Science.gov

Sample records for ags fixed target

  1. Event parameters - fixed target

    SciTech Connect

    Poskanzer, A.; Ritter, H.G.; Ludewigt, B.; Foley, K.; Borenstein, S.; Platner, E.; Love, W.; Keane, D.; Plasil, F.

    1984-06-15

    This subgroup has focussed on detectors for fixed target experiments which have full azimuthal coverage. The general scope of the working group was to consider (1) the configuration of an idealized detector, and (2) various configurations of practical detectors that could be implemented on a relatively short time scale. The second category includes possible upgrades and modifications of existing experimental facilities. Beams of both 15 GeV/A sulphur at the AGS and 200 GeV/A oxygen at the SPS were considered.

  2. Is there a role for fixed target heavy ion physics beyond RHIC startup?

    SciTech Connect

    Sandweiss, J.

    1995-07-15

    The interesting and important physics opportunities provided by AGS and CERN fixed target facilities will be far from exhausted by the time of RHIC turn on. Given the need for the AGS to provide heavy ion beams for injection into RHIC, the cost effectiveness of fixed target experimentation with AGS beams will be high. Examples of the physics are given.

  3. Fixed target flammable gas upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R.; Squires, B.; Gasteyer, T.; Richardson, R.

    1996-12-01

    In the past, fixed target flammable gas systems were not supported in an organized fashion. The Research Division, Mechanical Support Department began to support these gas systems for the 1995 run. This technical memo describes the new approach being used to supply chamber gasses to fixed target experiments at Fermilab. It describes the engineering design features, system safety, system documentation and performance results. Gas mixtures provide the medium for electron detection in proportional and drift chambers. Usually a mixture of a noble gas and a polyatomic quenching gas is used. Sometimes a small amount of electronegative gas is added as well. The mixture required is a function of the specific chamber design, including working voltage, gain requirements, high rate capability, aging and others. For the 1995 fixed target run all the experiments requested once through gas systems. We obtained a summary of problems from the 1990 fixed target run and made a summary of the operations logbook entries from the 1991 run. These summaries primarily include problems involving flammable gas alarms, but also include incidents where Operations was involved or informed. Usually contamination issues were dealt with by the experimenters. The summaries are attached. We discussed past operational issues with the experimenters involved. There were numerous incidents of drift chamber failure where contaminated gas was suspect. However analyses of the gas at the time usually did not show any particular problems. This could have been because the analysis did not look for the troublesome component, the contaminant was concentrated in the gas over the liquid and vented before the sample was taken, or that contaminants were drawn into the chambers directly through leaks or sub-atmospheric pressures. After some study we were unable to determine specific causes of past contamination problems, although in argon-ethane systems the problems were due to the ethane only.

  4. The 1994 Fermilab Fixed Target Program

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, J. |

    1994-11-01

    This paper highlights the results of the Fermilab Fixed Target Program that were announced between October, 1993 and October, 1994. These results are drawn from 18 experiments that took data in the 1985, 1987 and 1990/91 fixed target running periods. For this discussion, the Fermilab Fixed Target Program is divided into 5 major topics: hadron structure, precision electroweak measurements, heavy quark production, polarization and magnetic moments, and searches for new phenomena. However, it should be noted that most experiments span several subtopics. Also, measurements within each subtopic often affect the results in other subtopics. For example, parton distributions from hadron structure measurements are used in the studies of heavy quark production.

  5. Fixed-target physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-03-01

    The Fermilab Energy Saver is now successfully commissioned and fixed-target experimentation at high energy (800 GeV) has begun. In addition, a number of new experiments designed to exploit the unique features of the Tevatron are yet to come on-line. In this talk, we will review recent accomplishments in the fixed-target program and describe experiments in progress and others yet to come.

  6. Fixed target facility at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Loken, S.C.; Morfin, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The question of whether a facility for fixed target physics should be provided at the SSC must be answered before the final technical design of the SSC can be completed, particularly if the eventual form of extraction would influence the magnet design. To this end, an enthusiastic group of experimentalists, theoreticians and accelerator specialists have studied this point. The accelerator physics issues were addressed by a group led by E. Colton whose report is contained in these proceedings. The physics addressable by fixed target was considered by many of the Physics area working groups and in particular by the Structure Function Group. This report is the summary of the working group which considered various SSC fixed target experiments and determined which types of beams and detectors would be required. 13 references, 5 figures.

  7. Fixed Target Beauty Physics Experimental Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Garbincius, P.H.

    1987-11-01

    The current and near term future fixed target physics efforts in observing particles with open beauty are reviewed. This includes a compilation of the non-observation upper limits and the observation of both upsilon and b-states. A short discussion of the theoretical predictions for the hadro-produced beauty pairs is included. The major part of this review is devoted to the techniques and tricks employed, a survey of the current and proposed experiments. A personal summary of the experimental prospects concludes this report. 28 refs., 26 figs.

  8. Fixed target experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Gaston; Reyes, Marco A.

    2014-11-10

    This paper presents a review of the study of Exclusive Central Production at a Center of Mass energy of √s = 40 GeV at the Fermilab Fixed Target program. In all reactions reviewed in this paper, protons with an energy of 800 GeV were extracted from the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab and directed to a Liquid Hydrogen target. The states reviewed include π⁺π⁻, K⁰s K⁰s, K⁰s K±π, φφ and D. Partial Wave Analysis results will be presented on the light states but only the cross-section will be reviewed in the diffractive production of D.

  9. Fixed target experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE PAGES

    Gutierrez, Gaston; Reyes, Marco A.

    2014-11-10

    This paper presents a review of the study of Exclusive Central Production at a Center of Mass energy of √s = 40 GeV at the Fermilab Fixed Target program. In all reactions reviewed in this paper, protons with an energy of 800 GeV were extracted from the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab and directed to a Liquid Hydrogen target. The states reviewed include π⁺π⁻, K⁰s K⁰s, K⁰s K±π∓, φφ and D*±. Partial Wave Analysis results will be presented on the light states but only the cross-section will be reviewed in the diffractive production of D*±.

  10. Charm and beauty measurements at Fermilab fixed target

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, C.S.

    1993-10-01

    Eighteen months after a successful run of the Fermilab fixed target program, interesting results from several experiments are available. This is the first time that more than one Fermilab fixed target experiment has reported the observation of beauty mesons. In this paper we review recent results from charm and beauty fixed target experiments at Fermilab.

  11. Fixed-target hadron production experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris A.

    2015-08-01

    Results from fixed-target hadroproduction experiments (HARP, MIPP, NA49 and NA61/SHINE) as well as their implications for cosmic ray and neutrino physics are reviewed. HARP measurements have been used for predictions of neutrino beams in K2K and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE experiments and are also being used to improve predictions of the muon yields in EAS and of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes as well as to help in the optimization of neutrino factory and super-beam designs. Recent measurements released by the NA61/SHINE experiment are of significant importance for a precise prediction of the J-PARC neutrino beam used for the T2K experiment and for interpretation of EAS data. These hadroproduction experiments provide also a large amount of input for validation and tuning of hadron production models in Monte-Carlo generators.

  12. Review of calorimetry in Fermilab fixed-target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Crisler, M.B.

    1995-04-01

    The fixed-target program at Fermilab comprises as many as thirteen simultaneous experiments in ten separate beamlines using beams of primary protons, pions, kaons, electrons, neutrinos, and muons. The fixed target beamlines were last in operation in the latter half of 1991, shutting down in 1992. The next fixed target run is scheduled for early 1996. This article describes some of the wide variety of calorimetric devices that were in use in the past run or to be used in the coming run. Special attention is devoted to the new devices currently under construction.

  13. [A standardized AgNOR stain method for formalin fixed and paraffin embedded material].

    PubMed

    Ofner, D; Bankfalvi, A; Riehemann, K; Böcker, W; Schmid, K W

    1994-08-01

    Visualization of proteins associated with nucleolar organizer regions proteins (AgNORs) on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded archival tissues is substantially improved after application of wet autoclave pretreatment. Silver staining results are comparable to those obtained on tissues processed in alcohol based fixatives, illustrating AgNORs as substructures of the nucleoli without any staining artefacts. A highly reproducible staining quality was achieved irrespective of tissue origin or duration of formalin fixation. As a result of this novel and simple method, the grounds have been prepared for standardized AgNOR quantification on archival material.

  14. Beauty and charm production in fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kidonakis, Nikolaos; Vogt, Ramona

    2004-05-01

    We present calculations of NNLO threshold corrections for beauty and charm production in {pi}{sup -} p and pp interactions at fixed-target experiments. Recent calculations for heavy quark hadroproduction have included next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) soft-gluon corrections [1] to the double differential cross section from threshold resummation techniques [2]. These corrections are important for near-threshold beauty and charm production at fixed-target experiments, including HERA-B and some of the current and future heavy ion experiments.

  15. Test beams and polarized fixed target beams at the NLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Lewis; Pitthan, Rainer; Rokni, Sayed; Thompson, Kathleen; Kolomensky, Yury

    2001-07-01

    A conceptual program to use NLC beams for test beams and fixed target physics is described. Primary undisrupted polarized beams would be the most simple to use, but for NLC, the disrupted beams are of good enough quality that they could also be used, after collimation of the low energy tails, for test beams and fixed target physics. Pertinent issues are: what is the compelling physics, what are the requirements on beams and running time, and what is the impact on colliding beam physics running. A list of physics topics is given; one topic (Mo/ller Scattering) is treated in more depth.

  16. Event Display for the Fixed Target Experiment BM@N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertsenberger, Konstantin

    2016-02-01

    One of the main problems to be solved in modern high energy physics experiments on particle collisions with a fixed target is the visual representation of the events during the experiment run. The article briefly describes the structure of the BM@N facility at the Nuclotron being under construction at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research with the aim to study properties of the baryonic matter in collisions of ions with fixed target at energies up to 4 GeV/nucleon (for Au79+). Aspects concerning the visualization of data and detector details at the modern experiments and possibilities of practical applications are discussed. We present event display system intended to visualize the detector geometries and events of particle collisions with the fixed target, its options and features as well as integration with BMNRoot software. The examples of graphical representation of simulated and reconstructed points and particle tracks with BM@N geometry are given for central collisions of Au79+ ions with gold target and deuterons with carbon target.

  17. 48 CFR 16.403-1 - Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (firm target) contracts. 16.403-1 Section 16.403-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive (firm target) contract specifies a target cost, a target profit, a price ceiling (but not a profit ceiling or floor),...

  18. 48 CFR 16.403-1 - Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (firm target) contracts. 16.403-1 Section 16.403-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive (firm target) contract specifies a target cost, a target profit, a price ceiling (but not a profit ceiling or floor),...

  19. 48 CFR 16.403-1 - Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (firm target) contracts. 16.403-1 Section 16.403-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive (firm target) contract specifies a target cost, a target profit, a price ceiling (but not a profit ceiling or floor),...

  20. 48 CFR 16.403-1 - Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (firm target) contracts. 16.403-1 Section 16.403-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive (firm target) contract specifies a target cost, a target profit, a price ceiling (but not a profit ceiling or floor),...

  1. The Super Fixed Target beauty facility at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Kwong; The SFT Collaboration

    1991-12-31

    The rationale for pursuing beauty physics at the SSC in a fixed target configuration is described. The increased beauty production cross section at the SSC, combined with high interaction rate capability of the proposed detector, results in 10{sup 10{minus}11} produced BB events per year. The long decay length of the B hadrons ({approx_equal} 10 cm) allows direct observation of B decays in the high resolution silicon microstrip vertex detector. To optimize the operation of the proposed beauty spectrometer and the SSC, parasitic extraction of attendant or artificially generated large amplitude protons using crystal channeling is proposed and explored. The large sample of fully reconstructed B events allows detailed studies of various CP violating decays with requisite statistics to confront the standard model. The CP physics potential of the proposed experiment is evaluated and compared with alternative approaches, such as symmetric e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} B Factories and specialized hadron colliders.

  2. 48 CFR 16.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts. (a) Description. (1) A fixed-price incentive... parties have two alternatives, as follows: (i) They may negotiate a firm fixed price, using the...

  3. 48 CFR 16.403-1 - Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive (firm target... positive, calculable profit incentive for the contractor to control costs. (b) Application. A...

  4. In celebration of the fixed target program with the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Appel et al.

    2001-12-28

    The Tevatron is the world's first large superconducting accelerator. With its construction, we gained the dual opportunities to advance the state of the art in accelerator technology with the machine itself and in particle physics with the experiments that became possible in a higher energy regime. There have been 43 experiments in the Tevatron fixed target program. Many of these are better described as experimental programs, each with a broad range of physics goals and results, and more than 100 collaborating physicists and engineers. The results of this program are three-fold: (1) new technologies in accelerators, beams and detectors which advanced the state of the art; (2) new experimental results published in the refereed physics journals; and (3) newly trained scientists who are both the next generation of particle physicists and an important part of the scientific, technical and educational backbone of the country as a whole. In this book they compile these results. There are sections from each experiment including what their physics goals and results were, what papers were published, and which students have received degrees. Summaries of these results from the program as a whole are quite interesting, but the physics results from this program are too broad to summarize globally. The most important of the results appear in later sections of this booklet.

  5. 48 CFR 216.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (successive targets) contracts. 216.403-2 Section 216.403-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 216.403-2 Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts. See PGI 216.403-2 for guidance on the use of fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts....

  6. 48 CFR 216.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (successive targets) contracts. 216.403-2 Section 216.403-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 216.403-2 Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts. See PGI 216.403-2 for guidance on the use of fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts....

  7. 48 CFR 16.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (successive targets) contracts. 16.403-2 Section 16.403-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts. (a) Description. (1) A fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contract specifies the following elements, all of which are negotiated at the outset:...

  8. 48 CFR 216.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (successive targets) contracts. 216.403-2 Section 216.403-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 216.403-2 Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts. See PGI 216.403-2 for guidance on the use of fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts....

  9. 48 CFR 16.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (successive targets) contracts. 16.403-2 Section 16.403-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts. (a) Description. (1) A fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contract specifies the following elements, all of which are negotiated at the outset:...

  10. 48 CFR 16.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (successive targets) contracts. 16.403-2 Section 16.403-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts. (a) Description. (1) A fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contract specifies the following elements, all of which are negotiated at the outset:...

  11. 48 CFR 216.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (successive targets) contracts. 216.403-2 Section 216.403-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 216.403-2 Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts. See PGI 216.403-2 for guidance on the use of fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts....

  12. 48 CFR 216.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (successive targets) contracts. 216.403-2 Section 216.403-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 216.403-2 Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts. See PGI 216.403-2 for guidance on the use of fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts....

  13. 48 CFR 16.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (successive targets) contracts. 16.403-2 Section 16.403-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts. (a) Description. (1) A fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contract specifies the following elements, all of which are negotiated at the outset:...

  14. Main Ring bunch spreaders: Past, 1987/1988 fixed target run, and proposed future

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, G.P.

    1989-02-26

    During the last 1987--1988 fixed target running period beam intensity was limited many times by coherent instabilities in both the Main Ring and in the Tevatron. The intensity thresholds for instabilities are generally inversely proportional to the proton bunch length. Since fixed target operations are insensitive to the longitudinal phase space emittance of the beam, bunch spreaders are employed to increase this emittance, and hence the bunch length. As a result, more beam intensity can be delivered to the fixed target experiments. This paper starts with a short history behind the old Main Ring bunch spreader. After discussing the physics of stimulated emittance growth, the design and performance of the 1987--1988 fixed target run Main Ring bunch spreader is discussed. Finally, designs of improved Main Ring and Tevatron bunch spreaders for the next fixed target run are proposed. 23 figs.

  15. Renaissance of the {approximately} 1-TeV fixed-target program.

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.; Appel, J. A.; Arms, K. E.; Balantekin, A. B.; Conrad, J. M.; Tait, T. M. P.; High Energy Physics; Amherst Coll.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Massachuetts Inst. of Tech.

    2010-01-01

    This document describes the physics potential of a new fixed-target program based on a {approx}1 TeV proton source. Two proton sources are potentially available in the future: the existing Tevatron at Fermilab, which can provide 800 GeV protons for fixed-target physics, and a possible upgrade to the SPS at CERN, called SPS+, which would produce 1 TeV protons on target. In this paper we use an example Tevatron fixed-target program to illustrate the high discovery potential possible in the charm and neutrino sectors. We highlight examples which are either unique to the program or difficult to accomplish at other venues.

  16. Renaissance of the ~1 TeV Fixed-Target Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, T.; Appel, J. A.; Arms, K. E.; Balantekin, A. B.; Conrad, J. M.; Cooper, P. S.; Djurcic, Z.; Dunwoodie, W.; Engelfried, J.; Fisher, P. H.; Gottschalk, E.; de Gouvea, A.; Heller, K.; Ignarra, C. M.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kwan, S.; Loinaz, W. A.; Meadows, B.; Moore, R.; Morfín, J. G.; Naples, D.; Nienaber, P.; Pate, S. F.; Papavassiliou, V.; Petrov, A. A.; Purohit, M. V.; Ray, H.; Russ, J.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seligman, W. G.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Schellman, H.; Spitz, J.; Syphers, M. J.; Tait, T. M. P.; Vannucci, F.

    This document describes the physics potential of a new fixed-target program based on a ~1 TeV proton source. Two proton sources are potentially available in the future: the existing Tevatron at Fermilab, which can provide 800 GeV protons for fixed-target physics, and a possible upgrade to the SPS at CERN, called SPS+, which would produce 1 TeV protons on target. In this paper we use an example Tevatron fixed-target program to illustrate the high discovery potential possible in the charm and neutrino sectors. We highlight examples which are either unique to the program or difficult to accomplish at other venues.

  17. Renaissance of the ~ 1-TeV Fixed-Target Program

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.; Appel, J.A.; Arms, K.E.; Balantekin, A.B.; Conrad, J.M.; Cooper, P.S.; Djurcic, Z.; Dunwoodie, W.; Engelfried, J.; Fisher, P.H.; Gottschalk, Erik Edward; de Gouvea, A.; Heller, K.; Ignarra, C.M.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kwan, S.; Loinaz, W.A.; Meadows, B.; Moore, R.; Morfin, J.G.; Naples, D.; /Pittsburgh U. /St. Mary's Coll., Minnesota /New Mexico State U. /Michigan U. /Wayne State U. /South Carolina U. /Florida U. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Cincinnati U. /Columbia U. /Columbia U. /Northwestern U. /Yale U. /Fermilab /Argonne /Northwestern U. /APC, Paris

    2011-12-02

    This document describes the physics potential of a new fixed-target program based on a {approx}1 TeV proton source. Two proton sources are potentially available in the future: the existing Tevatron at Fermilab, which can provide 800 GeV protons for fixed-target physics, and a possible upgrade to the SPS at CERN, called SPS+, which would produce 1 TeV protons on target. In this paper we use an example Tevatron fixed-target program to illustrate the high discovery potential possible in the charm and neutrino sectors. We highlight examples which are either unique to the program or difficult to accomplish at other venues.

  18. Renaissance of the ~1 TeV Fixed-Target Program

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.; Appel, Jeffrey A.; Arms, Kregg Elliott; Balantekin, A.B.; Conrad, Janet Marie; Cooper, Peter S.; Djurcic, Zelimir; Dunwoodie, William M.; Engelfried, Jurgen; Fisher, Peter H.; Gottschalk, E.; /Fermilab /Northwestern U.

    2009-05-01

    This document describes the physics potential of a new fixed-target program based on a {approx} TeV proton source. Two proton sources are potentially available in the future: the existing Tevatron at Fermilab, which can provide 800 GeV protons for fixed-target physics, and a possible upgrade to the SPS at CERN, called SPS+, which would produce 1 TeV protons on target. In this paper we use an example Tevatron fixed-target program to illustrate the high discovery potential possible in the charm and neutrino sectors. We highlight examples which are either unique to the program or difficult to accomplish at other venues.

  19. 48 CFR 216.403-1 - Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (firm target) contracts. 216.403-1 Section 216.403-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 216.403-1 Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts. (b) Application. (1... target) contracts, especially for acquisitions moving from development to production. (2) The...

  20. 48 CFR 216.403-1 - Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (firm target) contracts. 216.403-1 Section 216.403-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 216.403-1 Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts. (b) Application. (1... target) contracts, especially for acquisitions moving from development to production. (2) The...

  1. 48 CFR 216.403-1 - Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (firm target) contracts. 216.403-1 Section 216.403-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 216.403-1 Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts. (b) Application. (1... target) contracts, especially for acquisitions moving from development to production. (2) The...

  2. 48 CFR 216.403-1 - Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (firm target) contracts. 216.403-1 Section 216.403-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 216.403-1 Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts. (b) Application. (1... target) contracts, especially for acquisitions moving from development to production. (2) The...

  3. Fixed lag smoothing target tracking in clutter for a high pulse repetition frequency radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Uzair; Shi, Yi Fang; Song, Taek Lyul

    2015-12-01

    A new method to smooth the target hybrid state with Gaussian mixture measurement likelihood-integrated track splitting (GMM-ITS) in the presence of clutter for a high pulse repetition frequency (HPRF) radar is proposed. This method smooths the target state at fixed lag N and considers all feasible multi-scan target existence sequences in the temporal window of scans in order to smooth the target hybrid state. The smoothing window can be of any length N. The proposed method to smooth the target hybrid state at fixed lag is also applied to the enhanced multiple model (EMM) tracking algorithm. Simulation results indicate that the performance of fixed lag smoothing GMM-ITS significantly improves false track discrimination and root mean square errors (RMSEs).

  4. New Fixed-Target Experiments to Search for Dark Gauge Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, James D.; Essig, Rouven; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., ITP

    2010-06-11

    Fixed-target experiments are ideally suited for discovering new MeV-GeV mass U(1) gauge bosons through their kinetic mixing with the photon. In this paper, we identify the production and decay properties of new light gauge bosons that dictate fixed-target search strategies. We summarize existing limits and suggest five new experimental approaches that we anticipate can cover most of the natural parameter space, using currently operating GeV-energy beams and well-established detection methods. Such experiments are particularly timely in light of recent terrestrial and astrophysical anomalies (PAMELA, FERMI, DAMA/LIBRA, etc.) consistent with dark matter charged under a new gauge force.

  5. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Ultra-Low-Level 129I in Carrier-Free AgI-AgCl Sputter Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weijian; Fu, Yunchong

    2015-05-01

    Separation of carrier-free iodine from low-level iodine samples and accurate measurement of ultra-low-level 129I in microgram iodine target are essential but a bottleneck in geology and environment research using naturally produced 129I. This article presents a detection technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for accurate determination of ultra-low-level 129I in carrier-free AgI-AgCl sputter targets. Copper instead of aluminum was selected as the suitable sample holder material to avoid the reaction of AgI-AgCl powder with aluminum. Niobium powder was selected as thermally and electrically conductive matrix to be mixed with AgI-AgCl powder, in order to obtain and maintain a stable and high iodine ion current intensity, as well as less memory effect and low background level of 129I. The most optimal ratio of the Nb matrix to the AgI-AgCl powder was found to be 5:1 by mass. The typical current of 127I5+ using AgI-AgCl targets with iodine content from 5 to 80 μg was measured to be 5 to 100 nA. Four-year AMS measurements of the 129I/127I ratios in standards of low iodine content and the machine blanks showed a good repeatability and stability.

  6. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of ultra-low-level (129)I in carrier-free AgI-AgCl sputter targets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weijian; Fu, Yunchong

    2015-05-01

    Separation of carrier-free iodine from low-level iodine samples and accurate measurement of ultra-low-level (129)I in microgram iodine target are essential but a bottleneck in geology and environment research using naturally produced (129)I. This article presents a detection technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for accurate determination of ultra-low-level (129)I in carrier-free AgI-AgCl sputter targets. Copper instead of aluminum was selected as the suitable sample holder material to avoid the reaction of AgI-AgCl powder with aluminum. Niobium powder was selected as thermally and electrically conductive matrix to be mixed with AgI-AgCl powder, in order to obtain and maintain a stable and high iodine ion current intensity, as well as less memory effect and low background level of (129)I. The most optimal ratio of the Nb matrix to the AgI-AgCl powder was found to be 5:1 by mass. The typical current of (127)I(5+) using AgI-AgCl targets with iodine content from 5 to 80 μg was measured to be 5 to 100 nA. Four-year AMS measurements of the (129)I/(127)I ratios in standards of low iodine content and the machine blanks showed a good repeatability and stability. PMID:25743113

  7. Interaction of a converging laser beam with a Ag colloidal solution during the ablation of a Ag target in water.

    PubMed

    Resano-Garcia, Amandine; Battie, Yann; Naciri, Aotmane En; Chaoui, Nouari

    2016-05-27

    We studied the nanosecond laser-induced shape modifications of Ag colloids exposed to a converging laser beam during the ablation of a Ag target in water. To this end, we performed a series of laser ablation experiments in which the laser energy was varied while all other parameters were kept constant. In addition to transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the shape distribution of the Ag nanoparticles was determined by modelling the extinction spectra of the final colloidal solutions using theoretical calculations based on shape distributed effective medium theory (SDEMT). From these calculations, two physical parameters named sphericity and dispersity were introduced and used to gauge the evolution of the shape distribution of the particles. As the laser energy on the target was increased from 5 to 20 mJ/pulse, an apparently abrupt modification of the shape distribution of the particles was evidenced by both TEM and SDEMT calculations. This change is explained in terms of competitive fragmentation, growth and reshaping processes. On the basis the heating-melting-vaporization model, we demonstrate how the competition between these processes, occurring at different locations of the converging beam, determines the shape distribution of the final product. We highlight the relevance of the fluence gradient along the beam path and the laser interaction volume on the laser-induced modifications of the suspended particles during the ablation process. PMID:27095289

  8. Interaction of a converging laser beam with a Ag colloidal solution during the ablation of a Ag target in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano-Garcia, Amandine; Battie, Yann; Naciri, Aotmane En; Chaoui, Nouari

    2016-05-01

    We studied the nanosecond laser-induced shape modifications of Ag colloids exposed to a converging laser beam during the ablation of a Ag target in water. To this end, we performed a series of laser ablation experiments in which the laser energy was varied while all other parameters were kept constant. In addition to transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the shape distribution of the Ag nanoparticles was determined by modelling the extinction spectra of the final colloidal solutions using theoretical calculations based on shape distributed effective medium theory (SDEMT). From these calculations, two physical parameters named sphericity and dispersity were introduced and used to gauge the evolution of the shape distribution of the particles. As the laser energy on the target was increased from 5 to 20 mJ/pulse, an apparently abrupt modification of the shape distribution of the particles was evidenced by both TEM and SDEMT calculations. This change is explained in terms of competitive fragmentation, growth and reshaping processes. On the basis the heating–melting–vaporization model, we demonstrate how the competition between these processes, occurring at different locations of the converging beam, determines the shape distribution of the final product. We highlight the relevance of the fluence gradient along the beam path and the laser interaction volume on the laser-induced modifications of the suspended particles during the ablation process.

  9. Overview of results from the Fermilab fixed target and collider experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, H.E.

    1997-06-01

    In this paper we present a review of recent QCD related results from Fermilab fixed target and collider experiments. Topics covered range from structure functions through W/Z production, heavy quark production and jet angular distributions. We also include the current state of knowledge about leptoquark pair production in hadronic collisions.

  10. The fixed target experiment for studies of baryonic matter at the Nuclotron (BM@N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapishin, Mikhail

    2016-08-01

    BM@N (Baryonic Matter at Nuclotron) is the first experiment to be realized at the accelerator complex of NICA-Nuclotron. The aim of the BM@N experiment is to study interactions of relativistic heavy-ion beams with fixed targets. The BM@N setup, results of Monte Carlo simulations and the BM@N experimental program are presented.

  11. Head perturbations during walking while viewing a head-fixed target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Vallabh E.; Zivotofsky, Ari Z.; Discenna, Alfred O.; Leigh, R. John

    1995-01-01

    Inexpensive, head-fixed computer displays are now available that subjects can wear during locomotion. Our hypothesis is that viewing a head-fixed visual display will change the character- istics of rotational head perturbations during natural walking. Using a 3-axis angular rate sensor, we measured head rotations during natural or treadmill walking, in 10 normal subjects and 2 patients with deficient vestibular function, as they attempted to view (1) a stationary target at optical infinity; and (2) a target at a distance of 20 cm rigidly attached to the head. Normal subjects and patients showed no significant change in the predominant frequency of head rotations in any plane (ranging 0.7-5.7 Hz) during the two different viewing tasks. Mean peak head velocities also showed no difference during the two viewing conditions except in the yaw plane, in which values were greater while viewing the near target. Predominant frequencies of head rotations were similar in the pitch plane during natural or treadmill walking; however, peak velocities of pitch head rotations were substantially greater during natural walking. One vestibular patient showed modest increases of head velocity during natural walking compared with normal subjects. Rotational head perturbations that occur during natural walking are largely unaffected when subjects view a head-fixed target. There is need to study how such perturbations, which induce vestibular eye movements, affect vision of head-fixed displays.

  12. Moving target detection through omni-orientational vision fixed on AGV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shu-Ying; Cao, Zuo-Liang; He, Pei-Lian

    2006-10-01

    Extremely wide view of the omni-vision performs highly advanced for the vehicle navigation and target detection. However moving targets detection through omni-vision fixed on AGV (Automatic Guided Vehicle) involves more complex environments, where both the targets and the vehicle are in the moving condition. The moving targets will be detected in a moving background. After analyzing the character on omniorientational vision and image, we propose to use the estimation in optical flow fields, Gabor filter over optical flow fields for detecting moving objects. Because polar angle θ and polar radius R of polar coordinates are being changed as the targets moving, we improved optical flow approach which can be calculated based on the polar coordinates at the omniorientational center. We constructed Gabor filter which has 24 orientations every 15°, and filter optical flow fields at 24 orientations. By the contrast of the Gabor filter images at the same orientation and the same AGV position between the situation which there aren't any moving targets in the environment and the situation which there are some moving targets in the same environment, the moving targets' optical flow fields could be recognized. Experiment results show that the proposed approach is feasible and effective.

  13. Automating ground-fixed target modeling with the smart target model generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verner, D.; Dukes, R.

    2007-04-01

    The Smart Target Model Generator (STMG) is an AFRL/MNAL sponsored tool for generating 3D building models for use in various weapon effectiveness tools. These tools include tri-service approved tools such as Modular Effectiveness/Vulnerability Assessment (MEVA), Building Analysis Module in Joint Weaponeering System (JWS), PENCRV3D, and WinBlast. It also supports internal dispersion modeling of chemical contaminants. STMG also has capabilities to generate infrared or other sensor images. Unlike most CAD-models, STMG provides physics-based component properties such as strength, density, reinforcement, and material type. Interior components such as electrical and mechanical equipment, rooms, and ducts are also modeled. Buildings can be manually created with a graphical editor or automatically generated using rule-bases which size and place the structural components using rules based on structural engineering principles. In addition to its primary purposes of supporting conventional kinetic munitions, it can also be used to support sensor modeling and automatic target recognition.

  14. High Transverse Momentum Direct Photon Production at Fermilab Fixed-Target Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Apanasevich, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the production of high transverse momentum direct photons and π0 mesons by proton beams at 530 and 800 GeV/c and π- beams at 515 GeV/c incident on beryllium, copper, and liquid hydrogen targets. The data were collected by Fermilab experiment E706 during the 1990 and 1991-92 fixed target runs. The apparatus included a large, finely segmented lead and liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter and a charged particle spectrometer featuring silicon strip detectors in the target region and proportional wire chambers and drift tubes downstream of a large aperture analysis magnet. The inclusive cross sections are presented as functions of transverse momentum and rapidity. The measurements are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations and to results from previous experiments.

  15. Preparation of a primary argon beam for the CERN fixed target physics

    SciTech Connect

    Küchler, D. O’Neil, M.; Scrivens, R.; Thomae, R.

    2014-02-15

    The fixed target experiment NA61 in the North Area of the Super Proton Synchrotron is studying phase transitions in strongly interacting matter. Up to now they used the primary beams available from the CERN accelerator complex (protons and lead ions) or fragmented beams created from the primary lead ion beam. To explore a wider range of energies and densities a request was made to provide primary argon and xenon beams. This paper describes the results of the setting up and 10 week test run of the Ar{sup 11+} beam from the 14.5 GHz ECR ion source and the linear accelerator (Linac3) at CERN.

  16. Preparation of a primary argon beam for the CERN fixed target physics.

    PubMed

    Küchler, D; O'Neil, M; Scrivens, R; Thomae, R

    2014-02-01

    The fixed target experiment NA61 in the North Area of the Super Proton Synchrotron is studying phase transitions in strongly interacting matter. Up to now they used the primary beams available from the CERN accelerator complex (protons and lead ions) or fragmented beams created from the primary lead ion beam. To explore a wider range of energies and densities a request was made to provide primary argon and xenon beams. This paper describes the results of the setting up and 10 week test run of the Ar(11+) beam from the 14.5 GHz ECR ion source and the linear accelerator (Linac3) at CERN.

  17. J/{sub psi} production: Tevatron and fixed-target collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Petrelli, A.

    2000-06-01

    In this talk the author shows the results of a fit of the NRQCD matrix elements to the CDF data for direct J/{psi} production, by including the radiative corrections to the g g {r_arrow} {sup 3} S {sub 1}{sup [1]} channel and the effect of the k{sub T}-smearing. Furthermore he performs the NLO NRQCD analysis of J/{psi} production in fixed-target proton-nucleon collisions and he fits the colour-octet matrix elements to the available experimental data. The results are compared to the Tevatron ones.

  18. Estimation of Cn² based on scintillation of fixed targets imaged through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Gulich, Damián; Funes, Gustavo; Pérez, Darío; Zunino, Luciano

    2015-12-01

    We define a pixel-based scintillation index for dynamic incoherent imaging of fixed high-contrast targets through atmospheric turbulence. We propose a simple setup to study this parameter varying the Cn(2) constant in controlled laboratory conditions (weak fluctuation regime). We find the semi-empirical relationship between the pixel-based scintillation index and the index of refraction structure constant, which we then employ to estimate Cn(2) successfully in an independent case in which this value was not known beforehand.

  19. Preparation of a primary argon beam for the CERN fixed target physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, D.; O'Neil, M.; Scrivens, R.; Thomae, R.

    2014-02-01

    The fixed target experiment NA61 in the North Area of the Super Proton Synchrotron is studying phase transitions in strongly interacting matter. Up to now they used the primary beams available from the CERN accelerator complex (protons and lead ions) or fragmented beams created from the primary lead ion beam. To explore a wider range of energies and densities a request was made to provide primary argon and xenon beams. This paper describes the results of the setting up and 10 week test run of the Ar11+ beam from the 14.5 GHz ECR ion source and the linear accelerator (Linac3) at CERN.

  20. Physics Opportunities of a Fixed-Target Experiment using the LHC Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Fleuret, F.; Hadjidakis, C.; Lansberg, J.P.; /Orsay, IPN

    2012-03-16

    We outline the many physics opportunities offered by a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment using the proton and lead-ion beams of the LHC extracted by a bent crystal. In a proton run with the LHC 7-TeV beam, one can analyze pp, pd and pA collisions at center-of-mass energy {radical}s{sub NN} {approx_equal} 115 GeV and even higher using the Fermi motion of the nucleons in a nuclear target. In a lead run with a 2.76 TeV-per-nucleon beam, {radical}s{sub NN} is as high as 72 GeV. Bent crystals can be used to extract about 5 x 10{sup 8} protons/sec; the integrated luminosity over a year reaches 0.5 fb{sup -1} on a typical 1 cm-long target without nuclear species limitation. We emphasize that such an extraction mode does not alter the performance of the collider experiments at the LHC. By instrumenting the target-rapidity region, gluon and heavy-quark distributions of the proton and the neutron can be accessed at large x and even at x larger than unity in the nuclear case. Single diffractive physics and, for the first time, the large negative-xF domain can be accessed. The nuclear target-species versatility provides a unique opportunity to study nuclear matter versus the features of the hot and dense matter formed in heavy-ion collisions, including the formation of the quark-gluon plasma, which can be studied in PbA collisions over the full range of target-rapidity domain with a large variety of nuclei. The polarization of hydrogen and nuclear targets allows an ambitious spin program, including measurements of the QCD lensing effects which underlie the Sivers single-spin asymmetry, the study of transversity distributions and possibly of polarized parton distributions. We also emphasize the potential offered by pA ultra-peripheral collisions where the nucleus target A is used as a coherent photon source, mimicking photoproduction processes in ep collisions. Finally, we note that W and Z bosons can be produced and detected in a fixed-target experiment and in their

  1. Physics opportunities of a fixed-target experiment using LHC beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, S. J.; Fleuret, F.; Hadjidakis, C.; Lansberg, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    We outline the many physics opportunities offered by a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment using the proton and lead-ion beams of the LHC extracted by a bent crystal. In a proton run with the LHC 7 TeV beam, one can analyze pp, pd and pA collisions at center-of-mass energy √{s}≃115 GeV and even higher using the Fermi motion of the nucleons in a nuclear target. In a lead run with a 2.76 TeV-per-nucleon beam, √{s} is as high as 72 GeV. Bent crystals can be used to extract about 5×108 protons/s; the integrated luminosity over a year reaches 0.5 fb-1 on a typical 1 cm long target without nuclear species limitation. We emphasize that such an extraction mode does not alter the performance of the collider experiments at the LHC. By instrumenting the target-rapidity region, gluon and heavy-quark distributions of the proton and the neutron can be accessed at large x and even at x larger than unity in the nuclear case. Single diffractive physics and, for the first time, the large negative-xF domain can be accessed. The nuclear target-species versatility provides a unique opportunity to study nuclear matter versus the features of the hot and dense matter formed in heavy-ion collisions, including the formation of the quark-gluon plasma, which can be studied in PbA collisions over the full range of target-rapidity domain with a large variety of nuclei. The polarization of hydrogen and nuclear targets allows an ambitious spin program, including measurements of the QCD lensing effects which underlie the Sivers single-spin asymmetry, the study of transversity distributions and possibly of polarized parton distributions. We also emphasize the potential offered by pA ultra-peripheral collisions where the nucleus target A is used as a coherent photon source, mimicking photoproduction processes in ep collisions. Finally, we note that W and Z bosons can be produced and detected in a fixed-target experiment and in their threshold domain for the first time, providing new ways to

  2. Surface target-tracking guidance by self-organizing formation flight of fixed-wing UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regina, N.; Zanzi, M.

    This paper presents a new concept of ground target surveillance based on a formation flight of two Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) of fixed-wing type. Each UAV considered in this work has its own guidance law specifically designed for two different aims. A self organizing non-symmetric collaborative surveying scheme has been developed based on pursuers with different roles: the close-up-pursuer and the distance-pursuer. The close-up-pursuer behaves according to a guidance law which takes it to continually over-fly the target, also optimizing flight endurance. On the other hand, the distancepursuer behaves so as to circle around the target by flying at a certain distance and altitude from it; moreover, its motion ensures the maximum “ seeability” of the ground based target. In addition, the guidance law designed for the distance-pursuer also implements a collision avoidance feature in order to prevent possible risks of collision with the close-up-pursuer during the tracking maneuvers. The surveying scheme is non-symmetric in the sense that the collision avoidance feature is accomplished by a guidance law implemented only on one of the two pursuers; moreover, it is collaborative because the surveying is performed by different tasks of two UAVs and is self-organizing because, due to the collision avoidance feature, target tracking does not require pre-planned collision-risk-free trajectories but trajectories are generated in real time.

  3. A H+/Ag+ dual-target responsive label-free light-up probe based on a DNA triplex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijun; Guo, Yahui; Wang, Jine; Zhou, Lu; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Hong, Shanni; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Jianye; Pei, Renjun

    2015-05-01

    We developed a dual-target responsive sensor for label-free light-up fluorescent detection of protons (H(+)) and silver ions (Ag(+)) using an "OR'' logic gate. Berberine, a cost-effective and non-toxic indicator, partially intercalates the formed triplex DNA in the presence of H(+) or Ag(+), generating enhanced fluorescence. The designed Ag(+) probe has high selectivity and desirable sensitivity, which is necessary for practical use. The robust "OR" logic gate is capable of a rapid and reversible response to the H(+) and/or Ag(+) inputs. PMID:25663002

  4. Protein characterization of intracellular target-sorted, formalin-fixed cell subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Sadick, Jessica S.; Boutin, Molly E.; Hoffman-Kim, Diane; Darling, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular heterogeneity is inherent in most human tissues, making the investigation of specific cell types challenging. Here, we describe a novel, fixation/intracellular target-based sorting and protein extraction method to provide accurate protein characterization for cell subpopulations. Validation and feasibility tests were conducted using homogeneous, neural cell lines and heterogeneous, rat brain cells, respectively. Intracellular proteins of interest were labeled with fluorescent antibodies for fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Reproducible protein extraction from fresh and fixed samples required lysis buffer with high concentrations of Tris-HCl and sodium dodecyl sulfate as well as exposure to high heat. No deterioration in protein amount or quality was observed for fixed, sorted samples. For the feasibility experiment, a primary rat subpopulation of neuronal cells was selected for based on high, intracellular β-III tubulin signal. These cells showed distinct protein expression differences from the unsorted population for specific (phosphorylated tau) and non-specific (total tau) protein targets. Our approach allows for determining more accurate protein profiles directly from cell types of interest and provides a platform technology in which any cell subpopulation can be biochemically investigated. PMID:27666089

  5. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    SciTech Connect

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also

  6. Quarkonium Physics at a Fixed-Target Experiment Using the LHC Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lansberg, J.P.; Brodsky, S.J.; Fleuret, F.; Hadjidakis, C.; /Orsay, IPN

    2012-04-09

    We outline the many quarkonium-physics opportunities offered by a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment using the p and Pb LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal. This provides an integrated luminosity of 0.5 fb{sup -1} per year on a typical 1cm-long target. Such an extraction mode does not alter the performance of the collider experiments at the LHC. With such a high luminosity, one can analyse quarkonium production in great details in pp, pd and pA collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} {approx_equal} 115 GeV and at {radical}s{sub NN} {approx_equal} 72 GeV in PbA collisions. In a typical pp (pA) run, the obtained quarkonium yields per unit of rapidity are 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than those expected at RHIC and about respectively 10 (70) times larger than for ALICE. In PbA, they are comparable. By instrumenting the target-rapidity region, the large negative-x{sub F} domain can be accessed for the first time, greatly extending previous measurements by Hera-B and E866. Such analyses should help resolving the quarkonium-production controversies and clear the way for gluon PDF extraction via quarkonium studies. The nuclear target-species versatility provides a unique opportunity to study nuclear matter and the features of the hot and dense matter formed in PbA collisions. A polarised proton target allows the study of transverse-spin asymmetries in J/{Psi} and {Upsilon} production, providing access to the gluon and charm Sivers functions.

  7. Targeted or whole genome sequencing of formalin fixed tissue samples: potential applications in cancer genomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yue; Cottrell, Joseph; Klotzle, Brandy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Koestler, Devin; Beyerlein, Peter; Fan, Jian-Bing; Bibikova, Marina; Chien, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Current genomic studies are limited by the poor availability of fresh-frozen tissue samples. Although formalin-fixed diagnostic samples are in abundance, they are seldom used in current genomic studies because of the concern of formalin-fixation artifacts. Better characterization of these artifacts will allow the use of archived clinical specimens in translational and clinical research studies. To provide a systematic analysis of formalin-fixation artifacts on Illumina sequencing, we generated 26 DNA sequencing data sets from 13 pairs of matched formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and fresh-frozen (FF) tissue samples. The results indicate high rate of concordant calls between matched FF/FFPE pairs at reference and variant positions in three commonly used sequencing approaches (whole genome, whole exome, and targeted exon sequencing). Global mismatch rates and C·G > T·A substitutions were comparable between matched FF/FFPE samples, and discordant rates were low (<0.26%) in all samples. Finally, low-pass whole genome sequencing produces similar pattern of copy number alterations between FF/FFPE pairs. The results from our studies suggest the potential use of diagnostic FFPE samples for cancer genomic studies to characterize and catalog variations in cancer genomes. PMID:26305677

  8. Targeted or whole genome sequencing of formalin fixed tissue samples: potential applications in cancer genomics.

    PubMed

    Munchel, Sarah; Hoang, Yen; Zhao, Yue; Cottrell, Joseph; Klotzle, Brandy; Godwin, Andrew K; Koestler, Devin; Beyerlein, Peter; Fan, Jian-Bing; Bibikova, Marina; Chien, Jeremy

    2015-09-22

    Current genomic studies are limited by the poor availability of fresh-frozen tissue samples. Although formalin-fixed diagnostic samples are in abundance, they are seldom used in current genomic studies because of the concern of formalin-fixation artifacts. Better characterization of these artifacts will allow the use of archived clinical specimens in translational and clinical research studies. To provide a systematic analysis of formalin-fixation artifacts on Illumina sequencing, we generated 26 DNA sequencing data sets from 13 pairs of matched formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and fresh-frozen (FF) tissue samples. The results indicate high rate of concordant calls between matched FF/FFPE pairs at reference and variant positions in three commonly used sequencing approaches (whole genome, whole exome, and targeted exon sequencing). Global mismatch rates and C · G > T · A substitutions were comparable between matched FF/FFPE samples, and discordant rates were low (<0.26%) in all samples. Finally, low-pass whole genome sequencing produces similar pattern of copy number alterations between FF/FFPE pairs. The results from our studies suggest the potential use of diagnostic FFPE samples for cancer genomic studies to characterize and catalog variations in cancer genomes.

  9. Targeted or whole genome sequencing of formalin fixed tissue samples: potential applications in cancer genomics.

    PubMed

    Munchel, Sarah; Hoang, Yen; Zhao, Yue; Cottrell, Joseph; Klotzle, Brandy; Godwin, Andrew K; Koestler, Devin; Beyerlein, Peter; Fan, Jian-Bing; Bibikova, Marina; Chien, Jeremy

    2015-09-22

    Current genomic studies are limited by the poor availability of fresh-frozen tissue samples. Although formalin-fixed diagnostic samples are in abundance, they are seldom used in current genomic studies because of the concern of formalin-fixation artifacts. Better characterization of these artifacts will allow the use of archived clinical specimens in translational and clinical research studies. To provide a systematic analysis of formalin-fixation artifacts on Illumina sequencing, we generated 26 DNA sequencing data sets from 13 pairs of matched formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and fresh-frozen (FF) tissue samples. The results indicate high rate of concordant calls between matched FF/FFPE pairs at reference and variant positions in three commonly used sequencing approaches (whole genome, whole exome, and targeted exon sequencing). Global mismatch rates and C · G > T · A substitutions were comparable between matched FF/FFPE samples, and discordant rates were low (<0.26%) in all samples. Finally, low-pass whole genome sequencing produces similar pattern of copy number alterations between FF/FFPE pairs. The results from our studies suggest the potential use of diagnostic FFPE samples for cancer genomic studies to characterize and catalog variations in cancer genomes. PMID:26305677

  10. The unified database for the fixed target experiment BM@N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertsenberger, K. V.

    2016-09-01

    The article describes the developed database designed as comprehensive data storage of the fixed target experiment BM@N [1] at Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna. The structure and purposes of the BM@N facility will be briefly presented. The scheme of the unified database and its parameters will be described in detail. The use of the BM@N database implemented on the PostgreSQL database management system (DBMS) allows one to provide user access to the actual information of the experiment. Also the interfaces developed for the access to the database will be presented. One was implemented as the set of C++ classes to access the data without SQL statements, the other-Web-interface being available on the Web page of the BM@N experiment.

  11. Measurement of strange particle production in the NICA fixed-target programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friese, Volker

    2016-08-01

    Strange particles provide a sensitive tool to study the dense and hot matter created in relativistic nuclear collisions. Although strangeness production in such collisions has been a topic of experimental and theoretical research for many years, its understanding is far from being complete. This holds in particular for multi-strange hyperons and for lower collision energies as relevant for NICA and FAIR. Multi-strange particles, being sensitive to both the mechanism of strangeness production and the net-baryon density, are expected to shed light on the state of the created matter and to indicate possible transitions to new phases of strongly interacting matter. We thus advocate the measurement of hyperons and φ mesons in a fixed-target experiment at NICA (BM@N), which can be achieved by a relatively compact detector system.

  12. Mycobacterial antigen 85 complex (Ag85) as a target for ficolins and mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Świerzko, Anna S; Bartłomiejczyk, Marcin A; Brzostek, Anna; Łukasiewicz, Jolanta; Michalski, Mateusz; Dziadek, Jarosław; Cedzyński, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    The pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) able to activate complement via the lectin pathway are suspected to be involved in the interaction between pathogenic Mycobacteria and the host immune response. Recently, we have found strong interactions between 25 and 35kDa mycobacterial cell fractions and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins. Here we demonstrate that two biologically important mycobacterial structures, mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and the antigen 85 (Ag85) complex, induce activation of the lectin pathway of complement. The strong interaction of recombinant MBL with purified ManLAM was confirmed, but no binding of recombinant ficolins (ficolin-1, -2, -3) with this structure was observed. Interestingly, all PRMs tested reacted with the mycobacterial antigen 85 (Ag85) complex. Based on the use of specific inhibitors (mannan for MBL, acetylated bovine serum albumin for ficolin-1 and -2, Hafnia alvei PCM 1200 lipopolysaccharide for ficolin-3), we concluded that carbohydrate-recognition (MBL) and fibrinogen-like domains (ficolins) were involved in these interactions. Our results indicate that the mycobacterial antigen 85 complex is a target for ficolins and MBL. Furthermore, those PRMs also bound to fibronectin and therefore might influence the Ag85 complex-dependent interaction of Mycobacterium with the extracellular matrix. PMID:27141819

  13. Low-Z polymer sample supports for fixed-target serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Feld, Geoffrey K.; Heymann, Michael; Benner, W. Henry; Pardini, Tommaso; Tsai, Ching -Ju; Boutet, Sebastien; Coleman, Matthew A.; Hunter, Mark S.; Li, Xiaodan; Messerschmidt, Marc; Opathalage, Achini; Pedrini, Bill; Williams, Garth J.; Krantz, Bryan A.; Fraden, Seth; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Evans, James E.; Segelke, Brent W.; Frank, Matthias

    2015-06-27

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) offer a new avenue to the structural probing of complex materials, including biomolecules. Delivery of precious sample to the XFEL beam is a key consideration, as the sample of interest must be serially replaced after each destructive pulse. The fixed-target approach to sample delivery involves depositing samples on a thin-film support and subsequent serial introduction via a translating stage. Some classes of biological materials, including two-dimensional protein crystals, must be introduced on fixed-target supports, as they require a flat surface to prevent sample wrinkling. A series of wafer and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-style grid supports constructed of low-Z plastic have been custom-designed and produced. Aluminium TEM grid holders were engineered, capable of delivering up to 20 different conventional or plastic TEM grids using fixed-target stages available at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). As proof-of-principle, X-ray diffraction has been demonstrated from two-dimensional crystals of bacteriorhodopsin and three-dimensional crystals of anthrax toxin protective antigen mounted on these supports at the LCLS. In conclusion, the benefits and limitations of these low-Z fixed-target supports are discussed; it is the authors' belief that they represent a viable and efficient alternative to previously reported fixed-target supports for conducting diffraction studies with XFELs.

  14. Proposed Fermilab fixed target experiment: Kaons at the Tevatron. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0898, evaluating the impacts associated with the proposed fixed target experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Femilab) in Batavia, Illinois, known as Kaons at the Tevatron (KTeV). The proposed KTeV project includes reconfiguration of an existing target station, enhancement of an existing beam transport system connected to existing utility facilities, and construction of a new experimental detector hall area. The study of the K meson, a type of subatomic particle, has been going on at Fermilab for 20 years. The proposed KTEV project advances the search for the origins of a violation of a fundamental symmetry of nature called charge parity (CP) violation. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  15. Report of the super fixed target beauty facility working group on progress towards the SFT at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, H.; Cumalat, J.; Carrigan, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    A low intensity 20 TeV proton beam extracted from the SSC by crystal channeling has been proposed for use in producing B hadrons in a fixed target configuration. This option for doing B physics offers a relatively inexpensive way of obtaining large numbers of reconstructable B decays for the study of rare B decays and CP violation in the B system. This paper reports on the progress during and since the 1990 Snowmass meeting in developing the techniques for the crystal extraction and discusses special advantages that an SSC fixed target spectrometer may have relative to other experimental methods for studying B decays.

  16. Fixed target combined with spectral mapping: approaching 100% hit rates for serial crystallography.

    PubMed

    Oghbaey, Saeed; Sarracini, Antoine; Ginn, Helen M; Pare-Labrosse, Olivier; Kuo, Anling; Marx, Alexander; Epp, Sascha W; Sherrell, Darren A; Eger, Bryan T; Zhong, Yinpeng; Loch, Rolf; Mariani, Valerio; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Nelson, Silke; Lemke, Henrik T; Owen, Robin L; Pearson, Arwen R; Stuart, David I; Ernst, Oliver P; Mueller-Werkmeister, Henrike M; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2016-08-01

    The advent of ultrafast highly brilliant coherent X-ray free-electron laser sources has driven the development of novel structure-determination approaches for proteins, and promises visualization of protein dynamics on sub-picosecond timescales with full atomic resolution. Significant efforts are being applied to the development of sample-delivery systems that allow these unique sources to be most efficiently exploited for high-throughput serial femtosecond crystallography. Here, the next iteration of a fixed-target crystallography chip designed for rapid and reliable delivery of up to 11 259 protein crystals with high spatial precision is presented. An experimental scheme for predetermining the positions of crystals in the chip by means of in situ spectroscopy using a fiducial system for rapid, precise alignment and registration of the crystal positions is presented. This delivers unprecedented performance in serial crystallography experiments at room temperature under atmospheric pressure, giving a raw hit rate approaching 100% with an effective indexing rate of approximately 50%, increasing the efficiency of beam usage and allowing the method to be applied to systems where the number of crystals is limited.

