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Sample records for ags gastric adenocarcinoma

  1. microRNA-25 Inhibits Cell Apoptosis of Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cell Line AGS via Regulating CCNE1 and MYC

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Peng, Zheng; Zhao, Yunshan; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastric carcinoma is the second leading cause of cancer death. microRNAs play vital roles in regulating expression of related oncogenes. microRNA-25 (miR-25) has been found to be up-regulated in gastric carcinoma. However, its roles in affecting cell apoptosis of gastric carcinoma and the related mechanism remain elusive. This study aimed to uncover the influences of miR-25 on gastric carcinoma cell apoptosis and the possible functional mechanisms involved. Material/Methods Human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS was used and transfected with lentivirus containing miR-25-specifc inhibitor sponge or expression vector to analyze the effects of miR-25. Results miR-25 had higher expression in AGS than in human gastric epithelial cell line GES-1 (P<0.01). Inhibition of miR-25 by its sponge in AGS cells resulted in suppressed cell viability (P<0.01) and promoted cell apoptosis (P<0.01), while overexpression of miR-25 abrogated these effects (P<0.01 and P<0.05), indicating that miR-25 can promote cell viability and inhibit cell apoptosis in AGS cells. Expression analysis of related factors by Western blot showed that inhibiting miR-25 led to the up-regulation of F-box and WD repeat domain-containing 7 (FBXW7, P<0.01) and the down-regulation of FBXW7 substrates, cyclin E1 (CCNE1, P<0.01), and v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC, P<0.001). Conclusions These results indicate that miR-25 has anti-apoptosis roles in AGS cells, possibly via inhibiting FBXW7 and thus promoting oncogenes, such as CCNE1 and MYC. This study provides basic evidence for using miR-25 as a possible therapeutic target in treating gastric carcinoma. PMID:27120728

  2. Extracts of Opuntia humifusa Fruits Inhibit the Growth of AGS Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, Sahng-Wook; Park, Jieun; Park, Kun-Young; Son, Yong-Suk; Han, Hyungchul

    2016-01-01

    Opuntia humifusa (OHF) has been used as a nutraceutical source for the prevention of chronic diseases. In the present study, the inhibitory effects of ethyl acetate extracts of OHF on the proliferation of AGS human gastric cancer cells and the mode of action were investigated. To elucidate the antiproliferative mechanisms of OHF in cancer cells, the expression of genes related to apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were determined with real-time PCR and western blot. The cytotoxic effect of OHF on AGS cells was observed in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to OHF (100 μg/mL) significantly induced (P<0.05) the G1 phase cell cycle arrest. Additionally, the apoptotic cell population was greater (P<0.05) in OHF (200 μg/mL) treated AGS cells when compared to the control. The expression of genes associated with cell cycle progression (Cdk4, Cdk2, and cyclin E) was significantly downregulated (P<0.05) by the OHF treatment. Moreover, the expression of Bax and caspase-3 in OHF treated cells was higher (P<0.05) than in the control. These findings suggest that OHF induces the G1 phase cell cycle arrest and activation of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway in AGS human gastric cancer cells. PMID:27069903

  3. In vitro and in vivo studies on antitumor effects of gossypol on human stomach adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line and MNNG induced experimental gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gunassekaran, G.R.; Kalpana Deepa Priya, D.; Gayathri, R.; Sakthisekaran, D.

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Gossypol is a well known polyphenolic compound used for anticancer studies but we are the first to report that gossypol has antitumor effect on MNNG induced gastric cancer in experimental animal models. {yields} Our study shows that gossypol inhibits the proliferation of AGS (human gastric adenocarcinoma) cell line. {yields} In animal models, gossypol extends the survival of cancer bearing animals and also protects the cells from carcinogenic effect. {yields} So we suggest that gossypol would be a potential chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agent for gastric cancer. -- Abstract: The present study has evaluated the chemopreventive effects of gossypol on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced gastric carcinogenesis and on human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line. Gossypol, C{sub 30}H{sub 30}O{sub 8}, is a polyphenolic compound that has anti proliferative effect and induces apoptosis in various cancer cells. The aim of this work was to delineate in vivo and in vitro anti-initiating mechanisms of orally administered gossypol in target (stomach) tissues and in human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line. In vitro results prove that gossypol has potent cytotoxic effect and inhibit the proliferation of adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line. In vivo results prove gossypol to be successful in prolonging the survival of MNNG induced cancer bearing animals and in delaying the onset of tumor in animals administrated with gossypol and MNNG simultaneously. Examination of the target (stomach) tissues in sacrificed experimental animals shows that administration of gossypol significantly reduces the level of tumor marker enzyme (carcino embryonic antigen) and pepsin. The level of Nucleic acid contents (DNA and RNA) significantly reduces, and the membrane damage of glycoprotein subsides, in the target tissues of cancer bearing animals, with the administration of gossypol. These data suggest that gossypol may create a beneficial effect in patients

  4. New Alkyl Phloroglucinol Derivatives from Rhus trichocarpa Roots and Their Cytotoxic Effects on Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma AGS Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki Yong; Choi, Ji Hoon; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Yan, Xi-Tao; Shin, Hyeji; Jeon, Young Ho; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2016-05-01

    The phytochemical investigation of the roots of Rhus trichocarpa led to this isolation of five new alkyl phloroglucinol derivatives, characterized as (Z)-15-hydroxy-1-(2,4,6-trihydroxyphenyl)-9-octadecen-1-one (named trichocarpol A, 1), (Z)-15-hydroxy-1-(2,6-dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-9-octadecen-1-one (named trichocarpol B, 2), (Z)-17-hydroxy-1-(2,4,6-trihydroxyphenyl)-9-octadecen-1-one (named trichocarpol C, 3), (Z)-18-hydroxy-1-(2,4,6-trihydroxyphenyl)-9-octadecen-1-one (named trichocarpol D, 4), and (9Z,12Z)-18-hydroxy-1-(2,4,6-trihydroxyphenyl)-9,12-octadecadien-1-one (named trichocarpol E, 5), together with a known compound, 4-(2,6-dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxobutanoic acid (6). In vitro cytotoxic activity of compounds 1-6 was evaluated in the human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cell line and compounds 1-5 showed significant cytotoxicity. Our results indicate that R. trichocarpa, especially the alkyl phloroglucinol derivatives in it, is a good source of promising natural agents for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26845711

  5. Scopadulciol, Isolated from Scoparia dulcis, Induces β-Catenin Degradation and Overcomes Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis Ligand Resistance in AGS Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Rolly G; Toume, Kazufumi; Arai, Midori A; Sadhu, Samir K; Ahmed, Firoj; Ishibashi, Masami

    2015-04-24

    Scopadulciol (1), a scopadulan-type diterpenoid, was isolated from Scoparia dulcis along with three other compounds (2-4) by an activity-guided approach using the TCF reporter (TOP) luciferase-based assay system. A fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA) revealed that compound 1 was cytotoxic to AGS human gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The treatment of AGS cells with 1 decreased β-catenin levels and also inhibited its nuclear localization. The pretreatment of AGS cells with a proteasome inhibitor, either MG132 or epoxomicin, protected against the degradation of β-catenin induced by 1. The 1-induced degradation of β-catenin was also abrogated in the presence of pifithrin-α, an inhibitor of p53 transcriptional activity. Compound 1 inhibited TOP activity in AGS cells and downregulated the protein levels of cyclin D1, c-myc, and survivin. Compound 1 also sensitized AGS cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis by increasing the levels of the death receptors, DR4 and DR5, and decreasing the level of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. Collectively, our results demonstrated that 1 induced the p53- and proteasome-dependent degradation of β-catenin, which resulted in the inhibition of TCF/β-catenin transcription in AGS cells. Furthermore, 1 enhanced apoptosis in TRAIL-resistant AGS when combined with TRAIL. PMID:25793965

  6. Escin suppresses migration and invasion involving the alteration of CXCL16/CXCR6 axis in human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Hong, Ji Eun; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Sun Hyo

    2014-01-01

    Escin, a natural mixture of triterpene saponins isolated from horse chestnut, has been reported to possess anticancer activity in many human cancer cells. However, the effect of escin on the metastasis has not been studied. The present study examined the effect of escin on the migration and invasion of AGS human gastric cancer cells. To examine the effects of escin on metastatic capacities of gastric cancer cells, AGS cells were cultured in the presence of 0-4 μmol/L escin. Escin inhibited cell migration and invasion in AGS cells. However, escin did not affect the viability of these cells at these concentrations. The chemokine receptor and its ligands play an important role in cancer metastasis. Escin decreased the production of soluble C-X-C motif chemokine (CXCL)16 but increased the expression of trans-membranous CXCL16. The expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR)6 was not affected by escin treatment. Exogenous CXCL16 reversed escin-induced migration inhibition. In addition, escin inhibited the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and Akt. These results demonstrate that escin inhibited the migration and invasion of AGS cells, which is associated with altered CXCL16/CXCR6 axis. These findings suggest that escin has potential as an antimetastatic agent in gastric cancer. PMID:24911042

  7. Irinotecan, Cisplatin, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  8. Paranuaclear E-cadherin in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Philip M; Al-Kuran, Rasha A; Theuer, Charles P

    2002-12-01

    Decreased E-cadherin expression permits dissociation and widespread dissemination of gastric adenocarcinoma cells. We studied the relationship between paranuclear E-cadherin distribution and the histopathologic characteristics of gastric adenocarcinomas. E-cadherin immunostains of 173 gastric adenocarcinoma sections revealed paranuclear; punctate to vesicular staining in 18% (16/87) of the intestinal-type adenocarcinomas, 30% (17/56) of the diffuse-type adenocarcinomas, and 30% (9/30) of the mired adenocarcinomas. These data suggest that in some gastric adenocarcinomas, there is a defect in transport of E-cadherin to the cell surface, which may prevent intercellular adhesion and encourage dissemination. Of 34 cancers with paranuclear E-cadherin staining, 20 (59%) had paranuclear staining within the nonneoplastic epithelium, but only 22.0% of 100 carcinomas with absent or membranous E-cadherin staining were accompanied by morphologically benign epithelium with paranuclear E-cadherin. In surface epithelium, paranuclear E-cadherin staining colocalized with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II in the Golgi apparatus. The presence of paranuclear E-cadherin in cancer-associated benign epithelium suggests that the alteration in the E-cadherin molecule responsible for the paranuclear distribution may be an early change in gastric adenocarcinoma progression. PMID:12472282

  9. Gastric Adenocarcinoma Presenting with Gastric Outlet Obstruction in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman; AlGhamdi, Salem; Al-Kasim, Fawaz; Habib, Zakaria; Ourfali, Nouri

    2014-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is extremely rare in children representing only 0.05% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Here, we report the first pediatric case of gastric cancer presenting with gastric outlet obstruction. Upper endoscopy revealed a markedly thickened antral mucosa occluding the pylorus and a clean base ulcer 1.5 cm × 2 cm at the lesser curvature of the stomach. The narrowed antrum and pylorus underwent balloon dilation, and biopsy from the antrum showed evidence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis. The biopsy taken from the edge of the gastric ulcer demonstrated signet-ring-cell type infiltrate consistent with gastric adenocarcinoma. At laparotomy, there were metastases to the liver, head of pancreas, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Therefore, the gastric carcinoma was deemed unresectable. The patient died few months after initiation of chemotherapy due to advanced malignancy. In conclusion, this case report underscores the possibility of gastric adenocarcinoma occurring in children and presenting with gastric outlet obstruction. PMID:24707411

  10. Choroidal and cutaneous metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shoichiro; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Yoshito; Ezaki, Hisao; Yamada, Takuya; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Miyazaki, Masanori; Nakai, Kei; Yakushijin, Takayuki; Watabe, Kenji; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Nishida, Kohji; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2013-03-01

    Choroidal or cutaneous metastasis of gastric cancer is rare. Gastrointestinal cancer was found in only 4% in patients with uveal metastasis. Choroidal metastasis from gastric cancer was reported in two cases in earlier literature. The frequency of gastric cancer as a primary lesion was 6% in cutaneous metastasis of men, and cutaneous metastasis occurs in 0.8% of all gastric cancers. We report a patient with gastric adenocarcinoma who presented with visual disorder in his left eye and skin pain on his head as his initial symptoms. These symptoms were diagnosed to be caused by choroidal and cutaneous metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma. Two cycles of chemotherapy consisted of oral S-1 and intravenous cisplatin (SPIRITS regimen); this was markedly effective to reduce the primary gastric lesion and almost all the metastatic lesions. PMID:23538460

  11. Expression of bile acid receptor TGR5 in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weibiao; Tian, Wei; Hong, Jie; Li, Dan; Tavares, Rosemarie; Noble, Lelia; Moss, Steven F; Resnick, Murray B

    2013-02-15

    Bile reflux is a risk factor in the development of intestinal metaplasia in the stomach and is believed to function as an initiator of gastric carcinogenesis. However, whether the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor TGR5 is expressed in this tumor is not known. In this study, we determined the expression of TGR5 in gastric adenocarcinoma and examined the role of TGR5 in cell proliferation. Strong TGR5 staining was present in 12% of cases of intestinal metaplasia but in no cases of normal gastric epithelium (P < 0.01). Moderate to strong TGR5 membranous and cytoplasmic staining was present in 52% of the intestinal but in only 25% of the diffuse subtype of adenocarcinomas (P < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier univariate survival analysis revealed that moderate to strong TGR5 staining was associated with decreased patient survival (P < 0.05). Treatment with taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA, a bile acid) significantly increased thymidine incorporation in the AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cell line, suggesting that bile acids may increase cell proliferation. This increase was significantly decreased by knockdown of TGR5 with TGR5 small-interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, overexpression of TGR5 significantly enhanced TDCA-induced increases in thymidine incorporation. TGR5 is coupled with G(q)α and Gα(i-3) proteins. TDCA-induced increase in thymidine incorporation was significantly decreased by knockdown of G(q)α and Gα(i-3) with their siRNAs. We conclude that TGR5 is overexpressed in most gastric intestinal-type adenocarcinomas, and moderate to strong TGR5 staining is associated with decreased patient survival in all gastric adenocarcinomas. Bile acids increase cell proliferation via activation of TGR5 receptors and G(q)α and Gα(i-3) proteins. PMID:23238937

  12. [18F]2-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose incorporation by AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cells in vitro during response to epirubicin, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Suttie, S A; Park, K G M; Smith, T A D

    2007-01-01

    Decreased tumour [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG) incorporation is related to response however its significance at the cell level in gastro-oesophageal cancer and how it relates to cell death is unknown. Here human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells were treated with lethal dose 10 and 50 (LD10 and LD50), determined by using the MTT assay, of the three drugs, epirubicin, 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin, commonly used in the treatment of patients with gastro-oesophageal cancer. 18FDG incorporation was determined after 48 and 72 h of treatment with each drug and related to drug-induced changes in glucose transport, hexokinase activity, cell cycle distribution and annexin V-PE binding (a measure of apoptosis). Treatment of cells for 48 and 72 h with LD50 doses of cisplatin resulted in reductions in 18FDG incorporation of 27 and 25% respectively and of 5-fluorouracil reduced 18FDG incorporation by 34 and 33% respectively: epirubicin treatment reduced incorporation by 30 and 69% respectively. Cells that had been treated for 72 h with each drug were incubated in drug-free media for a further 6 days to determine their ability to recover. Comparison of the ability to recover from the chemotherapy agent, with 18FDG incorporation before the recovery period allowed an assessment of the predictive ability of 18FDG incorporation. Cells treated with either 5-fluorouracil or cisplatin demonstrated recovery on removal of the drug. In contrast, cells treated with epirubicin did not recover corresponding with the greatest 72 h treatment decrease in 18FDG incorporation. In contrast to adherent cells treated with cisplatin or 5-fluorouracil, adherent epirubicin-treated cells also exhibited very high levels of apoptosis. Glucose transport was decreased after each treatment whilst hexokinase activity was only decreased after 72 h of treatment with each drug. There was no consistent relationship observed between 18FDG incorporation and cell cycle distribution. Our results

  13. The role of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Alén, Begoña O.; Leal-López, Saúl; Alén, María Otero; Viaño, Patricia; García-Castro, Victoria; Mosteiro, Carlos S.; Beiras, Andrés; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Gallego, Rosalía; García-Caballero, Tomás; Camiña, Jesús P.; Pazos, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide encoded by the ghrelin gene, and the GPR39 receptor were reported to be involved in the control of mitogenesis of gastric cancer cell lines; however, the relationship between the obestatin/GPR39 system and gastric cancer progression remains unknown. In the present study, we determined the expression levels of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas and explored their potential functional roles. Twenty-eight patients with gastric adenocarcinomas were retrospectively studied, and clinical data were obtained. The role of obestatin/GPR39 in gastric cancer progression was studied in vitro using the human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cell line. Obestatin exogenous administration in these GPR39-bearing cells deregulated the expression of several hallmarks of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, obestatin signaling promoted phenotypic changes via GPR39, increasingly impacting on the cell morphology, proliferation, migration and invasion of these cells. In healthy human stomachs, obestatin expression was observed in the neuroendocrine cells and GPR39 expression was localized mainly in the chief cells of the oxyntic glands. In human gastric adenocarcinomas, no obestatin expression was found; however, an aberrant pattern of GPR39 expression was discovered, correlating to the dedifferentiation of the tumor. Altogether, our data strongly suggest the involvement of the obestatin/GPR39 system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of human gastric adenocarcinomas and highlight the potential usefulness of GPR39 as a prognostic marker in gastric cancer. PMID:26716511

  14. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-03

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  15. Catumaxomab for Treatment of Peritoneal Carcinomatosis in Patients With Gastric Adenocarcinomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-15

    Gastric Adenocarcinoma With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Siewert Type II Adenocarcinoma of Esophagogastric Junction With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Siewert Type III Adenocarcinoma of Esophagogastric Junction With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

  16. Alpha-fetoprotein-producing hepatoid gastric adenocarcinoma in a child presenting with spontaneous gastric perforation.

    PubMed

    Emir, Suna; Karakurt, Neslihan; Karakuş, Esra; Şenel, Emrah; Kırsaçlıoğlu, Ceyda; Demir, Hacı Ahmet; Orhan, Diclehan

    2014-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is a rare entity in the pediatric population. Gastric hepatoid adenocarcinoma with elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is seen extremely rarely in children. A 12-year-old boy was admitted to the hospital with complaint of abdominal pain. X-ray revealed free air density below the diaphragm. Emergent laparotomy showed perforated stomach. Four weeks after the operation, he was readmitted with severe gastrointestinal obstruction symptoms. He underwent an explorative laparotomy, which revealed intestinal edema and diffuse small solid nodules covering the peritoneum. Serum AFP level was mildly elevated. Endoscopic evaluation of the upper gastrointestinal tract was performed, and a gastric mass was detected. All pathological findings were compatible with gastric carcinoma showing hepatoid differentiation. We report an unusual case of AFP-producing hepatoid gastric adenocarcinoma presenting with gastric perforation. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported case of AFP- producing hepatoid gastric adenocarcinoma presenting with gastric perforation in a child. PMID:24827954

  17. Comprehensive molecular characterization of gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Adam J.; Thorsson, Vesteinn; Shmulevich, Ilya; Reynolds, Sheila M.; Miller, Michael; Bernard, Brady; Hinoue, Toshinori; Laird, Peter W.; Curtis, Christina; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Shen, Ronglai; Weinhold, Nils; Kelsen, David P.; Bowlby, Reanne; Chu, Andy; Kasaian, Katayoon; Mungall, Andrew J.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Sipahimalani, Payal; Cherniack, Andrew; Getz, Gad; Liu, Yingchun; Noble, Michael S.; Pedamallu, Chandra; Sougnez, Carrie; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Akbani, Rehan; Lee, Ju-Seog; Liu, Wenbin; Mills, Gordon B.; Yang, Da; Zhang, Wei; Pantazi, Angeliki; Parfenov, Michael; Gulley, Margaret; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Schneider, Barbara G.; Kim, Jihun; Boussioutas, Alex; Sheth, Margi; Demchok, John A.; Rabkin, Charles S.; Willis, Joseph E.; Ng, Sam; Garman, Katherine; Beer, David G.; Pennathur, Arjun; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Odze, Robert; Kim, Hark K.; Bowen, Jay; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Weaver, Stephanie; McLellan, Michael; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Sakai, Ryo; Getz, Gad; Sougnez, Carrie; Lawrence, Michael S.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Lichtenstein, Lee; Fisher, Sheila; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Ding, Li; Niu, Beifang; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Birol, Inanc; Bowlby, Reanne; Brooks, Denise; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Chu, Andy; Chu, Justin; Chuah, Eric; Chun, Hye-Jung E.; Clarke, Amanda; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Kasaian, Katayoon; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan A.; Lim, Emilia; Ma, Yussanne; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Mungall, Karen L.; Nip, Ka Ming; Robertson, A. Gordon; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Beroukhim, Rameen; Carter, Scott L.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Cho, Juok; Cibulskis, Kristian; DiCara, Daniel; Frazer, Scott; Fisher, Sheila; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gehlenborg, Nils; Heiman, David I.; Jung, Joonil; Kim, Jaegil; Lander, Eric S.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Lichtenstein, Lee; Lin, Pei; Meyerson, Matthew; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Saksena, Gordon; Schumacher, Steven E.; Sougnez, Carrie; Stojanov, Petar; Tabak, Barbara; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Voet, Doug; Rosenberg, Mara; Zack, Travis I.; Zhang, Hailei; Zou, Lihua; Protopopov, Alexei; Santoso, Netty; Parfenov, Michael; Lee, Semin; Zhang, Jianhua; Mahadeshwar, Harshad S.; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Seth, Sahil; Yang, Lixing; Xu, Andrew W.; Song, Xingzhi; Pantazi, Angeliki; Xi, Ruibin; Bristow, Christopher A.; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Seidman, Jonathan; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Akbani, Rehan; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Rao, Arvind; Weinstein, John N.; Kim, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ju-Seog; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon; Laird, Peter W.; Hinoue, Toshinori; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Bootwalla, Moiz S.; Lai, Phillip H.; Shen, Hui; Triche, Timothy; Van Den Berg, David J.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Herman, James G.; Getz, Gad; Chin, Lynda; Liu, Yingchun; Murray, Bradley A.; Noble, Michael S.; Askoy, B. Arman; Ciriello, Giovanni; Dresdner, Gideon; Gao, Jianjiong; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Lee, William; Ramirez, Ricardo; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Sinha, Rileen; Sumer, S. Onur; Sun, Yichao; Weinhold, Nils; Thorsson, Vésteinn; Bernard, Brady; Iype, Lisa; Kramer, Roger W.; Kreisberg, Richard; Miller, Michael; Reynolds, Sheila M.; Rovira, Hector; Tasman, Natalie; Shmulevich, Ilya; Ng, Santa Cruz Sam; Haussler, David; Stuart, Josh M.; Akbani, Rehan; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Rao, Arvind; Weinstein, John N.; Verhaak, Roeland G.W.; Mills, Gordon B.; Leiserson, Mark D. M.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Taylor, Barry S.; Black, Aaron D.; Bowen, Jay; Carney, Julie Ann; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Helsel, Carmen; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; McAllister, Cynthia; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Tabler, Teresa R.; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Penny, Robert; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Curely, Erin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Shelton, Troy; Shelton, Candace; Sherman, Mark; Benz, Christopher; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Fedosenko, Konstantin; Manikhas, Georgy; Potapova, Olga; Voronina, Olga; Belyaev, Smitry; Dolzhansky, Oleg; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Brzezinski, Jakub; Ibbs, Matthew; Korski, Konstanty; Kycler, Witold; ŁaŸniak, Radoslaw; Leporowska, Ewa; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Murawa, Dawid; Murawa, Pawel; Spychała, Arkadiusz; Suchorska, Wiktoria M.; Tatka, Honorata; Teresiak, Marek; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Abdel-Misih, Raafat; Bennett, Joseph; Brown, Jennifer; Iacocca, Mary; Rabeno, Brenda; Kwon, Sun-Young

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths, but analysis of its molecular and clinical characteristics has been complicated by histological and aetiological heterogeneity. Here we describe a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric adenocarcinomas as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. We propose a molecular classification dividing gastric cancer into four subtypes: tumours positive for Epstein–Barr virus, which display recurrent PIK3CA mutations, extreme DNA hypermethylation, and amplification of JAK2, CD274 (also known as PD-L1) and PDCD1LG2 (also knownasPD-L2); microsatellite unstable tumours, which show elevated mutation rates, including mutations of genes encoding targetable oncogenic signalling proteins; genomically stable tumours, which are enriched for the diffuse histological variant and mutations of RHOA or fusions involving RHO-family GTPase-activating proteins; and tumours with chromosomal instability, which show marked aneuploidy and focal amplification of receptor tyrosine kinases. Identification of these subtypes provides a roadmap for patient stratification and trials of targeted therapies. PMID:25079317

  18. Poorly Differentiated Gastric Adenocarcinoma Can Mimic Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Urasaki, Tetsuya; Kodaira, Makoto; Hibino, Masaki; Yamagata, Shingo; Watanabe, Yukihiro; Terazawa, Yasuyuki; Sano, Munetaka; Kuriki, Ken

    2016-01-01

    This report describes two cases with obstructive jaundice caused by poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma. Computed tomography scans showed circumferential stenosis in the hilar bile ducts. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed dilatation of the bilateral hepatic ducts and stenosis of the common hepatic ducts from the bifurcation of the bilateral hepatic ducts. The first diagnoses were hilar cholangiocarcinoma and biliary drainage decreased serum bilirubin; however, both patients died of cancer within a short period of time. Autopsies revealed lymphatic vessel invasion and possible subepithelial invasion by gastric adenocarcinoma into the hilar bile ducts. A differential diagnosis should thus be required in suspected cases of hilar cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:27301505

  19. [Gastric signet ring cell adenocarcinoma: A distinct entity].

    PubMed

    Tabouret, Tessa; Dhooge, Marion; Rouquette, Alexandre; Brezault, Catherine; Beuvon, Frédéric; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2014-04-01

    Gastric signet ring cell carcinoma (GSRC) is a distinct entity. Their incidence is increasing. The pathologist plays a central role in the identification of this entity. Diagnosis is based on an adenocarcinoma containing a majority of signet ring cells (above 50 %). The prognosis of GSRC is the same as gastric adenocarcinoma while GSRC appeared more aggressive. Signet ring cells present a low sensitivity to chemotherapy. This review aimed to discuss the histological, the prognostic and the therapeutic aspect of this entity. PMID:24440764

  20. Inhibitory effects of dobutamine on human gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui-Xia; Wu, Li-Na; Xiao, Hong; Du, Qian; Liang, Jian-Fang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore the inhibitory effects of dobutamine on gastric adenocarcinoma cells. METHODS: Dobutamine was used to treat gastric adenocarcinoma cells (SGC-7901) and cell viability was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The effects of dobutamine combined with cisplatin on cell viability were also analyzed. Cell migration was studied using the wound healing assay, and cell proliferation was analyzed using the colony formation assay. A cell invasion assay was carried out using Transwell cell culture chambers. The cell cycle and cell apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Western blot and immunocytochemistry were performed to determine the expression of Yes-associated protein (YAP) in treated cells. RESULTS: Dobutamine significantly inhibited cell growth, migration, cell colony formation, and cell invasion into Matrigel. Dobutamine also arrested the cell cycle at G1/S phase, and increased the rate of apoptosis of gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The expression of YAP was detected mainly in the nucleus in the absence of dobutamine. However, reduced expression of phosphorylated YAP was mainly found in the cytosol following treatment with dobutamine. CONCLUSION: Dobutamine has significant inhibitory effects on gastric adenocarcinoma cells and may be used in neoadjuvant therapy not only for gastric cancer, but also for other tumors. PMID:25493021

  1. Opium: an emerging risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Ramin; Malekzadeh, Reza; Etemadi, Arash; Nasrollahzadeh, Dariush; Aghcheli, Karim; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Pawlita, Michael; Boffetta, Paolo; Dawsey, Sanford M; Abnet, Christian C; Kamangar, Farin

    2013-07-15

    Opium use has been associated with higher risk of cancers of the esophagus, bladder, larynx, and lung; however, no previous study has examined its association with gastric cancer. There is also little information on the associations between hookah (water pipe) smoking or the chewing of tobacco products and the risk of gastric cancer. In a case-control study in Golestan Province of Iran, we enrolled 309 cases of gastric adenocarcinoma (118 noncardia, 161 cardia and 30 mixed-location adenocarcinomas) and 613 matched controls. Detailed information on long-term use of opium, tobacco products and other covariates were collected using structured and validated lifestyle and food frequency questionnaires. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were obtained using conditional logistic regression models. Opium use was associated with an increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, with an adjusted OR (95% CI) of 3.1 (1.9-5.1), and this increased risk was apparent for both anatomic subsites (cardia and noncardia). There was a dose-response effect, and individuals with the highest cumulative opium use had the strongest association (OR: 4.5; 95% CI: 2.3-8.5). We did not find a statistically significant association between the use of any of the tobacco products and risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, overall or by anatomic subsite. We showed, for the first time, an association between opium use and gastric adenocarcinoma. Given that opium use is a traditional practice in many parts of the world, these results are of public health significance. PMID:23319416

  2. Allelotype analysis of adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia.

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, C. M.; Sloan, J. M.; McGuigan, J. A.; Ritchie, A. J.; Weber, J. L.; Russell, S. E.

    1997-01-01

    To identify chromosomal loci involved in the development of proximal gastric adenocarcinoma, this study delineated the pattern of allelic imbalance in a series of 38 adenocarcinomas arising in the gastric cardia. A total of 137 microsatellite markers covering all autosomal arms, excluding acrocentric arms, were analysed. A mean of 35 out of a total of 39 chromosomal arms studied were informative for each patient. The tumour group demonstrated a high level of allelic imbalance, with an observed median fractional allelic imbalance of 0.47 for the 29 intestinal-type adenocarcinomas and 0.54 for the nine diffuse-type adenocarcinomas. Allelic imbalance was detected in >50% of informative cases in both histological subtypes on a number of chromosomal arms. In the intestinal subtype, these included, 3p (61%), 4q (71%), 5q (59%), 8p (60%), 9p (65%), 9q (83%), 12q (52%), 13q (52%), 17p (78%) and 18q (70%). A higher incidence of allelic imbalance was detected on chromosome 16q in tumours of the diffuse type relative to those of the intestinal type. A more detailed mapping on chromosomes 4q and 6q identified a number of cases with subchromosomal breakpoints. In conclusion, this analysis has indicated regions of the genome potentially involved in the development of proximal gastric carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:9400942

  3. Gastric adenocarcinoma concurrent with paravertebral plasmacytoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fengcai; Jiang, Lixin; Zhu, Fangqing; Gong, Zhao Hua; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Liangming

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the case of a 77-year-old male patient who was revealed to have an unsuspected case of gastric adenocarcinoma with paravertebral plasmacytoma following biopsy. Plasmacytoma may be classified into two main groups: Multiple myeloma and plasmacytoma without marrow involvement. It comprises isolated plasmacytoma of the bone and extramedullary plasmacytoma. Extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) accounts for 3% of all plasmacytomas; however, ~80% are located in the upper respiratory tract and upper gastrointestinal tract. It occurs extremely rarely in paravertebral areas. Case reports of EMP and other types of malignant tumor occurring at the same time have not been identified in searches of the literature. In the present study, we describe the diagnosis and treatment process of a case of gastric adenocarcinoma concurrent with paravertebral plasmacytoma. It may be helpful for early clinical diagnosis and treatment of such cases. PMID:27446469

  4. Gastric adenocarcinoma of fundic gland type: Endoscopic and clinicopathological features.

    PubMed

    Tohda, Gen; Osawa, Takeshi; Asada, Yasuyuki; Dochin, Masaki; Terahata, Shintarou

    2016-02-25

    Gastric adenocarcinoma of fundic gland type (GA-FG) with chief cell differentiation was recently proposed as an extremely rare type of gastric adenocarcinoma. Here, we report 4 cases of GA-FG with chief cell differentiation. Endoscopic features included a submucosal tumor shape or a flat shape, whitish discoloration and dilated vessels on the surface. The tumors were located in the upper or middle third of the stomach. All cases were preoperatively diagnosed as GA-FG by biopsy, and endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed. Resected specimens revealed well-differentiated adenocarcinomas resembling chief cells. Tumor cells were diffusely positive for pepsinogen-I, but partially positive for H(+)/K(+)-ATPase in scattered locations around the tumor margin. Despite the presence of minimal invasion of the carcinoma into the submucosal layer, which was observed in two cases, neither lymphatic nor venous invasion was detected in any of the cases. Finally, all cases showed less aggressive clinical behavior with low grade malignancy. PMID:26962407

  5. Her2+ and b-HCG Producing Undifferentiated Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Eivaz-Mohammadi, Sahar; Tarar, Omer; Malik, Khurram; Syed, Amer K.