  17. Fixed target combined with spectral mapping: approaching 100% hit rates for serial crystallography.

    PubMed

    Oghbaey, Saeed; Sarracini, Antoine; Ginn, Helen M; Pare-Labrosse, Olivier; Kuo, Anling; Marx, Alexander; Epp, Sascha W; Sherrell, Darren A; Eger, Bryan T; Zhong, Yinpeng; Loch, Rolf; Mariani, Valerio; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Nelson, Silke; Lemke, Henrik T; Owen, Robin L; Pearson, Arwen R; Stuart, David I; Ernst, Oliver P; Mueller-Werkmeister, Henrike M; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2016-08-01

    The advent of ultrafast highly brilliant coherent X-ray free-electron laser sources has driven the development of novel structure-determination approaches for proteins, and promises visualization of protein dynamics on sub-picosecond timescales with full atomic resolution. Significant efforts are being applied to the development of sample-delivery systems that allow these unique sources to be most efficiently exploited for high-throughput serial femtosecond crystallography. Here, the next iteration of a fixed-target crystallography chip designed for rapid and reliable delivery of up to 11 259 protein crystals with high spatial precision is presented. An experimental scheme for predetermining the positions of crystals in the chip by means of in situ spectroscopy using a fiducial system for rapid, precise alignment and registration of the crystal positions is presented. This delivers unprecedented performance in serial crystallography experiments at room temperature under atmospheric pressure, giving a raw hit rate approaching 100% with an effective indexing rate of approximately 50%, increasing the efficiency of beam usage and allowing the method to be applied to systems where the number of crystals is limited. PMID:27487825

  18. Fixed-target protein serial microcrystallography with an x-ray free electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Mark S.; Segelke, Brent; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, W. Henry; Carlson, David B.; Coleman, Matthew; Graf, Alexander; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Pardini, Tommaso; Seibert, M. Marvin; Evans, James; Boutet, Sébastien; Frank, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    We present results from experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) demonstrating that serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) can be performed to high resolution (~2.5 Å) using protein microcrystals deposited on an ultra-thin silicon nitride membrane and embedded in a preservation medium at room temperature. Data can be acquired at a high acquisition rate using x-ray free electron laser sources to overcome radiation damage, while sample consumption is dramatically reduced compared to flowing jet methods. We achieved a peak data acquisition rate of 10 Hz with a hit rate of ~38%, indicating that a complete data set could be acquired in about one 12-hour LCLS shift using the setup described here, or in even less time using hardware optimized for fixed target SFX. This demonstration opens the door to ultra low sample consumption SFX using the technique of diffraction-before-destruction on proteins that exist in only small quantities and/or do not produce the copious quantities of microcrystals required for flowing jet methods. PMID:25113598

  19. Fixed-target protein serial microcrystallography with an x-ray free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Mark S; Segelke, Brent; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Carlson, David B; Coleman, Matthew; Graf, Alexander; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Pardini, Tommaso; Seibert, M Marvin; Evans, James; Boutet, Sébastien; Frank, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    We present results from experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) demonstrating that serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) can be performed to high resolution (~2.5 Å) using protein microcrystals deposited on an ultra-thin silicon nitride membrane and embedded in a preservation medium at room temperature. Data can be acquired at a high acquisition rate using x-ray free electron laser sources to overcome radiation damage, while sample consumption is dramatically reduced compared to flowing jet methods. We achieved a peak data acquisition rate of 10 Hz with a hit rate of ~38%, indicating that a complete data set could be acquired in about one 12-hour LCLS shift using the setup described here, or in even less time using hardware optimized for fixed target SFX. This demonstration opens the door to ultra low sample consumption SFX using the technique of diffraction-before-destruction on proteins that exist in only small quantities and/or do not produce the copious quantities of microcrystals required for flowing jet methods.

  20. Fixed-target protein serial microcrystallography with an x-ray free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Mark S; Segelke, Brent; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Carlson, David B; Coleman, Matthew; Graf, Alexander; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Pardini, Tommaso; Seibert, M Marvin; Evans, James; Boutet, Sébastien; Frank, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    We present results from experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) demonstrating that serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) can be performed to high resolution (~2.5 Å) using protein microcrystals deposited on an ultra-thin silicon nitride membrane and embedded in a preservation medium at room temperature. Data can be acquired at a high acquisition rate using x-ray free electron laser sources to overcome radiation damage, while sample consumption is dramatically reduced compared to flowing jet methods. We achieved a peak data acquisition rate of 10 Hz with a hit rate of ~38%, indicating that a complete data set could be acquired in about one 12-hour LCLS shift using the setup described here, or in even less time using hardware optimized for fixed target SFX. This demonstration opens the door to ultra low sample consumption SFX using the technique of diffraction-before-destruction on proteins that exist in only small quantities and/or do not produce the copious quantities of microcrystals required for flowing jet methods. PMID:25113598

  1. Refocusing resolution based on negative refractive-photonic crystal group with Ag defects for target detection and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yingfei; Zhu, Na; Fang, Yuntuan; Sun, Jiwen; Chen, Junlv; Qian, Huili

    2015-03-01

    Negative refractive-photonic crystal (NR-PC) lenses that can exceed the diffraction limit of focus resolution for imaging and target detection in the near field have gotten more and more special attention in recent years. Three flat lens groups with Ag defects based on NR-PC are designed, and the focusing imaging in the NR-PC three flat lens groups is concluded with the extension of Snell's law, and the influence on the resolution for a target detection dynamic scanning scheme is simulated by using the finite difference time domain method. An optimal-doped structure with Ag defects is achieved by different simulation combinations. The refocusing resolution 0.18834λ is achieved in the optimal structure and there is approximately a 0.06806λ improvement in the refocusing resolution compared to those undoped with Ag (0.2564λ) it also possesses distinct smaller side-lobes than a single flat lens doped with Ag. This means the optimal detecting ability for the three NR-PC flat lens groups with Ag defects is more improved than that for a single undoped and doped with Ag. This is significant for the perfect imaging being achieved for a particle structure.

  2. A Novel Fixed-Target Task to Determine Articulatory Speed Constraints in Persons with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mefferd, Antje S.; Green, Jordan R.; Pattee, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine if talkers with ALS are limited in their ability to increase lower lip and jaw speed at an early stage of the disease when their speaking rate and intelligibility are only minimally or not affected. Method: A novel metronome paced fixed-target task was used to assess movement speed capacities during…

  3. Spin physics and TMD studies at A Fixed-Target ExpeRiment at the LHC (AFTER@LHC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansberg, J. P.; Anselmino, M.; Arnaldi, R.; Brodsky, S. J.; Chambert, V.; den Dunnen, W.; Didelez, J. P.; Genolini, B.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Fleuret, F.; Gao, Y.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hrvinacova, I.; Lorcé, C.; Massacrier, L.; Mikkelsen, R.; Pisano, C.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Rosier, P.; Schienbein, I.; Schlegel, M.; Scomparin, E.; Trzeciak, B.; Uggerhøj, U. I.; Ulrich, R.; Yang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the opportunities for spin physics and Transverse-Momentum Dependent distribution (TMD) studies at a future multi-purpose fixed-target experiment using the proton or lead ion LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal. The LHC multi-TeV beams allow for the most energetic fixed-target experiments ever performed, opening new domains of particle and nuclear physics and complementing that of collider physics, in particular that of RHIC and the EIC projects. The luminosity achievable with AFTER@LHC using typical targets would surpass that of RHIC by more that 3 orders of magnitude in a similar energy region. In unpolarised proton-proton collisions, AFTER@LHC allows for measurements of TMDs such as the Boer-Mulders quark distributions, the distribution of unpolarised and linearly polarised gluons in unpolarised protons. Using the polarisation of hydrogen and nuclear targets, one can measure transverse single-spin asymmetries of quark and gluon sensitive probes, such as, respectively, Drell-Yan pair and quarkonium production. The fixed-target mode has the advantage to allow for measurements in the target-rapidity region, namely at large x↑ in the polarised nucleon. Overall, this allows for an ambitious spin program which we outline here.

  4. Characterization of tumor-targeting Ag2S quantum dots for cancer imaging and therapy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haiyan; Li, Bowen; Zhang, Min; Sun, Kang; Wang, Yiran; Peng, Kerui; Ao, Mengdi; Guo, Yiran; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-10-01

    Nanomedicine platforms that have the potential to simultaneously provide the function of molecular imaging and therapeutic treatment in one system are beneficial to address the challenges of cancer heterogeneity and adaptive resistance. In this study, Cyclic RGD peptide (cRGD), a less-expensive active tumor targeting tri-peptide, and doxorubicin (DOX), a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, were covalently attached to Ag2S quantum dots (QDs) to form the nano-conjugates Ag2S-DOX-cRGD. The optical characterization of Ag2S-DOX-cRGD manifested the maintenance of QDs fluorescence, which suggested the potential of Ag2S for monitoring intracellular and systemic drug distribution. The low biotoxicity of Ag2S QDs indicated that they are promisingly safe nanoparticles for bio-applications. Furthermore, the selective imaging and favorable tumor inhibition of the nanoconjugates were demonstrated at both cell and animal levels. These results indicated a promising future for the utilization of Ag2S QDs as a kind of multi-functional nano platform to achieve imaging-visible nano-therapeutics.

  5. An expression of interest in a Super Fixed Target Beauty Facility (SFT) at the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-25

    The concept of a Super Fixed Target Beauty Facility (SFT) which uses a relatively low intensity 20 TeV proton beam as a generator of very high momenta B's is an exciting prospect which is very competitive with other B factory ideas. The yields of B's in such a facility are quite high (3 {times} 10{sup 10} {yields} 10{sup 11} B's per year). At this level of statistics, CP violation measurements will be possible in many modes. In addition, the fixed target configuration, because of the high momenta of the produced B's and the resulting long decay lengths, facilitates the detection and reconstruction of B's and offers unique opportunities for observation of the B decays. The limited solid angle coverage required for the fixed target spectrometer makes the cost of the facility much cheaper than other e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} or hadron collider options under consideration. The relatively low intensity 20 TeV beam (1 {yields} 2 {times} 10{sup 8} protons/second) needed for the SFT makes it possible to consider an extraction system which operates concurrently and in a non-interfering manner with the other collider experiments. One possible method for generating such a beam, crystal channeling, is discussed.

  6. Growing Fixed With Age: Lay Theories of Malleability Are Target Age-Specific.

    PubMed

    Neel, Rebecca; Lassetter, Bethany

    2015-11-01

    Beliefs about whether people can change ("lay theories" of malleability) are known to have wide-ranging effects on social motivation, cognition, and judgment. Yet rather than holding an overarching belief that people can or cannot change, perceivers may hold independent beliefs about whether different people are malleable-that is, lay theories may be target-specific. Seven studies demonstrate that lay theories are target-specific with respect to age: Perceivers hold distinct, uncorrelated lay theories of people at different ages, and younger targets are considered to be more malleable than older targets. Both forms of target-specificity are consequential, as target age-specific lay theories predict policy support for learning-based senior services and the rehabilitation of old and young drug users. The implications of target age-specific lay theories for a number of psychological processes, the social psychology of aging, and theoretical frameworks of malleability beliefs are discussed.

  7. AG73-modified Bubble liposomes for targeted ultrasound imaging of tumor neovasculature.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Yoichi; Hamano, Nobuhito; Tsunoda, Yuka; Oda, Yusuke; Choijamts, Batsuren; Endo-Takahashi, Yoko; Omata, Daiki; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Emoto, Makoto; Aramaki, Yukihiko

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is a widely used imaging technique. The use of contrast agents has become an indispensible part of clinical ultrasound imaging, and molecular imaging via ultrasound has recently attracted significant attention. We recently reported that "Bubble liposomes" (BLs) encapsulating US imaging gas liposomes were suitable for ultrasound imaging and gene delivery. The 12 amino acid AG73 peptide derived from the laminin α1 chain is a ligand for syndecans, and syndecan-2 is highly expressed in blood vessels. In this study, we prepared AG73 peptide-modified BLs (AG73-BLs) and assessed their specific attachment and ultrasound imaging ability for blood vessels in vitro and in vivo. First, we assessed the specific attachment of AG73-BLs in vitro, using flow cytometry and microscopy. AG73-BLs showed specific attachment compared with non-labeled or control peptide-modified BLs. Next, we examined ultrasound imaging in tumor-bearing mice. When BLs were administered, contrast imaging of AG73-BLs was sustainable for up to 4 min, while contrast imaging of non-labeled BLs was not observed. Thus, it is suggested that AG73-BLs may become useful ultrasound contrast agents in the clinic for diagnosis based on ultrasound imaging.

  8. Albumin-Mediated Biomineralization of Paramagnetic NIR Ag2S QDs for Tiny Tumor Bimodal Targeted Imaging in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Hao, Guangyu; Yao, Chenfei; Yu, Jiani; Wang, Jun; Yang, Weitao; Hu, Chunhong; Zhang, Bingbo

    2016-07-01

    Bimodal imaging has captured increasing interests due to its complementary characteristics of two kinds of imaging modalities. Among the various dual-modal imaging techniques, MR/fluorescence imaging has been widely studied owing to its high 3D resolution and sensitivity. There is, however, still a strong demand to construct biocompatible MR/fluorescence contrast agents with near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent emissions and high relaxivities. In this study, BSA-DTPA(Gd) derived from bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a novel kind of biotemplate is employed for biomineralization of paramagnetic NIR Ag2S quantum dots (denoted as Ag2S@BSA-DTPA(Gd) pQDs). This synthetic strategy is found to be bioinspired, environmentally benign, and straightforward. The obtained Ag2S@BSA-DTPA(Gd) pQDs have fine sizes (ca. 6 nm) and good colloidal stability. They exhibit unabated NIR fluorescent emission (ca. 790 nm) as well as high longitudinal relaxivity (r1 = 12.6 mM(-1) s(-1)) compared to that of commercial Magnevist (r1 = 3.13 mM(-1) s(-1)). In vivo tumor-bearing MR and fluorescence imaging both demonstrate that Ag2S@BSA-DTPA(Gd) pQDs have pronounced tiny tumor targeting capability. In vitro and in vivo toxicity study show Ag2S@BSA-DTPA(Gd) pQDs are biocompatible. Also, biodistribution analysis indicates they can be cleared from body mainly via liver metabolism. This protein-mediated biomineralized Ag2S@BSA-DTPA(Gd) pQDs presents great potential as a novel bimodal imaging contrast agent for tiny tumor diagnosis. PMID:27300300

  9. A novel photoacoustic nanoprobe of ICG@PEG-Ag2S for atherosclerosis targeting and imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chenxin; Zhang, Yejun; Li, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Wang, Qiangbin

    2016-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cause of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases that have high mortality and disability rates. Because of its unclear pathogenic mechanism and heterogeneous distribution feature, it is still a big challenge to achieve precise diagnosis and therapy of atherosclerosis at its early stage in vivo. Herein, we fabricated a new ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe by a simple self-assembly of DT-Ag2S QDs, amphipathic C18/PEG polymer molecules and ICG. The ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe showed relatively long blood retention and was selectively accumulated in the region of atherosclerotic plaque due to the lipophilicity of the C18 chain to the atherosclerosis microenvironment, and thus the atherosclerosis was real-time monitored by high contrast-enhanced photoacoustic (PA) imaging of ICG. Combining the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high spatial resolution fluorescence imaging of Ag2S QDs in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) and related histological assessment in vitro, the feasibility of this new nanoprobe for atherosclerosis targeting in an Apoe-/- mouse model was verified. Additionally, hemolysis and coagulation assays of the ICG@PEG-Ag2S revealed its decent hemocompatibility and no histological changes were observed in the main organs of the mouse. Such a simple, multifunctional nanoprobe for targeting and PA imaging of atherosclerosis will have a great potential for future clinical applications.Atherosclerosis is a major cause of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases that have high mortality and disability rates. Because of its unclear pathogenic mechanism and heterogeneous distribution feature, it is still a big challenge to achieve precise diagnosis and therapy of atherosclerosis at its early stage in vivo. Herein, we fabricated a new ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe by a simple self-assembly of DT-Ag2S QDs, amphipathic C18/PEG polymer molecules and ICG. The ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe showed relatively long blood retention and was selectively

  10. Quantification of HER2 by Targeted Mass Spectrometry in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) Breast Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Carine; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Lamerz, Jens; Kux van Geijtenbeek, Sabine; McKee, Thomas A; Venturi, Miro; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Hochstrasser, Denis; Cutler, Paul; Lescuyer, Pierre; Ducret, Axel

    2015-10-01

    The ability to accurately quantify proteins in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues using targeted mass spectrometry opens exciting perspectives for biomarker discovery. We have developed and evaluated a selectedreaction monitoring assay for the human receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (HER2) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded breast tumors. Peptide candidates were identified using an untargeted mass spectrometry approach in relevant cell lines. A multiplexed assay was developed for the six best candidate peptides and evaluated for linearity, precision and lower limit of quantification. Results showed a linear response over a calibration range of 0.012 to 100 fmol on column (R(2): 0.99-1.00).The lower limit of quantification was 0.155 fmol on column for all peptides evaluated. The six HER2 peptides were quantified by selected reaction monitoring in a cohort of 40 archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues from women with invasive breast carcinomas, which showed different levels of HER2 gene amplification as assessed by standard methods used in clinical pathology. The amounts of the six HER2 peptides were highly and significantly correlated with each other, indicating that peptide levels can be used as surrogates of protein amounts in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. After normalization for sample size, selected reaction monitoring peptide measurements were able to correctly predict 90% of cases based on HER2 amplification as defined by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists. In conclusion, the developed assay showed good analytical performance and a high agreement with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization data. This study demonstrated that selected reaction monitoring allows to accurately quantify protein expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues and represents therefore a powerful approach for biomarker discovery studies. The untargeted mass spectrometry

  11. Quantification of HER2 by Targeted Mass Spectrometry in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) Breast Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Carine; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Lamerz, Jens; Kux van Geijtenbeek, Sabine; McKee, Thomas A; Venturi, Miro; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Hochstrasser, Denis; Cutler, Paul; Lescuyer, Pierre; Ducret, Axel

    2015-10-01

    The ability to accurately quantify proteins in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues using targeted mass spectrometry opens exciting perspectives for biomarker discovery. We have developed and evaluated a selectedreaction monitoring assay for the human receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (HER2) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded breast tumors. Peptide candidates were identified using an untargeted mass spectrometry approach in relevant cell lines. A multiplexed assay was developed for the six best candidate peptides and evaluated for linearity, precision and lower limit of quantification. Results showed a linear response over a calibration range of 0.012 to 100 fmol on column (R(2): 0.99-1.00).The lower limit of quantification was 0.155 fmol on column for all peptides evaluated. The six HER2 peptides were quantified by selected reaction monitoring in a cohort of 40 archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues from women with invasive breast carcinomas, which showed different levels of HER2 gene amplification as assessed by standard methods used in clinical pathology. The amounts of the six HER2 peptides were highly and significantly correlated with each other, indicating that peptide levels can be used as surrogates of protein amounts in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. After normalization for sample size, selected reaction monitoring peptide measurements were able to correctly predict 90% of cases based on HER2 amplification as defined by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists. In conclusion, the developed assay showed good analytical performance and a high agreement with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization data. This study demonstrated that selected reaction monitoring allows to accurately quantify protein expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues and represents therefore a powerful approach for biomarker discovery studies. The untargeted mass spectrometry

  12. HaloPlex Targeted Resequencing for Mutation Detection in Clinical Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tumor Samples.

    PubMed

    Moens, Lotte N J; Falk-Sörqvist, Elin; Ljungström, Viktor; Mattsson, Johanna; Sundström, Magnus; La Fleur, Linnéa; Mathot, Lucy; Micke, Patrick; Nilsson, Mats; Botling, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the advent of massively parallel next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled substantial advances in the study of human diseases. Combined with targeted DNA enrichment methods, high sequence coverage can be obtained for different genes simultaneously at a reduced cost per sample, creating unique opportunities for clinical cancer diagnostics. However, the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) process of tissue samples, routinely used in pathology departments, results in DNA fragmentation and nucleotide modifications that introduce a number of technical challenges for downstream biomolecular analyses. We evaluated the HaloPlex target enrichment system for somatic mutation detection in 80 tissue fractions derived from 20 clinical cancer cases with paired tumor and normal tissue available in both FFPE and fresh-frozen format. Several modifications to the standard method were introduced, including a reduced target fragment length and two strand capturing. We found that FFPE material can be used for HaloPlex-based target enrichment and next-generation sequencing, even when starting from small amounts of DNA. By specifically capturing both strands for each target fragment, we were able to reduce the number of false-positive errors caused by FFPE-induced artifacts and lower the detection limit for somatic mutations. We believe that the HaloPlex method presented here will be broadly applicable as a tool for somatic mutation detection in clinical cancer settings.

  13. HaloPlex Targeted Resequencing for Mutation Detection in Clinical Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tumor Samples.

    PubMed

    Moens, Lotte N J; Falk-Sörqvist, Elin; Ljungström, Viktor; Mattsson, Johanna; Sundström, Magnus; La Fleur, Linnéa; Mathot, Lucy; Micke, Patrick; Nilsson, Mats; Botling, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the advent of massively parallel next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled substantial advances in the study of human diseases. Combined with targeted DNA enrichment methods, high sequence coverage can be obtained for different genes simultaneously at a reduced cost per sample, creating unique opportunities for clinical cancer diagnostics. However, the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) process of tissue samples, routinely used in pathology departments, results in DNA fragmentation and nucleotide modifications that introduce a number of technical challenges for downstream biomolecular analyses. We evaluated the HaloPlex target enrichment system for somatic mutation detection in 80 tissue fractions derived from 20 clinical cancer cases with paired tumor and normal tissue available in both FFPE and fresh-frozen format. Several modifications to the standard method were introduced, including a reduced target fragment length and two strand capturing. We found that FFPE material can be used for HaloPlex-based target enrichment and next-generation sequencing, even when starting from small amounts of DNA. By specifically capturing both strands for each target fragment, we were able to reduce the number of false-positive errors caused by FFPE-induced artifacts and lower the detection limit for somatic mutations. We believe that the HaloPlex method presented here will be broadly applicable as a tool for somatic mutation detection in clinical cancer settings. PMID:26354930

  14. Dosimetric comparison of split field and fixed jaw techniques for large IMRT target volumes in the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shiv P; Das, Indra J; Kumar, Arvind; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2011-01-01

    Some treatment planning systems (TPSs), when used for large-field (>14 cm) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), create split fields that produce excessive multiple-leaf collimator segments, match-line dose inhomogeneity, and higher treatment times than nonsplit fields. A new method using a fixed-jaw technique (FJT) forces the jaw to stay at a fixed position during optimization and is proposed to reduce problems associated with split fields. Dosimetric comparisons between split-field technique (SFT) and FJT used for IMRT treatment is presented. Five patients with head and neck malignancies and regional target volumes were studied and compared with both techniques. Treatment planning was performed on an Eclipse TPS using beam data generated for Varian 2100C linear accelerator. A standard beam arrangement consisting of nine coplanar fields, equally spaced, was used in both techniques. Institutional dose-volume constraints used in head and neck cancer were kept the same for both techniques. The dosimetric coverage for the target volumes between SFT and FJT for head and neck IMRT plan is identical within ± 1% up to 90% dose. Similarly, the organs at risk (OARs) have dose-volume coverage nearly identical for all patients. When the total monitor unit (MU) and segments were analyzed, SFT produces statistically significant higher segments (17.3 ± 6.3%) and higher MU (13.7 ± 4.4%) than the FJT. There is no match line in FJT and hence dose uniformity in the target volume is superior to the SFT. Dosimetrically, SFT and FJT are similar for dose-volume coverage; however, the FJT method provides better logistics, lower MU, shorter treatment time, and better dose uniformity. The number of segments and MU also has been correlated with the whole body radiation dose with long-term complications. Thus, FJT should be the preferred option over SFT for large target volumes.

  15. Dosimetric Comparison of Split Field and Fixed Jaw Techniques for Large IMRT Target Volumes in the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Shiv P.; Das, Indra J.; Kumar, Arvind; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2011-04-01

    Some treatment planning systems (TPSs), when used for large-field (>14 cm) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), create split fields that produce excessive multiple-leaf collimator segments, match-line dose inhomogeneity, and higher treatment times than nonsplit fields. A new method using a fixed-jaw technique (FJT) forces the jaw to stay at a fixed position during optimization and is proposed to reduce problems associated with split fields. Dosimetric comparisons between split-field technique (SFT) and FJT used for IMRT treatment is presented. Five patients with head and neck malignancies and regional target volumes were studied and compared with both techniques. Treatment planning was performed on an Eclipse TPS using beam data generated for Varian 2100C linear accelerator. A standard beam arrangement consisting of nine coplanar fields, equally spaced, was used in both techniques. Institutional dose-volume constraints used in head and neck cancer were kept the same for both techniques. The dosimetric coverage for the target volumes between SFT and FJT for head and neck IMRT plan is identical within {+-}1% up to 90% dose. Similarly, the organs at risk (OARs) have dose-volume coverage nearly identical for all patients. When the total monitor unit (MU) and segments were analyzed, SFT produces statistically significant higher segments (17.3 {+-} 6.3%) and higher MU (13.7 {+-} 4.4%) than the FJT. There is no match line in FJT and hence dose uniformity in the target volume is superior to the SFT. Dosimetrically, SFT and FJT are similar for dose-volume coverage; however, the FJT method provides better logistics, lower MU, shorter treatment time, and better dose uniformity. The number of segments and MU also has been correlated with the whole body radiation dose with long-term complications. Thus, FJT should be the preferred option over SFT for large target volumes.

  16. A framework to analyze searches for gauge bosons of the hidden light sector in electron scattering fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Beranek, T.

    2013-11-07

    Electron scattering fixed target experiments are a versatile tool to probe various kinds of physics phenomena. Recently fixed target experiments in which an electron beam is scattered off a heavy nucleus and a lepton-antilepton pair is created, i.e. e(A,Z) →e(A,Z)l{sup +}l{sup −}, were utilized to search for physics beyond the standard model at modest energies. In these experiments one searches for a small, narrow resonance in the invariant mass spectrum of the lepton-antilepton pair, arising from the exchange of a new light gauge boson γ′ coupling to the dark sector as well as very weakly to standard model particles. Such a signal would appear as an enhancement over a smooth QED background. Hence a precise understanding of the background is crucial. We present a theoretical analysis of the process e(A,Z) →e(A,Z)l{sup +}l{sup −}. Therefore we have performed an analysis of the cross section, which is then used to extract exclusion limits on the parameter space of the γ′, describing the existing experimental data taken at MAMI.

  17. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 8; Tile Small Targets A-1, Ag-1, B-1, and Bg-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Targets A-1, Ag-1, B-1, and Bg-1 was to study hypervelocity impacts on the reinforced Shuttle Heat Shield Tiles of the Wing. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  18. Studies of the LBL CMOS integrated amplifier/discriminator for randomly timed inputs from fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, J.S.; Yarema, R.J.; Zimmerman, T.

    1988-12-01

    A group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has reported an elegant CMOS VLSI circuit for amplifying, discriminating, and encoding the signals from highly-segmented charge output devices, e.g., silicon strip detectors or pad readout structures in gaseous detectors. The design exploits switched capacitor circuits and the well-known time structure of data acquisition in colliding beam accelerators to cancel leakage effects and switching noise. For random inputs, these methods are not directly applicable. However, the high speed of the reset switches makes possible a mode of operation for fixed target experiments that uses fast resets to erase unwanted data from random triggers. Data acquisition in this mode has been performed. Details of operation and measurements of noise and rate capability will be presented. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Measurement of the ϒ production cross section in 920 GeV fixed-target proton nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hera-B Collaboration; Abt, I.; Adams, M.; Agari, M.; Albrecht, H.; Aleksandrov, A.; Amaral, V.; Amorim, A.; Aplin, S. J.; Aushev, V.; Bagaturia, Y.; Balagura, V.; Bargiotti, M.; Barsukova, O.; Bastos, J.; Batista, J.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Belkov, A.; Belkov, Ar.; Belotelov, I.; Bertin, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Böcker, M.; Bogatyrev, A.; Bohm, G.; Bräuer, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Bruschi, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buran, T.; Carvalho, J.; Conde, P.; Cruse, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danilov, M.; de Castro, S.; Deppe, H.; Dong, X.; Dreis, H. B.; Egorytchev, V.; Ehret, K.; Eisele, F.; Emeliyanov, D.; Essenov, S.; Fabbri, L.; Faccioli, P.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Flammer, J.; Fominykh, B.; Funcke, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Gellrich, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Gläß, J.; Goloubkov, D.; Golubkov, Y.; Golutvin, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, I.; Gorišek, A.; Gouchtchine, O.; Goulart, D. C.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Grimaldi, F.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Guilitsky, Yu.; Hansen, J. D.; Hernández, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hohlmann, M.; Hott, T.; Hulsbergen, W.; Husemann, U.; Igonkina, O.; Ispiryan, M.; Jagla, T.; Jiang, C.; Kapitza, H.; Karabekyan, S.; Karpenko, N.; Keller, S.; Kessler, J.; Khasanov, F.; Kiryushin, Yu.; Kisel, I.; Klinkby, E.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kolanoski, H.; Korpar, S.; Krauss, C.; Kreuzer, P.; Križan, P.; Krücker, D.; Kupper, S.; Kvaratskheliia, T.; Lanyov, A.; Lau, K.; Lewendel, B.; Lohse, T.; Lomonosov, B.; Männer, R.; Mankel, R.; Masciocchi, S.; Massa, I.; Matchikhilian, I.; Medin, G.; Medinnis, M.; Mevius, M.; Michetti, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.; Mizuk, R.; Muresan, R.; Zur Nedden, M.; Negodaev, M.; Nörenberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Núñez Pardo de Vera, M. T.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Padilla, C.; Peralta, D.; Pernack, R.; Pestotnik, R.; Petersen, B. Aa.; Piccinini, M.; Pleier, M. A.; Poli, M.; Popov, V.; Pose, D.; Prystupa, S.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Pyrlik, J.; Reeves, K.; Reßing, D.; Rick, H.; Riu, I.; Robmann, P.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rybnikov, V.; Sánchez, F.; Sbrizzi, A.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiner, A.; Schröder, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Schwenninger, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sciacca, F.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Shuvalov, S.; Silva, L.; Sözüer, L.; Solunin, S.; Somov, A.; Somov, S.; Spengler, J.; Spighi, R.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanovnik, A.; Starič, M.; Stegmann, C.; Subramania, H. S.; Symalla, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Tsakov, I.; Uwer, U.; van Eldik, C.; Vassiliev, Yu.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Vukotic, I.; Wahlberg, H.; Walenta, A. H.; Walter, M.; Wang, J. J.; Wegener, D.; Werthenbach, U.; Wolters, H.; Wurth, R.; Wurz, A.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zech, G.; Zeuner, T.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Z.; Zimmermann, R.; Živko, T.; Zoccoli, A.

    2006-06-01

    The cross section ratio R=Br(ϒ→ll)ṡdσ(ϒ)/dy|y=0/σ(J/ψ) has been measured with the HERA-B spectrometer in fixed-target proton nucleus collisions at 920 GeV proton beam energy corresponding to a proton nucleon c.m.s. energy of s=41.6 GeV. The combined results for the decay channels ϒ→ee and ϒ→μμ yield a ratio R=(9.0±2.1)×10. The corresponding ϒ production cross section per nucleon at mid-rapidity (y=0) has been determined to be Br(ϒ→ll)ṡdσ(ϒ)/dy|y=0=4.5±1.1 pb/nucleon.

  20. Measurement of the ϒ production cross section in 920 GeV fixed-target proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Adams, M.; Agari, M.; Albrecht, H.; Aleksandrov, A.; Amaral, V.; Amorim, A.; Aplin, S. J.; Aushev, V.; Bagaturia, Y.; Balagura, V.; Bargiotti, M.; Barsukova, O.; Bastos, J.; Batista, J.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Belkov, A.; Belkov, Ar.; Belotelov, I.; Bertin, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Böcker, M.; Bogatyrev, A.; Bohm, G.; Bräuer, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Bruschi, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buran, T.; Carvalho, J.; Conde, P.; Cruse, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danilov, M.; De Castro, S.; Deppe, H.; Dong, X.; Dreis, H. B.; Egorytchev, V.; Ehret, K.; Eisele, F.; Emeliyanov, D.; Essenov, S.; Fabbri, L.; Faccioli, P.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Flammer, J.; Fominykh, B.; Funcke, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Gellrich, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Gläß, J.; Goloubkov, D.; Golubkov, Y.; Golutvin, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, I.; Gorišek, A.; Gouchtchine, O.; Goulart, D. C.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Grimaldi, F.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Guilitsky, Yu.; Hansen, J. D.; Hernández, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hohlmann, M.; Hott, T.; Hulsbergen, W.; Husemann, U.; Igonkina, O.; Ispiryan, M.; Jagla, T.; Jiang, C.; Kapitza, H.; Karabekyan, S.; Karpenko, N.; Keller, S.; Kessler, J.; Khasanov, F.; Kiryushin, Yu.; Kisel, I.; Klinkby, E.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kolanoski, H.; Korpar, S.; Krauss, C.; Kreuzer, P.; Križan, P.; Krücker, D.; Kupper, S.; Kvaratskheliia, T.; Lanyov, A.; Lau, K.; Lewendel, B.; Lohse, T.; Lomonosov, B.; Männer, R.; Mankel, R.; Masciocchi, S.; Massa, I.; Matchikhilian, I.; Medin, G.; Medinnis, M.; Mevius, M.; Michetti, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.; Mizuk, R.; Muresan, R.; zur Nedden, M.; Negodaev, M.; Nörenberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Núñez Pardo de Vera, M. T.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Padilla, C.; Peralta, D.; Pernack, R.; Pestotnik, R.; Petersen, B. AA.; Piccinini, M.; Pleier, M. A.; Poli, M.; Popov, V.; Pose, D.; Prystupa, S.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Pyrlik, J.; Reeves, K.; Reßing, D.; Rick, H.; Riu, I.; Robmann, P.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rybnikov, V.; Sánchez, F.; Sbrizzi, A.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiner, A.; Schröder, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Schwenninger, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sciacca, F.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Shuvalov, S.; Silva, L.; Sözüer, L.; Solunin, S.; Somov, A.; Somov, S.; Spengler, J.; Spighi, R.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanovnik, A.; Starič, M.; Stegmann, C.; Subramania, H. S.; Symalla, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Tsakov, I.; Uwer, U.; van Eldik, C.; Vassiliev, Yu.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Vukotic, I.; Wahlberg, H.; Walenta, A. H.; Walter, M.; Wang, J. J.; Wegener, D.; Werthenbach, U.; Wolters, H.; Wurth, R.; Wurz, A.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zech, G.; Zeuner, T.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Z.; Zimmermann, R.; Živko, T.; Zoccoli, A.; HERA-B Collaboration

    2006-06-01

    The cross section ratio RJ / ψ = Br (ϒ →l+l-) ṡ dσ (ϒ) / dy|y = 0 / σ (J / ψ) has been measured with the HERA-B spectrometer in fixed-target proton-nucleus collisions at 920 GeV proton beam energy corresponding to a proton-nucleon c.m.s. energy of √{ s} = 41.6 GeV. The combined results for the decay channels ϒ →e+e- and ϒ →μ+μ- yield a ratio RJ / ψ = (9.0 ± 2.1) ×10-6. The corresponding ϒ production cross section per nucleon at mid-rapidity (y = 0) has been determined to be Br (ϒ →l+l-) ṡ dσ (ϒ) / dy|y = 0 = 4.5 ± 1.1 pb /nucleon.

  1. Performance of the SLC polarized electron source and injector with the SLAC 3 km linac configured for fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Alley, R.K.; Clendenin, J.E.

    1993-03-01

    The SLC polarized electron source (PES) can be modified to produce {mu}sec-long pulses for injection into the un-SLEDed SLAC 3 km linac, with a duty factor considerably higher than for SLC. Such beams are desirable for fixed target experiments at SLAC requiring polarized electron beams of up to 50 mA within an energy spread of 0.5%, at energies of up to 26 GeV. During the fall of 1992, the SLAC linac was operated continuously for two months unSLEDed with the PES dye laser (715 nm) modified to produce a 1{mu}ec pulse at 120Hz. An AlGaAs photocathode was installed in the electron gun to achieve 40% polarization, and a prebuncher was added to the SLC injector to improve capture for long pulse beams. We discuss the performance eo the polarized electron beam for long pulse operation.

  2. Identification of Cold-Responsive miRNAs and Their Target Genes in Nitrogen-Fixing Nodules of Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Senlei; Wang, Youning; Li, Kexue; Zou, Yanmin; Chen, Liang; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    As a warm climate species, soybean is highly sensitive to chilling temperatures. Exposure to chilling temperatures causes a significant reduction in the nitrogen fixation rate in soybean plants and subsequent yield loss. However, the molecular basis for the sensitivity of soybean to chilling is poorly understood. In this study, we identified cold-responsive miRNAs in nitrogen-fixing nodules of soybean. Upon chilling, the expression of gma-miR397a, gma-miR166u and gma-miR171p was greatly upregulated, whereas the expression of gma-miR169c, gma-miR159b, gma-miR319a/b and gma-miR5559 was significantly decreased. The target genes of these miRNAs were predicted and validated using 5' complementary DNA ends (5'-RACE) experiments, and qPCR analysis identified putative genes targeted by the cold-responsive miRNAs in response to chilling temperatures. Taken together, our results reveal that miRNAs may be involved in the protective mechanism against chilling injury in mature nodules of soybean. PMID:25100171

  3. The muon component in extensive air showers and new p+C data in fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Meurer, C.; Bluemer, J.; Engel, R.; Haungs, A.; Roth, M.

    2007-03-19

    One of the most promising approaches to determine the energy spectrum and composition of the cosmic rays with energies above 1015 eV is the measurement of the number of electrons and muons produced in extensive air showers (EAS). Therefore simulation of air showers using electromagnetic and hadronic interaction models are necessary. These simulations show uncertainties which come mainly from hadronic interaction models. One aim of this work is to specify the low energy hadronic interactions which are important for the muon production in EAS. Therefore we simulate extensive air showers with a modified version of the simulation package CORSIKA. In particular we investigate in detail the energy and the phase space regions of secondary particle production, which are most important for muon production. This phase space region is covered by fixed target experiments at CERN. In the second part of this work we present preliminary momentum spectra of secondary {pi}+ and {pi}- in p+C collisions at 12 GeV/c measured with the HARP spectrometer at the PS accelerator at CERN. In addition we use the new p+C NA49 data at 158 GeV/c to check the reliability of hadronic interaction models for muon production in EAS. Finally, possibilities to measure relevant quantities of hadron production in existing and planned accelerator experiments are discussed.

  4. Effects of azimuth-symmetric acceptance cutoffs on the measured asymmetry in unpolarized Drell-Yan fixed-target experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, A.; Bussa, M. P.; Destefanis, M.; Ferrero, L.; Greco, M.; Maggiora, M.; Spataro, S.

    2013-04-01

    Fixed-target unpolarized Drell-Yan experiments often feature an acceptance depending on the polar angle of the lepton tracks in the laboratory frame. Typically leptons are detected in a defined angular range, with a dead zone in the forward region. If the cutoffs imposed by the angular acceptance are independent of the azimuth, at first sight they do not appear dangerous for a measurement of the cos(2 φ) asymmetry, which is relevant because of its association with the violation of the Lam-Tung rule and with the Boer-Mulders function. On the contrary, direct simulations show that up to 10 percent asymmetries are produced by these cutoffs. These artificial asymmetries present qualitative features that allow them to mimic the physical ones. They introduce some model dependence in the measurements of the cos(2 φ) asymmetry, since a precise reconstruction of the acceptance in the Collins-Soper frame requires a Monte Carlo simulation, that in turn requires some detailed physical input to generate event distributions. Although experiments in the eighties seem to have been aware of this problem, the possibility of using the Boer-Mulders function as an input parameter in the extraction of transversity has much increased the requirements of precision on this measurement. Our simulations show that the safest approach to these measurements is a strong cutoff on the Collins-Soper polar angle. This reduces statistics, but does not necessarily decrease the precision in a measurement of the Boer-Mulders function.

  5. Studies of Transverse-Momentum-Dependent Distributions with a Fixed-Target ExpeRiment Using the LHC Beams (AFTER@LHC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massacrier, L.; Anselmino, M.; Arnaldi, R.; Brodsky, S. J.; Chambert, V.; den Dunnen, W.; Didelez, J. P.; Genolini, B.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Fleuret, F.; Gao, Y.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Lansberg, J. P.; Lorcé, C.; Mikkelsen, R.; Pisano, C.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Rosier, P.; Schienbein, I.; Schlegel, M.; Scomparin, E.; Trzeciak, B.; Uggerhøj, U. I.; Ulrich, R.; Yang, Z.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the studies of Transverse-Momentum-Dependent distributions (TMDs) at a future fixed-target experiment -AFTER@LHC- using the p+ or Pb ion LHC beams, which would be the most energetic fixed-target experiment ever performed. AFTER@LHC opens new domains of particle and nuclear physics by complementing collider-mode experiments, in particular those of RHIC and the EIC projects. Both with an extracted beam by a bent crystal or with an internal gas target, the luminosity achieved by AFTER@LHC surpasses that of RHIC by up to 3 orders of magnitude. With an unpolarised target, it allows for measurements of TMDs such as the Boer-Mulders quark distributions and the distribution of unpolarised and linearly polarised gluons in unpolarised protons. Using polarised targets, one can access the quark and gluon Sivers TMDs through single transverse-spin asymmetries in Drell-Yan and quarkonium production. In terms of kinematics, the fixed-target mode combined with a detector covering ηlab ∈ [1, 5] allows one to measure these asymmetries at large x↑ in the polarised nucleon.

  6. AGS slow extracted beam improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Marneris, I.; Danowski, G.; Sandberg, J.; Soukas, A.

    1997-07-01

    The Brookhaven AGS is a strong focusing accelerator which is used to accelerate protons and various heavy ion species to an equivalent proton energy of 29 GeV. Since the late 1960`s it has been serving high energy physics (HEP - proton beam) users of both slow and fast extracted beams. The AGS fixed target program presently uses primary proton and heavy ion beams (HIP) in slowly extracted fashion over spill lengths of 1.5 to 4.0 seconds. Extraction is accomplished by flattoping the main and extraction magnets and exciting a third integer resonance in the AGS. Over the long spill times, control of the subharmonic amplitude components up to a frequency of 1 kilohertz is very crucial. One of the most critical contributions to spill modulation is due to the AGS MMPS. An active filter was developed to reduce these frequencies and it`s operation is described in a previous paper. However there are still frequency components in the 60-720 Hz sub-harmonic ripple range, modulating the spill structure due to extraction power supplies and any remaining structures on the AGS MMPS. A recent scheme is being developed to use the existing tune-trim control horizontal quadrupole magnets and power supply to further reduce these troublesome noise sources. Feedback from an external beam sensor and overcoming the limitations of the quadrupole system by lead/lag compensation techniques will be described.

  7. Carbon micro-ribbon and strip polarimeter targets for the AGS and RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozowski, W. R.; Steski, D.; Huang, H.; Naylor, C.

    2008-06-01

    Current techniques used to produce carbon micro-ribbon targets 5 μm wide×3.7-4.5 μg/cm 2×25-mm long will be described. Developmental emphasis was to provide nearly identical micro-ribbons with the minimum number of atoms per unit of length, and to position them within ±0.5 mm of the desired location on C-shaped frames. The foil strip targets to be described were 200-600 μm wide×3.7-4.5 μg/cm 2×51 mm long. These were produced from 25-mm-wide carbon film deposits that were scribed using a jig prior to dissolving the betaine/sucrose release agent under ethanol. Both types of targets required methods and devices that differed significantly from those reported previously for substrate texturing, masking, vacuum deposition, releasing from the substrate, and mounting. Sets of 12-24 of the targets have been made for the 2006 run period at BNL.

  8. Permanent Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia sp. Strain ACN1ag, a Nitrogen-Fixing Actinobacterium Isolated from the Root Nodules of Alnus glutinosa.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Erik; Oshone, Rediet; Simpson, Stephen; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W Kelley; Tisa, Louis S

    2015-01-01

    Frankia strain ACN1(ag) is a member of Frankia lineage Ia, which are able to re-infect plants of the Betulaceae and Myricaceae families. Here, we report a 7.5-Mbp draft genome sequence with a G+C content of 72.35% and 5,687 candidate protein-encoding genes. PMID:26679592

  9. Permanent Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia sp. Strain ACN1ag, a Nitrogen-Fixing Actinobacterium Isolated from the Root Nodules of Alnus glutinosa

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Erik; Oshone, Rediet; Simpson, Stephen; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W. Kelley

    2015-01-01

    Frankia strain ACN1ag is a member of Frankia lineage Ia, which are able to re-infect plants of the Betulaceae and Myricaceae families. Here, we report a 7.5-Mbp draft genome sequence with a G+C content of 72.35% and 5,687 candidate protein-encoding genes. PMID:26679592

  10. SERS detection and targeted ablation of lymphoma cells using functionalized Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qian; Cao, Fei; Feng, Chao; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xiuhong

    2016-03-01

    Lymphoma is a heterogeneous group of malignancies of the lymphoid tissue, and is prevalent worldwide affecting both children and adults with a high mortality rate. There is in dire need of accurate and noninvasive approaches for early detection of the disease. Herein, we report a facile way to fabricate silver nanoparticle based nanoprobe by incorporating the corner-stone immunotherapeutic drug Rituxan for simultaneous detection and ablation of lymphoma cells in vitro. The fabricated nanoprobe can detect CD20 positive single lymphoma cell by surface enhanced Raman scattering technique with high specificity. The engineered nanoprobe retains the same antibody property as intact drug via Antibody-Dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxicity (ADCC) analysis. The nanoprobe efficiently eradicates lymphoma cells in vitro. By integrating the advantages of sensitive SERS detection with targeted ablation capabilities of immunotherapeutic drug through site specificity, this nanoprobe can be applied as outstanding tools in living imaging, cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Agglomeration in core-shell structure of CuAg nanoparticles synthesized by the laser ablation of Cu target in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, S.; Salatić, B.; Milovanović, D.; Lazović, V.; Živković, Lj; Trtica, M.; Jelenković, B.

    2015-02-01

    Metallic copper Cu and bimetallic copper-silver CuAg nanoparticles (NPs) are generated by the ablation of copper bulk target in water and aqueous Ag colloidal solution, respectively. The experiments were performed using nanosecond Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. The generated NPs are characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy. The conducted investigations can be summarized as follows: (i) CuAg NPs colloidal solution possess the absorption in UV-vis spectral region, which can be attributed to the Cu-component; (ii) the primary bimetallic CuAg NPs have near uniform dimensions with diameter of about 15 nm, and as a rule, they are grouped into larger agglomerates without defined morphology; (iii) the obtained Cu NPs have mainly spherical form with average diameters up to 20 nm. Both types of NPs show a tendency towards the formation of large agglomerates with different morphology. Bimetallic NPs show the plasmon resonance in the vicinity of 640 nm with a good coincidence with formation of the colloidal solution of pure Cu NPs. The results also demonstrate that the core-shell structure (Ag-rich core/Cu-rich shell) is important for the formation of the bimetallic NPs, also agreeing very well with theory.

  12. Ultrasound-targeted Bubble Liposome Destruction Enhances AG73-mediated Gene Transfer by Improvement of Intracellular Trafficking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omata, Daiki; Negishi, Yoichi; Endo-Takahashi, Yoko; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Aramaki, Yukihiko

    2011-09-01

    For selective cancer gene therapy, we have developed AG73-labeled polyethyleneglycol-modified liposomes (AG73-PEG liposomes) capable of encapsulating a gene condensed by poly-l-lysine. The present study examined whether echo-contrast gas-entrapping liposomes, also known as Bubble liposomes (BLs), and ultrasound (US) exposure affect not only the cell membrane but also intracellular vesicles, and enhance the release of pDNA from endosomes into the cytoplasm to achieve efficient gene transfection. AG73-mediated liposomal gene transfection efficiency was enhanced when BLs and US exposure were used. Furthermore, confocal microscopic analysis revealed that the BLs and US exposure promoted intracellular trafficking of the AG73-PEG liposomes during gene transfection. Thus, the use of AG73-PEG liposomes together with BLs and US exposure may be a promising way to achieve selective and efficient gene delivery.

  13. Search for strangelets and other rare objects in Au + Pt collisions at the AGS using a fixed-angle focusing spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Rusek, A.; Bassalleck, B.; Fischer, H.; Berdoz, A.; Franklin, G.B.; Buerger, T.; Burger, M.; Chrien, R.E.; Diebold, G.E.; En`yo, H.

    1995-12-31

    During the 1993 AGS heavy ion run, experiment E886 conducted a strangelet search in Au + Pt reactions, with beam momentum of 10.8 GeV/c per nucleon. Presented here are the upper limit for strangelet production, invariant cross sections for p, t, d, {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, {sup 6}He, {sup 8}He, {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Li, {sup 8}Li and {sup 7}Be, along with a demonstration of their agreement with a coalescence model fit to data collected by E886 during the 1992 engineering run, and upper limits for production cross sections for other rare objects, such as (H dibaryon)-nucleus systems. All results reported are preliminary.

  14. Membrane targeting of MnSOD is essential for oxidative stress tolerance of nitrogen-fixing cultures of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Prashanth S; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-07-01

    The nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena PCC7120 encodes for a membrane-targeted 30 kDa Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and a cytosolic FeSOD. The MnSOD is post-translationally processed to 27 and 24 kDa forms in the cytosol and periplasm/thylakoid lumen. The extent of cleavage of signal and linker peptides at the N-terminus is dependent on the availability of combined nitrogen during growth. While the 24 and 27 kDa forms are present in near equal proportions under nitrogen-fixing conditions, the 24 kDa form is predominant under nitrogen-supplemented conditions. Individual contribution of these forms of MnSOD to total oxidative stress tolerance was analysed using recombinant Anabaena strains overexpressing either different molecular forms of MnSOD or MnSOD defective in the cleavage of signal/linker peptide. Targeting of MnSOD to the membrane and subsequent cleavage to release both the 24 and 27 kDa forms was essential for oxidative stress tolerance under nitrogen-fixing conditions. On the other hand, the cleavage of linker peptide was absolutely essential and the release of cytosolic 24 kDa form of MnSOD was obligatory for developing oxidative stress tolerance under nitrogen-supplemented conditions. Thus, a single MnSOD caters to the reduction of superoxide radical in both cytosol and thylakoid lumen/periplasm irrespective of the N-status of growth by regulating its cleavage. This is the first report on the physiological advantage of membrane-targeting and processing of MnSOD in either bacteria or plants. The higher oxidative stress tolerance offered by the cytosolic form of MnSOD has possibly resulted in retention of only the cytosolic form in bacterial non-nitrogen-fixers during evolution.

  15. H. pylori-encoded CagA disrupts tight junctions and induces invasiveness of AGS gastric carcinoma cells via Cdx2-dependent targeting of Claudin-2.

    PubMed

    Song, Xin; Chen, Hui-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Deng, Xi-Yun; Xi, Yin-Xue; He, Qing; Peng, Tie-Li; Chen, Jie; Chen, Wei; Wong, Benjamin Chun-Yu; Chen, Min-Hu

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori encoded CagA is presently the only known virulence factor that is injected into gastric epithelial cells where it destroys apical junctional complexes and induces dedifferentiation of gastric epithelial cells, leading to H. pylori-related gastric carcinogensis. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which CagA mediates these changes. Caudal-related homeobox 2 (Cdx2) is an intestine-specific transcription factor highly expressed in multistage tissues of dysplasia and cancer. One specific target of Cdx2, Claudin-2, is involved in the regulation of tight junction (TJ) permeability. In this study, our findings showed that the activity of Cdx2 binding to Cdx binding sites of CdxA (GTTTATG) and CdxB (TTTTAGG) of probes corresponding to claudin-2 flanking region increased in AGS cells, infected with CagA positive wild-type strain of H. pylori, compared to CagA negative isogenic mutant-type strain. Moreover, Cdx2 upregulated claudin-2 expression at transcriptional level and translational level. In the meantime, we found that TJs of AGS cells, infected with CagA positive wild-type strain of H. pylori, compared to CagA negative isogenic mutant-type strain, were more severely destroyed, leading to wider cell gap, interference of contact, scattering and highly elevated migration of cells. Herein, this study is firstly demonstrated that H. pylori-encoded CagA disrupts TJs and induces invasiveness of AGS gastric carcinoma cells via Cdx2-dependent targeting of Claudin-2. This provides a new mechanism whereby CagA induced dedifferentiation of AGS cells, leading to malignant behavior of biology. PMID:24287273

  16. Generalization of vestibular learning to earth-fixed targets is possible but limited when the polarity of afferent vestibular information is changed.

    PubMed

    Mackrous, I; Simoneau, M

    2014-02-28

    To maintain perception of the world around us during body motion, the brain must update the spatial presentation of visual stimuli, known as space updating. Previous studies have demonstrated that vestibular signals contribute to space updating. Nonetheless, when being passively rotated in the dark, the ability to keep track of a memorized earth-fixed target (EFT) involves learning mechanism(s). We tested whether such learning generalizes across different EFT eccentricities. Furthermore, we ascertained whether learning transfers to similar target eccentricities but in the opposite direction. Participants were trained to predict the position of an EFT (located at 45° to their left) while being rotated counterclockwise (i.e., they press a push button when they perceived that their body midline have cross the position of the target). Overall, the results indicated that learning transferred to other target eccentricity (30° and 60°) for identical body rotation direction. In contrast, vestibular learning partly transferred to target location's matching body rotation but in the opposite rotation direction. Generalization of learning implies that participants do not adopt cognitive strategies to improve their performance during training. We argue that the brain learned to use vestibular signals for space updating. Generalization of learning while being rotated in the opposite direction implies that some parts of the neural networks involved in space updating is shared between trained and untrained direction.

  17. New prospects in fixed target searches for dark forces with the SeaQuest experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, S.; Holt, R. J.; Tadepalli, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    An intense 120 GeV proton beam incident on an extremely long iron target generates enormous numbers of light-mass particles that also decay within that target. If one of these particles decays to a final state with a hidden gauge boson, or if such a particle is produced as a result of the initial collision, then that weakly interacting hidden-sector particle may traverse the remainder of the target and be detected downstream through its possible decay to an e+e-, μ+μ-, or π+π- final state. These conditions can be realized through an extension of the SeaQuest experiment at Fermilab, and in this initial investigation we consider how it can serve as an ultrasensitive probe of hidden vector gauge forces, both Abelian and non-Abelian. A light, weakly coupled hidden sector may well explain the dark matter established through astrophysical observations, and the proposed search can provide tangible evidence for its existence—or, alternatively, constrain a "sea" of possibilities.