    2014-01-01

    A 25-year-old Hispanic female with a history of anemia, schizoaffective disorder, and psychosis was admitted for anemia associated with fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, night sweats, weight loss, and abdominal and lower back pain for the past two months. On routine management, she was found to have a positive serum b-HCG of 80.4 (0–5 mIU/mL) but the patient denied any sexual activity in her life. During her admission, U/S of the pelvis was noncontributory. CT angiogram of the chest was significant for prominent mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes, diffusely thickened stomach suggesting gastric malignancy with multiple hypoenhancing lesions in the liver and diffuse lytic lesions in the spine and sacrum suspicious for metastatic disease. The MRI of the abdomen confirmed the CT angiogram findings. After these findings, EGD was performed which showed lesions in the antrum, body of the stomach, fundus, and cardia on the lesser curvature of the stomach body correlating with carcinoma. The biopsy was positive for Her2, b-HCG producing poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma. Patient underwent one successful round of chemotherapy with Taxotene, Cisplatin, and 5-FU for Stage IV gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:25349615

  6. Oesophageal adenocarcinoma and gastric cancer: should we mind the gap?

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Sethi, Nilay; Sepulveda, Antonia R; Bass, Adam J; Wang, Timothy C

    2016-04-26

    Over recent decades we have witnessed a shift in the anatomical distribution of gastric cancer (GC), which increasingly originates from the proximal stomach near the junction with the oesophagus. In parallel, there has been a dramatic rise in the incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) in the lower oesophagus, which is associated with antecedent Barrett oesophagus (BO). In this context, there has been uncertainty regarding the characterization of adenocarcinomas spanning the area from the lower oesophagus to the distal stomach. Most relevant to this discussion is the distinction, if any, between OAC and intestinal-type GC of the proximal stomach. It is therefore timely to review our current understanding of OAC and intestinal-type GC, integrating advances from cell-of-origin studies and comprehensive genomic alteration analyses, ultimately enabling better insight into the relationship between these two cancers. PMID:27112208

  7. Novel Method for Differentiating Histological Types of Gastric Adenocarcinoma by Using Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheu, Jeng-Horng; Lin, Chia-Wen; Lin, Lien-Fu; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chau, Lai-Kwan; Chen, Wenlung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma, a single heterogeneous disease with multiple epidemiological and histopathological characteristics, accounts for approximately 10% of cancers worldwide. It is categorized into four histological types: papillary adenocarcinoma (PAC), tubular adenocarcinoma (TAC), mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC), and signet ring cell adenocarcinoma (SRC). Effective differentiation of the four types of adenocarcinoma will greatly improve the treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma to increase its five-year survival rate. We reported here the differentiation of the four histological types of gastric adenocarcinoma from the molecularly structural viewpoint of confocal Raman microspectroscopy. In total, 79 patients underwent laparoscopic or open radical gastrectomy during 2008-2011: 21 for signet ring cell carcinoma, 21 for tubular adenocarcinoma, 14 for papillary adenocarcinoma, 6 for mucinous carcinoma, and 17 for normal gastric mucosas obtained from patients underwent operation for other benign lesions. Clinical data were retrospectively reviewed from medical charts, and Raman data were processed and analyzed by using principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Two-dimensional plots of PCA and LDA clearly demonstrated that the four histological types of gastric adenocarcinoma could be differentiated, and confocal Raman microspectroscopy provides potentially a rapid and effective method for differentiating SRC and MAC from TAC or PAC. PMID:27472385

  8. Novel Method for Differentiating Histological Types of Gastric Adenocarcinoma by Using Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheu, Jeng-Horng; Lin, Chia-Wen; Lin, Lien-Fu; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chau, Lai-Kwan; Chen, Wenlung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma, a single heterogeneous disease with multiple epidemiological and histopathological characteristics, accounts for approximately 10% of cancers worldwide. It is categorized into four histological types: papillary adenocarcinoma (PAC), tubular adenocarcinoma (TAC), mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC), and signet ring cell adenocarcinoma (SRC). Effective differentiation of the four types of adenocarcinoma will greatly improve the treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma to increase its five-year survival rate. We reported here the differentiation of the four histological types of gastric adenocarcinoma from the molecularly structural viewpoint of confocal Raman microspectroscopy. In total, 79 patients underwent laparoscopic or open radical gastrectomy during 2008–2011: 21 for signet ring cell carcinoma, 21 for tubular adenocarcinoma, 14 for papillary adenocarcinoma, 6 for mucinous carcinoma, and 17 for normal gastric mucosas obtained from patients underwent operation for other benign lesions. Clinical data were retrospectively reviewed from medical charts, and Raman data were processed and analyzed by using principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Two-dimensional plots of PCA and LDA clearly demonstrated that the four histological types of gastric adenocarcinoma could be differentiated, and confocal Raman microspectroscopy provides potentially a rapid and effective method for differentiating SRC and MAC from TAC or PAC. PMID:27472385

  9. Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lim, Do Hoon

    2012-12-01

    In gastric adenocarcinoma, high rates of loco-regional recurrences have been reported even after complete resection, and various studies have been tried to find the role of postoperative adjuvant therapy. Among them, Intergroup 0116 trial was a landmark trial, and demonstrated the definite survival benefit in adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, compared with surgery alone. However, the INT 0116 trial had major limitation for global acceptance of the INT 0116 regimen as an adjuvant treatment modality because of the limited lymph node dissection. Lately, several randomized studies that were performed to patients with D2-dissected gastric cancer were published. This review summarizes the data about patterns of failure after surgical resection and the earlier prospective studies, including INT 0116 study. Author will introduce the latest studies, including ARTIST trial and discuss whether external beam radiotherapy should be applied to patients receiving extended lymph node dissection and adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:23346491

  10. Salt-Inducible Kinase 1 (SIK1) Is Induced by Gastrin and Inhibits Migration of Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Selvik, Linn-Karina M.; Rao, Shalini; Steigedal, Tonje S.; Haltbakk, Ildri; Misund, Kristine; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S.; Lægreid, Astrid; Thommesen, Liv

    2014-01-01

    Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1/Snf1lk) belongs to the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family of kinases, all of which play major roles in regulating metabolism and cell growth. Recent studies have shown that reduced levels of SIK1 are associated with poor outcome in cancers, and that this involves an invasive cellular phenotype with increased metastatic potential. However, the molecular mechanism(s) regulated by SIK1 in cancer cells is not well explored. The peptide hormone gastrin regulates cellular processes involved in oncogenesis, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. The aim of this study was to examine the role of SIK1 in gastrin responsive adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J, AGS-GR and MKN45. We show that gastrin, known to signal through the Gq/G11-coupled CCK2 receptor, induces SIK1 expression in adenocarcinoma cells, and that transcriptional activation of SIK1 is negatively regulated by the Inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER). We demonstrate that gastrin-mediated signalling induces phosphorylation of Liver Kinase 1B (LKB1) Ser-428 and SIK1 Thr-182. Ectopic expression of SIK1 increases gastrin-induced phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and enhances gastrin-induced transcription of c-fos and CRE-, SRE-, AP1- and NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter plasmids. We also show that gastrin induces phosphorylation and nuclear export of HDACs. Next we find that siRNA mediated knockdown of SIK1 increases migration of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS-GR. Evidence provided here demonstrates that SIK1 is regulated by gastrin and influences gastrin elicited signalling in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The results from the present study are relevant for the understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in gastric adenocarcinomas. PMID:25384047

  11. Identification of Differentiation-Related Proteins in Gastric Adenocarcinoma Tissues by Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Yao, Kun; Zhang, Lang; Zhang, Ying; Han, Yin; Liu, Hui-Ling; Liu, Xiang-Wen; Su, Gang; Yuan, Wen-Zhen; Wei, Xiao-Dong; Guan, Quan-Lin; Zhu, Bing-Dong

    2016-10-01

    There is a significant correlation between the degree of tumor differentiation and the survival of patients with gastric cancers. In this report, we compared proteomic differences between poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma tissues and well-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma tissues in order to identify differentiation-related proteins that may be closely correlated with differentiation of gastric cancer pathogenesis. We identified 7 proteins, of which calreticulin precursor, tapasinERP57 heterodimer, pyruvate kinase isozymes M1/M2 isoform M2, class Pi glutathione S-transferase, and chain A crystal structure of human enolase 1 were upregulated in poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma compared with well-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma, while myosin-11 isoform SM2A and actin alpha cardiac were downregulated. Two of them, pyruvate kinase isozymes M1/M2 isoform M2 and enolase 1 are enzymes involved in glycolytic pathway. The upregulation of pyruvate kinase isozymes M1/M2 isoform M2 and enolase 1 in poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma was confirmed by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we observed 107 cases with gastric adenocarcinoma and found that the high expression of pyruvate kinase isozymes M1/M2 isoform M2 and enolase 1 correlates with tumor size (P = .0001 and P = .0017, respectively), depth of invasion (P = .0024 and P = .0261, respectively), and poor prognosis of patients. In conclusion, with this proteomic analysis, pyruvate kinase isozymes M1/M2 isoform M2 and enolase 1 were identified upregulated in poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma comparing with well-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma. The expression level of pyruvate kinase isozymes M1/M2 isoform M2 and enolase 1 was significantly correlated with overall survival. Some of them would be differentiation-related cancer biomarkers and are associated with tumor metastasis, invasion, and prognosis. PMID:27624754

  12. Distal Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Gastric Adenocarcinoma: Time for a Shared Research Agenda.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Marnix; Wright, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    The key insight that sparked Darwin's theory of descent with modification was that he compared and contrasted differences between living and extinct species across time and space. He likely arrived on this theory in large part through his culinary experiences, set against the background of the rugged Patagonian landscape of Southern Argentina. We feel that further integration of research into gastric and esophageal adenocarcinoma may benefit both fields and similarly lead to a coherent understanding of cancer progression in the upper gastrointestinal tract across time and space. Although the environmental trigger differs between carcinogenesis of the stomach and distal esophagus, there remain many important lessons to be learned from comparing precursor stages, such as intestinal metaplasia, across anatomic borders. This analysis will absolutely require detailed sampling within and between these related species, but most importantly we need higher resolution clinical phenotyping to relate genomic differences to drivers of morphologic evolution. In the end, this may provide us with a new phylogeny showing key differences between esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27573764

  13. Gastric hepatoid adenocarcinoma: a computed tomography report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Ren, An; Cai, Feng; Shang, Yan-Ning; Ma, En-Sen; Huang, Zhen-Guo; Wang, Wu; Luo, Jie

    2014-10-28

    We describe the computed tomography (CT) imaging findings in six cases (five males and one female; age range 61-78 years; mean age 67.3 years) with histologically proven hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach (HAS). Five of the six patients had elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein levels. The most common type of gross appearance HAS on CT is a polypoid mass (83%, 5/6). The most common contrast enhancement pattern was heterogeneous. All six patients had a regional lymphadenopathy larger than 6 mm in its short axis. Liver metastases (n = 3) were noted. Venous tumor thrombosis was identified in the portal vein (n = 2) of the regions near primary gastric tumors or metastatic masses. Our findings suggest in an elderly, male patients with a large heterogeneous enhancement tumor, the presence of distant metastases, regional lymphadenopathy and characteristically increased serum alpha-fetoprotein levels indicates a high likelihood of HAS. PMID:25356063

  14. A case of gastric adenocarcinoma in a Shih Tzu dog: successful treatment of early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Chun; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Jee, Cho-Hee; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Moon, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Na-Hyun; Sur, Jung-Hyang; Cho, Kyu-Woan; Kang, Byeong-Teck; Ha, Jeongim; Jung, Dong-In

    2014-07-01

    A 9-year-old castrated male Shih Tzu dog was referred to us, because of chronic vomiting. The patient's hematological, radiographic, ultrasonographic, endoscopic and histological examinations were evaluated for diagnosis. Hematologic analysis indicated moderate anemia and azotemia. Based on the imaging studies, an oval-shaped mass was identified in the gastric pylorus area. A proliferative mass was found on endoscopic examination, and we performed biopsy using grasping forceps. The histopathological findings of the biopsy specimens indicated hypertrophic gastritis, and Y-U pyloroplasty was performed. However, histopathological examination of the surgically resected mass revealed tubular adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Then, carboplatin chemotherapy was performed 4 times for 13 weeks. Clinical signs, such as vomiting, were resolved gradually after surgery and chemotherapy, and the patient's condition was managed favorably until recently (30 months after surgery). This case report describes clinical features, imaging studies, endoscopic characteristics and histopathological and immunohistochemical features of gastric tubular adenocarcinoma as early gastric cancer in a dog. PMID:24646602

  15. Comparison of p53 and DNA content abnormalities in adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus and gastric cardia.

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, C. M.; Sloan, J. M.; McManus, D. T.; Maxwell, P.; Arthur, K.; McGuigan, J. A.; Ritchie, A. J.; Russell, S. E.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the association between 17p allelic loss, p53 gene mutation, p53 protein expression and DNA aneuploidy in a series of adenocarcinomas arising in the oesophagus and gastric cardia. 17p allelic loss was detected in 79% (15 of 19) of oesophageal and in 83% (29 of 35) of gastric adenocarcinomas. p53 mutations were detected in 70% (14 of 20) and 63% (26 of 41) of oesophageal and of gastric adenocarcinomas respectively. Both tumour types were associated with a predominance of base transitions at CpG dinucleotides. In five cases of oesophageal adenocarcinoma, the same mutation was detected both in tumour and in adjacent dysplastic Barrett's epithelium. Diffuse p53 protein expression was detected in 65% (13 of 20) and 59% (24 of 41) of oesophageal and of gastric tumours, respectively, and was associated with the presence of p53 missense mutation (Chi-squared, P < 0.0001). DNA aneuploidy was detected in 80% (16 of 20) of oesophageal and in 70% (28 of 40) of gastric tumours. No association was found between p53 or DNA content abnormalities and tumour stage or histological subtype. In conclusion, this study detected a similar pattern of p53 alterations in adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus and gastric cardia--molecular data consistent with the observation that these tumours demonstrate similar clinical and epidemiological features. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:9460999

  16. Gastric adenocarcinoma: the role of Helicobacter pylori in pathogenesis and prevention efforts.

    PubMed

    Laird-Fick, Heather S; Saini, Shivani; Hillard, James Randolph

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is the third most common cause of cancer deaths in the world, prompting high-risk countries like South Korea and Japan to establish nationwide screening programmes. Helicobacter pylori is linked to the majority of gastric adenocarcinoma cases and to the vast majority of non-cardia gastric adenocarcinomas. Several studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of 'test-and-treat' programmes for H. pylori infection to prevent gastric cancer in high-risk populations. While this strategy has gained momentum, providers in low-risk developed countries may be unaware of the risk individual patients face, particularly those who have emigrated from high-risk regions and members of economically disadvantaged minority groups. Rapidly evolving science in recent years has made it difficult for clinicians to keep up with the current best practices. This article reviews the epidemiology of H. pylori and gastric cancer, screening and diagnostic tests and the current treatment regimens for clinicians. PMID:27222587

  17. Gastric mucous neck cell and intestinal goblet cell phenotypes in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, N R; Bhathal, P S

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the phenotype of cells comprising diffuse and intestinal-type gastric cancers using monoclonal antibodies to two antigens. One antigen (designated D10) is characteristic of gastric mucous neck cells, cardiac glands, pyloric glands, and Brunner's glands. The second antigen (designated 17NM) is specific to the mucous vacuole of intestinal goblet cells. METHODS: Thirty two gastrectomy specimens with adenocarcinoma were studied. Serial paraffin sections were stained immunohistochemically for D10 and 17NM and histochemically for acid and neutral mucins. The cancers were classified histologically as of either diffuse or intestinal type according to Lauren. RESULTS: Of 15 diffuse-type gastric carcinomas, 11 showed the majority of cancer cells staining for D10 while four were typical signet ring cell cancers staining predominantly for 17NM; five tumours displayed both phenotypes with the two phenotypes segregated in different areas of the tumours. In contrast, of 16 intestinal-type cancers, six expressed 17NM, three D10, five neither antigen, and two expressed both antigens. One indeterminate-type cancer expressed both antigens. The staining of individual cells for D10 and 17NM was mutually exclusive in both diffuse and intestinal types. In contrast to the diffuse cancers, intestinal-type cancers typically expressed either antigen only in occasional small groups of cells and individual cells. CONCLUSIONS: In disease, the gastric stem cell can assume the capacity of the duodenal stem cell for divergent differentiation into either intestinal goblet cells (for example, as in intestinal metaplasia) or Brunner's gland cells (for example, as in pyloric gland/Brunner's gland metaplasia). With neoplastic transformation, this potential for divergent differentiation is maintained and gives rise to diffuse-type cancers that display either the D10 phenotype, the 17NM phenotype, or the clonal expression of both phenotypes. In the more cell cohesive (intestinal

  18. A Detailed Immunohistochemical Analysis of a Large Series of Cervical and Vaginal Gastric-type Adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Carleton, Claire; Hoang, Lien; Sah, Shatrughan; Kiyokawa, Takako; Karamurzin, Yevgeniy S; Talia, Karen L; Park, Kay J; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2016-05-01

    Adenocarcinomas exhibiting gastric differentiation represent a recently described and uncommon subtype of non-human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cervical adenocarcinoma. They comprise a spectrum from a well-differentiated variant (adenoma malignum/mucinous variant of minimal deviation adenocarcinoma) to a more poorly differentiated overtly malignant form, generally referred to as gastric-type adenocarcinoma. Rarely, such tumors have also been described as primary vaginal neoplasms. Gastric-type adenocarcinomas exhibit considerable morphologic overlap with adenocarcinomas originating outside the female genital tract, especially mucinous adenocarcinomas arising in the pancreas and biliary tract. Moreover, they often metastasize to unusual sites, such as the ovary and peritoneum/omentum, where they can be mistaken for metastatic adenocarcinomas from other, nongynecologic sites. There is little information regarding the immunophenotype of gastric-type adenocarcinomas, and knowledge of this is important to aid in the distinction from other adenocarcinomas. In this study, we undertook a detailed immunohistochemical analysis of a large series of cervical (n=45) and vaginal (n=2) gastric-type adenocarcinomas. Markers included were cytokeratin (CK)7, CK20, CDX2, carcinoembryonic antigen, CA125, CA19.9, p16, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, MUC6, PAX8, PAX2, p53, hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 beta, carbonic anhydrase IX, human epidermal receptor 2 (HER2), and mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. All markers were classified as negative, focal (<50% of tumor cells positive), or diffuse (≥50% tumor cells positive) except for p53 (classified as "wild-type" or "mutation-type"), HER2 (scored using the College of American Pathologists guidelines for gastric carcinomas), and MMR proteins (categorized as retained or lost). There was positive staining with CK7 (47/47-45 diffuse, 2 focal), MUC6 (17/21-6 diffuse, 11 focal), carcinoembryonic antigen (25/31-12 diffuse, 13 focal

  19. OTUB1 promotes tumor invasion and predicts a poor prognosis in gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Weiwei; Zhang, Qiongyan; Xu, Midie; Wu, Yong; Zhang, Meng; Shen, Chen; Chen, Xiaochen; Wang, Yiqin; Sheng, Weiqi

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds: The deubiquitinating enzyme OTUB1 participates in multiple cellular processes. However, its expression and functions in gastric adenocarcinoma remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of OTUB1 and its biological role in gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: We used immunohistochemistry to analyze OTUB1 expressions levels in 80 paired samples of gastric adenocarcinoma and adjacent normal tissue (ANT) and 30 samples of intraepithelial neoplasia (IN). We also analyzed the correlation between OTUB1 expression and clinicopathological parameters and patient survival status. Moreover, we performed wound-healing, transwell, RT-qPCR and Western blot assays to evaluate the impact of OTUB1 on tumor migration and invasion. Results: In gastric adenocarcinomas, staining for OTUB1 was localized in the cytoplasm. The proportion of samples that expressed OTUB1 and the intensity of its expression were much higher in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues (61 out of 80, 76.25%) than that in either IN (10 out of 30, 33.33%, p<0.001) or ANT (7 out of 80, 8.75%, p<0.001) samples. In malignant cases, higher expression OTUB1 levels were significantly associated with deeper tumor invasion depths (p=0.02), advanced lymph node status (p=0.008) and TNM stage (p=0.001), lymph duct invasion (p<0.001) and nerve invasion (p=0.013). Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that OTUB1 was an independent risk factor for disease-specific survival but not disease-free survival. In vitro wound-healing and transwell assays showed that OTUB1 overexpression promoted tumor cell migration and invasion in gastric cancer cells. Conclusion: OTUB1 contributes to gastric cancer development by enhancing tumor invasiveness. Targeting OTUB1 should be considered in future molecular therapies. PMID:27347330

  20. Coexistence of Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Choriocarcinoma: Complete Response to Trastuzumab and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gunduz, Seyda; Elpek, Gulsum Ozlem; Uysal, Mukremin; Goksu, Sema Sezgin; Tatli, Murat; Arslan, Deniz; Coskun, Hasan Senol; Bozcuk, Hakan; Savas, Burhan; Ozdogan, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Gastric choriocarcinoma is a rare neoplasm and usually accompanies gastric adenocarcinoma. The prognosis is poor due to the aggressive course of the disease. A 57-year-old female patient with weight loss and abdominal pain was examined. The patient was operated following the examination, and pathological analysis revealed the presence of a gastric adenocarcinoma associated with choriocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a positive reaction with antibodies to beta-human chorionic gonadotropin and overexpression of the cErbB2 proto-oncogene. Staging revealed multiple metastases in the liver. A complete response was obtained with a combination of trastuzumab and chemotherapy. The diagnosis of gastric choriocarcinomas without pathological examination is difficult due to their rare occurrence. A complete response can be obtained with trastuzumab in the treatment of cases with overexpression of the cErbB2 protein. PMID:23525369

  1. Lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA suppresses tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingchang; Wang, Fen; Dai, Lianzhi; Cai, Heguo; Zhan, Yanyan; Gang, Song; Hu, Tianhui; Xia, Chun; Zhang, Bing

    2016-02-16

    Targeted molecular therapy has gradually been a potential solution in cancer therapy. Other authors' and our previous studies have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase γ (PLCγ) is involved in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying PLCγ-dependent tumor growth and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma and whether PLCγ may be a potential target for tumor therapy in human gastric adenocarcinoma are not yet well determined. Here, we investigated the role of PLCγ inhibition in tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma using BGC-823 cell line and a nude mouse tumor xenograft model. The results manifested that the depletion of PLCγ1 by the transduction with lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) vector led to the decrease of tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the Akt/Bad, Akt/S6, and ERK/Bad signal axes were involved in PLCγ1-mediated tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma. Therefore, the abrogation of PLCγ1 signaling by shRNA could efficaciously suppress human gastric adenocarcinoma tumor growth and metastasis, with important implication for validating PLCγ1 as a potential target for human gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:26811493

  2. Lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA suppresses tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bingchang; Wang, Fen; Dai, Lianzhi; Cai, Heguo; Zhan, Yanyan; Gang, Song; Hu, Tianhui; Xia, Chun; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Targeted molecular therapy has gradually been a potential solution in cancer therapy. Other authors' and our previous studies have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase γ (PLCγ) is involved in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying PLCγ-dependent tumor growth and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma and whether PLCγ may be a potential target for tumor therapy in human gastric adenocarcinoma are not yet well determined. Here, we investigated the role of PLCγ inhibition in tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma using BGC-823 cell line and a nude mouse tumor xenograft model. The results manifested that the depletion of PLCγ1 by the transduction with lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) vector led to the decrease of tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the Akt/Bad, Akt/S6, and ERK/Bad signal axes were involved in PLCγ1-mediated tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma. Therefore, the abrogation of PLCγ1 signaling by shRNA could efficaciously suppress human gastric adenocarcinoma tumor growth and metastasis, with important implication for validating PLCγ1 as a potential target for human gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:26811493

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging findings and prognosis of gastric-type mucinous adenocarcinoma (minimal deviation adenocarcinoma or adenoma malignum) of the uterine corpus: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    HINO, MAYO; YAMAGUCHI, KEN; ABIKO, KAORU; YOSHIOKA, YUMIKO; HAMANISHI, JUNZO; KONDOH, EIJI; KOSHIYAMA, MASAFUMI; BABA, TSUKASA; MATSUMURA, NORIOMI; MINAMIGUCHI, SACHIKO; KIDO, AKI; KONISHI, IKUO

    2016-01-01

    Our group previously documented the first, very rare case of primary gastric-type mucinous adenocarcinoma of the uterine corpus. Although this type of endometrial cancer appears to be similar to the gastric-type adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix, its main symptoms, appearance on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and prognosis have not been fully elucidated due to its rarity. We herein describe an additional case of gastric-type mucinous adenocarcinoma of the endometrium and review the relevant literature. The two cases at our institution (Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan) involved postmenopausal women with a primary complaint of abnormal genital bleeding. Microscopic examination of the hysterectomy specimens indicated a highly differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma with a desmoplastic stromal reaction. Immunohistochemistry for HIK1083 and/or MUC6 was positive in both cases, suggesting a gastric phenotype. Both patients were diagnosed at an advanced stage, they relapsed or recurred immediately after adjuvant chemotherapy, and eventually succumbed to the disease. The main symptom of gastric-type mucinous adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix is watery discharge, whereas abnormal genital bleeding in addition to watery discharge is mainly observed in the mucinous type of endometrial adenocarcinoma. Cystic cavities in the tumor are present on MRI in cases of endometrial origin, and prognosis is very poor due to resistance to chemotherapy. Thus, gastric-type mucinous adenocarcinoma of the uterine endometrium exhibits a clinical behavior that is similar to tumors originating from the uterine cervix, but is associated with distinguishing clinical symptoms. The incidence of gastric-type endometrial adenocarcinoma may be higher than expected. PMID:27123265

  4. Goiter Frequency Is More Strongly Associated with Gastric Adenocarcinoma than Urine Iodine Level

    PubMed Central

    Tabaeizadeh, Mohammad; Haghpanah, Vahid; Keshtkar, Abbasali; Semnani, Shahryar; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Adabi, Khadijeh; Heshmat, Ramin; Rohani, Davood; Kia, Alireza; Hatami, Ehsan; Jahangirrad, Ataollah; Nabizadeh, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We designed our study to evaluate the hypothesis that gastric cancer is correlated with iodine deficiency or thyroid dysfunction. Materials and Methods We investigated the total body iodine reserve, thyroid function status and autoimmune disorder in 40 recently diagnosed gastric adenocarcinoma cases versus 80 healthy controls. The participants came from a region with high gastric cancer rate but sufficient iodine supply due to salt iodination. The investigation included urine iodine level, thyroid gland clinical and ultrasonographic examination, and thyroid function tests. Results Goiter was detected more frequently in the case group (P=0.001); such a finding, however, was not true for lower than normal urine iodine levels. The free T3 mean level was significantly lower in the case group compared to the control group (P=0.005). Conclusions The higher prevalence of goiter rather than low levels of urinary iodine in gastric adenocarcinoma cases suggests that goiter, perhaps due to protracted but currently adjusted iodine deficiency, is more likely to be associated with gastric adenocarcinoma compared to the existing iodine deficiency itself. PMID:23844325

  5. Differentiating gastrointestinal stromal tumors from gastric adenocarcinomas and normal mucosae using confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheu, Jeng-Horng; Lin, Chia-Wen; Lin, Lien-Fu; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chen, Wenlung

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, and gastric adenocarcinomas are a common cancer worldwide. To differentiate GISTs from adenocarcinomas is important because the surgical processes for both are different; the former excises the tumor with negative margins, while the latter requires radical gastrectomy with lymph node dissection. Endoscopy with biopsy is used to distinguish GISTs from adenocarcinomas; however, it may cause tumor bleeding in GISTs. We reported here the confocal Raman microspectroscopy as an effective tool to differentiate GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal mucosae. Of 119 patients enrolled in this study, 102 patients underwent gastrectomy (40 GISTs and 62 adenocarcinomas), and 17 patients with benign lesions were obtained as normal mucosae. Raman signals were integrated for 100 s for each spot on the specimen, and 5 to 10 spots, depending on the sample size, were chosen for each specimen. There were significant differences among those tissues as evidenced by different Raman signal responding to phospholipids and protein structures. The spectral data were further processed and analyzed by using principal component analysis. A two-dimensional plot demonstrated that GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal gastric mucosae could be effectively differentiated from each other.

  6. Synchronous occurrence of a primary colon adenocarcinoma and a gastric stromal tumor. A case report.

    PubMed

    Tzilves, D; Moschos, J; Paikos, D; Tagarakis, G; Pilpilidis, I; Soufleris, K; Kadis, S; Tarpagos, A; Katsos, I

    2008-03-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are currently the object of a great clinical and experimental interest. We are presenting the case of a 69-year-old patient, who was presented with lower gastrointestinal bleeding and dyspeptic symptoms over the last six months. The colonoscopy showed a large tumor of the sigmoid and the gastroscopy a large gastric tumor of the antrum, which were histologically diagnosed as colonic adenocarcinoma and gastric stromal tumor respectively. The patient underwent a sigmoidectomy and a partial gastrectomy. Six months after surgery were the clinical condition, abdominal CT, gastroscopy and colonoscopy without pathological findings. To our best knowledge, this is the second report of a synchronous gastric stromal tumor and a colonic adenocarcinoma in medical literature. PMID:18299673

  7. Peritoneal metastatic adenocarcinoma possibly due to a gastric duplication cyst: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastric duplication cysts are rare congenital abnormalities, and malignant transformation of these duplications is also thought to be rare. Case presentation During a routine health checkup, a 28-year-old man underwent abdominal sonography followed by computed tomography (CT) with contrast agent, which revealed a cystic lesion with no enhancement. Laparoscopic surgery showed a 10 × 10 cm cyst adhering to the gastric corpus. However, attempts to remove the lesion en bloc were unsuccessful, and the ruptured cyst had contaminated the peritoneal cavity. Gastric duplication was diagnosed from microscopic examination of the cyst. Seven months later, the patient suffered a progressive increase in ascites, and repeated cytological analysis showed small nests of adenocarcinoma cells, with primary lesion unknown. Diagnostic laparoscopy showed multiple white nodules scattered over the surface of the liver, greater omentum, and peritoneum. Biopsy of the omental nodules confirmed adenocarcinoma, while carcinomatosis was diagnosed in the peritoneum. Conclusions Clinical presentation and chronological developments indicated that the malignancy probably originated from the gastric duplication cyst. This case highlights the importance of accurate preoperative diagnosis and optimal surgical management for gastric duplication as well as considering the potential existence of malignant transformation during surgical evaluation of adult patients with gastric duplication cysts. PMID:24641252

  8. Poncirin Induces Apoptosis in AGS Human Gastric Cancer Cells through Extrinsic Apoptotic Pathway by up-Regulation of Fas Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Venkatarame Gowda Saralamma, Venu; Nagappan, Arulkumar; Hong, Gyeong Eun; Lee, Ho Jeong; Yumnam, Silvia; Raha, Suchismita; Heo, Jeong Doo; Lee, Sang Joon; Lee, Won Sup; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Gon Sup

    2015-01-01

    Poncirin, a natural bitter flavanone glycoside abundantly present in many species of citrus fruits, has various biological benefits such as anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. The anti-cancer mechanism of Poncirin remains elusive to date. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effects of Poncirin in AGS human gastric cancer cells (gastric adenocarcinoma). The results revealed that Poncirin could inhibit the proliferation of AGS cells in a dose-dependent manner. It was observed Poncirin induced accumulation of sub-G1 DNA content, apoptotic cell population, apoptotic bodies, chromatin condensation, and DNA fragmentation in a dose-dependent manner in AGS cells. The expression of Fas Ligand (FasL) protein was up-regulated dose dependently in Poncirin-treated AGS cells Moreover, Poncirin in AGS cells induced activation of Caspase-8 and -3, and subsequent cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Inhibitor studies’ results confirm that the induction of caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death in Poncirin-treated AGS cells was led by the Fas death receptor. Interestingly, Poncirin did not show any effect on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax and Bak) and anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-xL) in AGS-treated cells followed by no activation in the mitochondrial apoptotic protein caspase-9. This result suggests that the mitochondrial-mediated pathway is not involved in Poncirin-induced cell death in gastric cancer. These findings suggest that Poncirin has a potential anti-cancer effect via extrinsic pathway-mediated apoptosis, possibly making it a strong therapeutic agent for human gastric cancer. PMID:26393583

  9. Intracellular and Interstitial Expression of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Genes in Gastric Precancerous Intestinal Metaplasia and Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Semino-Mora, Cristina; Doi, Sonia Q.; Marty, Aileen; Simko, Vlado; Carlstedt, Ingemar; Dubois, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM) and gastric cancer are associated with Helicobacter pylori, but the bacterium often is undetectable in these lesions. To unravel this apparent paradox, IM, H. pylori presence, and the expression of H. pylori virulence genes were quantified concurrently using histologic testing, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. H. pylori was detected inside metaplastic, dysplastic, and neoplastic epithelial cells, and cagA and babA2 expression was colocalized. Importantly, expression of cagA was significantly higher in patients with IM and adenocarcinoma than in control subjects. The preneoplastic “acidic” MUC2 mucin was detected only in the presence of H. pylori, and MUC2 expression was higher in patients with IM, dysplasia, and cancer. These novel findings are compatible with the hypothesis that all stages of gastric carcinogenesis are fostered by persistent intracellular expression of H. pylori virulence genes, especially cagA inside MUC2-producing precancerous gastric cells and pleomorphic cancer cells. PMID:12695995

  10. Adenocarcinoma arising from gastric duplication: a case report with literature review.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Shohachi; Sakaguchi, Takanori; Morita, Yoshifumi; Oishi, Kosuke; Suzuki, Atsushi; Inaba, Keisuke; Kamiya, Kinji; Miura, Katsutoshi; Konno, Hiroyuki

    2008-12-01

    Gastric duplication is a rare congenital malformation. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with adenocarcinoma derived from gastric duplication. He was referred to our institute because of persistent vomiting due to pyloric stenosis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed two cystic lesions: a 2-cm mass located along the greater curvature of the upper gastric corpus and a 3-cm mass adjacent to the bulbus. Under the diagnosis of gastric duplication cysts, the oral cyst was removed with the gastric wall and the other cyst lesion firmly adhered to the bulbus was treated with distal gastrectomy. Based on histological findings showing adenocarcinoma in the anal duplication cyst wall and regional lymph node metastases and cancer invasion into the duodenal stump, pancreatoduodenectomy was performed 9 days after the initial surgery. Invasion into the pancreas head and duodenal walls was seen in the resected specimen. Although the postoperative course was uneventful, he died of local recurrence and multiple liver metastases 14 months after surgical treatment. This case report with literature review indicates that alimentary tract duplication cysts should be recognized as risky lesions of cancer development in patients aged 50 years or over. PMID:26193693

  11. A Case of Long-Term Complete Remission of Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma with Liver Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Rim, Ch'angbum; Lee, Jung-Ae; Gong, Soojung; Kang, Dong Wook; Yang, Heebum; Han, Hyun Young; Kim, Nae Yu

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a patient with gastric adenocarcinoma with multiple liver metastases. This patient showed complete remission for more than 68 months after S-1/cisplatin combination chemotherapy and radical total gastrectomy. The patient, a 63-year-old man, presented with dyspepsia and difficulty in swallowing. Endoscopic findings showed a huge ulcero-infiltrative mass at the lesser curvature of the mid-body, extending to the distal esophagus. Biopsy revealed a poorly differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma. An abdominal computed tomography scan demonstrated multiple hepatic metastases. S-1/cisplatin combination chemotherapy was initiated, and following completion of six cycles of chemotherapy, the gastric masses and hepatic metastatic lesions had disappeared on abdominal computed tomography. Radical total gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy combined with splenectomy were performed. The patient underwent three cycles of S-1/cisplatin combination chemotherapy followed by tegafur-uracil therapy for 1 year. He remained in complete remission for more than 68 months after surgery. PMID:27433398

  12. A Case of Long-Term Complete Remission of Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma with Liver Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Ch'angbum; Lee, Jung-Ae; Gong, Soojung; Kang, Dong Wook; Yang, Heebum; Han, Hyun Young

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with gastric adenocarcinoma with multiple liver metastases. This patient showed complete remission for more than 68 months after S-1/cisplatin combination chemotherapy and radical total gastrectomy. The patient, a 63-year-old man, presented with dyspepsia and difficulty in swallowing. Endoscopic findings showed a huge ulcero-infiltrative mass at the lesser curvature of the mid-body, extending to the distal esophagus. Biopsy revealed a poorly differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma. An abdominal computed tomography scan demonstrated multiple hepatic metastases. S-1/cisplatin combination chemotherapy was initiated, and following completion of six cycles of chemotherapy, the gastric masses and hepatic metastatic lesions had disappeared on abdominal computed tomography. Radical total gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy combined with splenectomy were performed. The patient underwent three cycles of S-1/cisplatin combination chemotherapy followed by tegafur-uracil therapy for 1 year. He remained in complete remission for more than 68 months after surgery. PMID:27433398

  13. Gastric adenocarcinoma presenting with thromboembolism in a 13-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Wendy L M

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal pain is a frequent complaint in the pediatric emergency department. A 13-year-old boy presented with complaints of abdominal pain, hematemesis, headache, and leg pain. Further investigation revealed an advanced-stage gastric adenocarcinoma with multiple thromboembolism including the greater saphenous vein and nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis. This case points out the challenges of diagnosing this rare condition and treating the primary tumor and thromboembolism in the setting of both hypercoagulable state and gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25738239

  14. Intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma without Helicobacter pylori infection successfully treated with endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Satoshi; Miyaoka, Youichi; Fujiwara, Aya; Tsukano, Kousuke; Ogawa, Sayaka; Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Kusunoki, Ryusaku; Fujishiro, Hirofumi; Kohge, Naruaki; Ohnuma, Hideyuki; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-08-01

    A 67-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for further examination and for treatment of gastric neoplasia located on the posterior wall of the antrum of the stomach, as revealed by screening esophagogastroduodenoscopy. The patient had no history of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication. Her serum H. pylori antibody and urea breath test results were negative, histopathological findings revealed no H. pylori bacteria, and endoscopic findings revealed no chronic gastritis. We performed endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Histological examination of the resected tissues revealed the tumor to be composed of a well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma with a tubular-type adenoma confined to the mucosa. This adenocarcinoma exhibited immunohistochemical expression of CD10, MUC2, and Cdx2, but not MUC5AC or MUC6. This is an extremely rare case of H. pylori infection-negative, intestinal-type, differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma revealed by detailed immunohistochemical examination that was treated with ESD. The patient has had no recurrence of adenocarcinoma after ESD. PMID:27259702

  15. Diffusion MRI on lymph node staging of gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Akcakaya, Adem; Memmi, Naim; Turkmen, Ihsan; Cipe, Gokhan; Yildiz, Pelin; Arici, Dilek Sema; Muslumanoglu, Mahmut

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative assessment of metastatic lymph nodes of gastric cancer. Methods A total of 23 gastric cancer patients with a mean age of 59.4±10.9 years were analyzed. Lymph nodes were grouped as perigastric lesser curvature (Group Ia), perigastric greater curvature (Group Ib), D1+/D2 lymph nodes (Group II). Identification of histologically metastatic lymph nodes by diffusion weighted MRI was regarded as the main outcome. Results A total of 1,056 lymph nodes including 180 histologically proven metastatic lymph nodes were dissected. Although diffusion weighted MRI could identify the metastatic lymph nodes in 18 out of 23 patients (77.8%), only 69 of total 1,056 nodes (6.53%), either metastatic or non-metastatic, could be detected. There was no correlation between histopathology and diffusion weighted MRI with regard to lymph node groups (P>0.05 for all). Overall accuracy was calculated as 69.56, 65.21 and 52.17 for Groups II, Ib and Ia lymph nodes, respectively. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values could not be helpful to differentiate metastatic lymph nodes (P=0.673). Conclusions Diffusion weighted MRI has low accuracy to detect or to differentiate metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes based on their ADC values in gastric cancer. PMID:26029642

  16. C5b-9 Staining Correlates With Clinical and Tumor Stage in Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Yang, Wei-Jun; Sun, Hai-Jian; Yang, Xia; Wu, Yu-Zhang

    2016-08-01

    The complement system is a critical part of the immune response, acting in defense against viral infections, clearance of immune complexes, and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Upregulated expression of the terminal complement complex, C5b-9, has been observed on various tumor cells, such as stomach carcinoma cells, and on cells in the necrotic regions of these tumors as well; however, whether and how C5b-9 is related to gastric cancer progression and severity remains unknown. In this study, human gastric adenocarcinoma (HGAC) tissues (n=47 cases) and patient-matched adjacent nontumoral parenchyma (n=20 cases) were evaluated by tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. The HGAC tissues showed upregulated C5b-9 expression. Multinomial logistic regression and likelihood ratio testing showed that overexpression of C5b-9 in HGAC tissue was significantly correlated with clinical stage (P=0.007) and tumor stage (P=0.005), but not with tumor distant organ metastasis, lymphoid nodal status, sex, or age. Patients with late-stage gastric adenocarcinoma had a higher amount of tumor cells showing positive staining for C5b-9 than patients with early-stage disease. These results may help in diagnosis and assessment of disease severity of human gastric carcinoma. PMID:26186252

  17. Morphological evidence of neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism) in human gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Caruso, R A; Muda, A O; Bersiga, A; Rigoli, L; Inferrera, C

    2002-01-01

    The phenomenon of neutrophil-tumor cell emperipolesis or phagocytosis has been documented by light microscopy in various human carcinomas, but little is known about the cellular pathological processes and the morphological changes involved. In an attempt to clarify the nature of this phenomenon, the authors' ultrastructural studies on the relationships among neutrophils and tumor cells in human gastric carcinomas are reviewed and analyzed. At the electron microscopy level, apoptotic neutrophils were found within vacuoles of adenocarcinoma cells in 2 cases. They showed either early apoptotic morphology with perinuclear chromatin aggregation but cytoplasm integrity or late apoptotic morphology with uniform, collapsed nucleus and tightly packed cytoplasmic granules. A light microscopy review of 200 cases of resected gastric carcinomas identified 22 cases (11%) that were characterized by neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism). TUNEL staining confirmed the presence of apoptotic neutrophils within the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. This study provides light and electron microscopic evidence of apoptotic neutrophils phagocytosed by gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The morphological features of neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism) would suggest a particular mechanism of tumor-immune escape in human gastric carcinoma. PMID:12396242

  18. De novo gastric adenocarcinoma 1 year after sleeve gastrectomy in a transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Masrur, M.; Elli, E.; Gonzalez-Ciccarelli, L.F.; Giulianotti, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It has been reported in the literature that upper gastrointestinal malignancies after bariatric surgery are mostly gastro-esophageal, although it is not clear whether bariatric surgery represents a risk factor for the development of esophageal and/or gastric cancer. We report a case of a de novo gastric adenocarcinoma occurring in a transplant patient 1 year after a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Presentation of case A 44 year-old woman with a BMI of 38 kg/m2, hypertension, type 1 diabetes mellitus, multiple malignancies and a pancreas transplant underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. The patient presented with intense dysphagias during the follow up. Studies were performed and the diagnoses of grade 2/3 adenocarcinoma were made. The patient underwent a robotic assisted total gastrectomy with a roux-en-y intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy. The procedure resulted in multiple metastasic lymph nodes, focal and transmural invasions to multiple organs with a tumor free margin resection. The patient presented with a postoperative pleural effusion, with no further complications. Discussion The diagnosis of gastroesophageal cancer after bariatric surgery is usually late since these patients have common upper gastrointestinal symptoms related to the procedure that could delay the diagnosis. De novo gastric cancer after sleeve gastrectomy has only been reported in one instance, in contrast with other bariatric surgery procedures. Conclusions No direct relation has been established between sleeve gastrectomy and the development of gastric cancer. Robotic procedures allow for complex multiorgan resections, while preserving the benefits of minimally invasive surgery. PMID:26774417

  19. C5b-9 Staining Correlates With Clinical and Tumor Stage in Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Yang, Wei-jun; Sun, Hai-jian; Wu, Yu-zhang

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is a critical part of the immune response, acting in defense against viral infections, clearance of immune complexes, and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Upregulated expression of the terminal complement complex, C5b-9, has been observed on various tumor cells, such as stomach carcinoma cells, and on cells in the necrotic regions of these tumors as well; however, whether and how C5b-9 is related to gastric cancer progression and severity remains unknown. In this study, human gastric adenocarcinoma (HGAC) tissues (n=47 cases) and patient-matched adjacent nontumoral parenchyma (n=20 cases) were evaluated by tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. The HGAC tissues showed upregulated C5b-9 expression. Multinomial logistic regression and likelihood ratio testing showed that overexpression of C5b-9 in HGAC tissue was significantly correlated with clinical stage (P=0.007) and tumor stage (P=0.005), but not with tumor distant organ metastasis, lymphoid nodal status, sex, or age. Patients with late-stage gastric adenocarcinoma had a higher amount of tumor cells showing positive staining for C5b-9 than patients with early-stage disease. These results may help in diagnosis and assessment of disease severity of human gastric carcinoma. PMID:26186252

  20. HER 2 Expression in Gastric and Gastro-esophageal Junction (GEJ) Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Indu; Sahadev, R; Nagappa, Preethan Kamagere; Rajendra, Sowmya Goddanakoppal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the world/India with majority being diagnosed at an advanced stage. Various chemotherapeutic regimens have modestly improved overall survival leading to quest for novel therapeutic agents. Overexpression of HER2 in many gastric cancers has lead to the advent of targeted therapy with anti HER2 antibody like Trastusumab which has improved the overall survival. Materials and Methods: Sixty cases of gastric adenocarcinomas (44 biopsies and 16 gastrectomies) over the past five years ( June 2009 to June 2014),were included in the study. Diagnosis was confirmed by review of slides and IHC with anti HER2 antibodies was performed using Dako Real Envision Detection system and scoring was done by Hoffmann et al., scoring system. Results: Of the 60 cases, majority were males (60%),with a mean age of 65.65 yrs. Tumours in antrum (76.7%) formed the major bulk. HER2 expression was observed in 26.7% of Tumours, predominantly in males (p=0.006) and intestinal type (p= 0.054). HER2 expression correlated with Tumour grade (moderately differentiated and well differentiated, p= 0.042). Tumours of gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) showed HER2 expression in 45.5% as opposed to 22.4% in gastric location. Poorly differentiated and diffuse type of adenocarcinomas did not express HER2. Two of three Tumours from patients in the age group 31-40 y expressed HER2. Conclusion: Male gender, intestinal-type and moderately differentiated gastric cancers may be the ones that can be targeted for therapy using Herceptin. Though trastusumab is approved for advanced gastric and GEJ cancers, it’s role in adjuvant / neo-adjuvant setting in early stages needs to be evaluated with newer agents like Pertuzumab, Bevacizumab, especially in young patients. PMID:25954623

  1. Remnant cystic duct adenocarcinoma presenting as gastric outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Samuel Tsoon Wuan; Cheng, Yue; Cheung, Frances; Tang, Chung Ngai

    2016-01-01

    Only a few case reports of remnant cystic duct carcinoma exist. The presented case of remnant cystic duct carcinoma with invasion to pylorus and bulbus of duodenum leading to gastric outlet obstruction was the first of its kind. We reviewed all cases of remnant cystic duct carcinoma that we found in the literature and summarized its definition, presentation, extent of invasion and clinical outcome after operation. The diagnosis can be difficult due to the rarity of disease, locally advanced nature of disease and distorted postoperative anatomy. A high index of suspicion can increase the likelihood of a preoperative diagnosis. PMID:27154747

  2. P16-positive continuous minimal deviation adenocarcinoma and gastric type adenocarcinoma in a patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wei-Xia; Kure, Shoko; Ishino, Kousuke; Kurose, Keisuke; Yoneyama, Koichi; Wada, Ryuichi; Naito, Zenya

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) in a 33-year-old female patient with synchronous uterine cervical minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) and gastric type adenocarcinoma (GTA). The patient was diagnosed with PJS at the age of 10. At the time of consultation, she complained of watery discharge. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis showed a poorly circumscribed mass in the uterine cervix. Histologically, both MDA and GTA components, as well as their transitional area, were observed. Both components were diffusely positive for MUC6, CK7 and, robustly, for p16. Moreover, the components were negative for ER, PgR and CEA, while HIK1083 and CK20 positive cells were found focally. Ki-67 labeling index in the MDA component was 5% while that in the GTA component was 50%. This case of GTA accompanied by MDA in a patient with PJS is distinct from the single previously-reported comparable case of which we are aware, with respect to the overexpression of p16 protein, an event considered rare in these tumors, and the continuity between the MDA and GTA components. This continuity favors the hypothesis that GTA arises from the dedifferentiation of MDA. PMID:26191312

  3. P16-positive continuous minimal deviation adenocarcinoma and gastric type adenocarcinoma in a patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei-Xia; Kure, Shoko; Ishino, Kousuke; Kurose, Keisuke; Yoneyama, Koichi; Wada, Ryuichi; Naito, Zenya

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) in a 33-year-old female patient with synchronous uterine cervical minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) and gastric type adenocarcinoma (GTA). The patient was diagnosed with PJS at the age of 10. At the time of consultation, she complained of watery discharge. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis showed a poorly circumscribed mass in the uterine cervix. Histologically, both MDA and GTA components, as well as their transitional area, were observed. Both components were diffusely positive for MUC6, CK7 and, robustly, for p16. Moreover, the components were negative for ER, PgR and CEA, while HIK1083 and CK20 positive cells were found focally. Ki-67 labeling index in the MDA component was 5% while that in the GTA component was 50%. This case of GTA accompanied by MDA in a patient with PJS is distinct from the single previously-reported comparable case of which we are aware, with respect to the overexpression of p16 protein, an event considered rare in these tumors, and the continuity between the MDA and GTA components. This continuity favors the hypothesis that GTA arises from the dedifferentiation of MDA. PMID:26191312

  4. The Effects of Aqueous Extract of Alpinia Galangal on Gastric Cancer Cells (AGS) and L929 Cells in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hadjzadeh, Mosa-Al-Reza; Ghanbari, Habib; Keshavarzi, Zakieh; Tavakol-Afshari, Jalil

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the incidence of gastric cancer is declining during the last half century, this cancer still is the second morbid cancer in the world after lung cancer. The incidence of gastric cancer is 26 per 100,000 in Iran. This study evaluated the effect of Alpinia galangal on AGS cells (human gastric adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line) and L929 cells (as a standard cell line originated from mouse fibroblast cells). Methods After culturing the cells in Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) medium, the cells were incubated with different doses of Alpinia galangal (0 (control), 125, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 µg/ml) in 24, 48 and 72 hour periods and then, cells viability were assessed using MTT based cell proliferation assay. Results After 24 hours, the percentage of living AGS cells compared to the control group showed no significant decrease at the concentrations of 125 and 250µg/ml. But in the rest concentrations were significant (p<0.05). Only, the percentage of surviving L929 cells at concentration of 125µg/ml of the extract was not significant, but these percentages in the other concentrations were significant. After 48 and 72h incubation, in the last three extract concentrations, the percentage of living AGS and L929 cells significantly decreased compared to control cells (p<0.05). Conclusion We have demonstrated, using cell culture model, anti-proliferative effect of aqueous extract of Alpinia galangal on human gastric tumor (AGS) and L929 cell lines. This effect was prominent in high concentrations. PMID:25250165

  5. Methanolic Extract of Ganoderma lucidum Induces Autophagy of AGS Human Gastric Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Reis, Filipa S; Lima, Raquel T; Morales, Patricia; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2015-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is one of the most widely studied mushroom species, particularly in what concerns its medicinal properties. Previous studies (including those from some of us) have shown some evidence that the methanolic extract of G. lucidum affects cellular autophagy. However, it was not known if it induces autophagy or decreases the autophagic flux. The treatment of a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (AGS) with the mushroom extract increased the formation of autophagosomes (vacuoles typical from autophagy). Moreover, the cellular levels of LC3-II were also increased, and the cellular levels of p62 decreased, confirming that the extract affects cellular autophagy. Treating the cells with the extract together with lysossomal protease inhibitors, the cellular levels of LC3-II and p62 increased. The results obtained proved that, in AGS cells, the methanolic extract of G. lucidum causes an induction of autophagy, rather than a reduction in the autophagic flux. To our knowledge, this is the first study proving that statement. PMID:26426001

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam; Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92-1.01). The median V{sub 30} (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V{sub 20} (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V{sub 40} (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate

  7. Gastric adenocarcinoma in common variable immunodeficiency: features of cancer and associated gastritis may be characteristic of the condition.

    PubMed

    De Petris, Giovanni; Dhungel, Bal M; Chen, Longwen; Chang, Yu-Hui H

    2014-10-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. The aim of the study was to determine the morphological features of CVID-associated gastric adenocarcinoma (CAGA) and of the background gastritis. The population of gastric cancer patients with CVID of Mayo Clinic in the period 2000-2010 was studied; 6 cases of CVID (2 males, 4 females, average age 47 years, age range 26-71 years) were found in 5793 patients with gastric cancer in the study period. Each patient underwent gastric resection for which histology slides were reviewed. Chronic gastritis variables, CVID-related findings, and features of the adenocarcinoma were recorded. CAGA was of intestinal type, with high number of intratumoral lymphocytes (ITLs). Cancer was diagnosed in younger patients than in the overall population of gastric cancer. Severe atrophic metaplastic pangastritis with extensive dysplasia was present in the background in 4 cases, with features of lymphocytic gastritis in 2 cases. Features of CVID (plasma cells paucity in 4 of 6 cases, lymphoid nodules prominent in four cases) could be detected. In summary, gastric adenocarcinoma at young age with ITLs, accompanied by atrophic metaplastic pangastritis, should alert the pathologist of the possibility of CAGA. It follows that, in presence of those characteristics, the search of CVID-associated abnormalities should be undertaken in the nonneoplastic tissues. PMID:24788529

  8. Adenocarcinoma arising from a gastric duplication cyst with invasion to the stomach: a case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kuraoka, K; Nakayama, H; Kagawa, T; Ichikawa, T; Yasui, W

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of adenocarcinoma arising from a gastric duplication cyst, with invasion to the stomach wall, in a 40 year old Japanese man. A cystic lesion was found between the stomach and the spleen. The cyst had a well circumscribed smooth muscle layer, corresponding to the muscularis propria of the stomach and the mucosa of the alimentary tract. A well differentiated adenocarcinoma was found within the duplication cyst, invading its serosa. Well differentiated adenocarcinoma was independently found in the fundus of the stomach; the tumour of the cyst was connected by fibrous tissue. Microscopically, there was neither adenocarcinoma in situ nor precancerous lesions, such as epithelial dysplasia, suggesting that the carcinoma derived from a gastric duplication cyst that invaded the stomach. Duplication cysts should be included in the differential diagnosis of cystic masses of the gastrointestinal tract, and the possibility of malignancy within these cysts should be considered. PMID:15047751

  9. Gastric Composite Tumor of Alpha Fetoprotein-Producing Carcinoma/Hepatoid Adenocarcinoma and Endocrine Carcinoma with Reference to Cellular Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Akira; Koide, Naohiko; Kitazawa, Masato; Mochizuka, Akiyoshi; Ota, Hiroyoshi; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein-producing carcinoma (AFPC)/hepatoid adenocarcinoma (HAC) and neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) are uncommon in the stomach. Composite tumors consisting of these carcinomas and their histologic phenotypes are not well known. Between 2002 and 2007, to estimate the prevalence of composite tumors consisting of tubular adenocarcinoma, AFPC/HAC and NEC, we reviewed specimens obtained from 294 consecutive patients treated surgically for gastric cancer. We examined histological phenotype of tumors of AFPC or NEC containing the composite tumor by evaluating immunohistochemical expressions of MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC6, CDX2, and SOX2. Immunohistochemically, AFPC/HAC dominantly showed the intestinal or mixed phenotype, and NEC frequently showed the gastric phenotype. In the composite tumor, the tubular and hepatoid components showed the gastric phenotype, and the neuroendocrine component showed the mixed type. The unique composite tumor predominantly showed the gastric phenotype, and the hepatoid and neuroendocrine components were considered to be differentiated from the tubular component. PMID:22482081

  10. Gastric-type Endocervical Adenocarcinoma: An Aggressive Tumor With Unusual Metastatic Patterns and Poor Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Karamurzin, Yevgeniy S; Kiyokawa, Takako; Parkash, Vinita; Jotwani, Anjali R; Patel, Prusha; Pike, Malcolm C; Soslow, Robert A; Park, Kay J

    2015-11-01

    Gastric-type adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix (GAS) is a rare variant of mucinous endocervical adenocarcinoma not etiologically associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, with minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) at the well-differentiated end of the morphologic spectrum. These tumors are reported to have worse prognosis than usual HPV associated endocervical adenocarcinoma (UEA). A retrospective review of GAS was performed from the pathology databases of 3 institutions spanning 20 years. Stage, metastatic patterns, and overall survival were documented. Forty GAS cases were identified, with clinical follow-up data available for 38. The tumors were subclassified as MDA (n=13) and non-MDA GAS (n=27). Two patients were syndromic (1 Li-Fraumeni, 1 Peutz-Jeghers). At presentation, 59% were advanced stage (FIGO II to IV), 50% had lymph node metastases, 35% had ovarian involvement, 20% had abdominal disease, 39% had at least 1 site of metastasis at the time of initial surgery, and 12% of patients experienced distant recurrence. The metastatic sites included lymph nodes, adnexa, omentum, bowel, peritoneum, diaphragm, abdominal wall, bladder, vagina, appendix, and brain. Follow-up ranged from 1.4 to 136.0 months (mean, 33.9 mo); 20/38 (52.6%) had no evidence of disease, 3/38 (7.9%) were alive with disease, and 15/38 (39.5%) died of disease. Disease-specific survival at 5 years was 42% for GAS versus 91% for UEA. There were no survival differences between MDA and non-MDA GAS. GAS represents a distinct, biologically aggressive type of endocervical adenocarcinoma. The majority of patients present at advanced stage and pelvic, abdominal, and distant metastases are not uncommon. PMID:26457350

  11. Adenocarcinoma of the cervical esophagus arising from ectopic gastric mucosa: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kosuke; Iizuka, Toshiro; Inoshita, Naoko; Kuribayashi, Yasutaka; Toba, Takahito; Yamada, Akihiro; Yamashita, Satoshi; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Matsui, Akira; Mitani, Toshifumi; Ogawa, Osamu; Hoteya, Shu; Ueno, Masaki; Udagawa, Harushi; Kaise, Mitsuru

    2015-12-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from ectopic gastric mucosa (EGM) is extremely rare. We describe here two Japanese patients with adenocarcinoma of the cervical esophagus arising from EGM. Case 1 is a 62-year-old man who had slightly red EGM in the cervical esophagus on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE). Because the biopsy showed atypical glands that were suspicious for adenocarcinoma, endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed. Histopathological examination revealed that the lesion was a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma (pT1a MM). Lymphovascular invasion was absent, and the margins were free from carcinoma. Case 2 is a 57-year-old man who had an elevated lesion with a bleeding tendency in an area of EGM in the cervical esophagus on UGE. Adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in the biopsy. Because of the presence of enlarged lymph nodes (#106recL), preoperative chemoradiotherapy was performed to reduce the size of the adenocarcinoma and lymph nodes prior to resection of the cervical esophagus and reconstruction with free jejunal grafts. Histopathological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (0-I, pT2N1M0, pStage II). In both cases, adenocarcinoma was surrounded by EGM, which led to the diagnosis of EGM-derived esophageal adenocarcinoma. Here, we report its immunohistochemical characteristics in the present cases and discuss the histogenesis. PMID:26476962

  12. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes carcinogenesis and invasion of gastric adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Jung Hwa; Park, Chan Hyuk; Yu, Dayeon; Lee, Yong Chan; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon; Lee, Sang Kil

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • HOTAIR expression was tested in fifty patients with gastric cancer. • Cell proliferation was measured after HOTAIR silencing in gastric cancer cell line. • siRNA–HOTAIR suppresses cell invasiveness and capacity of migration. • Knock down of HOTAR leads to decreased expression of EMT markers. • Inhibition of HOTAIR induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. - Abstract: Gastric cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide; however, the mechanism of carcinogenesis is complex and poorly understood. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR (HOX transcript antisense RNA) recently emerged as a promoter of metastasis in various cancers including gastric cancer. Here we investigated the impact of HOTAIR on apoptosis, cell proliferation and cell cycle to dissect the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. We examined the mechanism of invasion and metastasis and analyzed the clinical significance of HOTAIR. Downregulation of HOTAIR was confirmed by two different siRNAs. The expression of HOTAIR was significantly elevated in various gastric cancer cell lines and tissues compared to normal control. si-HOTAIR significantly reduced viability in MKN 28, MKN 74, and KATO III cells but not in AGS cells. si-HOTAIR induced apoptosis in KATO III cells. Lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis were more common in the high level of HOTAIR group. si-HOTAIR significantly decreased invasiveness and migration. si-HOTAIR led to differential expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition markers. We found that HOTAIR was involved in inhibition of apoptosis and promoted invasiveness, supporting a role for HOTAIR in carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer.

  13. Expression of Fas ligand by human gastric adenocarcinomas: a potential mechanism of immune escape in stomach cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M; O'Connell, J; O'Sullivan, G; Roche, D; Brady, C; Kelly, J; Collins, J; Shanahan, F

    1999-01-01

    Background—Despite being immunogenic, gastric cancers overcome antitumour immune responses by mechanisms that have yet to be fully elucidated. Fas ligand (FasL) is a molecule that induces Fas receptor mediated apoptosis of activated immunocytes, thereby mediating normal immune downregulatory roles including immune response termination, tolerance acquisition, and immune privilege. Colon cancer cell lines have previously been shown to express FasL and kill lymphoid cells by Fas mediated apoptosis in vitro. Many diverse tumours have since been found to express FasL suggesting that a "Fas counterattack" against antitumour immune effector cells may contribute to tumour immune escape. 
Aim—To ascertain if human gastric tumours express FasL in vivo, as a potential mediator of immune escape in stomach cancer. 
Specimens—Thirty paraffin wax embedded human gastric adenocarcinomas. 
Methods—FasL protein was detected in gastric tumours using immunohistochemistry; FasL mRNA was detected in the tumours using in situ hybridisation. Cell death was detected in situ in tumour infiltrating lymphocytes using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). 
Results—Prevalent expression of FasL was detected in all 30 resected gastric adenocarcinomas examined. In the tumours, FasL protein and mRNA were co-localised to neoplastic gastric epithelial cells, confirming expression by the tumour cells. FasL expression was independent of tumour stage, suggesting that it may be expressed throughout gastric cancer progression. TUNEL staining disclosed a high level of cell death among lymphocytes infiltrating FasL positive areas of tumour. 
Conclusions—Human gastric adenocarcinomas express the immune downregulatory molecule, FasL. The results suggest that FasL is a prevalent mediator of immune privilege in stomach cancer. 

 Keywords: Fas ligand; gastric cancer; immune escape; apoptosis; tumour; mRNA PMID:9895372

  14. Pembrolizumab, Combination Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy Before Surgery in Treating Adult Patients With Locally Advanced Gastroesophageal Junction or Gastric Cardia Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Gastric Cardia Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer

  15. Influencing factors and clinical significance of the metastatic lymph nodes ratio in gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ji-wei; Wu, Ju-gang; Zheng, Lin-hai; Zhang, Biao; Ni, Xiao-chun; Li, Xiao-qiang; Jiang, Bo-jian

    2009-01-01

    Background To investigate influencing factors of the metastatic lymph nodes ratio (MLR) and whether it is related to survival in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods We retrospectively evaluated the clinical features of 121 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma enrolled in our hospital between 2000 and 2007. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the cutoff of the MLR, and CK20 immunohistochemical staining was used to detect micrometastasis of the lymph nodes. Results The areas under the ROC curve of MLR used to predict the death of 3-year and 5-year postoperative patients were 0.826 ± 0.053 and 0.896 ± 0.046. Thus MLR = 30.95% and MLR = 3.15% were designated as cutoffs. The MLR was then classified into three groups: MLR1 (MLR<3.15%); MLR2(3.15% ≤ MLR ≤ 30.95%); and MLR3 (MLR>30.95%). We found that patients with a higher MLR demonstrated a much poorer survival period after radical operation than those patients with a lower MLR (P = 0.000). The COX model showed that MLR was an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.000). The MLR could also discriminate between subsets of patients with different 5-year survival periods within the same N stage (P < 0.05). The MLR has been shown to be 34.7% (242/697) by HE staining and 43.5% (303/697) by CK staining (P = 0.001). The clinicopathological characteristics of lymph vessel invasion and the depth of invasion could significantly affect the MLR. Conclusion MLR is an independent prognostic factor in gastric cancer. The combined ROC curve with MLR is an effective strategy to produce a curve to predict the 3-year and 5-year survival rates. PMID:19393100

  16. Cutaneous Metastasis from Signet-ring Gastric Adenocarcinoma in a Carcinoma En Cuirasse Pattern: An Unusual Clinical-diagnostic Sequence.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sarabjit; Aggarwal, Parul; Dayal, Surabhi; Sangwan, Ankita; Jain, Vijay Kumar; Jindal, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis (CM) of gastric adenocarcinoma (ADC) is rare and usually presents late in the course of the disease. We report a rare case of carcinoma en cuirasse (CEC) pattern of CM secondary to gastric malignancy in a 55-year-old male patient-the interesting part being that CM was the first-presenting sign, which on further histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation led to the diagnosis of hidden gastric carcinoma. The finding of signet ring cells (SRCs) on cutaneous biopsy further added a differential of the rare possibility of primary cutaneous tumors. PMID:26677305

  17. Association between the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8 and the prognosis of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, LING; YANG, XIGUI; YANG, XIANGSHAN; FAN, KAIXI; XIAO, PING; ZHANG, JING; WANG, XIUWEN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8) in gastric adenocarcinoma. TNFAIP8 expression levels in gastric adenocarcinoma tissue samples (with and without lymph node metastasis), adjacent normal tissue samples and metastatic lymph node tissue samples were detected by immunohistochemistry. The correlation between TNFAIP8 expression levels and clinicopathological data and gastric adenocarcinoma prognosis was analyzed. The results demonstrated that TNFAIP8 expression in gastric adenocarcinoma tissue samples and metastatic lymph node tissue samples markedly increased at a rate of 47.2% (50/106) and 81.7% (49/60), respectively, as compared with the adjacent normal tissue samples in which no TNGFAIP8 expression was detected (0%). This increase in TNFAIP8 expression was statistically significant. TNFAIP8 expression rates in the primary tumors (60%, 36/60) of patients with lymph node metastasis were significantly higher compared with the primary tumors of patients without lymph node metastasis (30.4%, 14/46). TNFAIP8 expression was associated with an increase in the severity of TNM stage, tumor grade, vascular invasion, lymph node metastasis and serum CA72-4 levels. The overall survival rate of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma and high TNFAIP8 expression was poorer compared with patients with low TNFAIP8 expression, and TNFAIP8 expression was negatively correlated with patient prognosis. The results also demonstrated that TNFAIP8 was an independent prognostic marker in gastric adenocarcinoma (relative risk, 1.736; P=0.029). In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that TNFAIP8 expression was associated with the occurrence, development and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma, and negatively correlated with the prognosis of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. TNFAIP8 may therefore serve as a prognostic factor for gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27347043

  18. Immune checkpoints programmed death 1 ligand 1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated molecule 4 in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schlößer, Hans A; Drebber, Uta; Kloth, Michael; Thelen, Martin; Rothschild, Sacha I; Haase, Simon; Garcia-Marquez, Maria; Wennhold, Kerstin; Berlth, Felix; Urbanski, Alexander; Alakus, Hakan; Schauss, Astrid; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Theurich, Sebastian; Warnecke-Ebertz, Ute; Stippel, Dirk L; Zippelius, Alfred; Büttner, Reinhard; Hallek, Michael; Hölscher, Arnulf H; Zander, Thomas; Mönig, Stefan P; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Remarkable efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibition has been reported for several types of solid tumors and early studies in gastric adenocarcinoma are promising. A detailed knowledge about the natural biology of immune checkpoints in gastric adenocarcinoma is essential for clinical and translational evaluation of these drugs. This study is a comprehensive analysis of cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated molecule 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in gastric adenocarcinoma. PD-L1 and CTLA-4 were stained on tumor sections of 127 Caucasian patients with gastric adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and somatic mutation profiling was performed using targeted next-generation sequencing. Expression of PD-L1 and CTLA-4 on lymphocytes in tumor sections, tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN) and peripheral blood were studied by flow-cytometry and immune-fluorescence microscopy in an additional cohort. PD-L1 and CTLA-4 were expressed in 44.9% (57/127) and 86.6% (110/127) of the analyzed gastric adenocarcinoma samples, respectively. Positive tumor cell staining for PD-L1 or CTLA-4 was associated with inferior overall survival. Somatic mutational analysis did not reveal a correlation to expression of PD-L1 or CTLA-4 on tumor cells. Expression of PD-1 (52.2%), PD-L1 (42.2%) and CTLA-4 (1.6%) on tumor infiltrating T cells was significantly elevated compared to peripheral blood. Of note, PD-1 and PD-L1 were expressed far higher by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes than CTLA-4. In conclusion, specific immune checkpoint-inhibitors should be evaluated in this disease and the combination with molecular targeted therapies might be of benefit. An extensive immune monitoring should accompany these studies to better understand their mode of action in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27467911

  19. Tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography: association with N categories

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hang; Chen, Xiao-li; Li, Jun-ru; Li, Zhen-lin; Chen, Tian-wu; Pu, Hong; Yin, Long-lin; Xu, Guo-hui; Li, Zhen-wen; Reng, Jing; Zhou, Peng; Cheng, Zhu-zhong; Cao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the gross tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography could predict the presence of regional lymph node metastasis and could determine N categories. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 202 consecutive patients with gastric adenocarcinoma who had undergone gastrectomy 1 week after contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography were retrospectively identified. The gross tumor volume was evaluated on multidetector computed tomography images. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine whether the gross tumor volume could predict regional lymph node metastasis, and the Mann-Whitney U test was performed to compare the gross tumor volume among N categories. Additionally, a receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to identify the accuracy of the gross tumor volume in differentiating N categories. RESULTS: The gross tumor volume could predict regional lymph node metastasis (p<0.0001) in the univariate analysis, and the multivariate analyses indicated that the gross tumor volume was an independent risk factor for regional lymph node metastasis (p=0.005, odds ratio=1.364). The Mann-Whitney U test showed that the gross tumor volume could distinguish N0 from the N1-N3 categories, N0-N1 from N2-N3, and N0-N2 from N3 (all p<0.0001). In the T1-T4a categories, the gross tumor volume could differentiate N0 from the N1-N3 categories (cutoff, 12.3 cm3), N0-N1 from N2-N3 (cutoff, 16.6 cm3), and N0-N2 from N3 (cutoff, 24.6 cm3). In the T4a category, the gross tumor volume could differentiate N0 from the N1-N3 categories (cutoff, 15.8 cm3), N0-N1 from N2-N3 (cutoff, 17.8 cm3), and N0-N2 from N3 (cutoff, 24 cm3). CONCLUSION: The gross tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography could predict regional lymph node metastasis and N categories. PMID:27166769

  20. High Levels of Epstein-Barr Virus DNA in Latently Infected Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Julie L.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Thorne, Leigh B.; Elmore, Sandra H.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Booker, Jessica K.; Gulley, Margaret L.

    2008-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is present in the malignant cells of approximately 10% of cases. It is unclear whether EBV is being missed in some gastric adenocarcinomas due to insensitive test methods or partial EBV genome loss. In the current study, we screened 113 gastric adenocarcinomas from low and high incidence regions (United States and Central America) for the presence of EBV using a battery quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) assays targeting disparate segments of the EBV genome (BamH1W, EBNA1, LMP1, LMP2, BZLF1, EBER1) and histochemical stains targeting EBV-encoded RNA (EBER), the latent proteins LMP1 and LMP2, and the lytic proteins BMRF1 and BZLF1. EBV DNA was detected by Q-PCR in 48/75 United States cancers (64%) and in 38/38 Central American cancers (100%), which was a significant differrence. EBER was localized to malignant epithelial cells in 8/48 (17%) United States and 3/38 (8%) Central American cancers. Viral loads were considerably higher for EBER-positive versus EBER-negative cancers (mean 162,986 versus 62 EBV DNA copies per 100,000 cells). A viral load of 2,000 copies per 100,000 cells is recommended as the threshold distinguishing EBER-positive from EBER-negative tumors. One infected cancer selectively failed to amplify the LMP2 gene because of a point mutation, while another cancer had an atypical pattern of Q-PCR positivity suggesting deletion of large segments of the EBV genome. Three different viral latency profiles were observed in the cancers based on constant expression of EBER and focal or variable expression of LMP1 or LMP2, without lytic protein expression. We conclude that EBV DNA levels generally reflect EBER status, and a panel of at least two Q-PCR assays is recommended for sensitive identification of infected cancers. PMID:19002111

  1. Intraoperative Gastroscopy for Tumor Localization in Laparoscopic Surgery for Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hur, Hoon; Son, Sang-Yong; Cho, Yong Kwan; Han, Sang-Uk

    2016-01-01

    Determining resection margins for gastric cancer, which are not exposed to the serosal surface of the stomach, is the most important procedure during totally laparoscopic gastrectomy (TLG). The aim of this protocol is to introduce a procedure for intraoperative gastroscopy, in order to directly mark tumors during TLG for gastric cancer in the middle third of the stomach. Patients who were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma in the middle third of the stomach were enrolled in this case series. Before surgery, additional gastroscopy for tumor localization is not performed. Under general anesthesia, laparoscopic mobilization of the stomach is performed first. After the first portion of the duodenum is mobilized from the pancreas and clamped, the surgeon moves to the other side for the gastroscopic procedure. On the insertion of a gastroscope through the oral cavity into the stomach, 2 - 3 cc of indigo carmine is administered via an endoscopic injector into the gastric muscle layer at the proximal margin of the stomach. The location of stained serosa in the laparoscopic view is used to guide distal subtotal gastrectomy, however, total gastrectomy is performed if the tumor is too close to the esophagogastric junction. A specimen is sampled after distal gastrectomy to confirm sufficient length from resection margin to tumor before reconstruction. In our case series, all patients had tumor-free margins and required no additional resection. There was no morbidity related to the gastroscopic procedure, and the time required for the procedure has gradually decreased to about five minutes. Intraoperative gastroscopy for tumor localization is an accurate and tolerated method for gastric cancer patients undergoing totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy. PMID:27584713

  2. Multinuclear giant cell formation is enhanced by down-regulation of Wnt signaling in gastric cancer cell line, AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Kim, Rockki; Ryu, Jae-Hyun; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Song, Ki-Joon; Jang, Shyh-Ing; Kee, Sun-Ho . E-mail: keesh@korea.ac.kr

    2005-08-01

    AGS cells, which were derived from malignant gastric adenocarcinoma tissue, lack E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion but have a high level of nuclear {beta}-catenin, which suggests altered Wnt signal. In addition, approximately 5% of AGS cells form multinuclear giant cells in the routine culture conditions, while taxol treatment causes most AGS cells to become giant cells. The observation of reduced nuclear {beta}-catenin levels in giant cells induced by taxol treatment prompted us to investigate the relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. After overnight serum starvation, the shape of AGS cells became flattened, and this morphological change was accompanied by decrease in Myc expression and an increase in the giant cell population. Lithium chloride treatment, which inhibits GSK3{beta} activity, reversed these serum starvation effects, which suggests an inverse relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Wnt signaling caused by the over-expression of ICAT, E-cadherin, and Axin enhanced giant cell formation. Therefore, down-regulation of Wnt signaling may be related to giant cell formation, which is considered to be a survival mechanism against induced cell death.