  18. Measurement of D0, D+, Ds + and D*+ production in fixed target 920 GeV proton nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Adams, M.; Agari, M.; Albrecht, H.; Aleksandrov, A.; Amaral, V.; Amorim, A.; Aplin, S. J.; Aushev, V.; Bagaturia, Y.; Balagura, V.; Bargiotti, M.; Barsukova, O.; Bastos, J.; Batista, J.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, T. S.; Belkov, A.; Belkov, A.; Belotelov, I.; Bertin, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Böcker, M.; Bogatyrev, A.; Bohm, G.; Bräuer, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Bruschi, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buran, T.; Carvalho, J.; Conde, P.; Cruse, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danilov, M.; de Castro, S.; Deppe, H.; Dong, X.; Dreis, H. B.; Egorytchev, V.; Ehret, K.; Eisele, F.; Emeliyanov, D.; Essenov, S.; Fabbri, L.; Faccioli, P.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Flammer, J.; Fominykh, B.; Funcke, M.; Garrido, L.; Gellrich, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Gläß, J.; Goloubkov, D.; Golubkov, Y.; Golutvin, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, I.; Gorišek, A.; Gouchtchine, O.; Goulart, D. C.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Grimaldi, F.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Guilitsky, Y.; Hansen, J. D.; Hernández, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hohlmann, M.; Hott, T.; Hulsbergen, W.; Husemann, U.; Igonkina, O.; Ispiryan, M.; Jagla, T.; Jiang, C.; Kapitza, H.; Karabekyan, S.; Karpenko, N.; Keller, S.; Kessler, J.; Khasanov, F.; Kiryushin, Y.; Kisel, I.; Klinkby, E.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kolanoski, H.; Korpar, S.; Krauss, C.; Kreuzer, P.; Križan, P.; Krücker, D.; Kupper, S.; Kvaratskheliia, T.; Lanyov, A.; Lau, K.; Lewendel, B.; Lohse, T.; Lomonosov, B.; Männer, R.; Mankel, R.; Masciocchi, S.; Massa, I.; Matchikhilian, I.; Medin, G.; Medinnis, M.; Mevius, M.; Michetti, A.; Mikhailov, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Muresan, R.; Zur Nedden, M.; Negodaev, M.; Nörenberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Núñez Pardo de Vera, M. T.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Padilla, C.; Peralta, D.; Pernack, R.; Pestotnik, R.; Petersen, B. A. A.; Piccinini, M.; Pleier, M. A.; Poli, M.; Popov, V.; Pose, D.; Prystupa, S.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Pyrlik, J.; Reeves, K.; Reßing, D.; Rick, H.; Riu, I.; Robmann, P.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rybnikov, V.; Sánchez, F.; Sbrizzi, A.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiner, A.; Schröder, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Schwenninger, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sciacca, F.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Shuvalov, S.; Silva, L.; Škrk, D.; Sözüer, L.; Solunin, S.; Somov, A.; Somov, S.; Spengler, J.; Spighi, R.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanovnik, A.; Starič, M.; Stegmann, C.; Subramania, H. S.; Symalla, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Tsakov, I.; Uwer, U.; van Eldik, C.; Vassiliev, Y.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Vukotic, I.; Wahlberg, H.; Walenta, A. H.; Walter, M.; Wang, J. J.; Wegener, D.; Werthenbach, U.; Wolters, H.; Wurth, R.; Wurz, A.; Xella-Hansen, S.; Zaitsev, Y.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zeuner, T.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Z.; Zimmermann, R.; Živko, T.; Zoccoli, A.

    2007-11-01

    The inclusive production cross sections of the charmed mesons D0,D+,Ds + and D*+ have been measured in interactions of 920 GeV protons on C, Ti, and W targets with the HERA-B detector at the HERA storage ring. Differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and Feynman’s x variable are given for the central rapidity region and for transverse momenta up to pT=3.5 GeV/ c. The atomic mass number dependence and the leading to non-leading particle production asymmetries are presented as well.

  19. Polarization of Λ and Λ¯ in 920 GeV fixed-target proton nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hera-B Collaboration; Abt, I.; Adams, M.; Agari, M.; Albrecht, H.; Aleksandrov, A.; Amaral, V.; Amorim, A.; Aplin, S. J.; Aushev, V.; Bagaturia, Y.; Balagura, V.; Bargiotti, M.; Barsukova, O.; Bastos, J.; Batista, J.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Belkov, A.; Belkov, Ar.; Belotelov, I.; Bertin, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Böcker, M.; Bogatyrev, A.; Bohm, G.; Bräuer, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Bruschi, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buran, T.; Carvalho, J.; Conde, P.; Cruse, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danilov, M.; de Castro, S.; Deppe, H.; Dong, X.; Dreis, H. B.; Egorytchev, V.; Ehret, K.; Eisele, F.; Emeliyanov, D.; Erhan, S.; Essenov, S.; Fabbri, L.; Faccioli, P.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Flammer, J.; Fominykh, B.; Funcke, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Gellrich, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Gläß, J.; Goloubkov, D.; Golubkov, Y.; Golutvin, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, I.; Gorišek, A.; Gouchtchine, O.; Goulart, D. C.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Grimaldi, F.; Guilitsky, Yu.; Hansen, J. D.; Hernández, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hohlmann, M.; Hott, T.; Hulsbergen, W.; Husemann, U.; Igonkina, O.; Ispiryan, M.; Jagla, T.; Jiang, C.; Kapitza, H.; Karabekyan, S.; Karpenko, N.; Keller, S.; Kessler, J.; Khasanov, F.; Kiryushin, Yu.; Kisel, I.; Klinkby, E.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kolanoski, H.; Korpar, S.; Krauss, C.; Kreuzer, P.; Križan, P.; Krücker, D.; Kupper, S.; Kvaratskheliia, T.; Lanyov, A.; Lau, K.; Lewendel, B.; Lohse, T.; Lomonosov, B.; Männer, R.; Mankel, R.; Masciocchi, S.; Massa, I.; Matchikhilian, I.; Medin, G.; Medinnis, M.; Mevius, M.; Michetti, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.; Mizuk, R.; Muresan, R.; Zur Nedden, M.; Negodaev, M.; Nörenberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Núñez Pardo de Vera, M. T.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Padilla, C.; Peralta, D.; Pernack, R.; Pestotnik, R.; Petersen, B. Aa.; Piccinini, M.; Pleier, M. A.; Poli, M.; Popov, V.; Pose, D.; Prystupa, S.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Pyrlik, J.; Reeves, K.; Reßing, D.; Rick, H.; Riu, I.; Robmann, P.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rybnikov, V.; Sánchez, F.; Sbrizzi, A.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiner, A.; Schröder, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Schwenninger, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sciacca, F.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Shuvalov, S.; Silva, L.; Sözüer, L.; Solunin, S.; Somov, A.; Somov, S.; Spengler, J.; Spighi, R.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanovnik, A.; Starič, M.; Stegmann, C.; Subramania, H. S.; Symalla, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Tsakov, I.; Uwer, U.; van Eldik, C.; Vassiliev, Yu.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Vukotic, I.; Wahlberg, H.; Walenta, A. H.; Walter, M.; Wang, J. J.; Wegener, D.; Werthenbach, U.; Wolters, H.; Wurth, R.; Wurz, A.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zeuner, T.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Z.; Zimmermann, R.; Živko, T.; Zoccoli, A.

    2006-07-01

    A measurement of the polarization of Λ and Λ¯ baryons produced in pC and pW collisions at s=41.6 GeV has been performed with the HERA-B spectrometer. The measurements cover the kinematic range of 0.6 GeV/ctargets agree within the statistical error. In the combined data set, the largest deviation from zero, +0.054±0.029, is measured for x≲-0.07. Zero polarization is expected at x=0 in the absence of nuclear effects. The polarization results for the Λ agree with a parametrization of previous measurements which were performed at positive x values, where the Λ polarization is negative. Results of Λ¯ polarization measurements are consistent with zero.

  20. Target-specific near-IR induced drug release and photothermal therapy with accumulated Au/Ag hollow nanoshells on pulmonary cancer cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Noh, Mi Suk; Lee, Somin; Kang, Homan; Yang, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Hyunmi; Hwang, Doyk; Lee, Jong Woo; Jeong, Sinyoung; Jang, Yoonjeong; Jun, Bong-Hyun; Jeong, Dae Hong; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-03-01

    Au/Ag hollow nanoshells (AuHNSs) were developed as multifunctional therapeutic agents for effective, targeted, photothermally induced drug delivery under near-infrared (NIR) light. AuHNSs were synthesized by galvanic replacement reaction. We further conjugated antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to the PEGylated AuHNS, followed by loading with the antitumor drug doxorubicin (AuHNS-EGFR-DOX) for lung cancer treatment. AuHNSs showed similar photothermal efficiency to gold nanorods under optimized NIR laser power. The targeting of AuHNS-EGFR-DOX was confirmed by light-scattering images of A549 cells, and doxorubicin release from the AuHNSs was evaluated under low pH and NIR-irradiated conditions. Multifunctional AuHNS-EGFR-DOX induced photothermal ablation of the targeted lung cancer cells and rapid doxorubicin release following irradiation with NIR laser. Furthermore, we evaluated the effectiveness of AuHNS-EGFR-DOX drug delivery by comparing two drug delivery methods: receptor-mediated endocytosis and cell-surface targeting. Accumulation of the AuHNS-EGFR-DOX on the cell surfaces by targeting EGFR turned out to be more effective for lung cancer treatments than uptake of AuHNS-EGFR-DOX. Taken together, our data suggest a new and optimal method of NIR-induced drug release via the accumulation of targeted AuHNS-EGFR-DOX on cancer cell membranes. PMID:25662498

  1. Target-specific near-IR induced drug release and photothermal therapy with accumulated Au/Ag hollow nanoshells on pulmonary cancer cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Noh, Mi Suk; Lee, Somin; Kang, Homan; Yang, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Hyunmi; Hwang, Doyk; Lee, Jong Woo; Jeong, Sinyoung; Jang, Yoonjeong; Jun, Bong-Hyun; Jeong, Dae Hong; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-03-01

    Au/Ag hollow nanoshells (AuHNSs) were developed as multifunctional therapeutic agents for effective, targeted, photothermally induced drug delivery under near-infrared (NIR) light. AuHNSs were synthesized by galvanic replacement reaction. We further conjugated antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to the PEGylated AuHNS, followed by loading with the antitumor drug doxorubicin (AuHNS-EGFR-DOX) for lung cancer treatment. AuHNSs showed similar photothermal efficiency to gold nanorods under optimized NIR laser power. The targeting of AuHNS-EGFR-DOX was confirmed by light-scattering images of A549 cells, and doxorubicin release from the AuHNSs was evaluated under low pH and NIR-irradiated conditions. Multifunctional AuHNS-EGFR-DOX induced photothermal ablation of the targeted lung cancer cells and rapid doxorubicin release following irradiation with NIR laser. Furthermore, we evaluated the effectiveness of AuHNS-EGFR-DOX drug delivery by comparing two drug delivery methods: receptor-mediated endocytosis and cell-surface targeting. Accumulation of the AuHNS-EGFR-DOX on the cell surfaces by targeting EGFR turned out to be more effective for lung cancer treatments than uptake of AuHNS-EGFR-DOX. Taken together, our data suggest a new and optimal method of NIR-induced drug release via the accumulation of targeted AuHNS-EGFR-DOX on cancer cell membranes.

  2. A modular and compact portable mini-endstation for high-precision, high-speed fixed target serial crystallography at FEL and synchrotron sources

    DOE PAGES

    Sherrell, Darren A.; Foster, Andrew J.; Hudson, Lee; Nutter, Brian; O'Hea, James; Nelson, Silke; Pare-Labrosse, Olivier; Oghbaey, Saeed; Miller, R. J. Dwayne; Owen, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    The design and implementation of a compact and portable sample alignment system suitable for use at both synchrotron and free-electron laser (FEL) sources and its performance are described. The system provides the ability to quickly and reliably deliver large numbers of samples using the minimum amount of sample possible, through positioning of fixed target arrays into the X-ray beam. The combination of high-precision stages, high-quality sample viewing, a fast controller and a software layer overcome many of the challenges associated with sample alignment. A straightforward interface that minimizes setup and sample changeover time as well as simplifying communication with themore » stages during the experiment is also described, together with an intuitive naming convention for defining, tracking and locating sample positions. Lastly, the setup allows the precise delivery of samples in predefined locations to a specific position in space and time, reliably and simply.« less

  3. A modular and compact portable mini-endstation for high-precision, high-speed fixed target serial crystallography at FEL and synchrotron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, Darren A.; Foster, Andrew J.; Hudson, Lee; Nutter, Brian; O'Hea, James; Nelson, Silke; Pare-Labrosse, Olivier; Oghbaey, Saeed; Miller, R. J. Dwayne; Owen, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    The design and implementation of a compact and portable sample alignment system suitable for use at both synchrotron and free-electron laser (FEL) sources and its performance are described. The system provides the ability to quickly and reliably deliver large numbers of samples using the minimum amount of sample possible, through positioning of fixed target arrays into the X-ray beam. The combination of high-precision stages, high-quality sample viewing, a fast controller and a software layer overcome many of the challenges associated with sample alignment. A straightforward interface that minimizes setup and sample changeover time as well as simplifying communication with the stages during the experiment is also described, together with an intuitive naming convention for defining, tracking and locating sample positions. Lastly, the setup allows the precise delivery of samples in predefined locations to a specific position in space and time, reliably and simply.

  4. A modular and compact portable mini-endstation for high-precision, high-speed fixed target serial crystallography at FEL and synchrotron sources.

    PubMed

    Sherrell, Darren A; Foster, Andrew J; Hudson, Lee; Nutter, Brian; O'Hea, James; Nelson, Silke; Paré-Labrosse, Olivier; Oghbaey, Saeed; Miller, R J Dwayne; Owen, Robin L

    2015-11-01

    The design and implementation of a compact and portable sample alignment system suitable for use at both synchrotron and free-electron laser (FEL) sources and its performance are described. The system provides the ability to quickly and reliably deliver large numbers of samples using the minimum amount of sample possible, through positioning of fixed target arrays into the X-ray beam. The combination of high-precision stages, high-quality sample viewing, a fast controller and a software layer overcome many of the challenges associated with sample alignment. A straightforward interface that minimizes setup and sample changeover time as well as simplifying communication with the stages during the experiment is also described, together with an intuitive naming convention for defining, tracking and locating sample positions. The setup allows the precise delivery of samples in predefined locations to a specific position in space and time, reliably and simply. PMID:26524301

  5. A modular and compact portable mini-endstation for high-precision, high-speed fixed target serial crystallography at FEL and synchrotron sources

    PubMed Central

    Sherrell, Darren A.; Foster, Andrew J.; Hudson, Lee; Nutter, Brian; O’Hea, James; Nelson, Silke; Paré-Labrosse, Olivier; Oghbaey, Saeed; Miller, R. J. Dwayne; Owen, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    The design and implementation of a compact and portable sample alignment system suitable for use at both synchrotron and free-electron laser (FEL) sources and its performance are described. The system provides the ability to quickly and reliably deliver large numbers of samples using the minimum amount of sample possible, through positioning of fixed target arrays into the X-ray beam. The combination of high-precision stages, high-quality sample viewing, a fast controller and a software layer overcome many of the challenges associated with sample alignment. A straightforward interface that minimizes setup and sample changeover time as well as simplifying communication with the stages during the experiment is also described, together with an intuitive naming convention for defining, tracking and locating sample positions. The setup allows the precise delivery of samples in predefined locations to a specific position in space and time, reliably and simply. PMID:26524301

  6. Bio-mimetic Nanostructure Self-assembled from Au@Ag Heterogeneous Nanorods and Phage Fusion Proteins for Targeted Tumor Optical Detection and Photothermal Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Pei; Sun, Lin; Li, Cuncheng; Petrenko, Valery A.; Liu, Aihua

    2014-10-01

    Nanomaterials with near-infrared (NIR) absorption have been widely studied in cancer detection and photothermal therapy (PTT), while it remains a great challenge in targeting tumor efficiently with minimal side effects. Herein we report a novel multifunctional phage-mimetic nanostructure, which was prepared by layer-by-layer self-assembly of Au@Ag heterogenous nanorods (NRs) with rhodamine 6G, and specific pVIII fusion proteins. Au@Ag NRs, first being applied for PTT, exhibited excellent stability, cost-effectivity, biocompatibility and tunable NIR absorption. The fusion proteins were isolated from phage DDAGNRQP specifically selected from f8/8 landscape phage library against colorectal cancer cells in a high-throughput way. Considering the definite charge distribution and low molecular weight, phage fusion proteins were assembled on the negatively charged NR core by electrostatic interactions, exposing the N-terminus fused with DDAGNRQP peptide on the surface. The fluorescent images showed that assembled phage fusion proteins can direct the nanostructure into cancer cells. The nanostructure was more efficient than gold nanorods and silver nanotriangle-based photothermal agents and was capable of specifically ablating SW620 cells after 10 min illumination with an 808 nm laser in the light intensity of 4 W/cm2. The prepared nanostructure would become an ideal reagent for simutaneously targeted optical imaging and PTT of tumor.

  7. Polarization of Λ and Λbar in 920 GeV fixed-target proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Adams, M.; Agari, M.; Albrecht, H.; Aleksandrov, A.; Amaral, V.; Amorim, A.; Aplin, S. J.; Aushev, V.; Bagaturia, Y.; Balagura, V.; Bargiotti, M.; Barsukova, O.; Bastos, J.; Batista, J.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Belkov, A.; Belkov, Ar.; Belotelov, I.; Bertin, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Böcker, M.; Bogatyrev, A.; Bohm, G.; Bräuer, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Bruschi, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buran, T.; Carvalho, J.; Conde, P.; Cruse, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danilov, M.; De Castro, S.; Deppe, H.; Dong, X.; Dreis, H. B.; Egorytchev, V.; Ehret, K.; Eisele, F.; Emeliyanov, D.; Erhan, S.; Essenov, S.; Fabbri, L.; Faccioli, P.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Flammer, J.; Fominykh, B.; Funcke, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Gellrich, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Gläß, J.; Goloubkov, D.; Golubkov, Y.; Golutvin, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, I.; Gorišek, A.; Gouchtchine, O.; Goulart, D. C.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Grimaldi, F.; Guilitsky, Yu.; Hansen, J. D.; Hernández, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hohlmann, M.; Hott, T.; Hulsbergen, W.; Husemann, U.; Igonkina, O.; Ispiryan, M.; Jagla, T.; Jiang, C.; Kapitza, H.; Karabekyan, S.; Karpenko, N.; Keller, S.; Kessler, J.; Khasanov, F.; Kiryushin, Yu.; Kisel, I.; Klinkby, E.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kolanoski, H.; Korpar, S.; Krauss, C.; Kreuzer, P.; Križan, P.; Krücker, D.; Kupper, S.; Kvaratskheliia, T.; Lanyov, A.; Lau, K.; Lewendel, B.; Lohse, T.; Lomonosov, B.; Männer, R.; Mankel, R.; Masciocchi, S.; Massa, I.; Matchikhilian, I.; Medin, G.; Medinnis, M.; Mevius, M.; Michetti, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.; Mizuk, R.; Muresan, R.; zur Nedden, M.; Negodaev, M.; Nörenberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Núñez Pardo de Vera, M. T.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Padilla, C.; Peralta, D.; Pernack, R.; Pestotnik, R.; Petersen, B. AA.; Piccinini, M.; Pleier, M. A.; Poli, M.; Popov, V.; Pose, D.; Prystupa, S.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Pyrlik, J.; Reeves, K.; Reßing, D.; Rick, H.; Riu, I.; Robmann, P.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rybnikov, V.; Sánchez, F.; Sbrizzi, A.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiner, A.; Schröder, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Schwenninger, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sciacca, F.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Shuvalov, S.; Silva, L.; Sözüer, L.; Solunin, S.; Somov, A.; Somov, S.; Spengler, J.; Spighi, R.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanovnik, A.; Starič, M.; Stegmann, C.; Subramania, H. S.; Symalla, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Tsakov, I.; Uwer, U.; van Eldik, C.; Vassiliev, Yu.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Vukotic, I.; Wahlberg, H.; Walenta, A. H.; Walter, M.; Wang, J. J.; Wegener, D.; Werthenbach, U.; Wolters, H.; Wurth, R.; Wurz, A.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zeuner, T.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Z.; Zimmermann, R.; Živko, T.; Zoccoli, A.; HERA-B Collaboration

    2006-07-01

    A measurement of the polarization of Λ and Λbar baryons produced in pC and pW collisions at √{ s} = 41.6 GeV has been performed with the HERA-B spectrometer. The measurements cover the kinematic range of 0.6 GeV / c targets agree within the statistical error. In the combined data set, the largest deviation from zero, + 0.054 ± 0.029, is measured for xF ≲ - 0.07. Zero polarization is expected at xF = 0 in the absence of nuclear effects. The polarization results for the Λ agree with a parametrization of previous measurements which were performed at positive xF values, where the Λ polarization is negative. Results of Λbar polarization measurements are consistent with zero.

  8. The data acquisition system for a fixed target experiment at NICA complex at JINR and its connection to the ATLAS TileCal readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiwa, K. G.; Slepnev, I.; Bazylev, S.

    2015-10-01

    Today's large-scale science projects have always encountered challenges in processing large data flow from the experiments, the ATLAS detector records proton-proton collisions provided by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN every 50 ns which results in a total data flow of 10 Pb/s. These data must be reduced to the science data product for further analysis, thus a very fast decisions need to be executed, to modify this large amounts of data at high rates. The capabilities required to support this scale of data movement is development and improvement of high-throughput electronics. The upgraded LHC will provide collisions at rates that will be at least 10 times higher than those of today due to it's luminosity by 2022. This will require a complete redesign of the read-out electronics and Processing Units (PU) in the Tile-calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment. A general purpose, high-throughput PU has been developed for the TileCal at CERN, by using several ARM-processors in cluster configuration. The PU is capable of handling large data throughput and apply advanced operations at high rates. This system has been proposed for the fixed target experiment at NICA complex to handle the first level processes and event building. The aim of this work is to have a look at the architecture of the data acquisition system (DAQ) of the fixed target experiment at the NICA complex at JINR, by compiling the data-flow requirements of all the subcomponents. Furthermore, the VME DAQ modules characteristics to control, triggering and data acquisition will be described in order to define the DAQ with maximum readout efficiency, no dead time and data selection and compression.

  9. An Electron Fixed Target Experiment to Search for a New Vector Boson A' Decaying to e+e-

    SciTech Connect

    Essig, Rouven; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; /Jefferson Lab

    2010-06-11

    We describe an experiment to search for a new vector boson A' with weak coupling {alpha}' {approx}> 6 x 10{sup -8} {alpha} to electrons ({alpha} = e{sup 2}/4{pi}) in the mass range 65 MeV < m{sub A'} < 550 MeV. New vector bosons with such small couplings arise naturally from a small kinetic mixing of the 'dark photon' A' with the photon - one of the very few ways in which new forces can couple to the Standard Model - and have received considerable attention as an explanation of various dark matter related anomalies. A' bosons are produced by radiation off an electron beam, and could appear as narrow resonances with small production cross-section in the trident e{sup +}e{sup -} spectrum. We summarize the experimental approach described in a proposal submitted to Jefferson Laboratory's PAC35, PR-10-009. This experiment, the A' Experiment (APEX), uses the electron beam of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Laboratory (CEBAF) at energies of {approx} 1-4 GeV incident on 0.5-10% radiation length Tungsten wire mesh targets, and measures the resulting e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs to search for the A' using the High Resolution Spectrometer and the septum magnet in Hall A. With a {approx} 1 month run, APEX will achieve very good sensitivity because the statistics of e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs will be {approx} 10,000 times larger in the explored mass range than any previous search for the A' boson. These statistics and the excellent mass resolution of the spectrometers allow sensitivity to {alpha}'/{alpha} one to three orders of magnitude below current limits, in a region of parameter space of great theoretical and phenomenological interest. Similar experiments could also be performed at other facilities, such as the Mainz Microtron.

  10. An electron fixed target experiment to search for a new vector boson A' decaying to e+e-

    DOE PAGES

    Rouven Essig; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2011-02-02

    We describe an experiment to search for a new vector boson A' with weak coupling alpha' > 6 x 10–8 α to electrons (α' = e2/4π) in the mass range 65 MeV < mA' < 550 MeV. New vector bosons with such small couplings arise naturally from a small kinetic mixing of the "dark photon" A' with the photon -- one of the very few ways in which new forces can couple to the Standard Model -- and have received considerable attention as an explanation of various dark matter related anomalies. A' bosons are produced by radiation off an electronmore » beam, and could appear as narrow resonances with small production cross-section in the trident e+e- spectrum. We summarize the experimental approach described in a proposal submitted to Jefferson Laboratory's PAC35, PR-10-009. This experiment, the A' Experiment (APEX), uses the electron beam of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Laboratory (CEBAF) at energies of ~1-4 GeV incident on 0.5-10% radiation length Tungsten wire mesh targets, and measures the resulting e+e- pairs to search for the A' using the High Resolution Spectrometer and the septum magnet in Hall A. With a ~1 month run, APEX will achieve very good sensitivity because the statistics of e+e- pairs will be ~10,000 times larger in the explored mass range than any previous search for the A' boson. These statistics and the excellent mass resolution of the spectrometers allow sensitivity to α'/α one to three orders of magnitude below current limits, in a region of parameter space of great theoretical and phenomenological interest. Similar experiments could also be performed at other facilities, such as the Mainz Microtron.« less

  11. Targeted Next Generation Sequencing as a Reliable Diagnostic Assay for the Detection of Somatic Mutations in Tumours Using Minimal DNA Amounts from Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Material

    PubMed Central

    Koudijs, Marco J.; Nijman, Ies; Hinrichs, John W. J.; Cuppen, Edwin; van Lieshout, Stef; Loberg, Robert D.; de Jonge, Maja; Voest, Emile E.; de Weger, Roel A.; Steeghs, Neeltje; Langenberg, Marlies H. G.; Sleijfer, Stefan; Willems, Stefan M.; Lolkema, Martijn P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Targeted Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) offers a way to implement testing of multiple genetic aberrations in diagnostic pathology practice, which is necessary for personalized cancer treatment. However, no standards regarding input material have been defined. This study therefore aimed to determine the effect of the type of input material (e.g. formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) versus fresh frozen (FF) tissue) on NGS derived results. Moreover, this study aimed to explore a standardized analysis pipeline to support consistent clinical decision-making. Method We used the Ion Torrent PGM sequencing platform in combination with the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 to sequence frequently mutated regions in 50 cancer related genes, and validated the NGS detected variants in 250 FFPE samples using standard diagnostic assays. Next, 386 tumour samples were sequenced to explore the effect of input material on variant detection variables. For variant calling, Ion Torrent analysis software was supplemented with additional variant annotation and filtering. Results Both FFPE and FF tissue could be sequenced reliably with a sensitivity of 99.1%. Validation showed a 98.5% concordance between NGS and conventional sequencing techniques, where NGS provided both the advantage of low input DNA concentration and the detection of low-frequency variants. The reliability of mutation analysis could be further improved with manual inspection of sequence data. Conclusion Targeted NGS can be reliably implemented in cancer diagnostics using both FFPE and FF tissue when using appropriate analysis settings, even with low input DNA. PMID:26919633

  12. Microarray gene expression analysis of fixed archival tissue permits molecular classification and identification of potential therapeutic targets in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kim; Howarth, Christopher; Wappett, Mark; Newton, Gillian; Lachel, Cynthia; Iqbal, Javeed; Pepper, Stuart; Byers, Richard; Chan, Wing John; Radford, John

    2012-01-01

    Refractory/relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has a poor prognosis. Novel drugs targeting the constitutively activated NF-κB pathway characteristic of ABC-DLBCL are promising, but evaluation depends on accurate activated B cell-like (ABC)/germinal center B cell-like (GCB) molecular classification. This is traditionally performed on gene microarray expression profiles of fresh biopsies, which are not routinely collected, or by immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue, which lacks reproducibility and classification accuracy. We explored the possibility of using routine archival FFPE tissue for gene microarray applications. We examined Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2.0 gene expression profiles from paired archival FFPE and fresh-frozen tissues of 40 ABC/GCB-classified DLBCL cases to compare classification accuracy and test the potential for this approach to aid the discovery of therapeutic targets and disease classifiers in DLBCL. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of unselected present probe sets distinguished ABC/GCB in FFPE with remarkable accuracy, and a Bayesian classifier correctly assigned 32 of 36 cases with >90% probability. Enrichment for NF-κB genes was appropriately seen in ABC-DLBCL FFPE tissues. The top discriminatory genes expressed in FFPE separated cases with high statistical significance and contained novel biology with potential therapeutic insights, warranting further investigation. These results support a growing understanding that archival FFPE tissues can be used in microarray experiments aimed at molecular classification, prognostic biomarker discovery, and molecular exploration of rare diseases.

  13. Methods for Studying MicroRNA Expression and Their Targets in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) Breast Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Bruno Costa; Santos, Bruno; Rueff, José; Rodrigues, António Sebastião

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance remains a burden in cancer treatment. In the past few years molecular genetics brought a new hope with personalized therapy. This individual approach allows the identification of genetic profiles that will respond better to a given treatment and consequently get a better outcome. Recently, physicians received an extra aid with the approval of molecular tools based on gene expression signatures. With these tools, physicians have the capacity to identify the probability of disease recurrence in the first 5 years following diagnosis, a fact that is essential for a more effective adjuvant therapy administration. However, some patients still relapse and acquire drug resistance and aggressive tumors. For that reason, a comprehensive understanding of the molecular players in drug resistance is of extreme importance. MicroRNAs have been described as regulators of various cellular pathways and as predictive and prognostic factors. As broad regulators, microRNAs also interfere with drug metabolism and drug targets. Thus it is of paramount importance to understand which microRNAs are deregulated in breast cancer and try to relate this misexpression with resistance to therapeutics, poor outcomes, and survival. Here, we describe a possible approach to study microRNA expression and respective targets from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast cancer tissues. FFPE tissues are regularly archived for long periods in pathology departments, and microRNAs are well conserved in these tissues. PMID:26910075

  14. Immunotherapy of HCC metastases with autologous T cell receptor redirected T cells, targeting HBsAg in a liver transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Waseem; Brunetto, Maurizia; Gehring, Adam J; Xue, Shao-An; Schurich, Anna; Khakpoor, Atefeh; Zhan, Hong; Ciccorossi, Pietro; Gilmour, Kimberly; Cavallone, Daniela; Moriconi, Francesco; Farzhenah, Farzin; Mazzoni, Alessandro; Chan, Lucas; Morris, Emma; Thrasher, Adrian; Maini, Mala K; Bonino, Ferruccio; Stauss, Hans; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    HBV-DNA integration frequently occurs in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but whether HBV antigens are expressed in HCC cells and can be targeted by immune therapeutic strategies remains controversial. Here, we first characterized HBV antigen expression in HCC metastases, occurring in a patient who had undergone liver transplantation for HBV-related HCC. We then deployed for the first time in HCC autologous T cells, genetically modified to express an HBsAg specific T cell receptor, as therapy against chemoresistant extrahepatic metastases. We confirmed that HBV antigens were expressed in HCC metastases (but not in the donor liver) and demonstrated that tumour cells were recognized in vivo by lymphocytes, engineered to express an HBV-specific T cell receptor (TCR). Gene-modified T cells survived, expanded and mediated a reduction in HBsAg levels without exacerbation of liver inflammation or other toxicity. Whilst clinical efficacy was not established in this subject with end-stage metastatic disease, we confirm the feasibility of providing autologous TCR-redirected therapy against HCC and advocate this strategy as a novel therapeutic opportunity in hepatitis B-associated malignancies.

  15. Targeted, high-depth, next-generation sequencing of cancer genes in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and fine-needle aspiration tumor specimens.

    PubMed

    Hadd, Andrew G; Houghton, Jeff; Choudhary, Ashish; Sah, Sachin; Chen, Liangjing; Marko, Adam C; Sanford, Tiffany; Buddavarapu, Kalyan; Krosting, Julie; Garmire, Lana; Wylie, Dennis; Shinde, Rupali; Beaudenon, Sylvie; Alexander, Erik K; Mambo, Elizabeth; Adai, Alex T; Latham, Gary J

    2013-03-01

    Implementation of highly sophisticated technologies, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), into routine clinical practice requires compatibility with common tumor biopsy types, such as formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and fine-needle aspiration specimens, and validation metrics for platforms, controls, and data analysis pipelines. In this study, a two-step PCR enrichment workflow was used to assess 540 known cancer-relevant variants in 16 oncogenes for high-depth sequencing in tumor samples on either mature (Illumina GAIIx) or emerging (Ion Torrent PGM) NGS platforms. The results revealed that the background noise of variant detection was elevated approximately twofold in FFPE compared with cell line DNA. Bioinformatic algorithms were optimized to accommodate this background. Variant calls from 38 residual clinical colorectal cancer FFPE specimens and 10 thyroid fine-needle aspiration specimens were compared across multiple cancer genes, resulting in an accuracy of 96.1% (95% CI, 96.1% to 99.3%) compared with Sanger sequencing, and 99.6% (95% CI, 97.9% to 99.9%) compared with an alternative method with an analytical sensitivity of 1% mutation detection. A total of 45 of 48 samples were concordant between NGS platforms across all matched regions, with the three discordant calls each represented at <10% of reads. Consequently, NGS of targeted oncogenes in real-life tumor specimens using distinct platforms addresses unmet needs for unbiased and highly sensitive mutation detection and can accelerate both basic and clinical cancer research.

  16. A multi correlated sampler of the high resolution acquisition system for high rate fixed target KTeV experiments at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, H.; Cheu, E.; Zeleznik, M.; Hansen, S.; Tschirhart, R.

    1993-05-01

    A new facility is being planned at Fermilab for fixed target experiments dealing with CP violation in rate neutral kaon decays; and precision measurements on the "direct" CP-violation parameters e'/ e in the 2 pi decay mode of the neutral kaon system. This new Kaons at the TeVatron(KTeV) beam line is expected to be in operation in 1994. The most important new detector component in the KTeV spectrometer is the precision electromagnetic calorimeter, consisting of bars of Cesium Iodide crystals. The choice has been motivated by its radiation hardness, speed and light output. The size of this detector is 2 meters square and includes over 3200 blocks which are coupled to photomultipliers. We expect a peak anode current pulse of 100 ma from an80 Gev deposit. The pulse shape approximates a signal with a FWHM of 25 nanoseconds, but contains some energy in a long tail that exists for more than 500 nanoseconds. The design for the data acquisition electronics will measure deposited charge in every channel in two 12 bit linear ranges: a low range of 2 MEV per count up to a maximum signal of 82 GEV and a range that will handle signals ten times larger with the same proportion in energy resolution. Since the total required dynamic range of this design is between 15 and 16 bit resolution, the problem of pedestal and pile up is seriously engaged with the configuration of this design.

  17. Application of targeted metagenomics to explore abundance and diversity of CO₂-fixing bacterial community using cbbL gene from the rhizosphere of Arachis hypogaea.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Basit; Keshri, Jitendra; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2012-09-10

    Sequestration of CO(2) by autotrophic bacteria is a key process of biogeochemical carbon cycling in soil ecosystem. Rhizosphere is a rich niche of microbial activity and diversity, influenced by change in atmospheric CO(2). Structural changes in rhizosphere composition influence microbial communities and the nutrient cycling. In the present study, the bacterial diversity and population dynamics were established using cbbL and 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomics approach from the rhizosphere of Arachis hypogaea. A total of 108 cbbL clones were obtained from the rhizospheric soil which revealed predominance of cbbL sequences affiliated to Rhizobium leguminosarum, Bradyrhizobium sp., Sinorhizobium meliloti, Ochrobactrum anthropi and a variety of uncultured cbbL harboring bacteria. The 16S rRNA gene clone library exhibited the dominance of Firmicutes (34.4%), Proteobacteria (18.3%), Actinobacteria (17.2%) and Bacteroidetes (16.1%). About 43% nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA gene clone library were novel genera which showed <95% homology with published sequences. Gene copy number of cbbL and 16S rRNA genes, determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT PCR), was 9.38 ± 0.75 × 10(7) and 5.43 ± 0.79 × 10(8) (per g dry soil), respectively. The results exhibited bacterial community structure with high bacterial diversity and abundance of CO(2)-fixing bacteria, which can be explored further for their role in carbon cycling, sustainable agriculture and environment management.

  18. MINI-BUNCHED AND MICRO-BUNCHED SLOW EXTRACTED BEAMS FROM THE AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,K.A.AHRENS,L.BRENNAN,J.M.GLENN,J.W.SIVERTZ,M.KOSCIELNIAK,S.R.

    2004-07-05

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNLs) Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) has a long history of providing slow extracted proton beams to fixed target experiments. This program of providing high quality high intensity beams continues with two new experiments currently being designed for operation at the AGS. Both experiments require slow extracted beam, but with an added requirement that those beams be bunched. Bunched beam slow extraction techniques have been developed for both experiments and initial tests have been performed. In this report we describe the beam requirements for the two experiments, and present results of detailed simulations and initial beam tests.

  19. AGS-2000: Experiments for the 21. Century. Proceedings of the workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, May 13--17, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Littenberg, L.; Sandweiss, J.

    1996-10-01

    The AGS has a vital and interesting potential for new research. The reasons for this are a fortunate concomitance of the energy chosen for the AGS and the steady stream of technological advances which have both increased the intensity and flexibility of the AGS beams, and the capability of detectors to use these new beam parameters. The physics potentials of the future AGS program can be roughly divided into three broad areas. (1) fundamental elementary particle studies (based on rare kaon decays, rare muon processes and searches for new particles); (2) non-perturbative QCD; and (3) heavy ion physics. The overriding considerations for the operation of the AGS in the next decade must, of course, be the interest and potential of the scientific program. However, once that has been established, there are other aspects of the AGS program which deserve mention. Although experiments at the AGS are of increasing sophistication, they are smaller, less expensive, and more quickly executed than experiments at newer, larger facilities. Finally, the authors note that since the AGS must be maintained as a viable accelerator to serve as an injector to RHIC, the cost of an AGS fixed target experiment need be only the incremental cost of the experiment itself along with some modest additional operating costs. This means that AGS fixed target experiments are substantially cheaper than they would have been before the RHIC era. The remainder of this document contains brief summaries of the experiments considered by the working groups in the AGS-2000 Workshop. These summaries expand on points discussed here.

  20. Peculiar and rapid photocatalytic degradation of tetrabromodiphenyl ethers over Ag/TiO2 induced by interaction between silver nanoparticles and bromine atoms in the target.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ming; Wang, Nan; Zhu, Lihua; Tang, Heqing

    2016-05-01

    As a typical moderately-brominated diphenylethers, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE47) is hardly debrominated by a conventional TiO2-mediated photocatalysis. However, its reductive debromination was rapid achieved over silver nanoparticle-loaded TiO2 (Ag/TiO2) in UV-irradiated anoxic acetonitrile-water within 13 min. An "Ag-promoted electron transfer and C-Br cleavage" concept was proposed based on experimental results and density functional theory calculations. Ag(0) exerted affinity interaction with bromine atoms, and the storing of electrons on Ag(0) increased the binding interaction, which elongated the C-Br bond of BDE47 and facilitated its cleavage. The initiating of the BDE47 debromination on Ag(0) required an induction period to enrich a critical amount of electrons, leading to a stronger driving force for both injecting electron to BDE47 and stretching the C-Br bond. Stronger photo-excitation, higher polar solvent, and a moderate Ag(0) load strengthened the interfacial electron transfer over Ag/TiO2, and thereby shortening the induction time and accelerating the BDE47 degradation.

  1. Impact parameter dependence of K+/-, p, pbar, d and dbar production in fixed-target Pb + Pb collisions at 158 GeV/nucleonImpact parameter dependence of K+/-, p, pbar, d and dbar production in fixed-target Pb + Pb collisions at 158 GeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NA52 Collaboration; Ambrosini, G.; Arsenescu, R.; Baglin, C.; Beringer, J.; Borer, K.; Bussière, A.; Elsener, K.; Gorodetzky, Ph; Guillaud, J. P.; Hess, P.; Kabana, S.; Klingenberg, R.; Lindén, T.; Lohmann, K. D.; Mommsen, R.; Moser, U.; Pretzl, K.; Schacher, J.; Stoffel, F.; Tuominiemi, J.; Weber, M.

    1999-12-01

    Nuclear matter is expected to undergo a phase transition to quark matter in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions, possibly showing up as a discontinuity in the impact parameter dependence of relevant observables. Following this expectation, we have investigated the impact parameter dependence of the invariant yields of K+/-, p, d, pbar and dbar in the range ~ 2 - 12 fm in fixed-target Pb+Pb collisions at 158 GeV/nucleon incident energy at the CERN SPS. The particles have been measured near zero transverse momentum and in the rapidity range y = 3.1 - 4.4. In addition, the centrality dependence of the baryon chemical potential, the effective temperature and the size of the particle emitting source at freeze-out were studied. No dramatic change in the distribution of any of these variables is observed as a function of the impact parameter. The same is found for the particle yields, with the exception of the yield of charged kaons per number of nucleons participating in the collision (Np), where there is an indication of a threshold behaviour at Np~80.

  2. Simulation study of 3-5 keV x-ray conversion efficiency from Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, G. E.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Patel, M. V.; Scott, H. A.; Marinak, M. M.

    2015-05-01

    Tailored, high-flux, multi-keV x-ray sources are desirable for studying x-ray interactions with matter for various civilian, space and military applications. For this study, we focus on designing an efficient laser-driven non-local thermodynamic equilibrium 3-5 keV x-ray source from photon-energy-matched Ar K-shell and Ag L-shell targets at sub-critical densities (˜nc/10) to ensure supersonic, volumetric laser heating with minimal losses to kinetic energy, thermal x rays and laser-plasma instabilities. Using Hydra, a multi-dimensional, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian, radiation-hydrodynamics code, we performed a parameter study by varying initial target density and laser parameters for each material using conditions readily achievable on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. We employ a model, benchmarked against Kr data collected on the NIF, that uses flux-limited Lee-More thermal conductivity and multi-group implicit Monte-Carlo photonics with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, detailed super-configuration accounting opacities from Cretin, an atomic-kinetics code. While the highest power laser configurations produced the largest x-ray yields, we report that the peak simulated laser to 3-5 keV x-ray conversion efficiencies of 17.7% and 36.4% for Ar and Ag, respectively, occurred at lower powers between ˜100-150 TW. For identical initial target densities and laser illumination, the Ag L-shell is observed to have ≳10× higher emissivity per ion per deposited laser energy than the Ar K-shell. Although such low-density Ag targets have not yet been demonstrated, simulations of targets fabricated using atomic layer deposition of Ag on silica aerogels (˜20% by atomic fraction) suggest similar performance to atomically pure metal foams and that either fabrication technique may be worth pursuing for an efficient 3-5 keV x-ray source on NIF.

  3. Simulation study of 3–5 keV x-ray conversion efficiency from Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, G. E. Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Patel, M. V.; Scott, H. A.; Marinak, M. M.

    2015-05-15

    Tailored, high-flux, multi-keV x-ray sources are desirable for studying x-ray interactions with matter for various civilian, space and military applications. For this study, we focus on designing an efficient laser-driven non-local thermodynamic equilibrium 3–5 keV x-ray source from photon-energy-matched Ar K-shell and Ag L-shell targets at sub-critical densities (∼n{sub c}/10) to ensure supersonic, volumetric laser heating with minimal losses to kinetic energy, thermal x rays and laser-plasma instabilities. Using HYDRA, a multi-dimensional, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian, radiation-hydrodynamics code, we performed a parameter study by varying initial target density and laser parameters for each material using conditions readily achievable on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. We employ a model, benchmarked against Kr data collected on the NIF, that uses flux-limited Lee-More thermal conductivity and multi-group implicit Monte-Carlo photonics with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, detailed super-configuration accounting opacities from CRETIN, an atomic-kinetics code. While the highest power laser configurations produced the largest x-ray yields, we report that the peak simulated laser to 3–5 keV x-ray conversion efficiencies of 17.7% and 36.4% for Ar and Ag, respectively, occurred at lower powers between ∼100–150 TW. For identical initial target densities and laser illumination, the Ag L-shell is observed to have ≳10× higher emissivity per ion per deposited laser energy than the Ar K-shell. Although such low-density Ag targets have not yet been demonstrated, simulations of targets fabricated using atomic layer deposition of Ag on silica aerogels (∼20% by atomic fraction) suggest similar performance to atomically pure metal foams and that either fabrication technique may be worth pursuing for an efficient 3–5 keV x-ray source on NIF.

  4. Atomic-level observation of Ag-ion hopping motion in AgI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, W.; Komatsuda, S.; Mizuuchi, R.; Irioka, N.; Kawata, S.; Ohkubo, Y.

    2015-04-01

    Applicability of the 111mCd(→111Cd) and 111In(→111Cd) probes to the study of dynamics in polycrystalline silver iodide (AgI) was examined by means of the time-differential perturbed angular correlation technique. It was found that the 111mCd(→111Cd) probe occupies a unique site in γ-AgI and exhibits nuclear relaxation caused by dynamic perturbation arising from Ag + hopping motion in α-AgI; while the residential sites of 111In(→111Cd) vary, suggesting that 111In ions can not settle themselves in a fixed site in the AgI crystal structure. We here demonstrate that 111mCd(→111Cd) can be a potential nucleus to probe the Ag +-ion dynamic motion in α-AgI.

  5. Beam Transport of 4 GeV Protons from AGS to the Proton Interrogation Target of the Neutrino Line (Z_line) and Effect of the Air on the Transported Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas,N.; Ahrens, L.; Pile, P.; Thieberger, P.; Murray, M.M.

    2008-10-01

    As part of the preparation for the Proton Interrogation Experiment, we have calculated the beam optics for the transport of 4 GeV protons, from the AGS extraction point, to the 'Cross-Section Target Wheel 1' and to the 'Proton Interrogation Target'. In this technical note we present three possible beam-transports each corresponding to a particular Fast Extracted Beam W B setup of the AGS. In addition we present results on the effect of the atmospheric air, (which fills the drift space of the last 100 [m] of the transport line), on the size of the beam, at two locations along the drift space, one location at the middle of the drift space and the other at the end where the 'Proton Interrogation Target' is placed. All the beam transports mentioned above require the removal of the WD1 dipole magnet, which is the first magnet of the W-line, because it acts as a limiting beam aperture, and the magnet is not used in the beam transport. An alternative solution of a beam transport, which does not require the removal of the WD1 magnet, is also presented. In this solution, which models the transport line using the TURTLE computer code[7], the vertical beam sizes at the location of the WD1 magnet is minimized to allow 'lossless' beam transport at the location of the WD1 magnet. A similar solution, but using a MAD model of the line, is also presented.

  6. Alnus peptides modify membrane porosity and induce the release of nitrogen-rich metabolites from nitrogen-fixing Frankia

    PubMed Central

    Carro, Lorena; Pujic, Petar; Alloisio, Nicole; Fournier, Pascale; Boubakri, Hasna; Hay, Anne E; Poly, Franck; François, Philippe; Hocher, Valerie; Mergaert, Peter; Balmand, Severine; Rey, Marjolaine; Heddi, Abdelaziz; Normand, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Actinorhizal plant growth in pioneer ecosystems depends on the symbiosis with the nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium Frankia cells that are housed in special root organs called nodules. Nitrogen fixation occurs in differentiated Frankia cells known as vesicles. Vesicles lack a pathway for assimilating ammonia beyond the glutamine stage and are supposed to transfer reduced nitrogen to the plant host cells. However, a mechanism for the transfer of nitrogen-fixation products to the plant cells remains elusive. Here, new elements for this metabolic exchange are described. We show that Alnus glutinosa nodules express defensin-like peptides, and one of these, Ag5, was found to target Frankia vesicles. In vitro and in vivo analyses showed that Ag5 induces drastic physiological changes in Frankia, including an increased permeability of vesicle membranes. A significant release of nitrogen-containing metabolites, mainly glutamine and glutamate, was found in N2-fixing cultures treated with Ag5. This work demonstrates that the Ag5 peptide is central for Frankia physiology in nodules and uncovers a novel cellular function for this large and widespread defensin peptide family. PMID:25603394

  7. Alnus peptides modify membrane porosity and induce the release of nitrogen-rich metabolites from nitrogen-fixing Frankia.

    PubMed

    Carro, Lorena; Pujic, Petar; Alloisio, Nicole; Fournier, Pascale; Boubakri, Hasna; Hay, Anne E; Poly, Franck; François, Philippe; Hocher, Valerie; Mergaert, Peter; Balmand, Severine; Rey, Marjolaine; Heddi, Abdelaziz; Normand, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Actinorhizal plant growth in pioneer ecosystems depends on the symbiosis with the nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium Frankia cells that are housed in special root organs called nodules. Nitrogen fixation occurs in differentiated Frankia cells known as vesicles. Vesicles lack a pathway for assimilating ammonia beyond the glutamine stage and are supposed to transfer reduced nitrogen to the plant host cells. However, a mechanism for the transfer of nitrogen-fixation products to the plant cells remains elusive. Here, new elements for this metabolic exchange are described. We show that Alnus glutinosa nodules express defensin-like peptides, and one of these, Ag5, was found to target Frankia vesicles. In vitro and in vivo analyses showed that Ag5 induces drastic physiological changes in Frankia, including an increased permeability of vesicle membranes. A significant release of nitrogen-containing metabolites, mainly glutamine and glutamate, was found in N2-fixing cultures treated with Ag5. This work demonstrates that the Ag5 peptide is central for Frankia physiology in nodules and uncovers a novel cellular function for this large and widespread defensin peptide family. PMID:25603394

  8. Alnus peptides modify membrane porosity and induce the release of nitrogen-rich metabolites from nitrogen-fixing Frankia.

    PubMed

    Carro, Lorena; Pujic, Petar; Alloisio, Nicole; Fournier, Pascale; Boubakri, Hasna; Hay, Anne E; Poly, Franck; François, Philippe; Hocher, Valerie; Mergaert, Peter; Balmand, Severine; Rey, Marjolaine; Heddi, Abdelaziz; Normand, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Actinorhizal plant growth in pioneer ecosystems depends on the symbiosis with the nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium Frankia cells that are housed in special root organs called nodules. Nitrogen fixation occurs in differentiated Frankia cells known as vesicles. Vesicles lack a pathway for assimilating ammonia beyond the glutamine stage and are supposed to transfer reduced nitrogen to the plant host cells. However, a mechanism for the transfer of nitrogen-fixation products to the plant cells remains elusive. Here, new elements for this metabolic exchange are described. We show that Alnus glutinosa nodules express defensin-like peptides, and one of these, Ag5, was found to target Frankia vesicles. In vitro and in vivo analyses showed that Ag5 induces drastic physiological changes in Frankia, including an increased permeability of vesicle membranes. A significant release of nitrogen-containing metabolites, mainly glutamine and glutamate, was found in N2-fixing cultures treated with Ag5. This work demonstrates that the Ag5 peptide is central for Frankia physiology in nodules and uncovers a novel cellular function for this large and widespread defensin peptide family.

  9. Measurement of the J/ψ production cross section in 920 GeV/c fixed-target proton nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hera-B Collaboration; Abt, I.; Adams, M.; Agari, M.; Albrecht, H.; Aleksandrov, A.; Amaral, V.; Amorim, A.; Aplin, S. J.; Aushev, V.; Bagaturia, Y.; Balagura, V.; Bargiotti, M.; Barsukova, O.; Bastos, J.; Batista, J.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Belkov, A.; Belkov, Ar.; Belotelov, I.; Bertin, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Böcker, M.; Bogatyrev, A.; Bohm, G.; Bräuer, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Bruschi, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buran, T.; Carvalho, J.; Conde, P.; Cruse, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danilov, M.; de Castro, S.; Deppe, H.; Dong, X.; Dreis, H. B.; Egorytchev, V.; Ehret, K.; Eisele, F.; Emeliyanov, D.; Essenov, S.; Fabbri, L.; Faccioli, P.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Flammer, J.; Fominykh, B.; Funcke, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Gellrich, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Gläß, J.; Goloubkov, D.; Golubkov, Y.; Golutvin, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, I.; Gorišek, A.; Gouchtchine, O.; Goulart, D. C.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Grimaldi, F.; Guilitsky, Yu.; Hansen, J. D.; Hernández, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hohlmann, M.; Hott, T.; Hulsbergen, W.; Husemann, U.; Igonkina, O.; Ispiryan, M.; Jagla, T.; Jiang, C.; Kapitza, H.; Karabekyan, S.; Karpenko, N.; Keller, S.; Kessler, J.; Khasanov, F.; Kiryushin, Yu.; Kisel, I.; Klinkby, E.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kolanoski, H.; Korpar, S.; Krauss, C.; Kreuzer, P.; Križan, P.; Krücker, D.; Kupper, S.; Kvaratskheliia, T.; Lanyov, A.; Lau, K.; Lewendel, B.; Lohse, T.; Lomonosov, B.; Männer, R.; Mankel, R.; Masciocchi, S.; Massa, I.; Matchikhilian, I.; Medin, G.; Medinnis, M.; Mevius, M.; Michetti, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.; Mizuk, R.; Muresan, R.; Zur Nedden, M.; Negodaev, M.; Nörenberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Núñez Pardo de Vera, M. T.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Padilla, C.; Peralta, D.; Pernack, R.; Pestotnik, R.; Petersen, B. Aa.; Piccinini, M.; Pleier, M. A.; Poli, M.; Popov, V.; Pose, D.; Prystupa, S.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Pyrlik, J.; Reeves, K.; Reßing, D.; Rick, H.; Riu, I.; Robmann, P.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rybnikov, V.; Sánchez, F.; Sbrizzi, A.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiner, A.; Schröder, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Schwenninger, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sciacca, F.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Shuvalov, S.; Silva, L.; Sözüer, L.; Solunin, S.; Somov, A.; Somov, S.; Spengler, J.; Spighi, R.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanovnik, A.; Starič, M.; Stegmann, C.; Subramania, H. S.; Symalla, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Tsakov, I.; Uwer, U.; van Eldik, C.; Vassiliev, Yu.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Vukotic, I.; Wahlberg, H.; Walenta, A. H.; Walter, M.; Wang, J. J.; Wegener, D.; Werthenbach, U.; Wolters, H.; Wurth, R.; Wurz, A.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zeuner, T.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Z.; Zimmermann, R.; Živko, T.; Zoccoli, A.

    2006-07-01

    The mid-rapidity (dσ/dy at y=0) and total (σ) production cross sections of Jψ mesons are measured in proton nucleus interactions. Data collected by the HERA-B experiment in interactions of 920 GeV/c protons with carbon, titanium and tungsten targets are used for this analysis. The Jψ mesons are reconstructed by their decay into lepton pairs. The total production cross section obtained is σpNJ/ψ=663±74±46 nb/nucleon. In addition, our result is compared with previous measurements.

  10. Measurement of the J / ψ production cross section in 920 GeV / c fixed-target proton-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Adams, M.; Agari, M.; Albrecht, H.; Aleksandrov, A.; Amaral, V.; Amorim, A.; Aplin, S. J.; Aushev, V.; Bagaturia, Y.; Balagura, V.; Bargiotti, M.; Barsukova, O.; Bastos, J.; Batista, J.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Belkov, A.; Belkov, Ar.; Belotelov, I.; Bertin, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Böcker, M.; Bogatyrev, A.; Bohm, G.; Bräuer, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Bruschi, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buran, T.; Carvalho, J.; Conde, P.; Cruse, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danilov, M.; De Castro, S.; Deppe, H.; Dong, X.; Dreis, H. B.; Egorytchev, V.; Ehret, K.; Eisele, F.; Emeliyanov, D.; Essenov, S.; Fabbri, L.; Faccioli, P.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Flammer, J.; Fominykh, B.; Funcke, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Gellrich, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Gläß, J.; Goloubkov, D.; Golubkov, Y.; Golutvin, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, I.; Gorišek, A.; Gouchtchine, O.; Goulart, D. C.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Grimaldi, F.; Guilitsky, Yu.; Hansen, J. D.; Hernández, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hohlmann, M.; Hott, T.; Hulsbergen, W.; Husemann, U.; Igonkina, O.; Ispiryan, M.; Jagla, T.; Jiang, C.; Kapitza, H.; Karabekyan, S.; Karpenko, N.; Keller, S.; Kessler, J.; Khasanov, F.; Kiryushin, Yu.; Kisel, I.; Klinkby, E.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kolanoski, H.; Korpar, S.; Krauss, C.; Kreuzer, P.; Križan, P.; Krücker, D.; Kupper, S.; Kvaratskheliia, T.; Lanyov, A.; Lau, K.; Lewendel, B.; Lohse, T.; Lomonosov, B.; Männer, R.; Mankel, R.; Masciocchi, S.; Massa, I.; Matchikhilian, I.; Medin, G.; Medinnis, M.; Mevius, M.; Michetti, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.; Mizuk, R.; Muresan, R.; zur Nedden, M.; Negodaev, M.; Nörenberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Núñez Pardo de Vera, M. T.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Padilla, C.; Peralta, D.; Pernack, R.; Pestotnik, R.; Petersen, B. AA.; Piccinini, M.; Pleier, M. A.; Poli, M.; Popov, V.; Pose, D.; Prystupa, S.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Pyrlik, J.; Reeves, K.; Reßing, D.; Rick, H.; Riu, I.; Robmann, P.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rybnikov, V.; Sánchez, F.; Sbrizzi, A.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiner, A.; Schröder, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Schwenninger, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sciacca, F.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Shuvalov, S.; Silva, L.; Sözüer, L.; Solunin, S.; Somov, A.; Somov, S.; Spengler, J.; Spighi, R.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanovnik, A.; Starič, M.; Stegmann, C.; Subramania, H. S.; Symalla, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Tsakov, I.; Uwer, U.; van Eldik, C.; Vassiliev, Yu.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Vukotic, I.; Wahlberg, H.; Walenta, A. H.; Walter, M.; Wang, J. J.; Wegener, D.; Werthenbach, U.; Wolters, H.; Wurth, R.; Wurz, A.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zeuner, T.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Z.; Zimmermann, R.; Živko, T.; Zoccoli, A.; HERA-B Collaboration

    2006-07-01

    The mid-rapidity (dσpN / dy at y = 0) and total (σpN) production cross sections of Jψ mesons are measured in proton-nucleus interactions. Data collected by the HERA-B experiment in interactions of 920 GeV / c protons with carbon, titanium and tungsten targets are used for this analysis. The Jψ mesons are reconstructed by their decay into lepton pairs. The total production cross section obtained is σpNJ / ψ = 663 ± 74 ± 46 nb /nucleon. In addition, our result is compared with previous measurements.

  11. AGS II

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Interest in rare K decays, neutrino oscillations and other fields have generated an increasing demand for running, and improved intensity and duty cycle, at the AGS. Current projects include acceleration of polarized protons and light ions (up to mass 32). Future plans are for a booster to increase intensity and allow heavy ions (up to mass 200), and a stretcher to give 100% duty cycle. A later upgrade could yield an average current of 32 ..mu.. amps. 6 figures, 2 tables.

  12. An electron fixed target experiment to search for a new vector boson A' decaying to e+e-

    SciTech Connect

    Rouven Essig; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2011-02-02

    We describe an experiment to search for a new vector boson A' with weak coupling alpha' > 6 x 10–8 α to electrons (α' = e2/4π) in the mass range 65 MeV < mA' < 550 MeV. New vector bosons with such small couplings arise naturally from a small kinetic mixing of the "dark photon" A' with the photon -- one of the very few ways in which new forces can couple to the Standard Model -- and have received considerable attention as an explanation of various dark matter related anomalies. A' bosons are produced by radiation off an electron beam, and could appear as narrow resonances with small production cross-section in the trident e+e- spectrum. We summarize the experimental approach described in a proposal submitted to Jefferson Laboratory's PAC35, PR-10-009. This experiment, the A' Experiment (APEX), uses the electron beam of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Laboratory (CEBAF) at energies of ~1-4 GeV incident on 0.5-10% radiation length Tungsten wire mesh targets, and measures the resulting e+e- pairs to search for the A' using the High Resolution Spectrometer and the septum magnet in Hall A. With a ~1 month run, APEX will achieve very good sensitivity because the statistics of e+e- pairs will be ~10,000 times larger in the explored mass range than any previous search for the A' boson. These statistics and the excellent mass resolution of the spectrometers allow sensitivity to α'/α one to three orders of magnitude below current limits, in a region of parameter space of great theoretical and phenomenological interest. Similar experiments could also be performed at other facilities, such as the Mainz Microtron.

  13. A new fluorescent based screening system for high throughput screening of drugs targeting HBV-core and HBsAg interaction.

    PubMed

    Suresh, V; Krishnakumar, K A; Asha, V V

    2015-03-01

    The existing screening systems for anti-hepatitis B virus (anti-HBV) drug discovery is time-consuming mainly due to the laborious detection system it is using. A new fluorescence based screening system for high throughput anti-HBV drug discovery was created by tagging hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) with monomeric red fluorescent protein and hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein with enhanced green fluorescent protein. The two constructs were co-transfected on to Hep3B cells and the transfection was stabilized by fluorescent activated cell sorter (FACS). The fusion proteins expressed through the secretory protein pathway as evidenced by localization with ER-Tracker and tubulin tracker. The new system has given analogues results like that of conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Hence it can be of very high potential for large scale drug screening systems.

  14. Simulation study of optimizing the 3-5 keV x-ray emission from pure Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, G. E.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; Patel, M. V.; Scott, H. A.; Marinak, M.; Fisher, J. H.; Davis, J. F.

    2014-10-01

    High-flux x-ray sources are desirable for testing the radiation hardness of materials used in various civilian, space and military applications. For this study, there is an interest to design a source with primarily mid-energy (~ 3 keV) but limited soft (< 1 keV) x-ray contributions; we focus on optimizing the 3--5 keV non-LTE emission from targets consisting of pure Ar (K-shell) or Ag (L-shell) at sub-critical densities (~nc / 10) to ensure supersonic, volumetric laser heating with minimal losses to kinetic energy and thermal x rays. However, K and L-shell sources are expected to optimize at different temperatures and densities and it is a priori unclear under what target and laser conditions this will occur. Using HYDRA, a multi-dimensional, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian, radiation-hydrodynamics code, we performed a simulation study by varying initial target density and laser parameters for each material as it would perform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We employ a model, benchmarked against Kr data collected on the NIF, that uses flux-limited Lee-More thermal conductivity and implicit Monte-Carlo photonics with non-LTE, detailed configuration accounting opacities from CRETIN. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Chitosan/DsiRNA nanoparticle targeting identifies AgCad1 cadherin in Anopheles gambiae larvae as an in vivo receptor of Cry11Ba toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Hua, Gang; Adang, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    The Cry11Ba protein of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan crystals has uniquely high toxicity against a spectrum of mosquito species. The high potency of Cry11Ba against Anopheles gambiae is caused by recognition of multiple midgut proteins including glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored alkaline phosphatase AgALP1, aminopeptidase AgAPN2, α-amylase AgAmy1 and α-glucosidase Agm3 that bind Cry11Ba with high affinity and function as putative receptors. The cadherin AgCad2 in An. gambiae larvae also binds Cry11Ba with high affinity (Kd = 12 nM) and is considered a putative receptor, while cadherin AgCad1 bound Cry11Ba with low affinity (Kd = 766 nM), a property not supportive for a Cry11Ba receptor role. Here, we show the in vivo involvement of AgCad1 in Cry11Ba toxicity in An. gambiae larvae using chitosan/DsiRNA nanoparticles to inhibit AgCad expression in larvae. Cry11Ba was significantly less toxic to AgCad1-silenced larvae than to control larvae. Because AgCad1 was co-suppressed by AgCad2 DsRNAi, the involvement of AgCad2 in Cry11Ba toxicity could not be ascertained. The ratio of AgCad1:AgCad2 transcript level is 36:1 for gut tissue in 4th instar larvae. Silencing AgCad expression had no effect on transcript levels of other binding receptors of Cry11Ba. We conclude that AgCad1 and possibly AgCad2 in An. gambiae larvae are functional receptors of Cry11Ba toxin in vivo. PMID:25758367

  16. Laser assisted magnetic recording properties using SiAg near-field super-resolution structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xinbing; Wei, Jingsong; Gan, Fuxi

    2008-12-01

    Laser assisted magnetic recording properties were obtained by SiAg nonmagnetic mask layer combined near-field coupled super-resolution technique. The film structure was "Glass/SiN(30nm)/SiAg(20nm)/SiN(20nm)/TbFeCo(50nm)/SiN(10nm)". SiN and TbFeCo films were prepared by Radio frequency (RF) and Direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering respectively. The SiAg nonmagnetic mask layer was deposited by co-sputtering from a composite target. In the process of sputtering, the substrate negative DC bias voltage was kept at about 100V. Magnetic properties were obtained by vibrating sample magnetometer(VSM) and the magneto optical Kerr measurement. The magnetic recording was conducted by a home-made laser-assisted optic-magnetic hybrid recording setup, whose laser wavelength is 406.7nm and numerical aperture of converging lens is 0.80, respectively. The optical spot size is about 600nm. In the course of recording, the laser pulse was fixed at 100ns, and the magnetic field intensity was 300 Oe. The magnetic domains with a size of about 100nm were obtained, which is about 1/6 of the optical spot size. The analysis indicates that the SiAg nonmagnetic mask layer played a key role in reducing the magnetic domain size.

  17. Preparation, characterization, and photocatalytic activity of porous AgBr@Ag and AgBrI@Ag plasmonic photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Tian, Baozhu; Zhang, Jinlong; Xiong, Tianqing; Wang, Tingting

    2014-02-01

    Porous AgBr@Ag and AgBrI@Ag plasmonic photocatalysts were synthesized by a multistep route, including a dealloying method to prepare porous Ag, a transformation from Ag to AgBr and AgBrI, and a photo-reduction process to form Ag nanoparticles on the surface of AgBr and AgBrI. It was found that the porous structure kept unchanged during Ag was transferred into AgBr, AgBrI, AgBr@Ag, and AgBrI@Ag. Both porous AgBr@Ag and porous AgBrI@Ag showed much higher visible-light photocatalytic activity than cubic AgBr@Ag for the degradation of methyl orange, which is because the interconnected pore channels not only provide more reactive sites but also favor the transportation of photo-generated electrons and holes. For AgBrI@Ag, AgBrI solid solution formed at the interface of AgBr and AgI, and the phase junction can effectively separate the photo-generated electrons and holes, favorable to the improvement of photocatalytic activity. The optimal I content for obtaining the highest activity is ∼10 at.%.

  18. Cytotoxicity and biodistribution studies of luminescent Au(i) and Ag(i) N-heterocyclic carbenes. Searching for new biological targets.

    PubMed

    Visbal, Renso; Fernández-Moreira, Vanesa; Marzo, Isabel; Laguna, Antonio; Gimeno, M Concepción

    2016-10-14

    A range of fluorescent and biologically compatible gold(i)-N-heterocyclic carbenes bearing acridine as a wingtip group and either a 2-mercaptopyridine or a tetra-O-acetyl-1-thio-β-d-glucopyranoside as an ancillary ligand has been synthesised. Their luminescence, cytotoxicity and biodistribution have been investigated together with those of analogous gold(i) and silver(i) chloride- and bis-NHC complexes. All complexes displayed emissions based on IL transitions centred on the acridine moiety. The cytotoxic activity measured in lung, A549, and pancreatic, MiaPaca2, carcinoma cell lines revealed a general cytotoxicity pattern (thiolate > biscarbene > chloride derivatives) and flow cytometry assays pointed towards apoptosis as the cell death mechanism. Moreover, fluorescence cell microscopy disclosed an unusual biodistribution behavior, being mainly localised in lysosomes and to a lesser extent in the nucleus. Preliminary DNA interaction experiments suggested the metal fragment and not the acridine moiety as responsible for such biodistribution, which widen the scope for new biological targets.

  19. Inhibition of Dengue Virus Infections in Cell Cultures and in AG129 Mice by a Small Interfering RNA Targeting a Highly Conserved Sequence ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stein, David A.; Perry, Stuart T.; Buck, Michael D.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Fischer, Matthew A.; Poore, Elizabeth; Smith, Jessica L.; Lancaster, Alissa M.; Hirsch, Alec J.; Slifka, Mark K.; Nelson, Jay A.; Shresta, Sujan; Früh, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The dengue viruses (DENVs) exist as numerous genetic strains that are grouped into four antigenically distinct serotypes. DENV strains from each serotype can cause severe disease and threaten public health in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. No licensed antiviral agent to treat DENV infections is currently available, and there is an acute need for the development of novel therapeutics. We found that a synthetic small interfering RNA (siRNA) (DC-3) targeting the highly conserved 5′ cyclization sequence (5′CS) region of the DENV genome reduced, by more than 100-fold, the titers of representative strains from each DENV serotype in vitro. To determine if DC-3 siRNA could inhibit DENV in vivo, an “in vivo-ready” version of DC-3 was synthesized and tested against DENV-2 by using a mouse model of antibody-dependent enhancement of infection (ADE)-induced disease. Compared with the rapid weight loss and 5-day average survival time of the control groups, mice receiving the DC-3 siRNA had an average survival time of 15 days and showed little weight loss for approximately 12 days. DC-3-treated mice also contained significantly less virus than control groups in several tissues at various time points postinfection. These results suggest that exogenously introduced siRNA combined with the endogenous RNA interference processing machinery has the capacity to prevent severe dengue disease. Overall, the data indicate that DC-3 siRNA represents a useful research reagent and has potential as a novel approach to therapeutic intervention against the genetically diverse dengue viruses. PMID:21795337

  20. [Advantages of fixed combinations].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2008-07-01

    Fixed combinations are indicated in the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension when monotherapy does not sufficiently reduce IOP. Fixed combinations show better efficacy than the instillation of each separate component and are at least equivalent to the administration of both components in a separate association. They simplify treatment, increase compliance and quality of life, and decrease exposure to preservatives. Although they are less aggressive for patients when a new drug needs to be added, the use of fixed combinations should not decrease the follow-up. PMID:18957922

  1. Fixed Exit Monochromator with fixed Rotation Axis

    SciTech Connect

    Caliebe, W.A.; Cheung, S.; Lenhard, A.; Siddons, D.P.

    2004-05-12

    A new simple design for a fixed-exit monochromator has been developed. The set-up uses a linear slide to couple the rotation of the crystals to a translation of the second one to compensate for the 2hcos{theta} dependence of the beam-offset in a double crystal monochromator. This set-up requires just one motor for the rotation of the monochromator, and three piezo-actuators to tune the second crystal.The monochromator has been tested for Bragg-angles between 7 deg. and 70 deg.

  2. AGS experiments - 1994, 1995, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the following information on the Brookhaven AGS Accelerator complex: FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; FY 1997 AGS schedule (working copy); AGS beams 1997; AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program (in progress); a listing of experiments by number; two-phage summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and listing of AGS experimenters begins here.

  3. Why to Treat Subjects as Fixed Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, James S.; Estes, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    Adelman, Marquis, Sabatos-DeVito, and Estes (2013) collected word naming latencies from 4 participants who read 2,820 words 50 times each. Their recommendation and practice was that R2 targets set for models should take into account subject idiosyncrasies as replicable patterns, equivalent to a subjects-as-fixed-effects assumption. In light of an…

  4. Fixing Dataset Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Three current search engines are queried for ozone data at the GES DISC. The results range from sub-optimal to counter-intuitive. We propose a method to fix dataset search by implementing a robust relevancy ranking scheme. The relevancy ranking scheme is based on several heuristics culled from more than 20 years of helping users select datasets.

  5. Fixed mount wavefront sensor

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.

    2000-01-01

    A rigid mount and method of mounting for a wavefront sensor. A wavefront dissector, such as a lenslet array, is rigidly mounted at a fixed distance relative to an imager, such as a CCD camera, without need for a relay imaging lens therebetween.

  6. LOTUS NUV-Optical Spectroscopy of AG Peg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, I. A.; Jermak, H. E.; Marchant, J. M.; Bates, S. D.

    2015-07-01

    We were alerted by Atel#7741to the ongoing outburst of the symbiotic nova AG Peg. This formed an ideal first science target for the new LOTUS NUV-optical spectrograph being commissioned at the Liverpool Telescope on La Palma.

  7. Comparison of targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) and real-time PCR in the detection of EGFR, KRAS, and BRAF mutations on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor material of non-small cell lung carcinoma-superiority of NGS.

    PubMed

    Tuononen, Katja; Mäki-Nevala, Satu; Sarhadi, Virinder Kaur; Wirtanen, Aino; Rönty, Mikko; Salmenkivi, Kaisa; Andrews, Jenny M; Telaranta-Keerie, Aino I; Hannula, Sari; Lagström, Sonja; Ellonen, Pekka; Knuuttila, Aija; Knuutila, Sakari

    2013-05-01

    The development of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatments has made it important to test cancer patients for clinically significant gene mutations that influence the benefit of treatment. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) provides a promising method for diagnostic purposes by enabling the simultaneous detection of multiple mutations in various genes in a single test. The aim of our study was to screen EGFR, KRAS, and BRAF mutations by targeted NGS and commonly used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods to evaluate the feasibility of targeted NGS for the detection of the mutations. Furthermore, we aimed to identify potential novel mutations by targeted NGS. We analyzed formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue specimens from 81 non-small cell lung carcinoma patients. We observed a significant concordance (from 96.3 to 100%) of the EGFR, KRAS, and BRAF mutation detection results between targeted NGS and real-time PCR. Moreover, targeted NGS revealed seven nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations and one insertion-deletion variation in EGFR not detectable by the real-time PCR methods. The potential clinical significance of these variants requires elucidation in future studies. Our results support the use of targeted NGS in the screening of EGFR, KRAS, and BRAF mutations in FFPE tissue material.

  8. Symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and Medicago truncatula is not significantly affected by silver and silver sulfide nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Judy, Jonathan D; Kirby, Jason K; McLaughlin, Mike J; McNear, David; Bertsch, Paul M

    2016-07-01

    Silver (Ag) engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are being released into waste streams and are being discharged, largely as Ag2S aged-ENMs (a-ENMs), into agroecosystems receiving biosolids amendments. Recent research has demonstrated that biosolids containing an environmentally relevant mixture of ZnO, TiO2, and Ag ENMs and their transformation products, including Ag2S a-ENMs, disrupted the symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and legumes. However, this study was unable to unequivocally determine which ENM or combination of ENMs and a-ENMs was responsible for the observed inhibition. Here, we examined further the effects of polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP) coated pristine Ag ENMs (PVP-Ag), Ag2S a-ENMs, and soluble Ag (as AgSO4) at 1, 10, and 100 mg Ag kg(-1) on the symbiosis between the legume Medicago truncatula and the nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Sinorhizobium melliloti in biosolids-amended soil. Nodulation frequency, nodule function, glutathione reductase production, and biomass were not significantly affected by any of the Ag treatments, even at 100 mg kg(-1), a concentration analogous to a worst-case scenario resulting from long-term, repeated biosolids amendments. Our results provide additional evidence that the disruption of the symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and legumes in response to a mixture of ENMs in biosolids-amended soil reported previously may not be attributable to Ag ENMs or their transformation end-products. We anticipate these findings will provide clarity to regulators and industry regarding potential unintended consequences to terrestrial ecosystems resulting from of the use of Ag ENMs in consumer products. PMID:27149150

  9. Strong coupling between Rhodamine 6G and localized surface plasmon resonance of immobile Ag nanoclusters fabricated by direct current sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yingcui; Blinn, Kevin; Li, Xiaxi; Weng, Guojun; Liu, Meilin

    2013-04-01

    We made clean silver nano-clusters (AgNCs) on glass substrates by DC magnetron sputtering of a high purity Ag target in a high vacuum chamber. The AgNCs film shows strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) due to the coupling among Ag nanoparticles in the AgNCs and the coupling between AgNCs. The LSPR indicates strong coupling with Rhodamine 6G (R6G) adsorbed on the AgNC surface, which enhances the R6G absorption intensity and broadens the absorption wavelength range. This result promotes plasmonic nanoparticles to be better used in solar cells.

  10. AgRISTARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    An introduction to the overall AgRISTARS program, a general statement on progress, and separate summaries of the activities of each project, with emphasis on the technical highlights are presented. Organizational and management information on AgRISTARS is included in the appendices, as is a complete bibliography of publication and reports.

  11. AGS experiments: 1993 - 1994 - 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1996-04-01

    This report contains: FY 1995 AGS Schedule as Run; FY 1996-97 AGE Schedule (working copy); AGS Beams 1995; AGS Experimental Area FY 1993 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1994 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1995 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1996 Physics Program (In progress); A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and Listing of AGS experimenters begins here. This is the twelfth edition.

  12. Impedance studies of the cell Ag/AgI/Ag beta alumina/AgI/Ag. Technical report No. 15, August 1987-August 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Breiter, M.W.; Drstak, H.; Maly-Schreiber, M.

    1988-07-01

    The construction of the cell Ag/AgI/Ag beta alumina/AgI/Ag is described. The impedance of this cell was measured between .001 and 10000 Hz at temperatures between 20 and 550 C. At temperatures below 100 C the cell impedance is determined to a large extent by the bulk resistance of the AgI layer and to a smaller extent by the impedance of the interface Ag/Agi. At temperatures between 160 and 350 C the impedance is controlled by the bulk resistance of the Ag beta alumina and an impedance due to contact problems between Ag and AgI. The bulk resistance of the beta' alumina becomes predominant between 350 and 550 C. A hindrance due to the transfer of silver ions from AgI to Ag beta' alumina was not observable in the whole temperature range.

  13. Fixed sagittal plane imbalance.

    PubMed

    Savage, Jason W; Patel, Alpesh A

    2014-12-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To discuss the evaluation and management of fixed sagittal plane imbalance. Methods A comprehensive literature review was performed on the preoperative evaluation of patients with sagittal plane malalignment, as well as the surgical strategies to address sagittal plane deformity. Results Sagittal plane imbalance is often caused by de novo scoliosis or iatrogenic flat back deformity. Understanding the etiology and magnitude of sagittal malalignment is crucial in realignment planning. Objective parameters have been developed to guide surgeons in determining how much correction is needed to achieve favorable outcomes. Currently, the goals of surgery are to restore a sagittal vertical axis < 5 cm, pelvic tilt < 20 degrees, and lumbar lordosis equal to pelvic incidence ± 9 degrees. Conclusion Sagittal plane malalignment is an increasingly recognized cause of pain and disability. Treatment of sagittal plane imbalance varies according to the etiology, location, and severity of the deformity. Fixed sagittal malalignment often requires complex reconstructive procedures that include osteotomy correction. Reestablishing harmonious spinopelvic alignment is associated with significant improvement in health-related quality-of-life outcome measures and patient satisfaction.

  14. Fixed and Sunk Costs Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, X. Henry; Yang, Bill Z.

    2001-01-01

    Attempts to clarify the concepts of, and the link between, fixed costs and sunk costs. Argues that the root of confusion is the inconsistency in defining the term fixed costs. Consistently defines fixed and sunk costs, and describes how instructors must teach under these definitions. (RLH)

  15. Transparent Conductive AGZO/Ag/AGZO Multilayers on PET Substrate by Roll-to-Roll Sputtering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehoon; Park, Kwangwon; Kim, Jongsu

    2016-02-01

    Indium-free Al and Ga-codoped ZnO (AGZO) multilayer films with nanoscale Ag interlayer were deposited by dual target roll-to-roll RF for AGZO and DC sputtering systems for Ag at room temperature for a large scale. The thicknesses of AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer were optimized by changing the roll speed: 0.15/1.1/0.15 m/min for AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayers, respectively. The optimum thicknesses of AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer are 9.21, 8.32 and 8.04 nm, respectively. Optimized AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer films showed an excellent transparency (84% at 550 nm) and a low sheet resistance (9.2 omega/sq.) on PET substrates for opto-electronic applications. The effects of nanoscale Ag interlayer on optical and electrical properties of AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer films were discussed.

  16. Transparent Conductive AGZO/Ag/AGZO Multilayers on PET Substrate by Roll-to-Roll Sputtering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehoon; Park, Kwangwon; Kim, Jongsu

    2016-02-01

    Indium-free Al and Ga-codoped ZnO (AGZO) multilayer films with nanoscale Ag interlayer were deposited by dual target roll-to-roll RF for AGZO and DC sputtering systems for Ag at room temperature for a large scale. The thicknesses of AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer were optimized by changing the roll speed: 0.15/1.1/0.15 m/min for AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayers, respectively. The optimum thicknesses of AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer are 9.21, 8.32 and 8.04 nm, respectively. Optimized AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer films showed an excellent transparency (84% at 550 nm) and a low sheet resistance (9.2 omega/sq.) on PET substrates for opto-electronic applications. The effects of nanoscale Ag interlayer on optical and electrical properties of AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer films were discussed. PMID:27433648

  17. Apparatus for fixing latency

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Moon, Justin; Koehler, Roger O.

    2009-09-08

    An apparatus for fixing computational latency within a deterministic region on a network comprises a network interface modem, a high priority module and at least one deterministic peripheral device. The network interface modem is in communication with the network. The high priority module is in communication with the network interface modem. The at least one deterministic peripheral device is connected to the high priority module. The high priority module comprises a packet assembler/disassembler, and hardware for performing at least one operation. Also disclosed is an apparatus for executing at least one instruction on a downhole device within a deterministic region, the apparatus comprising a control device, a downhole network, and a downhole device. The control device is near the surface of a downhole tool string. The downhole network is integrated into the tool string. The downhole device is in communication with the downhole network.

  18. [Fixed-dose combination].

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yoshio

    2015-03-01

    Many patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus(T2DM) do not achieve satisfactory glycemic control by monotherapy alone, and often require multiple oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs). Combining OHAs with complementary mechanisms of action is fundamental to the management of T2DM. Fixed-dose combination therapy(FDC) offers a method of simplifying complex regimens. Efficacy and tolerability appear to be similar between FDC and treatment with individual agents. In addition, FDC can enhance adherence and improved adherence may result in improved glycemic control. Four FDC agents are available in Japan: pioglitazone-glimepiride, pioglitazone-metformin, pioglitazone-alogliptin, and voglibose-mitiglinide. In this review, the advantages and disadvantages of these four combinations are identified and discussed. PMID:25812374

  19. Fixed Access Network Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaglia, Bruno; Young, Gavin; Marchetta, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Fixed broadband network deployments are moving inexorably to the use of Next Generation Access (NGA) technologies and architectures. These NGA deployments involve building fiber infrastructure increasingly closer to the customer in order to increase the proportion of fiber on the customer's access connection (Fibre-To-The-Home/Building/Door/Cabinet… i.e. FTTx). This increases the speed of services that can be sold and will be increasingly required to meet the demands of new generations of video services as we evolve from HDTV to "Ultra-HD TV" with 4k and 8k lines of video resolution. However, building fiber access networks is a costly endeavor. It requires significant capital in order to cover any significant geographic coverage. Hence many companies are forming partnerships and joint-ventures in order to share the NGA network construction costs. One form of such a partnership involves two companies agreeing to each build to cover a certain geographic area and then "cross-selling" NGA products to each other in order to access customers within their partner's footprint (NGA coverage area). This is tantamount to a bi-lateral wholesale partnership. The concept of Fixed Access Network Sharing (FANS) is to address the possibility of sharing infrastructure with a high degree of flexibility for all network operators involved. By providing greater configuration control over the NGA network infrastructure, the service provider has a greater ability to define the network and hence to define their product capabilities at the active layer. This gives the service provider partners greater product development autonomy plus the ability to differentiate from each other at the active network layer.

  20. SYNTHESIZER CONTROLLED BEAM TRANSFER FROM THE AGS TO RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DELONG,J.; BRENNAN,J.M.; FISCHER,W.; HAYES,T.; SMITH,K.; VALENTINO,S.

    2001-06-18

    To ensure minimal losses and to preserve longitudinal emittance, beam is transferred from the AGS to the RHIC bunch to bucket. This requires precision frequency and phase control for synchronization and kicker timing. The required precision is realized with a set of Direct Digital Synthesizers. Each synthesizer can be frequency and phase modulated to align the AGS bunch to the target bucket in the RHIC phase.

  1. Targeting of a Fixed Bacterial Immunogen to Fc Receptors Reverses the Anti-Inflammatory Properties of the Gram-Negative Bacterium, Francisella tularensis, during the Early Stages of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Babadjanova, Zulfia; Wiedinger, Kari; Gosselin, Edmund J.; Bitsaktsis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells at the early stages of bacterial infection is important for host protection against the pathogen. Many intracellular bacteria, including Francisella tularensis, the agent of tularemia, utilize the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, to evade the host immune response. It is well established that IL-10 has the ability to inhibit robust antigen presentation by dendritic cells and macrophages, thus suppressing the generation of protective immunity. The pathogenesis of F. tularensis is not fully understood, and research has failed to develop an effective vaccine to this date. In the current study, we hypothesized that F. tularensis polarizes antigen presenting cells during the early stages of infection towards an anti-inflammatory status characterized by increased synthesis of IL-10 and decreased production of IL-12p70 and TNF-α in an IFN-ɣ-dependent fashion. In addition, F. tularensis drives an alternative activation of alveolar macrophages within the first 48 hours post-infection, thus allowing the bacterium to avoid protective immunity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that targeting inactivated F. tularensis (iFt) to Fcγ receptors (FcɣRs) via intranasal immunization with mAb-iFt complexes, a proven vaccine strategy in our laboratories, reverses the anti-inflammatory effects of the bacterium on macrophages by down-regulating production of IL-10. More specifically, we observed that targeting of iFt to FcγRs enhances the classical activation of macrophages not only within the respiratory mucosa, but also systemically, at the early stages of infection. These results provide important insight for further understanding the protective immune mechanisms generated when targeting immunogens to Fc receptors. PMID:26114641

  2. Why to treat subjects as fixed effects.

    PubMed

    Adelman, James S; Estes, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    Adelman, Marquis, Sabatos-DeVito, and Estes (2013) collected word naming latencies from 4 participants who read 2,820 words 50 times each. Their recommendation and practice was that R² targets set for models should take into account subject idiosyncrasies as replicable patterns, equivalent to a subjects-as-fixed-effects assumption. In light of an interaction involving subjects, they broke down the interaction into individual subject data. Courrieu and Rey's (2015) commentary argues that (a) single-subject data need not be more reliable than subject-average data, and (b) anyway, treating groups of subjects as random samples leads to valid conclusions about general mechanisms of reading. Point (a) was not part of Adelman et al.'s claim. In this reply, we examine the consequences of using the fixed-effect assumption. It (a) produces the correct target to check if by-items regression models contain all necessary variables, (b) more accurately constrains cognitive models, (c) more accurately reveals general mechanisms, and (d) can offer more powerful tests of effects. Even when individual differences are not the primary focus of a study, the fixed-effect analysis is often preferable to the random-effects analysis. PMID:26348203

  3. Finding novel pharmaceuticals in the systems biology era using multiple effective drug targets, phenotypic screening and knowledge of transporters: where drug discovery went wrong and how to fix it.

    PubMed

    Kell, Douglas B

    2013-12-01

    Despite the sequencing of the human genome, the rate of innovative and successful drug discovery in the pharmaceutical industry has continued to decrease. Leaving aside regulatory matters, the fundamental and interlinked intellectual issues proposed to be largely responsible for this are: (a) the move from 'function-first' to 'target-first' methods of screening and drug discovery; (b) the belief that successful drugs should and do interact solely with single, individual targets, despite natural evolution's selection for biochemical networks that are robust to individual parameter changes; (c) an over-reliance on the rule-of-5 to constrain biophysical and chemical properties of drug libraries; (d) the general abandoning of natural products that do not obey the rule-of-5; (e) an incorrect belief that drugs diffuse passively into (and presumably out of) cells across the bilayers portions of membranes, according to their lipophilicity; (f) a widespread failure to recognize the overwhelmingly important role of proteinaceous transporters, as well as their expression profiles, in determining drug distribution in and between different tissues and individual patients; and (g) the general failure to use engineering principles to model biology in parallel with performing 'wet' experiments, such that 'what if?' experiments can be performed in silico to assess the likely success of any strategy. These facts/ideas are illustrated with a reasonably extensive literature review. Success in turning round drug discovery consequently requires: (a) decent systems biology models of human biochemical networks; (b) the use of these (iteratively with experiments) to model how drugs need to interact with multiple targets to have substantive effects on the phenotype; (c) the adoption of polypharmacology and/or cocktails of drugs as a desirable goal in itself; (d) the incorporation of drug transporters into systems biology models, en route to full and multiscale systems biology models that

  4. Endocrine-specific NIR fluorophores for adrenal gland targeting.

    PubMed

    Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Levitz, Andrew; Park, Min Ho; Hyun, Hoon; Venugopal, Vivek; Park, GwangLi; El Fakhri, Georges; Henary, Maged; Gioux, Sylvain; Frangioni, John V; Choi, Hak Soo

    2016-08-11

    The adrenal glands (AGs) are relatively small yet require definitive identification during their resection, or more commonly their avoidance. To enable image-guided surgery involving the AGs, we have developed novel near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores that target the AGs after a single intravenous injection, which provided dual-NIR image-guided resection or avoidance of the AGs during both open and minimally-invasive surgery. PMID:27476533

  5. Cysteine-Ag Cluster Hydrogel Confirmed by Experimental and Numerical Studies.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanyan; Wang, Yaling; Zhao, Lina

    2015-10-01

    The native cysteine (Cys)-Ag3 cluster hydrogel is approved for the first time by both experimental and theoretical studies. From the detailed molecular structure and energy information, three factors are found to ensure the self-assembly of Cys and Ag3 , and result in the hydrogel. First, the Ag-S bonds make Cys and Ag3 form Cys-Ag3 -Cys monomer. Second, intermolecular hydrogen bonds between carboxyl groups of adjacent monomer push them self-assembled. Third, more monomer precisely self-assemble to produce the -[Cys-Ag3 -Cys]n multimer, e.g., a single molecular chain with the left-handed helix conformation, via a benign thermodynamic process. These multimers entangle together to form micro-network to trap water and produce hydorgel in situ. The hydrogen bonds of hydrogel are sensitive to thermal and proton stimuli, and the hydrogel presents lysosome targeting properties via fluorescent imaging with biocompatibility.

  6. Cysteine-Ag Cluster Hydrogel Confirmed by Experimental and Numerical Studies.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanyan; Wang, Yaling; Zhao, Lina

    2015-10-01

    The native cysteine (Cys)-Ag3 cluster hydrogel is approved for the first time by both experimental and theoretical studies. From the detailed molecular structure and energy information, three factors are found to ensure the self-assembly of Cys and Ag3 , and result in the hydrogel. First, the Ag-S bonds make Cys and Ag3 form Cys-Ag3 -Cys monomer. Second, intermolecular hydrogen bonds between carboxyl groups of adjacent monomer push them self-assembled. Third, more monomer precisely self-assemble to produce the -[Cys-Ag3 -Cys]n multimer, e.g., a single molecular chain with the left-handed helix conformation, via a benign thermodynamic process. These multimers entangle together to form micro-network to trap water and produce hydorgel in situ. The hydrogen bonds of hydrogel are sensitive to thermal and proton stimuli, and the hydrogel presents lysosome targeting properties via fluorescent imaging with biocompatibility. PMID:26248576

  7. Ag Division States Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Journal, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The discussion which took place during the American Vocational Association's (AVA) Agriculture Division meeting at the 1975 AVA Convention is summarized, and the statement of vo-ag education philosophy (including 13 key concepts), which was passed during the convention, is presented. (AJ)

  8. Fixed points of quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Litim, Daniel F

    2004-05-21

    Euclidean quantum gravity is studied with renormalization group methods. Analytical results for a nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point are found for arbitrary dimensions and gauge fixing parameters in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation. Implications for quantum gravity in four dimensions are discussed.

  9. Freeze-dried PVP-Ag+ precursors to novel AgBr/AgCl-Ag hybrid nanocrystals for visible-light-driven photodegradation of organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Deliang; Chen, Qianqian; Zhang, Wenjie; Ge, Lianfang; Shao, Gang; Fan, Bingbing; Lu, Hongxia; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Daoyuan; Shao, Guosheng

    2015-04-01

    AgBr/AgCl-Ag nanocrystals with various molar Br-to-Ag ratios (RBr/Ag = 0, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, 1) and different photoreduction times (0-20 min) were synthesized via stepwise liquid-solid reactions using the freeze-dried PVP-Ag+ hybrid as the Ag source, followed by a photoreduction reaction. The AgBr/AgCl-Ag7.5(1:2) nanocrystals obtained take on a spherical morphology with a particle-size range of 58 ± 15 nm. The photocatalytic performance of AgBr/AgCl-Ag nanocrystals was evaluated by photodegrading organic dyes, 4-chlorophenol and isopropanol under artificial visible light (λ ⩾ 420 nm, 100 mW cm-2). For the decomposition of rhodamine B, the AgBr/AgCl-Ag7.5(1:2) nanocrystals has a photodegradation rate of ∼0.87 min-1, ∼159 times higher than that (∼0.0054 min-1) of TiO2 (P25), whereas the AgCl-Ag and AgBr-Ag nanocrystals have photodegradation rates of 0.35 min-1 and 0.45 min-1, respectively. The efficient separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs in the ternary system consisting of AgBr, AgCl and Ag species plays a key role in the enhancement of photocatalytic performance.

  10. N-terminal processing of membrane-targeted MnSOD and formation of multiple active superoxide dismutase dimers in the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Prashanth S; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree K

    2013-10-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 expresses a 30 kDa manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) comprising a hydrophobic region (signal peptide + linker peptide) attached to a catalytic unit. Bioinformatics predicted cleavage of the signal peptide at (25)CQPQ by signal peptidase and of the linker peptide by an Arg-C-like protease at the Arg52/Arg59 residue. The three predicted forms of MnSOD were immunodetected in Anabaena, with the 30 kDa MnSOD found exclusively in the membrane and the shorter 27 and 24 kDa forms found both in the membrane and soluble fractions. The corresponding sodA gene was truncated for (a) the first eight residues, or, (b) the signal peptide, or (c) the entire hydrophobic region, or (d) the Arg52/Arg59 residues were modified to serine. Overexpression of these MnSOD variants in recombinant Anabaena strains revealed that (a) the 30 kDa membrane-targeted MnSOD was cleaved by membrane-localized signal peptidase either during or after its transport through the membrane to release the 27 kDa form, either in the cytosol or in the periplasmic/thylakoid lumen, (b) the 27 kDa form was further cleaved to the 24 kDa form by Arg-C-like protease, both in the cytosol and in the periplasmic/thylakoid lumen, (c) deletion of signal peptide localized the MnSOD forms in the cytosol, and (d) alteration of the signal/linker peptide cleavage sites interfered with MnSOD localization and processing. Homo/heterodimerization of the 24 and 27 kDa forms of MnSOD and the cytosolic iron-dependent SOD results in multiple SOD activities, from a single MnSOD gene (sodA), in different cellular compartments of Anabaena.

  11. AGS experiments -- 1995, 1996 and 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.; Presti, P.L.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains (1) FY 1995 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; (3) FY 1997 AGS schedule as run; (4) FY 1998--1999 AGS schedule (proposed); (5) AGS beams 1997; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program; (9) AGS experimental area FY 1998--1999 physics program (proposed); (10) a listing of experiments by number; (11) two-page summaries of each experiment, in order by number; and (12) listing of publications of AGS experiments.

  12. AGS experiments -- 1991, 1992, 1993. Tenth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains: (1) FY 1993 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1994--95 AGS schedule; (3) AGS experiments {ge} FY 1993 (as of 30 March 1994); (4) AGS beams 1993; (5) AGS experimental area FY 1991 physics program; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1992 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1993 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program (planned); (9) a listing of experiments by number; (10) two-page summaries of each experiment; (11) listing of publications of AGS experiments; and (12) listing of AGS experiments.

  13. Destabilization of Ag nanoislands on Ag(100) by adsorbed sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Mingmin; Russell, Selena M.; Liu, Da-Jiang; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2011-10-17

    Sulfur accelerates coarsening of Ag nanoislands on Ag(100) at 300 K, and this effect is enhanced with increasing sulfur coverage over a range spanning a few hundredths of a monolayer, to nearly 0.25 monolayers. We propose that acceleration of coarsening in this system is tied to the formation of AgS{sub 2} clusters primarily at step edges. These clusters can transport Ag more efficiently than can Ag adatoms (due to a lower diffusion barrier and comparable formation energy). The mobility of isolated sulfur on Ag(100) is very low so that formation of the complex is kinetically limited at low sulfur coverages, and thus enhancement is minimal. However, higher sulfur coverages force the population of sites adjacent to step edges, so that formation of the cluster is no longer limited by diffusion of sulfur across terraces. Sulfur exerts a much weaker effect on the rate of coarsening on Ag(100) than it does on Ag(111). This is consistent with theory, which shows that the difference between the total energy barrier for coarsening with and without sulfur is also much smaller on Ag(100) than on Ag(111).

  14. AGS preinjector improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, J.G.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, H.N.; Brodowski, J.; Gough, R.; Kponou, A.; Prelec, K.; Staples, J.; Tanabe, J.; Witkover, R.

    1987-01-01

    In 1984, a polarized H/sup -/ source was installed to permit the acceleration of polarized protons in the AGS, using a low current, 750 keV RFQ Linear Accelerator as the preinjector. This RFQ was designed by LANL and has proved to be quite satisfactory and reliable. In order to improve the reliability and simplify maintenance of the overall AGS operations, it has been decided to replace one of the two 750 keV Cockcroft-Waltons (C-W) with an RFQ. The design of a new high current RFQ has been carried out by LBL and is also being constructed there. This paper describes the preinjector improvement project, centered around that RFQ, which is underway at BNL.

  15. Preparation and antibacterial activities of Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites made by pomegranate (Punica granatum) rind extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Ren, Yan-yu; Wang, Tao; Wang, Chuang

    Nano-silver and its composite materials are widely used in medicine, food and other industries due to their strong conductivity, size effect and other special performances. So far, more microbial researches have been applied, but a plant method is rarely reported. In order to open up a new way to prepare AgNP composites, pomegranate peel extract was used in this work to reduce Ag+ to prepare Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites. UV-Vis was employed to detect and track the reduction of Ag+ and the forming process of AgNPs. The composition, structure and size of the crystal were analyzed by XRD and TEM. Results showed that, under mild conditions, pomegranate peel extract reacted with dilute AgNO3 solution to produce Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites. At pH = 8 and 10 mmol/L of AgNO3 concentration, the size of the achieved composites ranged between 15 and 35 nm with spherical shapes and good crystallinity. The bactericidal experiment indicated that the prepared Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticles had strong antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria and gram negative bacteria. FTIR analysis revealed that biological macromolecules with groups of sbnd NH2, sbnd OH, and others were distributed on the surface of the newly synthesized Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticles. This provided a useful clue to further study the AgNP biosynthesis mechanism.

  16. A Comparison Simulation of Fixed-fixed Type MEMS Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezazadeh, G.; Sadeghian, H.; Malekpour, E.

    2006-04-01

    In the present work pull-in voltage of fixed-fixed end type MEMS switches with variative electrostatic area has been calculated using a distributed model and applying a full nonlinear finite difference discretizing method. The governing nonlinear differential equation has been derived using of the variational principle for multi domain electromechanical coupled system. The numerical results of the beam with variative electrostatic area with the results of Coupled-Domain Finite Element method have been compared and very good agreement has been achieved.

  17. Bar coded retroreflective target

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, C.S.

    2000-01-25

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  18. Bar coded retroreflective target

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  19. Fabrication of Ag nanowire and Al-doped ZnO hybrid transparent electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Sslimsearom; Park, Yong Seo; Choi, Hyung Wook; Kim, Kyung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Among the materials used as transparent electrodes, silver nanowires (AgNWs) have attracted attention because of their high transmittance and excellent conductivity. However, AgNWs have shortcomings, including their poor adhesion, oxidation by atmospheric oxygen, and unstable characteristics at high temperature. To overcome these shortcomings, multi-layer thin films with an aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO)/AgNW/AZO structure were fabricated using facing targets sputtering. The samples heated to 350 °C exhibited stable electrical characteristics. In addition, the adhesion to the substrate was improved compared with AgNWs layer. The AZO/AgNW/AZO thin films with multilayer structure overcame the shortcomings of AgNWs, and we propose their use as transparent electrodes with excellent properties for optoelectronic applications.

  20. K-shell ionization cross section for Ti, Fe, Cu, Zr, and Ag

    SciTech Connect

    Benka, O.; Geretschlager, M.

    1981-04-01

    Absolute K-shell ionisation cross sections have been measured for thin targets of Ti, Fe, Cu, Zr and Ag for protons in the energy range 85-790 keV and for thin targets of Ti, Fe and Cu for He ions in the energy range 190-750 keV. In addition the relative variation of the cross sections with energy has been determined with high accuracy. The experimental values are compared to the perturbed stationary state approximation (CPSSR) and the semiclassical approximation (SCA). The CPSSR theory provides the best overall agreement with experimental cross sections. For higher scaled energies the CPSSR theory predicts the energy dependence of the cross sections very well but in the lower energy range it overpredicts the cross sections by as much as a factor of two and this overprediction seems to increase with Z/sub 2/ at a fixed scaled energy y. The SCA theory predicts slightly too large ionisation cross sections except for the lowest pounds values. The relative variation of the cross sections with energy is not well described in either energy range.

  1. Ag-Air Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Econ, Inc.'s agricultural aerial application, "ag-air," involves more than 10,000 aircraft spreading insecticides, herbicides, fertilizer, seed and other materials over millions of acres of farmland. Difficult for an operator to estimate costs accurately and decide what to charge or which airplane can handle which assignment most efficiently. Computerized service was designed to improve business efficiency in choice of aircraft and determination of charge rates based on realistic operating cost data. Each subscriber fills out a detailed form which pertains to his needs and then receives a custom-tailored computer printout best suited to his particular business mix.

  2. Communication: Structure, formation, and equilibration of ensembles of Ag-S complexes on an Ag surface

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Selena M.; Kim, Yousoo; Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, J. W.; Thiel, P. A.

    2013-02-15

    We have utilized conditions of very low temperature (4.7 K) and very low sulfur coverage to isolate and identify Ag-S complexes that exist on the Ag(111) surface. The experimental conditions are such that the complexes form at temperatures above the temperature of observation. These complexes can be regarded as polymeric chains of varying length, with an Ag4S pyramid at the core of each monomeric unit. Steps may catalyze the formation of the chains and this mechanism may be reflected in the chain length distribution.

  3. Evidence of the big fix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Yuta; Kawai, Hikaru; Kawana, Kiyoharu

    2014-06-01

    We give an evidence of the Big Fix. The theory of wormholes and multiverse suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model are fixed in such a way that the total entropy at the late stage of the universe is maximized, which we call the maximum entropy principle. In this paper, we discuss how it can be confirmed by the experimental data, and we show that it is indeed true for the Higgs vacuum expectation value vh. We assume that the baryon number is produced by the sphaleron process, and that the current quark masses, the gauge couplings and the Higgs self-coupling are fixed when we vary vh. It turns out that the existence of the atomic nuclei plays a crucial role to maximize the entropy. This is reminiscent of the anthropic principle, however it is required by the fundamental law in our case.

  4. Full and partial gauge fixing

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzad, A.

    2007-08-15

    Gauge fixing may be done in different ways. We show that using the chain structure to describe a constrained system enables us to use either a full gauge, in which all gauged degrees of freedom are determined, or a partial gauge, in which some first class constraints remain as subsidiary conditions to be imposed on the solutions of the equations of motion. We also show that the number of constants of motion depends on the level in a constraint chain in which the gauge fixing condition is imposed. The relativistic point particle, electromagnetism, and the Polyakov string are discussed as examples and full or partial gauges are distinguished.

  5. AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

  6. AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule ``as run``; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

  7. Fabrication of folate bioconjugated near-infrared fluorescent silver nanoclusters for targeted in vitro and in vivo bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Dai, Cong; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2014-11-28

    Thiolpolyethyleneimine stabilized silver nanoclusters (SH-PEI-AgNCs) with intense NIR fluorescence and chemical stability were fabricated in aqueous solution. The SH-PEI-AgNCs were subsequently bioconjugated with folate for targeted in vitro and in vivo bioimaging.

  8. Fixed Costs and Hours Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Hours constraints are typically identified by worker responses to questions asking whether they would prefer a job with more hours and more pay or fewer hours and less pay. Because jobs with different hours but the same rate of pay may be infeasible when there are fixed costs of employment or mandatory overtime premia, the constraint in those…

  9. Fixed memory least squares filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bierman, G. J.

    1975-01-01

    Buxbaum has reported on three algorithms for computing least squares estimates that are based on fixed amounts of data. In this correspondence, the filter is arranged as a point-deleting Kalman filter concatenated with the standard point-inclusion Kalman filter. The resulting algorithm is couched in a square root framework for greater numerical stability, and special attention is given to computer implementation.

  10. 29 CFR 1917.120 - Fixed stairways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fixed stairways. 1917.120 Section 1917.120 Labor... (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.120 Fixed stairways. (a) Definition. “Fixed stairway... intergral part of machinery. (b) New installations. (1) Fixed stairs installed after October 3, 1983...

  11. 46 CFR 170.235 - Fixed ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed ballast. 170.235 Section 170.235 Shipping COAST... ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Special Installations § 170.235 Fixed ballast. (a) Fixed ballast, if used, must... shifting of position. (b) Fixed ballast may not be removed from a vessel or relocated unless approved...

  12. 46 CFR 170.235 - Fixed ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed ballast. 170.235 Section 170.235 Shipping COAST... ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Special Installations § 170.235 Fixed ballast. (a) Fixed ballast, if used, must... shifting of position. (b) Fixed ballast may not be removed from a vessel or relocated unless approved...

  13. 29 CFR 1917.120 - Fixed stairways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fixed stairways. 1917.120 Section 1917.120 Labor... (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.120 Fixed stairways. (a) Definition. “Fixed stairway... intergral part of machinery. (b) New installations. (1) Fixed stairs installed after October 3, 1983...

  14. 46 CFR 170.235 - Fixed ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed ballast. 170.235 Section 170.235 Shipping COAST... ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Special Installations § 170.235 Fixed ballast. (a) Fixed ballast, if used, must... shifting of position. (b) Fixed ballast may not be removed from a vessel or relocated unless approved...

  15. 29 CFR 1917.120 - Fixed stairways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fixed stairways. 1917.120 Section 1917.120 Labor... (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.120 Fixed stairways. (a) Definition. “Fixed stairway... intergral part of machinery. (b) New installations. (1) Fixed stairs installed after October 3, 1983...

  16. 46 CFR 170.235 - Fixed ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed ballast. 170.235 Section 170.235 Shipping COAST... ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Special Installations § 170.235 Fixed ballast. (a) Fixed ballast, if used, must... shifting of position. (b) Fixed ballast may not be removed from a vessel or relocated unless approved...

  17. 29 CFR 1917.120 - Fixed stairways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fixed stairways. 1917.120 Section 1917.120 Labor... (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.120 Fixed stairways. (a) Definition. “Fixed stairway... intergral part of machinery. (b) New installations. (1) Fixed stairs installed after October 3, 1983...

  18. 46 CFR 170.235 - Fixed ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed ballast. 170.235 Section 170.235 Shipping COAST... ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Special Installations § 170.235 Fixed ballast. (a) Fixed ballast, if used, must... shifting of position. (b) Fixed ballast may not be removed from a vessel or relocated unless approved...

  19. Salivary gland tumors studied by means of the AgNOR technique.

    PubMed

    Epivatianos, A; Trigonidis, G

    1994-01-01

    Silver-binding nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) were counted in sections from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of 14 benign and 17 malignant tumors of minor salivary glands. The difference in the mean number of AgNORs count per nucleus between benign and malignant tumors was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.001). A positive correlation between the AgNORs count and the degree of malignancy of the malignant salivary gland tumors was generally observed. The AgNORs technique can be used as a diagnostic aid in differentiating between benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, and possibly the salivary duct carcinoma from the acinic cell carcinoma and poorly differentiated mucoepidermoid carcinoma.

  20. The AGS-Booster lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Barton, D.S.; Claus, J.; Cottingham, J.G.; Courant, E.D.; Danby, G.T.; Dell, G.F.; Forsyth, E.B.; Gupta, R.C.; Kats, J.

    1987-01-01

    The AGS Booster has three objectives. They are to increase the space charge limit of the AGS, to increase the intensity of the polarized proton beam by accumulating many linac pulses (since the intensity is limited by the polarized ion source), and to reaccelerate heavy ions from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff before injection into the AGS. The machine is capable of accelerating protons at 7.5 Hertz from 200 MeV to 1.5 GeV or to lower final energies at faster repetition rates. The machine will also be able to accelerate heavy ions from as low as 1 MeV/nucleon to a magnetic rigidity as high as 17.6 Tesla-meters with a one second repetition rate. As an accumulator for polarized protons, the Booster should be able to store the protons at 200 MeV for several seconds. We expect that the Booster will increase the AGS proton intensity by a factor of four, polarized proton intensity by a factor of twenty to thirty, and will also enable the AGS to accelerate all species of heavy ions (at present the AGS heavy ion program is limited to the elements lighter than sulfur because it can only accelerate fully stripped ions). The construction project started in FY 1985 and is expected to be completed in 1989. The purpose of this paper is to provide a future reference for the AGS Booster lattice.

  1. Laser ablation efficiency during the production of Ag nanoparticles in ethanol at a low pulse repetition rate (1-10 Hz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde-Alva, M. A.; García-Fernández, T.; Esparza-Alegría, E.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.; Sánchez-Aké, C.; Castañeda-Guzmán, R.; de la Mora, M. B.; Márquez-Herrera, C. E.; Sánchez Llamazares, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    We studied the effect of the repetition rate of laser pulses (RRLP) in the range from 1-10 Hz in the production of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) by laser ablation in ethanol. Laser pulses with a duration of 7 ns, a wavelength of 1064 nm and an energy of 60 mJ were used to ablate a 99.99% pure silver target immersed in 10 ml of ethanol. Transmittance analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy were used to study the silver concentration in the colloidal solutions. The ablation process was studied by measuring the transmission of the laser pulses through the colloid. It is shown that for a fixed number of laser pulses (NLP) the ablation efficiency, in terms of the ablated silver mass per laser pulse, increases with the RRLP. This result contradicts what had previously been established in the literature.

  2. Variable delivery, fixed displacement pump

    DOEpatents

    Sommars, Mark F.

    2001-01-01

    A variable delivery, fixed displacement pump comprises a plurality of pistons reciprocated within corresponding cylinders in a cylinder block. The pistons are reciprocated by rotation of a fixed angle swash plate connected to the pistons. The pistons and cylinders cooperate to define a plurality of fluid compression chambers each have a delivery outlet. A vent port is provided from each fluid compression chamber to vent fluid therefrom during at least a portion of the reciprocal stroke of the piston. Each piston and cylinder combination cooperates to close the associated vent port during another portion of the reciprocal stroke so that fluid is then pumped through the associated delivery outlet. The delivery rate of the pump is varied by adjusting the axial position of the swash plate relative to the cylinder block, which varies the duration of the piston stroke during which the vent port is closed.