  3. EPO-R expression patterns in resected gastric adenocarcinoma followed by adjuvant chemoradiation treatment.

    PubMed

    Sereno, Maria; De Castro, Javier; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Garcia-Cabezas, Miguel Angel; Cejas, Paloma; Casado, Enrique; Barriuso, Jorge; Feliu, Jaime; Larrauri, Javier

    2009-03-01

    The primary aim was to determine whether Epo-R immunohistochemical expression is related to disease free survival (DFS) in specimens of GC from patients who underwent adjuvant chemoradiation. Specimens of gastric adenocarcinomas obtained from 44 patients who had undergone curative gastrectomy and adjuvant treatment were investigated immunohistochemically expression of Epo-R. Three patterns for Epo-R staining were defined: Pattern A (secretory cells-like staining), Pattern B (parietal-like staining) and Pattern C (chief-like staining). Median DFS was 38 months (CI 95%: 33-43) and 15 months (IC 95%: 3-27) in the pattern B and C, respectively, but it was not reached in the pattern A (p = 0.06). Our findings suggest that there may be a relationship between Epo-R expression and DFS in the patients with GC resected. PMID:19002606

  4. Mucin glycosylating enzyme GALNT2 suppresses malignancy in gastric adenocarcinoma by reducing MET phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shin-Yun; Shun, Chia-Tung; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Hsu, Chia-Lang; Huang, Min-Chuan; Lai, I-Rue

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation affects malignancy in cancer. Here, we report that N- acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (GALNT2), an enzyme that mediates the initial step of mucin type-O glycosylation, suppresses malignant phenotypes in gastric adenocarcinoma (GCA) by modifying MET (Hepatocyte growth factor receptor) activity. GALNT2 mRNA and protein were downregulated in GCAs, and this reduction was associated with more advanced disease stage and shorter recurrence-free survival. Suppressing GALNT2 expression in GCA cells increased cell growth, migration, and invasion in vitro, and tumor metastasis in vivo. GALNT2 knockdown enhanced phosphorylation of MET and decreased expression of the Tn antigen on MET. Inhibiting MET activity with PHA665752 decreased the malignant phenotypes caused by GALNT2 knockdown in GCA cells. Our results indicate that GALNT2 suppresses the malignant potential of GCA cells and provide novel insights into the significance of O-glycosylation in MET activity and GCA progression. PMID:26848976

  5. Phase II Study of Oxaliplatin, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Advanced Gastric/Gastroesophageal Junction Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  6. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Shen; Lu Jiade; Zhang Qing Yang Zhe; Peng Lihua; Xiong, Fei

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and external beam RT (EBRT) in the treatment of locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 97 consecutive and nonselected patients with newly diagnosed Stage T3, T4, or N+ adenocarcinoma of the stomach underwent gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection between March 2003 and October 2005. Of the 97 patients, 51 received adjuvant concurrent chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, docetaxel, and cisplatin) and EBRT (EBRT group) and 46 received IORT (dose range, 12-15 Gy) immediately after gastrectomy and lymph node dissection before concurrent chemoradiotherapy (EBRT+IORT group). Results: After a median follow-up of 24 months, the 3-year locoregional control rate was 77% and 63% in the two groups with or without IORT, respectively (p = 0.05). The 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 47% and 36% in the EBRT group and 56% and 44% in the EBRT+IORT group, respectively (p > 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that the use of IORT, presence of residual disease after surgery, and pN category were independent prognostic factors for locoregional control and that IORT, pN, and pT categories were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (p < 0.05). Four patients experienced Grade 3 or 4 late complications, but no significant difference was observed between the two groups. Conclusions: Radical gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection and IORT followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy appeared to be feasible and well-tolerated in the treatment of locally advanced gastric cancer. The addition of IORT to the trimodality treatment significantly improved the 3-year locoregional control rate.

  7. Network pharmacology dissection of multiscale mechanisms of herbal medicines in stage IV gastric adenocarcinoma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Hao, Jian; Niu, Yang-Yang; Tian, Miao; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Cui-Hong; Ding, Xiu-Li; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Liu, Chang; Qin, Xue-Mei; Wu, Xiong-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increasing evidence has shown that Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM) has efficient therapeutic effects for advanced gastric adenocarcinoma, while the therapeutic mechanisms underlying this treatment remain unclear. In this study, the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the survival benefit of CHM treatment, and correlation analysis was applied to identify the most effective components in the formulas. A network pharmacological approach was developed to decipher the potential therapeutic mechanisms of CHM. CHM treatment was an independent protective factor. The hazard ratio was 0.364 (95% CI 0.245–0.540; P < 0.001). The median survival time was 18 months for patients who received CHM treatment, while for patients without CHM treatment was decreased to 9 months (P < 0.001). Thirteen out of the total 204 herbs were significantly correlated with favorable survival outcomes (P < 0.05), likely representing the most effective components in these formulas. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that the simultaneous manipulation of multiple targets in proliferation pathways (such as epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and insulin like growth factor 2) and the process of cancer metastasis (collagen families, fibronectin 1 and matrix metalloproteinases families) might largely account for the mechanisms of the 13 herbs against gastric adenocarcinoma. A network pharmacology method was introduced to decipher the underlying mechanisms of CHM, which provides a good foundation for herbal research based on clinical data. PMID:27583849

  8. Network pharmacology dissection of multiscale mechanisms of herbal medicines in stage IV gastric adenocarcinoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Hao, Jian; Niu, Yang-Yang; Tian, Miao; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Cui-Hong; Ding, Xiu-Li; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Liu, Chang; Qin, Xue-Mei; Wu, Xiong-Zhi

    2016-08-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM) has efficient therapeutic effects for advanced gastric adenocarcinoma, while the therapeutic mechanisms underlying this treatment remain unclear.In this study, the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the survival benefit of CHM treatment, and correlation analysis was applied to identify the most effective components in the formulas. A network pharmacological approach was developed to decipher the potential therapeutic mechanisms of CHM.CHM treatment was an independent protective factor. The hazard ratio was 0.364 (95% CI 0.245-0.540; P < 0.001). The median survival time was 18 months for patients who received CHM treatment, while for patients without CHM treatment was decreased to 9 months (P < 0.001). Thirteen out of the total 204 herbs were significantly correlated with favorable survival outcomes (P < 0.05), likely representing the most effective components in these formulas. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that the simultaneous manipulation of multiple targets in proliferation pathways (such as epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and insulin like growth factor 2) and the process of cancer metastasis (collagen families, fibronectin 1 and matrix metalloproteinases families) might largely account for the mechanisms of the 13 herbs against gastric adenocarcinoma.A network pharmacology method was introduced to decipher the underlying mechanisms of CHM, which provides a good foundation for herbal research based on clinical data. PMID:27583849

  9. Expression and Prognostic Significance of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors 1 and 3 in Gastric and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hedner, Charlotta; Borg, David; Nodin, Björn; Karnevi, Emelie; Jirström, Karin; Eberhard, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas are major global cancer burdens. These cancer forms are characterized by a poor prognosis and a modest response to chemo- radio- and targeted treatment. Hence there is an obvious need for further enhanced diagnostic and treatment strategies. The aim of this study was to examine the expression and prognostic impact of human epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (HER1/EGFR) and 3 (HER3), as well as the occurrence of EGFR and KRAS mutations in gastric and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Methods Immunohistochemical expression of EGFR and HER3 was analysed in all primary tumours and a subset of lymph node metastases in a consecutive cohort of 174 patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach, cardia and esophagus. The anti-HER3 antibody used was validated by siRNA-mediated knockdown, immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR. EGFR and KRAS mutation status was analysed by pyrosequencing tecchnology. Results and Discussion High EGFR expression was an independent risk factor for shorter overall survival (OS), whereas high HER3 expression was associated with a borderline significant trend towards a longer OS. KRAS mutations were present in only 4% of the tumours and had no prognostic impact. All tumours were EGFR wild-type. These findings contribute to the ongoing efforts to decide on the potential clinical value of different HERs and druggable mutations in gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas, and attention is drawn to the need for more standardised investigational methods. PMID:26844548

  10. Surgical Resection First for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma: Are There Adjuvant Options?

    PubMed

    Elimova, Elena; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2015-10-01

    A 55-year-old male presented with upper abdominal bloating followed by modest hematemesis that led to the diagnosis of an ulcerated poorly differentiated (with signet ring cells) adenocarcinoma in the angularis of the stomach. A contrast-enhanced positron emission tomography (PET) with computed tomography (CT) scan showed higher-than-normal physiologic avidity (standardized uptake value, 4.3) in the proximal stomach but not in the lower stomach, and the CT scan vaguely suggested a polypoid lesion in the distal stomach. Nodes were normal in size, and there were no metastases. He underwent esophagoduodenoscopy with ultrasonography (EUS) that showed a 3- x 2-cm flat nodular mass with an 8-mm ulcer in the angularis. The tumor mass was demarcated well on narrow-band imaging, and with a 20-MHz EUS probe, it was designated eusT1bN0. His case was presented to our weekly Multidisciplinary Gastric Adenocarcinoma Conference, and the consensus was to offer surgery as primary therapy. He underwent a subtotal gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy along with D2 nodal dissection. The surgical pathology showed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells; the primary tumor measured 2.8 x 2.2 cm in diameter with infiltration through the muscularis propria and into the subserosal fat. Seven of 53 examined lymph nodes were malignant; therefore, his cancer was staged pT3N3M0 (a higher stage than designated clinically). He recovered well without complications, and the postoperative CT scans showed no metastases. His case was represented at the tumor board meeting, and adjuvant chemotherapy with oxaliplatin and capecitabine was recommended. PMID:26324361

  11. Concurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma of Fundic Gland Type and Carcinoma with Lymphoid Stroma: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hee Jeong; Kim, Kyungbin; Kim, Misung; Choi, Hyejeong; Kim, Young Min; Suh, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Both gastric adenocarcinoma of fundic gland type (ADC-FG) and carcinoma with lymphoid stroma (lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma, LELC) are relatively rare. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of LELC. However, the pathogenesis of ADC-FG, as well as the role of EBV in the carcinogenesis of LELC, remain unclear and under debate. The current study presents a case of concurrent ADC-FG and LELC in the stomach in a 69-year-old man. Total gastrectomy was performed, and two separate masses were identified. Upon histological and immunohistochemical examination, the mass located in the lower body was determined to be LELC and the mass in the upper body was diagnosed as ADC-FG. The lesions were characterized by different mucin phenotypes and EBV in situ results. In the lower-body mass, EBV in situ hybridization expression was diffusely strongly positive, but MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC6, and CD10 were all negative. On the other hand, in the upper-body mass, the results were positive for MUC6 but negative for MUC2, MUC5AC, CD10, and EBV by in situ hybridization. The remaining gastric tissue was unremarkable, and perigastric lymph node metastases were absent. Seven months after the gastrectomy, a postoperative computed tomography scan revealed no recurrence or metastasis. PMID:27462199

  12. Expression and prognostic significance of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor in esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (PIGR) has been proposed to be a candidate prognostic biomarker in a few cancer forms, and one previous study reported that reduced PIGR expression signifies more aggressive tumours of the distal esophagus and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). In the present study, we examined the expression, clinicopathological correlates and prognostic significance of PIGR expression in an extended cohort of adenocarcinoma of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Materials and methods Immunohistochemical PIGR expression was examined in a consecutive cohort of patients with surgically resected, radio-chemonaive adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, GE-junction and stomach (n = 173), including paired samples of benign-appearing squamous epithelium (n = 51), gastric mucosa (n = 114), Barrett’s esophagus (BE) or intestinal metaplasia (IM) (n = 57) and lymph node metastases (n = 75). Non-parametric tests were applied to explore associations between PIGR expression in primary tumours and clinicopathological characteristics. Classification and regression tree analysis was applied for selection of prognostic cut-off. The impact of PIGR expression on overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis and hazard ratios (HR) calculated by adjusted and unadjusted Cox proportional hazards modelling. Results PIGR expression was significantly higher in intestinal metaplasia (BE or gastric IM) compared to normal tissues and cancer (p < 0.001). Reduced PIGR expression in primary tumours was significantly associated with more advanced tumour stage (p = 0.002) and inversely associated with involved margins (p = 0.034). PIGR expression did not differ between primary tumours and lymph node metastases. There was no significant difference in PIGR expression between tumours with and without a background of intestinal metaplasia. High PIGR expression was an independent predictor of a

  13. The Value of miR-299-5p in Diagnosis and Prognosis of Intestinal-Type Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Azarbarzin, Shirin; Hosseinpour Feizi, Mohammad Ali; Safaralizadeh, Reza; Ravanbakhsh, Reyhaneh; Kazemzadeh, Mina; Fateh, Alavieh; Karimi, Nasibeh; Moaddab, Yaghoub

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs, containing about 22 nucleotides and having a pivotal function in various cellular processes. The oncogenic and tumor suppressor roles of miRNAs have been identified in cancers especially in gastric cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers. MiR-299-5p is located in the imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 region in chromosome 14q32. Aberrant expression of miR-299-5p was determined in solid and blood cancers. The current study was performed to assess the expression pattern of miR-299-5p in intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma and compare it with the normal adjacent counterparts. The expression level of miR-299-5p was investigated in forty fresh specimens which were obtained from gastric cancer patients during endoscopy. Moreover, the association of aberrant expression of miR-299-5p and clinicopathological features, as well as the susceptibility of miR-299-5p as a tumor marker, was determined. The result of qRT-PCR revealed the downregulation of miR-299-5p in intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma compared with adjacent tumor-free tissues (P < 0.001); this misregulation can be used as a tumor marker. Analysis of miR-299-5p misregulation did not reveal a significant correlation with clinical features. The result obtained from the present study revealed the significant downregulation of miR-299-5p in intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma which is consistent with previous studies showing miR-299-5p downregulation in other types of cancers. The data obtained from the current study suggest basic information which can be very helpful for future research in the field of diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:27007598

  14. Gastric adenocarcinoma in Zambia: a case-control study of HIV, lifestyle risk factors, and biomarkers of pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kayamba, Violet; Asombang, Akwi W; Mudenda, Victor; Lisulo, Mpala Mwanza; Sinkala, Edford; Mwanamakondo, Stayner; Mweemba, Isaac; Kelly, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide but there are few data from Africa. We have recently observed a trend towards diagnosis in younger patients. Objective To test the hypothesis that HIV may have altered risk factors for acquisition of gastric cancer, in a case-control study in the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia. Methods Cases (n=52) with confirmed gastric adenocarcinoma and controls (n=94) undergoing endoscopy but with no macroscopic gastric pathology. Established risk factors and HIV status were compared. Results HIV status did not differ significantly in cases and controls (Odds Ratio 1·03; 95% CI 0·2–4·3; P=1·00) and seroprevalence in cases was similar to the Zambian population. Smoking, regular alcohol intake, and gastric atrophy were all associated with cancer in univariate and multivariate analysis. H. pylori serology was positive in 84% of patients studied and cagA serology in 66%; neither serological marker was associated with cancer. Atrophy, assessed serologically, was common in cases (57%) and controls (30%). In controls, both smoking and alcohol use were associated with atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia was present in 17% but was not associated with atrophy. Conclusions HIV was not associated with gastric cancer and does not explain the apparent change in age distribution in Zambia. Atrophy was common and was not essential for the development of intestinal metaplasia, suggesting that gastric carcinogenesis in Africa does not always follow the Correa pathway. PMID:23547703

  15. Primary vaginal mucinous adenocarcinoma of gastric type arising in adenosis: a report of 2 cases, 1 associated with uterus didelphys.

    PubMed

    Talia, Karen L; Scurry, James; Manolitsas, Thomas; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2012-03-01

    We report 2 cases of primary vaginal mucinous adenocarcinoma arising in adenosis in nondiethylstilbestrol-exposed women, 1 with uterus didelphys. Both tumors exhibited morphologic and immunohistochemical features (MUC6 and/or HIK 1083 positivity) identical to the recently described cervical gastric-type adenocarcinoma, a subtype of mucinous adenocarcinoma that is non-human papillomavirus related and possibly related to adenoma malignum. Both neoplasms were intensely p53 positive, suggesting that TP53 mutation may be implicated in their development. We believe that the vaginal tumors arose from adenosis through atypical adenosis, as benign and atypical glands were present at the periphery of the neoplasms. In reporting these cases, we discuss atypical adenosis and other types of non-diethylstilbestrol-associated vaginal adenocarcinomas. At least 9 other examples of primary vaginal, or more uncommonly cervical, adenocarcinomas arising in non-diethylstilbestrol-exposed women with congenital genitourinary malformations have been reported, suggesting a probable causal association between congenital malformation, vaginal adenosis, and vaginal adenocarcinoma. PMID:22317878

  16. Impact of Perioperative Blood Transfusion on Postoperative Complications and Prognosis of Gastric Adenocarcinoma Patients with Different Preoperative Hemoglobin Value

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Lian; Wei-Han, Zhang; Yang, Kun; Chen, Xin-Zu; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Chen, Jia-Ping; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background. The impact of perioperative blood transfusion on the prognosis of gastric adenocarcinoma patients is still controversial. The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of perioperative blood transfusion on postoperative complications and prognosis of patients who underwent gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma with different levels of preoperative hemoglobin value (POHb). Method. From 2003 to 2011, 1199 patients who underwent curative gastrectomy were retrospectively enrolled and followed up to December 2014. Clinicopathological features and survival outcomes were compared between transfused and nontransfused patients. Results. In this study, transfused patients had more postoperative complications than nontransfused ones (P = 0.002). In survival analysis, the difference was not significant between transfused and nontransfused patients with POHb between 70 and 100 g/L (P = 0.191). However, in patients with POHb >100 g/L, transfused patients had significantly worse prognosis (P < 0.001), especially in TNM III stage patients (P = 0.002). And intraoperative blood transfusion predicted poor prognosis (P = 0.001). Conclusion. Perioperative blood transfusion might lead to poor survival in gastric adenocarcinoma patients with POHb >100 g/L and transfused patients had more postoperative complications; thus it is better to refrain from unnecessary perioperative blood transfusion especially intraoperative transfusion. PMID:26819609

  17. Expression of SPARC like protein 1 (SPARCL1), extracellular matrix-associated protein is down regulated in gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jakharia, Aniruddha; Borkakoty, Biswajyoti

    2016-01-01

    Background SPARC-like protein 1 (SPARCL1/Hevin), a member of the SPARC family is defined by the presence of a highly acidic domain-I, a follistatin-like domain, and an extracellular calcium (EC) binding domain. SPARCL1 has been shown to be down-regulated in many types of cancer and may serve as a negative regulator of cell growth and proliferation. Methods Both tumor and adjacent normal tissue were collected from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. Monoclonal antibody developed against recombinant SPARCL1 was used to analyze the expression of SPARCL1 by immunohisto chemical and western blotting (WB) analysis. Results The expression of SPARCL1 was found to be significantly lower or negligible in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues in nearly all of the cases in comparison with adjacent normal tissue. This comparison was found to be independent of the patient’s age, sex, and stage of cancer. Conclusions We postulate that down regulation of SPARCL1 may be related to inactivation of its tumor suppressor functions and might play an important role in the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27034797

  18. Genetic variations in angiogenesis pathway genes associated with clinical outcome in localized gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lurje, G.; Husain, H.; Power, D. G.; Yang, D.; Groshen, S.; Pohl, A.; Zhang, W.; Ning, Y.; Manegold, P. C.; El-Khoueiry, A.; Iqbal, S.; Tang, L. H.; Shah, M. A.; Lenz, H.-J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Angiogenesis has been attributed to be a well-recognized aspect of human cancer biology. As such, proteinase-activated receptor (PAR)-1, endostatin (ES) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) mediate the regulation of early-onset angiogenesis and in turn impact the process of tumor-growth and disease progression. Patients and methods: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues were obtained from 137 patients with localized gastric cancer at University of Southern California and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center medical facilities. DNA was extracted and genotyping was carried out using PCR–restriction fragment length polymorphism-based protocols. Results: In false discovery rate-adjusted univariate analysis, PAR-1 −506 ins/del (P < 0.001), ES +4349 G>A (P = 0.004), and IL-8 −251 T>A (P < 0.0001) were associated with time to tumor recurrence (TTR). Further, PAR-1 −506 ins/del and IL-8 −251 were associated with overall survival (OS). After adjusting for covariates, IL-8 remained significantly associated with TTR (adjusted P = 0.003) and OS (adjusted P = 0.049), whereas ES was significantly associated with TTR (adjusted P = 0.026). Conclusions: Polymorphisms in PAR-1, ES, and IL-8 may serve as independent molecular prognostic markers in patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma. The assessment of the patients’ individual risk on the basis of interindividual genotypes may therefore help to identify patient subgroups at high risk for poor clinical outcome. PMID:19622587

  19. Increased expression of IDO associates with poor postoperative clinical outcome of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao; Shen, Zhenbin; Wang, Zhenglin; Wang, Xuefei; Zhang, Heng; Qin, Jing; Qin, Xinyu; Xu, Jiejie; Sun, Yihong

    2016-01-01

    Clinical significance of 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been studied in types of tumors, but the role that IDO played in gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) is still unclear. Here, we aim to investigate the prognostic value of IDO expression in patients with GAC. We examined intratumoral IDO expression in retrospectively enrolled 357 patients with GAC undergoing gastrectomy at Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University in 2008 by immunohistochemical staining. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression models were used to evaluate the prognostic value of IDO expression and its association with clinical pathological factors. We generated a predictive nomogram by integrating IDO expression with the TNM staging system for overall survival of GAC patients. High expression of intratumoral IDO predicted a dismal outcome. Intratumoral IDO expression gave a further discrimination for the prognosis of GAC patients. By Cox multivariate analysis, IDO expression was defined as an independent prognosticator. The generated nomogram performed well in predicting the 3- and 5-year overall survival of GAC patients. Conclusively, IDO is a potential prognostic biomarker for overall survival of patients with GAC after gastrectomy. PMID:26887337

  20. Deconvolution Analysis for Classifying Gastric Adenocarcinoma Patients Based on Differential Scanning Calorimetry Serum Thermograms

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Sonia; Garcia-Gonzalez, María Asuncion; Lanas, Angel; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Abian, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Recently, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been acknowledged as a novel tool for diagnosing and monitoring several diseases. This highly sensitive technique has been traditionally used to study thermally induced protein folding/unfolding transitions. In previous research papers, DSC profiles from blood samples of patients were analyzed and they exhibited marked differences in the thermal denaturation profile. Thus, we investigated the use of this novel technology in blood serum samples from 25 healthy subjects and 30 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) at different stages of tumor development with a new multiparametric approach. The analysis of the calorimetric profiles of blood serum from GAC patients allowed us to discriminate three stages of cancer development (I to III) from those of healthy individuals. After a multiparametric analysis, a classification of blood serum DSC parameters from patients with GAC is proposed. Certain parameters exhibited significant differences (P < 0.05) and allowed the discrimination of healthy subjects/patients from patients at different tumor stages. The results of this work validate DSC as a novel technique for GAC patient classification and staging, and offer new graphical tools and value ranges for the acquired parameters in order to discriminate healthy from diseased subjects with increased disease burden. PMID:25614381

  1. Genetic variations in MTHFR and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma susceptibility in the Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yafeng; Chen, Shuchen; Kang, Mingqiang; Tang, Weifeng; Gu, Haiyong; Yin, Jun; Huang, Ziyang

    2015-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphisms are associated with many types of cancers. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of MTHFR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA). We conducted a hospital-based case-control study. Three hundred and thirty cases with GCA and 608 controls were recruited. The ligation detection reaction (LDR) method was used to determine genotypes. The genotype MTHFR rs1801133 TT was significantly more frequent in cases than in controls (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-2.05, P = 0.029) in a recessive model, after adjusting for age, sex and smoking and alcohol use. The haplotype MTHFR Grs4845882Ars4846048Trs1801133Crs9651118Ars3753584 was more frequent in cases than in controls (crude OR = 5.32, 95% CI = 2.34-12.10, P < 0.001). No association between other genotypes and haplotypes was observed. Our results suggest that the genotype MTHFR rs1801133 TT and the MTHFR Grs4845882Ars4846048Trs1801133Crs9651118Ars3753584 haplotype may be associated with susceptibility to GCA. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26770518

  2. Genetically engineered Newcastle disease virus expressing human interferon-λ1 induces apoptosis in gastric adenocarcinoma cells and modulates the Th1/Th2 immune response.

    PubMed

    Bu, Xuefeng; Li, Mi; Zhao, Yinghai; Liu, Sha; Wang, Mubin; Ge, Jinying; Bu, Zhigao; Yan, Yulan

    2016-09-01

    Interferon-λ1 (IFN-λ1), a recently discovered cytokine of the type III IFN family, was found to be a therapeutic alternative to type I IFN in terms of tumors. Using reverse genetics technique, we generated a recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota strains named as human IFN‑λ1 recombinant adenovirus (rL-hIFN-λ1) containing human IFN-λ1 gene and further evaluated the expressing of IFN-λ1 in human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line SGC-7901 after infected with rL-hIFN-λ1 by using western blot analysis, RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses. IFN-λl specific receptor IFNLR1 was detected on several gastric tumor cell lines including SGC-7901 and AGS and on PBMCs.The expression of the IFN-λ1 proteins reached a high level detected in the supernatant harvested 24 h after the infection of tumor cells. The proliferation changes of SGC infected with rL-hIFN-λ1 was significantly inhibited compared with NDV-infected group. Apoptosis was significantly induced by rL-hIFN-λ1 in gastric cancer cells compared with NDV virus tested by TUNEL assay, western blot analysis and Annexin V flow cytometry. Due to the high dose of IFN-λ1 expressed by the rL-hIFN-λ1-infected tumor cells, the immune study showed that rL-hIFN-λ1 increased IFN-γ production [the T helper cell subtype 1 (Th1) response] and inhibited interleukin (IL)-13 production [the T helper cell subtype 2 (Th2) response] to change the Th1/Th2 response of tumor microenvironment which inhibited tumor growth. This study aims at building recombinant NDV rL-hIFN-λ1 as an efficient antitumor agent. PMID:27430534

  3. Impact of marital status on survival of gastric adenocarcinoma patients: Results from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Database

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Miaozhen; Yang, Dajun; Xu, Ruihua

    2016-01-01

    Marital status was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival in various cancer types. In this study, we used the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database to analyze the survival difference among different marital status in the United States. Gastric adenocarcinoma patients from 2004–2012 were enrolled for study. The 5-year cause specific survival (CSS) was our primary endpoint. Totally 29,074 eligible patients were identified. We found that more male patients were married than female. Asian patients had the highest percentages of married than the other races. More married patients were covered by the insurance. Married patients had better 5-year CSS than unmarried, 30.6% vs 25.7%, P < 0.001. The median overall CSS was 17.87 and 13.61 months for the married and unmarried patients, hazard ratio: 1.09 (95% confidence interval: 1.01–1.17), P = 0.027. The survival difference was significant in the insured but not in the uninsured patients. Widowed patients had the worst prognosis compared with other groups even though they had more stage I disease and more well / moderate differentiated tumors. These results indicated that unmarried gastric adenocarcinoma patients were at greater risk of cancer specific mortality. We recommend every patient should have access to best available gastric cancer therapy. PMID:26876653

  4. Methylation-mediated downregulation of long noncoding RNA LOC100130476 in gastric cardia adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Dong, Zhiming; Shi, Yabin; Liu, Shengnan; Liang, Jia; Guo, Yanli; Guo, Xin; Shen, Supeng; Wang, Guiying

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating evidences indicate that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in several biological processes and dysregulated lncRNAs are involved in different kinds of cancer and are associated with carcinogenesis, metastasis, and prognosis of cancer. The role of a new lncRNA LOC100130476 in gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA) has remained unknown. The present study investigated the role and methylation status of LOC100130476 in the pathogenesis of GCA, and further evaluated the potential prognostic role of LOC100130476 in GCA. Significant downregulation of LOC100130476 was detected in SGC-7901 and BGC-823 cell lines and primary GCA tissues. Methylation frequency of LOC100130476 was gradually increased from exon 1 to exon 2 both in tumor tissues and corresponding normal tissues; however, methylation status of region 1 closing to the transcription start site was more tumor-specific among the three regions examined. The findings of the association between LOC100130476 expression, methylation and TNM stage, pathological differentiation, and GCA patients' survival further identified the role of LOC100130476 as a tumor suppressor gene. Furthermore, the hypermethylation of LOC100130476 was also detected in peripheral white blood cells of GCA cases. Thus, LOC100130476 may be act as a tumor suppressor gene in GCA carcinogenesis and aberrant methylation at the CpG sites near the transcription start site within exon 1 may be critical for gene silencing. In addition, aberrant methylation of LOC100130476 in peripheral white blood cells and GCA tissues may be used as a potential valuable biomarker in GCA diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:27189370

  5. Synchronous gastric and ampullary adenocarcinomas in a hairy cell leukemia patient treated with pentostatin eight years prior.

    PubMed

    Senatore, Frank J; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2016-06-01

    Hairy cell leukemia patients are at increased risk for second malignancies, including both solid and lymphoid neoplasms. Along with other factors, multiple immune defects present in hairy cell leukemia likely contribute to subsequent carcinogenesis. We report herein a case of synchronous high-grade gastric and ampullary adenocarcinomas in a patient with a history of hairy cell leukemia treated eight years prior with pentostatin. We include a review of immune alterations induced by both hairy cell leukemia and its therapies, and link them with the occurrence of second cancers in these patients. PMID:25712625

  6. Gastric Adenocarcinomas Express the Glycosphingolipid Gb3/CD77: Targeting of Gastric Cancer Cells with Shiga Toxin B-Subunit.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Philipp Emanuel; Maak, Matthias; Nitsche, Ulrich; Perl, Markus; Novotny, Alexander; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Dransart, Estelle; Holtorf, Anne; Johannes, Ludger; Janssen, Klaus-Peter

    2016-05-01

    The B-subunit of the bacterial Shiga toxin (STxB), which is nontoxic and has low immunogenicity, can be used for tumor targeting of breast, colon, and pancreatic cancer. Here, we tested whether human gastric cancers, which are among the most aggressive tumor entities, express the cellular receptor of Shiga toxin, the glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide (Gb3/CD77). The majority of cases showed an extensive staining for Gb3 (36/50 cases, 72%), as evidenced on tissue sections of surgically resected specimen. Gb3 expression was detected independent of type (diffuse/intestinal), and was negatively correlated to increasing tumor-node-metastasis stages (P = 0.0385), as well as with markers for senescence. Gb3 expression in nondiseased gastric mucosa was restricted to chief and parietal cells at the bottom of the gastric glands, and was not elevated in endoscopic samples of gastritis (n = 10). Gb3 expression in established cell lines of gastric carcinoma was heterogeneous, with 6 of 10 lines being positive, evidenced by flow cytometry. STxB was taken up rapidly by live Gb3-positive gastric cancer cells, following the intracellular retrograde transport route, avoiding lysosomes and rapidly reaching the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum. Treatment of the Gb3-expressing gastric carcinoma cell line St3051 with STxB coupled to SN38, the active metabolite of the topoisomerase type I inhibitor irinotecan, resulted in >100-fold increased cytotoxicity, as compared with irinotecan alone. No cytotoxicity was observed on gastric cancer cell lines lacking Gb3 expression, demonstrating receptor specificity of the STxB-SN38 compound. Thus, STxB is a highly specific transport vehicle for cytotoxic agents in gastric carcinoma. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 1008-17. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26826119

  7. 64Cu DOTA-Trastuzumab PET/CT in Studying Patients With Gastric Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer

  8. General and abdominal obesity and risk of esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Annika; Huerta, José-Maria; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; May, Anne M; Siersema, Peter D; Kaaks, Rudolf; Neamat-Allah, Jasmine; Pala, Valeria; Panico, Salvatore; Saieva, Calogero; Tumino, Rosario; Naccarati, Alessio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Ardanaz, Eva; Quirós, J Ramón; Ohlsson, Bodil; Johansson, Mattias; Wallner, Bengt; Overvad, Kim; Halkjaer, Jytte; Tjønneland, Anne; Fagherazzi, Guy; Racine, Antoine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Key, Tim J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Ferrari, Pietro; Freisling, Heinz; Lu, Yunxia; Riboli, Elio; Cross, Amanda J; Gonzalez, Carlos A; Boeing, Heiner

    2015-08-01

    General obesity, as reflected by BMI, is an established risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), a suspected risk factor for gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCC) and appears unrelated to gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCC). How abdominal obesity, as commonly measured by waist circumference (WC), relates to these cancers remains largely unexplored. Using measured anthropometric data from 391,456 individuals from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study and 11 years of follow-up, we comprehensively assessed the association of anthropometric measures with risk of EAC, GCC and GNCC using multivariable proportional hazards regression. One hundred twenty-four incident EAC, 193 GCC and 224 GNCC were accrued. After mutual adjustment, BMI was unrelated to EAC, while WC showed a strong positive association (highest vs. lowest quintile HR = 1.19; 95% CI, 0.63-2.22 and HR = 3.76; 1.72-8.22, respectively). Hip circumference (HC) was inversely related to EAC after controlling for WC, while WC remained positively associated (HR = 0.35; 0.18-0.68, and HR=4.10; 1.94-8.63, respectively). BMI was not associated with GCC or GNCC. WC was related to higher risks of GCC after adjustment for BMI and more strongly after adjustment for HC (highest vs. lowest quintile HR = 1.91; 1.09-3.37, and HR = 2.23; 1.28-3.90, respectively). Our study demonstrates that abdominal, rather than general, obesity is an indisputable risk factor for EAC and also provides evidence for a protective effect of gluteofemoral (subcutaneous) adipose tissue in EAC. Our study further shows that general obesity is not a risk factor for GCC and GNCC, while the role of abdominal obesity in GCC needs further investigation. PMID:25598323

  9. Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Enhances Cell Proliferation of Human Gastric Cancer AGS Cells.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Sekimoto, Teruki; Ogura, Ayaka; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third gasotransmitter, is endogenously generated by certain H2S synthesizing enzymes, including cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) from L-cysteine in the mammalian body. Several studies have shown that endogenous and exogenous H2S affects the proliferation of cancer cells, although the effects of H2S appear to vary with cell type, being either promotive or suppressive. In the present study, we determined whether endogenously formed H2S regulates proliferation in human gastric cancer AGS cells. CSE, but not CBS, was expressed in AGS cells. CSE inhibitors, DL-propargylglycine (PPG) and β-cyano-L-alanine (BCA), significantly suppressed the proliferation of AGS cells in a concentration-dependent manner. CSE inhibitors did not increase lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in the same concentration range. The inhibitory effects of PPG and BCA on cell proliferation were reversed by repetitive application of NaHS, a donor of H2S. Interestingly, nuclear condensation and fragmentation were detected in AGS cells treated with PPG or BCA. These results suggest that endogenous H2S produced by CSE may contribute to the proliferation of gastric cancer AGS cells, most probably through anti-apoptotic actions. PMID:27150157

  10. Two distinct etiologies of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma: interactions among pH, Helicobacter pylori, and bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Nakayama, Takahisa; Hagiwara, Tadashi; Hattori, Takanori; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer can be classified as cardia and non-cardia subtypes according to the anatomic site. Although the gastric cancer incidence has decreased steadily in several countries over the past 50 years, the incidence of cardia cancers and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) continue to increase. The etiological factors involved in the development of both cardia cancers and EACs are associated with high animal fat intake, which causes severe obesity. Central obesity plays roles in cardiac-type mucosa lengthening and partial hiatus hernia development. There are two distinct etiologies of cardia cancer subtypes: one associated with gastroesophageal reflux (GER), which predominantly occurs in patients without Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and resembles EAC, and the other associated with H. pylori atrophic gastritis, which resembles non-cardia cancer. The former can be developed in the environment of high volume duodenal content reflux, including bile acids and a higher acid production in H. pylori–negative patients. N-nitroso compounds, which are generated from the refluxate that includes a large volume of bile acids and are stabilized in the stomach (which has high levels of gastric acid), play a pivotal role in this carcinogenesis. The latter can be associated with the changing colonization of H. pylori from the distal to the proximal stomach with atrophic gastritis because a high concentration of soluble bile acids in an environment of low acid production is likely to act as a bactericide or chemorepellent for H. pylori in the distal stomach. The manuscript introduces new insights in causative factors of adenocarcinoma of the cardia about the role of bile acids in gastro-esophageal refluxate based upon robust evidences supporting interactions among pH, H. pylori, and bile acids. PMID:26029176

  11. Progressing Sclerosing Mesenteritis (Mesenteric Panniculitis) Mimics Progression of Malignancy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Gastric Adenocarcinoma on Serial 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Makis, William

    2016-04-01

    A 62-year-old man was diagnosed with a moderately differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma in the proximal stomach. A staging 18F-FDG PET/CT showed an intensely FDG-avid gastric mass, as well as a mildly FDG-avid misty nodular mesentery. After 3 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, a follow-up PET/CT showed partial response of the gastric primary, with increase in the size of nodules in the mesentery and increased FDG uptake, raising concern of secondary malignancy. Biopsy of the mesentery revealed xanthogranulomatous inflammation, consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis. PMID:26359565

  12. Invasive mouse gastric adenocarcinomas arising from Lgr5+ stem cells are dependent on crosstalk between the Hedgehog/GLI2 and mTOR pathways

    PubMed Central

    Syu, Li-Jyun; Zhao, Xinyi; Zhang, Yaqing; Grachtchouk, Marina; Demitrack, Elise; Ermilov, Alexandre; Wilbert, Dawn M.; Zheng, Xinlei; Kaatz, Ashley; Greenson, Joel K.; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Merchant, Juanita L.; di Magliano, Marina Pasca; Samuelson, Linda C.; Dlugosz, Andrzej A.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is the third most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Here we report a novel, highly-penetrant mouse model of invasive gastric cancer arising from deregulated Hedgehog/Gli2 signaling targeted to Lgr5-expressing stem cells in adult stomach. Tumor development progressed rapidly: three weeks after inducing the Hh pathway oncogene GLI2A, 65% of mice harbored in situ gastric cancer, and an additional 23% of mice had locally invasive tumors. Advanced mouse gastric tumors had multiple features in common with human gastric adenocarcinomas, including characteristic histological changes, expression of RNA and protein markers, and the presence of major inflammatory and stromal cell populations. A subset of tumor cells underwent epithelial-mesenchymal transition, likely mediated by focal activation of canonical Wnt signaling and Snail1 induction. Strikingly, mTOR pathway activation, based on pS6 expression, was robustly activated in mouse gastric adenocarcinomas from the earliest stages of tumor development, and treatment with rapamycin impaired tumor growth. GLI2A-expressing epithelial cells were detected transiently in intestine, which also contains Lgr5+ stem cells, but they did not give rise to epithelial tumors in this organ. These findings establish that deregulated activation of Hedgehog/Gli2 signaling in Lgr5-expressing stem cells is sufficient to drive gastric adenocarcinoma development in mice, identify a critical requirement for mTOR signaling in the pathogenesis of these tumors, and underscore the importance of tissue context in defining stem cell responsiveness to oncogenic stimuli. PMID:26859571

  13. HOTAIR is a predictive and prognostic biomarker for patients with advanced gastric adenocarcinoma receiving fluorouracil and platinum combination chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Dong, Shuang; Duan, Bensong; Chen, Ping; Shi, Lei; Gao, Hengjun; Qi, Haizhi

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) HOTAIR participates in many types of cancer such as gastric cancer and may confer malignant phenotype to tumor cells. Fluorouracil and platinum combination chemotherapy is the first line therapy for gastric cancer. However, it is still unknown whether HOTAIR influences the outcome of cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. This study aimed to evaluate the association of HOTAIR expression with the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric adenocarcinoma (GA) receiving fluorouracil and platinum based chemotherapy. We examined the levels of HOTAIR in 168 GA samples using quantitative real-time PCR and analyzed its relationship with clinical features and prognosis of patients with advanced GA treated with fluorouracil and platinum based chemotherapy. Compared with paracancerous tissues, HOTAIR was significantly upregulated in GA tissues, especially in more advanced cases. High HOTAIR expression was an independent poor prognostic factor for patients with advanced GA. Further stratification analyses revealed that the association between HOTAIR expression and survival in patients with advanced GA remained significant in the subgroup of patients with TNM stages IIIA and IIIB, poorly differentiated, and smaller tumors. In conclusion, our results provide first evidence that HOTAIR may be served as a biomarker that predicts which patient with advanced GA will benefit from fluorouracil and platinum combination chemotherapy. PMID:26328013

  14. Preoperative Gross Classification of Gastric Adenocarcinoma: Comparison of Double Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Multi-Detector Row CT.

    PubMed

    Yan, Caoxin; Bao, Xiaofeng; Shentu, Weihui; Chen, Jian; Liu, Chunmei; Ye, Qin; Wang, Liuhong; Tan, Yangbin; Huang, Pintong

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) with double contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS), in which intravenous microbubbles are used alongside oral contrast-enhanced ultrasound, in determining the gross classification of patients with gastric carcinoma (GC). Altogether, 239 patients with GC proved by histology after endoscopic biopsy were included in this study. DCEUS and MDCT were performed pre-operatively. The diagnostic accuracies of DCEUS and MDCT in determining the gross classification were calculated and compared. The overall accuracy of DCEUS in determining the gross appearance of GC was higher than that of MDCT (84.9% vs. 79.9%, p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in accuracy between DCEUS and MDCT for Borrmann I and IV classifications of advanced gastric cancer (χ(2), p = 0.323 for Borrmann type I, p = 0.141 for Borrmann type IV). The accuracy of DCEUS for early GC and Borrmann II and III classifications of GC was higher than that of MDCT (χ(2), p = 0.000 for all). DCEUS may be regarded as a valuable complementary tool to MDCT in determining the gross appearance of gastric adenocarcinoma pre-operatively. PMID:27072076

  15. Calcium calmodulin dependent kinase kinase 2 - a novel therapeutic target for gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Syed, Nazia; Barbhuiya, Mustafa A; Raja, Remya; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini; Pinto, Sneha M; Manda, Srikanth Srinivas; Renuse, Santosh; Manju, HC; Zameer, Mohammed Abdul Lateef; Sharma, Jyoti; Brait, Mariana; Srikumar, Kotteazeth; Roa, Juan Carlos; Vijaya Kumar, M; Kumar, KV Veerendra; Prasad, TS Keshava; Ramaswamy, Girija; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha; Chatterjee, Aditi

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common gastrointestinal malignancies and is associated with poor prognosis. Exploring alterations in the proteomic landscape of gastric cancer is likely to provide potential biomarkers for early detection and molecules for targeted therapeutic intervention. Using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis, we identified 22 proteins that were overexpressed and 17 proteins that were downregulated in gastric tumor tissues as compared to the adjacent normal tissue. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CAMKK2) was found to be 7-fold overexpressed in gastric tumor tissues. Immunohistochemical labeling of tumor tissue microarrays for validation of CAMKK2 overexpression revealed that it was indeed overexpressed in 94% (92 of 98) of gastric cancer cases. Silencing of CAMKK2 using siRNA significantly reduced cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that CAMKK2 signals in gastric cancer through AMPK activation and suggest that CAMKK2 could be a novel therapeutic target in gastric cancer. PMID:25756516

  16. Reduced MUTYH, MTH1, and OGG1 expression and TP53 mutation in diffuse-type adenocarcinoma of gastric cardia.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Hirahashi, Minako; Kumagae, Yoshiteru; Nakamura, Masafumi; Oki, Eiji; Oda, Yoshinao

    2016-06-01

    The effects of oxidative stress in adenocarcinomas of gastric cardia (AGCs) have not been fully elucidated. With a strict definition of AGC, we examined the immunohistochemical expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase; 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine; and the base excision repair enzymes such as MUTYH, MTH1, and OGG1, and TP53 mutational status. Sixty-three cases of AGC were characterized by younger patient age (P = .0227) and more frequent venous invasion (P = .0106) compared with the adenocarcinomas of pylorus (APs). 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine was accumulated (P = .0011), whereas MUTYH (P = .0325) and OGG1 (P = .0007) were decreased, in the AGCs compared with the adjacent mucosa, but these differences were not detected in the APs. Among the AGCs, lower expressions of MUTYH (P = .0013) and MTH1 (P = .0059) were each significantly associated with diffuse-type histology. A lower expression of OGG1 was correlated with higher T-stage (P = .0011), lymphatic invasion (P = .004), and lymph node metastasis (P = .0094). In addition, the presence of TP53 mutation was associated with diffuse-type histology (P = .0153) and a lower level of MUTYH (P = .0221). The AGCs also showed a relatively high rate of a transversion-type mutation of TP53 (50%), whereas all TP53 mutations in the APs were transition type. Age 62years or older (P = .0073), diffuse-type histology (P = .0020), and TP53 mutation (P = .0066) were each associated with worse survival in the AGC patients. Our results indicate that oxidative stress accumulation and a downregulation of base excision repair enzymes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AGC, in particular diffuse-type AGCs. Diffuse-type AGC might involve molecular pathways different from those of other subsets of gastric cancer. PMID:26980051

  17. Cellular responses induced in vitro by pestheic acid, a fungal metabolite, in a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (PG100).

    PubMed

    Sousa, J M C; Matos, L A; Alcântara, D F A; Ribeiro, H F; Santos, L S; Oliveira, M N; Brito-Junior, L C; Khayat, A S; Guimarães, A C; Cunha, L A; Burbano, R R; Bahia, M O

    2013-01-01

    There is a constant search for new cancer treatments that are less aggressive and economically affordable. In this context, natural products extracted from plants, fungi, and microorganisms are of great interest. Pestheic acid, or dihidromaldoxin, is a chlorinated diphenylic ether extracted from the phytopathogenic fungus Pestalotiopsis guepinii (Amphisphaeriaceae). We assessed the cytotoxic, cytostatic, and genotoxic effects of pestheic acid in a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (PG100). A decrease in clonogenic survival was observed. Pestheic acid also induced significant increases in both micronucleus and nucleoplasmic bridge frequency. However, we did not observe changes in cell cycle kinetics or apoptosis induction. Reactive oxygen species induced by diphenylic ethers may explain the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of pestheic acid. The absence of repair checkpoints that we observed is probably due to the fact that the PG100 cell line lacks the TP53 gene, which is common in gastric cancers. Even though pestheic acid has had a clear cytotoxic effect, the minimal inhibitory concentration was high, which shows that pestheic acid is not an active anticancer compound under these conditions. PMID:24114206

  18. Proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowers gastric adenocarcinoma TMK1 cell proliferation via bone morphogenetic protein signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Yu Le; Cho, C.H.

    2008-06-27

    Proteasome inhibitor is a novel class of cancer therapeutics, of which the mechanism of action is not fully understood. It is reported that proteasome inhibitor enhances bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in osteoblasts to stimulate bone formation. BMP signaling is also an important tumor-suppressing pathway in gastric carcinogenesis. We therefore sought to determine the anti-mitogenic effect of proteasome inhibition in relation to BMP signaling in gastric cancer cells. Results showed that proteasome inhibitor MG-132 significantly suppressed the proliferation and the colony-forming ability of gastric cancer TMK1 cells. In this connection, MG-132 activated BMP signaling, manifested as an increase in Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and up-regulation of p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} mRNA and protein expression. Knockdown of BMP receptor II by RNA interference abolished Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation, p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} induction, and the inhibition of cell proliferation induced by MG-132. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 up-regulated the expression of BMP1 and BMP4 and suppressed the expression of Smad6. Knockdown of Smad6 also mimicked the effect of MG-132 on BMP signaling. Collectively, these findings suggest that inhibition of proteasome suppresses gastric cancer cell proliferation via activation of BMP signaling. This discovery may open up a novel therapeutic avenue to proteasome inhibitors for the management of gastric cancer.

  19. Total versus subtotal gastrectomy for adenocarcinoma of the gastric antrum. A French prospective controlled study.

    PubMed Central

    Gouzi, J L; Huguier, M; Fagniez, P L; Launois, B; Flamant, Y; Lacaine, F; Paquet, J C; Hay, J M

    1989-01-01

    In a multicentric trial the postoperative mortality and the 5-year survival of elective total gastrectomy (TG) was compared with subtotal gastrectomy (SG) for adenocarcinoma of the antrum operated on with intent of cure. Two hundred and one patients were included in the study; 32 were excluded after pathologic examination (linitis plastica, superficial cancer, lymphoma). One hundred sixty-nine patients remained for analysis, with 93 undergoing TG and 76 undergoing SG. Elective TG did not increase postoperative mortality (1.3%) compared with SG (3.2%). There was no difference in the 5-year survival rate (48%). Analysis of survival showed no difference in the two techniques when related to nodal involvement and serosal extension. It is concluded that both TG and SG can be performed safely in patients with adenocarcinoma of the antrum; however TG did not increase the survival rate. PMID:2644898

  20. The inhibition of histone deacetylase 8 suppresses proliferation and inhibits apoptosis in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Shiyuan; Wang, Ying; Xu, Po; Yang, Ruina; Ma, Zhikun; Liang, Shuo; Zhang, Guangping

    2015-11-01

    Histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8), a unique member of class I HDACs, shows remarkable correlation with advanced disease stage. The depletion of HDAC8 leads to inhibition of proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in multiple malignant tumors. However, little is known about the contribution of HDAC8 to the tumorigenesis of gastric cancer (GC). The present study investigated expression of HDAC8 in GC cell lines and tissues, and the roles of HDAC8 inhibition in the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells and explored the potential mechanisms. In the present study, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), western blotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to examine the mRNA and protein expression of HDAC8 in GC cell lines and tissues. Then, the correlation between the clinicopathological parameters and the expression of HDAC8 was assessed. Finally, siRNA transfection and HDAC8 plasmid was performed to explore the functions of HDAC8 in GC progression in vitro. We found that the expression of HDAC8 was significantly upregulated both in GC cell lines and tumor tissues compared to human normal gastric epithelial cell, GES-1 and matched non-tumor tissues. Furthermore, depletion of HDAC8 remarkably inhibited GC cell proliferation, increased the apoptosis rate and G0/G1 phase percentage in vitro. Western blotting showed that the expression of protein promoting apoptosis such as, Bmf, activated caspase-3, caspase-6 were elevated following HDAC8 depletion. Our data exhibited an important role of HDAC8 in promoting gastric cancer tumorigenesis and identify this HDAC8 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26412386

  1. Capsosiphon fulvescens glycoprotein inhibits AGS gastric cancer cell proliferation by downregulating Wnt-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Kim, In-Hye; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2013-11-01

    Previously, we examined various apoptosis pathways in the AGS gastric cancer cell line using Capsosiphon fulvescens glycoprotein (Cf-GP). In this study, we focused on the downregulation of the Wnt-1 signaling pathway and cell cycle arrest. Upregulation of the Wnt signaling pathway has been observed in various cancer cells. The Wnt signal ligand acts in both canonical and non-canonical pathways. Among them, Wnt-1 was dependent on the canonical pathway. Here, we show inhibition of Wnt-1 signaling, β-catenin and transcription factors in AGS cells via Cf-GP. First, we examined the Frizzled receptor and Wnt-1 signal-related proteins including Axin, LRP, β-catenin, APC and GSK-3β. In addition, the expression levels of transcription factors Tcf/LEF were determined by western blot analysis and RT-PCR. Based on the data, we confirmed downregulation of the Wnt-1 signaling pathway by Cf-GP. Also, we determined the expression levels of cell cycle-related proteins cyclin D and c-myc, and looked for cell cycle arrest by cell cycle test analysis. We found that AGS cells arrested in the G0/G1 phase by Cf-GP. These results provide a mechanism of AGS cell inhibition through the downregulation of Wnt-1 signaling by Cf-GP. PMID:23982808

  2. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of CagA from Chinese Helicobacter pylori Isolates in AGS Gastric Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youli; Argent, Richard H.; Letley, Darren P.; Thomas, Rachael J.; Atherton, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains possessing the cag pathogenicity island (PaI) are associated with the development of gastroduodenal diseases, including gastric cancer. cag PaI products induce the secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) from epithelial cells and facilitate the translocation of CagA into the cell cytosol. In East Asia, where the incidence of gastric cancer is high, most strains possess the cag PaI. To date, however, no cag PaI phenotypic data have been provided for strains isolated in mainland China. Here we used 31 Chinese strains to determine the genotypic and phenotypic status of the cag PaI. All strains possessed cagA and cagE, and we observed a variation in the length of cagA variable regions. Nucleotide sequencing of the cagA variable region revealed that CagA was of two types, a short “Western” form with two tyrosine phosphorylation sites and a longer “East Asian” form with three tyrosine phosphorylation sites. Coculture of strains with AGS epithelial cells showed that strains could induce IL-8 secretion from the cells and that CagA with three phosphorylation sites became more phosphorylated than that with two and could induce significantly (P < 0.001) more cells to elongate. We hypothesize that the preponderance of the more active East Asian form of cagA may underlie the high rate of gastric cancer in China. PMID:15695680

  3. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Simpson, Peter T; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R; Clouston, Andrew D; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C; Neklason, Deborah W; Davis, Sean R; Walker, Robert L; Calzone, Kathleen A; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N; Hulick, Peter J; Weissman, Scott M; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sampson, Jone E; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K; Huntsman, David G; Foulkes, William D; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M; Edwards, Stacey L; French, Juliet D; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S; Worthley, Daniel L; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-05-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present. PMID:27087319

  4. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase and metalloprotease-9 of human adenocarcinoma gastric cells by chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) infusion.

    PubMed

    Bulgari, Michela; Sangiovanni, Enrico; Colombo, Elisa; Maschi, Omar; Caruso, Donatella; Bosisio, Enrica; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated whether the antiinflammatory effect of chamomile infusion at gastric level could be ascribed to the inhibition of metalloproteinase-9 and elastase. The infusions from capitula and sifted flowers (250-1500 µg/mL) and individual flavonoids (10 µM) were tested on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated AGS cells and human neutrophil elastase. The results indicate that the antiinflammatory activity associated with chamomile infusions from both the capitula and sifted flowers is most likely due to the inhibition of neutrophil elastase and gastric metalloproteinase-9 activity and secretion; the inhibition occurring in a concentration dependent manner. The promoter activity was inhibited as well and the decrease of metalloproteinase-9 expression was found to be associated with the inhibition of NF-kB driven transcription. The results further indicate that the flavonoid-7-glycosides, major constituents of chamomile flowers, may be responsible for the antiinflammatory action of the chamomile infusion observed here. PMID:22407864

  5. Gastric signet-ring cell adenocarcinoma presenting with left arm deep-vein thrombosis and bilateral chylothorax.

    PubMed

    Kayacan, Oya; Karnak, Demet; Ayşe Can, Berna; Dizbay Sak, Serpil; Beder, Sumru

    2008-10-01

    A 28-year-old housewife, a life-long nonsmoker, presented with 3 weeks of pleuritic chest pain along with swollen right leg, left arm, and left breast. Six months previously she had left subclavian vein thrombosis. On admission, bilateral supraclavicular lymphedema on right leg and left arm and breast was observed and bilateral pleural fluid, chylous exudates, was detected. Abdomen computed tomography revealed abundant ascites and right ovarian enlargement. Whole body bone scintigraphy showed bone metastases on left humerus, right femur, and pelvis. Bronchial biopsy, obtained from edematous, hyperemic-irregular mucosa, revealed a carcinoma composed of signet-ring cells with intracytoplasmic mucin. Breast biopsy also showed signet-ring cells within the lymphatics. Pleural fluid cytology showed similar malignant cells. The patient was diagnosed as gastric signet-ring cell adenocarcinoma with endobronchial, mammary, ovarian, pleural, pericardial, peritoneal, and osteal metastases. The authors recommend that deep-vein thrombosis in unusual sites deserves further evaluation for an occult malignancy. PMID:18263634

  6. THE PRESENCE OF METASTASES IN REGIONAL LYMPH NODES IS ASSOCIATED WITH TUMOR SIZE AND DEPTH OF INVASION IN SPORADIC GASTRIC ADENOCARCINOMA

    PubMed Central

    CAMBRUZZI, Eduardo; de AZEREDO, Andreza Mariane; KRONHART, Ardala; FOLTZ, Katia Martins; ZETTLER, Cláudio Galeano; PÊGAS, Karla Lais

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastric adenocarcinoma is more often found in men over 50 years in the form of an antral lesion. The tumor has heterogeneous histopathologic features and a poor prognosis (median survival of 15% in five years). Aim To estimate the relationship between the presence of nodal metastasis and other prognostic factors in sporadic gastric adenocarcinoma. Method Were evaluated 164 consecutive cases of gastric adenocarcinoma previously undergone gastrectomy (partial or total), without clinical evidence of distant metastasis, and determined the following variables: topography of the lesion, tumor size, Borrmann macroscopic configuration, histological grade, early or advanced lesions, Lauren histological subtype, presence of signet ring cell, degree of invasion, perigastric lymph node status, angiolymphatic/perineural invasion, and staging. Results Were found 21 early lesions (12.8%) and 143 advanced lesions (87.2%), with a predominance of lesions classified as T3 (n=99/60, 4%) and N1 (n=62/37, 8%). The nodal status was associated with depth of invasion (p<0.001) and tumor size (p<0.001). The staging was related to age (p=0.048), histological grade (p=0.003), and presence of signet ring cells (p = 0.007), angiolymphatic invasion (p = 0.001), and perineural invasion (p=0.003). Conclusion In gastric cancer, lymph node involvement, tumor size and depth of invasion are histopathological data associated with the pattern of growth/tumor spread, suggesting that a wide dissection of perigastric lymph nodes is a fundamental step in the surgical treatment of these patients. PMID:24676292

  7. A Phase I/II Study of Oblimersen Plus Cisplatin and Fluorouracil in Gastric & Esophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  8. Prognostic role of telomerase activity in gastric adenocarcinoma: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    LÜ, MU-HAN; DENG, JIA-QI; CAO, YA-LING; FANG, DIAN-CHUN; ZHANG, YAO; YANG, SHI-MING

    2012-01-01

    Activation of telomerase is involved in carcinogenesis in most types of cancers. However, the prognostic value of telomerase activity (TA) in patients with gastric carcinoma (GC) remains controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the relationship between TA and the clinical outcome of GC. A meta-analysis of 18 studies (886 patients) was performed to evaluate the association between TA and metastasis-related parameters in GC patients by searching databases, including PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science databases, Cochrane Library and the Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM) (last search updated in October 2011). We used the odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the strength of the association between TA and metastasis of GC. Our analysis results indicated that high telomerase activity expression tended to be associated with the presence of lymph node metastasis (866 patients) (OR=2.03, 95% CI 1.21–3.39, p=0.007), the depth of invasion (886 patients) (OR=1.87, 95% CI 1.30–2.70, p=0.0007), distant metastasis (407 patients) (OR=2.71, 95% CI 1.59–4.63, p=0.0002), tumor size (466 patients) (OR=2.14, 95% CI 1.31–3.50, p=0.002) and TNM stage (711 patients) (OR=2.39, 95% CI 1.30–4.41, p=0.005). However, high TA expression was not associated with the presence of histologic differentiation (791 patients) (OR=1.51, 95% CI 0.73–3.11, p=0.26). In conclusion, telomerase overexpression not only plays a key role in primary initiation, but also promotes invasion and metastatic progression of GC. These findings raise the possibility of using TA to screen for the prognosis of gastric cancer. PMID:22969960

  9. S-1 plus cisplatin versus fluorouracil plus cisplatin in advanced gastric or gastro-esophageal junction adenocarcinoma patients: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guoping; Lu, Huishan; Liu, Yunpeng; Zhong, Meizuo; Zhang, Helong; Yu, Shiying; Li, Wei; Hu, Xiaohua; Wang, Jiejun; Cheng, Ying; Zhou, Juntian; Guo, Zengqing; Guan, Zhongzhen; Xu, Ruihua

    2015-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of S-1 plus cisplatin in Chinese advanced gastric cancer patients in first line setting is unknown. In this pilot study, patients with advanced gastric or gastro-esophageal junction adenocarcinoma were enrolled and randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive S-1 plus cisplatin (CS group) or 5-FU plus cisplatin (CF group). The primary endpoint was time to progression (TTP). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS) and safety. This study was registered on ClinicalTrials. Gov, number NCT01198392. A total of 236 patients were enrolled. Median TTP was 5.51 months in CS group compared with 4.62 months in CF group [hazard ratio (HR) 1.028, 95% confidential interval (CI) 0.758-1.394, p = 0.859]. Median OS was 10.00 months and 10.46 months in CS and CF groups (HR 1.046, 95%CI 0.709-1.543, p = 0.820), respectively. The most common adverse events in both groups were anemia, leukopenia, neutropenia, nausea, thrombocytopenia, vomiting, anorexia and diarrhea. We find that S-1 plus cisplatin is an effective and tolerable option for advanced gastric or gastro-esophageal junction adenocarcinoma patients in China. PMID:26439700

  10. Synthesis of CdTe quantum dot-conjugated CC49 and their application for in vitro imaging of gastric adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun-Peng; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Xu-Rui; Yang, Wu-Li; Si, Cheng-Shuai

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the visible imaging of gastric adenocarcinoma cells in vitro by targeting tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 (TAG-72) with near-infrared quantum dots (QDs). QDs with an emission wavelength of about 550 to 780 nm were conjugated to CC49 monoclonal antibodies against TAG-72, resulting in a probe named as CC49-QDs. A gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (MGC80-3) expressing high levels of TAG-72 was cultured for fluorescence imaging, and a gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1) was used for the negative control group. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the average diameter of CC49-QDs was 0.2 nm higher compared with that of the primary QDs. Also, fluorescence spectrum analysis indicated that the CC49-QDs did not have different optical properties compared to the primary QDs. Immunohistochemical examination and in vitro fluorescence imaging of the tumors showed that the CC49-QDs probe could bind TAG-72 expressed on MGC80-3 cells.

  11. Association between CXCR2 and IL-22BP expression indicate a poor outcome for gastric adenocarcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shi Bin; Han, Fanghai; Wu, Jian Hai; Zhao, Zhi; Zhan, Wenhua

    2016-01-01

    C-X-C motif chemokine receptor type 2 (CXCR2), a key regulatory protein, has been associated with multiple roles in the progression of numerous tumors, including gastric adenocarcinoma (GA). However, the mechanism of CXCR2 in the development of tumors remains controversial and unclear. In a previous study, the expression of CXCR2 and interleukin-22 receptor 2 (IL-22BP) was observed in GA. This promoted the present study, which aimed to explore the association between the two proteins, and to further analyze their roles in GA. CXCR2 and IL-22BP protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays in gastric cancer (GC) tissue, additionally confirmed via western blotting and immunocytochemical analysis in the MKN-45, BGC-823 and SGC-7901 cell lines. The association between expression levels and clinicopathological characteristics was evaluated by the Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazard models, overall survival (OS) was analyzed. Compared with non-cancerous tissue, CXCR2 and IL-22BP were over expressed (P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively), and were observed mainly in the cytoplasm (P=0.022 and P=0.014, respectively) in GA. The associated protein and messenger RNA levels were analyzed, and coexpression was identified. Increased expression and more positive cases of CXCR2 and IL-22BP were observed with advanced pathological tumor-node-metastasis (p-TNM) stage in GC (P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively), as well as the presence and absence of lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P=0.003 and P=0.041, respectively) and deep or superficial muscular invasion (P=0.002 and P=0.004, respectively). In addition, an association between IL-22BP and tumor diameter was indicated (P=0.021). In a Kaplan-Meier analysis, compared with negative expression, the two proteins identified a group of patients with the shortest OS. Cox proportional hazard models revealed that

  12. FOLFOX-6 Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Esophagectomy and Post-operative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastric Cardia; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer

  13. Signatures of tumour immunity distinguish Asian and non-Asian gastric adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Suling J; Gagnon-Bartsch, Johann A; Tan, Iain Beehuat; Earle, Sophie; Ruff, Louise; Pettinger, Katherine; Ylstra, Bauke; van Grieken, Nicole; Rha, Sun Young; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Lee, Ju-Seog; Cheong, Jae Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon; Aoyama, Toru; Miyagi, Yohei; Tsuburaya, Akira; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Ajani, Jaffer A; Boussioutas, Alex; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Yong, Wei Peng; So, Jimmy; Lee, Jeeyun; Kang, Won Ki; Kim, Sung; Kameda, Yoichi; Arai, Tomio; zur Hausen, Axel; Speed, Terence P; Grabsch, Heike I; Tan, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Objective Differences in gastric cancer (GC) clinical outcomes between patients in Asian and non-Asian countries has been historically attributed to variability in clinical management. However, recent international Phase III trials suggest that even with standardised treatments, GC outcomes differ by geography. Here, we investigated gene expression differences between Asian and non-Asian GCs, and if these molecular differences might influence clinical outcome. Design We compared gene expression profiles of 1016 GCs from six Asian and three non-Asian GC cohorts, using a two-stage meta-analysis design and a novel biostatistical method (RUV-4) to adjust for technical variation between cohorts. We further validated our findings by computerised immunohistochemical analysis on two independent tissue microarray (TMA) cohorts from Asian and non-Asian localities (n=665). Results Gene signatures differentially expressed between Asians and non-Asian GCs were related to immune function and inflammation. Non-Asian GCs were significantly enriched in signatures related to T-cell biology, including CTLA-4 signalling. Similarly, in the TMA cohorts, non-Asian GCs showed significantly higher expression of T-cell markers (CD3, CD45R0, CD8) and lower expression of the immunosuppressive T-regulatory cell marker FOXP3 compared to Asian GCs (p<0.05). Inflammatory cell markers CD66b and CD68 also exhibited significant cohort differences (p<0.05). Exploratory analyses revealed a significant relationship between tumour immunity factors, geographic locality-specific prognosis, and postchemotherapy outcomes. Conclusions Analyses of >1600 GCs suggest that Asian and non-Asian GCs exhibit distinct tumour immunity signatures related to T-cell function. These differences may influence geographical differences in clinical outcome, and the design of future trials particularly in immuno-oncology. PMID:25385008

  14. An Unusual Recurrence of Signet Ring Cell Gastric Adenocarcinoma Treated by Right Hemicolectomy, Pancreaticoduodenectomy, and IVC Resection: Controversies and Dilemmas of Following Standard Treatment Pathways.

    PubMed

    Sodergren, Mikael; Brammer, Kirsty; Zentler-Munro, Patrick L; Cunningham, David; Mudan, Satvinder

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 67-year-old male patient with a past history of previously resected T3 right adrenocortical carcinoma and T3N1 signet ring cell adenocarcinoma of the stomach who presented with recurrence of gastric cancer in the form of a large solitary mass in the right abdomen. He was treated with ECX (epirubicin, cisplatin and capecitabine) chemotherapy and multivisceral resection. This recurrence pattern is the first such description in the literature, and we discuss the controversies and arguments in favour of offering surgical resection. PMID:26848413

  15. Gastric-type extremely well-differentiated adenocarcinoma arising in the blind pouch of a bypassed stomach, presenting as colonic pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Sarah; Manivel, Carlos J; Ramaswamy, Archana; Mesa, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma after gastric bypass is rare. Extremely well-differentiated adenocarcinoma (EWDA) of the stomach is a rare variant that has been mostly reported in Japan. We present a case of a 68-year-old man with EWDA arising in the bypassed stomach that presented as a colonic pseudo-obstruction (CPO). Several imaging, endoscopic and pathologic studies performed in the course of 2 months were non-diagnostic. An iatrogenic duodenal perforation during a diagnostic procedure led to an emergent exploratory laparotomy in which the dilated colonic segment was resected. Pathologic examination showed metastatic EWDA in the colonic wall. Post-operative complications led to the patient's demise. At autopsy the primary tumor was identified in the blind pouch of the bypassed stomach. A literature review on gastric EWDA and carcinomas arising in bypassed stomachs is discussed. EWDA of the stomach is rare, difficult to diagnose, and shows an aggressive clinical course discordant with its near-benign histology. Gastric cancer arising in a bypassed stomach is uncommon; when it occurs it is usually diagnosed at advanced stage. Surveillance of the blind pouch is not currently recommended. Malignant infiltration of the colonic wall should be included in the differential diagnosis of CPO of unclear etiology. PMID:26424554

  16. miR-107 and miR-25 simultaneously target LATS2 and regulate proliferation and invasion of gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Mingjun; Wang, Xiaolei; Li, Wanhu; Cui, Yongchun

    2015-05-08

    Although a series of oncogenes and tumor suppressors were identified in the pathological development of gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC), the underlying molecule mechanism were still not fully understood. The current study explored the expression profile of miR-107 and miR-25 in GAC patients and their downstream regulative network. qRT-PCR analysis was performed to quantify the expression of these two miRNAs in serum samples from both patients and healthy controls. Dual luciferase assay was conducted to verify their putative bindings with LATS2. MTT assay, cell cycle assay and transwell assay were performed to explore how miR-107 and miR-25 regulate proliferation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Findings of this study demonstrated that total miR-107 or miR-25 expression might be overexpressed in gastric cancer patients and they can simultaneously and synchronically regulate LATS2 expression, thereby affecting gastric cancer cell growth and invasion. Therefore, the miR-25/miR-107-LATS2 axis might play an important role in proliferation and invasion of the gastric cancer cells. - Highlights: • Total miR-107 and miR-25 expression is significantly increased in GAC patients. • Both miR-107 and miR-25 can promote proliferation and invasion of GAC cells. • Both miR-107 and miR-25 can target LATS2 and regulate its expression. • miR-107 and miR-25 regulate proliferation and invasion of GAC cells though LATS2.

  17. Akebia saponin PA induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death in AGS human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei-Ying; Lee, Dong Hwa; Joo, Eun Ji; Son, Kun Ho; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the anticancer mechanism of akebia saponin PA (AS), a natural product isolated from Dipsacus asperoides in human gastric cancer cell lines. It was shown that AS-induced cell death is caused by autophagy and apoptosis in AGS cells. The apoptosis-inducing effect of AS was characterized by annexin V/propidium (PI) staining, increase of sub-G1 phase and caspase-3 activation, while the autophagy-inducing effect was indicated by the formation of cytoplasmic vacuoles and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain-3 II (LC3-II) conversion. The autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 (BaF1) decreased AS-induced cell death and caspase-3 activation, but caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO did not affect LC3-II accumulation or AS-induced cell viability, suggesting that AS induces autophagic cell death and autophagy contributes to caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, AS activated p38/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which could be inhibited by BaF1, and caspase-3 activation was attenuated by both SB202190 and SP600125, indicating that AS-induced autophagy promotes mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AS induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death and autophagy plays the main role in akebia saponin PA-induced cell death. PMID:23850994

  18. Inhibition of {beta}-catenin-mediated transactivation by flavanone in AGS gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chi Hoon; Hahm, Eun Ryeong; Lee, Ju Hyung; Jung, Kyung Chae; Yang, Chul Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-06-17

    Recently, data which prove that Wnt pathway activation may be an early event in multistep carcinogenesis in the stomach have been accumulating. We examined the effect of flavanone against {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in AGS gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that flavanone inhibited {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by flavanone in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant {beta}-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3{beta}, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to {beta}-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that there is no change of {beta}-catenin distribution and of nuclear {beta}-catenin levels through flavanone. In addition, the binding of Tcf complexes to DNA is not influenced by flavanone. The {beta}-catenin/Tcf transcriptional target gene cyclinD1 was downregulated by flavanone. These data suggest that flavanone inhibits the transcription of {beta}-catenin/Tcf responsive genes, by modulating Tcf activity without disrupting {beta}-catenin/Tcf complex formation.

  19. Treatment of Gastric Adenocarcinoma May Differ Among Hospital Types in the United States, a Report from the National Cancer Data Base

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Greer; Patel-Parekh, Lina; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Donohue, John H.