  3. Effect of 45 nm silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) upon the smooth muscle of rat trachea: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    González, Carmen; Salazar-García, Samuel; Palestino, Gabriela; Martínez-Cuevas, Pedro P; Ramírez-Lee, Manuel A; Jurado-Manzano, Brenda B; Rosas-Hernández, Héctor; Gaytán-Pacheco, Noemí; Martel, Guadalupe; Espinosa-Tanguma, Ricardo; Biris, Alexandru S; Ali, Syed F

    2011-12-15

    AgNPs have been used to manufacture nanomaterials with new biophysical properties and functions. However, few experimental approaches have been used to assess their potential toxic or beneficial effects on human health, in association with the size, concentration, and biological target. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of the AgNPs on the smooth muscle of rat trachea. A single administration of AgNPs did not modify the smooth muscle tone, but, when the trachea rings were pre-treated with acetylcholine (ACh), AgNPs produced a contractile effect. Simultaneous administration of AgNPs and ACh resulted in a slight increase of smooth muscle contractility induced by ACh. AgNPs pretreatment followed by ACh administration showed that AgNPs exerted an important contraction effect induced by ACh after which muscle tone did not return to the basal level. This effect was associated with an increase in the production of nitric oxide (NO). The contractile response of the AgNPs induced by ACh was completely blocked when the rings were incubated, after the ACh but before the AgNPs administration, with 1400 W (NO blocker). The contractile effect was also abolished by atropine, which suggests that AgNPs alter ACh muscarinic receptor signaling. These data also show that AgNPs modify the contractile action of ACh through NO production and possibly induce hyper-reactivity of tracheal smooth muscle.

  4. Spin dynamics simulations at AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Meot, F.; Roser, T.

    2010-05-23

    To preserve proton polarization through acceleration, it is important to have a correct model of the process. It has been known that with the insertion of the two helical partial Siberian snakes in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), the MAD model of AGS can not deal with a field map with offset orbit. The stepwise ray-tracing code Zgoubi provides a tool to represent the real electromagnetic fields in the modeling of the optics and spin dynamics for the AGS. Numerical experiments of resonance crossing, including spin dynamics in presence of the snakes and Q-jump, have been performed in AGS lattice models, using Zgoubi. This contribution reports on various results so obtained.

  5. Wake Shield Target Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Valmianski, Emanuil I.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.; Alexander, Neil B.

    2003-05-15

    The heat flux from both gas convection and chamber radiation on a direct drive target must be limited to avoid target damage from excessive D-T temperature increase. One of the possibilities of protecting the target is a wake shield flying in front of the target. A shield will also reduce drag force on the target, thereby facilitating target tracking and position prediction. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code was used to calculate convection heat loads as boundary conditions input into ANSYS thermal calculations. These were used for studying the quality of target protection depending on various shapes of shields, target-shield distance, and protective properties of the shield moving relative to the target. The results show that the shield can reduce the convective heat flux by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on pressure, temperature, and velocity. The protective effect of a shield moving relative to the target is greater than the protective properties of a fixed shield. However, the protective effect of a shield moving under the drag force is not sufficient for bringing the heat load on the target down to the necessary limit. Some other ways of diminishing heat flux using a protective shield are discussed.

  6. Synthesis of Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms and their use as DNA hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Ma, Zhanfang

    2011-06-01

    A simple synthetic route to prepare Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms consists of the facile addition of Na(2) S to a solution of triangular Ag nanoprisms. The resulting Ag(2) S-Ag nanoparticles are more stable in solution than the original Ag nanoprisms, and two surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands of the original Ag nanoprisms still remain. In addition, the SPR bands of the Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms are tunable over a wide range. The Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms can be directly bioconjugated via well-established stable Ag(2) S surface chemistry with readily available sulfur coupling agents. The nanoprisms are used in the hybridization of functionalized oligonucleotides, and show promise as probes for future biosensing applications. PMID:21538868

  7. The upgrade project for the RF system for the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Ciardullo, D.J.; Hayes, T.; Meth, M.; McNerney, A.J.; Otis, A.; Pirkl, W.; Sanders, R.; Spitz, R.; Toldo, F.; Zaltsman, A.

    1993-01-01

    The AGS operates a varied program of proton, heavy ion, and polarized proton acceleration for fixed-target experiments and will soon serve as the injector of these beams into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC. The new Booster synchrotron extends the range of intensities and masses that can be accelerated. The 1.5 GeV injection energy increases the space charge limit by a factor of four to more than 6 [times] 10[sup 13] protons per pulse. To accommodate the increased beam current the rf system will be upgraded to provide more power and lower impedance to the beam. The flexibility of the rf system will also be enhanced by virtue of a new rf beam control system and installation of individual tuning servos for the ten rf cavities. The fundamental necessity for upgrading the rf system is to deliver more power to the accelerating beam. Three key ingredients of the upgrade project addressing this problem is (1) new power amplifiers provide the necessary power, and are closely coupled to the cavities, (2) wideband rf feedback reduces the effective impedance by a factor of 10, and (3) the capacitors loading the acceleration gaps (four per cavity) are increased from 275 pF to 600 pF.

  8. The upgrade project for the RF system for the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Ciardullo, D.J.; Hayes, T.; Meth, M.; McNerney, A.J.; Otis, A.; Pirkl, W.; Sanders, R.; Spitz, R.; Toldo, F.; Zaltsman, A.

    1993-06-01

    The AGS operates a varied program of proton, heavy ion, and polarized proton acceleration for fixed-target experiments and will soon serve as the injector of these beams into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC. The new Booster synchrotron extends the range of intensities and masses that can be accelerated. The 1.5 GeV injection energy increases the space charge limit by a factor of four to more than 6 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse. To accommodate the increased beam current the rf system will be upgraded to provide more power and lower impedance to the beam. The flexibility of the rf system will also be enhanced by virtue of a new rf beam control system and installation of individual tuning servos for the ten rf cavities. The fundamental necessity for upgrading the rf system is to deliver more power to the accelerating beam. Three key ingredients of the upgrade project addressing this problem is (1) new power amplifiers provide the necessary power, and are closely coupled to the cavities, (2) wideband rf feedback reduces the effective impedance by a factor of 10, and (3) the capacitors loading the acceleration gaps (four per cavity) are increased from 275 pF to 600 pF.

  9. Widespread bullous fixed drug eruption

    PubMed Central

    Patell, Rushad D; Dosi, Rupal V; Shah, Purav C; Joshi, Harshal S

    2014-01-01

    A 53-year-old man developed a widespread erythematous eruption which rapidly evolved into fluid-filled bulla mostly involving the distal areas of all four limbs and erosions on the oral as well as anogenital mucosa. Based on clinical presentation, chronology of drug exposure, past events and histopathology as diagnosis of widespread bullous fixed drug eruption was made over Steven Johnson-toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome. Steroids were deferred and the lesions healed with minimal pigmentation within a week. Differentiating between the two entities has been historically difficult, and yet can have significant therapeutic and prognostic implications. PMID:24510691

  10. Widespread bullous fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Patell, Rushad D; Dosi, Rupal V; Shah, Purav C; Joshi, Harshal S

    2014-02-07

    A 53-year-old man developed a widespread erythematous eruption which rapidly evolved into fluid-filled bulla mostly involving the distal areas of all four limbs and erosions on the oral as well as anogenital mucosa. Based on clinical presentation, chronology of drug exposure, past events and histopathology as diagnosis of widespread bullous fixed drug eruption was made over Steven Johnson-toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome. Steroids were deferred and the lesions healed with minimal pigmentation within a week. Differentiating between the two entities has been historically difficult, and yet can have significant therapeutic and prognostic implications.

  11. Study of the oxygen transport through Ag (110), Ag (poly), and Ag 2.0 Zr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Wu, D.; Davidson, M. R.; Hoflund, Gar B.

    1992-01-01

    The transport of oxygen through high-purity membranes of Ag (110), Ag (poly), Ag (nano), and Ag 2.0 Zr has been studied by an ultrahigh vacuum permeation method over the temperature range of 400-800 C. The data show that there are substantial deviations from ordinary diffusion-controlled transport. A surface limitation has been confirmed by glow-discharge studies where the upstream O2 supply has been partially converted to atoms, which, for the same temperature and pressure, gave rise to over an order of magnitude increase in transport flux. Further, the addition of 2.0 wt percent Zr to the Ag has provided increased dissociative adsorption rates, which, in turn, increased the transport flux by a factor of 2. It was also observed that below a temperature of 630 C, the diffusivity exhibits an increase in activation energy of over 4 kcal/mol, which has been attributed to trapping of the atomic oxygen and/or kinetic barriers at the surface and subsurface of the vacuum interface. Above 630 C, the activation barrier decreases to the accepted value of about 11 kcal/mol for Ag (poly), consistent with zero concentration at the vacuum interface.

  12. Adaptive MFR parameter control: fixed vs. variable probabilities of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boers, Yvo; Driessen, Hans; Zwaga, Jitse

    2005-09-01

    In this paper an efficient adaptive parameter control scheme for Multi Function Radar (MFR) is used. This scheme has been introduced in.5 The scheme has been designed in such a way that it meets constraints on specific quantities that are relevant for target tracking while minimizing the energy spent. It is shown here, that this optimal scheme leads to a considerable variation of the realized detection probability, even within a single scenario. We also show that constraining or fixing the probability of detection to a certain predefined value leads to a considerable increase in the energy spent on the target. This holds even when one optimizes the fixed probability of detection. The bottom line message is that the detection probability is not a design parameter by itself, but merely the product of an optimal schedule.

  13. 29 CFR 1917.118 - Fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fixed ladders. 1917.118 Section 1917.118 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.118 Fixed ladders. (a) Scope and applicability. This section applies to all fixed ladders except: (1) Ladders forming an integral part of railway cars,...

  14. 29 CFR 1910.27 - Fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fixed ladders. 1910.27 Section 1910.27 Labor Regulations... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Walking-Working Surfaces § 1910.27 Fixed ladders. (a) Design... those specified in § 1910.25. All wood parts of fixed ladders shall meet the requirements of §...

  15. 29 CFR 1910.27 - Fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fixed ladders. 1910.27 Section 1910.27 Labor Regulations... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Walking-Working Surfaces § 1910.27 Fixed ladders. (a) Design... those specified in § 1910.25. All wood parts of fixed ladders shall meet the requirements of §...

  16. 29 CFR 1910.27 - Fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fixed ladders. 1910.27 Section 1910.27 Labor Regulations... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Walking-Working Surfaces § 1910.27 Fixed ladders. (a) Design... those specified in § 1910.25. All wood parts of fixed ladders shall meet the requirements of §...

  17. Magnetic properties of Co/Ag core/shell nanoparticles prepared by successive reactions in microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, J.; Garcia-Bastida, A. J.; Lopez-Quintela, M. A.; Ramos, C.

    2006-05-01

    Co nanoparticles with an Ag covering layer have been prepared by successive reactions in microemulsions. Their magnetic behavior was studied as a function of heat treatment. It was confirmed that, under the experimental conditions of this study, the size of the Co nuclei is limited by the reactant concentration, whereas the Ag covering is fixed by microemulsion droplet size. The as-prepared particles contain mainly Co 3O 4 nuclei, and present high effective moments that agree with the spin state of Co 3+. The observed magnetic behaviors were explained taking into account the intra- and inter-particle structural evolution of the particle assemblies annealed under different experimental conditions.

  18. Nuclear target development

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Thomas, G.E.

    1995-08-01

    The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces thin foil targets needed for experiments performed at the ATLAS and Dynamitron accelerators. Targets are not only produced for the Physics Division but also for other divisions and occasionally for other laboratories and universities. In the past year, numerous targets were fabricated by vacuum evaporation either as self-supporting foils or on various substrates. Targets produced included Ag, Au, {sup 10,11}B, {sup 138}Ba, Be, {sup 12}C, {sup 40}Ca, {sup 116}Cd, {sup 155,160}Gd, {sup 76}Ge, In, LID, {sup 6}LiH, Melamine, Mg, {sup 142,150}Nd, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 206,208}Pb, {sup 194}Pt, {sup 28}Si, {sup 144,148}Sm, {sup 120,122,124}Sn, Ta, {sup 130}Te, ThF{sub 4}, {sup 46,50}Ti, TiH, U, UF{sub 4}, {sup 182}W and {sup 170}Yb. Polypropylene and aluminized polypropylene, along with metallized Mylar were produced for experiments at ATLAS. A number of targets of {sup 11}B of various thickness were made for the DEP 2-MeV Van de Graff accelerator. An increased output of foils fabricated using our small rolling mill included targets of Au, C, {sup 50}Cr, Cu, {sup 155,160}Gd, Mg, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 208}Pb, {sup 105,110}Pd. Sc, Ti, and {sup 64,66}Zn.

  19. Removal of well-fixed fixed femoral stems.

    PubMed

    Laffosse, J-M

    2016-02-01

    The removal of a well-fixed prosthetic stem raises technical challenges. The objective is not only to remove the material, but also to prepare the implantation of a new prosthesis. Cemented stems are only very rarely unremovable; extraction of the cement mantle and plug raises the greatest difficulties. The main risk is cortex perforation, and a radiograph should be obtained at the slightest doubt. The removal of cementless stems carries a higher risk of fracture. Difficulties should be anticipated based on thorough familiarity with the implant design and on evaluations of implant fixation and bone stock. The intramedullary approach is usually sufficient to extract a cemented or cementless, well fixed, standard stem. Routine use of a transfemoral approach is warranted only in the following situations: revision surgery for infection, S-shaped stem, long stem, curvature or angulation of the femoral shaft, or unfeasible hip dislocation. However, the possibility that the intramedullary approach may need to be converted to a transfemoral approach should be anticipated. Thus, preoperative planning must include determination of the optimal length of a femoral osteotomy or femoral flap, should one be needed, and the surgeon must have access to all the revision implants and tools that might be needed for re-implantation. Experience with the various techniques is indispensable, as a well-performed extensive approach is associated with less morbidity than a fracture or trajectory error. There are three main techniques, which are described here: intramedullary extraction of a cementless stem, intramedullary extraction of a cemented stem, and transfemoral extraction through an extended trochanterotomy. The patients should receive detailed information on the difficulties of femoral stem removal and on the available solutions. PMID:26797009

  20. Electrospun cellulose acetate supported Ag@AgCl composites with facet-dependent photocatalytic properties on degradation of organic dyes under visible-light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zidan; Peng, Xinwen; Zhong, Linxin; Wu, Lan; Cao, Xuefei; Sun, Run Cang

    2016-01-20

    Electrospun cellulose acetate (CA) membrane was employed as a support that provided sites for AgCl crystals in situ growth. The Ag@AgCl crystals on electrospun CA composites with exposed {100} and {111} facets were fabricated at room temperature by a double diffusion technique. The crystal structure, morphology, composition, and absorption light ability of CA supported Ag@AgCl were characterized utilizing X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflection-infrared intensity (ATR-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements (XPS), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) diffuse reflectance spectra, respectively. The photocatalytic activity of the catalysts was evaluated using methyl orange (MO) as a target. The CA supported cubic Ag@AgCl catalyst exhibited much higher catalytic activity than octahedral catalyst in terms of the degradation of MO under visible light. The 10mg CA based cubes could completely degrade MO (10 mg L(-1)) in 160 min. The photocatalyst still exhibited a good catalytic ability after three times. PMID:26572362

  1. Electrospun cellulose acetate supported Ag@AgCl composites with facet-dependent photocatalytic properties on degradation of organic dyes under visible-light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zidan; Peng, Xinwen; Zhong, Linxin; Wu, Lan; Cao, Xuefei; Sun, Run Cang

    2016-01-20

    Electrospun cellulose acetate (CA) membrane was employed as a support that provided sites for AgCl crystals in situ growth. The Ag@AgCl crystals on electrospun CA composites with exposed {100} and {111} facets were fabricated at room temperature by a double diffusion technique. The crystal structure, morphology, composition, and absorption light ability of CA supported Ag@AgCl were characterized utilizing X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflection-infrared intensity (ATR-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements (XPS), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) diffuse reflectance spectra, respectively. The photocatalytic activity of the catalysts was evaluated using methyl orange (MO) as a target. The CA supported cubic Ag@AgCl catalyst exhibited much higher catalytic activity than octahedral catalyst in terms of the degradation of MO under visible light. The 10mg CA based cubes could completely degrade MO (10 mg L(-1)) in 160 min. The photocatalyst still exhibited a good catalytic ability after three times.

  2. THE AGS-BASED SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    WENG,W.T.; DIWAN,M.; RAPARIA,D.

    2004-10-08

    be upgraded to 0.2 s to reach the required repetition rate of 2.5 Hz. The required upgrade of the AGS power supply, the rf system, and other rate dependent accelerator issues is discussed. The design of the target/horn configuration is shown. The material selected for the proton target is a Carbon-Carbon composite. It is a 3-dimensional woven material that exhibits extremely low thermal expansion for temperatures up to 1000 C; for higher temperatures it responds like graphite. This property is important for greatly reducing the thermo-elastic stresses induced by the beam, thereby extending the life of the target. The target consists of a 80 cm long cylindrical rod of 12 mm diameter. The target intercepts a 2 mm rms proton beam of 10{sup 14} protons/pulse. The total energy deposited as heat in the target is 7.3 kJ with peak temperature rise of about 280 C. Heat will be removed from the target through forced convection of helium gas across its outside surface. The extracted proton beam uses an existing beamline at the AGS, but is then directed to a target station atop a constructed earthen hill. The target is followed by a downward slopping pion decay channel. This vertical arrangement keeps the target and decay pipe well above the water table in this area. The 11.3 degrees slope aims the neutrino beam at a water Cerenkov neutrino detector to be located in the Homestake mine at Lead, South Dakota. A 3-dimensional view of the beam transport line, target station, and decay tunnel is provided.

  3. Renormalization Group Trajectories Between Two Fixed Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdesselam, Abdelmalek

    2010-03-01

    We report on our recent rigorous construction of complete renormalization group trajectories between two fixed points for the three-dimensional phi-four model with modified propagator considered by Brydges, Mitter and Scoppola (BMS). These are discrete critical trajectories which connect the ultraviolet Gaussian fixed point to the nontrivial BMS infrared fixed point which is an analogue of the Wilson-Fisher fixed point. The renormalization group map is defined rigorously and nonperturbatively, without using the hierarchical approximation. The trajectories are constructed by a fixed point argument in a suitable Banach space of sequences, where one perturbs a nonlinear one-dimensional iteration.

  4. Analysis of AGS E880 polarimeter data at Ggamma = 12.5

    SciTech Connect

    Cadman, R. V.; Huang, H.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.

    2012-01-27

    Data were collected with the AGS internal (E880) polarimeter at G{gamma} = 12.5 during the FY04 polarized proton run. Measurements were made with forward scintillation counters in coincidence with recoil counter telescopes, permitting an absolute calibration of the polarimeter for both nylon and carbon targets. The results are summarized and they will also be useful for an absolute calibration of the AGS CNI polarimeter at G{gamma} = 12.5.

  5. Analysis of AGS E880 polarimeter data at Gy = 12.5.

    SciTech Connect

    Cadman, R.; Huang, H.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.

    2012-02-23

    Data were collected with the AGS internal (E880) polarimeter at G{gamma} = 12.5 during the FY04 polarized proton run. Measurements were made with forward scintillation counters in coincidence with recoil counter telescopes, permitting an absolute calibration of the polarimeter for both nylon and carbon targets. The results are summarized and they will also be useful for an absolute calibration of the AGS CNI polarimeter at G{gamma} = 12.5.

  6. Simple Fixed Functional Space Maintainer

    PubMed Central

    Sarawgi, Aditi; Marwah, Nikhil; Gumber, Parvind; Dutta, Samir

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Premature loss of a primary tooth is one of the most common etiology for malocclusion. Space maintainers are employed to prevent this complication. In anterior region, esthetics is an important concern along with function and space management. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retained space maintainer solves all these purposes ef ficiently and ef fectively. In addition, the technique is simple and the appliance is very comfortable inside the oral cavity. Here is a case of premature loss of anterior primary tooth which was replaced by FRC retained esthetic functional space maintainer. The appliance was found to be functioning satisfactorily inside the oral cavity till the last visit (1 Year). How to cite this article: Goenka P, Sarawgi A, Marwah N, Gumber P, Dutta S. Simple Fixed Functional Space Maintainer. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):225-228. PMID:25709309

  7. Simple fixed functional space maintainer.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Puneet; Sarawgi, Aditi; Marwah, Nikhil; Gumber, Parvind; Dutta, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Premature loss of a primary tooth is one of the most common etiology for malocclusion. Space maintainers are employed to prevent this complication. In anterior region, esthetics is an important concern along with function and space management. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retained space maintainer solves all these purposes ef ficiently and ef fectively. In addition, the technique is simple and the appliance is very comfortable inside the oral cavity. Here is a case of premature loss of anterior primary tooth which was replaced by FRC retained esthetic functional space maintainer. The appliance was found to be functioning satisfactorily inside the oral cavity till the last visit (1 Year). How to cite this article: Goenka P, Sarawgi A, Marwah N, Gumber P, Dutta S. Simple Fixed Functional Space Maintainer. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):225-228.

  8. Highly reliable ag nanowire flexible transparent electrode with mechanically welded junctions.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Byungil; Shin, Hae-A-Seul; Kim, Taegeon; Joo, Young-Chang; Han, Seung Min

    2014-08-27

    Deformation behavior of the Ag nanowire flexible transparent electrode under bending strain is studied and results in a novel approach for highly reliable Ag nanowire network with mechanically welded junctions. Bending fatigue tests up to 500,000 cycles are used to evaluate the in situ resistance change while imposing fixed, uniform bending strain. In the initial stages of bending cycles, the thermally annealed Ag nanowire networks show a reduction in fractional resistance followed by a transient and steady-state increase at later stages of cycling. SEM analysis reveals that the initial reduction in resistance is caused by mechanical welding as a result of applied bending strain, and the increase in resistance at later stages of cycling is determined to be due to the failure at the thermally locked-in junctions. Based on the observations from this study, a new methodology for highly reliable Ag nanowire network is proposed: formation of Ag nanowire networks with no prior thermal annealing but localized junction formation through simple application of mechanical bending strain. The non-annealed, mechanically welded Ag nanowire network shows significantly enhanced cyclic reliability with essentially 0% increase in resistance due to effective formation of localized wire-to-wire contact.

  9. Targeted silver nanoparticles for ratiometric cell phenotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmore, Anne-Mari A.; Simón-Gracia, Lorena; Toome, Kadri; Paiste, Päärn; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Mölder, Tarmo; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Braun, Gary B.; Teesalu, Tambet

    2016-04-01

    Affinity targeting is used to deliver nanoparticles to cells and tissues. For efficient targeting, it is critical to consider the expression and accessibility of the relevant receptors in the target cells. Here, we describe isotopically barcoded silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a tool for auditing affinity ligand receptors in cells. Tumor penetrating peptide RPARPAR (receptor: NRP-1) and tumor homing peptide GKRK (receptor: p32) were used as affinity ligands on the AgNPs. The binding and uptake of the peptide-functionalized AgNPs by cultured PPC-1 prostate cancer and M21 melanoma cells was dependent on the cell surface expression of the cognate peptide receptors. Barcoded peptide-functionalized AgNPs were synthesized from silver and palladium isotopes. The cells were incubated with a cocktail of the barcoded nanoparticles [RPARPAR (R), GKRK (K), and control], and cellular binding and internalization of each type of nanoparticle was assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results of isotopic analysis were in agreement with data obtained using optical methods. Using ratiometric measurements, we were able to classify the PPC-1 cell line as mainly NRP-1-positive, with 75 +/- 5% R-AgNP uptake, and the M21 cell line as only p32-positive, with 89 +/- 9% K-AgNP uptake. The isotopically barcoded multiplexed AgNPs are useful as an in vitro ratiometric phenotyping tool and have potential uses in functional evaluation of the expression of accessible homing peptide receptors in vivo.Affinity targeting is used to deliver nanoparticles to cells and tissues. For efficient targeting, it is critical to consider the expression and accessibility of the relevant receptors in the target cells. Here, we describe isotopically barcoded silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a tool for auditing affinity ligand receptors in cells. Tumor penetrating peptide RPARPAR (receptor: NRP-1) and tumor homing peptide GKRK (receptor: p32) were used as affinity ligands on the AgNPs. The

  10. hAG-2 and hAG-3, human homologues of genes involved in differentiation, are associated with oestrogen receptor-positive breast tumours and interact with metastasis gene C4.4a and dystroglycan.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, G C; Patel, S; Tyson, K; Adam, P J; Schenker, M; Loader, J A; Daviet, L; Legrain, P; Parekh, R; Harris, A L; Terrett, J A

    2003-02-24

    hAG-2 and hAG-3 are recently discovered human homologues of the secreted Xenopus laevis proteins XAG-1/2 (AGR-1/2) that are expressed in the cement gland, an ectodermal organ in the head associated with anteroposterior fate determination during early development. Although the roles of hAG-2 and hAG-3 in mammalian cells are unknown, both proteins share a high degree of protein sequence homology and lie adjacent to one another on chromosome 7p21. hAG-2 mRNA expression has previously been demonstrated in oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive cell lines. In this study, we have used real-time quantitative RT - PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays to demonstrate concordant expression of hAG-2 and hAG-3 mRNA and protein in breast tumour tissues. Tumour expression of both genes correlated with OR (hAG2, P=0.0002; hAG-3, P=0.0012), and inversely correlated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (P=0.003). Yeast two-hybrid cloning identified metastasis-associated GPI-anchored C4.4a protein and extracellular alpha-dystroglycan (DAG-1) as binding partners for both hAG-2 and hAG-3, which if replicated in clinical oncology would demonstrate a potential role in tumour metastasis through the regulation of receptor adhesion and functioning. hAG-2 and hAG-3 may therefore serve as useful molecular markers and/or potential therapeutic targets for hormone-responsive breast tumours.

  11. Photoelectron spectroscopy of AgCl, AgBr, and AgI vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Batson, C.H.; Goodman, G.L.

    1980-06-01

    He I photoelectron spectra of AgCl, AgBr and AgI vapors have been obtained which differ significantly from earlier work. In each instance, the characteristic features of the diatomic molecule are prominent. The spectral features separate into a valence region, predominantly halogen p-like, and a deeper region, predominantly of Ag 4d character. The latter is split by spin--orbit and ligand field interactions, which are parametrized from the experimental data. Relativistic calculations of the X/sub ..cap alpha../--DVM--SCC type have been performed for these species. At the transition state level, they agree very well with the experimental peak positions. Nonrelativistic calculations of this type have been performed for CuCl and cyclic Cu/sub 3/Cl/sub 3/. Unlike the AgX species, the CuCl and Cu/sub 3/Cl/sub 3/ exhibit strong mixing of metal d and halogen p orbitals for the uppermost occupied orbital, and other Cu 3d-like orbitals above the Cl 3p-like orbitals. It is suggested that the occurrence of Cu 3d orbitals in the valence region may play a role in the anomalous diagmagnetic signal and large conductivity changes of CuCl condensed from the vapor.

  12. Expanding the regulatory network that controls nitrogen fixation in Sinorhizobium meliloti: elucidating the role of the two-component system hFixL-FxkR.

    PubMed

    Reyes-González, Alma; Talbi, Chouhra; Rodríguez, Susana; Rivera, Patricia; Zamorano-Sánchez, David; Girard, Lourdes

    2016-06-01

    In Sinorhizobium meliloti, nitrogen fixation is regulated in response to oxygen concentration through the FixL-FixJ two-component system (TCS). Besides this conserved TCS, the field isolate SM11 also encodes the hFixL-FxkR TCS, which is responsible for the microoxic response in Rhizobium etli. Through genetic and physiological assays, we evaluated the role of the hFixL-FxkR TCS in S. meliloti SM11. Our results revealed that this regulatory system activates the expression of a fixKf orthologue (fixKa), in response to low oxygen concentration. Null mutations in either hFixL or FxkR promote upregulation of fixK1, a direct target of FixJ. Furthermore, the absence of this TCS translates into higher nitrogen fixation values as well as higher expression of fixN1 in nodules. Individual mutations in each of the fixK-like regulators encoded in the S. meliloti SM11 genome do not completely restrict fixN1 or fixN2 expression, pointing towards redundancy among these regulators. Both copies of fixN are necessary to achieve optimal levels of nitrogen fixation. This work provides evidence that the hFixL-FxkR TCS is activated in response to low oxygen concentration in S. meliloti SM11 and that it negatively regulates the expression of fixK1, fixN1 and nitrogen fixation. PMID:27010660

  13. Expanding the regulatory network that controls nitrogen fixation in Sinorhizobium meliloti: elucidating the role of the two-component system hFixL-FxkR.

    PubMed

    Reyes-González, Alma; Talbi, Chouhra; Rodríguez, Susana; Rivera, Patricia; Zamorano-Sánchez, David; Girard, Lourdes

    2016-06-01

    In Sinorhizobium meliloti, nitrogen fixation is regulated in response to oxygen concentration through the FixL-FixJ two-component system (TCS). Besides this conserved TCS, the field isolate SM11 also encodes the hFixL-FxkR TCS, which is responsible for the microoxic response in Rhizobium etli. Through genetic and physiological assays, we evaluated the role of the hFixL-FxkR TCS in S. meliloti SM11. Our results revealed that this regulatory system activates the expression of a fixKf orthologue (fixKa), in response to low oxygen concentration. Null mutations in either hFixL or FxkR promote upregulation of fixK1, a direct target of FixJ. Furthermore, the absence of this TCS translates into higher nitrogen fixation values as well as higher expression of fixN1 in nodules. Individual mutations in each of the fixK-like regulators encoded in the S. meliloti SM11 genome do not completely restrict fixN1 or fixN2 expression, pointing towards redundancy among these regulators. Both copies of fixN are necessary to achieve optimal levels of nitrogen fixation. This work provides evidence that the hFixL-FxkR TCS is activated in response to low oxygen concentration in S. meliloti SM11 and that it negatively regulates the expression of fixK1, fixN1 and nitrogen fixation.

  14. The AGS Booster control system

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, R.; Auerbach, E.; Culwick, B.; Clifford, T.; Mandell, S.; Mariotti, R.; Salwen, C.; Schumburg, N.

    1988-01-01

    Although moderate in size, the Booster construction project requires a comprehensive control system. There are three operational modes: as a high intensity proton injector for the AGS, as a heavy ion accelerator and injector supporting a wide range of ions and as a polarized proton storage injector. These requirements are met using a workstation based extension of the existing AGS control system. Since the Booster is joining a complex of existing accelerators, the new system will be capable of supporting multiuser operational scenarios. A short discussion of this system is discussed in this paper.

  15. AG Draconis - a symbiotic mystery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galis, R.; Hric, L.; Smelcer, L.

    2015-02-01

    Symbiotic system AG Draconis regularly undergoes quiescent and active stages which consist of the series of individual outbursts. The period analysis of new and historical photometric data, as well as radial velocities, confirmed the presence of the two periods. The longer one (~550 d) is related to the orbital motion and the shorter one (~355 d) could be due to pulsation of the cool component of AG Dra. In addition, the active stages change distinctively, but the outbursts are repeated with periods from 359 - 375 d.

  16. Ag-Ag2S Hybrid Nanoprisms: Structural versus Plasmonic Evolution.

    PubMed

    Shahjamali, Mohammad M; Zhou, Yong; Zaraee, Negin; Xue, Can; Wu, Jinsong; Large, Nicolas; McGuirk, C Michael; Boey, Freddy; Dravid, Vinayak; Cui, Zhifeng; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-05-24

    Recently, Ag-Ag2S hybrid nanostructures have attracted a great deal of attention due to their enhanced chemical and thermal stability, in addition to their morphology- and composition-dependent tunable local surface plasmon resonances. Although Ag-Ag2S nanostructures can be synthesized via sulfidation of as-prepared anisotropic Ag nanoparticles, this process is poorly understood, often leading to materials with anomalous compositions, sizes, and shapes and, consequently, optical properties. In this work, we use theory and experiment to investigate the structural and plasmonic evolution of Ag-Ag2S nanoprisms during the sulfidation of Ag precursors. The previously observed red-shifted extinction of the Ag-Ag2S hybrid nanoprism as sulfidation occurs contradicts theoretical predictions, indicating that the reaction does not just occur at the prism tips as previously speculated. Our experiments show that sulfidation can induce either blue or red shifts in the extinction of the dipole plasmon mode, depending on reaction conditions. By elucidating the correlation with the final structure and morphology of the synthesized Ag-Ag2S nanoprisms, we find that, depending on the reaction conditions, sulfidation occurs on the prism tips and/or the (111) surfaces, leading to a core(Ag)-anisotropic shell(Ag2S) prism nanostructure. Additionally, we demonstrate that the direction of the shift in the dipole plasmon is a function of the relative amounts of Ag2S at the prism tips and Ag2S shell thickness around the prism.

  17. Lipopolysacharide Rapidly and Completely Suppresses AgRP Neuron-Mediated Food Intake in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Huang, Ying; Liu, Tiemin; Wu, Hua; Cui, Huxing; Gautron, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    Although Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons play a key role in the regulation of food intake, their contribution to the anorexia caused by proinflammatory insults has yet to be identified. Using a combination of neuroanatomical and pharmacogenetics experiments, this study sought to investigate the importance of AgRP neurons and downstream targets in the anorexia caused by the peripheral administration of a moderate dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (100 μg/kg, ip). First, in the C57/Bl6 mouse, we demonstrated that LPS induced c-fos in select AgRP-innervated brain sites involved in feeding but not in any arcuate proopiomelanocortin neurons. Double immunohistochemistry further showed that LPS selectively induced c-Fos in a large subset of melanocortin 4 receptor-expressing neurons in the lateral parabrachial nucleus. Secondly, we used pharmacogenetics to stimulate the activity of AgRP neurons during the course of LPS-induced anorexia. In AgRP-Cre mice expressing the designer receptor hM3Dq-Gq only in AgRP neurons, the administration of the designer drug clozapine-N-oxide (CNO) induced robust food intake. Strikingly, CNO-mediated food intake was rapidly and completely blunted by the coadministration of LPS. Neuroanatomical experiments further indicated that LPS did not interfere with the ability of CNO to stimulate c-Fos in AgRP neurons. In summary, our findings combined together support the view that the stimulation of select AgRP-innervated brain sites and target neurons, rather than the inhibition of AgRP neurons themselves, is likely to contribute to the rapid suppression of food intake observed during acute bacterial endotoxemia. PMID:27111742

  18. Ag nanotubes and Ag/AgCl electrodes in nanoporous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Matthew; Healy, Ken; Siwy, Zuzanna S.

    2011-04-01

    Miniaturization of the entire experimental setup is a key requirement for widespread application of nanodevices. For nanopore biosensing, integrating electrodes onto the nanopore membrane and controlling the pore length is important for reducing the complexity and improving the sensitivity of the system. Here we present a method to achieve these goals, which relies on electroless plating to produce Ag nanotubes in track-etched polymer nanopore templates. By plating from one side only, we create a conductive nanotube that does not span the full length of the pore, and thus can act as a nanoelectrode located inside the nanopore. To give optimal electrochemical behavior for sensing, we coat the Ag nanotube with a layer of AgCl. We characterize the behavior of this nanoelectrode by measuring its current-voltage response and find that, in most cases, the response is asymmetric. The plated nanopores have initial diameters between 100 and 300 nm, thus a range suitable for detection of viruses.

  19. Photoreduction of Ag+ in Ag/Ag2S/Au memristor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, N. I.; Tabib-Azar, M.

    2015-06-01

    Silver halides and chalcogenides are excellent memristor materials that have been extensively used in the past as photosensitive layers in photography. Here we examine the effect of illumination on the operating voltages and switching speed of Ag/Ag2S/Au memristors using a green laser (473-523 nm). Our results indicate that illumination decreases the average switching time from high to low resistance states by ∼19% and decreases the turn-off voltages dramatically from -0.8 V to -0.25 V that we attribute to the change in sulfur valency and a photo-induced change in its oxidation/reduction potential. Photo-induced reduction of silver in Ag2S may be used in three dimensional optical memories that can be electronically read and reset.

  20. Ag-Ag dispersive interaction and physical properties of Ag3Co(CN)6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hong; Dove, Martin T.; Refson, Keith

    2014-08-01

    We report a density functional theory (DFT) study of Ag3Co(CN)6, a material noted for its colossal positive and negative thermal expansion, and its giant negative linear compressibility. Here, we explicitly include the dispersive interaction within the DFT calculation, and find that it is essential to reproduce the ground state, the high-pressure phase, and the phonons of this material, and hence essential to understand this material's remarkable physical properties. New exotic properties are predicted. These include heat enhancement of the negative linear compressibility, a large reduction in the coefficient of thermal expansion on compression with change of sign of the mode Grüneisen parameters under pressure, and large softening of the material on heating. Our results suggest that these are associated with the weak Ag-Ag dispersive interactions acting with an efficient hinging mechanism in the framework structure.

  1. Laser-based synthesis of core Ag-shell AgI nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hua; Fan, Wai Yip

    2005-05-01

    A laser-controlled synthesis of silver iodide (AgI) nanoparticles with isolable AgI shell-Ag core stable intermediates is achieved via molecular iodine photodissociation in the presence of pure Ag nanoparticles dispersed in water. Ag nanoparticles were introduced into the solution containing sodium dodecylsulphate surfactants and iodine by ablating a piece of silver foil with a 532 nm pulsed Nd-YAG laser. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that different AgI shell-Ag core sizes could be achieved by controlling the photolysis of I 2 in solution. These nanoparticles were also found to catalyse an atom-economy Grignard-Barbier organic reaction.

  2. AGS experiments: 1990, 1991, 1992. Ninth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains a description of the following: AGS Experimental Area - High Energy Physics FY 1993 and Heavy Ion Physics FY 1993; Table of Beam Parameters and Fluxes; Experiment Schedule ``as run``; Proposed 1993 Schedule; A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Publications of AGS Experiments; and List of AGS Experimenters.

  3. An efficient photocatalyst for degradation of various organic dyes: Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu-Yang; Lu, Yi; Liu, Jin-Ku

    2016-04-15

    The Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite was prepared by a facile in-situ anion-exchange method, then the Ag nanoparticles were coated on this composite through photodeposition route to form a novel Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite. The in-situ Br(-) replacement in a crystal lattice node position of Ag2MoO4 crystal allows for overcoming the resistance of electron transition effectively. Meanwhile silver nano-particles on the surface of Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite could act as electron traps to intensify the photogeneration electron-hole separation and the subsequent transfer of the trapped electron to the adsorbed O2 as an electron acceptor. As an efficient visible light catalyst, the Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite exhibited superior photocatalytic activity for the degradation of various organic dyes. The experimental results demonstrated superior photocatalytic rate of Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite compared to pure AgBr and Ag2MoO4 crystals (37.6% and 348.4% enhancement respectively). The Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite cloud degraded Rhodamin B, bromophenol blue, and amino black 10b completed in 7min. PMID:26775100

  4. An efficient photocatalyst for degradation of various organic dyes: Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu-Yang; Lu, Yi; Liu, Jin-Ku

    2016-04-15

    The Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite was prepared by a facile in-situ anion-exchange method, then the Ag nanoparticles were coated on this composite through photodeposition route to form a novel Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite. The in-situ Br(-) replacement in a crystal lattice node position of Ag2MoO4 crystal allows for overcoming the resistance of electron transition effectively. Meanwhile silver nano-particles on the surface of Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite could act as electron traps to intensify the photogeneration electron-hole separation and the subsequent transfer of the trapped electron to the adsorbed O2 as an electron acceptor. As an efficient visible light catalyst, the Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite exhibited superior photocatalytic activity for the degradation of various organic dyes. The experimental results demonstrated superior photocatalytic rate of Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite compared to pure AgBr and Ag2MoO4 crystals (37.6% and 348.4% enhancement respectively). The Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite cloud degraded Rhodamin B, bromophenol blue, and amino black 10b completed in 7min.

  5. AGS 20th anniversary celebration

    SciTech Connect

    Baggett, N.V.

    1980-05-22

    On May 22, 1980, a symposium was held at Brookhaven to celebrate the 20th birthday of the AGS, to recall its beginnings, and to review major discoveries that have been made with its beams. The talks at the symposium are recorded in this volume.

  6. AGS experiments: 1985, 1986, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout, table of beam parameters and fluxes, experiment schedule ''as run,'' experiment long range schedule, a listing of experiments by number, two-page summaries of each experiment, also ordered by number, and publications of AGS experiments, 1982-1987.

  7. Correcting the AGS depolarizing resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, L.G.

    1986-01-01

    For the 1986 AGS run, the technique of correcting an imperfection resonance using a beat harmonic instead of the direct harmonic was applied and found to be useful in achieving a 22 GeV/c polarized beam. Both conventional and modified techniques are explained. (LEW)

  8. What Is Ag-Ed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linley, Judy; Mylne, Lee

    1998-01-01

    Ag-Ed, an agricultural education project for upper elementary students, was held in conjunction with the Toowoomba Show in Queensland, Australia. Agriculture industry representatives provided 20 interactive agricultural presentations for class groups, which were supplemented with a teacher resource-package containing a directory and 13 sections of…

  9. AGS experiments, 1988, 1989, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1991-04-01

    This report contains: experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; experiment long range schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS experiments; and list of experimenters.

  10. Fixed drug eruption in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nnoruka, Edith N; Ikeh, V O; Mbah, A U

    2006-09-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) causes cosmetic embarrassment in Nigerian patients, particularly when the characteristic hyperpigmented patches affect the face and lips. Drugs that have been implicated in the etiology of FDE, and the sites of lesions, may vary from country to country. Antimalarials, such as Fansidar, Fancimef, Maloxine, Amalar, and Metakelfin, were the most common offending agents, accounting for 38% of FDEs, followed by trimethoprim + sulfamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole) (28%), dipyrones (10%), Butazolidin (6%), thiacetazone (6%), metronidazole (4%), paracetamol (3%), and naproxen (3%). Lesions induced by the combination of sulfadoxine and pyrimethamine (in antimalarials) mainly involved the face and lips. In most cases, patients took these sulfa-containing antimalarials in combination with numerous other drugs, particularly analgesics. Unlike chloroquine-induced pruritus, which affects most Africans, the association between antimalarials and FDE has not been well documented in our region. Co-trimoxazole was associated more often than antimalarials with FDEs involving the mucocutaneous junctions of the genitalia and lips. Males with genital lesions on the glans penis represented 11 (48%) of those with co-trimoxazole hypersensitivity. The trunk and limbs were affected mainly by pyrazoles and Butazolidin, respectively; however, solitary lesions on the trunk were usually due to co-trimoxazole, whereas solitary lesions on the limbs were associated with Butazolidin.

  11. Updraft Fixed Bed Gasification Aspen Plus Model

    SciTech Connect

    2007-09-27

    The updraft fixed bed gasification model provides predictive modeling capabilities for updraft fixed bed gasifiers, when devolatilization data is available. The fixed bed model is constructed using Aspen Plus, process modeling software, coupled with a FORTRAN user kinetic subroutine. Current updraft gasification models created in Aspen Plus have limited predictive capabilities and must be "tuned" to reflect a generalized gas composition as specified in literature or by the gasifier manufacturer. This limits the applicability of the process model.

  12. Antibacterial activity and reusability of CNT-Ag and GO-Ag nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Dang; Yun, Hyosuk; Kim, Gwui Cheol; Lee, Chul Won; Choi, Hyun Chul

    2013-10-01

    A facile approach to the synthesis of novel CNT-Ag and GO-Ag antibacterial materials, in which thiol groups are utilized as linkers to secure silver (Ag) nanoparticles to the CNT and GO surfaces without agglomeration, is reported. The resulting CNT-Ag and GO-Ag samples were characterized by performing TEM, XRD, Auger, XPS, and Raman measurements, which revealed that in these antibacterial materials size-similar and quasi-spherical Ag nanoparticles are anchored to the CNT and GO surfaces. The Ag nanoparticles in CNT-Ag and GO-Ag have narrow size distributions with average diameters of 2.6 and 3.5 nm respectively. The antibacterial activities of CNT-Ag and GO-Ag against Escherichia coli were assessed with the paper-disk diffusion method and by determining the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). CNT-Ag was found to have higher antibacterial activity than the reference Ag colloid. Moreover, both CNT-Ag and GO-Ag retain more than 50% of their original antibacterial activities after 20 washes with detergent, which indicates their potential as antibacterial materials for laboratory and medical purposes.

  13. Comparative Study of Antimicrobial Activity of AgBr and Ag Nanoparticles (NPs)

    PubMed Central

    Suchomel, Petr; Kvitek, Libor; Panacek, Ales; Prucek, Robert; Hrbac, Jan; Vecerova, Renata; Zboril, Radek

    2015-01-01

    The diverse mechanism of antimicrobial activity of Ag and AgBr nanoparticles against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and also against several strains of candida was explored in this study. The AgBr nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by simple precipitation of silver nitrate by potassium bromide in the presence of stabilizing polymers. The used polymers (PEG, PVP, PVA, and HEC) influence significantly the size of the prepared AgBr NPs dependently on the mode of interaction of polymer with Ag+ ions. Small NPs (diameter of about 60–70 nm) were formed in the presence of the polymer with low interaction as are PEG and HEC, the polymers which interact with Ag+ strongly produce nearly two times bigger NPs (120–130 nm). The prepared AgBr NPs were transformed to Ag NPs by the reduction using NaBH4. The sizes of the produced Ag NPs followed the same trends – the smallest NPs were produced in the presence of PEG and HEC polymers. Prepared AgBr and Ag NPs dispersions were tested for their biological activity. The obtained results of antimicrobial activity of AgBr and Ag NPs are discussed in terms of possible mechanism of the action of these NPs against tested microbial strains. The AgBr NPs are more effective against gram-negative bacteria and tested yeast strains while Ag NPs show the best antibacterial action against gram-positive bacteria strains. PMID:25781988

  14. 29 CFR 1917.118 - Fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... applies to all fixed ladders except: (1) Ladders forming an integral part of railway cars, highway..., microwave communications, electrical power and similar towers, poles and structures, including stacks...

  15. 29 CFR 1917.118 - Fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... applies to all fixed ladders except: (1) Ladders forming an integral part of railway cars, highway..., microwave communications, electrical power and similar towers, poles and structures, including stacks...

  16. Differential cross-sections with hard targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, J. L.; Pacheco, A. F.

    2005-09-01

    When the concept of scattering differential cross-section is introduced in classical mechanics textbooks, usually it is first supposed that the target is a fixed, hard sphere. In this paper we calculate the scattering differential cross-section in the case of the hard target being a fixed figure of revolution of any shape. When the target is a paraboloid of revolution, we find the well-known formula corresponding to Rutherford's scattering. In addition, we analyse the inverse problem, i.e. given a differential cross-section, what is the profile of the corresponding hard target?

  17. A ketone/alcohol polymer for cycle of electrolytic hydrogen-fixing with water and releasing under mild conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ryo; Yoshimasa, Keisuke; Egashira, Tatsuya; Oya, Takahiro; Oyaizu, Kenichi; Nishide, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Finding a safe and efficient carrier of hydrogen is a major challenge. Recently, hydrogenated organic compounds have been studied as hydrogen storage materials because of their ability to stably and reversibly store hydrogen by forming chemical bonds; however, these compounds often suffer from safety issues and are usually hydrogenated with hydrogen at high pressure and/or temperature. Here we present a ketone (fluorenone) polymer that can be moulded as a plastic sheet and fixes hydrogen via a simple electrolytic hydrogenation at -1.5 V (versus Ag/AgCl) in water at room temperature. The hydrogenated alcohol derivative (the fluorenol polymer) reversibly releases hydrogen by heating (80 °C) in the presence of an aqueous iridium catalyst. Both the use of a ketone polymer and the efficient hydrogen fixing with water as a proton source are completely different from other (de)hydrogenated compounds and hydrogenation processes. The easy handling and mouldable polymers could suggest a pocketable hydrogen carrier.

  18. Effect of metals on water flow in glutaraldehyde fixed toad bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Hoch, B.S.; Gorfien, P.C.; Eres, A.; Shahmehdi, S.; Lipner, H.I. )

    1990-02-26

    The authors previously reported that HgCl{sub 2} inhibits flow in tissues fixed with glutaraldehyde after ADH stimulation. The authors examined the effect of numerous other metals on the ADH-induced water channel. Water flows were measured gravimetrically. In glutaraldehyde-fixed tissues water flow and sucrose permeability are maintained from pH 2.5 through pH 12. Several metals including Ba, Co, Fe, La, Sr, and Zn have no effect on flow. Al, Cd, Cu, Pb, and U all elicit a small but significant increase in water flow associated with inhibition of the increased sucrose permeability normally observed in glutaraldehyde-fixed tissues. Ag inhibits flow but increases sucrose permeability. Au inhibits flow by 90% in tissues fixed after pretreatment with ADH but increases the permeability of tissues fixed in the absence of ADH. These effects may result from disruption of epithelial integrity rather than direct blocking of the ADH-induced water channel. At pH {le} 3, Pt inhibits flow in ADH-pretreated tissues. Sucrose permeability is decreased and basal flow unaffected. No inhibitory effect is present at pH {ge} 3.5. The data indicate that at physiologic pH, the ADH induced water channel is blocked specifically by Hg but not by other metals.

  19. Fixed-trim re-entry guidance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gracey, C.; Cliff, E. M.; Lutze, F. H.; Kelley, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The terminal guidance problem for a fixed-trim re-entry body is formulated with the objective of synthesizing a closed-loop steering law. A transformation of variables and subsequent linearization of the motion, with the sight-line to the target as a reference, reduces the order of the state system for the guidance problem. The reduced order system, although nonlinear and time-varying, is simple enough to lend itself to synthesis of a class of guidance laws. A generalization of the feedforward device of classical control theory is successfully employed for compensation of roll autopilot lags. The proposed steering law exhibits superior miss-distance performance in a computational comparison with existing fixed-trim guidance laws.

  20. Amplified terminal protection assay of small molecule/protein interactions via a highly characteristic solid-state Ag/AgCl process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Jiang, Bingying; Xu, Jin; Xie, Jiaqing; Xiang, Yun; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin

    2013-05-15

    In this work, we describe a new sensitive strategy for electrochemical detection of protein via small molecule/protein interactions. This assay is based on a terminal protection mechanism that small molecule-linked single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is protected against hydrolysis by exonuclease I when the target protein is captured by the corresponding small molecule recognition element. Positively charged gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are attached to the termini-protected and negatively charged ssDNA through electrostatic interactions. Subsequent AuNP-catalyzed silver enhancement followed by a highly characteristic and sensitive solid-state Ag/AgCl process is introduced to the sensing platform to amplify the signal output. By combining the amplification ability resulting from the silver deposition on the surface-captured AuNPs with the inherent high sensitivity of the electrochemical solid-state Ag/AgCl process, our method expands its range to the detection of macromolecules that bind to specific small molecules and enables low picomolar detection of protein. As a model of biotin/streptavidin interaction, a detection limit of 10 pM for streptavidin is readily achieved with desirable sensitivity and specificity, which indicates that the terminal protection assay coupled with the electrochemical solid-state Ag/AgCl process can offer a promising platform for the determination of various of types of proteins or small molecule-protein interactions.

  1. Photostimulated Luminescence and Dynamics of AgI and Ag Nanoclusters in Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Joly, Alan G.; Roark, Joel

    2002-06-15

    The photoluminescence and photostimulated luminescence of Ag and AgI nanoclusters formed in zeolite-Y are studied using fluorescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectra of AgI nanoclusters show emission from both AgI and Ag nanoclusters, while the in the photostimulated luminescence, only the emission of Ag clusters is observed. While the photoluminescence from both Ag and AgI particles displays both sub-nanosecond and microsecond lifetimes, the emission from photostimulated luminescence shows very short, picosecond lifetimes. A model which ascribes the photostimulated luminescence to recombination of electrons trapped in the zeolite with Ag in close proximity to the trap site is proposed. The appearance of strong photostimulated luminescence with short decays in these systems demonstrates that nanoparticles have potential for digital storage and medical radiology applications.

  2. Chemically-inactive interfaces in thin film Ag/AgI systems for resistive switching memories

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Deok-Yong; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Waser, Rainer; Valov, Ilia

    2013-01-01

    AgI nanoionics-based resistive switching memories were studied in respect to chemical stability of the Ag/AgI interface using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The apparent dissolution of Ag films of thickness below some tens of nanometers and the loss of electrode/electrolyte contact was critically addressed. The results evidently show that there are no chemical interactions at the interface despite the high ionic mobility of Ag ions. Simulation results further show that Ag metal clusters can form in the AgI layer with intermediate-range order at least up to next-next nearest neighbors, suggesting that Ag can permeate into the AgI only in an aggregated form of metal crystallite. PMID:23378904

  3. Reproducible and recyclable SERS substrates: Flower-like Ag structures with concave surfaces formed by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Juncao; Shu, Shiwei; Li, Jianfu; Huang, Chao; Li, Yang Yang; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2015-04-01

    Direct synthesis of three-dimensional Ag structures on solid substrates for the purposes of producing reproducible and recyclable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications remains challenging. In this work, flower-like Ag structures with concave surfaces (FACS) were successfully electrodeposited onto ITO glass using the double-potentiostatic method. The FACS, with an enhancement factor of the order of 108, exhibited a SERS signal intensity 3.3 times stronger than that measured from Ag nanostructures without concave surfaces. A cleaning procedure involving lengthy immersion of the sample in ethanol and KNO3 was proposed to recycle the substrate and confirmed by using rhodamine 6G, adenine, and 4-aminothiophenol as target molecules. The findings can help to advance the practical applications of Ag nanostructure-based SERS substrates.

  4. Error tolerance in an NMR implementation of Grover's fixed-point quantum search algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Li; Jones, Jonathan A.

    2005-09-15

    We describe an implementation of Grover's fixed-point quantum search algorithm on a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computer, searching for either one or two matching items in an unsorted database of four items. In this algorithm the target state (an equally weighted superposition of the matching states) is a fixed point of the recursive search operator, so that the algorithm always moves towards the desired state. The effects of systematic errors in the implementation are briefly explored.

  5. Fixed-Response Questions with a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstone, Alex H.; Ambusaidi, Abdullah

    2002-01-01

    Offers three types of fixed-response questions that are designed to overcome drawbacks appearing in the conventional forms of fixed-response questions such as not allowing the examiner to investigate reasoning, background, or prevent guessing. (Contains 14 references.) (Author/YDS)

  6. 29 CFR 1910.27 - Fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fixed ladders. 1910.27 Section 1910.27 Labor Regulations... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Walking-Working Surfaces § 1910.27 Fixed ladders. (a) Design requirements—(1) Design considerations. All ladders, appurtenances, and fastenings shall be designed to...

  7. 78 FR 20705 - Fixed Income Roundtable

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Fixed Income Roundtable AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Notice of roundtable..., efficiency, and other aspects of fixed income markets. The roundtable will focus on the municipal...