    2007-01-01

    The concept that complex surgical procedures should be performed at high-volume centers to improve surgical morbidity and mortality is becoming widely accepted. We wanted to determine if there were differences in the treatment of patients with gastric cancer between community cancer centers and teaching hospitals in the United States. Data from the 2001 Gastric Cancer Patient Care Evaluation Study of the National Cancer Data Base comprising 6,047 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma treated at 691 hospitals were assessed. The mean number of patients treated was larger at teaching hospitals (14/year) when compared to community centers (5–9/year) (p < 0.05). The utilization of laparoscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography were significantly more common at teaching centers (p < 0.01). Pathologic assessment of greater than 15 nodes was documented in 31% of specimen at community hospitals and 38% at teaching hospitals (p < 0.01). Adjusted for cancer stage, chemotherapy and radiation therapy were utilized with equal frequency at all types of treatment centers. The 30-day postoperative mortality was lowest at teaching hospitals (5.5%) and highest at community hospitals (9.9%) (p < 0.01). These data support previous publications demonstrating that patients with diseases requiring specialized treatment have lower operative mortality when treated at high-volume centers. PMID:17436123

  20. NeoFLOT: Multicenter phase II study of perioperative chemotherapy in resectable adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction or gastric adenocarcinoma-Very good response predominantly in patients with intestinal type tumors.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Christoph; Kullmann, Frank; Kunzmann, Volker; Fuchs, Martin; Geissler, Michael; Vehling-Kaiser, Ursula; Stauder, Heribert; Wein, Axel; Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Kubin, Thomas; Schäfer, Claus; Stintzing, Sebastian; Giessen, Clemens; Modest, Dominik Paul; Ridwelski, Karsten; Heinemann, Volker

    2015-08-01

    Perioperative treatment is a standard of care in locally advanced gastroesophageal cancer (GEC) (gastric adenocarcinoma and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma). While preoperative treatment can be applied to the majority of patients, postoperative chemotherapy can be given only to a fraction. The NeoFLOT-study therefore investigates the application of prolonged neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). Patients with T3, T4, and/or node-positive adenocarcinoma (GEC) were eligible for this multicenter phase II trial. NACT consisted of 6 cycles of oxaliplatin 85 mg/m(2) , leucovorin 200 mg/m(2) , 5-fluorouracil 2600 mg/m(2) and docetaxel 50 mg/m(2) (FLOT) applied q 2 wks. Application of adjuvant chemotherapy was explicitly not part of the protocol. R0-resection rate was evaluated as a primary endpoint. Of 59 enrolled patients, 50 patients underwent surgery and were assessable for the primary endpoint. R0-resection rate was 86.0% (43/50). Pathologic complete response (pCR) was 20.0% (10/50) and a further 20% (10/50) of patients achieved near complete histological remission (<10% residual tumor). Among these very good responders, 85% (17/20) had intestinal type tumors, 10% (2/20) had diffuse and 5% (1/20) had mixed type tumors. After 3 cycles of NACT, 6.9% (4/58) of patients developed progressive disease. Median disease-free survival was 32.9 months. The 1-year survival-rate was 79.3%. Grade 3-4 toxicities included neutropenia 29.3%, febrile neutropenia 1.7%, diarrhea 12.1% and mucositis 6.9%. This study indicates that intensified NACT with 6 cycles of FLOT is highly effective and tolerable in resectable GEC. Very good response (pCR and <10% residual tumor) was predominantly observed in patients with intestinal type tumors. PMID:25530271

  1. A phase II study of 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, adriamycin, and cisplatin (FLAP) for metastatic gastric and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. A Penn Cancer Clinical Trial Group and Roswell Park Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program Trial.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, D J; Meropol, N J; Holroyde, C; Mintzer, D; Nuamah, I; Armstead, B; Douglass, H O; Haller, D G

    1997-06-01

    A Phase II study was performed to evaluate the activity and toxicity of 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, Adriamycin, and cisplatin combination chemotherapy (FLAP) in patients with previously untreated advanced gastric and gastroesophageal (GE) junction adenocarcinoma. Forty-two consecutive patients were enrolled to received FLAP in this multi-institutional trial. Response, toxicity, and survival data were noted. Fifteen of 42 (36%) patients demonstrated objective responses, with two complete responses (5%) and 13 partial responses (31%). The median time to disease progression was 17 weeks, and the overall survival duration was 30 weeks. Myelosuppression was significant, requiring dose modifications, but there were no treatment-related deaths. FLAP is an active regimen in the treatment of advanced gastric and GE junction adenocarcinoma. We are presently using this regimen in the neoadjuvant setting in patients with gastric and GE junction cancers. PMID:9167745

  2. A Phase II Study of Sequential Capecitabine Plus Oxaliplatin Followed by Docetaxel Plus Capecitabine in Patients With Unresectable Gastric Adenocarcinoma: The TCOG 3211 Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Huang; Lin, Johnson; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Shan, Yan-Shen; Chen, Yeu-Chin; Chen, Li-Tzong; Liu, Tsang-Wu; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee

    2016-01-01

    Fluorouracil and platinum are considered the standard treatment options for advanced gastric cancer. Docetaxel is also an effective agent and it shows no cross-resistance with fluorouracil and platinum. The combination treatment of docetaxel with fluorouracil and platinum has been explored, but it demonstrated intolerable toxicities. An alternative approach in the first-line treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma may be to use these agents sequentially. We aimed to evaluate the activity and safety profile of sequential chemotherapy with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin, followed by docetaxel plus capecitabine in the first-line treatment of unresectable gastric cancer.We conducted a phase II study of sequential first-line chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer. Treatment consisted of 6 cycles of capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (capecitabine 1000 mg/m bid on days 1-10 and oxaliplatin 85 mg/m on day 1, every 2 weeks), followed by 4 cycles of docetaxel plus capecitabine (docetaxel 30 mg/m on days 1 and 8, capecitabine 825 mg/m bid on days 1-14, every 3 weeks). The primary end-point was the objective response rate.Fifty-one patients were enrolled: median age, 63 years; male/female: 37/14. The main grade 3 to 4 toxicities were a decreased absolute neutrophil count (25.4%), diarrhea (9.8%), and hand-foot syndrome (15.7%). The objective response rate was 61.7%. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 8.6 and 11.0 months, respectively. Six patients (11.8%) received surgery after chemotherapy and 5 are still disease-free.This sequential treatment demonstrated feasibility with a favorable safety profile and produced encouraging results in terms of activity and efficacy. PMID:26817912

  3. DAG/PKCδ and IP3/Ca2+/CaMK IIβ Operate in Parallel to Each Other in PLCγ1-Driven Cell Proliferation and Migration of Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells, through Akt/mTOR/S6 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lianzhi; Zhuang, Luhua; Zhang, Bingchang; Wang, Fen; Chen, Xiaolei; Xia, Chun; Zhang, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositide specific phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) activates diacylglycerol (DAG)/protein kinase C (PKC) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)/Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II) axes to regulate import events in some cancer cells, including gastric adenocarcinoma cells. However, whether DAG/PKCδ and IP3/Ca2+/CaMK IIβ axes are simultaneously involved in PLCγ1-driven cell proliferation and migration of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells and the underlying mechanism are not elucidated. Here, we investigated the role of DAG/PKCδ or CaMK IIβ in PLCγ1-driven cell proliferation and migration of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells, using the BGC-823 cell line. The results indicated that the inhibition of PKCδ and CaMK IIβ could block cell proliferation and migration of BGC-823 cells as well as the effect of inhibiting PLCγ1, including the decrease of cell viability, the increase of apoptotic index, the down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 expression level, and the decrease of cell migration rate. Both DAG/PKCδ and CaMK IIβ triggered protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/S6 pathway to regulate protein synthesis. The data indicate that DAG/PKCδ and IP3/Ca2+/CaMK IIβ operate in parallel to each other in PLCγ1-driven cell proliferation and migration of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells through Akt/mTOR/S6 pathway, with important implication for validating PLCγ1 as a molecular biomarker in early gastric cancer diagnosis and disease surveillance. PMID:26633375

  4. Impact of PTEN on the expression of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF-binding proteins in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Ho-Keun; Kim, Sun-Young; Hwang, Pyoung-Han; Kim, Chan-Young; Yang, Doo-Hyun; Oh, Youngman; Lee, Dae-Yeol . E-mail: leedy@chonbuk.ac.kr

    2005-05-13

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently mutated or deleted in a variety of human cancers including human gastric cancer. PTEN functions primarily as a lipid phosphatase and plays a key role in the regulation of the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway, thereby modulating cell proliferation and cell survival. On the other hand, the IGF system plays an important role in cell proliferation and cell survival via the PI3 kinase/Akt and MAP kinase pathways in many cancer cells. To characterize the impact of PTEN on the IGF-IGFR-IGFBP axis in gastric cancer, we overexpressed PTEN using an adenovirus gene transfer system in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells, SNU-484 and SNU-663, which lack PTEN. Overexpression of PTEN inhibited serum-induced as well as IGF-I-induced cell proliferation as compared to control cells. PTEN overexpression resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of IGF-I, -II, and IGF-IR. Interestingly, amongst the six IGFBPs, only IGFBP-3 was upregulated by PTEN, whereas IGFBP-4 and -6 were reduced. The IGFBP-3 promoter activity assay and Western immunoblotting demonstrate that PTEN regulates IGFBP-3 at the transcriptional level. In addition, the PI3 kinase inhibitor, LY294002, upregulates IGFBP-3 expression but downregulates IGF-I and IGF-II, indicating that PTEN controls IGFBP-3 and IGFs by an Akt-dependent pathway. These findings suggest that PTEN may inhibit antiapoptotic IGF actions not only by blocking the IGF-IGFR-induced Akt activity, but also by regulating expression of components of the IGF system, in particular, upregulation of IGFBP-3, which is known to exert antiproliferative effects through IGF-dependent and IGF-independent mechanisms in cancer cells.

  5. Gastric adenocarcinoma microRNA profiles in fixed tissue and in plasma reveal cancer-associated and Epstein-Barr virus-related expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Treece, Amanda L; Duncan, Daniel L; Tang, Weihua; Elmore, Sandra; Morgan, Douglas R; Dominguez, Ricardo L; Speck, Olga; Meyers, Michael O; Gulley, Margaret L

    2016-06-01

    MicroRNA expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPE) or plasma may add value for cancer management. The GastroGenus miR Panel was developed to measure 55 cancer-specific human microRNAs, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded microRNAs, and controls. This Q-rtPCR panel was applied to 100 FFPEs enriched for adenocarcinoma or adjacent non-malignant mucosa, and to plasma of 31 patients. In FFPE, microRNAs upregulated in malignant versus adjacent benign gastric mucosa were hsa-miR-21, -155, -196a, -196b, -185, and -let-7i. Hsa-miR-18a, 34a, 187, -200a, -423-3p, -484, and -744 were downregulated. Plasma of cancer versus non-cancer controls had upregulated hsa-miR-23a, -103, and -221 and downregulated hsa-miR-378, -346, -486-5p, -200b, -196a, -141, and -484. EBV-infected versus uninfected cancers expressed multiple EBV-encoded microRNAs, and concomitant dysregulation of four human microRNAs suggests that viral infection may alter cellular biochemical pathways. Human microRNAs were dysregulated between malignant and benign gastric mucosa and between plasma of cancer patients and non-cancer controls. Strong association of EBV microRNA expression with known EBV status underscores the ability of microRNA technology to reflect disease biology. Expression of viral microRNAs in concert with unique human microRNAs provides novel insights into viral oncogenesis and reinforces the potential for microRNA profiles to aid in classifying gastric cancer subtypes. Pilot studies of plasma suggest the potential for a noninvasive addition to cancer diagnostics. PMID:26950485

  6. Claudin-4 expression in gastric cancer cells enhances the invasion and is associated with the increased level of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 expression

    PubMed Central

    HWANG, TSANN-LONG; CHANGCHIEN, TZU-TSUNG; WANG, CHEE-CHAN; WU, CHI-MING

    2014-01-01

    Claudin-4 is a member of a large family of transmembrane proteins known as claudins, which are essential for the formation and maintenance of tight junctions. Our previous studies have revealed that claudin-4 proteins are overexpressed in metastatic gastric cancer. To clarify the roles of claudin-4 in gastric cancer metastasis, human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells constitutively expressing wild-type claudin-4 were generated. Expression of claudin-4 in AGS cells was found to increase cell invasion and migration, as measured by Boyden invasion chamber assays. Moreover, the claudin-4-expressing AGS cells were found to have increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 expression, indicating that claudin-mediated increased invasion may be mediated through the activation of the MMP protein. Overall, the results suggest that claudin-4 overexpression may promote gastric cancer metastasis through the increased invasion of gastric cancer cells. PMID:25120725

  7. Not all gastric masses are gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Del Rosario, Michael; Tsai, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer metastasising to the gastrointestinal tract normally does not occur. However, as clinicians, we must be aware that lung adenocarcinoma, as in all cancers, can and will metastasise to any part of the body. We describe a case of a patient with a presumed primary gastric adenocarcinoma who presented with shortness of breath due to pleural effusion. Pathology from the pleural effusion was positive for primary lung adenocarcinoma. Further investigation revealed that the patient's gastric mass was misdiagnosed as gastric adenocarcinoma. We correctly diagnosed the mass as metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. This was very significant because the patient was transitioning to palliative care with possible tube feeding. After the correct diagnosis, her management drastically changed and her health improved. Clinical, pathological and medical management of lung cancer metastasis to the stomach are discussed. PMID:26976833

  8. Chemotherapy vs supportive care alone for relapsed gastric, gastroesophageal junction, and oesophageal adenocarcinoma: a meta-analysis of patient-level data

    PubMed Central

    Janowitz, Tobias; Thuss-Patience, Peter; Marshall, Andrea; Kang, Jung Hun; Connell, Claire; Cook, Natalie; Dunn, Janet; Park, Se Hoon; Ford, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Second-line chemotherapy treatment of patients with relapsed gastric and oesophageal cancers in comparison with supportive care (SC) alone has been supported by recent phase 3 clinical trials, but a meta-analysis of patient-level data is lacking. Methods: We searched Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and the Web of Science for phase 3 clinical trials that compared second-line chemotherapy with SC alone for gastric and oesophageal cancers. A meta-analysis of the comprehensive patient-level data from the three identified trials was performed. Results: A total of 410 patients with gastric (n=301), gastroesophageal junction (n=76), or oesophageal (n=33) adenocarcinoma were identified. In all, 154 patients received single-agent docetaxel and 84 patients received single-agent irinotecan, each with SC. SC alone was given to 172 patients. Chemotherapy significantly reduced the risk of death (hazard ratio (HR)=0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.51–0.77, P<0.0001). This effect was observed for treatment with docetaxel (HR=0.71, 95% CI=0.56–0.89, P=0.003) and irinotecan (HR=0.49, 95% CI=0.36–0.67, P<0.001). Overall survival (OS) benefit was greatest for patients who progressed 3–6 months following first-line chemotherapy (HR=0.39, 95% CI=0.26–0.59, P<0.0001). Performance status (PS) 0–1 compared with PS 2 (HR=0.66, 95% CI=0.46–0.94, P=0.02), locally advanced disease compared with metastatic disease (HR=0.41, 95% CI=0.25–0.67, P=0.0004) and older age (HR=0.94 per 5 years, 95% CI=0.90–0.99, P=0.01) were significant predictors of improved OS. Progression of disease during first-line treatment (HR=1.24, 95% CI=0.96–1.59) or within the first 3 months of completion of first-line treatment (HR=1.42, 95% CI=1.09–1.83) were predictors of an increased risk of death compared with progression between 3 and 6 months (P=0.03). Health-related quality of life outcomes were reported in only one of the three trials

  9. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 Is Confined to Tumor-Associated Myofibroblasts and Is Increased With Progression in Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Alpízar-Alpízar, Warner; Laerum, Ole Didrik; Christensen, Ib J; Ovrebo, Kjell; Skarstein, Arne; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla; Ploug, Michael; Illemann, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) inhibits the extracellular matrix-degrading activity of several matrix metalloproteinases, thereby regulating cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Studies describing the expression pattern and cellular localization of TIMP-1 in gastric cancer are, however, highly discordant. We addressed these inconsistencies by performing immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization analyses in a set of 49 gastric cancer lesions to reexamine the TIMP-1 localization. In addition, we correlated these findings to clinicopathological parameters. We show that strong expression of TIMP-1 protein and mRNA was observed in a subpopulation of stromal fibroblast-like cells at the periphery of the cancer lesions. In a few cases, a small fraction of cancer cells showed weak expression of TIMP-1 protein and mRNA. The stromal TIMP-1-expressing cells were mainly tumor-associated myofibroblasts. In the normal-appearing mucosa, scattered TIMP-1 protein was only found in chromogranin A positive cells. TIMP-1-positive myofibroblasts at the invasive front of the tumors were more frequently seen in intestinal than in diffuse histological subtype cases (p=0.009). A significant trend to a higher number of cases showing TIMP-1 staining in myofibroblasts with increasing tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage was also revealed (p=0.041). In conclusion, tumor-associated myofibroblasts are the main source of increased TIMP-1 expression in gastric cancer. PMID:27370797

  10. Helicobacter pylori evolution during progression from chronic atrophic gastritis to gastric cancer and its impact on gastric stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Giannakis, Marios; Chen, Swaine L.; Karam, Sherif M.; Engstrand, Lars; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2008-01-01

    We have characterized the adaptations of Helicobacter pylori to a rarely captured event in the evolution of its impact on host biology—the transition from chronic atrophic gastritis (ChAG) to gastric adenocarcinoma—and defined the impact of these adaptations on an intriguing but poorly characterized interaction between this bacterium and gastric epithelial stem cells. Bacterial isolates were obtained from a single human host colonized with a single dominant strain before and after his progression from ChAG to gastric adenocarcinoma during a 4-year interval. Draft genome assemblies were generated from two isolates, one ChAG-associated, the other cancer-associated. The cancer-associated strain was less fit in a gnotobiotic transgenic mouse model of human ChAG and better able to establish itself within a mouse gastric epithelial progenitor-derived cell line (mGEP) that supports bacterial attachment. GeneChip-based comparisons of the transcriptomes of mGEPs and a control mouse gastric epithelial cell line revealed that, upon infection, the cancer-associated strain regulates expression of GEP-associated signaling and metabolic pathways, and tumor suppressor genes associated with development of gastric cancer in humans, in a manner distinct from the ChAG-associated isolate. The effects on GEP metabolic pathways, some of which were confirmed in gnotobiotic mice, together with observed changes in the bacterial transcriptome are predicted to support aspects of an endosymbiosis between this microbe and gastric stem cells. These results provide insights about how H. pylori may adapt to and influence stem cell biology and how its intracellular residency could contribute to gastric tumorigenesis. PMID:18332421

  11. GNAS mutation as an alternative mechanism of activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in gastric adenocarcinoma of the fundic gland type.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Ryosuke; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Mitomi, Hiroyuki; Hidaka, Yasuhiro; Lee, Se-yong; Watanabe, Sumio; Yao, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma of the fundic gland type (GAFG) is a rare variant of gastric tumor. We have recently reported the frequent accumulation of β-catenin in GAFGs and showed that approximately half of the cases studied harbored at least 1 mutation in CTNNB1/AXINs/APC, leading to the constitutive activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. However, the mechanisms of Wnt signaling activation in the remaining cases are unknown. Accumulating evidence showed that the activating mutation in GNAS promotes tumorigenesis via the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway or the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway. Therefore, we analyzed the mutations in GNAS (exons 8 and 9) and in KRAS (exon 2) in 26 GAFGs. Immunohistochemistry revealed nuclear β-catenin expression in 22 of 26 GAFGs, and 10 (38.5%) of 26 cases harbored at least 1 mutation in CTNNB1/AXINs/APC. Activating mutations in GNAS were found in 5 (19.2%) of 26 GAFGs, all of which harbored R201C mutations. Activating mutations in KRAS were found in 2 (7.7%) of 26 GAFGs, and both of these also contained GNAS activating mutations. Four of 5 cases with GNAS mutation showed nuclear β-catenin expression, and presence of GNAS mutation was associated with β-catenin nuclear expression (P = .01). Furthermore, 3 of these 4 cases did not harbor mutations in CTNNB1, APC, or AXINs, suggesting that mutations in the Wnt component genes and those in GNAS occur almost exclusively. These results suggest that GNAS mutation might occur in a small subset of GAFG as an alternative mechanism of activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:25288233

  12. Response of gastric epithelial progenitors to Helicobacter pylori Isolates obtained from Swedish patients with chronic atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Giannakis, Marios; Bäckhed, Helene Kling; Chen, Swaine L; Faith, Jeremiah J; Wu, Meng; Guruge, Janaki L; Engstrand, Lars; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2009-10-30

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gastric adenocarcinoma in some humans, especially those that develop an antecedent condition, chronic atrophic gastritis (ChAG). Gastric epithelial progenitors (GEPs) in transgenic gnotobiotic mice with a ChAG-like phenotype harbor intracellular collections of H. pylori. To characterize H. pylori adaptations to ChAG, we sequenced the genomes of 24 isolates obtained from 6 individuals, each sampled over a 4-year interval, as they did or did not progress from normal gastric histology to ChAG and/or adenocarcinoma. H. pylori populations within study participants were largely clonal and remarkably stable regardless of disease state. GeneChip studies of the responses of a cultured mouse gastric stem cell-like line (mGEPs) to infection with sequenced strains yielded a 695-member dataset of transcripts that are (i) differentially expressed after infection with ChAG-associated isolates, but not with a "normal" or a heat-killed ChAG isolate, and (ii) enriched in genes and gene functions associated with tumorigenesis in general and gastric carcinogenesis in specific cases. Transcriptional profiling of a ChAG strain during mGEP infection disclosed a set of responses, including up-regulation of hopZ, an adhesin belonging to a family of outer membrane proteins. Expression profiles of wild-type and DeltahopZ strains revealed a number of pH-regulated genes modulated by HopZ, including hopP, which binds sialylated glycans produced by GEPs in vivo. Genetic inactivation of hopZ produced a fitness defect in the stomachs of gnotobiotic transgenic mice but not in wild-type littermates. This study illustrates an approach for identifying GEP responses specific to ChAG-associated H. Pylori strains and bacterial genes important for survival in a model of the ChAG gastric ecosystem. PMID:19723631

  13. Jak1/Stat3 is an upstream signaling of NF-κB activation in Helicobacter pylori-induced IL-8 production in gastric epithelial AGS cells.

    PubMed

    Cha, Boram; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2015-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) induces the activation of nuclear factor-kB (NF-κB) and cytokine expression in gastric epithelial cells. The Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/Stat) cascade is the inflammatory signaling in various cells. The purpose of the present study is to determine whether H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and the expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) are mediated by the activation of Jak1/Stat3 in gastric epithelial (AGS) cells. Thus, gastric epithelial AGS cells were infected with H. pylori in Korean isolates (HP99) at bacterium/cell ratio of 300:1, and the level of IL-8 in the medium was determined by enzyme-linked immonosorbent assay. Phospho-specific and total forms of Jak1/Stat3 and IκBα were assessed by Western blot analysis, and NF-κB activation was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The results showed that H. pylori induced the activation of Jak1/Stat3 and IL-8 production, which was inhibited by a Jak/Stat3 specific inhibitor AG490 in AGS cells in a dose-dependent manner. H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB, determined by phosphorylation of IκBα and NF-κB-DNA binding activity, were inhibited by AG490. In conclusion, Jak1/Stat3 activation may mediate the activation of NF-κB and the expression of IL-8 in H. pylori-infected AGS cells. Inhibition of Jak1/Stat3 may be beneficial for the treatment of H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation, since the activation of NF-κB is inhibited and inflammatory cytokine expression is suppressed. PMID:25837197

  14. Jak1/Stat3 Is an Upstream Signaling of NF-κB Activation in Helicobacter pylori-Induced IL-8 Production in Gastric Epithelial AGS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Boram; Lim, Joo Weon

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) induces the activation of nuclear factor-kB (NF-κB) and cytokine expression in gastric epithelial cells. The Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/Stat) cascade is the inflammatory signaling in various cells. The purpose of the present study is to determine whether H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and the expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) are mediated by the activation of Jak1/Stat3 in gastric epithelial (AGS) cells. Thus, gastric epithelial AGS cells were infected with H. pylori in Korean isolates (HP99) at bacterium/cell ratio of 300:1, and the level of IL-8 in the medium was determined by enzyme-linked immonosorbent assay. Phospho-specific and total forms of Jak1/Stat3 and IκBα were assessed by Western blot analysis, and NF-κB activation was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The results showed that H. pylori induced the activation of Jak1/Stat3 and IL-8 production, which was inhibited by a Jak/Stat3 specific inhibitor AG490 in AGS cells in a dose-dependent manner. H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB, determined by phosphorylation of IκBα and NF-κB-DNA binding activity, were inhibited by AG490. In conclusion, Jak1/Stat3 activation may mediate the activation of NF-κB and the expression of IL-8 in H. pylori-infected AGS cells. Inhibition of Jak1/Stat3 may be beneficial for the treatment of H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation, since the activation of NF-κB is inhibited and inflammatory cytokine expression is suppressed. PMID:25837197

  15. β-Carotene-induced apoptosis is mediated with loss of Ku proteins in gastric cancer AGS cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoona; Choi, Jiyeon; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2015-07-01

    High dietary intakes and high blood levels of β-carotene are associated with a decreased incidence of various cancers. The anticancer effect of β-carotene is related to its pro-oxidant activity. DNA repair Ku proteins, as a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80, play a crucial role in DNA double-strand break repair. Reductions in Ku70/80 contribute to apoptosis. Previously, we showed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) activate caspase-3 which induces degradation of Ku proteins. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of β-carotene-induced apoptosis of gastric cancer AGS cells by determining cell viability, DNA fragmentation, apoptotic indices (increases in cytochrome c and Bax, decrease in Bcl-2), ROS levels, mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 activity, Ku70/80 levels, and Ku-DNA-binding activity of the cells treated with or without antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine and caspase-3 inhibitor z-DEVED-fmk. As a result, β-carotene induced apoptosis (decrease in cell viability, increases in DNA fragmentation and apoptotic indices) and caspase-3 activation, but decreased Ku70/80 levels and Ku-DNA-binding activity. β-Carotene-induced alterations (increase in caspase-3 activity, decrease in Ku proteins) and apoptosis were inhibited by N-acetyl cysteine and z-DEVED-fmk. Increment of intracellular and mitochondrial ROS levels and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were suppressed by N-acetyl cysteine, but not by z-DEVED-fmk in β-carotene-treated cells. Therefore, β-carotene-induced increases in ROS and caspase-3 activity may lead to reduction of Ku70/80 levels, which results in apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Loss of Ku proteins might be the underlying mechanism for β-carotene-induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. PMID:25981694

  16. Variant TP53BP1 rs560191 G>C is associated with risk of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma in a Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Tang, Weifeng; Ding, Guowen; Liu, Chao; Liu, Ruiping; Chen, Suocheng; Gu, Haiyong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA) and ten functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including TP53BP1 rs560191 G>C, CASP8 rs1035142 G>T, CASP7 rs3127075 G>C, CASP7 rs7907519 C>A, and six C1orf10/CRNN variants. We performed a hospital-based case-control study to evaluate the genetic effects of these SNPs. Methods Two hundred and forty-three GCA cases and 476 controls were enrolled in this study. A custom-by-design 48-Plex SNPscanTM Kit was used to determine their genotypes. Results When the TP53BP1 rs560191 GG homozygote genotype was used as the reference group, the GC genotype was associated with a significantly increased risk of GCA. The CC genotype was not associated with the risk of GCA compared with the GG genotype. None of the CASP8 rs1035142 G>T, CASP7 rs3127075 G>C, CASP7 rs7907519 C>A or the six C1orf10/CRNN polymorphisms showed a significant difference in genotype distributions between the cases and the controls. Conclusions The results demonstrated that the functional polymorphism TP53BP1 rs560191 G>C might contribute to GCA susceptibility. However, the statistical power of our study was limited. Large, well-designed studies and further functional investigations are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:25937777

  17. Neoadjuvant therapy for gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Samalin, Emmanuelle; Ychou, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas are one of the main causes of cancer-related death worldwide. While the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma is decreasing, the incidence of gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma is rising rapidly in Western countries. Considering that surgical resection is currently the major curative treatment, and that the 5-year survival rate highly depends on the pTNM stage at diagnosis, gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma management is very challenging for oncologists. Several treatment strategies are being evaluated, and among them systemic chemotherapy, to decrease recurrences and improve overall survival. The MAGIC and FNCLCC-FFCD trials showed a survival benefit of perioperative chemotherapy in patients with operable gastric and lower esophageal cancer, and these results had an impact on the European clinical practice. New strategies, including induction chemotherapy followed by preoperative chemoradiotherapy, targeted therapies in combination with perioperative chemotherapy and the new cytotoxic regimens, are currently assessed to improve current standards and help developing patient-tailored therapeutic interventions. PMID:27298768

  18. Neoadjuvant therapy for gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Samalin, Emmanuelle; Ychou, Marc

    2016-06-10

    Gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas are one of the main causes of cancer-related death worldwide. While the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma is decreasing, the incidence of gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma is rising rapidly in Western countries. Considering that surgical resection is currently the major curative treatment, and that the 5-year survival rate highly depends on the pTNM stage at diagnosis, gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma management is very challenging for oncologists. Several treatment strategies are being evaluated, and among them systemic chemotherapy, to decrease recurrences and improve overall survival. The MAGIC and FNCLCC-FFCD trials showed a survival benefit of perioperative chemotherapy in patients with operable gastric and lower esophageal cancer, and these results had an impact on the European clinical practice. New strategies, including induction chemotherapy followed by preoperative chemoradiotherapy, targeted therapies in combination with perioperative chemotherapy and the new cytotoxic regimens, are currently assessed to improve current standards and help developing patient-tailored therapeutic interventions. PMID:27298768

  19. A Prognostic Model Using Inflammation- and Nutrition-Based Scores in Patients With Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma Treated With Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Meng-Che; Wang, Shih-Hor; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Lin, Yu-Hung; Lan, Jui; Rau, Kun-Ming

    2016-04-01

    The outcomes of patients with metastatic gastric cancer (mGC) are poor. Recent studies have identified the prognostic impact of inflammatory response and nutritional status on survival for patients with gastric cancer. This study aims to create a prognostic model using inflammatory- and nutrition-based scores to predict survival in patients with mGC treated with chemotherapy.After institutional review board approval, patients who had mGC and were treated with chemotherapy from 2007 to 2012 at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Significantly predictive factors were identified by multivariate Cox regression analyses. Based on these variables, a prognostic model using inflammatory- and nutrition-based scores was constructed to predict survival. Kaplan-Meier curves were plotted to estimate overall survival. The c-statistic values with 95% confidence interval (CI) were also calculated to access their predicting performances.Our study consisted of 256 patients with a median age of 60 years and a median follow-up visit of 18.5 months. Multivariate analyses showed that neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS), and Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) were independently related to survival. After computing these scores, patients were classified into favorable-, intermediate-, and poor-risk groups. The median overall survival were 27.6 versus 13.2 versus 8.2 months in favorable, intermediate, and poor-risk groups, respectively. The 2-year survival rate was 52% versus 16% versus 3% in favorable-, intermediate-, and poor-risk groups, respectively. (P < 0.001). The c-statistic value of our model at 2 years is 0.8 (95% CI, 0.75-0.86).NLR, mGPS, and PG-SGA were independently related to survival. Our prognostic model using inflammatory- and nutrition-based scores could provide prognostic information to patients and physicians. PMID:27124056

  20. A Prognostic Model Using Inflammation- and Nutrition-Based Scores in Patients With Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma Treated With Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Meng-Che; Wang, Shih-Hor; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Lin, Yu-Hung; Lan, Jui; Rau, Kun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The outcomes of patients with metastatic gastric cancer (mGC) are poor. Recent studies have identified the prognostic impact of inflammatory response and nutritional status on survival for patients with gastric cancer. This study aims to create a prognostic model using inflammatory- and nutrition-based scores to predict survival in patients with mGC treated with chemotherapy. After institutional review board approval, patients who had mGC and were treated with chemotherapy from 2007 to 2012 at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Significantly predictive factors were identified by multivariate Cox regression analyses. Based on these variables, a prognostic model using inflammatory- and nutrition-based scores was constructed to predict survival. Kaplan-Meier curves were plotted to estimate overall survival. The c-statistic values with 95% confidence interval (CI) were also calculated to access their predicting performances. Our study consisted of 256 patients with a median age of 60 years and a median follow-up visit of 18.5 months. Multivariate analyses showed that neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS), and Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) were independently related to survival. After computing these scores, patients were classified into favorable-, intermediate-, and poor-risk groups. The median overall survival were 27.6 versus 13.2 versus 8.2 months in favorable, intermediate, and poor-risk groups, respectively. The 2-year survival rate was 52% versus 16% versus 3% in favorable-, intermediate-, and poor-risk groups, respectively. (P < 0.001). The c-statistic value of our model at 2 years is 0.8 (95% CI, 0.75–0.86). NLR, mGPS, and PG-SGA were independently related to survival. Our prognostic model using inflammatory- and nutrition-based scores could provide prognostic information to patients and physicians. PMID:27124056

  1. Negative regulation of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by naringenin in AGS gastric cancer cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ju Hyung; Park, Chi Hoon; Jung, Kyung Chae; Rhee, Ho Sung; Yang, Chul Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-09-30

    Functional activation of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling plays an important role in early events in carcinogenesis. We examined the effect of naringenin against {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that naringenin inhibited {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by naringenin in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant {beta}-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3{beta}, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to {beta}-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that the {beta}-catenin distribution and the levels of nuclear {beta}-catenin and Tcf-4 proteins were unchanged after naringenin treatment. Moreover, the binding activities of Tcf complexes to consensus DNA were not affected by naringenin. Taken together, these data suggest that naringenin inhibits {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in gastric cancer with unknown mechanisms.

  2. Phase II Trial of Preoperative Irinotecan-Cisplatin Followed by Concurrent Irinotecan-Cisplatin and Radiotherapy for Resectable Locally Advanced Gastric and Esophagogastric Junction Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Fernando; Galan, Maica; Tabernero, Josep; Cervantes, Andres; Vega-Villegas, M. Eugenia; Gallego, Javier; Laquente, Berta; Rodriguez, Edith; Carrato, Alfredo; Escudero, Pilar; Massuti, Bartomeu; Alonso-Orduna, Vicente; Cardenal, Adelaida; Saenz, Alberto; Giralt, Jordi; Yuste, Ana Lucia

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To determine in a Phase II trial whether preoperative irinotecan-cisplatin (IC) followed by concurrent IC therapy and radiotherapy (IC/RT) improved outcome in patients with resectable, locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma (GC) or esophagogastric junction cancer (EGJC). Patients and Methods: Patients with resectable Stage II-IV, M0 GC or EGJC made up the study population. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR). Two courses of IC (irinotecan, 65mg/m{sup 2}; cisplatin, 30mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 8 every 21 days) were given. Patients without progression then received IC/RT, consisting of daily radiotherapy (45Gy) with concurrent IC (irinotecan, 65mg/m{sup 2}; cisplatin, 30mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22). Surgical resection was performed, if feasible, 5-8 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. Results: Twenty-three patients were included in the study: 10 with EGJC and 13 with GC. Two patients (9%) achieved pCR. The incidences of Grade 3-4 toxicities were as follows: IC: neutropenia 35% (febrile 13%), anemia 22%, diarrhea 22%, emesis 8%; IC/RT: neutropenia 52% (febrile 5%), asthenia 19%, anemia 9%, emesis 9%, diarrhea 5%, cardiotoxicity 5%. No patients died during IC or IC/RT. R0 resection was achieved in 15 patients (65%). Median survival was 14.5 months, and the actuarial 2-year survival rate was 35%. Conclusions: Preoperative IC followed by IC/RT resulted in moderate response and resection rates with mild toxicity in patients with GC and EGJC.

  3. Elevated Preoperative Serum Alanine Aminotransferase/Aspartate Aminotransferase (ALT/AST) Ratio Is Associated with Better Prognosis in Patients Undergoing Curative Treatment for Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shu-Lin; Li, Jian-Pei; Li, Lin-Fang; Zeng, Tao; He, Xia

    2016-01-01

    The level of anine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase (ALT/AST) ratio in the serum was often used to assess liver injury. Whether the ALT/AST ratio (LSR) was associated with prognosis for gastric adenocarcinoma (GA) has not been reported in the literature. Our aim was to investigate the prognostic value of the preoperative LSR in patients with GA. A retrospective study was performed in 231 patients with GA undergoing curative resection. The medical records collected include clinical information and laboratory results. We investigated the correlations between the preoperative LSR and overall survival (OS). Survival analysis was conducted with the Kaplan–Meier method, and Cox regression analysis was used to determine significant independent prognostic factors for predicting survival. A p value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. A total of 231 patients were finally enrolled. The median overall survival was 47 months. Multivariate analysis indicated that preoperative LSR was an independent prognostic factor in GA. Patients with LSR ≤ 0.80 had a greater risk of death than those with LSR > 0.80. The LSR was independently associated with OS in patients with GA (hazard ratio: 0.610; 95% confidence interval: 0.388–0.958; p = 0.032), along with tumor stages (hazard ratio: 3.118; 95% confidence interval: 2.044–4.756; p < 0.001) and distant metastases (hazard ratio: 1.957; 95% confidence interval: 1.119–3.422; p = 0.019). Our study first established a connection between the preoperative LSR and patients undergoing curative resection for GA, suggesting that LSR was a simple, inexpensive, and easily measurable marker as a prognostic factor, and may help to identify high-risk patients for treatment decisions. PMID:27294917

  4. Catechin-based procyanidins from Peumus boldus Mol. aqueous extract inhibit Helicobacter pylori urease and adherence to adenocarcinoma gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Pastene, Edgar; Parada, Víctor; Avello, Marcia; Ruiz, Antonieta; García, Apolinaria

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the anti-Helicobacter pylori effect of an aqueous extract from dried leaves of Peumus boldus Mol. (Monimiaceae) was evaluated. This extract displayed high inhibitory activity against H. pylori urease. Therefore, in order to clarify the type of substances responsible for such effect, a bioassay-guided fractionation strategy was carried out. The active compounds in the fractions were characterized through different chromatographic methods (RP-HPLC; HILIC-HPLC). The fraction named F5 (mDP = 7.8) from aqueous extract was the most active against H. pylori urease with an IC50  = 15.9 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL. HPLC analysis evidenced that F5 was composed mainly by catechin-derived proanthocyanidins (LC-MS and phloroglucinolysis). The anti-adherent effect of boldo was assessed by co-culture of H. pylori and AGS cells. Both the aqueous extract and F5 showed an anti-adherent effect in a concentration-dependent manner. An 89.3% of inhibition was reached at 2.0 mg GAE/mL of boldo extract. In conjunction, our results suggest that boldo extract has a potent anti-urease activity and anti-adherent effect against H. pylori, properties directly linked with the presence of catechin-derived proanthocyanidins. PMID:24853276

  5. Previous Exposure to the Fish Parasite Anisakis as a Potential Risk Factor for Gastric or Colon Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Perez, Juan Carlos; Rodríguez-Perez, Rosa; Ballestero, Araceli; Zuloaga, Jaime; Fernandez-Puntero, Belen; Arias-Díaz, Javier; Caballero, María Luisa

    2015-10-01

    Anisakiasis is a global disease caused by consumption of raw or lightly cooked fish contaminated with L3 Anisakis spp. larvae. High rates of parasitization of fish worldwide make Anisakis a serious health hazard. In fact, anisakiasis is a growing disease in countries such as Spain, Italy, and Japan, where consumption of raw/marinated fish is high. Some parasitic infections have been recognized as a causative factor for human cancer. Suggested mechanisms include chronic inflammation elicited by the parasite, and a possible tumorigenic effect from certain parasitic secretions. Anisakis can produce persistent local inflammation and granuloma, and larvae have been incidentally found in gastrointestinal (GI) tumors. Our aim was to discover possible differences in the prevalence of unnoticed or asymptomatic previous Anisakis infection in GI cancer patients compared with healthy individuals. Serum levels of specific antibodies against Anisakis antigens were used as a reliable marker of previous contact with their larvae. Ninety-four participants without a previous history of Anisakis infection were prospectively allocated into 1 of 2 groups: 47 patients with GI cancer and 47 controls. Specific IgE, IgA1, and IgG1 against the Anisakis recombinant antigens Ani s 1, Ani s 5, Ani s 9, and Ani s 10 were determined by an ELISA assay. The ratio of positivity to sIgA1, rAni s 1, or rAni s 5 was significantly higher in the cancer patients than in the controls (38.30% vs 6.38%, P < 0.001) and (42.55% vs 10.64%, P < 0.001, respectively). When disaggregated by type of tumor, the patients with gastric cancer showed a higher proportion of positive results for sIgA1 to rAni s 1 (P < 0.001), whereas a higher proportion of colon cancer patients were shown to be positive for sIgA1 to both rAni s 1 (P < 0.05) and rAni s 5 (P < 0.01). Earlier Anisakis infection might be a risk factor for the development of stomach or colon cancer. PMID:26448021

  6. Effect of hyperthermic CO2-treated dendritic cell-derived exosomes on the human gastric cancer AGS cell line

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JINLIN; WANG, ZHIYONG; MO, YANXIA; ZENG, ZHAOHUI; WEI, PEI; LI, TAO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the antitumor effects of hyperthermic CO2 (HT-CO2)-treated dendritic cell (DC)-derived exosomes (Dex) on human gastric cancer AGS cells. Mouse-derived DCs were incubated in HT-CO2 at 43°C for 4 h. The exosomes in the cell culture supernatant were then isolated. Cell proliferation was analyzed using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. Cell apoptosis was observed using flow cytometry, Hoechst 33258 staining and the analysis of caspase-3 activity. In addition, the proliferation of tumor cells was evaluated in xenotransplant nude mice. HT-CO2 markedly inhibited cell proliferation, as assessed by the CCK-8 assay, and also induced apoptosis in a time-dependent manner, as demonstrated by Annexin V/propidium iodide flow cytometry, caspase-3 activity and morphological analysis using Hoechst fluorescent dye. It was also revealed that HT-CO2-treated Dex decreased the expression of heat shock protein 70 and inhibited tumor growth in nude mice. In conclusion, HT-CO2 exerted an efficacious immune-enhancing effect on DCs. These findings may provide a novel strategy for the elimination of free cancer cells during laparoscopic resection. However, the potential cellular mechanisms underlying this process require further investigation. PMID:26170979

  7. Enhanced immunogenicity and antitumour effects with heterologous prime-boost regime using vaccines based on MG7-Ag mimotope of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, T; Liang, S; Meng, F; Han, Q; Guo, C; Sun, L; Chen, Y; Liu, Z; Yu, Z; Xie, H; Ding, J; Fan, D

    2006-01-01

    MG7-Ag, gastric cancer-associated antigen, has been shown to be immunogenic and has been used as marker molecule for prognosis. In a previous study, we developed an oral DNA vaccine based on MG7-Ag mimotope. However, we failed to detect cellular immune response using the oral MG7-Ag mimotope DNA vaccine. To induce significant T cell response, we developed a recombinant adenovirus vaccine based on MG7-Ag mimotope and evaluated the efficacy and protective effects of heterologous prime-boost immunization protocol with an oral DNA vaccine previously developed. We found that both vaccines were able to elicit a significant humoral response against MG7-Ag, while the highest serum titre MG7 antibody was detected in mice immunized with the heterologous prime-boost immunization protocol. Enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay demonstrated that the heterologous prime-boost immunization strategy was more efficient in inducing T cell response than the homologous prime-boost strategy. In the tumour challenge assay, 2 of 5 mice immunized with the heterologous prime-boost protocol were tumour free, while none of the mice in homologous prime-boost groups or control groups was tumour free. Those tumour-bearing mice in the heterologous prime-boost regime had smaller tumour masses than their counterparts in the homologous prime-boost groups or control groups. Therefore, our study suggests that vaccines against MG7-Ag induce significant immune response against gastric cancer, and that the heterologous prime-boost protocol using different types of vaccines could achieve better protective effect than the homologous prime-boost protocol. PMID:16634806

  8. Identification of Volatile Biomarkers of Gastric Cancer Cells and Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection based on Sensing Interface of Au-Ag Alloy coated MWCNTs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yixia; Gao, Guo; Liu, Huijuan; Fu, Hualin; Fan, Jun; Wang, Kan; Chen, Yunsheng; Li, Baojie; Zhang, Chunlei; Zhi, Xiao; He, Lin; Cui, Daxiang

    2014-01-01

    Successful development of novel electrochemical biosensing interface for ultrasensitive detection of volatile biomarkers of gastric cancer cells is a challenging task. Herein we reported to screen out novel volatile biomarkers associated with gastric cancer cells and develop a novel Au-Ag alloy composites-coated MWCNTs as sensing interface for ultrasensitive detection of volatile biomarkers. MGC-803 gastric cancer cells and GES-1 gastric mucous cells were cultured in serum-free media. The sample preparation approaches and HS-SPME conditions were optimized for screening volatile biomarkers. Volatiles emitted from the headspace of the cells/medium culture were identified using GC-MS. The Au-Ag nanoparticles-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes were prepared as a sensing interface for detection of volatile biomarkers. Results showed that eight different volatile metabolites were screened out between MGC-803 cells and GES-1 cells. Two compounds such as 3-octanone and butanone were specifically present in the headspace of the MGC-803 cells. Three volatiles such as 4-isopropoxybutanol, nonanol and 4-butoxy 1-butanol coexisted in the headspace of both the MGC-803 cells and the GES-1 cells, their concentrations in the headspace of the GES-1cells were markedly higher than those in the MGC-803 cells, three volatiles such as formic acid propyl ester, 1.4-butanediol and 2, 6, 11-trimethyl dodecane solely existed in the headspace of the GES-1 cells. The nanocomposites of MWNTs loaded with Au-Ag nanoparticles were prepared as a electrochemical sensing interface for detection of two volatile biomarkers, cyclic voltammetry studies showed that the fabricated sensor could detect 3-octanone in the range of 0~0.0025% (v/v) and with a detection limitation of 0.3 ppb, could detect butanone in the range of 0 ~ 0.055% (v/v), and with a detection limitation of 0.5 ppb, and exhibited good selectivity. The novel electrochemical biosensor combined with volatile biomarkers of gastric cancer

  9. Ethanol extract of paeonia suffruticosa Andrews (PSE) induced AGS human gastric cancer cell apoptosis via fas-dependent apoptosis and MDM2-p53 pathways

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The root bark of Paeonia suffruticosa Andrews (PSE), also known as Moutan Cortex, has been widely used in Asia to treat various diseases. The molecular mechanisms by which PSE exerts its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities are well known, but its anti-cancer activity is not yet well understood. Here, we present evidence demonstrating that PSE can be used as a potent anti-cancer agent to treat gastric cancer. Methods The effects of the ethanol extract of PSE on cell proliferation were determined using an MTT (1-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan) assay. Cell cytotoxicity induced by the PSE extact is measured using an LDH leakage assay. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell cycle and to measure the subG0/G1 apoptotic cell fraction. Apoptosis induced by the PSE extact is also examined using a DNA fragmentation assay. Western blot analysis is used to measure the levels of apoptotic proteins such as Fas receptor, caspase-8, caspase-3, PARP, Bax, Bcl-2, MDM2, and p53. Results This study demonstrated that treating AGS cells with the PSE extact significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cytotoxicity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The PSE extract also induced apoptosis in AGS cells, as measured by flow cytometry and a DNA fragmentation assay. We found that the PSE extract induced apoptosis via the extrinsic Fas-mediated apoptosis pathway, which was concurrent with the activation of caspases, including caspase-8 and caspase-3, and cleavage of PARP. The MDM2-p53 pathway also played a role in the apoptosis of AGS cells that was induced by the PSE extract. Conclusions These results clearly demonstrate that the PSE extact displays growth-suppressive activity and induces apoptosis in AGS cells. Our data suggest that the PSE extact might be a potential anti-cancer agent for gastric cancer. PMID:22963678

  10. Effect of Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate on Helicobacter pylori-Induced Apoptosis in AGS Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chuang-Hao; Wu, Chien-Yi; Kou, Hwang-Shang; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Huang, Meng-Chuan; Hu, Huang-Ming; Wu, Meng-Chieh; Lu, Chien-Yu; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Kuo, Fu-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products are wildly used in human life. Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is an essential additive in plastic manufacturing and is used as plasticizer for many products including plastic food packaging. DEHP is a teratogenic compound and can cause potent reproductive toxicity. DEHP can also cause liver damage, peroxisome proliferation, and carcinogenesis. DEHP is also strongly associated with peptic ulcers and gastric cancer; however, the underlying effect and mechanism of DEHP on the gastrointestinal tract are not entirely clear. The oral infection route of H. pylori parallels the major ingestion route of DEHP into the human body. Therefore, we wanted to study the effect of DEHP and H. pylori exposure on the human gastric epithelial cell line, AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma). The viability of the AGS cell line was significantly lower in 80  μ M-DEHP and H. pylori (MOI = 100 : 1) coexposure than DEHP or H. pylori alone. DEHP and H. pylori coexposure also induced caspase-3 activation, and increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and DNA fragmentation in AGS cells. These results indicate that DEHP can enhance H. pylori cytotoxicity and induce gastric epithelial cell apoptosis. Therefore, it is possible that DEHP and H. pylori coexposure might enhance the disruption of the gastric mucosa integrity and potentially promote the pathogenesis of gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:24454344

  11. Effect of Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate on Helicobacter pylori-Induced Apoptosis in AGS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chien-Yi; Kou, Hwang-Shang; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Huang, Meng-Chuan; Hu, Huang-Ming; Wu, Meng-Chieh; Lu, Chien-Yu; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Kuo, Fu-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products are wildly used in human life. Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is an essential additive in plastic manufacturing and is used as plasticizer for many products including plastic food packaging. DEHP is a teratogenic compound and can cause potent reproductive toxicity. DEHP can also cause liver damage, peroxisome proliferation, and carcinogenesis. DEHP is also strongly associated with peptic ulcers and gastric cancer; however, the underlying effect and mechanism of DEHP on the gastrointestinal tract are not entirely clear. The oral infection route of H. pylori parallels the major ingestion route of DEHP into the human body. Therefore, we wanted to study the effect of DEHP and H. pylori exposure on the human gastric epithelial cell line, AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma). The viability of the AGS cell line was significantly lower in 80 μM-DEHP and H. pylori (MOI = 100 : 1) coexposure than DEHP or H. pylori alone. DEHP and H. pylori coexposure also induced caspase-3 activation, and increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and DNA fragmentation in AGS cells. These results indicate that DEHP can enhance H. pylori cytotoxicity and induce gastric epithelial cell apoptosis. Therefore, it is possible that DEHP and H. pylori coexposure might enhance the disruption of the gastric mucosa integrity and potentially promote the pathogenesis of gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:24454344

  12. Nuclear Pattern of CXCR4 Expression Is Associated with a Better Overall Survival in Patients with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nikkhoo, Bahram; Fakhari, Shohreh; Sheikhesmaili, Farshad; Fathi, Fardin; Rooshani, Daem; Hoseinpour Feizi, Mohammad Ali; Nikzaban, Mehrnoush

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Previous studies have shown that stromal-derived factor-1 (CXCL12) and its receptor, CXCR4, play a crucial role in metastasis of various tumors. Similarly, it has been cleared that CXCR4 is expressed on the cell surface of gastric cancers. However, nuclear expression of CXCR4 and its clinical importance have not been yet studied. Materials and Methods. Herein, we studied the expression of CXCR4 in gastric samples from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma as well as human gastric carcinoma cell line, AGS, by employing RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry techniques. Results. RT-PCR data showed that CXCR4 is highly expressed on AGS cells. This was confirmed by IHC and FACS as CXCR4 was detected on cell membrane, in cytoplasm, and in nucleus of AGS cells. Moreover, we found that both cytoplasmic and nuclear CXCR4 are strongly expressed in primary gastric cancer and the cytoplasmic pattern of CXCR4 tends to be associated with a shorter overall survival than nuclear staining. In conclusion, we present evidence for the first time that both cytoplasmic and nuclear expression of CXCR4 are detectable in gastric cancer tissues. However, the role of both cytoplasmic and nuclear CXCR4 needs to be further elucidated. PMID:24659999

  13. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Inhibits Fas Antigen-Mediated Gastric Mucosal Cell Apoptosis through Actin-Dependent Inhibition of Receptor Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Stoicov, Calin; Cai, Xun; Li, Hanchen; Klucevsek, Kristine; Carlson, Jane; Saffari, Reza; Houghton, JeanMarie

    2005-01-01

    Escape from normal apoptotic controls is thought to be essential for the development of cancer. During Helicobacter pylori infection, the leading cause of gastric cancer, activation of the Fas antigen (Fas Ag) apoptotic pathway is responsible for early atrophy and tissue loss. As disease progresses, metaplastic and dysplastic glands arise which express Fas Ag but are resistant to apoptosis and are believed to be the precursor cells for adenocarcinoma. In this report, we show that one mechanism of acquired Fas resistance is inhibition of receptor aggregation via a major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII)-mediated, actin-dependent mechanism. For these studies we used the well-described C57BL/6 mouse model of Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter felis infection. Under normal conditions, Fas Ag is expressed at low levels, and MHCII expression on gastric mucosal cells is negligible. With infection and inflammation, both receptors are upregulated, and 6.1% of gastric mucosal cells express MHCII in combination with Fas Ag. Using the rat gastric mucosal cell line RGM-1 transfected with murine Fas Ag and MHCIIαβ chains, we demonstrate that MHCII prevents Fas receptor aggregation and inhibits Fas-mediated signaling through its effects on the actin cytoskeleton. Depolymerization of actin with cytochalasin D allows receptors to aggregate and restores Fas sensitivity. These findings offer one mechanism by which gastric mucosal cells acquire Fas resistance. PMID:16177302

  14. Helicobacter pylori associated gastric intestinal metaplasia: Treatment and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kevin Sze-Hang; Wong, Irene Oi-Ling; Leung, Wai K

    2016-01-21

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the leading causes of cancer related death in the world, particularly in East Asia. According to the Correa's cancer cascade, non-cardia GC is usually developed through a series of mucosal changes from non-atrophic gastritis to atrophic gastritis (AG), intestinal metaplasia (IM), dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. Atrophic gastritis and IM are therefore generally considered to be pre-neoplastic gastric lesions. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is an important initiating and promoting step of this gastric carcinogenesis cascade. Emerging long-term data showed that eradication of H. pylori reduced the risk of subsequent cancer development. It however remains confusing whether eradication of the bacterium in individuals with pre-neoplastic gastric lesions could regress these changes as well as in preventing cancer. Whilst H. pylori eradication could likely regress AG, the presence of IM may be a point of no return in this cascade. Hence, surveillance by endoscopy may be indicated in those with extensive IM or those with incomplete IM, particularly in populations with high GC risk. The optimal interval and the best tool of surveillance endoscopy remains to be determined in future studies. PMID:26811668

  15. Helicobacter pylori associated gastric intestinal metaplasia: Treatment and surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kevin Sze-Hang; Wong, Irene Oi-Ling; Leung, Wai K

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the leading causes of cancer related death in the world, particularly in East Asia. According to the Correa’s cancer cascade, non-cardia GC is usually developed through a series of mucosal changes from non-atrophic gastritis to atrophic gastritis (AG), intestinal metaplasia (IM), dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. Atrophic gastritis and IM are therefore generally considered to be pre-neoplastic gastric lesions. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is an important initiating and promoting step of this gastric carcinogenesis cascade. Emerging long-term data showed that eradication of H. pylori reduced the risk of subsequent cancer development. It however remains confusing whether eradication of the bacterium in individuals with pre-neoplastic gastric lesions could regress these changes as well as in preventing cancer. Whilst H. pylori eradication could likely regress AG, the presence of IM may be a point of no return in this cascade. Hence, surveillance by endoscopy may be indicated in those with extensive IM or those with incomplete IM, particularly in populations with high GC risk. The optimal interval and the best tool of surveillance endoscopy remains to be determined in future studies. PMID:26811668

  16. Constitutive hypophosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 and down-regulation of c-Jun in human gastric adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Sung, Joseph Joe Yiu; Yu Le; Li Zhijie; Chu, Kent Man; Cho, C.H.

    2008-08-22

    Hyperphosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases-1/2 (ERK1/2) is known to promote cancer cell proliferation. We therefore investigated the constitutive phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and the expression of its downstream targets c-Fos, c-Jun, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in biopsied human gastric cancer tissues. Results showed that ERK1/2 phosphorylation and c-Jun expression were significantly lowered in gastric cancer compared with the non-cancer adjacent tissues. The expression of c-Fos, however, was not altered while COX-2 was significantly up-regulated. To conclude, we demonstrate that hypophosphorylation of ERK1/2 may occur in gastric cancer. Such discovery may have implication in the application of pathway-directed therapy for this malignant disease.

  17. Synergistic anticancer properties of docosahexaenoic acid and 5-fluorouracil through interference with energy metabolism and cell cycle arrest in human gastric cancer cell line AGS cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kun; Liang, Qi; Zhao, Zhi-Hao; Li, You-Fen; Wang, Shu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the synergistic effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)/5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on the human gastric cancer cell line AGS and examine the underlying mechanism. METHODS: AGS cells were cultured and treated with a series of concentrations of DHA and 5-FU alone or in combination for 24 and 48 h. To investigate the synergistic effect of DHA and 5-FU on AGS cells, the inhibition of cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay and cell morphology. Flow cytometric analysis was also used to assess cell cycle distribution, and the expression of mitochondrial electron transfer chain complexes (METCs) I, II and V in AGS cells was further determined by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: DHA and 5-FU alone or in combination could markedly suppress the proliferation of AGS cells in a significant time and dose-dependent manner. DHA markedly strengthened the antiproliferative effect of 5-FU, decreasing the IC50 by 3.56-2.15-fold in an apparent synergy. The morphological changes of the cells were characterized by shrinkage, cell membrane blebbing and decreased adherence. Cell cycle analysis showed a shift of cells into the G0/G1 phase from the S phase following treatment with DHA or 5-FU (G0/G1 phase: 30.04% ± 1.54% vs 49.05% ± 6.41% and 63.39% ± 6.83%, respectively, P < 0.05; S phase: 56.76% ± 3.14% vs 34.75% ± 2.35% and 25.63% ± 2.21%, respectively, P < 0.05). Combination treatment of DHA and 5-FU resulted in a significantly larger shift toward the G0/G1 phase and subsequent reduction in S phase (G0/G1 phase: 69.06% ± 2.63% vs 49.05% ± 6.41% and 63.39% ± 6.83%, respectively, P < 0.05; S phase: 19.80% ± 4.30% vs 34.75% ± 2.35% and 25.63% ± 2.21%, respectively, P < 0.05). This synergy was also reflected in the significant downregulation of the expression of METCs in AGS cells. CONCLUSION: Synergistic anticancer properties of DHA and 5-FU may involve interference with energy production of AGS cells via downregulation of METCs and cell cycle arrest. PMID

  18. Primary adenocarcinoma of cervical esophagus.

    PubMed

    Alrawi, S J; Winston, J; Tan, D; Gibbs, J; Loree, T R; Hicks, W; Rigual, N; Lorè, J M

    2005-06-01

    Most upper esophageal malignancies are squamous cell carcinomas, rarely adenocarcinomas arising from Barrett's esophagus and very rarely adenocarcinomas from heterotopic gastric mucosa without evidence of Barrett's especially in the cervical part of the esophagus. We report a case of adenocarcinoma of the polypoid type in the upper esophagus (cervical esophagus) arising from ectopic gastric mucosa, in a 60 year-old man who presented with progressive dysphagia. Accurate diagnosis by esophagogram revealed a large mass in the cervical esophagus; CAT scan showed intraluminal mass at the level of thoracic inlet, esophagogastroscopy showed a fleshy polyp (3.2cm x 3.0cm) at 20 cm from the incisors with a biopsy confirming moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma with no evidence of Barrett's esophagus. Through a left cervical approach and resection of medial third of clavicle, the tumor was removed by partial esophagectomy followed by lymph node dissection, and proved to be T1NOMO, stage I (AJCC staging 6th ed.). Post operatively, the patient received chemoradiation with no evidence of recurrence or metastasis in six years of follow up. It seems this tumor has a much better prognosis than adenocarcinomas arising from Barrett's. To our knowledge only 19 cases have been reported in literature so far. PMID:16110768

  19. Pathology and Genetics of Syndromic Gastric Polyps.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Wood, Laura D; Offerhaus, G Johan; Arnold, Christina A; Lam-Himlin, Dora; Giardiello, Francis M; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Gastric polyps are found in 1% to 4% of patients undergoing gastroscopy. The vast majority are sporadic, but some gastric polyps indicate an underlying syndrome. Gastric polyps can manifest in each of the gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes, including the recently described gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach syndrome. In addition, gastric polyps occur in Lynch syndrome and in a few rare conditions that are not primarily gastrointestinal. While some of these syndromes are clearly associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer, others are not. Interestingly, even in disorders with a well-established risk of gastric cancer, the neoplastic potential and the precursor status of these gastric polyps are not always clear. Although rare, recognition of syndromic gastric polyps is important for individual patient management. These conditions also serve as important models to study gastric homeostasis and gastric tumorigenesis. PMID:26721304

  20. Sulforaphene promotes Bax/Bcl2, MAPK-dependent human gastric cancer AGS cells apoptosis and inhibits migration via EGFR, p-ERK1/2 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Arindam; Biswas, Raktim; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Jongkee; Ahn, Jin-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer migration and invasion considered as main causes of this cancer-related death around the world. Sulforaphene (4-isothiocyanato-4R-(methylsulfinyl)-1-butene), a structural analog of sulforaphane, has been found to exhibit anticancer potential against different cancers. Our aim was to investigate whether dietary isothiocyanate sulforaphene (SFE) can promote human gastric cancer (AGS) cells apoptosis and inhibit migration. Cells were treated with various concentrations of SFE and cell viability, morphology, intracellular ROS, migration and different signaling protein expressions were investigated. The results indicate that SFE decreases AGS cell viability and induces apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Intracellular ROS generation, dose- and time-dependent Bax/Bcl2 alteration and signaling proteins like cytochrome c, Casp-3, Casp-8 and PARP-1 higher expression demonstrated the SFE-induced apoptotic pathway in AGS cells. Again, SFE induced apoptosis also accompanied by the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) like JNK and P-38. Moreover, dose-dependent EGFR, p-ERK1/2 down-regulation and cell migration inhibition at non-toxic concentration confirms SFE activity in AGS cell migration inhibition. Thus, this study demonstrated effective chemotherapeutic potential of SFE by inducing apoptisis as well as inhibiting migration and their preliminary mechanism for human gastric cancer management. PMID:26612919

  1. Apoptosis induction by glycoprotein isolated from Laminaria japonica is associated with down-regulation of telomerase activity and prostaglandin E2 synthesis in AGS human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Min Ho; Kim, Gi Young; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Wun-Jae; Nam, Taek-Jeong; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2011-02-01

    Glycoprotein isolated from Laminaria japonica (LJGP) is known to exhibit significant cytotoxic activity against human cancer cells; however, the mechanisms of its cytoxicity are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated further possible mechanisms by which LJGP exerts its anti-cancer action in cultured human gastric carcinoma AGS cells. LJGP treatment of AGS cells resulted in inhibition of growth and induction of apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, as determined by MTT assay, fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry analysis. The increase in apoptosis was associated with up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax expression, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and IAP family members, and activation of caspase-3 and -9. LJGP treatment markedly down-regulated the activity of telomerase and expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase, a main determinant of telomerase enzymatic activity, with inhibition of Sp1 and c-Myc expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, LJGP treatment also caused a progressive decrease in the expression levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 without significant changes in the levels of COX-1, which was correlated with a decrease in prostaglandin E2 synthesis. These results provide important new insights into the possible molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of LJGP. PMID:21132266

  2. High expression of RNA-binding motif protein 3 in esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma correlates with intestinal metaplasia-associated tumours and independently predicts a reduced risk of recurrence and death

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High nuclear expression of the RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) has previously been found to correlate with favourable clinicopathological characteristics and a prolonged survival in several cancer forms. Here, we examined the clinicopathological correlates and prognostic significance of RBM3 expression in tumours from a consecutive cohort of upper gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma. Material and methods Immunohistochemical RBM3 expression was analysed in tissue microarrays with primary radiotherapy- and chemotherapy-naive adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction and stomach (n = 173). In addition paired samples of normal squamous epithelium (n = 53), gastric mucosa (n = 117), Barrett’s esophagus/gastric intestinal metaplasia (n = 61) and lymph node metastases (n = 71) were analysed. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling was applied to assess the impact of RBM3 expression on overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results RBM3 expression was similar in primary tumours and lymph node metastases, but significantly higher in primary tumours and metastases arising in a background of intestinal metaplasia compared with cases without intestinal metaplasia (p < 0.001). RBM3 expression was significantly reduced in more advanced tumour stages (p = 0.006). Low RBM3 expression was significantly associated with a shorter OS in cases with radically resected (R0) tumours (HR 2.19, 95% CI 1.33-3.61, p = 0.002) and RFS in curatively treated patients with R0 resection/distant metastasis-free disease (HR = 3.21, 95% CI 1.64-6.30, p = 0.001). These associations remained significant in adjusted analysis (HR = 1.95, 95% CI 1.17-3.25, p = 0.010 for OS and HR = 3.02, 95% CI 1.45-6.29, p = 0.003 for RFS). Conclusion High expression of RBM3 may signify a subset of upper gastrointestinal cancers arising in a background of intestinal metaplasia and independently predicts a reduced risk of recurrence

  3. Hypermethylation of XIAP-associated factor 1, a putative tumor suppressor gene from the 17p13.2 locus, in human gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Byun, Do-Sun; Cho, Kyucheol; Ryu, Byung-Kyu; Lee, Min-Goo; Kang, Min-Ju; Kim, Hak-Ryul; Chi, Sung-Gil

    2003-11-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) is the most potent member of the IAP family that exerts antiapoptotic effects by interfering with the activities of caspases. Recently, XIAP-associated factor 1 (XAF1) and two mitochondrial proteins, Smac/DIABLO and HtrA2, have been identified to negatively regulate the caspase-inhibiting activity of XIAP. To explore the candidacy of XAF1, Smac/DIABLO, and HtrA2 as a tumor suppressor in gastric tumorigenesis, we investigated the expression and mutation status of the genes in 123 gastric tissues and 15 cancer cell lines. Whereas Smac/DIABLO and HtrA2 transcripts were normally expressed in all cancer specimens we examined, XAF1 transcript was not expressed or present at extremely low levels in 40% (6 of 15) of cancer cell lines and in 23% (20 of 87) of primary carcinomas. Abnormal reduction of XAF1 expression showed a strong correlation with stage and grade of tumors, and a tumor-specific down-regulation of XAF1 was observed in 45% (9 of 20) of matched sets. Unlike XAF1, XIAP expression exhibited no detectable alteration in cancers. Whereas loss of heterozygosity within the XAF1 region or somatic mutations of the gene was not detected, expression of XAF1 transcript was reactivated in all nonexpressor cell lines after 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment. The 5' upstream region of the XAF1 gene encompasses no gastric cell-rich region that rigorously satisfies the formal criteria for CpG islands. However, bisulfite DNA sequencing analysis for 34 CpG sites in the promoter region revealed a strong association between hypermethylation and gene silencing. Moreover, transcriptional silencing of XAF1 was tightly associated with hypermethylation of seven CpGs located in the 5' proximal region (nucleotides -23 to -234). Additionally, loss or abnormal reduction of XAF1 expression was found to inversely correlate with p53 mutations, suggesting that epigenetic inactivation of XAF1 and mutational alteration of p53 might be mutually exclusive

  4. [Urachal adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Dakir, M; Dahami, Z; Sarf, I; Tahri, A; Elmrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2001-09-01

    Cancer of the urachus is very unusual. The lesion is a mucosecretory adenocarcinoma. The diagnosis is usually established late, and has a serious prognosis because of a long clinical latency. We report a case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the urachus revealed by hematuria. A review of the literature allows us to demonstrate the rarity of this tumour and to demonstrate its various clinical, histological, radiological and therapeutical aspects. PMID:11761694

  5. Gastric metastasis from salivary duct carcinoma mimicking primary gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Kanefumi; Takeno, Shinsuke; Nimura, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Yoshikazu; Sueta, Takayuki; Maki, Kenji; Kayashima, Yoshiyuki; Shiwaku, Hironari; Kato, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We present a very rare case of gastric metastasis mimicking primary gastric cancer in a patient who had undergone surgery for salivary duct carcinoma. Presentation of case A 67-year-old man had been diagnosed as having right parotid cancer and had undergone a right parotidectomy and lymph node dissection. The histological diagnosis was salivary duct carcinoma. One year after the surgery, a positron emission tomography–computed tomography scan using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) revealed an abnormal uptake of FDG in the left cervical, mediastinal, paraaortic, and cardiac lymph nodes; stomach; and pancreas. On gastroduodenoscopy, there was a huge, easily bleeding ulcer mimicking primary gastric cancer at the upper body of the stomach. Biopsy revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Therefore, we were unable to differentiate between the primary gastric cancer and the metastatic tumor using gastroduodenoscopy and biopsy. Because of the uncontrollable bleeding from the gastric cancer, we performed an emergency palliative total gastrectomy. On histological examination, the gastric lesion was found to be metastatic carcinoma originating from the salivary duct carcinoma. Discussion In the presented case, we could not diagnose the gastric metastasis originating from the salivary duct carcinoma even by endoscopic biopsy. This is because the histological appearance of salivary duct carcinoma is similar to that of high-grade adenocarcinoma, thus, resembling primary gastric cancer. Conclusion When we perform endoscopic examination of patients with malignant neoplasias, a possibility of metastatic gastric cancer should be taken into consideration. PMID:27085106

  6. The Role of E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Cbl Proteins in β-Elemene Reversing Multi-Drug Resistance of Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Mu, Xiao-Dong; Li, En-Zhe; Luo, Ying; Song, Na; Qu, Xiu-Juan; Hu, Xue-Jun; Liu, Yun-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that β-elemene, a compound isolated from the Chinese herbal medicine Curcuma wenyujin, is capable of reversing tumor MDR, although the mechanism remains elusive. In this study, β-Elemene treatment markedly increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin (DOX) and rhodamine 123 in both K562/DNR and SGC7901/ADR cells and significantly inhibited the expression of P-gp. Treatment of SGC7901/ADR cells with β-elemene led to downregulation of Akt phosphorylation and significant upregulation of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, c-Cbl and Cbl-b. Importantly, β-elemene significantly enhanced the anti-tumor activity of DOX in nude mice bearing SGC7901/ADR xenografts. Taken together, our results suggest that β-elemene may target P-gp-overexpressing leukemia and gastric cancer cells to enhance the efficacy of DOX treatment. PMID:23665906

  7. The A/G Allele of Rs16906252 Predicts for MGMT Methylation and Is Selectively Silenced in Premalignant Lesions from Smokers and in Lung Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuguang; Bernauer, Amanda M.; Hong, Chibo; Do, Kieu C.; Yingling, Christin M.; Flores, Kristina G.; Tessema, Mathewos; Tellez, Carmen S.; Willink, Randall P.; Burki, Elizabeth A.; Picchi, Maria A.; Stidley, Christine A.; Prados, Michael D.; Costello, Joseph F.; Gilliland, Frank D.; Crowell, Richard E.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To address the association between sequence variants within the MGMT promoter-enhancer region and methylation of MGMT in premalignant lesions from smokers and lung adenocarcinomas, their biological effects on gene regulation, and targeting MGMT for therapy. Experimental Design SNPs identified through sequencing a 1.9kb fragment 5' of MGMT were examined in relation to MGMT methylation in 169 lung adenocarcinomas and 1731 sputum samples from smokers. The effect of promoter haplotypes on MGMT expression was tested using a luciferase reporter assay and cDNA expression analysis along with allele-specific sequencing for methylation. The response of MGMT methylated lung cancer cell lines to the alkylating agent temozolomide was assessed. Results The A allele of rs16906252 and the haplotype containing this SNP were strongly associated with increased risk for MGMT methylation in adenocarcinomas (ORs ≥ 94). This association was observed to a lesser extent in sputum samples in both smoker cohorts. The A allele was selectively methylated in primary lung tumors and cell lines heterozygous for rs16906252. With the most common haplotype as the reference, a 20–41% reduction in promoter activity was seen for the haplotype carrying the A allele that correlated with lower MGMT expression. The sensitivity of lung cancer cell lines to temozolamide was strongly correlated with levels of MGMT methylation and expression. Conclusions These studies provide strong evidence that the A allele of a MGMT promoter-enhancer SNP is a key determinant for MGMT methylation in lung carcinogenesis. Moreover, temozolamide treatment may benefit a subset of lung cancer patients methylated for MGMT. PMID:21355081

  8. Effectiveness of Magnifying Narrow-Band Imaging Endoscopy for Differential Diagnosis between the High-Risk Mixed-Type and Low-Risk Simple-Type of Low-Grade, Well-Differentiated Gastric Tubular Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Takamura, Asako; Watanabe, Gen; Sugitani, Suzuko; Ajioka, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds. Magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging (NBI-ME) is useful for diagnosing differentiated early gastric cancer (D-EGC). D-EGC is classified as high- or low-grade based on its glandular architectural and cytological atypia. Low-grade, well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma (LG-tub1) mixed with high-grade tub1 (HG-tub1) and/or other histological types (M-LG-tub1) may indicate a primitive high-risk malignant lesion compared to histologically simple-type LG-tub1 (S-LG-tub1). Because LG-tub1 is occasionally difficult to diagnose due to its unclear demarcation under conventional white light endoscopy, early precise diagnoses are important. Methods. We compared NBI-ME and postendoscopic submucosal dissection histological findings for 30 S-LG-tub1 and 15 M-LG-tub1 lesions. We classified the NBI-ME findings of S-LG-tub1 (and not D-EGC) into four patterns. The differential diagnosis between M-LG-tub1 and S-LG-tub1 depended on the presence of more than one of these patterns without or with other patterns (referred to as “limited-to-four-pattern [LFP] sign-positive” and “sign-negative”, resp.). Result. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values, and intraobserver and interobserver agreement, using the “LFP sign” for the differential diagnosis between M-LG-tub1 and S-LG-tub1, were 87.9%, 91.7%, 88.9%, 96.7%, 73.3%, and k = 0.842 and k = 0.737, respectively. Conclusion. NBI-ME may be useful in differentiating between high-risk M-LG-tub1 and low-risk S-LG-tub1. PMID:27127502

  9. Effectiveness of Magnifying Narrow-Band Imaging Endoscopy for Differential Diagnosis between the High-Risk Mixed-Type and Low-Risk Simple-Type of Low-Grade, Well-Differentiated Gastric Tubular Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Takashi; Takamura, Asako; Watanabe, Gen; Sugitani, Suzuko; Ajioka, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds. Magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging (NBI-ME) is useful for diagnosing differentiated early gastric cancer (D-EGC). D-EGC is classified as high- or low-grade based on its glandular architectural and cytological atypia. Low-grade, well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma (LG-tub1) mixed with high-grade tub1 (HG-tub1) and/or other histological types (M-LG-tub1) may indicate a primitive high-risk malignant lesion compared to histologically simple-type LG-tub1 (S-LG-tub1). Because LG-tub1 is occasionally difficult to diagnose due to its unclear demarcation under conventional white light endoscopy, early precise diagnoses are important. Methods. We compared NBI-ME and postendoscopic submucosal dissection histological findings for 30 S-LG-tub1 and 15 M-LG-tub1 lesions. We classified the NBI-ME findings of S-LG-tub1 (and not D-EGC) into four patterns. The differential diagnosis between M-LG-tub1 and S-LG-tub1 depended on the presence of more than one of these patterns without or with other patterns (referred to as "limited-to-four-pattern [LFP] sign-positive" and "sign-negative", resp.). Result. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values, and intraobserver and interobserver agreement, using the "LFP sign" for the differential diagnosis between M-LG-tub1 and S-LG-tub1, were 87.9%, 91.7%, 88.9%, 96.7%, 73.3%, and k = 0.842 and k = 0.737, respectively. Conclusion. NBI-ME may be useful in differentiating between high-risk M-LG-tub1 and low-risk S-LG-tub1. PMID:27127502

  10. Adenocarcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Compared to adenomas, adenocarcinomas show greater cytological atypia, increased frequency of mitoses, regional variation in growth pattern, more papillary structures, have size over 5 mm in diameter, show invasion of vessels, large airways or pleura, as well as lymphatic and hematogenous metastases.