  8. Gaining Insight into an Organization's Fixed Assets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Elisabet

    2003-01-01

    Discusses issues related to school district implementation of June 2001 Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement 34 designed to change how schools report fixed assets. Includes planning for GASB implementation, conducting fixed-asset inventories, and making time for GASB reporting. (PKP)

  9. Negotiating a Fixed-Unit Price Contract.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasquale, Mathew; Morrison, Wade

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the concept of "fixed-unit price contracting," an arrangement that is becoming popular with private industry councils (PICs). Guidelines include (1) find out as much as you can about the PIC's requirements; (2) figure out whether you can meet the PIC's requirements; and (3) keep in mind that most elements of a fixed-unit price contract…

  10. Targets and targeting.

    PubMed

    Will, E

    2001-08-01

    Using the vocabulary of ballistics in medicine for emphasis can result in misleading exaggeration and semantic confusion. The dual meaning of target as either aiming point (aim at) or outcome (aim to achieve) creates a muddle in the efforts to comply with quality assurance initiatives. Disentangling the two meanings allows new approaches to the clinical technology required in a modern health care environment. An example can be shown in new strategies for the management of renal anemia with iron and erythropoietin. The potential to shape outcome distributions through validated, preemptive intervention thresholds offers the predictable results required by patients and payers. Using the management of patient cohorts as a platform for outcomes creates no necessary conflict with individualized clinical care. Future guideline statements should include the likely characteristics of compliant outcome populations, as a prompt to clinical goals and as an indication of the necessary cost and effort of compliance with treatment standards. Overemphasis in language is no substitute for considered clinical methodology.

  11. Experimental status of the AGS Relativistic Heavy Ion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T.C.

    1994-10-01

    The universal motivation for colliding large nuclei at relativistic energies is the expectation that a small volume of the primordial quark soup, generally referred to as the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), can be created and studied. The QGP is formed via a phase transition caused by either the extreme baryon densities and/or the extreme temperatures achieved in the overlap zone of the two colliding nuclei. Experiments at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) using a beam of Si nuclei at 14.6 GeV per nucleon on various nuclear targets have been completed. These same experiments are now actively searching for signatures of QGP formation using a beam of Au nuclei at 11.7 GeV per nucleon. This paper briefly summarizes some of the key results from the Si beam program and the current status of the experimental Au beam program at the AGS.

  12. Ag- and Cu-doped multifunctional bioactive nanostructured TiCaPCON films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtansky, D. V.; Batenina, I. V.; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, Ph. V.; Sheveyko, A. N.; Kuptsov, K. A.; Zhitnyak, I. Y.; Anisimova, N. Yu.; Gloushankova, N. A.

    2013-11-01

    A key property of multicomponent bioactive nanostructured Ti(C,N)-based films doped with Ca, P, and O (TiCaPCON) that can be improved further is their antibacterial effect that should be achieved without compromising the implant bioactivity and biocompatibility. The present work is focused on the study of structure, chemical, mechanical, tribological, and biological properties of Ag- and Cu-doped TiCaPCON films. The films with Ag (0.4-4 at.%) and Cu (13 at.%) contents were obtained by simultaneous sputtering of a TiC0.5-Ca3(PO4)2 target and either an Ag or a Cu target. The film structure was studied using X-ray diffraction, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy, and Raman-shift and IR spectroscopy. The films were characterized in terms of their hardness, elastic modulus, dynamic impact resistance, friction coefficient and wear rate (both in air and normal saline), surface wettability, electrochemical behavior and Ag or Cu ion release in normal saline. Particular attention was paid to the influence of inorganic bactericides (Ag and Cu ions) on the bactericidal activity against unicellular yeast fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae and gram-positive bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus, as well as on the attachment, spreading, actin cytoskeleton organization, focal adhesions, and early stages of osteoblastic cell differentiation. The obtained results show that the Ag-doped films are more suitable for the protection of metallic surfaces against bacterial infection compared with their Cu-doped counterpart. In particular, an excellent combination of mechanical, tribological, and biological properties makes Ag-doped TiCaPCON film with 1.2 at.% of Ag very attractive material for bioengineering and modification of load-bearing metal implant surfaces.

  13. Investigation of Electrical and Optical Properties of Highly Transparent TCO/Ag/TCO Multilayer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunbo; Lee, Jaehyeong; Dao, Vinh Ai; Ahn, Shihyun; Hussain, Shahzada Qamar; Park, Jinjoo; Jung, Junhee; Lee, Chan; Song, Bong-Shik; Choi, Byoungdeog; Lee, Youn-Jung; Iftiquar, S M; Yi, Junsin

    2015-03-01

    Transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) have been widely used as transparent electrodes for opto-electronic devices, such as solar cells, flat-panel displays, and light-emitting diodes, because of their unique characteristics of high optical transmittance and low electrical resistivity. Among various TCO materials, zinc oxide based films have recently received much attention because they have advantages over commonly used indium and tin-based oxide films. Most TCO films, however, exhibit valleys of transmittance in the wavelength range of 550-700 nm, lowering the average transmittance in the visible region and decreasing short-circuit current (Isc) of solar cells. A TCO/Ag/TCO multi-layer structure has emerged as an attractive alternative because it provides optical characteristics without the valley of transmittance compared with a 100-nm-thick single-layer TCO. In this article, we report the electrical, optical and surface properties of TCO/Ag/TCO. These multi-layers were deposited at room temperature with various Ag film thicknesses from 5 to 15 nm while the thickness of TCO thin film was fixed at 40 nm. The TCO/Ag/TCO multi-layer with a 10-nm-thick Ag film showed optimum transmittance in the visible (400-800 nm) wavelength region. These multi-layer structures have advantages over TCO layers of the same thickness. PMID:26413647

  14. Investigation of Electrical and Optical Properties of Highly Transparent TCO/Ag/TCO Multilayer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunbo; Lee, Jaehyeong; Dao, Vinh Ai; Ahn, Shihyun; Hussain, Shahzada Qamar; Park, Jinjoo; Jung, Junhee; Lee, Chan; Song, Bong-Shik; Choi, Byoungdeog; Lee, Youn-Jung; Iftiquar, S M; Yi, Junsin

    2015-03-01

    Transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) have been widely used as transparent electrodes for opto-electronic devices, such as solar cells, flat-panel displays, and light-emitting diodes, because of their unique characteristics of high optical transmittance and low electrical resistivity. Among various TCO materials, zinc oxide based films have recently received much attention because they have advantages over commonly used indium and tin-based oxide films. Most TCO films, however, exhibit valleys of transmittance in the wavelength range of 550-700 nm, lowering the average transmittance in the visible region and decreasing short-circuit current (Isc) of solar cells. A TCO/Ag/TCO multi-layer structure has emerged as an attractive alternative because it provides optical characteristics without the valley of transmittance compared with a 100-nm-thick single-layer TCO. In this article, we report the electrical, optical and surface properties of TCO/Ag/TCO. These multi-layers were deposited at room temperature with various Ag film thicknesses from 5 to 15 nm while the thickness of TCO thin film was fixed at 40 nm. The TCO/Ag/TCO multi-layer with a 10-nm-thick Ag film showed optimum transmittance in the visible (400-800 nm) wavelength region. These multi-layer structures have advantages over TCO layers of the same thickness.

  15. Ag diffusion in cubic silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrader, David; Khalil, Sarah M.; Gerczak, Tyler; Allen, Todd R.; Heim, Andrew J.; Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane

    2011-01-01

    The diffusion of Ag impurities in bulk 3C-SiC is studied using ab initio methods based on density functional theory. This work is motivated by the desire to reduce transport of radioactive Ag isotopes through the SiC boundary layer in the Tristructural-Isotropic (TRISO) fuel pellet, which is a significant concern for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) nuclear reactor concept. The structure and stability of charged Ag and Ag-vacancy clusters in SiC are calculated. Relevant intrinsic SiC defect energies are also determined. The most stable state for the Ag impurity in SiC is found to be a Ag atom substituting on the Si sub-lattice and bound to a C vacancy. Bulk diffusion coefficients are estimated for different impurity states and values are all found to have very high activation energy. The impurity state with the lowest activation energy for diffusion is found to be the Ag interstitial, with an activation energy of approximately 7.9 eV. The high activation energies for Ag diffusion in bulk 3C-SiC cause Ag transport to be very slow in the bulk and suggests that observed Ag transport in this material is due to an alternative mechanism (e.g., grain boundary diffusion).

  16. Ag shell-Au satellite hetero-nanostructure for ultra-sensitive, reproducible, and homogeneous NIR SERS activity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyejin; Kang, Homan; Yang, Jin-Kyoung; Jo, Ahla; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Jeong, Dae Hong

    2014-08-13

    It is critical to create isotropic hot spots in developing a reproducible, homogeneous, and ultrasensitive SERS probe. Here, an Ag shell-Au satellite (Ag-Au SS) nanostructure composed of an Ag shell and surrounding Au nanoparticles was developed as a near-IR active SERS probe. The heterometallic shell-satellite structure based SERS probe produced intense and uniform SERS signals (SERS enhancement factor ∼1.4 × 10(6) with 11% relative standard deviation) with high detectability (100% under current measurement condition) by 785 nm photoexcitation. This signal enhancement was independent of the laser polarizations, which reflects the isotropic feature of the SERS activity of Ag-Au SS from the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of SERS hot spots between the shell and the surrounding satellite particles. The Ag-Au SS nanostructure shows a great potential as a reproducible and quantifiable NIR SERS probe for in vivo targets.

  17. Fracture analysis of randomized implant-supported fixed dental prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F.; Mehler, Alex; Clark, Arthur E.; Neal, Dan; Anusavice, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fractures of posterior fixed dental all-ceramic prostheses can be caused by one or more factors including prosthesis design, flaw distribution, direction and magnitude of occlusal loading, and nature of supporting infrastructure (tooth root/implant), and presence of adjacent teeth. This clinical study of implant-supported, all-ceramic fixed dental prostheses, determined the effects of (1) presence of a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; (2) prosthesis loading either along the non-load bearing or load bearing areas; (3) presence of excursive contacts or maximum intercuspation contacts in the prosthesis; and (4) magnitude of bite force on the occurrence of veneer ceramic fracture. Methods 89 implant-supported FDPs were randomized as either a three-unit posterior metal-ceramic (Au-Pd-Ag alloy and InLine POM, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP or a ceramic-ceramic (ZirCAD and ZirPress, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP. Two implants (Osseospeed, Dentsply) and custom abutments (Atlantis, Dentsply) supported these FDPs, which were cemented with resin cement (RelyX Universal Cement). Baseline photographs were made with markings of teeth from maximum intercuspation (MI) and excursive function. Patients were recalled at 6 months and 1 to 3 years. Fractures were observed, their locations recorded, and images compared with baseline photographs of occlusal contacts. Conclusion No significant relationship exists between the occurrence of fracture and: (1) the magnitude of bite force; (2) a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; and (3) contacts in load-bearing or non-load-bearing areas. However, there was a significantly higher likelihood of fracture in areas with MI contacts only. Clinical Significance This clinical study demonstrates that there is a need to evaluate occlusion differently with implant-supported prostheses than with natural tooth supported prostheses because of the absence of a periodontal ligament. Implant supported prostheses should have minimal occlusion and

  18. Capacitive deionization of seawater effected by nano Ag and Ag@C on graphene.

    PubMed

    Cai, P-F; Su, C-J; Chang, W-T; Chang, F-C; Peng, C-Y; Sun, I-W; Wei, Y-L; Jou, C-J; Wang, H Paul

    2014-08-30

    Drinking water shortage has become worse in recent decades. A new capacitive deionization (CDI) method for increasing water supplies through the effective desalination of seawater has been developed. Silver as nano Ag and Ag@C which was prepared by carbonization of the Ag(+)-β-cyclodextrin complex at 573 K for 30 min can add the antimicrobial function into the CDI process. The Ag@C and Ag nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide (Ag@C/rGO and nano Ag/rGO) were used as the CDI electrodes. The nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can reduce the charging resistant, and enhance the electrosorption capability. Better CDI efficiencies with the nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can therefore be obtained. When reversed the voltage, the electrodes can be recovered up to 90% within 5 min. This work presents the feasibility for the nano Ag and Ag@C on rGO electrodes applied in CDI process to produce drinking water from seawater or saline water.

  19. Ag/AgBr/TiO2 visible light photocatalyst for destruction of azodyes and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chun; Lan, Yongqing; Qu, Jiuhui; Hu, Xuexiang; Wang, Aimin

    2006-03-01

    Ag/AgBr/TiO2 was prepared by the deposition-precipitation method and was found to be a novel visible light driven photocatalyst. The catalyst showed high efficiency for the degradation of nonbiodegradable azodyes and the killing of Escherichia coli under visible light irradiation (lambda>420 nm). The catalyst activity was maintained effectively after successive cyclic experiments under UV or visible light irradiation without the destruction of AgBr. On the basis of the characterization of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy, the surface Ag species mainly exist as Ag0 in the structure of all samples before and after reaction, and Ag0 species scavenged hVB+ and then trapped eCB- in the process of photocatalytic reaction, inhibiting the decomposition of AgBr. The studies of ESR and H2O2 formation revealed that *OH and O2*- were formed in visible light irradiated aqueous Ag/AgBr/TiO2 suspension, while there was no reactive oxygen species in the visible light irradiated Ag0/TiO2 system. The results indicate that AgBr is the main photoactive species for the destruction of azodyes and bacteria under visible light. In addition, the bactericidal efficiency and killing mechanism of Ag/AgBr/TiO2 under visible light irradiation are illustrated and discussed. PMID:16509698

  20. Capacitive deionization of seawater effected by nano Ag and Ag@C on graphene.

    PubMed

    Cai, P-F; Su, C-J; Chang, W-T; Chang, F-C; Peng, C-Y; Sun, I-W; Wei, Y-L; Jou, C-J; Wang, H Paul

    2014-08-30

    Drinking water shortage has become worse in recent decades. A new capacitive deionization (CDI) method for increasing water supplies through the effective desalination of seawater has been developed. Silver as nano Ag and Ag@C which was prepared by carbonization of the Ag(+)-β-cyclodextrin complex at 573 K for 30 min can add the antimicrobial function into the CDI process. The Ag@C and Ag nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide (Ag@C/rGO and nano Ag/rGO) were used as the CDI electrodes. The nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can reduce the charging resistant, and enhance the electrosorption capability. Better CDI efficiencies with the nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can therefore be obtained. When reversed the voltage, the electrodes can be recovered up to 90% within 5 min. This work presents the feasibility for the nano Ag and Ag@C on rGO electrodes applied in CDI process to produce drinking water from seawater or saline water. PMID:24928455

  1. Stimulus properties of fixed-interval responses.

    PubMed

    Buchman, I B; Zeiler, M D

    1975-11-01

    Responses in the first component of a chained schedule produced a change to the terminal component according to a fixed-interval schedule. The number of responses emitted in the fixed interval determined whether a variable-interval schedule of food presentation or extinction prevailed in the terminal component. In one condition, the variable-interval schedule was in effect only if the number of responses during the fixed interval was less than that specified; in another condition, the number of responses had to exceed that specified. The number of responses emitted in the fixed interval did not shift markedly in the direction required for food presentation. Instead, responding often tended to change in the opposite direction. Such an effect indicated that differential food presentation did not modify the reference behavior in accord with the requirement, but it was consistent with other data on fixed-interval schedule performance. Behavior in the terminal component, however, did reveal sensitivity to the relation between total responses emitted in the fixed interval and the availability of food. Response rate in the terminal component was a function of the proximity of the response number emitted in the fixed interval to that required for food presentation. Thus, response number served as a discriminative stimulus controlling subsequent performance.

  2. Facile synthesis of S-Ag nanocomposites and Ag2S short nanorods by the interaction of sulfur with AgNO3 in PEG400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Li; Xie, Xin-Yuan; Liang, Ming; Xie, Shu-Ming; Chen, Jie-Mei; Zheng, Wen-Jie

    2016-06-01

    A facile, eco-friendly and inexpensive method to prepare Ag2S short nanorods and S-Ag nanocomposites using sublimed sulfur, AgNO3, PVP and PEG400 was studied. According to x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy of the Ag2S, the products are highly crystalline and pure Ag2S nanorods with diameters of 70-160 nm and lengths of 200-360 nm. X-ray diffraction of the S-Ag nanocomposites shows that we obtained cubic Ag and S nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the molar ratio of PVP to Ag+ plays an important role in controlling the size and morphology of the S-Ag nanocomposites. When the molar ratio of PVP to Ag+ was 10:1, smaller sizes, better dispersibility and narrower distribution of S-Ag nanocomposites with diameters of 10-40 nm were obtained. The formation mechanism of the S-Ag nanocomposites was studied by designing a series of experiments using ultraviolet-visible measurement, and it was found that S nanoparticles are produced first and act as seed crystals; then Ag+ becomes Ag nanocrystals on the surfaces of the S nanoparticles by the reduction of PVP. PEG400 acts as a catalyzer, accelerating the reaction rate, and protects the S-Ag nanocomposites from reacting to produce Ag2S. The antimicrobial experiments show that the S-Ag nanocomposites have greater antimicrobial activity on Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus niger and blue mold than Ag nanoparticles.

  3. Facile synthesis of S–Ag nanocomposites and Ag2S short nanorods by the interaction of sulfur with AgNO3 in PEG400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Li; Xie, Xin-Yuan; Liang, Ming; Xie, Shu-Ming; Chen, Jie-Mei; Zheng, Wen-Jie

    2016-06-01

    A facile, eco-friendly and inexpensive method to prepare Ag2S short nanorods and S–Ag nanocomposites using sublimed sulfur, AgNO3, PVP and PEG400 was studied. According to x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy of the Ag2S, the products are highly crystalline and pure Ag2S nanorods with diameters of 70–160 nm and lengths of 200–360 nm. X-ray diffraction of the S–Ag nanocomposites shows that we obtained cubic Ag and S nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the molar ratio of PVP to Ag+ plays an important role in controlling the size and morphology of the S–Ag nanocomposites. When the molar ratio of PVP to Ag+ was 10:1, smaller sizes, better dispersibility and narrower distribution of S–Ag nanocomposites with diameters of 10–40 nm were obtained. The formation mechanism of the S–Ag nanocomposites was studied by designing a series of experiments using ultraviolet–visible measurement, and it was found that S nanoparticles are produced first and act as seed crystals; then Ag+ becomes Ag nanocrystals on the surfaces of the S nanoparticles by the reduction of PVP. PEG400 acts as a catalyzer, accelerating the reaction rate, and protects the S–Ag nanocomposites from reacting to produce Ag2S. The antimicrobial experiments show that the S–Ag nanocomposites have greater antimicrobial activity on Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus niger and blue mold than Ag nanoparticles.

  4. Updraft Fixed Bed Gasification Aspen Plus Model

    2007-09-27

    The updraft fixed bed gasification model provides predictive modeling capabilities for updraft fixed bed gasifiers, when devolatilization data is available. The fixed bed model is constructed using Aspen Plus, process modeling software, coupled with a FORTRAN user kinetic subroutine. Current updraft gasification models created in Aspen Plus have limited predictive capabilities and must be "tuned" to reflect a generalized gas composition as specified in literature or by the gasifier manufacturer. This limits the applicability ofmore » the process model.« less

  5. [FIXED COMBINATION ATORVASTATIN-EZETIMIBE (ATOZET®)].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular prevention in subjects at high or very high risk requires a drastic reduction in LDL cholesterol according to the concept "the lower, the better". The combination of an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis and a selective inhibitor of intestinal absorption results in a complementary and synergistic LDL-lowering activity. Besides a first fixed combination ezetimibe-simvastatin (Inegy®), a new fixed combination is presented, Atozet® that combines atorvastatin and ezetimibe. Because atorvastatin is more potent than simvastatin, this novel fixed combination should facilitate reaching therapeutic goals in terms of LDL cholesterol amongst patients with severe hypercholesterolaemia and/or at high or very high cardiovascular risk.

  6. Finite volume QCD at fixed topological charge

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Sinya; Fukaya, Hidenori; Hashimoto, Shoji; Onogi, Tetsuya

    2007-09-01

    In finite volume the partition function of QCD with a given {theta} is a sum of different topological sectors with a weight primarily determined by the topological susceptibility. If a physical observable is evaluated only in a fixed topological sector, the result deviates from the true expectation value by an amount proportional to the inverse space-time volume 1/V. Using the saddle point expansion, we derive formulas to express the correction due to the fixed topological charge in terms of a 1/V expansion. Applying this formula, we propose a class of methods to determine the topological susceptibility in QCD from various correlation functions calculated in a fixed topological sector.

  7. AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrids with highly efficient visible-light driven photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumata, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Masanao; Suzuki, Tohru; Kaneco, Satoshi

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrid was prepared via an in situ anion-exchange method. • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} displays the excellent photocatalytic activity under visible light. • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} readily transforms to be Ag@AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} system. • h{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup ·−} play the major role in the AO 7 decolorization over AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. • The activity enhancement is ascribed to a Z-scheme system composed of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, Ag and AgI. - Abstract: Highly efficient visible-light-driven AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrid photocatalysts with different mole ratios of AgI were prepared via an in situ anion-exchange method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) technique. Under visible light irradiation (>420 nm), the AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} photocatalysts displayed the higher photocatalytic activity than pure Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and AgI for the decolorization of acid orange 7 (AO 7). Among the hybrid photocatalysts, AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with 80% of AgI exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity for the decolorization of AO 7. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} readily transformed to be Ag@AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} system while the photocatalytic activity of AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} remained after 5 recycling runs. In addition, the quenching effects of different scavengers displayed that the reactive h{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup ·−} play the major role in the AO 7 decolorization. The photocatalytic activity enhancement of AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrids can be ascribed to the efficient separation of electron–hole pairs through a Z-scheme system composed of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, Ag and AgI, in which Ag nanoparticles act as the charge separation center.

  8. Visible-light-driven photocatalysts Ag/AgCl dispersed on mesoporous Al2O3 with enhanced photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhouzhou; Yu, Jiajie; Sun, Dongping; Wang, Tianhe

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, Ag/AgCl and Ag/AgCl/Al2O3 photocatalysts were synthesized via a precipitation reaction between NaCl and CH3COOAg or Ag(NH3)2NO3, wherein Ag/AgCl was immobilized into mesoporous Al2O3 medium. The Ag/AgCl-based nanostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and so on. The photocatalysts displayed excellent photocatalytic activity for the degradations of methyl orange (MO) and methylene blue (MB) pollutants under visible light irradiation. The Ag/AgCl(CH3COOAg)/Al2O3 sample exhibited the best photocatalytic performance, degrading 99% MO after 9min of irradiation, which was 1.1 times, 1.22 times and 1.65 times higher than that of Ag/AgCl(Ag(NH3)2NO3)/Al2O3, Ag/AgCl(CH3COOAg) and Ag/AgCl(Ag(NH3)2NO3) photocatalyst, respectively. Meanwhile, Ag/AgCl(CH3COOAg)/Al2O3 also showed excellent capability of MB degradation. Compared to the data reported for Ag/AgCl/TiO2, the Ag/AgCl/Al2O3 prepared in this work exhibited a good performance for the degradation of methyl orange (MO). The results suggest that the dispersion of Ag/AgCl on mesoporous Al2O3 strongly affected their photocatalytic activities. O2(-), OH radicals and Cl(0) atoms are main active species during photocatalysis. PMID:27442145

  9. Excitons in AgI-BASED-GLASSES and -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishiro, Fumito; Mochizuki, Shosuke

    2007-01-01

    We summarize our recent optical studies on different pristine AgI films, different AgI-based glasses and different AgI-oxide fine particle composites. The exciton spectra of these specimens give useful information about the ionic and electronic structures at the AgI/glass and AgI/oxide particle interfaces.

  10. The cardiovascular response to the AGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardus, David; Mctaggart, Wesley G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results of experiments on human subjects conducted to study the cardiovascular response to various g-levels and exposure times using an artificial gravity simulator (AGS). The AGS is a short arm centrifuge consisting of a turntable, a traction system, a platform and four beds. Data collection hardware is part of the communication system. The AGS provides a steep acceleration gradient in subjects in the supine position.

  11. Organ-Specific and Size-Dependent Ag Nanoparticle Toxicity in Gills and Intestines of Adult Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Olivia J; Lin, Sijie; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Yu, Xuechen; Wang, Xiang; Lin, Shuo; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E

    2015-10-27

    We studied adult zebrafish to determine whether the size of 20 and 110 nm citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (AgC NPs) differentially impact the gills and intestines, known target organs for Ag toxicity in fish. Following exposure for 4 h, 4 days, or 4 days plus a 7 day depuration period, we obtained different toxicokinetic profiles for different particle sizes, as determined by Ag content of the tissues. Ionic AgNO3 served as a positive control. The gills showed a significantly higher Ag content for the 20 nm particles at 4 h and 4 days than the 110 nm particles, while the values were more similar in the intestines. Both particle types were retained in the intestines even after depuration. These toxicokinetics were accompanied by striking size-dependent differences in the ultrastructural features and histopathology in the target organs in response to the particulates. Ag staining of the gills and intestines confirmed prominent Ag deposition in the basolateral membranes for the 20 nm but not for the 110 nm particles. Furthermore, it was possible to link the site of tissue deposition to disruption of the Na(+)/K(+) ion channel, which is also localized to the basolateral membrane. This was confirmed by a reduction in ATPase activity and immunohistochemical detection of the α subunit of this channel in both target organs, with the 20 nm particles causing significantly higher inhibition and disruption than the larger size particles or AgNO3. These results demonstrate the importance of particle size in determining the hazardous impact of AgNPs in the gills and intestines of adult zebrafish.

  12. Organ-Specific and Size-Dependent Ag Nanoparticle Toxicity in Gills and Intestines of Adult Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Olivia J; Lin, Sijie; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Yu, Xuechen; Wang, Xiang; Lin, Shuo; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E

    2015-10-27

    We studied adult zebrafish to determine whether the size of 20 and 110 nm citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (AgC NPs) differentially impact the gills and intestines, known target organs for Ag toxicity in fish. Following exposure for 4 h, 4 days, or 4 days plus a 7 day depuration period, we obtained different toxicokinetic profiles for different particle sizes, as determined by Ag content of the tissues. Ionic AgNO3 served as a positive control. The gills showed a significantly higher Ag content for the 20 nm particles at 4 h and 4 days than the 110 nm particles, while the values were more similar in the intestines. Both particle types were retained in the intestines even after depuration. These toxicokinetics were accompanied by striking size-dependent differences in the ultrastructural features and histopathology in the target organs in response to the particulates. Ag staining of the gills and intestines confirmed prominent Ag deposition in the basolateral membranes for the 20 nm but not for the 110 nm particles. Furthermore, it was possible to link the site of tissue deposition to disruption of the Na(+)/K(+) ion channel, which is also localized to the basolateral membrane. This was confirmed by a reduction in ATPase activity and immunohistochemical detection of the α subunit of this channel in both target organs, with the 20 nm particles causing significantly higher inhibition and disruption than the larger size particles or AgNO3. These results demonstrate the importance of particle size in determining the hazardous impact of AgNPs in the gills and intestines of adult zebrafish. PMID:26327297

  13. NASA Fixed Wing Project: Green Technologies for Future Aircraft Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Rosario, Ruben; Koudelka, John M.; Wahls, Rich; Madavan, Nateri

    2014-01-01

    Commercial aviation relies almost entirely on subsonic fixed wing aircraft to constantly move people and goods from one place to another across the globe. While air travel is an effective means of transportation providing an unmatched combination of speed and range, future subsonic aircraft must improve substantially to meet efficiency and environmental targets.The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Fixed Wing (FW) Project addresses the comprehensive challenge of enabling revolutionary energy efficiency improvements in subsonic transport aircraft combined with dramatic reductions in harmful emissions and perceived noise to facilitate sustained growth of the air transportation system. Advanced technologies and the development of unconventional aircraft systems offer the potential to achieve these improvements. Multidisciplinary advances are required in aerodynamic efficiency to reduce drag, structural efficiency to reduce aircraft empty weight, and propulsive and thermal efficiency to reduce thrust-specific energy consumption (TSEC) for overall system benefit. Additionally, advances are required to reduce perceived noise without adversely affecting drag, weight, or TSEC, and to reduce harmful emissions without adversely affecting energy efficiency or noise.The paper will highlight the Fixed Wing project vision of revolutionary systems and technologies needed to achieve these challenging goals. Specifically, the primary focus of the FW Project is on the N+3 generation; that is, vehicles that are three generations beyond the current state of the art, requiring mature technology solutions in the 2025-30 timeframe

  14. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) cause degeneration of cytoskeleton and disrupt synaptic machinery of cultured cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), owing to their effective antimicrobial properties, are being widely used in a broad range of applications. These include, but are not limited to, antibacterial materials, the textile industry, cosmetics, coatings of various household appliances and medical devices. Despite their extensive use, little is known about AgNP safety and toxicity vis-à-vis human and animal health. Recent studies have drawn attention towards potential neurotoxic effects of AgNPs, however, the primary cellular and molecular targets of AgNP action/s remain to be defined. Results Here we examine the effects of ultra fine scales (20 nm) of AgNPs at various concentrations (1, 5, 10 and 50 μg/ml) on primary rat cortical cell cultures. We found that AgNPs (at 1-50 μg/ml) not only inhibited neurite outgrowth and reduced cell viability of premature neurons and glial cells, but also induced degeneration of neuronal processes of mature neurons. Our immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy studies further demonstrated that AgNPs induced the loss of cytoskeleton components such as the β-tubulin and filamentous actin (F-actin). AgNPs also dramatically reduced the number of synaptic clusters of the presynaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin, and the postsynaptic receptor density protein PSD-95. Finally, AgNP exposure also resulted in mitochondria dysfunction in rat cortical cells. Conclusions Taken together, our data show that AgNPs induce toxicity in neurons, which involves degradation of cytoskeleton components, perturbations of pre- and postsynaptic proteins, and mitochondrial dysfunction leading to cell death. Our study clearly demonstrates the potential detrimental effects of AgNPs on neuronal development and physiological functions and warns against its prolific usage. PMID:23782671

  15. AgRP Neurons Regulate Bone Mass.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Geun; Sun, Ben-Hua; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Koch, Marco; Yao, Gang-Qing; Diano, Sabrina; Insogna, Karl; Horvath, Tamas L

    2015-10-01

    The hypothalamus has been implicated in skeletal metabolism. Whether hunger-promoting neurons of the arcuate nucleus impact the bone is not known. We generated multiple lines of mice to affect AgRP neuronal circuit integrity. We found that mice with Ucp2 gene deletion, in which AgRP neuronal function was impaired, were osteopenic. This phenotype was rescued by cell-selective reactivation of Ucp2 in AgRP neurons. When the AgRP circuitry was impaired by early postnatal deletion of AgRP neurons or by cell autonomous deletion of Sirt1 (AgRP-Sirt1(-/-)), mice also developed reduced bone mass. No impact of leptin receptor deletion in AgRP neurons was found on bone homeostasis. Suppression of sympathetic tone in AgRP-Sirt1(-/-) mice reversed osteopenia in transgenic animals. Taken together, these observations establish a significant regulatory role for AgRP neurons in skeletal bone metabolism independent of leptin action. PMID:26411686

  16. Multiple Partial Siberian Snakes in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, J.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Gardner, C. J.; Glenn, J. W.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Okamura, M.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Hattori, T.; Lin, F.

    2007-06-13

    Polarized protons are accelerated up to 24.3 GeV in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). To accelerate the beam with preserving the polarization, two different types of helical dipole partial Siberian snake have been installed to the AGS. One is a superconducting magnet (Cold Snake, CSNK), and the other is a normal conducting one (Warm Snake, WSNK). With these snake magnets, the polarization at the AGS extraction achieved 65%. However, the AGS has spin mismatches at the injection and extraction. This description shows calculated results to have better spin matching with using two or three snakes.

  17. Anderson Acceleration for Fixed-Point Iterations

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Homer F.

    2015-08-31

    The purpose of this grant was to support research on acceleration methods for fixed-point iterations, with applications to computational frameworks and simulation problems that are of interest to DOE.

  18. Gravitational Fixed Points from Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Niedermaier, Max R.

    2009-09-04

    The fixed point structure of the renormalization flow in higher derivative gravity is investigated in terms of the background covariant effective action using an operator cutoff that keeps track of powerlike divergences. Spectral positivity of the gauge fixed Hessian can be satisfied upon expansion in the asymptotically free higher derivative coupling. At one-loop order in this coupling strictly positive fixed points are found for the dimensionless Newton constant g{sub N} and the cosmological constant lambda, which are determined solely by the coefficients of the powerlike divergences. The renormalization flow is asymptotically safe with respect to this fixed point and settles on a lambda(g{sub N}) trajectory after O(10) units of the renormalization mass scale to accuracy 10{sup -7}.

  19. Gravitational fixed points from perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niedermaier, Max R

    2009-09-01

    The fixed point structure of the renormalization flow in higher derivative gravity is investigated in terms of the background covariant effective action using an operator cutoff that keeps track of powerlike divergences. Spectral positivity of the gauge fixed Hessian can be satisfied upon expansion in the asymptotically free higher derivative coupling. At one-loop order in this coupling strictly positive fixed points are found for the dimensionless Newton constant g(N) and the cosmological constant lambda, which are determined solely by the coefficients of the powerlike divergences. The renormalization flow is asymptotically safe with respect to this fixed point and settles on a lambda(g(N)) trajectory after O(10) units of the renormalization mass scale to accuracy 10(-7).

  20. Intriguing centrality dependence of the Au-Au source size at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.D.; The E802 Collaboration

    1996-06-01

    One of the main goals of high energy heavy ion physics is to establish the existence of a deconfined phase of nuclear matter--the quark-gluon plasma--at high temperatures or densities. One possible signature of such a phase transition, especially if it were first order, would be a larger source size or lifetime than a similar hadronic system. At current AGS energies, we attempt to form a quark- gluon plasma by achieving a high baryon density for a period of time in the center of the collision region. For a given density threshold, the size of this high density region should be a strong function of the impact parameter: the more central the event, the larger the high density region. Therefore, one possible signature of a quark-gluon plasma would be a sudden change in system lifetime or size as a function of the centrality of the collision. In this talk we present an intriguing effect which was not predicted for simple hadronic systems: a rapid increase of the HBT-measured source radius parameter for pion pairs with increasing centrality for Au-Au collisions at a beam momentum of 11.45 A GeV/c on a fixed target. Experience has shown, however, that we must be cautious in our interpretation. A complete understanding of the collision dynamics at a given energy must be built up from several measurements and new, but conventional, hadronic explanations must be considered for such unexpected effects. More study is needed, therefore, before any strong conclusions can be reached.

  1. Toxicokinetics of Ag in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus exposed to Ag NPs and AgNO₃ via soil and food.

    PubMed

    Tourinho, Paula S; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Morgan, A John; Kille, Peter; Svendsen, Claus; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Mosselmans, J Fred W; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2016-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been used in numerous consumer products and may enter the soil through the land application of biosolids. However, little is known about the relationship between Ag NP exposure and their bioavailability for soil organisms. This study aims at comparing the uptake and elimination kinetics of Ag upon exposures to different Ag forms (NPs and ionic Ag (as AgNO3)) in the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus. Isopods were exposed to contaminated Lufa 2.2 soil or alder leaves as food. Uptake and elimination rate constants for soil exposure did not significantly differ between Ag NPs and ionic Ag at 30 and 60 mg Ag/kg. For dietary exposure, the uptake rate constant was up to 5 times higher for Ag NPs than for AgNO3, but this was related to feeding activity and exposure concentrations, while no difference in the elimination rate constants was found. When comparing both routes, dietary exposure resulted in lower Ag uptake rate constants but elimination rate constants did not differ. A fast Ag uptake was observed from both routes and most of the Ag taken up seemed not to be eliminated. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence showed Ag in the S-cells of the hepatopancreas, thus supporting the observations from the kinetic experiment (i.e. low elimination). In addition, our results show that isopods have an extremely high Ag accumulation capacity, suggesting the presence of an efficient Ag storage compartment. PMID:26581474

  2. Characterization of the intermediate-range order in new superionic conducting AgI-Ag2S-AgPO3 glasses by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartini, E.; Kennedy, S. J.; Itoh, K.; Fukunaga, T.; Suminta, S.; Kamiyama, T.

    Superionic conducting glasses are of considerable technological interest because of their use in batteries, sensors, and displays. We have investigated the new ternary systems AgI-Ag2S-AgPO3 where the ratio AgI:Ag2S is 1:1. The system (AgI)x(Ag2S)x(AgPO3)1-2x, for a AgI+Ag2S fraction less than 82mol%, yields glasses. We have used a neutron-diffraction technique to obtain the total scattering structure factor S(Q) of this system at room temperature by using the HIT spectrometer at the High Energy Accelerator (KEK), Tsukuba, Japan. As for AgI-AgPO3 glasses, S(Q) shows a peak at anomalously low Q in the range from 0.6 to 0.9 Å-1. This peak is not observed in the corresponding glass Ag2S-AgPO3 or pure AgPO3. The peak depends strongly on the dopant salt. Its intensity increases as the amount of (AgI+Ag2S) increases and its position shifts to lower Q, while the number density of the glasses decreases with x. This peak can be associated with an intermediate structure of particles lying inside a continuous host with the characteristic length between 5 and 10 Å [1].

  3. Toxicokinetics of Ag in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus exposed to Ag NPs and AgNO₃ via soil and food.

    PubMed

    Tourinho, Paula S; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Morgan, A John; Kille, Peter; Svendsen, Claus; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Mosselmans, J Fred W; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2016-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been used in numerous consumer products and may enter the soil through the land application of biosolids. However, little is known about the relationship between Ag NP exposure and their bioavailability for soil organisms. This study aims at comparing the uptake and elimination kinetics of Ag upon exposures to different Ag forms (NPs and ionic Ag (as AgNO3)) in the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus. Isopods were exposed to contaminated Lufa 2.2 soil or alder leaves as food. Uptake and elimination rate constants for soil exposure did not significantly differ between Ag NPs and ionic Ag at 30 and 60 mg Ag/kg. For dietary exposure, the uptake rate constant was up to 5 times higher for Ag NPs than for AgNO3, but this was related to feeding activity and exposure concentrations, while no difference in the elimination rate constants was found. When comparing both routes, dietary exposure resulted in lower Ag uptake rate constants but elimination rate constants did not differ. A fast Ag uptake was observed from both routes and most of the Ag taken up seemed not to be eliminated. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence showed Ag in the S-cells of the hepatopancreas, thus supporting the observations from the kinetic experiment (i.e. low elimination). In addition, our results show that isopods have an extremely high Ag accumulation capacity, suggesting the presence of an efficient Ag storage compartment.

  4. Evidence for surface Ag + complexes as the SERS-active sites on Ag electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Kawanami, O.; Honda, K.; Pettinger, B.

    1983-12-01

    Evidence is given that SERS-active sites at Ag electrodes are associated with Ag + ions, forming sparingly soluble surface complexes with ligands such as pyridine molecules and halide ions. Such surface Ag + complexes contribute a factor of >800 to the overall (10 7-fold) enhancement, possibly via a resonance Raman effect.

  5. Single step electrochemical synthesis of hydrophilic/hydrophobic Ag5 and Ag6 blue luminescent clusters.

    PubMed

    Santiago González, Beatriz; Blanco, M C; López-Quintela, M Arturo

    2012-12-21

    Well-defined Ag(5) and Ag(6) dodecanethiol/tetrabutyl ammonium-protected clusters were prepared by a one-pot electrochemical method. Ag clusters show bright and photostable emissions. The presence of a dual capping renders the silver clusters soluble in both organic and aqueous solvents.

  6. 78 FR 30965 - AG Valley Railroad, LLC-Operation Exemption-Ag Valley Holdings, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... Surface Transportation Board AG Valley Railroad, LLC--Operation Exemption--Ag Valley Holdings, LLC AG... original and 10 copies of all pleadings, referring to Docket No. FD 35736, must be filed with the Surface.... Board decisions and notices are available on our Web site at www.stb.dot.gov . Decided: May 20, 2013....

  7. Ultrafast processes in Ag and Au: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hall, P. J.

    2001-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of ultrafast electron processes in Ag and Au have been used to analyze transient reflectivity as well as two-photon photoemission experiments. The model consisted of an electron Fermi gas coupled to longitudinal acoustic phonons. A laser pulse of finite width excited the electrons, after which the development of the distribution function was followed during 3-5 ps. In the electron-phonon coupling we used the full q dependence of the scattering together with a semirealistic phonon dispersion relation. The strength of the electron-phonon scattering is governed by the deformation potential. Its value was fixed to low-fluence transient reflection data. Also hot-phonon effects were included. For the electron-electron scattering we employed a Coulomb interaction screened according to the Thomas-Fermi prescription. We accounted for exchange effects in the total scattering probability. In a later stage we varied the screening. We analyzed a variety of data for Ag and Au. A good description of the temperature dependence of the transient reflectivity for various excitation powers could be obtained. Also the time evolution of the Fermi surface showed fair agreement with the experiment. In the case of Ag the lifetime of an electron above the Fermi sea was predicted correctly. For Au, however, it was necessary to increase the screening to obtain the correct lifetimes of electrons excited above the Fermi sea. Using this adjusted screening the description of the other experiments no longer was appropriate. Finally also the resistivity due to electron-phonon scattering was predicted quite well using the deformation potential extracted from the ultrafast reflectivity experiments.

  8. Stabilising Springs for Fixed Lingual Retainer

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, M.K.; Ramachandraprabhakar; Saravanan, R.; Rajvikram, N.; Kuppuchamy

    2013-01-01

    Most treated malocclusion needs fixed lingual retention. To stabilise fixed lingual retainer in the exact location needs proper stabilisation. Proper stabilization requires a holding spring. This Stabilising Spring should be easy to fabricate and help the clinician to stabilise the retainer quickly and save the chair side time. More over it should not irritate the mucosa and should be easy to insert and remove. PMID:24392431

  9. DNA extraction from formalin-fixed material.

    PubMed

    Campos, Paula F; Gilbert, Thomas M P

    2012-01-01

    The principal challenges facing PCR-based analyses of DNA extracted from formalin-fixed materials are fragmentation of the DNA and cross-linked protein-DNA complexes. Here, we present an efficient protocol to extract DNA from formalin-fixed or paraffin-embedded tissues (FFPE). In this protocol, protein-DNA cross-links are reversed using heat and alkali treatment, yielding significantly longer fragments and larger amounts of PCR-amplifiable DNA than standard DNA extraction protocols.

  10. Characterizations of fixed points of quantum operations

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yuan

    2011-05-15

    Let {phi}{sub A} be a general quantum operation. An operator B is said to be a fixed point of {phi}{sub A}, if {phi}{sub A}(B)=B. In this note, we shall show conditions under which B, a fixed point {phi}{sub A}, implies that B is compatible with the operation element of {phi}{sub A}. In particular, we offer an extension of the generalized Lueders theorem.

  11. Regulation of the fixA gene and fixBC operon in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, M; Hennecke, H

    1988-01-01

    The transcriptional start site of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum fixBC operon was identified by nuclease S1 mapping. It was located approximately 700 base pairs upstream of fixB and was preceded by a promoter sequence that showed strong homology to the B. japonicum fixA promoter and thus to the general nif consensus promoter sequence. Further transcript mapping experiments revealed that fixA and fixBC transcription in B. japonicum strictly depended on the presence of the regulatory gene nifA and on low oxygen partial pressure. Consistent with these data, chromosomally integrated fixA- and fixB-lacZ fusions expressed beta-galactosidase activity only in the wild type but not in a nifA mutant and only under microaerobic but not aerobic growth conditions. The presence of nifA accounted for a 19-fold and 44-fold activation of the fixA and fixB promoters, respectively. These results show that the fixA and fixBC genes are regulated in a way similar to that of the nitrogenase genes nifH and nifDK. A very peculiar finding was that the fixA and fixB promoters, when they were located on plasmids, could hardly be activated by the NifA protein, irrespective of whether this was tested in Escherichia coli or B. japonicum backgrounds. This is in clear contrast to the situation with nifH and nifD promoters. Images PMID:3343218

  12. Precise Point Positioning with Partial Ambiguity Fixing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Reliable and rapid ambiguity resolution (AR) is the key to fast precise point positioning (PPP). We propose a modified partial ambiguity resolution (PAR) method, in which an elevation and standard deviation criterion are first used to remove the low-precision ambiguity estimates for AR. Subsequently the success rate and ratio-test are simultaneously used in an iterative process to increase the possibility of finding a subset of decorrelated ambiguities which can be fixed with high confidence. One can apply the proposed PAR method to try to achieve an ambiguity-fixed solution when full ambiguity resolution (FAR) fails. We validate this method using data from 450 stations during DOY 021 to 027, 2012. Results demonstrate the proposed PAR method can significantly shorten the time to first fix (TTFF) and increase the fixing rate. Compared with FAR, the average TTFF for PAR is reduced by 14.9% for static PPP and 15.1% for kinematic PPP. Besides, using the PAR method, the average fixing rate can be increased from 83.5% to 98.2% for static PPP, from 80.1% to 95.2% for kinematic PPP respectively. Kinematic PPP accuracy with PAR can also be significantly improved, compared to that with FAR, due to a higher fixing rate. PMID:26067196

  13. Modeling and Analysis of AGS (1998) Thermal Shock Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, J.R.; Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    An overview is provided on modeling and analysis of thermal shock experiments conducted during 1998 with high-energy, short-pulse energy deposition in a mercury filled container in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The simulation framework utilized along with the results of simulations for pressure and strain profiles are presented. While the magnitude of penk strain predictions versus data are in reasonable agreement, the temporal variations were found to differ significantly in selected cases, indicating lack of modeling of certain physical phenomena or due to uncertainties in the experimental data gathering techniques. Key thermal-shock related issues and uncertainties are highlighted. Specific experiments conducted at BNL's AGS facility during 1998 (the subject of this paper) involved high-energy (24 GeV) proton energy deposition in the mercury target over a time frame of - 0.1s. The target consisted of an - 1 m. long cylindrical stainless steel shell with a hemispherical dome at the leading edge. It was filled with mercury at room temperature and pressure. Several optical strain gages were attached to the surface of the steel target. Figure 1 shows a schematic representation of the test vessel along with the main dimensions and positions of three optical strain gages at which meaningful data were obtained. As

  14. Sputter target

    DOEpatents

    Gates, Willard G.; Hale, Gerald J.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an improved sputter target for use in the deposition of hard coatings. An exemplary target is given wherein titanium diboride is brazed to a tantalum backing plate using a gold-palladium-nickel braze alloy.

  15. Tyrphostin AG 1296 induces glioblastoma cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    LI, HONGWEI; ZHENG, JUNNING; GUAN, RUIYUN; ZHU, ZIFENG; YUAN, XIANHOU

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common type of malignant human brain tumor. Currently available chemotherapies for glioblastoma focus on targeting tyrosine kinases. However, the existing inhibitors of tyrosine kinases have not produced the therapeutic outcomes that were anticipated. In order to investigate the viability alternative chemotherapeutic agents in this disease, the present study examined the anticancer effects of tyrphostin AG 1296, focusing on its involvement in apoptosis in glioblastoma cells. The study aimed to identify whether tyrphostin AG 1296 affects glioblastoma cell growth by inducing cell apoptosis. To achieve this, cell viability, propidium iodide analysis and cell invasion assay were used to measure cell growth, cell apoptosis and cell migration of human glioblastoma cells. The results showed that tyrphostin AG 1296 treatment reduced cell viability and suppressed migration of human glioblastoma cells. It was also demonstrated that tyrphostin AG 1296 induced cell apoptosis in vitro. Finally, tyrphostin AG 1296 was also shown to significantly inhibit the growth of glioblastoma cells and to increase tumor cell apoptosis in vivo. These findings suggest that tyrphostin AG 1296 induces apoptosis, thereby reducing cell viability and capacity for migration of glioblastoma cells. PMID:26788146

  16. Necklace-shaped Au-Ag nanoalloys: laser-assisted synthesis and nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarkhani, P.; Torkamany, M. J.; Dadras, S.; Chehrghani, A.; Sabbaghzadeh, J.

    2011-06-01

    Here in this paper, necklace-shaped Au-Ag nanoalloys (NAs) have been synthesized by a laser-based approach. A chain of Ag nanoparticles (NPs), which were joined together with Au junctions, was formed upon copper vapor laser (CVL) irradiation of a colloidal mixture of Ag and Au NPs; while the corresponding NPs were separately provided by laser ablation of gold and silver targets in deionized water by a 1064 nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Dependence of the NAs development process on the CVL irradiation time in three distinct stages of as-mixed, nucleation and complete formation has been systematically studied by UV-vis optical absorption spectroscopy analysis as well as by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which was exploited to visually confirm the NAs evolution through the process. Furthermore, the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique was accurately employed to determine the synthesized alloy content. On the other hand, using the open-and closed-aperture Z-scan technique, the nonlinear absorption (NLA) as well as nonlinear refraction (NLR) changes in Au-Ag NAs were investigated through their formation. The deduced results from the nonlinear optical properties of the colloidal NAs in the mentioned stages were interpreted considering the spectroscopic and microscopic observations. The total change of individual Au and Ag NPs saturable absorption (SA) into the reverse saturable absorption (RSA) behavior was concluded through the evolution into Au-Ag NAs.

  17. Progress with the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Rare K-decay, neutrino and heavy ion physics demands that a rapid- cycling high vacuum and high intensity Booster be built for the AGS at Brookhaven. For each mode of operation there are corresponding accelerator physics and design issues needing special attention. Problems pertinent to any single mode of operation have been encountered and solved before, but putting high intensity proton requirements and high vacuum heavy ion requirements into one machine demands careful design considerations and decisions. The lattice design and magnet characteristics will be briefly reviewed. Major design issues will be discussed and design choices explained. Finally, the construction status and schedule will be presented. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Hypernuclear research at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    Although the field of hypernuclear research is over 30 years old, progress in exploring the detailed behavior of hypernuclei has been slow. This fact is due mainly to the technical problems of producing and studying these strange objects. Indeed each step in the improvement of technique has been accompanied by a breakthrough in our understanding of this fascinating subject. In this paper, the aim is to describe the evolution of hypernuclear research, stressing especially the contributions of the program based on the Brookhaven AGS. 23 references, 17 figures, 1 table.

  19. 48 CFR 16.204 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Fixed-Price Contracts 16.204 Fixed-price incentive contracts. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides for adjusting profit...

  20. 48 CFR 16.204 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Fixed-Price Contracts 16.204 Fixed-price incentive contracts. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides for adjusting profit...

  1. 48 CFR 16.204 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Fixed-Price Contracts 16.204 Fixed-price incentive contracts. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides for adjusting profit...

  2. 48 CFR 16.204 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Fixed-Price Contracts 16.204 Fixed-price incentive contracts. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides for adjusting profit...

  3. 48 CFR 16.204 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Fixed-Price Contracts 16.204 Fixed-price incentive contracts. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides for adjusting profit...

  4. Evidence for a fixed capacity limit in attending multiple locations.

    PubMed

    Ester, Edward F; Fukuda, Keisuke; May, Lisa M; Vogel, Edward K; Awh, Edward

    2014-03-01

    A classic question concerns whether humans can attend multiple locations or objects at once. Although it is generally agreed that the answer to this question is "yes," the limits on this ability are subject to extensive debate. According to one view, attentional resources can be flexibly allocated to a variable number of locations, with an inverse relationship between the number of selected locations and the quality of information processing at each location. Alternatively, these resources might be quantized in a "discrete" fashion that enables concurrent access to a small number of locations. Here, we report a series of experiments comparing these alternatives. In each experiment, we cued participants to attend a variable number of spatial locations and asked them to report the orientation of a single, briefly presented target. In all experiments, participants' orientation report errors were well-described by a model that assumes a fixed upper limit in the number of locations that can be attended. Conversely, report errors were poorly described by a flexible-resource model that assumes no fixed limit on the number of locations that can be attended. Critically, we showed that these discrete limits were predicted by cue-evoked neural activity elicited before the onset of the target array, suggesting that performance was limited by selection processes that began prior to subsequent encoding and memory storage. Together, these findings constitute novel evidence supporting the hypothesis that human observers can attend only a small number of discrete locations at an instant.

  5. Structural and optical properties of (Ag,Cu)(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} polycrystalline thin film alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, J. H.; Shafarman, W. N.; Birkmire, R. W.; McCandless, B. E.

    2014-06-14

    The structural and optical properties of pentenary alloy (Ag,Cu)(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} polycrystalline thin films were characterized over the entire compositional range at a fixed (Cu + Ag)/(In + Ga) ratio. Films deposited at 550 °C on bare and molybdenum coated soda-lime glass by elemental co-evaporation in a single-stage process with constant incident fluxes exhibit single phase chalcopyrite structure, corresponding to 122 spacegroup (I-42d) over the entire compositional space. Unit cell refinement of the diffraction patterns show that increasing Ag substitution for Cu, the refined a{sub o} lattice constant, (Ag,Cu)-Se bond length, and anion displacement increase in accordance with the theoretical model proposed by Jaffe, Wei, and Zunger. However, the refined c{sub o} lattice constant and (In,Ga)-Se bond length deviated from theoretical expectations for films with mid-range Ag and Ga compositions and are attributed to influences from crystallographic bond chain ordering or cation electronegativity. The optical band gap, derived from transmission and reflection measurements, widened with increasing Ag and Ga content, due to influences from anion displacement and cation electronegativity, as expected from theoretical considerations for pseudo-binary chalcopyrite compounds.

  6. Effect of salts, solvents and buffer on miRNA detection using DNA silver nanocluster (DNA/AgNCs) probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Pratik; Cho, Seok Keun; Waaben Thulstrup, Peter; Bhang, Yong-Joo; Ahn, Jong Cheol; Choi, Suk Won; Rørvig-Lund, Andreas; Yang, Seong Wook

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs (size ˜21 nt to ˜25 nt) which regulate a variety of important cellular events in plants, animals and single cell eukaryotes. Especially because of their use in diagnostics of human diseases, efforts have been directed towards the invention of a rapid, simple and sequence selective detection method for miRNAs. Recently, we reported an innovative method for the determination of miRNA levels using the red fluorescent properties of DNA/silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs). Our method is based on monitoring the emission drop of a DNA/AgNCs probe in the presence of its specific target miRNA. Accordingly, the accuracy and efficiency of the method relies on the sensitivity of hybridization between the probe and target. To gain specific and robust hybridization between probe and target, we investigated a range of diverse salts, organic solvents, and buffer to optimize target sensing conditions. Under the newly adjusted conditions, the target sensitivity and the formation of emissive DNA/AgNCs probes were significantly improved. Also, fortification of the Tris-acetate buffer with inorganic salts or organic solvents improved the sensitivity of the DNA/AgNC probes. On the basis of these optimizations, the versatility of the DNA/AgNCs-based miRNA detection method can be expanded.

  7. Ag(I)-cysteamine complex based electrochemical stripping immunoassay: ultrasensitive human IgG detection.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hui-Bog; Rahman, Md Aminur; Yang, Jee Eun; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2011-07-15

    An ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor for a protein using a Ag (I)-cysteamine complex (Ag-Cys) as a label was fabricated. The low detection of a protein was based on the electrochemical stripping of Ag from the adsorbed Ag-Cys complex on the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated human immunoglobulin G (anti-IgG) antibody (AuNPs-anti-IgG). The electrochemical immunosensor was fabricated by immobilizing anti-IgG antibody on a poly-5,2':5',2''-terthiophene-3'-carboxylic acid (polyTTCA) film grown on the glassy carbon electrode through the covalent bond formation between amine groups of anti-IgG and carboxylic acid groups of polyTTCA. The target protein, IgG was sandwiched between the anti-IgG antibody that covalently attached onto the polyTTCA layer and AuNPs-anti-IgG. Using square wave voltammetry, well defined Ag stripping voltammograms were obtained for the each target concentration. Various experimental parameters were optimized and interference effects from other proteins were checked out. The immunosensor exhibited a wide dynamic range with the detection limit of 0.4 ± 0.05 fg/mL. To evaluate the analytical reliability, the proposed immunosensor was applied to human IgG spiked serum samples and acceptable results were obtained indicating that the method can be readily extended to other bioaffinity assays of clinical or environmental significance.

  8. The role of Ag in the pulsed laser growth of YBCO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyanaraman, R.; Oktyabrsky, S.; Narayan, J.

    1999-05-01

    We have studied systematically the role of silver in improving microstructure and properties of Y1Ba2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) thin films. We have more than doubled the grain size to nearly 1.8 μm and reduced processing temperatures by incorporating Ag in the YBCO films, which is accomplished by using a composite target containing 15% by weight of Ag. These films show approximately four times higher Jc than the best films obtained on MgO(001) substrates deposited from stoichiometric Y1Ba2Cu3O7-δ targets. Study of the silver content in the film as a function of the deposition temperature shows clearly a decreasing concentration with increasing temperature and a segregation of the Ag to the surface. The increased oxygen content in the films is also observed at lower processing temperatures, providing strong support for the efficient oxygenation of YBCO via the presence of silver. A qualitative model suggests that the formation of silver oxide, rapid surface diffusion of Ag on MgO surfaces, and the nonreactivity of Ag with YBCO are the key aspects to the improvement in microstructure. The possibility of extending these ideas to the growth of oxides is also discussed, along with the fabrication of in-situ superconducting-metal junctions with 3D geometries.

  9. Synthesis and Optical Responses of Ag@Au/Ag@Au Double Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Li; Yang, Da-Jie; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2015-02-01

    We synthesize hollow-structured Ag@Au nanoparticles with single porous shell and Ag@Au/Ag@Au double shells by using the galvanic replacement reaction and investigate their linear and nonlinear optical properties. Our results show that the surface plasmon resonance wavelength of the hollow porous nanoparticles could be easily tuned in a wide range in the visible and near infrared region by controlling the volume of HAuCl4. The nonlinear optical refraction of the double-shelled Ag@Au/Ag@Au nanoparticles is prominently enhanced by the plasmon resonance. Our findings may find applications in biosensors and nonlinear optical nanodevices.

  10. Photon emission intensities in the decay of 108mAg and 110mAg.

    PubMed

    Ferreux, L; Lépy, M-C; Bé, M-M; Isnard, H; Lourenço, V

    2014-05-01

    This study focuses on two radioisotopes of silver, (108m)Ag and (110m)Ag, characterized by a complex decay scheme. Each isotope has two disintegration modes, the isomeric transition leading to the daughter isotope ((108)Ag and (110)Ag, respectively) with a short half-life. The radioactive solution was obtained by neutron activation on silver powder enriched in (109)Ag. Gamma-spectrometry was carried out using a calibrated high purity germanium detector. The main relative photon emission intensities for both radionuclides were obtained and compared with previously published values.

  11. Visible light driven photocatalysis and antibacterial activity of AgVO{sub 3} and Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anamika; Dutta, Dimple P.; Ballal, A.; Tyagi, A.K.; Fulekar, M.H.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ag/AgVO{sub 3} and pure AgVO{sub 3} nanowires synthesized by sonochemical process. • Characterization done using XRD, SEM, TEM, EDX and BET analysis. • Visible light degradation of RhB by Ag/AgVO{sub 3} within 45 min. • Antibacterial activity of Ag/AgVO{sub 3} demonstrated. - Abstract: Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires and AgVO{sub 3} nanorods were synthesized in aqueous media via a facile sonochemical route. The as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis, scanning electron microscopy together with an energy dispersion X-ray spectrum analysis, transmission electron microscopy and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The results revealed that inert atmosphere promotes the formation of Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires. The photocatalytic studies revealed that the Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires exhibited complete photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B within 45 min under visible light irradiation. The antibacterial activity of Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires was tested against Escherechia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The minimum growth inhibitory concentration value was found to be 50 and 10 folds lower than for the antibiotic ciprofloxacin for E. coli and B. subtilis, respectively. The antibacterial properties of the β-AgVO{sub 3} nanorods prove that in case of the Ag dispersed Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires, the enhanced antibacterial action is also due to contribution from the AgVO{sub 3} support.

  12. Effects of soil and dietary exposures to Ag nanoparticles and AgNO₃ in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus.

    PubMed

    Tourinho, Paula S; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2015-10-01

    The effects of Ag-NPs and AgNO3 on the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus were determined upon soil and dietary exposures. Isopods avoided Ag in soil, with EC50 values of ∼16.0 and 14.0 mg Ag/kg for Ag-NPs and AgNO3, respectively. Feeding inhibition tests in soil showed EC50s for effects on consumption ratio of 127 and 56.7 mg Ag/kg, respectively. Although similar EC50s for effects on biomass were observed for nanoparticulate and ionic Ag (114 and 120 mg Ag/kg dry soil, respectively), at higher concentrations greater biomass loss was found for AgNO3. Upon dietary exposure, AgNO3 was more toxic, with EC50 for effects on biomass change being >1500 and 233 mg Ag/kg for Ag-NPs and AgNO3, respectively. The difference in toxicity between Ag-NPs and AgNO3 could not be explained from Ag body concentrations. This suggests that the relation between toxicity and bioavailability of Ag-NPs differs from that of ionic Ag in soils.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of AgCl nanoparticles produced by laser ablation of Ag in NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodi, Afsaneh; Shoorshinie, Seyedeh Zahra; Dorranian, Davoud

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the structural and optical properties of silver chloride nanoparticles produced by laser ablation of Ag plate in NaCl solution were investigated. Five different concentrations of NaCl solution were used as the ablation environment. The beam of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser of 1064 nm wavelength and 7 ns pulse width was employed to irradiate the Ag target in NaCl solutions. Fluence of laser pulse was 1.5 J/cm2, and repetition rate was 5 Hz. Samples were prepared using 1500 pulses. Produced nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible-NIR absorption, and transmission spectrum, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction pattern, photoluminescence spectrum, and dynamic light scattering method. Results show that laser ablation is a promising method to produce AgCl nanoparticles. Size of nanoparticles, their lattice structure, and bandgap energy as well as the production rate may be controlled by the concentration of NaCl in the ablation environment.

  14. Tribological properties of ag-based amphiphiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most ag-based materials are amphiphilic because they comprise polar and non-polar groups within the same molecule. One of the major categories of amphiphilic ag-based materials are seed oils, which are actively investigated as substitutes for petroleum in a wide variety of consumer and industrial a...

  15. AgRISTARS documents tracking list report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A quarterly listing of documents issued and placed in the AgRISTARS tracking system is provided. The technical publications are arranged by type of documents. The reference AgRISTARS document number, title and date of publication, the issuing organization, and the National Technical Information Service reference number is given.

  16. The AGS synchrotron with four helical magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas N.; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; MacKay, W.W.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    The idea of using two partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. The placement of four helical magnets in the AGS ring provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets allows for a better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection, second, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, and third, it provides for a larger 'spin tune gap', which allows the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed, and prevent the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS to occur during the acceleration cycle. Although the same spin gap can be obtained with a single or two partial helices, the required high field strength of a single helix makes its use impractical, and that of the double helix rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  17. Recent hypernuclear research at the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Recent AGS experiments contributing to our knowledge of hypernuclei are reviewed. These experiments have suggested new areas of research on hypernuclei. With the proper beam line facilities, the AGS will be able to perform experiments in these areas and provide a transition to the future era of ''kaon factories''. 20 refs., 14 figs.

  18. Label-Free Detection of Ag+ Based on Gold Nanoparticles and Ag+-Specific DNA.

    PubMed

    Pu, Wendan; Zhao, Zhao; Wu, Liping; Liu, Yue; Zhao, Huawen

    2015-08-01

    A sensitive label-free method was presented for the determination of silver ion (Ag+) in this paper. Cytosine-rich DNA (C-DNA) was used as Ag+ specific DNA. Without Ag+ in the solution, fluorescence of fluorescein (FAM) is quenched by C-DNA stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in high salt environment. When Ag+ is present in the solution, however, Ag+-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine (C-Ag+-C) base pairs induced the C-DNA folding into a hairpin structure, which can not stabilize AuNPs in high salt environment, thus causing AuNPs aggregation. After centrifugation to remove the aggregated AuNPs, the quenching ability of the supernatant for FAM is decreased and the fluorescence intensity of solution increases with increasing the Ag+ concentration. Due to the highly specific interaction of the C-DNA towards Ag+ and the strong fluorescent quenching ability of AuNPs for FAM, the method has high selectivity and sensitivity for Ag+. Under the optimal conditions, the fluorescence intensity at 515 nm increased linearly with the concentration of Ag+ ranging from 15 nM to 700 nM, and the detection limit was determined as 6 nM based on 3 σ/slope. This method is simple, sensitive, and may be applied to other detection systems by selecting the appropriate DNA sequences. PMID:26369112

  19. Raman scattering enhanced within the plasmonic gap between an isolated Ag triangular nanoplate and Ag film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kuanguo; Jiang, Kang; Zhang, Lan; Wang, Yong; Mao, Lei; Zeng, Jie; Lu, Yonghua; Wang, Pei

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced electromagnetic field in the tiny gaps between metallic nanostructures holds great promise in optical applications. Herein, we report novel out-of-plane nanogaps composed of micrometer-sized Ag triangular nanoplates (AgTN) on Ag films. Notably, the new coupled plasmonic structure can dramatically enhance the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by visible laser excitation, although the micrometer-sized AgTN has localized plasmon resonance at infrared wavelength. This enhancement is derived from the gap plasmon polariton between the AgTN and Ag film, which is excited via the antenna effect of the corner and edge of the AgTN. Systematic SERS studies indicated that the plasmon enhancement was on the order of corner > edge > face. These results were further verified by theoretical simulations. Our device paves the way for rational design of sensitive SERS substrates by judiciously choosing appropriate nanoparticles and optimizing the gap distance.

  20. 30 CFR 57.11026 - Protection for inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection for inclined fixed ladders. 57.11026... and Escapeways Travelways-Surface Only § 57.11026 Protection for inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders... ladders....

  1. 30 CFR 57.11026 - Protection for inclined fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protection for inclined fixed ladders. 57.11026... and Escapeways Travelways-Surface Only § 57.11026 Protection for inclined fixed ladders. Fixed ladders... ladders....

  2. AgPO2F2 and Ag9(PO2F2)14: the first Ag(i) and Ag(i)/Ag(ii) difluorophosphates with complex crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Przemysław J; Kurzydłowski, Dominik; Grochala, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    The reaction of AgF2 with P2O3F4 yields a mixed valence Ag(I)/Ag(II) difluorophosphate salt with AgAg(PO2F2)14 stoichiometry - the first Ag(ii)-PO2F2 system known. This highly moisture sensitive brown solid is thermally stable up to 120 °C, which points at further feasible extension of the chemistry of Ag(ii)-PO2F2 systems. The crystal structure shows a very complex bonding pattern, comprising of polymeric Ag(PO2F2)14(4-) anions and two types of Ag(I) cations. One particular Ag(II) site present in the crystal structure of Ag9(PO2F2)14 is the first known example of square pyramidal penta-coordinated Ag(ii) in an oxo-ligand environment. Ag(i)PO2F2 - the product of the thermal decomposition of Ag9(PO2F2)14 - has also been characterized by thermal analysis, IR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. It has a complicated crystal structure as well, which consists of infinite 1D [Ag(I)O4/2] chains which are linked to more complex 3D structures via OPO bridges. The PO2F2(-) anions bind to cations in both compounds as bidentate oxo-ligands. The terminal F atoms tend to point inside the van der Waals cavities in the crystal structure of both compounds. All important structural details of both title compounds were corroborated by DFT calculations. PMID:26200921

  3. Antibacterial biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys.

    PubMed

    Tie, D; Feyerabend, F; Müller, W D; Schade, R; Liefeith, K; Kainer, K U; Willumeit, R

    2013-06-16

    The use of magnesium alloys as degradable metals for biomedical applications is a topic of ongoing research and the demand for multifunctional materials is increasing. Hence, binary Mg-Ag alloys were designed as implant materials to combine the favourable properties of magnesium with the well-known antibacterial property of silver. In this study, three Mg-Ag alloys, Mg2Ag, Mg4Ag and Mg6Ag that contain 1.87 %, 3.82 % and 6.00 % silver by weight, respectively, were cast and processed with solution (T4) and aging (T6) heat treatment. The metallurgical analysis and phase identification showed that all alloys contained Mg4Ag as the dominant β phase. After heat treatment, the mechanical properties of all Mg-Ag alloys were significantly improved and the corrosion rate was also significantly reduced, due to presence of silver. Mg(OH)₂ and MgO present the main magnesium corrosion products, while AgCl was found as the corresponding primary silver corrosion product. Immersion tests, under cell culture conditions, demonstrated that the silver content did not significantly shift the pH and magnesium ion release. In vitro tests, with both primary osteoblasts and cell lines (MG63, RAW 264.7), revealed that Mg-Ag alloys show negligible cytotoxicity and sound cytocompatibility. Antibacterial assays, performed in a dynamic bioreactor system, proved that the alloys reduce the viability of two common pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus (DSMZ 20231) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (DSMZ 3269), and the results showed that the killing rate of the alloys against tested bacteria exceeded 90%. In summary, biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys are cytocompatible materials with adjustable mechanical and corrosion properties and show promising antibacterial activity, which indicates their potential as antibacterial biodegradable implant materials.

  4. The characteristics of novel bimodal Ag-TiO2 nanoparticles generated by hybrid laser-ultrasonic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Abubaker; Li, Lin; Liu, Zhu; Zhong, Xiang Li; Burke, Grace; Wang, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Silver-titania (Ag-TiO2) nanoparticles with smaller Ag nanoparticles attached to larger TiO2 nanoparticles were generated by hybrid ultrasonic vibration and picosecond laser ablation of Ag and Ti bulk targets in deionised water, for the first time. The laser has a wavelength of 1064 nm and a pulse duration of 10 ps. It was observed that without the ultrasonic vibration, Ag and TiO2 nanoparticles did not combine, thus the role of ultrasonic vibration is essential. In addition, colloidal TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles were generated separately for comparison under the same laser beam characteristics and process conditions. The absorption spectra of colloidal Ag-TiO2 cluster nanoparticles were examined by UV-Vis spectroscopy, and size distribution was characterised using transmission electron microscopy. The morphology and composition of Ag-TiO2 nanoparticles were examined using scanning transmission electron microscopy in high-angle annular dark field, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The crystalline structures were investigated by X-ray diffraction. The size of larger TiO2 particles was in the range 30-150 nm, and the smaller-sized Ag nanoparticles attached to the TiO2 was mainly in the range of 10-15 nm. The yield is more than 50 % with the remaining nanoparticles in the form of uncombined Ag and TiO2. The nanoparticles generated had strong antibacterial effects as tested against E. coli. A discussion is given on the role of ultrasonic vibration in the formation of Ag-TiO2 hybrid nanoparticles by picosecond laser ablation.

  5. Ag(I)-binding to phytochelatins.

    PubMed

    Mehra, R K; Tran, K; Scott, G W; Mulchandani, P; Saini, S S

    1996-02-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are glutathione-derived peptides with the general structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)nGly, where n varies from 2 to 11. A variety of metal ions such as Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), and Ag(I) induce PC synthesis in plants and some yeasts. It has generally been assumed that the inducer metals also bind PCs. However, very little information is available on the binding of metals other than Cu(I) and Cd(II) to PCs. In this paper, we describe the Ag(I)-binding characteristics of PCs with the structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly, (gamma-Glu-Cys)3Gly, and (gamma-Glu-Cys)4Gly. The Ag(I)-binding stoichiometries of these three peptides were determined by (i) UV/VIS spectrophotometry, (ii) luminescence spectroscopy at 77 K, and (iii) reverse-phase HPLC. The three techniques yielded similar results. ApoPCs exhibit featureless absorption in the 220-340 nm range. The binding of Ag(I) to PCs induced the appearance of specific absorption shoulders. The titration end point was indicated by the flattening of the characteristic absorption shoulders. Similarly, luminescence at 77 K due to Ag(I)-thiolate clusters increased with the addition of graded Ag(I) equivalents. The luminescence declined when Ag(I) equivalents in excess of the saturating amounts were added to the peptides. At neutral pH, (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly, (gamma-Glu-Cys)3Gly, and (gamma-Glu-Cys)4Gly bind 1.0, 1.5, and 4.0 equivalents of Ag(I), respectively. The Ag(I)-binding capacity of (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly and (gamma-Glu-Cys)3Gly was increased at pH 5.0 and below so that Ag(I)/-SH ratio approached 1.0. A similar pH-dependent binding of Ag(I) to glutathione was also observed. The increased Ag(I)-binding to PCs at lower pH is of physiological significance as these peptides accumulate in acidic vacuoles. We also report lifetime data on Ag(I)-PCs. The relatively long decay-times (approximately 0.1-0.3 msec) accompanied with a large Stokes shift in the emission band are indicative of spin-forbidden phosphorescence. PMID

  6. Carbon-Fixing Reactions of Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Summaryplantcell;28/7/tpc.116.tt0716/FIG1F1fig1Photosynthesis in plants converts the energy of sunlight into chemical energy. Although photosynthesis involves many proteins and catalytic processes, it often is described as two sets of reactions, the light-dependent reactions and the carbon-fixing reactions. This lesson introduces the core biochemistry of the carbon-fixing reactions of photosynthesis, as well as its variations, C4 and CAM. Finally, it addresses how and why plants are affected by rising atmospheric CO2 levels, and research efforts to increase photosynthetic efficiency in current and future conditions.

  7. Carbon-Fixing Reactions of Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Summaryplantcell;28/7/tpc.116.tt0716/FIG1F1fig1Photosynthesis in plants converts the energy of sunlight into chemical energy. Although photosynthesis involves many proteins and catalytic processes, it often is described as two sets of reactions, the light-dependent reactions and the carbon-fixing reactions. This lesson introduces the core biochemistry of the carbon-fixing reactions of photosynthesis, as well as its variations, C4 and CAM. Finally, it addresses how and why plants are affected by rising atmospheric CO2 levels, and research efforts to increase photosynthetic efficiency in current and future conditions. PMID:27493209

  8. Quantum entanglement and fixed-point bifurcations

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, Andrew P.; McKenzie, Ross H.; Milburn, G.J.

    2005-04-01

    How does the classical phase-space structure for a composite system relate to the entanglement characteristics of the corresponding quantum system? We demonstrate how the entanglement in nonlinear bipartite systems can be associated with a fixed-point bifurcation in the classical dynamics. Using the example of coupled giant spins we show that when a fixed point undergoes a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation, the corresponding quantum state--the ground state--achieves its maximum amount of entanglement near the critical point. We conjecture that this will be a generic feature of systems whose classical limit exhibits such a bifurcation.

  9. Reading with fixed and variable character pitch.

    PubMed

    Arditi, A; Knoblauch, K; Grunwald, I

    1990-10-01

    We compared the effects of fixed and variable (proportional) spacing on reading speeds and found variable pitch to yield better performance at medium and large character sizes and fixed pitch to be superior for character sizes approaching the acuity limit. The data indicate at least two crowding effects at the smallest sizes: one that interferes with individual character identification and one that interferes with word identification. A control experiment using rapid serial visual presentation suggests that it is the greater horizontal compression and consequently reduced eye-movement requirements of variable pitch that are responsible for its superiority at medium and large character sizes.

  10. Spectroscopic Study on Eu3+ Doped Borate Glasses Containing Ag Nanoparticles and Ag Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shaobo; Zheng, Hui; Zhang, Jinsu; Li, Xiangping; Sun, Jiashi; Hua, Ruinian; Dong, Bin; Xia, Haiping; Chen, Baojiu

    2015-01-01

    Transparent Eu(3+)-doped borate glasses containing Ag nanoparticles and Ag aggregates with composition (40 - x) CaO-59.5B2O3-0.5Eu2O3-xAgNO3 were prepared by a simple one-step melt-quenching technique. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the glasses reveal amorphous structural properties and no diffraction peaks belonging to metal Ag particles. Ag particles and Ag aggregates were observed from the absorption spectra. Effective energy transfers from the Ag aggregates to the Eu3+ ions were observed in the excitation spectra from monitoring the intrinsic emission of Eu3+x .5D0 --> 7F2. The glasses with higher Ag content can be effectively excited by light in a wide wavelength region, indicating that these glasses have potential application in the solid state lighting driven by semiconductor light emitting diodes (LEDs). The emission spectra of the samples with higher Ag contents exhibit plenteous spectral components covering the full visible region from violet to red, thus indicating that these glass materials possess an excellent and tunable color rendering index. The color coordinates for all the glass samples were calculated by using the intensity-corrected emission spectra and the standard data issued by the CIE (Commission International de l' Eclairage) in 1931. It was found that the color coordinates for most samples with higher Ag contents fall into the white region in the color space. PMID:26328363

  11. Study of antibacterial activity of Ag and Ag2CO3 nanoparticles stabilized over montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabnezhad, Sh.; Pourahmad, A.; Mehdipour Moghaddam, M. J.; Sadeghi, A.

    2015-02-01

    Silver carbonate and silver nanoparticles (NPs) over of stabilizer montmorillonite (MMT) have been synthesized in aqueous and polyol solvent, respectively. Dispersions of silver nanoparticles have been prepared by the reduction of silver nitrate over of MMT in presence and absence of Na2CO3 compound in ethylene glycol. It was observed that montmorillonite was capable of stabilizing formed Ag nanoparticles through the reduction of Ag+ ions in ethylene glycol. Na2CO3 was used as carbonate source in synthesis of Ag2CO3 NPs in water solvent and also for controlling of Ag nanoparticles size in ethylene glycol medium. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). The TEM images showed that Ag NPs size in presence Na2CO3 salts was smaller than without that. The results indicated intercalation of Ag and Ag2CO3 nanoparticles into the montmorillonite clay layers. The diffuse reflectance spectra exhibited a strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) adsorption peak in the visible region, resulting from Ag nanoparticles. The antibacterial testing results showed that the Ag2CO3-MMT nanocomposite exhibited an antibacterial activity higher than Ag-MMT sample against Escherichia coli.

  12. Evaluation of two new automated assays for hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) detection: IMMULITE HBsAg and IMMULITE 2000 HBsAg.

    PubMed

    Weber, Bernard; Dengler, Thomas; Berger, Annemarie; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Rabenau, Holger

    2003-01-01

    In recent years the diagnostic industry has developed new automated immunoassays for the qualitative detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) in serum and plasma samples that are performed on analyzers that permit a high-speed throughput, random access, and primary tube sampling. The aim of the present study was the evaluation of two new automated HBsAg screening assays, IMMULITE HBsAg and IMMULITE 2000 HBsAg, from Diagnostic Products Corporation. The new HBsAg assays were compared to well-established tests (Auszyme Monoclonal [overnight incubation, version B], IMx HBsAg, AxSYM HBsAg, and Prism HBsAg [all from Abbott] and Elecsys HBsAg [Roche Diagnostics]). In the evaluation were included seroconversion panels, sera from the acute and chronic phases of infection, dilution series of various HBsAg standards, HBV subtypes and S gene mutants. To challenge the specificity of the new assays, sera from HBsAg-negative blood donors, pregnant women, and dialysis and hospitalized patients and potentially cross-reactive samples were investigated. IMMULITE HBsAg and IMMULITE 2000 HBsAg, although not as sensitive as the Elecsys HBsAg assay, were equivalent to the AxSYM HBsAg assay and showed a higher sensitivity than the Auszyme Monoclonal B and IMx HBsAg systems for detection of acute infection in seroconversion panels. The specificities (100%) of both IMMULITE assays on unselected blood donors and potentially interfering samples were comparable to those of the alternative assays after repeated testing. In conclusion, the new IMMULITE HBsAg and IMMULITE 2000 HBsAg assays show a good sensitivity for HBsAg detection compared to other well-established tests. The specificity on repeatedly tested samples was equivalent to that of the alternative assays. The rapid turnaround time, primary tube sampling, and on-board dilution make it an interesting assay system for clinical laboratory diagnosis.

  13. Demonstration and partial characterization of 22-nm HBsAg and Dane particles of subtype HBsAg/ady.

    PubMed

    Hess, G; Shih, J W; Arnold, W; Gerin, J L; zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1979-09-01

    The present paper describes the demonstration of d, y, w, and r HBsAg determinants in one serum. It was shown that there are two populations of HBsAg particles: HBsAg/ad and HBsAg/ady. All complete Dane particles were of subtype HBsAg/ady. Further characterization of HBsAg/ady particles did not reveal morphologic differences when they were compared with HBsAg/ad and HBsAg/ay particles. An HBsAg/ady phenotype may be the result of a double infection with hepatitis B viruses or exchanges of DNA sequences that determine HBsAg/ay and HBsAg/ad to form a new genotype. PMID:89163

  14. Demonstration and partial characterization of 22-nm HBsAg and Dane particles of subtype HBsAg/ady.

    PubMed

    Hess, G; Shih, J W; Arnold, W; Gerin, J L; zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1979-09-01

    The present paper describes the demonstration of d, y, w, and r HBsAg determinants in one serum. It was shown that there are two populations of HBsAg particles: HBsAg/ad and HBsAg/ady. All complete Dane particles were of subtype HBsAg/ady. Further characterization of HBsAg/ady particles did not reveal morphologic differences when they were compared with HBsAg/ad and HBsAg/ay particles. An HBsAg/ady phenotype may be the result of a double infection with hepatitis B viruses or exchanges of DNA sequences that determine HBsAg/ay and HBsAg/ad to form a new genotype.

  15. SPR sensitivity of silver nanorods in CsBr-Ag nanocomposite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovkush; Ravikant, Chhaya; Arun, P.; Kumar, Kuldeep

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the optical and morphological properties of CsBr-Ag complex thin films deposited by thermal evaporation on glass substrate. By varying the thickness of the film with fixed mass ratio of cesium bromide and silver, we observed a broad absorption peak in the visible region from 350 to 450 nm corresponding to the transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (SPR) mode. Red shift is observed, with varying film thickness, in SPR peak position corresponding to longitudinal mode with no significant change in transverse mode due to variation in the aspect ratio of the silver nano crystalline grains. Scanning electron microscope and EDX revealed the formation of silver nanorods in film samples. Such, stable and tunable CsBr-Ag films can be used in optical filters.

  16. Unexpected Generation and Observation of a T-Shaped Complex of H_{2}C_{2}\\cdotsAgCCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, N. R.; Stephens, S. L.; Mizukami, W.; Tew, D. P.; Legon, A. C.

    2013-06-01

    An experiment to probe species generated within a supersonically-expanding jet consisting of SF_{6}, Ag, C_{2}H_{2} and argon by broadband rotational spectroscopy revealed the existence of a T-shaped complex of hitherto unknown origin. Empirical tests revealed that this complex requires the presence of C_{2}H_{2} and Ag within the gas sample. While the intensity of the associated transitions are enhanced by the presence of SF_{6}, theoretical calculations and empirical tests implied that the identified complex is H_{2}C_{2}\\cdotsAgCCH rather than the original target of the experiment, H_{2}C_{2}\\cdotsAgF. This deduction is now supported by evidence acquired through experiments exploiting ^{13}C-enriched isotopic samples. Transitions have been assigned for the H_{2}^{13}C_{2}\\cdotsAg^{13}C^{13}CH isotopologue. Data acquired from each isotopologue allows determination of the rotational constants (B}_{0}, C}_{0}) and centrifugal distortion constant, Δ_J}. The data are consistent with a T-shaped complex in which the Ag atom of AgCCH binds to electrons within the {π}-orbitals of ethyne. Preliminary determinations of bond lengths will be presented. Experiments are in progress to measure the spectra of deuterated isotopologues.

  17. Kinetic trapping through coalescence and the formation of patterned Ag-Cu nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Kioseoglou, Joseph; Galea, Antony; Vernieres, Jerome; Benelmekki, Maria; Diaz, Rosa E.; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, due to its inherent flexibility, magnetron-sputtering has been widely used to synthesise bi-metallic nanoparticles (NPs) via subsequent inert-gas cooling and gas-phase condensation of the sputtered atomic vapour. Utilising two separate sputter targets allows for good control over composition. Simultaneously, it involves fast kinetics and non-equilibrium processes, which can trap the nascent NPs into metastable configurations. In this study, we observed such configurations in immiscible, bi-metallic Ag-Cu NPs by scanning transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and noticed a marked difference in the shape of NPs belonging to Ag- and Cu-rich samples. We explained the formation of Janus or Ag@Cu core/shell metastable structures on the grounds of in-flight mixed NP coalescence. We utilised molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) computer simulations to demonstrate that such configurations cannot occur as a result of nanoalloy segregation. Instead, sintering at relatively low temperatures can give rise to metastable structures, which eventually can be stabilised by subsequent quenching. Furthermore, we compared the heteroepitaxial diffusivities along various surfaces of both Ag and Cu NPs, and emphasised the differences between the sintering mechanisms of Ag- and Cu-rich NP compositions: small Cu NPs deform as coherent objects on large Ag NPs, whereas small Ag NPs dissolve into large Cu NPs, with their atoms diffusing along specific directions. Taking advantage of this observation, we propose controlled NP coalescence as a method to engineer mixed NPs of a unique, patterned core@partial-shell structure, which we refer to as a ``glass-float'' (ukidama) structure.In recent years, due to its inherent flexibility, magnetron-sputtering has been widely used to synthesise bi-metallic nanoparticles (NPs) via subsequent inert-gas cooling and gas-phase condensation of the sputtered atomic vapour. Utilising two

  18. LIQUID TARGET

    DOEpatents

    Martin, M.D.; Salsig, W.W. Jr.

    1959-01-13

    A liquid handling apparatus is presented for a liquid material which is to be irradiated. The apparatus consists essentially of a reservoir for the liquid, a target element, a drain tank and a drain lock chamber. The target is in the form of a looped tube, the upper end of which is adapted to be disposed in a beam of atomic particles. The lower end of the target tube is in communication with the liquid in the reservoir and a means is provided to continuously circulate the liquid material to be irradiated through the target tube. Means to heat the reservoir tank is provided in the event that a metal is to be used as the target material. The apparatus is provided with suitable valves and shielding to provide maximum safety in operation.

  19. Agent planning in AgScala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tošić, Saša; Mitrović, Dejan; Ivanović, Mirjana

    2013-10-01

    Agent-oriented programming languages are designed to simplify the development of software agents, especially those that exhibit complex, intelligent behavior. This paper presents recent improvements of AgScala, an agent-oriented programming language based on Scala. AgScala includes declarative constructs for managing beliefs, actions and goals of intelligent agents. Combined with object-oriented and functional programming paradigms offered by Scala, it aims to be an efficient framework for developing both purely reactive, and more complex, deliberate agents. Instead of the Prolog back-end used initially, the new version of AgScala relies on Agent Planning Package, a more advanced system for automated planning and reasoning.

  20. A FLYING WIRE SYSTEM IN THE AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG,H.; BUXTON,W.; MAHLER,G.; MARUSIC,A.; ROSER,T.; SMITH,G.; SYPHERS,M.; WILLIAMS,N.; WITKOVER,R.

    1999-03-29

    As the AGS prepares to serve as the injector for RHIC, monitoring and control of the beam transverse emittance become a major and important topic. Before the installation of the flying wire system, the emittance was measured with ionization profile monitors in the AGS, which require correction for space charge effects. It is desirable to have a second means of measuring profile that is less depend on intensity. A flying wire system has been installed in the AGS recently to perform this task. This paper discusses the hardware and software setup and the capabilities of the system.

  1. Route Optimization for Offloading Congested Meter Fixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, Min; Zelinski, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    The Optimized Route Capability (ORC) concept proposed by the FAA facilitates traffic managers to identify and resolve arrival flight delays caused by bottlenecks formed at arrival meter fixes when there exists imbalance between arrival fixes and runways. ORC makes use of the prediction capability of existing automation tools, monitors the traffic delays based on these predictions, and searches the best reroutes upstream of the meter fixes based on the predictions and estimated arrival schedules when delays are over a predefined threshold. Initial implementation and evaluation of the ORC concept considered only reroutes available at the time arrival congestion was first predicted. This work extends previous work by introducing an additional dimension in reroute options such that ORC can find the best time to reroute and overcome the 'firstcome- first-reroute' phenomenon. To deal with the enlarged reroute solution space, a genetic algorithm was developed to solve this problem. Experiments were conducted using the same traffic scenario used in previous work, when an arrival rush was created for one of the four arrival meter fixes at George Bush Intercontinental Houston Airport. Results showed the new approach further improved delay savings. The suggested route changes from the new approach were on average 30 minutes later than those using other approaches, and fewer numbers of reroutes were required. Fewer numbers of reroutes reduce operational complexity and later reroutes help decision makers deal with uncertain situations.

  2. Stress tolerant crops from nitrogen fixing trees

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R.; Saunders, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    Notes are given on the nutritional quality and uses of: pods of Geoffroea decorticans, a species tolerant of saline and limed soils and saline water; seeds of Olneya tesota which nodulates readily and fixes nitrogen and photosynthesizes at low water potential; and pods of Prosopis chilensis and P. tamarugo which tolerate long periods without rain. 3 references.

  3. Fixing Advising: A Model for Faculty Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocker, Robert M.; Kahla, Marlene; Allen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses mandates to fix the advising process with a focus on faculty advising systems. Measures of student success and satisfaction, administrative issues, and faculty concerns are among the many factors discussed. Regression analysis is used to explore long-voiced faculty complaints that students do not follow advice. A case study is…

  4. Force dynamics in fixed-ratio schedules.

    PubMed

    Pinkston, Jonathan W; McBee, Lindsey N

    2014-03-01

    Fixed-ratio schedules are widely used in behavioral research. Although fixed-ratio schedules often conjure up relationships to work and effort, little is known about effort-related measures in these schedules. Early research had shown that force and effort of operant behavior vary systematically during the execution of ratio schedules, and the goal of the present study was to revisit early research on force dynamics in fixed-ratio schedules. Four rats earned sucrose by pressing an isometric force transducer. Presses produced sucrose after ten or twenty responses. In general, the force of responses increased then decreased systematically across the ratio. The possibility that decreases in force during ratio execution was due to a trade-off with the differential reinforcement of short inter-response times (IRT) was investigated in an additional condition where sucrose was made available according to a tandem fixed-ratio 19 inter-response (IRT)> t schedule. The tandem IRT requirement did not eliminate decreasing trends in force across the ratio; unexpectedly, the tandem requirement did eliminate increases in force early in the ratio, which may reflect sequence-level organization operating in the control of force dynamics. PMID:24315798

  5. Fixed drug eruption related to fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Lai, Olivia; Hsu, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a type of cutaneous drug reaction that occurs at the same sites upon re-exposure to specific medications. Herein we discuss the case of a 23-year-old man with a FDE to fluconazole. PMID:27617471

  6. The microanalysis of fixed-interval responding

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, G. David; Weiss, Bernard; Laties, Victor G.

    1983-01-01

    The fixed-interval schedule of reinforcement is one of the more widely studied schedules in the experimental analysis of behavior and is also a common baseline for behavior pharmacology. Despite many intensive studies, the controlling variables and the pattern of behavior engendered are not well understood. The present study examined the microstructure and superstructure of the behavior engendered by a fixed-interval 5- and a fixed-interval 15-minute schedule of food reinforcement in the pigeon. Analysis of performance typical of fixed-interval responding indicated that the scalloped pattern does not result from smooth acceleration in responding, but, rather, from renewed pausing early in the interval. Individual interresponse-time (IRT) analyses provided no evidence of acceleration. There was a strong indication of alternation in shorter-longer IRTs, but these shorter-longer IRTs did not occur at random, reflecting instead a sequential dependency in successive IRTs. Furthermore, early in the interval there was a high relative frequency of short IRTs. Such a pattern of early pauses and short IRTs does not suggest behavior typical of reinforced responding as exemplified by the pattern found near the end of the interval. Thus, behavior from clearly scalloped performance can be classified into three states: postreinforcement pause, interim behavior, and terminal behavior. PMID:16812324

  7. Fixed Drug Eruption Due to Ornidazole

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ramji

    2014-01-01

    A 56-year-old male developed an ulcer on his glans penis and mucosae of upper and lower lips 3 days after taking ofloxacin, cephalexin, and ornidazole. Clinically, a provisional diagnosis of fixed drug eruption was made. The causative drug was confirmed by an oral provocation test which triggered a reactivation of all lesions only with ornidazole. PMID:25484435

  8. Microanalysis of fixed-interval responding

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, G.D.; Weiss, B.; Laties, V.G.

    1983-03-01

    The fixed-interval schedule of reinforcement is one of the more widely studied schedules in the experimental analysis of behavior and is also a common baseline for behavior pharmacology. Despite many intensive studies, the controlling variables and the pattern of behavior engendered are not well understood. The present study examined the microstructure and superstructure of the behavior engendered by a fixed-interval 5- and a fixed-interval 15-minute schedule of food reinforcement in the pigeon. Analysis of performance typical of fixed-interval responding indicated that the scalloped pattern does not result from smooth acceleration in responding, but, rather, from renewed pausing early in the interval. Individual interresponse-time (IRT) analyses provided no evidence of acceleration. There was a strong indication of alternation is shorter-longer IRTs, but these shorter-longer IRTs did not occur at random, reflecting instead a sequential dependency in successive IRTs. Furthermore, early in the interval there was a high relative frequency of short IRTs. Such a pattern of early pauses and short IRTs does not suggest behavior typical of reinforced responding as exemplified by the pattern found near the end of the interval. Thus, behavior from clearly scalloped performance can be classified into three states: postreinforcement pause, interim behavior, and terminal behavior. 31 references, 11 figures, 4 tables.

  9. 29 CFR 1917.118 - Fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and fastened to one or both of the ladder's side rails or to another structure. (2) Fixed ladder means a ladder, including individual rung ladders, permanently attached to a structure, building or piece..., microwave communications, electrical power and similar towers, poles and structures, including stacks...

  10. 29 CFR 1917.118 - Fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and fastened to one or both of the ladder's side rails or to another structure. (2) Fixed ladder means a ladder, including individual rung ladders, permanently attached to a structure, building or piece..., microwave communications, electrical power and similar towers, poles and structures, including stacks...

  11. Fixing the Shadows While Moving the Gnomon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangui, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    It is a common practice to fix a vertical gnomon and study the moving shadow cast by it. This shows our local solar time and gives us a hint regarding the season in which we perform the observation. The moving shadow can also tell us our latitude with high precision. In this paper we propose to exchange the roles and while keeping the shadows…

  12. Sputtered Ag thin films with modified morphologies: Influence on wetting property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutheil, P.; Thomann, A. L.; Lecas, T.; Brault, P.; Vayer, M.

    2015-08-01

    Silver thin films with thickness ranging from 3 nm to 33 nm were sputter deposited onto silicon wafers and tungsten layers. Those W layers were previously synthesized in the same DC magnetron sputter deposition system with various experimental conditions (argon pressure, target to substrate distance) in order to stabilize different surface morphologies. SEM observations and AFM images showed that the growth mode of Ag films is similar on Si substrates and on the smoothest W layers, whereas it is modified for rough W layers made of sharp grains. The effect of the W layer morphology on Ag film growth was clearly evidenced when the deposition took place at high temperature. It is seen that performing the deposition onto substrates of various morphologies allows tailoring the wetting property of the Ag deposit.

  13. In vitro and in vivo host range of Anopheles gambiae densovirus (AgDNV)

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yasutsugu; Barik, Tapan K.; Johnson, Rebecca M.; Rasgon, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    AgDNV is a powerful gene transduction tool and potential biological control agent for Anopheles mosquitoes. Using a GFP reporter virus system, we investigated AgDNV host range specificity in four arthropod cell lines (derived from An. gambiae, Aedes albopictus and Drosophila melanogaster) and six mosquito species from 3 genera (An. gambiae, An. arabiensis, An. stephensi, Ae. albopictus, Ae. aegypti and Culex tarsalis). In vitro, efficient viral invasion, replication and GFP expression was only observed in MOS55 An. gambiae cells. In vivo, high levels of GFP were observed in An. gambiae mosquitoes. Intermediate levels of GFP were observed in the closely related species An. arabiensis. Low levels of GFP were observed in An. stephensi, Ae. albopictus, Ae. aegypti and Cx. tarsalis. These results suggest that AgDNV is a specific gene transduction tool for members of the An. gambiae species complex, and could be potentially developed into a biocontrol agent with minimal off-target effects. PMID:26220140

  14. Crystallization kinetics of {alpha}-AgI in AgI-based silver orthoborate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Akihiro; Tatsumisago, Masahiro; Minami, Tsutomu

    1995-02-01

    Kinetics for nucleation and growth of {alpha}-AgI crystals in AgI-based silver orthoborate glasses, in which only {alpha}-AgI crystals were found to crystallize in the heating process of the glasses, were studied by isothermal and nonisothermal measurements using differential scanning calorimetry and by observations of the microstructure of the glasses using scanning electron microscopy. The values of both n and m, dependent on the crystallization mechanism, were found to be 3, indicating that a constant number of nuclei of {alpha}-AgI precipitated in a glass matrix grew three-dimensionally. The preannealing of the glasses at temperatures between glass transition and crystallization did not affect the DSC isothermal curves in the crystal growth process, which suggested that the number of {alpha}-AgI nuclei would have been saturated in the glass when the glasses were prepared by quenching the AgI-based melts.

  15. Extranuclear dynamics of 111Ag(→111Cd) doped in AgI nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, W.; Mizuuchi, R.; Irioka, N.; Komatsuda, S.; Kawata, S.; Taoka, A.; Ohkubo, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Dynamic behavior of the extranuclear field relative to the 111Ag(→111Cd) probe nucleus introduced in a superionic conductor silver iodide (AgI) was investigated by means of the time-differential perturbed angular correlation technique. For poly-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP)-coated AgI nanoparticles, we observed nuclear spin relaxation of the probe at room temperature. This result signifies that Ag+ ions in the polymer-coated sample make hopping motion from site to site at this low temperature. The activation energy for the dynamic motion was successfully estimated to be 46(10) meV. The first atomic-level observation of the temperature-dependent dynamic behavior of Ag+ ions in the polymer-coated AgI is reported.

  16. Ag induced electromagnetic interference shielding of Ag-graphite/PVDF flexible nanocomposites thinfilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, R.; Alagar, M.; Dinesh Kumar, S.; Subramanian, V.; Dinakaran, K.

    2015-09-01

    We report Ag nanoparticle induced Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) shielding in a flexible composite films of Ag nanoparticles incorporated graphite/poly-vinylidene difluoride (PVDF). PVDF nanocomposite thin-films were synthesized by intercalating Ag in Graphite (GIC) followed by dispersing GIC in PVDF. The X-ray diffraction analysis and the high-resolution transmission electron microscope clearly dictate the microstructure of silver nanoparticles in graphite intercalated composite of PVDF matrix. The conductivity values of nanocomposites are increased upto 2.5 times when compared to neat PVDF having a value of 2.70 S/cm at 1 MHz. The presence of Ag broadly enhanced the dielectric constant and lowers the dielectric loss of PVDF matrix proportional to Ag content. The EMI shielding effectiveness of the composites is 29.1 dB at 12.4 GHz for the sample having 5 wt. % Ag and 10 wt. % graphite in PVDF.

  17. Preparation of Ag-M (M: Fe, Co and Mn)-ZSM-5 bimetal catalysts with high performance for catalytic oxidation of ethyl acetate.

    PubMed

    Jodaei, A; Salari, D; Niaei, A; Khatamian, M; Caylak, N

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic combustion of ethyl acetate has been investigated in a series of mono-metal silver and bimetal Ag-M (M: Fe, Co and Mn)-modified HZSM-5 zeolites. The objective was to find a catalyst with high superior activity, selectivity towards deep oxidation product and stability. The catalyst activity was measured under excess oxygen condition in a fixed bed reactor operated at gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) = 30000 h(-1), reaction temperature between 150 and 450 degrees C and ethyl acetate inlet concentration of 1000 ppm. Both Fe-Ag-ZSM-5 and Co-Ag-ZSM-5 catalysts exhibited high activity in the oxidation of ethyl acetate. The sequences of catalytic activity and catalytic stability were as follows: Fe-Ag-ZSM-5 > Co-Ag-ZSM-5 > Mn-Ag-ZSM-5 > Ag-ZSM-5 > HZSM-5. Total conversion of ethyl acetate was achieved at above 250 degrees C. The catalysts were characterized by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  18. Effect of Solder-Joint Geometry on the Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Sn-xAg-0.7Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwa-Teng; Huang, Kuo-Chen

    2016-07-01

    Low-cycle fatigue tests of Sn-Ag-Cu (SAC) Pb-free solder joints under fixed displacement were performed to evaluate the influence of Ag content (0-3 wt.%) and solder-joint geometry (barrel and hourglass types) on solder-joint fatigue behavior and reliability. The solder joints were composed of fine particles of Ag3Sn and Cu6Sn5, which aggregated as an eutectic constituent at grain boundaries of the primary β-Sn phase and formed a dense network structure. A decrease in the Ag content resulted in coarsening of the β-Sn and eutectic phases, which, in turn, decreased the strength of the joint and caused earlier failure. Solder joints in the hourglass form exhibited better fatigue performance with longer life than barrel-type joints. The sharp contact angle formed between the solder and the Cu substrate by the barrel-type joints concentrated stress, which compromised fatigue reliability. The addition of Ag to the solder, however, enhanced fatigue performance because of strengthening caused by Ag3Sn formation. The cracks of the barrel-type SAC solder joints originated mostly at the contact corner and propagated along the interfacial layer between the interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) and solder matrix. Hourglass-type solder joints, however, demonstrated both crack initiation and propagation in the solder matrix (solder mode). The addition of 1.5-2.0 wt.% Ag to SAC solder appears to enhance the fatigue performance of solder joints while maintaining sufficient strength.

  19. Oxidation of ethyl acetate by a high performance nanostructure (Ni, Mn)-Ag/ZSM-5 bimetallic catalysts and development of an artificial neural networks predictive modeling.

    PubMed

    Jodaei, Azadeh; Salari, Darush; Niaei, Ali; Khatamian, Masumeh; Hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of ethyl acetate in low concentration was investigated over mono-metallic Ag/ZSM5 and bimetallic (Ni, Mn)-Ag/ZSM-5 catalysts. Catalytic studies were carried out in a catalytic fixed bed reactor under atmospheric pressure. The sequence of catalytic activity was as follows: Ni-Ag-ZSM-5 > Mn-Ag-ZSM-5 > Ag-ZSM-5 > H-ZSM-5. The catalysts were characterized by ICP-AES, X-ray diffraction (XRD), low temperature nitrogen adsorption, NH(3)-TPD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectra (UV-vis). An artificial neural networks (ANN) model was developed to predict the performance of catalytic oxidation process over bimetallic Ni-Ag/ZSM-5 catalyst based on experimental data. For this purpose the standard feed forward back propagation algorithm was employed to train the model by using laboratory experimental data. A good agreement was resulted between experimental results and those obtained by ANN. Following order for variables effects on conversion yield of ethyl acetate was predicted by ANN model: reaction temperature (32.99%) > Ag loading (27.38%) > initial ethyl acetate concentration (23.58%) > Ni loading (16.05%). PMID:21104495

  20. 46 CFR 184.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 184.410 Section 184... Electronic position fixing devices. A vessel on an oceans route must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device, capable of providing accurate fixes for the area in which the vessel operates, to...

  1. 46 CFR 184.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 184.410 Section 184... Electronic position fixing devices. A vessel on an oceans route must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device, capable of providing accurate fixes for the area in which the vessel operates, to...

  2. 46 CFR 184.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 184.410 Section 184... Electronic position fixing devices. A vessel on an oceans route must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device, capable of providing accurate fixes for the area in which the vessel operates, to...

  3. 46 CFR 184.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 184.410 Section 184... Electronic position fixing devices. A vessel on an oceans route must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device, capable of providing accurate fixes for the area in which the vessel operates, to...

  4. 46 CFR 184.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 184.410 Section 184... Electronic position fixing devices. A vessel on an oceans route must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device, capable of providing accurate fixes for the area in which the vessel operates, to...

  5. 50 CFR 660.219 - Fixed gear identification and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed gear identification and marking... West Coast Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.219 Fixed gear identification and marking. (a) Gear identification. (1) Limited entry fixed gear (longline, trap or pot) must be marked...

  6. 50 CFR 660.219 - Fixed gear identification and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed gear identification and marking... West Coast Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.219 Fixed gear identification and marking. (a) Gear identification. (1) Limited entry fixed gear (longline, trap or pot) must be marked...

  7. 40 CFR 63.902 - Standards-Tank fixed roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards-Tank fixed roof. 63.902...) National Emission Standards for Tanks-Level 1 § 63.902 Standards—Tank fixed roof. (a) This section applies... fixed roof. This section does not apply to a fixed-roof tank that is also equipped with an...

  8. 48 CFR 1852.216-75 - Payment of fixed fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment of fixed fee. 1852... 1852.216-75 Payment of fixed fee. As prescribed in 1816.307-70(c), insert the following clause: Payment of Fixed Fee (DEC 1988) The fixed fee shall be paid in monthly installments based upon the...

  9. 48 CFR 1852.216-75 - Payment of fixed fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment of fixed fee. 1852... 1852.216-75 Payment of fixed fee. As prescribed in 1816.307-70(c), insert the following clause: Payment of Fixed Fee (DEC 1988) The fixed fee shall be paid in monthly installments based upon the...

  10. 48 CFR 16.403 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 16.403 Fixed-price incentive contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides...

  11. 48 CFR 52.216-9 - Fixed Fee-Construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed Fee-Construction. 52....216-9 Fixed Fee—Construction. As prescribed in 16.307(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when a cost-plus-fixed-fee construction contract is contemplated: Fixed...

  12. 47 CFR 90.235 - Secondary fixed signaling operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Secondary fixed signaling operations. 90.235... fixed signaling operations. Fixed operations may, subject to the following conditions, be authorized on... function is repeated consecutively more than five times. (h) Fixed stations authorized pursuant to...

  13. 47 CFR 90.637 - Restrictions on operational fixed stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on operational fixed stations. 90... operational fixed stations. (a) Except for control stations, operational fixed operations will not be... secondary fixed tone signaling and alarm operations authorized in § 90.235 or in paragraph (c) of...

  14. 48 CFR 52.216-9 - Fixed Fee-Construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed Fee-Construction. 52....216-9 Fixed Fee—Construction. As prescribed in 16.307(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when a cost-plus-fixed-fee construction contract is contemplated: Fixed...

  15. 47 CFR 90.235 - Secondary fixed signaling operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Secondary fixed signaling operations. 90.235... fixed signaling operations. Fixed operations may, subject to the following conditions, be authorized on... function is repeated consecutively more than five times. (h) Fixed stations authorized pursuant to...

  16. 10 CFR 600.29 - Fixed obligation awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fixed obligation awards. 600.29 Section 600.29 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES General § 600.29 Fixed... assistance instruments on a fixed amount basis. Under a fixed obligation award, funds are issued in...

  17. 40 CFR 63.902 - Standards-Tank fixed roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards-Tank fixed roof. 63.902...) National Emission Standards for Tanks-Level 1 § 63.902 Standards—Tank fixed roof. (a) This section applies... fixed roof. This section does not apply to a fixed-roof tank that is also equipped with an...

  18. 40 CFR 63.902 - Standards-Tank fixed roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards-Tank fixed roof. 63.902...) National Emission Standards for Tanks-Level 1 § 63.902 Standards—Tank fixed roof. (a) This section applies... fixed roof. This section does not apply to a fixed-roof tank that is also equipped with an...

  19. 48 CFR 1852.216-78 - Firm fixed price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Firm fixed price. 1852.216... 1852.216-78 Firm fixed price. As prescribed in 1816.202-70, insert the following clause: Firm Fixed Price (DEC 1988) The total firm fixed price of this contract is $ . (End of clause)...

  20. 10 CFR 600.29 - Fixed obligation awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fixed obligation awards. 600.29 Section 600.29 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES General § 600.29 Fixed... assistance instruments on a fixed amount basis. Under a fixed obligation award, funds are issued in...

  1. 47 CFR 90.235 - Secondary fixed signaling operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Secondary fixed signaling operations. 90.235... fixed signaling operations. Fixed operations may, subject to the following conditions, be authorized on... function is repeated consecutively more than five times. (h) Fixed stations authorized pursuant to...

  2. 10 CFR 600.29 - Fixed obligation awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fixed obligation awards. 600.29 Section 600.29 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES General § 600.29 Fixed... assistance instruments on a fixed amount basis. Under a fixed obligation award, funds are issued in...

  3. 48 CFR 1852.216-75 - Payment of fixed fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment of fixed fee. 1852... 1852.216-75 Payment of fixed fee. As prescribed in 1816.307-70(c), insert the following clause: Payment of Fixed Fee (DEC 1988) The fixed fee shall be paid in monthly installments based upon the...

  4. 48 CFR 1852.216-78 - Firm fixed price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Firm fixed price. 1852.216... 1852.216-78 Firm fixed price. As prescribed in 1816.202-70, insert the following clause: Firm Fixed Price (DEC 1988) The total firm fixed price of this contract is $ . (End of clause)...

  5. 48 CFR 16.403 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 16.403 Fixed-price incentive contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides...

  6. 47 CFR 90.637 - Restrictions on operational fixed stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Restrictions on operational fixed stations. 90... operational fixed stations. (a) Except for control stations, operational fixed operations will not be... secondary fixed tone signaling and alarm operations authorized in § 90.235 or in paragraph (c) of...

  7. 48 CFR 1852.216-78 - Firm fixed price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Firm fixed price. 1852.216... 1852.216-78 Firm fixed price. As prescribed in 1816.202-70, insert the following clause: Firm Fixed Price (DEC 1988) The total firm fixed price of this contract is $ . (End of clause)...

  8. 2 CFR 200.45 - Fixed amount awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fixed amount awards. 200.45 Section 200.45... REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL AWARDS Acronyms and Definitions Acronyms § 200.45 Fixed amount awards. Fixed amount... primarily on performance and results. See §§ 200.201 Use of grant agreements (including fixed amount...

  9. 40 CFR 63.902 - Standards-Tank fixed roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards-Tank fixed roof. 63.902...) National Emission Standards for Tanks-Level 1 § 63.902 Standards—Tank fixed roof. (a) This section applies... fixed roof. This section does not apply to a fixed-roof tank that is also equipped with an...

  10. 47 CFR 90.235 - Secondary fixed signaling operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Secondary fixed signaling operations. 90.235... fixed signaling operations. Fixed operations may, subject to the following conditions, be authorized on... function is repeated consecutively more than five times. (h) Fixed stations authorized pursuant to...

  11. 47 CFR 90.637 - Restrictions on operational fixed stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Restrictions on operational fixed stations. 90... operational fixed stations. (a) Except for control stations, operational fixed operations will not be... secondary fixed tone signaling and alarm operations authorized in § 90.235 or in paragraph (c) of...

  12. 48 CFR 16.403 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 16.403 Fixed-price incentive contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides...

  13. 48 CFR 16.403 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 16.403 Fixed-price incentive contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides...

  14. 47 CFR 90.235 - Secondary fixed signaling operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Secondary fixed signaling operations. 90.235... fixed signaling operations. Fixed operations may, subject to the following conditions, be authorized on... function is repeated consecutively more than five times. (h) Fixed stations authorized pursuant to...

  15. 47 CFR 90.637 - Restrictions on operational fixed stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Restrictions on operational fixed stations. 90... operational fixed stations. (a) Except for control stations, operational fixed operations will not be... secondary fixed tone signaling and alarm operations authorized in § 90.235 or in paragraph (c) of...

  16. 40 CFR 63.902 - Standards-Tank fixed roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards-Tank fixed roof. 63.902...) National Emission Standards for Tanks-Level 1 § 63.902 Standards—Tank fixed roof. (a) This section applies... fixed roof. This section does not apply to a fixed-roof tank that is also equipped with an...

  17. 10 CFR 600.29 - Fixed obligation awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fixed obligation awards. 600.29 Section 600.29 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES General § 600.29 Fixed... assistance instruments on a fixed amount basis. Under a fixed obligation award, funds are issued in...

  18. 48 CFR 1852.216-78 - Firm fixed price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Firm fixed price. 1852.216... 1852.216-78 Firm fixed price. As prescribed in 1816.202-70, insert the following clause: Firm Fixed Price (DEC 1988) The total firm fixed price of this contract is $ . (End of clause)...

  19. 50 CFR 660.219 - Fixed gear identification and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed gear identification and marking... West Coast Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.219 Fixed gear identification and marking. (a) Gear identification. (1) Limited entry fixed gear (longline, trap or pot) must be marked...

  20. 48 CFR 52.216-9 - Fixed Fee-Construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed Fee-Construction. 52....216-9 Fixed Fee—Construction. As prescribed in 16.307(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when a cost-plus-fixed-fee construction contract is contemplated: Fixed...

  1. 48 CFR 52.216-9 - Fixed Fee-Construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed Fee-Construction. 52....216-9 Fixed Fee—Construction. As prescribed in 16.307(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when a cost-plus-fixed-fee construction contract is contemplated: Fixed...

  2. 48 CFR 52.216-9 - Fixed Fee-Construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed Fee-Construction. 52....216-9 Fixed Fee—Construction. As prescribed in 16.307(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when a cost-plus-fixed-fee construction contract is contemplated: Fixed...

  3. 48 CFR 1852.216-75 - Payment of fixed fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment of fixed fee. 1852... 1852.216-75 Payment of fixed fee. As prescribed in 1816.307-70(c), insert the following clause: Payment of Fixed Fee (DEC 1988) The fixed fee shall be paid in monthly installments based upon the...

  4. 48 CFR 16.403 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 16.403 Fixed-price incentive contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides...

  5. 48 CFR 1852.216-78 - Firm fixed price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Firm fixed price. 1852.216... 1852.216-78 Firm fixed price. As prescribed in 1816.202-70, insert the following clause: Firm Fixed Price (DEC 1988) The total firm fixed price of this contract is $ . (End of clause)...

  6. 48 CFR 1852.216-75 - Payment of fixed fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Payment of fixed fee. 1852... 1852.216-75 Payment of fixed fee. As prescribed in 1816.307-70(c), insert the following clause: Payment of Fixed Fee (DEC 1988) The fixed fee shall be paid in monthly installments based upon the...

  7. 10 CFR 600.29 - Fixed obligation awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fixed obligation awards. 600.29 Section 600.29 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES General § 600.29 Fixed... assistance instruments on a fixed amount basis. Under a fixed obligation award, funds are issued in...

  8. Kinetic trapping through coalescence and the formation of patterned Ag-Cu nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Kioseoglou, Joseph; Galea, Antony; Vernieres, Jerome; Benelmekki, Maria; Diaz, Rosa E; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2016-05-14

    In recent years, due to its inherent flexibility, magnetron-sputtering has been widely used to synthesise bi-metallic nanoparticles (NPs) via subsequent inert-gas cooling and gas-phase condensation of the sputtered atomic vapour. Utilising two separate sputter targets allows for good control over composition. Simultaneously, it involves fast kinetics and non-equilibrium processes, which can trap the nascent NPs into metastable configurations. In this study, we observed such configurations in immiscible, bi-metallic Ag-Cu NPs by scanning transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and noticed a marked difference in the shape of NPs belonging to Ag- and Cu-rich samples. We explained the formation of Janus or Ag@Cu core/shell metastable structures on the grounds of in-flight mixed NP coalescence. We utilised molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) computer simulations to demonstrate that such configurations cannot occur as a result of nanoalloy segregation. Instead, sintering at relatively low temperatures can give rise to metastable structures, which eventually can be stabilised by subsequent quenching. Furthermore, we compared the heteroepitaxial diffusivities along various surfaces of both Ag and Cu NPs, and emphasised the differences between the sintering mechanisms of Ag- and Cu-rich NP compositions: small Cu NPs deform as coherent objects on large Ag NPs, whereas small Ag NPs dissolve into large Cu NPs, with their atoms diffusing along specific directions. Taking advantage of this observation, we propose controlled NP coalescence as a method to engineer mixed NPs of a unique, patterned core@partial-shell structure, which we refer to as a "glass-float" (ukidama) structure. PMID:27119383

  9. Fixed-combination treatments for intraocular hypertension in Chinese patients - focus on bimatoprost-timolol.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Ling, Zhihong; Sun, Xinghuai

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a common eye disease that can lead to irreversible vision loss if left untreated. The early diagnosis and treatment of primary open-angle glaucoma is challenging, and visual impairment in Chinese glaucoma patients is a serious concern. Most of these patients need more than one topical antiglaucoma agent to control their intraocular pressures (IOPs). In the People's Republic of China, the daily cost of different glaucoma medication varies greatly, and the treatment habits differ throughout the country. Prostaglandin analogs (PGAs) are recommended as first-line monotherapy, because of their efficacy and low risk of systemic side effects. Fixed-combination drops, particularly PGA-based fixed combinations, have recently been developed and used in patients with progression or who have failed to achieve their target IOPs. Here, we reviewed the current literature on the use of bimatoprost-timolol fixed combination (BTFC) in the People's Republic of China. BTFC has achieved good efficacy and tolerability in Chinese clinical trials. In addition, BTFC is more cost effective compared with other fixed combinations available in the People's Republic of China. Fixed-combination drops may offer benefits, such as keeping the ocular surface healthy, convenience of administration, and improvement in long-term adherence and quality of life. Therefore, BTFC has great potential for the treatment of Chinese glaucoma patients. However, the long-term efficacy of BTFC, comparisons of BTFC with other fixed-combination drugs, and treatment adherence and persistence with treatment in Chinese patients are unknown and will require further study.

  10. Design and Implementation of Numerical Linear Algebra Algorithms on Fixed Point DSPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Zoran; Nguyen, Ha Thai; Frantz, Gene

    2007-12-01

    Numerical linear algebra algorithms use the inherent elegance of matrix formulations and are usually implemented using C/C++ floating point representation. The system implementation is faced with practical constraints because these algorithms usually need to run in real time on fixed point digital signal processors (DSPs) to reduce total hardware costs. Converting the simulation model to fixed point arithmetic and then porting it to a target DSP device is a difficult and time-consuming process. In this paper, we analyze the conversion process. We transformed selected linear algebra algorithms from floating point to fixed point arithmetic, and compared real-time requirements and performance between the fixed point DSP and floating point DSP algorithm implementations. We also introduce an advanced code optimization and an implementation by DSP-specific, fixed point C code generation. By using the techniques described in the paper, speed can be increased by a factor of up to 10 compared to floating point emulation on fixed point hardware.

  11. Implementation Considerations for Automotive Vision Systems on a Fixed-Point DSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Zoran

    In this chapter we evaluate numerical requirements for implementation of camera-based lateral position detection algorithms, such as lane keep assistant (LKA) and lane departure warning (LDW) on a fixed-point DSP. We first present methods that address the challenges and requirements of fixed-point design process. The flow proposed is targeted at converting C/C++ code with floating-point operations into C code with integer operations that can then be fed through the native C compiler for a fixed-point DSP. Advanced code optimization and an implementation by DSP-specific, fixed-point C code generation are introduced. We then demonstrate the conversion flow on tracking example (extended Kalman filter) using synthetically generated data, and we analyze trade-offs for algorithm implementation in fixed-point arithmetic. By using the techniques described in this chapter speed can be increased by a factor of up to 10 compared to floating-point emulation on fixed-point hardware.

  12. Control and performance of the AGS and AGS Booster Main Magnet Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Casella, R.; Culwick, B.; Geller, J.; Marneris, I.; Sandberg, J.; Soukas, A.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Techniques for precision control of the main magnet power supplies for the AGS and AGS Booster synchrotron will be discussed. Both synchrotrons are designed to operate in a Pulse-to-Pulse Modulation (PPM) environment with a Supercycle Generator defining and distributing global timing events for the AGS Facility. Details of modelling, real-time feedback and feedforward systems, generation and distribution of real time field data, operational parameters and an overview of performance for both machines are included.

  13. Control and performance of the AGS and AGS Booster Main Magnet Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Casella, R.; Culwick, B.; Geller, J.; Marneris, I.; Sandberg, J.; Soukas, A.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1993-06-01

    Techniques for precision control of the main magnet power supplies for the AGS and AGS Booster synchrotron will be discussed. Both synchrotrons are designed to operate in a Pulse-to-Pulse Modulation (PPM) environment with a Supercycle Generator defining and distributing global timing events for the AGS Facility. Details of modelling, real-time feedback and feedforward systems, generation and distribution of real time field data, operational parameters and an overview of performance for both machines are included.

  14. Nanoporous Ag prepared from the melt-spun Cu-Ag alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guijing; Song, Xiaoping; Sun, Zhanbo; Yang, Shengchun; Ding, Bingjun; Yang, Sen; Yang, Zhimao; Wang, Fei

    2011-07-01

    Nanoporous Ag ribbons with different morphology and porosity were achieved by the electrochemical corrosion of the melt-spun Cu-Ag alloys. The Cu-rich phase in the alloys was removed, resulting in the formation of the nanopores distributed across the whole ribbon. It is found that the structures, morphology and porosity of the nanoporous Ag ribbons were dependent on the microstructures of the parent alloys. The most of ligaments presented a rod-like shape due to the formation of pseudoeutectic microstructure in the melt-spun Cu 55Ag 45 and Cu 70Ag 30 alloys. For nanoporous Ag prepared from Cu 85Ag 15 alloys, the ligaments were camber-like because of the appearance of the divorced microstructures. Especially, a novel bamboo-grove-like structure could be observed at the cross-section of the nanoporous Ag ribbons. The experiment reveals that nanoporous Ag ribbons exhibited excellent enhancement of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect, but a slight difference existed due to the discrepancy of their morphology.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of Mg-Al layered double hydroxide with Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, A.; Birjega, R.; Vlad, A.; Luculescu, C.; Epurescu, G.; Stokker-Cheregi, F.; Dinescu, M.; Zavoianu, R.; Pavel, O. D.

    2013-03-01

    Powdered layered double hydroxides (LDHs)—also known as hydrotalcite-like (HT)—compounds have been widely studied due to their applications as catalysts, anionic exchangers or host materials for inorganic or organic molecules. Assembling thin films of nano-sized LDHs onto flat solid substrates is an expanding area of research, with promising applications as sensors, corrosion-resistant coatings, components in optical and magnetic devices. The exploitation of LDHs as vehicles to carry dispersed metal nanoparticles onto a substrate is a new approach to obtain composite thin films with prospects for biomedical and optical applications. We report the deposition of thin films of Ag nanoparticles embedded in a Mg-Al layered double hydroxide matrix by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The Ag-LDH powder was prepared by co-precipitation at supersaturation and pH = 10 using aqueous solutions of Mg and Al nitrates, Na hydroxide and carbonate, and AgNO3, having atomic ratios of Mg/Al = 3 and Ag/Al = 0.55. The target to be used in laser ablation experiments was a dry pressed pellet obtained from the prepared Ag-LDH powder. Three different wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser (266, 532 and 1064 nm) working at a repetition rate of 10 Hz were used. X-Ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and secondary ions mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to investigate the structure, surface morphology and composition of the deposited films.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of Ag deposited TiO2 particles by laser ablation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. H.; Hong, M. H.; Zhou, Y.; Chen, G. X.; Saw, M. M.; Hor, A. T. S.

    2007-12-01

    Ag deposited TiO2 (Ag/TiO2) particles were synthesized by laser ablation of silver and titanium targets in de-ionized (DI) water. Post-annealing makes the structure stable and the materials change to crystalline state. It is a new approach to form Ag/TiO2 particles with a simple system and non-toxic materials. TiO2 particles with size from 20 to 30 nm coated with silver nano-clusters were observed. The silver nano-clusters can enhance the absorption capability of TiO2 photocatalysts. UV-vis spectrum analysis shows that there is a strong absorption peak at around 400 nm. It is attributed to Ag nanoparticles surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect. This effect helps to improve the spectral characteristics of TiO2 nanoparticles with its absorption spectra shifted to a longer wavelength region. From the above properties, Ag/TiO2 nanoparticles would have new potential applications in photocatalyst and photo-anode.

  17. Near-infrared emitting AgInTe2 and Zn-Ag-In-Te colloidal nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langevin, Marc-Antoine; Pons, Thomas; Ritcey, Anna M.; Nì. Allen, Claudine

    2015-06-01

    The synthesis of AgInTe2 nanocrystals emitting between 1095 nm and 1160 nm is presented. Evolution of the Ag:In:Te ratio shows progressive incorporation of In3+ in Ag2Te, leading to the formation of orthorhombic AgInTe2. When zinc is added to the synthesis, the photoluminescence quantum yield reaches 3.4 %.

  18. Redetermination of AgPO3

    PubMed Central

    Terebilenko, Katherina V.; Zatovsky, Igor V.; Ogorodnyk, Ivan V.; Baumer, Vyacheslav N.; Slobodyanik, Nikolay S.

    2011-01-01

    Single crystals of silver(I) polyphosphate(V), AgPO3, were prepared via a phospho­ric acid melt method using a solution of Ag3PO4 in H3PO4. In comparison with the previous study based on single-crystal Weissenberg photographs [Jost (1961 ▶). Acta Cryst. 14, 779–784], the results were mainly confirmed, but with much higher precision and with all displacement parameters refined anisotropically. The structure is built up from two types of distorted edge- and corner-sharing [AgO5] polyhedra, giving rise to multidirectional ribbons, and from two types of PO4 tetra­hedra linked into meandering chains (PO3)n spreading parallel to the b axis with a repeat unit of four tetra­hedra. The calculated bond-valence sum value of one of the two AgI ions indicates a significant strain of the structure. PMID:21522230

  19. Redetermination of AgPO(3).

    PubMed

    Terebilenko, Katherina V; Zatovsky, Igor V; Ogorodnyk, Ivan V; Baumer, Vyacheslav N; Slobodyanik, Nikolay S

    2011-02-09

    Single crystals of silver(I) polyphosphate(V), AgPO(3), were prepared via a phospho-ric acid melt method using a solution of Ag(3)PO(4) in H(3)PO(4). In comparison with the previous study based on single-crystal Weissenberg photographs [Jost (1961 ▶). Acta Cryst. 14, 779-784], the results were mainly confirmed, but with much higher precision and with all displacement parameters refined anisotropically. The structure is built up from two types of distorted edge- and corner-sharing [AgO(5)] polyhedra, giving rise to multidirectional ribbons, and from two types of PO(4) tetra-hedra linked into meandering chains (PO(3))(n) spreading parallel to the b axis with a repeat unit of four tetra-hedra. The calculated bond-valence sum value of one of the two Ag(I) ions indicates a significant strain of the structure.

  20. Redetermination of AgPO(3).

    PubMed

    Terebilenko, Katherina V; Zatovsky, Igor V; Ogorodnyk, Ivan V; Baumer, Vyacheslav N; Slobodyanik, Nikolay S

    2011-01-01

    Single crystals of silver(I) polyphosphate(V), AgPO(3), were prepared via a phospho-ric acid melt method using a solution of Ag(3)PO(4) in H(3)PO(4). In comparison with the previous study based on single-crystal Weissenberg photographs [Jost (1961 ▶). Acta Cryst. 14, 779-784], the results were mainly confirmed, but with much higher precision and with all displacement parameters refined anisotropically. The structure is built up from two types of distorted edge- and corner-sharing [AgO(5)] polyhedra, giving rise to multidirectional ribbons, and from two types of PO(4) tetra-hedra linked into meandering chains (PO(3))(n) spreading parallel to the b axis with a repeat unit of four tetra-hedra. The calculated bond-valence sum value of one of the two Ag(I) ions indicates a significant strain of the structure. PMID:21522230

  1. Exposure-dependent Ag+ release from silver nanoparticles and its complexation in AgS2 sites in primary murine macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronesi, G.; Aude-Garcia, C.; Kieffer, I.; Gallon, T.; Delangle, P.; Herlin-Boime, N.; Rabilloud, T.; Carrière, M.

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticle (AgNP) toxicity is related to their dissolution in biological environments and to the binding of the released Ag+ ions in cellulo; the chemical environment of recombined Ag+ ions is responsible for their toxicological outcome, moreover it is indicative of the cellular response to AgNP exposure, and can therefore shed light on the mechanisms governing AgNP toxicity. This study probes the chemistry of Ag species in primary murine macrophages exposed to AgNPs by making use of X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy under cryogenic conditions: the linear combination analysis of the near-edge region of the spectra provides the fraction of Ag+ ions released from the AgNPs under a given exposure condition and highlights their complexation with thiolate groups; the ab initio modelling of the extended spectra allows measuring the Ag-S bond length in cellulo. Dissolution rates depend on the exposure scenario, chronicity leading to higher Ag+ release than acute exposure; Ag-S bond lengths are 2.41 +/- 0.03 Å and 2.38 +/- 0.01 Å in acute and chronic exposure respectively, compatible with digonal AgS2 coordination. Glutathione is identified as the most likely putative ligand for Ag+. The proposed method offers a scope for the investigation of metallic nanoparticle dissolution and recombination in cellular models.Silver nanoparticle (AgNP) toxicity is related to their dissolution in biological environments and to the binding of the released Ag+ ions in cellulo; the chemical environment of recombined Ag+ ions is responsible for their toxicological outcome, moreover it is indicative of the cellular response to AgNP exposure, and can therefore shed light on the mechanisms governing AgNP toxicity. This study probes the chemistry of Ag species in primary murine macrophages exposed to AgNPs by making use of X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy under cryogenic conditions: the linear combination analysis of the near-edge region of the spectra provides

  2. AgRISTARS documents tracking list report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A quarterly listing of those documents and related publications that have been issued and placed in the AgRISTARS tracking system is presented. The Tracking List Report provides a catalog, by project, of technical publications arranged by type of document and gives the reference AgRISTARS document numbers, title and date of publication, the issuing organization, and the National Technical Information Service reference number.

  3. 20% PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKE IN THE AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H; Bai, M; Brown, K A; Glenn, W; Luccio, A U; Mackay, W W; Montag, C; Ptitsyn, V; Roser, T; Tsoupas, N; Zeno, K; Ranjbar, V; Spinka, H; Underwood, D

    2002-11-06

    An 11.4% partial Siberian snake was used to successfully accelerate polarized proton through a strong intrinsic depolarizing spin resonance in the AGS. No noticeable depolarization was observed. This opens up the possibility of using a 20% to 30% partial Siberian snake in the AGS to overcome all weak and strong depolarizing spin resonances. Some design and operation issues of the new partial Siberian snake are discussed.

  4. Parallel fixed point implementation of a radial basis function network in an FPGA.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Alisson C D; Fernandes, Marcelo A C

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a parallel fixed point radial basis function (RBF) artificial neural network (ANN), implemented in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) trained online with a least mean square (LMS) algorithm. The processing time and occupied area were analyzed for various fixed point formats. The problems of precision of the ANN response for nonlinear classification using the XOR gate and interpolation using the sine function were also analyzed in a hardware implementation. The entire project was developed using the System Generator platform (Xilinx), with a Virtex-6 xc6vcx240t-1ff1156 as the target FPGA.

  5. Parallel Fixed Point Implementation of a Radial Basis Function Network in an FPGA

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Alisson C. D.; Fernandes, Marcelo A. C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a parallel fixed point radial basis function (RBF) artificial neural network (ANN), implemented in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) trained online with a least mean square (LMS) algorithm. The processing time and occupied area were analyzed for various fixed point formats. The problems of precision of the ANN response for nonlinear classification using the XOR gate and interpolation using the sine function were also analyzed in a hardware implementation. The entire project was developed using the System Generator platform (Xilinx), with a Virtex-6 xc6vcx240t-1ff1156 as the target FPGA. PMID:25268918

  6. Hyperspectral reflected light microscopy of plasmonic Au/Ag alloy nanoparticles incubated as multiplex chromatic biomarkers with cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Patskovsky, Sergiy; Bergeron, Eric; Rioux, David; Simard, Mikaël; Meunier, Michel

    2014-10-21

    A hyperspectral microscopy system based on a reflected light method for plasmonic nanoparticle (NP) imaging was designed and compared with a conventional darkfield method for spatial localization and spectroscopic identification of single Au, Ag and Au/Ag alloy NPs incubated with fixed human cancer cell preparations. A new synthesis protocol based on co-reduction of Au and Ag salts combined with the seeded growth technique was used for the fabrication of monodispersed alloy NPs with sizes ranging from 30 to 100 nm in diameter. We validated theoretically and experimentally the performance of 60 nm Au, Ag and Au/Ag (50 : 50) NPs as multiplexed biological chromatic markers for biomedical diagnostics and optical biosensing. The advantages of the proposed reflected light microscopy method are presented for NP imaging in a complex and highly diffusing medium such as a cellular environment. The obtained information is essential for the development of a high throughput, selective and efficient strategy for cancer detection and treatment. PMID:25133743

  7. MGr1-Ag/37LRP promotes growth and proliferation of gastric cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Sun, L; Wu, K; Shi, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Zhang, N; Zhang, H; Zhang, H

    2014-09-01

    Gastric carcinoma (GC) is an aggressive cancer with a poor prognosis. We previously reported that MGr1-Ag was involved in multidrug resistance and anti-apoptosis in GC. However, the exact function of MGr1-Ag in GC proliferation is not clear. In this study, we found that MGr1-Ag was highly expressed in GC tissues and four GC cell lines compared with nontumor gastric tissues or gastric epithelial mucosa cells. The high expression of MGr1-Ag/37LRP was also consistent with the decreased median survival time of GC patients. We employed lenti-mediated RNA interference technique to knock down MGr1-Ag expression in SGC7901 and MKN45 cells, respectively, and observed its effects on GC cells growth in vitro and in vivo. Further study showed that knockdown of MGr1-Ag could inhibit GC cell proliferation by inhibiting the cell cycle S-phase entry and induced apoptosis. Soft agar colony formation assay indicated that the colony formation ability of SGC7901 and MKN45 cells decreased after lenti-MGr1-Ag small interfering RNA (siRNA) infection. Western blot revealed that cyclin D1 and Bcl-2 expression were downregulated whereas p27 and Bax were upregulated in lenti-MGr-siRNA-infected GC cells. Further study demonstrated that the proliferation effect of MGr1-Ag in GC is dependent on its laminin-binding region. Taken together, these data revealed a novel function of MGr1-Ag that can possibly be used as an independent prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target for GC. PMID:25060631

  8. Acceleration of polarized protons in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E.; Glenn, J.W.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Zeno, K.

    2010-02-25

    The high energy (s{sup 1/2} = 500 GeV) polarized proton beam experiments performed in RHIC, require high polarization of the proton beam. With the AGS used as the pre-injector to RHIC, one of the main tasks is to preserve the polarization of the proton beam, during the beam acceleration in the AGS. The polarization preservation is accomplished by the two partial helical magnets [1,2,3,4,5,6,7] which have been installed in AGS, and help overcome the imperfection and the intrinsic spin resonances which occur during the acceleration of protons. This elimination of the intrinsic resonances is accomplished by placing the vertical tune Q{sub y} at a value close to 8.98, within the spin-tune stop-band created by the snake. At this near integer tune the perturbations caused by the partial helical magnets is large resulting in large beta and dispersion waves. To mitigate the adverse effect of the partial helices on the optics of the AGS, we have introduced compensation quads[2] in the AGS. In this paper we present the beam optics of the AGS which ameliorates this effect of the partial helices.

  9. Dihydroisoxazole inhibitors of Anopheles gambiae seminal transglutaminase AgTG3

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Current vector-based malaria control strategies are threatened by the rise of biochemical and behavioural resistance in mosquitoes. Researching mosquito traits of immunity and fertility is required to find potential targets for new vector control strategies. The seminal transglutaminase AgTG3 coagulates male Anopheles gambiae seminal fluids, forming a ‘mating plug’ that is required for male reproductive success. Inhibitors of AgTG3 can be useful both as chemical probes of A. gambiae reproductive biology and may further the development of new chemosterilants for mosquito population control. Methods A targeted library of 3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxoisoxazole inhibitors were synthesized and screened for inhibition of AgTG3 in a fluorescent, plate-based assay. Positive hits were tested for in vitro activity using cross-linking and mass spectrometry, and in vivo efficacy in laboratory mating assays. Results A targeted chemical library was screened for inhibition of AgTG3 in a fluorescent plate-based assay using its native substrate, plugin. Several inhibitors were identified with IC50 < 10 μM. Preliminary structure-activity relationships within the library support the stereo-specificity and preference for aromatic substituents in the chemical scaffold. Both inhibition of plugin cross-linking and covalent modification of the active site cysteine of AgTG3 were verified. Administration of an AgTG3 inhibitor to A. gambiae males by intrathoracic injection led to a 15% reduction in mating plug transfer in laboratory mating assays. Conclusions A targeted screen has identified chemical inhibitors of A. gambiae transglutaminase 3 (AgTG3). The most potent inhibitors are known inhibitors of human transglutaminase 2, suggesting a common binding pose may exist within the active site of both enzymes. Future efforts to develop additional inhibitors will provide chemical tools to address important biological questions regarding the role of the A. gambiae mating plug. A

  10. A visible-light-driven core-shell like Ag2S@Ag2CO3 composite photocatalyst with high performance in pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changlin; Wei, Longfu; Zhou, Wanqin; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Zhu, Lihua; Shu, Qing; Liu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    A series of Ag2S-Ag2CO3 (4%, 8%, 16%, 32% and 40% Ag2S), Ag2CO3@Ag2S (32%Ag2S) and Ag2S@Ag2CO3 (32%Ag2S) composite photocatalysts were fabricated by coprecipitation or successive precipitation reaction. The obtained catalysts were analyzed by N2 physical adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and photocurrent test. Under visible light irradiation, the influences of Ag2S content and core-shell property on photocatalytic activity and stability were evaluated in studies focused on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) dye, phenol, and bisphenol A. Results showed that excellent photocatalytic performance was obtained over Ag2S/Ag2CO3 composite photocatalysts with respect to Ag2S and Ag2CO3. With optimal content of Ag2S (32 wt%), the Ag2S-Ag2CO3 showed the highest photocatalytic degradation efficiency. Moreover, the structured property of Ag2S/Ag2CO3 greatly influenced the activity. Compared with Ag2S-Ag2CO3 and Ag2CO3@Ag2S, core-shell like Ag2S@Ag2CO3 demonstrated the highest activity and stability. The main reason for the boosting of photocatalytic performance was due to the formation of Ag2S/Ag2CO3 well contacted interface and unique electron structures. Ag2S/Ag2CO3 interface could significantly increase the separation efficiency of the photo-generated electrons (e(-)) and holes (h(+)), and production of OH radicals. More importantly, the low solubility of Ag2S shell could effectively protect the core of Ag2CO3, which further guarantees the stability of Ag2CO3. PMID:27236845

  11. Green and Tunable Decoration of Graphene with Spherical Nanoparticles Based on Laser Ablation in Water: A Case of Ag Nanoparticle/Graphene Oxide Sheet Composites.

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Wang, Haibo; Li, Kai; Zhu, Jun; Liu, Jianshuang; Meng, Xiangdong; Shen, Xiaoshuang; Zeng, Xianghua; Cai, Weiping

    2016-02-23

    A simple and green strategy is presented to decorate graphene with nanoparticles, based on laser ablation of targets in graphene auqeous solution. Ag and graphene oxide (GO) are chosen as model materials. The surface of GO sheets is strongly anchored with spherical Ag nanoparticles. The density and size of the Ag nanoparticles can be easily tuned by laser ablation conditions. Further, the GO sheets can be decorated with other nanoparticles from simple metals or semiconductors to multicomponent hybrids. Additionally, the Ag nanoparticle/GO sheet colloids can be utilized as blocks to build three-dimensional structures, such as sandwich membranes by evaporation-induced self-assembly. These graphene-based composite materials could be very useful in catalysis, sensors, and nanodevices. Particularly, the Ag nanoparticle/GO sheet sandwich composite membranes exhibit excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering performance and possess the huge potential in trace-detecting persistent organic pollutants in the environment.

  12. Fixed-Cell Imaging of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Iain M; Bagley, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The acknowledged genetic malleability of fission yeast has been matched by impressive cytology to drive major advances in our understanding of basic molecular cell biological processes. In many of the more recent studies, traditional approaches of fixation followed by processing to accommodate classical staining procedures have been superseded by live-cell imaging approaches that monitor the distribution of fusion proteins between a molecule of interest and a fluorescent protein. Although such live-cell imaging is uniquely informative for many questions, fixed-cell imaging remains the better option for others and is an important-sometimes critical-complement to the analysis of fluorescent fusion proteins by live-cell imaging. Here, we discuss the merits of fixed- and live-cell imaging as well as specific issues for fluorescence microscopy imaging of fission yeast. PMID:27371603

  13. Fixed-rate layered multicast congestion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing, Zhang; Bing, Yuan; Zengji, Liu

    2006-10-01

    A new fixed-rate layered multicast congestion control algorithm called FLMCC is proposed. The sender of a multicast session transmits data packets at a fixed rate on each layer, while receivers each obtain different throughput by cumulatively subscribing to deferent number of layers based on their expected rates. In order to provide TCP-friendliness and estimate the expected rate accurately, a window-based mechanism implemented at receivers is presented. To achieve this, each receiver maintains a congestion window, adjusts it based on the GAIMD algorithm, and from the congestion window an expected rate is calculated. To measure RTT, a new method is presented which combines an accurate measurement with a rough estimation. A feedback suppression based on a random timer mechanism is given to avoid feedback implosion in the accurate measurement. The protocol is simple in its implementation. Simulations indicate that FLMCC shows good TCP-friendliness, responsiveness as well as intra-protocol fairness, and provides high link utilization.

  14. Earth stations for fixed and mobile services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charyk, J. V.; Metzger, S.

    1984-07-01

    Communication service provided with the aid of commercial satellites began 18 years ago with the launch of Early Bird (Inselsat I). The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of the earth stations used in the Intelsat system, taking into account the technical, political, and operational factors which have influenced the design of the stations. The success of the Intelsat system led to the use of communication satellites for domestic, maritime, and direct broadcast use. More than 2000 commercial ships communicate via satellite, and by the end of the 1980s, there should be missions of home receivers for direct broadcast satellite television reception. Fixed international service stations are discussed, taking into account overall considerations, antennas, high power amplifiers, low noise amplifiers, multiplex systems, and small earth stations. Attention is also given to fixed domestic service stations, direct broadcast stations, and maritime service.

  15. Fixed flexion deformity and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Su, E P

    2012-11-01

    Fixed flexion deformities are common in osteoarthritic knees that are indicated for total knee arthroplasty. The lack of full extension at the knee results in a greater force of quadriceps contracture and energy expenditure. It also results in slower walking velocity and abnormal gait mechanics, overloading the contralateral limb. Residual flexion contractures after TKA have been associated with poorer functional scores and outcomes. Although some flexion contractures may resolve with time after surgery, a substantial percentage will become permanent. Therefore, it is essential to correct fixed flexion deformities at the time of TKA, and be vigilant in the post-operative course to maintain the correction. Surgical techniques to address pre-operative flexion contractures include: adequate bone resection, ligament releases, removal of posterior osteophytes, and posterior capsular releases. Post-operatively, extension can be maintained with focused physiotherapy, a specially modified continuous passive motion machine, a contralateral heel lift, and splinting.

  16. Investigation of the structure of a Ag/Pd/Ag( 1 1 1 ) trilayer by means of electronic spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, J.; Ghijsen, J.; Sporken, R.

    2002-06-01

    The growth of the Ag/Pd/Ag system has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. No chemical reaction or interdiffusion was observed between the Pd and Ag layers. The growth of the Pd interlayer follows the Frank Van der Merwe mode but is not pseudomorphic on the Ag(1 1 1) substrate. The growth of the top Ag layer on the Pd interlayer is pseudomorphic and layer by layer but contains around 12% of voids.

  17. Integrating fixed and removable provisional restorations.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S R

    1993-10-01

    When both fixed and removable components are required, provisional restorations can be difficult. This article describes a technique where provisional restoration "shells" are made with a plastic stent of the diagnostic wax-up on lightly prepared teeth of a diagnostic cast. An acrylic removable partial denture is then waxed to the shells. The shells are relined intraorally after tooth preparation with the partial denture in place.

  18. Coating removal systems - Mobile or fixed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangold, Vernon L., Jr.

    1992-04-01

    Various coating removal technologies are discussed from the viewpoint of the process and delivery, with emphasis placed on the mobile Large Aircraft Robot Paint Stripping (LARPS) concept. LARPS is a combined and integrated package of a delivery system and the process media, representing the alternative to the fixed-frame or gantry robot style delivery systems. The paper describes details of the LARPS system design and performance, and presents design diagrams of LARPS.

  19. Fixed drug eruptions with intraoral presentation

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rahul; Bihari, Manorama; Bhuvan, Jyoti; Saad, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Fixed-drug eruption (FDE) is an unusual and rare adverse drug reaction. This type of reaction is actually a delayed type of hypersensitivity reaction that occurs as lesions recurring at the same skin site due to repeated intake of an offending drug. Here is a case report of a 58-year-old male patient who developed intraoral FDEs after ingestion of the first dose of ornidazole. PMID:26097341

  20. Fixed-combination and emerging glaucoma therapies.

    PubMed

    Woodward, David F; Chen, June

    2007-05-01

    Ocular hypotensive agents are the only approved pharmacotherapy for glaucoma. Despite significant advances during the past two decades, a large proportion of glaucoma patients require more than one drug. The most recent additions to the armamentarium of antiglaucoma drugs are fixed-combination products for the glaucoma patient who is insufficiently responsive to monotherapy. Fixed-combination products have the combined efficacy of two ocular hypotensive drugs, and the convenience of a two-drug treatment regimen in a single container, which may aid patient adherence to treatment. Available fixed-combination products consist of timolol 0.5% as an invariant with brimonidine 0.2%, dorzolamide 2%, travoprost 0.004%, latanoprost 0.005% or bimatoprost 0.03%. Research on more advanced antiglaucoma medications continues. Promising new directions appear to be the Rho-kinase inhibitors, microtubule-disrupting agents, serotonergics and cannabimimetics. Efforts continue to improve existing antiglaucoma drugs in an attempt to design second-generation cholinomimetics, adrenergics, prostaglandins and prostamides. PMID:17604504

  1. Zirconia in fixed prosthesis. A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Román-Rodríguez, Juan L.; Ferreiroa, Alberto; Solá-Ruíz, María F.; Fons-Font, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Statement of problem: Evidence is limited on the efficacy of zirconia-based fixed dental prostheses. Objective: To carry out a literature review of the behavior of zirconium oxide dental restorations. Material and Methods: This literature review searched the Pubmed, Scopus, Medline and Cochrane Library databases using key search words “zirconium oxide,” “zirconia,” “non-metal restorations,” “ceramic oxides,” “veneering ceramic,” “zirconia-based fixed dental prostheses”. Both in vivo and in vitro studies into zirconia-based prosthodontic restoration behavior were included. Results: Clinical studies have revealed a high rate of fracture for porcelain-veneered zirconia-based restorations that varies between 6% and 15% over a 3- to 5-year period, while for ceramo-metallic restorations the fracture rate ranges between 4 and 10% over ten years. These results provoke uncertainty as to the long-term prognosis for this material in the oral medium. The cause of veneering porcelain fractures is unknown but hypothetically they could be associated with bond failure between the veneer material and the zirconia sub-structure. Key words:Veneering ceramic, zirconia-based ceramic restoration, crown, zirconia, tooth-supported fixed prosthesis. PMID:24596638

  2. RSRM nozzle fixed housing cooldown test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolieau, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Flight 5 aft segments with nozzles were exposed to -17 F temperatures while awaiting shipment to KSC in February, 1989. No records were found which show that any previous nozzles were exposed to air temperatures as low as those seen by the Flight 5 nozzles. Thermal analysis shows that the temperature of the fixed housing, and forward and aft exit cone components dropped as low as -10 F. Structural analysis of the nozzles at these low temperatures show the forward and aft exit cone adhesive bonds to have a positive margin of safety, based on a 2.0 safety factor. These analyses show the normal and shear stresses in the fixed housing bond as low values. However, the hoop and meridinal stresses were predicted to be in the 4000 psi range; the failure stress allowable of EA913NA adhesive at -7 F. If the bonds did break in directions perpendicular to the surfaces, called bond crazing, no normal bond strength would be lost. Testing was conducted in two phases, showing that no degradation to the adhesive bonds occurred while the Flight 5 nozzles were subjected to subzero temperatures. The results of these tests are documented. Phase 1 testing cooled a full-scale RSRM insulated fixed housing to -13 F, with extensive bondline inspections. Phase 2 testing cooled the witness panel adhesive tensile buttions to -13 F, with failure strengths recorded before, during, and after the cooldown.

  3. One-pot synthesis and transfer of PMMA/Ag photonic nanocomposites by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karoutsos, V.; Koutselas, I.; Orfanou, P.; Mpatzaka, Th.; Vasileiadis, M.; Vassilakopoulou, A.; Vainos, N. A.; Perrone, A.

    2015-08-01

    Nanocomposite films comprising metallic nanoparticles in polymer matrices find increasing use in emerging photonic, electronic and microsystem applications owing to their tailored advanced functionalities. The versatile development of such films based on poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) matrix having embedded Ag nanoparticles is addressed here. Two low-cost one-pot chemical methods for the synthesis of bulk target nanocomposite materials are demonstrated. These nanocomposites are subsequently transferred via pulsed laser deposition using 193 nm ArF excimer laser radiation, producing films maintaining the structural and functional properties. Both target- and laser-deposited materials have been thoroughly characterized using microscopic, spectroscopic and thermal analysis methods. Infrared spectra demonstrated the close molecular PMMA chain similarity for both target and film materials, though structural alterations identified by thermal analysis proved the enhanced characteristics of films grown. High-resolution electron microscopy proved the transfer of Ag nanoparticles sized 10-50 nm. Visible absorption peaked in the spectral range of 430-440 nm and attributed to the Ag nanocomposite plasmonic response verifying the transfer of the functional performance from target to film.

  4. Facile synthesis of sunlight-driven AgCI:Ag plasmonic nanophotocatalyst.

    SciTech Connect

    An, C.; Peng, S.; Sun, Y.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Univ. of Illinois

    2010-06-18

    Highly efficient plasmonic photocatalysts of AgCl:Ag hybrid nanoparticles are successfully synthesized via a one-pot synthetic approach involving a precipitation reaction followed by polyol reduction. The as-synthesized nanoparticles exhibit high catalytic performance under visible light and sunlight for decomposing organics, such as methylene blue.

  5. Beet Juice-Induced Green Fabrication of Plasmonic AgCl/Ag Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple, green, and fast approach (complete within 5 min) was explored for the fabrication of hybrid AgCl/Ag plasmonic nanoparticles under microwave (MW) irradiation. In this method, beet juice served as a reducing reagent, which is an abundant sugar-rich agricultural produce. I...

  6. Ultra-Fast Synthesis for Ag2Se and CuAgSe Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DUAN, H. Z.; LI, Y. L.; ZHAO, K. P.; QIU, P. F.; SHI, X.; CHEN, L. D.

    2016-10-01

    Ag2Se and CuAgSe have been recently reported as promising thermoelectric materials at room temperature. The traditional melting-annealing-sintering processes are used to grow Ag2Se and CuAgSe materials with the disadvantages of high costs of energy and time. In this work, phase-pure polycrystalline Ag2Se and CuAgSe compounds were synthesized from raw elemental powders directly by manual mixing followed by spark plasma sintering (MM-SPS) in a few minutes. The influence of SPS heating rate on the phase composition, microstructure, and thermoelectric properties, including Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity, were investigated. The zTs of 0.8 at 390 K and 0.6 at 450 K are obtained for Ag2Se and CuAgSe, respectively, which is comparable with the values in the materials prepared by the traditional method. Furthermore, this ultrafast sample synthesis can significantly save material synthesis time and thus has the obvious advantage for large-scale production.

  7. EXAFS Studies of Bimetallic Ag-Pt and Ag-Pd Nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, D.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Bunker, B.A.; Doudna, C.M.; Bertino, M.F.; Blum, F.; Tokuhiro, A.; Terry, J.

    2008-10-30

    Nanoparticles of Ag-Pt and Ag-Pd with high aspect ratios were synthesized using a radiolysis method. Gamma rays at dose rates below 0.5 kGy/h were used for irradiation. The nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), optical absorption spectroscopy and x-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Bright field micrographs show that Ag-Pt nanowires are composed of large particles with diameters ranging from 20-30 nm and joined by filaments of diameter between 2-5 nm. The Ag-Pd nanowires have diameters of 20-25 nm and lengths of 1.5 {micro}m. For XAFS measurements, the Pt L3 edge (11.564 keV), Ag K-edge (25.514 keV) and Pd K-edge (24.350 keV) were excited to determine the local structure around the respective atoms in the cluster. The Ag-Pt particles were found to possess a distinct core-shell structure with Pt in the core surrounded by Ag shell, with no indication of alloy formation. However, nanorods of Ag-Pd have formed an alloy for all the alloy compositions.

  8. Ultra-Fast Synthesis for Ag2Se and CuAgSe Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DUAN, H. Z.; LI, Y. L.; ZHAO, K. P.; QIU, P. F.; SHI, X.; CHEN, L. D.

    2016-06-01

    Ag2Se and CuAgSe have been recently reported as promising thermoelectric materials at room temperature. The traditional melting-annealing-sintering processes are used to grow Ag2Se and CuAgSe materials with the disadvantages of high costs of energy and time. In this work, phase-pure polycrystalline Ag2Se and CuAgSe compounds were synthesized from raw elemental powders directly by manual mixing followed by spark plasma sintering (MM-SPS) in a few minutes. The influence of SPS heating rate on the phase composition, microstructure, and thermoelectric properties, including Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity, were investigated. The zTs of 0.8 at 390 K and 0.6 at 450 K are obtained for Ag2Se and CuAgSe, respectively, which is comparable with the values in the materials prepared by the traditional method. Furthermore, this ultrafast sample synthesis can significantly save material synthesis time and thus has the obvious advantage for large-scale production.

  9. Ultra-sensitive detection of Ag+ ions based on Ag+-assisted isothermal exponential degradation reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Fan, Qi; Zhu, Sha; Duan, Aiping; Yin, Yongmei; Li, Genxi

    2013-01-15

    Ag(+) ions are greatly toxic to a lot of algae, fungi, viruses and bacteria, which can also induce harmful side-effects to environments and human health. Herein we report an ultra-sensitive method for the selective detection of Ag(+) ions with electrochemical technique based on Ag(+)-assisted isothermal exponential degradation reaction. In the presence of Ag(+), mismatched trigger DNA can transiently bind to template DNA immobilized on an electrode surface through the formation of C-Ag(+)-C base pair, which then initiates the isothermal exponential degradation reaction. As a result, the mismatched trigger DNA may melt off the cleaved template DNA to trigger rounds of elongation and cutting. After the cyclic degradation reactions, removal of the template DNA immobilized on the electrode surface can be efficiently monitored by using electrochemical technique to show the status of the electrode surface, which can be then used to determine the presence of Ag(+). Further studies reveal that the proposed method can be ultra-sensitive to detect Ag(+) at a picomolar level. The selectivity of the detection can also be satisfactory, thus the proposed method for the Ag(+) ions detection may be potentially useful in the future. PMID:22921090

  10. Ag on Si(111) from basic science to application

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    In our work we revisit Ag and Au adsorbates on Si(111)-7x7, as well as experiment with a ternary system of Pentacene, Ag and Si(111). Of particular interest to us is the Si(111)-(√3x√3)R30°}–Ag (Ag-Si-√3 hereafter). In this thesis I systematically explore effects of Ag deposition on the Ag-Si-√3 at different temperatures, film thicknesses and deposition fluxes. The generated insight of the Ag system on the Si(111) is then applied to generate novel methods of nanostructuring and nanowire growth. I then extend our expertise to the Au system on the Ag-Si(111) to gain insight into Au-Si eutectic silicide formation. Finally we explore behavior and growth modes of an organic molecule on the Ag-Si interface.

  11. Enhanced thermoelectric performance of CdO : Ag nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Gao, Linjie; Wang, Shufang; Liu, Ran; Zha, Xinyu; Sun, Niefeng; Wang, Shujie; Wang, Jianglong; Fu, Guangsheng

    2016-07-26

    CdO : Ag nanocomposites with metallic Ag nanoparticles embedded in the polycrystalline CdO matrix were synthesized by the solid-state reaction method. The addition of Ag led to increased grain boundaries of CdO and created numerous CdO/Ag interfaces. By incorporating Ag into the CdO matrix, the power factor was increased which was probably due to the carrier energy filtering effect induced by the enhanced energy-dependent scattering of electrons. In addition, reduced thermal conductivity was also achieved by stronger phonon scattering from grain boundaries, CdO/Ag interfaces and Ag nanoparticles. These concomitant effects resulted in enhanced ZT values for all CdO : Ag nanocomposites, demonstrating that the strategy of introducing metallic Ag nanoparticles into the CdO host was very effective in optimizing the thermoelectric performance. PMID:27411573

  12. Anomalous evolution of interfaces in Fe/Ag magnetic multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gagan; Gupta, Ranjeeta; Kumar, Dileep; Gupta, Ajay

    2013-12-01

    Interfaces greatly influence the magnetic properties of multilayer nanostructures. In the present work, the x-ray standing wave (XSW) technique along with conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy have been used to study the evolution of interfaces in Fe/Ag system as a function of thermal annealing. The XSW technique has sufficient depth resolution so as to determine the concentration profiles of Fe across the two interfaces, namely Fe-on-Ag and Ag-on-Fe independently. In as-deposited Ag/Fe/Ag trilayer, Fe-on-Ag interface has a substantially higher roughness of 1.3 nm as compared to 0.9 nm of Ag-on-Fe interface. It is shown that the observed difference in the roughness of the two interfaces is due to a substantial intermixing between Fe and Ag occurring preferentially at Fe-on-Ag interface. With thermal annealing, the two interfaces exhibit opposite behaviour; while Fe-on-Ag interface exhibits an initial sharpening, Ag-on-Fe interface exhibits a monotonous broadening. Two competing processes occur at the interfaces, (i) interface sharpening as a result of de-mixing, driven by a large positive heat of mixing between Fe and Ag and (ii) increase in topological roughness due to increased thermal agitation. This results in a non-monotonous variation in the roughness of Fe-on-Ag interface. At sufficiently high temperature the layered structure is completely destroyed, leading to formation of Fe and Ag nanoparticles.

  13. Noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains: annealing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shao Hui; Fei, Guang Tao; You, Qiao; Gao, Xu Dong; Huo, Peng Cheng; De Zhang, Li

    2016-09-01

    One-dimensional noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains have been prepared by electrodepositing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in a porous anodic alumina oxide (AAO) template and following an annealing process in vacuum. It is found that Bi, as a sacrificial metal, can be removed completely after annealing at 450 °C with a vacuum degree of 10-5 Torr. The regulation of particle size, shape and interparticle spacing of Ag NP chains has been realized by adjusting the segment length of the Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires and the annealing condition. With an extension of the annealing time, it is observed that Ag particles display the transform trend from ellipsoid to sphere. Our findings could inspire further investigation on the design and fabrication of metal nanoparticle chains.

  14. Noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains: annealing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shao Hui; Fei, Guang Tao; You, Qiao; Gao, Xu Dong; Huo, Peng Cheng; De Zhang, Li

    2016-09-01

    One-dimensional noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains have been prepared by electrodepositing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in a porous anodic alumina oxide (AAO) template and following an annealing process in vacuum. It is found that Bi, as a sacrificial metal, can be removed completely after annealing at 450 °C with a vacuum degree of 10‑5 Torr. The regulation of particle size, shape and interparticle spacing of Ag NP chains has been realized by adjusting the segment length of the Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires and the annealing condition. With an extension of the annealing time, it is observed that Ag particles display the transform trend from ellipsoid to sphere. Our findings could inspire further investigation on the design and fabrication of metal nanoparticle chains.

  15. Noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains: annealing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shao Hui; Fei, Guang Tao; You, Qiao; Gao, Xu Dong; Huo, Peng Cheng; De Zhang, Li

    2016-09-16

    One-dimensional noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains have been prepared by electrodepositing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in a porous anodic alumina oxide (AAO) template and following an annealing process in vacuum. It is found that Bi, as a sacrificial metal, can be removed completely after annealing at 450 °C with a vacuum degree of 10(-5) Torr. The regulation of particle size, shape and interparticle spacing of Ag NP chains has been realized by adjusting the segment length of the Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires and the annealing condition. With an extension of the annealing time, it is observed that Ag particles display the transform trend from ellipsoid to sphere. Our findings could inspire further investigation on the design and fabrication of metal nanoparticle chains.

  16. Noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains: annealing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shao Hui; Fei, Guang Tao; You, Qiao; Gao, Xu Dong; Huo, Peng Cheng; De Zhang, Li

    2016-09-16

    One-dimensional noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains have been prepared by electrodepositing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in a porous anodic alumina oxide (AAO) template and following an annealing process in vacuum. It is found that Bi, as a sacrificial metal, can be removed completely after annealing at 450 °C with a vacuum degree of 10(-5) Torr. The regulation of particle size, shape and interparticle spacing of Ag NP chains has been realized by adjusting the segment length of the Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires and the annealing condition. With an extension of the annealing time, it is observed that Ag particles display the transform trend from ellipsoid to sphere. Our findings could inspire further investigation on the design and fabrication of metal nanoparticle chains. PMID:27487089

  17. Auditory target detection in reverberation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Patrick M.; Freyman, Richard L.; Balakrishnan, Uma

    2004-04-01

    Measurements and theoretical predictions of auditory target detection in simulated reverberant conditions are reported. The target signals were pulsed 13-octave bands of noise and the masker signal was a continuous wideband noise. Target and masker signals were passed through a software simulation of a reverberant room with a rigid sphere modeling a listener's head. The location of the target was fixed while the location of the masker was varied in the simulated room. Degree of reverberation was controlled by varying the uniform acoustic absorption of the simulated room's surfaces. The resulting target and masker signals were presented to the listeners over headphones in monaural-left, monaural-right, or binaural listening modes. Changes in detection performance in the monaural listening modes were largely predictable from the changes in target-to-masker ratio in the target band, but with a few dB of extra masking in reverberation. Binaural detection performance was generally well predicted by applying Durlach's [in Foundations of Modern Auditory Theory (Academic, New York, 1972)] equalization-cancellation theory to the direct-plus-reverberant ear signals. Predictions in all cases were based on a statistical description of room acoustics and on acoustic diffraction by a sphere. The success of these detection models in the present well-controlled reverberant conditions suggests that they can be used to incorporate listening mode and source location as factors in speech-intelligibility predictions.

  18. MGr1-Ag/37LRP induces cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance through FAK/PI3K and MAPK pathway in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Liu, Lili; Liu, Xiangqiang; Wang, Yafang; Li, Mengbin; Yao, Liping; Yang, Jianjun; Ji, Genlin; Guo, Changcun; Pan, Yanglin; Liang, Shuhui; Wang, Biaoluo; Ding, Jie; Zhang, Hongwei; Shi, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that tumor microenvironment plays a vital role in drug resistance and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR), a form of de novo drug resistance. In our previous study, we reported that MGr1-Ag/37LRP ligation-induced adhesion participated in protecting gastric cancer cells from a number of apoptotic stimuli caused by chemotherapeutic drugs. Further study suggested that MGr1-Ag could prompt CAM-DR through interaction with laminin. However, the MGr1-Ag-initiated intracellular signal transduction pathway is still unknown. In this study, our experimental results showed that gastric cancer MDR cell lines mediated CAM-DR through upregulation of Bcl-2 by MGr1-Ag interaction with laminin. Further study found that, as a receptor of ECM components, MGr1-Ag/37LRP may activate the downstream signal pathway PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK through interaction with phosphorylated FAK. Moreover, the sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs could be significantly enhanced by inhibiting MGr1-Ag/37LRP expression through mAbs, siRNA, and antisense oligonucleotide. According to these results, we concluded that the FAK/PI3K and MAPK signal pathway plays an important role in MGr1-Ag-mediated CAM-DR in gastric cancer. MGr1-Ag/37LRP might be a potential effective reversal target to MDR in gastric cancer. PMID:24703465

  19. Synthetic aperture radar target simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, H. A.; Held, D. N.; Goldstein, R. M.; Bickler, T. C.

    1984-01-01

    A simulator for simulating the radar return, or echo, from a target seen by a SAR antenna mounted on a platform moving with respect to the target is described. It includes a first-in first-out memory which has digital information clocked in at a rate related to the frequency of a transmitted radar signal and digital information clocked out with a fixed delay defining range between the SAR and the simulated target, and at a rate related to the frequency of the return signal. An RF input signal having a frequency similar to that utilized by a synthetic aperture array radar is mixed with a local oscillator signal to provide a first baseband signal having a frequency considerably lower than that of the RF input signal.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and antimycobacterial activity of Ag(I)-aspartame, Ag(I)-saccharin and Ag(I)-cyclamate complexes.

    PubMed

    Cavicchioli, Maurício; Leite, Clarice Q F; Sato, Daisy N; Massabni, Antonio C

    2007-10-01

    The present work describes the synthesis and antimycobacterial activity of three Ag(I)-complexes with the sweeteners aspartame, saccharin, and cyclamate as ligands, with the aim of finding new candidate substances for fighting tuberculosis and other mycobacterial infections. The minimal inhibitory concentration of these three complexes was investigated in order to determine their in-vitro antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium malmoense, and Mycobacterium kansasii. The MIC values were determined using the Microplate Alamar Blue Assay. The best MIC values found for the complexes were 9.75 microM for Ag(I)-aspartame against M. kansasii and 15.7 microM for Ag(I)-cyclamate against M. tuberculosis.