  11. Synchronous Appearance of Adenocarcinoma and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) of the Stomach: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pushparaj, Magesh; Masih, Dipti; Pulimood, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histological type of gastric tumour, accounting for approximately 95% of all gastric carcinomas. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. Synchronous adenocarcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) occurring in the stomach is rare and very few cases have been reported in literature. Synchronous tumours in the stomach are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. A 63-year-old gentleman was diagnosed with a gastric adenocarcinoma on endoscopic biopsy and underwent surgery. Postoperative histopathologic examination revealed 2 synchronous tumours with both adenocarcinoma and GIST. The adenocarcinoma was determined to be the aggressive tumour based on histologic features. GIST was categorized as a very low risk of malignancy, based on its size and mitosis. The patient underwent chemotherapy for adenocarcinoma. He is under follow up and is currently disease free. Careful histopathologic evaluation is required to detect co-existing rare synchronous tumours. Presence of the second tumour may require additional procedures or protocols. PMID:27042477

  12. Synchronous Appearance of Adenocarcinoma and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) of the Stomach: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Pushparaj, Magesh; Masih, Dipti; Pulimood, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histological type of gastric tumour, accounting for approximately 95% of all gastric carcinomas. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. Synchronous adenocarcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) occurring in the stomach is rare and very few cases have been reported in literature. Synchronous tumours in the stomach are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. A 63-year-old gentleman was diagnosed with a gastric adenocarcinoma on endoscopic biopsy and underwent surgery. Postoperative histopathologic examination revealed 2 synchronous tumours with both adenocarcinoma and GIST. The adenocarcinoma was determined to be the aggressive tumour based on histologic features. GIST was categorized as a very low risk of malignancy, based on its size and mitosis. The patient underwent chemotherapy for adenocarcinoma. He is under follow up and is currently disease free. Careful histopathologic evaluation is required to detect co-existing rare synchronous tumours. Presence of the second tumour may require additional procedures or protocols. PMID:27042477

  13. Tanshinone IIA decreases the protein expression of EGFR, and IGFR blocking the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in gastric carcinoma AGS cells both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Su, Chin-Cheng; Chiu, Tsung-Lang

    2016-08-01

    Tan-IIA exerts powerful inhibitory effects in gastric cancer AGS cells. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is one of the most frequently dysregulated kinase cascades in human cancer. In the present study, we investigated the protein expression levels of PI3K, AKT and mTOR in AGS cells treated with Tan-IIA both in vitro and in vivo. The AGS cells were treated with Tan-IIA for different durations in vitro. In the in vivo study, AGS cell xerograft SCID mice were treated with Tan-IIA for 8 weeks. Subsequently, the protein expression of EGFR, IGFR, PI3K, AKT and mTOR was measured by western blotting. The results showed that Tan-IIA was able to decrease the protein expression levels of EGFR, IGFR, PI3K, AKT and mTOR significantly and dose-dependently in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, these findings indicate Tan-IIA could inhibit AGS cells through decreasing the protein expression of EGFR, IGFR and blocking PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27277844

  14. Sequential FDG-PET and induction chemotherapy in locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the Oesophago-gastric junction (AEG): The Heidelberg Imaging program in Cancer of the oesophago-gastric junction during Neoadjuvant treatment: HICON trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET (18F-FDG-PET) can be used for early response assessment in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinomas of the oesophagogastric junction (AEG) undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. It has been recently shown in the MUNICON trials that response-guided treatment algorithms based on early changes of the FDG tumor uptake detected by PET are feasible and that they can be implemented into clinical practice. Only 40%-50% of the patients respond metabolically to therapy. As metabolic non-response is known to be associated with a dismal prognosis, metabolic non-responders are increasingly treated with alternative neoadjuvant chemotherapies or chemoradiation in order to improve their clinical outcome. We plan to investigate whether PET can be used as response assessment during radiochemotherapy given as salvage treatment in early metabolic non-responders to standard chemotherapy. Methods/Design The HICON trial is a prospective, non-randomized, explorative imaging study evaluating the value of PET as a predictor of histopathological response in metabolic non-responders. Patients with resectable AEG type I and II according to Siewerts classification, staged cT3/4 and/or cN+ and cM0 by endoscopic ultrasound, spiral CT or MRI and FDG-PET are eligible. Tumors must be potentially R0 resectable and must have a sufficient FDG-baseline uptake. Only metabolic non-responders, showing a < 35% decrease of SUV two weeks after the start of neoadjuvant chemotherapy are eligible for the study and are taken to intensified taxane-based RCT (chemoradiotherapy (45 Gy) before surgery. 18FDG-PET scans will be performed before ( = Baseline) and after 14 days of standard neoadjuvant therapy as well as after the first cycle of salvage docetaxel/cisplatin chemotherapy (PET 1) and at the end of radiochemotherapy (PET2). Tracer uptake will be assessed semiquantitatively using standardized uptake values (SUV). The percentage difference ΔSUV = 100 (SUVBaseline - SUV

  15. Buxus Microphylla var. Koreana Nakai Extract for the Treatment of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Jung; Kim, Min Chul; Lim, Bora; Kim, Byung Joo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Buxus Microphylla var. Koreana Nakai Extract (BMKNE) is used as a folk remedy for malaria and veneral disease. In the present study, we investigated the effects of BMKNE in the growth and the survival of AGS cells, the most common human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines. Methods: The AGS cells were treated with varying concentrations of BMKNE. Analyses of the sub G1 peak, the caspase-3 and -9 activities, and the mitochondrial depolarization were conducted to determine whether AGS cell death occured by apoptosis. Also, to identify the role of transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) 7 channels in AGS cell growth and survival, we used human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells overexpressed with TRPM7 channels. Results: Experimental results showed that the sub G1 peak, the caspase-3 and -9 activities, and the mitochondrial depolarization were increased. Therefore, BMKNE was found to induce the apoptosis of these cells, and this apoptosis was inhibited by SB203580 (a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor), and by a c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) II inhibitor. Furthermore, BMKNE inhibited TRPM7 currents and TRPM7 channel over-expressions in HEK 293 cells, exacerbating BMKNE-induced cell death. Conclusions: These findings indicate that BMKNE inhibits the growth and the survival of gastric cancer cells due to a blockade of the TRPM7 channel’s activity and MAPK signaling. Therefore, BMKNE is a potential drug for treatment of gastric cancer, and both the TRPM7 channel and MAPK signaling may play an important role in survival in gastric cancer cells. PMID:25780674

  16. Food group intake and risk of subtypes of esophageal and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    SA, Navarro Silvera; ST, Mayne; H, Risch; MD, Gammon; T, Vaughan; W-H, Chow; R, Dubrow; J, Schoenberg; JL, Stanford; AB, West; H, Rotterdam; WJ, Blot; JF, Fraumeni

    2010-01-01

    Incidence rates for adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and gastric cardia have been increasing rapidly, while rates for non-cardia gastric adenocarcinoma and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma have declined. We examined food group intake as a risk factor for subtypes of esophageal and gastric cancers in a multi-center, population-based case-control study in Connecticut, New Jersey, and western Washington state. Associations between food groups and risk were estimated using adjusted odds ratios (OR), based on increasing intake of one serving per day. Total vegetable intake was associated with decreased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.75, 0.96). Conversely, total meat intake was associated with increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.11, 1.83), gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.08, 1.73), and non-cardia gastric adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.12, 1.71), with red meat most strongly associated with esophageal adenocarcinoma risk (OR = 2.49, 95% CI = 1.39, 4.46). Poultry was most strongly associated with gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.15, 3.11) and non-cardia gastric adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.19, 3.03). High-fat dairy was associated with increased risk of both esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Higher intake of meats, particularly red meats, and lower intake of vegetables were associated with an increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma, while higher intake of meats, particularly poultry, and high-fat dairy was associated with increased risk of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. PMID:18537156

  17. Molecular classification and prediction in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongzhong; Song, Won-min; Zhang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer, a highly heterogeneous disease, is the second leading cause of cancer death and the fourth most common cancer globally, with East Asia accounting for more than half of cases annually. Alongside TNM staging, gastric cancer clinic has two well-recognized classification systems, the Lauren classification that subdivides gastric adenocarcinoma into intestinal and diffuse types and the alternative World Health Organization system that divides gastric cancer into papillary, tubular, mucinous (colloid), and poorly cohesive carcinomas. Both classification systems enable a better understanding of the histogenesis and the biology of gastric cancer yet have a limited clinical utility in guiding patient therapy due to the molecular heterogeneity of gastric cancer. Unprecedented whole-genome-scale data have been catalyzing and advancing the molecular subtyping approach. Here we cataloged and compared those published gene expression profiling signatures in gastric cancer. We summarized recent integrated genomic characterization of gastric cancer based on additional data of somatic mutation, chromosomal instability, EBV virus infection, and DNA methylation. We identified the consensus patterns across these signatures and identified the underlying molecular pathways and biological functions. The identification of molecular subtyping of gastric adenocarcinoma and the development of integrated genomics approaches for clinical applications such as prediction of clinical intervening emerge as an essential phase toward personalized medicine in treating gastric cancer. PMID:26380657

  18. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-12-15

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  19. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  20. Gastric cáncer: Overview.

    PubMed

    Piazuelo, M Blanca; Correa, Pelayo

    2013-07-01

    Gastric cancer ranks fourth in incidence and second in mortality among all cancers worldwide. Despite the decrease in incidence in some regions of the world, gastric cancer continues to present a major clinical challenge due to most cases being diagnosed in advanced stages with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. The development of gastric cancer is a complex and multifactorial process involving a number of etiological factors and multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations. Among the predisposing factors are: Helicobacter pylori infection, high salt intake, smoking, and in a small percentage of patients, a familial genetic component. More than 95% of stomach cancer cases are adenocarcinomas, which are classified into two major histologic types: intestinal and diffuse. Intestinal type adenocarcinoma is preceded by a sequence of gastric lesions known as Correa´s cascade and is the histologic type associated with the global decrease in gastric cancer rates. Diffuse type adenocarcinomas have a more aggressive behavior and worse prognosis than those of the intestinal type. According to the anatomical location, adenocarcinomas are classified as proximal (originating in the cardia) and distal (originating in the body and antrum). This classification seems to recognize two different clinical entities. Surgical resection of the tumor at an early stage is the only effective treatment method. Therefore, the identification and surveillance of patients at risk may play a significant role in survival rates. Anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy has been shown to be an effective measure in the prevention of gastric cancer. PMID:24892619

  1. Gastric inverted hyperplastic polyp: A rare cause of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jin Tak; Lee, Seung Woo; Kim, Dong Pil; Choi, Seung Hwa; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Park, Jun Kyu; Jang, Sun Hee; Park, Yun Jung; Sung, Ye Gyu; Sul, Hae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric inverted hyperplastic polyp (IHP) is a rare gastric polyp characterized by the downward growth of hyperplastic mucosal components into the submucosal layer. Macroscopically, a gastric IHP resembles a subepithelial tumor (SET); as a result, accurately diagnosing gastric IHP is difficult. This issue has clinical significance because gastric IHP can be misdiagnosed as SET or as malignant neoplasm In addition, adenocarcinoma can accompany benign gastric IHP. Although in most cases, gastric IHPs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally, these polyps may cause anemia secondary to chronic bleeding. Here, we report one case involving gastric IHP accompanied by chronic iron deficiency anemia that was successfully managed using endoscopic submucosal dissection. PMID:27099452

  2. Isolated Splenic Metastases of Her2+++ Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sigrand, Julie; Bazin, Camille; Ewald, Jacques; Dermeche, Slimane; Ries, Pauline; Poizat, Flora; Guiramand, Jerome; Raoul, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Isolated metastases from gastric adenocarcinoma to the spleen are very infrequent. Usually, there are multiple metastases from gastric cancer, and isolated splenic metastases are very rare [Lam and Tang: Arch Pathol Lab Med 2000;124:526–530] because of certain anatomical and physiological characteristics (e.g., angulation between the splenic artery and celiac trunk, paucity of afferent lymph flow toward the spleen, contractility of the spleen and major immune content). Here, we report 2 cases of isolated splenic metastases from an adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction, both with long-term survival outcome and overexpression of Her2. PMID:27065846

  3. Isolated Splenic Metastases of Her2+++ Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sigrand, Julie; Bazin, Camille; Ewald, Jacques; Dermeche, Slimane; Ries, Pauline; Poizat, Flora; Guiramand, Jerome; Raoul, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Isolated metastases from gastric adenocarcinoma to the spleen are very infrequent. Usually, there are multiple metastases from gastric cancer, and isolated splenic metastases are very rare [Lam and Tang: Arch Pathol Lab Med 2000;124:526-530] because of certain anatomical and physiological characteristics (e.g., angulation between the splenic artery and celiac trunk, paucity of afferent lymph flow toward the spleen, contractility of the spleen and major immune content). Here, we report 2 cases of isolated splenic metastases from an adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction, both with long-term survival outcome and overexpression of Her2. PMID:27065846

  4. Effect of Rumex Aquaticus Herba Extract Against Helicobacter pylori-Induced Inflammation in Gastric Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Jeong Hoon; Khin, Phyu Phyu; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the characteristics of Helicobacter pylori and the effect of Rumex Aquaticus Herba extract on the expression of cytokines in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. Cultured human adenocarcinoma gastric cells (AGS) were infected by H. pylori in RPMI 1640 media. Cell growth was measured by trypan blue assay. Western blot analysis was performed to investigate effect of extract containing Quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucuronopyranoside (ECQ) on the expression of inflammatory factors and the inhibition on cell growth. Furthermore, we compared the inhibitory effects with various combinations of clarithromycin, amoxicillin, omeprazole, and ECQ. The urease test with Christensen's Urea Agar was performed to identify the urease activity of H. pylori and the effect ECQ has on urease activity. When the cells were exposed to H. pylori, the trypan blue assay revealed a decrease in the rate of cell growth. Western blot analysis showed that H. pylori-infected cells had increased levels of degraded IκB-α and inflammatory factors. Pretreatment with ECQ inhibited interleukin expression induced by H. pylori in a dose-dependent manner. A combination of ECQ and antibiotics inhibited cytokine expression more effectively than other treatments. H. pylori displayed significant urease activity. ECQ did not significantly inhibit urease activity. These data suggest that H. pylori infection has cytotoxic effects against AGS cells, and ECQ may inhibit the production of proinflammatory cytokines in H. pylori-infected AGS cells. PMID:26580421

  5. α-Lipoic Acid Inhibits Expression of IL-8 by Suppressing Activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-Infected Gastric Epithelial AGS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Hyun; Cho, Soon Ok

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial cytokine response, associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), is important in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced inflammation. H. pylori induces the production of ROS, which may be involved in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/Stat), and oxidant-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and thus, expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in gastric epithelial cells. α-lipoic acid, a naturally occurring thiol compound, is a potential antioxidant. It shows beneficial effects in treatment of oxidant-associated diseases including diabetes. The present study is purposed to investigate whether α-lipoic acid inhibits expression of inflammatory cytokine IL-8 by suppressing activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. Gastric epithelial AGS cells were pretreated with or without α-lipoic acid for 2 h and infected with H. pylori in a Korean isolate (HP99) at a ratio of 300:1. IL-8 mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR analysis. IL-8 levels in the medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-κB-DNA binding activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Phospho-specific and total forms of MAPK and Jak/Stat were assessed by Western blot analysis. ROS levels were determined using dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. As a result, H. pylori induced increases in ROS levels, mRNA, and protein levels of IL-8, as well as the activation of MAPK [extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), p38], Jak/Stat (Jak1/2, Stat3), and NF-κB in AGS cells, which was inhibited by α-lipoic acid. In conclusion, α-lipoic acid may be beneficial for prevention and/or treatment of H. pylori infection-associated gastric inflammation. PMID:26632410

  6. α-Lipoic Acid Inhibits Expression of IL-8 by Suppressing Activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-Infected Gastric Epithelial AGS Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Hyun; Cho, Soon Ok; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial cytokine response, associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), is important in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced inflammation. H. pylori induces the production of ROS, which may be involved in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/Stat), and oxidant-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and thus, expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in gastric epithelial cells. α-lipoic acid, a naturally occurring thiol compound, is a potential antioxidant. It shows beneficial effects in treatment of oxidant-associated diseases including diabetes. The present study is purposed to investigate whether α-lipoic acid inhibits expression of inflammatory cytokine IL-8 by suppressing activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. Gastric epithelial AGS cells were pretreated with or without α-lipoic acid for 2 h and infected with H. pylori in a Korean isolate (HP99) at a ratio of 300:1. IL-8 mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR analysis. IL-8 levels in the medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-κB-DNA binding activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Phospho-specific and total forms of MAPK and Jak/Stat were assessed by Western blot analysis. ROS levels were determined using dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. As a result, H. pylori induced increases in ROS levels, mRNA, and protein levels of IL-8, as well as the activation of MAPK [extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), p38], Jak/Stat (Jak1/2, Stat3), and NF-κB in AGS cells, which was inhibited by α-lipoic acid. In conclusion, α-lipoic acid may be beneficial for prevention and/or treatment of H. pylori infection-associated gastric inflammation. PMID:26632410

  7. Clinical Efficacy of Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Adenocarcinomas of the Esophagogastric Junction

    PubMed Central

    Nagami, Yasuaki; Machida, Hirohisa; Shiba, Masatsugu; Obayashi, Tomoko; Ominami, Masaki; Fukunaga, Shusei; Sugimori, Satoshi; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Kenji; Watanabe, Toshio; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Study Aims There are a few reports about the efficacy of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for adenocarcinomas of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ). However, there is no detailed analysis that divides EGJ cancers into Barrett’s adenocarcinoma and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of ESD for EGJ cancers, comparing these two adenocarcinomas. Patients and Methods This study included 43 patients who underwent ESD for type II EGJ cancers between 2004 and 2011. Pathological examination of resected specimens confirmed 14 cases of Barrett’s adenocarcinoma and 29 cases of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Cutting margins on the oral side were placed 1 cm from the squamocolumnar junction, or 1 cm away from the slight elevation that is an endoscopic sign of subsquamous carcinoma extension. Clinical outcomes, prevalence and length of subsquamous carcinoma extension, and long-term outcomes were compared between these two types of adenocarcinoma. Results No significant differences in clinical outcomes were found between these two types of adenocarcinoma (en bloc, 100 % versus 100 %; complete, 100 % versus 89.7 %; curative, 85.7 % versus 75.9 %). No serious adverse events were encountered. The prevalence of subsquamous carcinoma extension was significantly higher in Barrett’s adenocarcinoma compared with gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Local and distant recurrence were not observed in any cases with curative resection during the follow-up period (1.6 – 87.6 months). Conclusion ESD for EGJ cancers, including both Barrett’s adenocarcinoma and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, was efficient and useful. ESD with a 1 cm safety margin may be acceptable for EGJ cancers. PMID:26134607

  8. Epstein-Barr virus in gastric carcinomas and gastric stump carcinomas: a late event in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    zur Hausen, A; van Rees, B P; van Beek, J; Craanen, M E; Bloemena, E; Offerhaus, G J A; Meijer, C J L M; van den Brule, A J C

    2004-01-01

    Background: To determine at what stage during gastric carcinogenesis Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) enters the gastric epithelial cells, the presence of EBV was investigated in two pathogenetically related but distinct forms of adenocarcinoma of the stomach—gastric carcinoma of the intact stomach (GCIS) and gastric stump carcinoma (GSC)—and their presumed precursor lesions. Patients and methods: Eleven patients with EBV positive GCIS and eight patients with EBV positive GSC, demonstrated by the highly sensitive EBV encoded RNA 1/2 (EBER1/2) RNA in situ hybridisation (RISH) technique, were studied. Paraffin wax embedded tissue available from preoperative gastric biopsies and tumour adjacent tissue from the resection specimens containing normal gastric mucosa, inflamed gastric mucosa, and preneoplastic lesions (intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia) was investigated by EBER1/2 RISH, in addition to EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) and latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results: In both GCIS and GSC and their precursor lesions EBER1/2 transcripts were restricted to the carcinoma cells. In addition, positivity of EBNA-1 IHC was also restricted to the tumour cells. IHC for LMP-1 was negative in all cases tested. Conclusions: The absence of EBER1/2 transcripts in preneoplastic gastric lesions (intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia) and their presence in two distinct types of gastric carcinoma strongly suggest that EBV can only infect neoplastic gastric cells and thus is a late event in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:15113855

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with early gastric cancer by the endoscopic phenol red test

    PubMed Central

    Iseki, K; Tatsuta, M; Iishi, H; Baba, M; Ishiguro, S

    1998-01-01

    Background—An endoscopic procedure that uses a pH indicator called phenol red to assess Helicobacter pylori infected gastric mucosa has recently been developed. This test makes it possible to take biopsy specimens from H pylori infected areas. 
Aim—This test was applied to patients with early gastric cancers to clarify the role of H pylori in gastric carcinogenesis. 
Subjects—Sixty five patients with early gastric cancer (50 with differentiated adenocarcinoma and 15 with undifferentiated adenocarcinoma). 
Methods—Patients with early gastric cancer underwent the endoscopic phenol red test before their operation. In this test, areas infected with H pylori can be observed as "coloured" areas where phenol red was turned from yellow to red. 
Results—H pylori infection was significantly (p<0.001) more frequent in patients with differentiated adenocarcinomas than in those with undifferentiated adenocarcinomas. Differentiated adenocarcinomas were usually located in areas of mucosa infected with H pylori, but undifferentiated adenocarcinomas were frequently located in non-infected areas. 
Conclusion—H pylori may be a strong risk factor for differentiated early gastric cancer. 

 Keywords: endoscopic phenol red test; Helicobacter pylori; gastric cancer; differentiated adenocarcinoma; high risk factor PMID:9505880

  10. Current Status on Stem Cells and Cancers of the Gastric Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is still a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide in spite of declining incidence. Gastric cancers are, essentially, adenocarcinomas and one of the strongest risk factors is still infection with Helicobacter pylori. Within the last years, it became clear that gastric self-renewal and carcinogenesis are intimately linked, particularly during chronic inflammatory conditions. Generally, gastric cancer is now regarded as a disease resulting from dysregulated differentiation of stem and progenitor cells, mainly due to an inflammatory environment. However, the situation in the stomach is rather complex, consisting of two types of gastric units which show bidirectional self-renewal from an unexpectedly large variety of progenitor/stem cell populations. As in many other tumors, cancer stem cells have also been characterized for gastric cancer. This review focuses on the various gastric epithelial stem cells, how they contribute to self-renewal and which routes are known to gastric adenocarcinomas, including their stem cells. PMID:26287172

  11. Astaxanthin Inhibits Proliferation of Human Gastric Cancer Cell Lines by Interrupting Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ha; Park, Jong-Jae; Lee, Beom Jae; Joo, Moon Kyung; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Sang Woo; Bak, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Astaxanthin is a carotenoid pigment that has antioxidant, antitumoral, and anti-inflammatory properties. In this in vitro study, we investigated the mechanism of anticancer effects of astaxanthin in gastric carcinoma cell lines. Methods The human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines AGS, KATO-III, MKN-45, and SNU-1 were treated with various concentrations of astaxanthin. A cell viability test, cell cycle analysis, and immunoblotting were performed. Results The viability of each cancer cell line was suppressed by astaxanthin in a dose-dependent manner with significantly decreased proliferation in KATO-III and SNU-1 cells. Astaxanthin increased the number of cells in the G0/G1 phase but reduced the proportion of S phase KATO-III and SNU-1 cells. Phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was decreased in an inverse dose-dependent correlation with astaxanthin concentration, and the expression of p27kip-1 increased the KATO-III and SNU-1 cell lines in an astaxanthin dose-dependent manner. Conclusions Astaxanthin inhibits proliferation by interrupting cell cycle progression in KATO-III and SNU-1 gastric cancer cells. This may be caused by the inhibition of the phosphorylation of ERK and the enhanced expression of p27kip-1. PMID:26470770

  12. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer. PMID:27573782

  13. Gastric mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma with a trilineage cell differentiation: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pericleous, Marinos; Toumpanakis, Christos; Lumgair, Heather; Caplin, Martyn E; Morgan-Rowe, Luke; Clark, Ian; Luong, Tu Vinh

    2012-05-01

    Most gastric neuroendocrine tumours are well differentiated and considered as neuroendocrine neoplasms, whilst poorly differentiated lesions are considered as neuroendocrine carcinomas and account for only 6-16% of gastric neuroendocrine tumours. Gastric mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas are rare malignancies usually composed of a neuroendocrine carcinoma and an adenocarcinoma with a variable grade of differentiation. Here, we report an unusual and rare gastric mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma with a trilineage cell differentiation including a neuroendocrine carcinoma, an adenocarcinoma and a squamous cell carcinoma. A brief discussion of the histopathological features, biological behaviour and treatment of this rare tumour type is presented. PMID:22740822

  14. Gastric Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma with a Trilineage Cell Differentiation: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Pericleous, Marinos; Toumpanakis, Christos; Lumgair, Heather; Caplin, Martyn E.; Morgan-Rowe, Luke; Clark, Ian; Luong, Tu Vinh

    2012-01-01

    Most gastric neuroendocrine tumours are well differentiated and considered as neuroendocrine neoplasms, whilst poorly differentiated lesions are considered as neuroendocrine carcinomas and account for only 6–16% of gastric neuroendocrine tumours. Gastric mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas are rare malignancies usually composed of a neuroendocrine carcinoma and an adenocarcinoma with a variable grade of differentiation. Here, we report an unusual and rare gastric mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma with a trilineage cell differentiation including a neuroendocrine carcinoma, an adenocarcinoma and a squamous cell carcinoma. A brief discussion of the histopathological features, biological behaviour and treatment of this rare tumour type is presented. PMID:22740822

  15. Expression of p53β and Δ133p53 isoforms in different gastric tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wansheng; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Hongmei; Ma, Jingrong; Zhong, Hua; Jiao, Jianxin; Gao, Zhixing

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to detect the mRNA of p53β and Δ133p53 isoforms in three gastric carcinoma cell lines and tissues of superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, gastric carcinoma, or paracancerous area. Nested reverse transcription PCR was used to detect the mRNA of p53β and Δ133p53 isoforms in tissues of superficial gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis, gastric cancer cell lines (SGC-7901, MKN45, KATO III), gastric adenocarcinoma, and paracancerous lesion. The amplified products were shown by agarose gel electrophoresis. The expression difference among various tissues was analyzed by x2 tests. The positive rates of ∆133p53 mRNA were 73.3% (11/15) in gastric adenocarcinoma and 20% (3/15) in paracancerous tissue, whereas the positive rates of p53β mRNA were 20% (3/15) in gastric adenocarcinoma and 66.7% (10/15) in paracancerous tissue. The difference between adenocarcinoma and paracancerous tissues was significant (P<0.05). The positive rates of ∆133p53 mRNA were 25% (5/20), 50% (15/30), and 75% (15/20), respectively, in superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and gastric adenocarcinoma; the positive rates of p53β mRNA were 65% (13/20), 33.3% (10/30), and 25% (5/20), respectively, in superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The difference between adenocarcinoma and superficial gastritis samples was significant (P<0.05). Both p53β and ∆133p53 mRNAs were positive in MKN45; only p53β mRNA was detected in SGC7901; neither p53β nor ∆133p53 mRNA was detected in KATO III. ∆133p53 and p53β, which are possible indicators for the diagnosis and biological therapy of gastric carcinoma, were expressed differentially in different gastric tissues. PMID:26617756

  16. Hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach – proper identification and treatment remain a challenge

    PubMed Central

    Søreide, Jon Arne; Greve, Ole Jacob; Gudlaugsson, Einar; Størset, Svein

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The term hepatoid adenocarcinoma (HAC) of the stomach was introduced three decades ago with the observation of high serum α-fetoprotein (AFP) levels in some gastric adenocarcinoma patients. This very rare gastric cancer patient subgroup is likely frequently misdiagnosed. Material Two patients who were recently diagnosed with HAC of the stomach at our institution are presented. We also performed a structured literature search and reviewed pertinent articles to provide knowledge to improve the proper identification, diagnosis and management of patients with gastric HAC. Results HAC is a rare subgroup of gastric carcinoma with poor prognosis. Clinical management of this population may be challenging. The scientific literature is largely based on very small patient series or case reports, and the evidence for proper decision making and management is considered weak. Conclusion All physicians involved in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with gastric cancer should pay attention to this rare subgroup to improve identification. PMID:26728165

  17. Hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach - proper identification and treatment remain a challenge.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Jon Arne; Greve, Ole Jacob; Gudlaugsson, Einar; Størset, Svein

    2016-06-01

    Objective The term hepatoid adenocarcinoma (HAC) of the stomach was introduced three decades ago with the observation of high serum α-fetoprotein (AFP) levels in some gastric adenocarcinoma patients. This very rare gastric cancer patient subgroup is likely frequently misdiagnosed. Material Two patients who were recently diagnosed with HAC of the stomach at our institution are presented. We also performed a structured literature search and reviewed pertinent articles to provide knowledge to improve the proper identification, diagnosis and management of patients with gastric HAC. Results HAC is a rare subgroup of gastric carcinoma with poor prognosis. Clinical management of this population may be challenging. The scientific literature is largely based on very small patient series or case reports, and the evidence for proper decision making and management is considered weak. Conclusion All physicians involved in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with gastric cancer should pay attention to this rare subgroup to improve identification. PMID:26728165

  18. Ectopic expression of guanylyl cyclase C in adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and stomach.

    PubMed

    Park, Jason; Schulz, Stephanie; Haaf, Janis; Kairys, John C; Waldman, Scott A

    2002-08-01

    Guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C), a receptor specifically expressed in cells originating from differentiated intestinal epithelium, is a marker and therapeutic target for colorectal cancer metastases. Intestinal metaplasia, in which epithelial cells assume histological and molecular characteristics of differentiated intestinal enterocytes, is a common precursor to adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and stomach. Thus, those tumors, tissues adjacent to them, and their associated regional lymph nodes were assessed for GC-C expression by reverse transcription coupled with the PCR. GC-C mRNA was detected in five of five and eight of nine esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas, respectively. Also, GC-C mRNA was detected in three of five and six of seven tissues adjacent to, but not histologically involved in, esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas, respectively, reflecting molecular changes associated with neoplastic transformation preceding histopathological changes. In contrast, three normal gastric specimens did not express GC-C. Furthermore, GC-C mRNA was detected in 1 of 1 lymph node containing tumor cells by histopathology from a patient with gastric adenocarcinoma and in 3 of 11 lymph nodes, all of which were free of tumor cells by histopathology, from a patient with a gastroesophageal junction tumor. This is the first demonstration that GC-C is ectopically expressed by primary and metastatic adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and stomach and suggests that GC-C may be a sensitive and specific clinical marker and target for adenocarcinomas of the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:12163327

  19. Pure intramedullary spinal cord metastasis secondary to gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Galarza, Marcelo; Faiola, Andrea; Gazzeri, Giovanni

    2006-04-01

    Pure intramedullary spinal-cord metastases (ISCM) are a rare manifestation of cancer. We report a case of ISCM from gastric cancer. A 68-year-old man, treated with total gastrectomy for a gastric cancer, presented 9 months later with paresis of the left arm, pain and dissociated sensory loss. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a pure intramedullary lesion at the C3-C5 level. After surgical resection, pathological findings revealed an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma of gastric origin. To our knowledge, this is only the second report of ISCM from gastric cancer in the literature. PMID:16465555

  20. PSMB8 and PBK as potential gastric cancer subtype-specific biomarkers associated with prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chae Hwa; Park, Hye Ji; Choi, Yu Ri; Kim, Ahrong; Kim, Hye Won; Choi, Jin Hwa; Hwang, Chung Su; Lee, So Jung; Choi, Chang In; Jeon, Tae Yong; Kim, Dae Hwan; Kim, Gwang Ha; Park, Do Youn

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is a common form of cancer associated with a poor prognosis. We analyzed microarray profiling data from 48 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma to characterize gastric cancer subtypes and identify biomarkers associated with prognosis. We identified two major subtypes of gastric adenocarcinoma differentially associated with overall survival (P = 0.025). Genes that were differentially expressed were identified using specific criteria (P < 0.001 and >1.5-fold); expression of 294 and 116 genes was enriched in good and poor prognosis subtypes, respectively. Genes related to translational elongation and cell cycle were upregulated in the poor prognosis group. Of these genes, upregulation of proteasome subunit beta type 8 PSMB8 and PDZ binding kinase PBK was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis. PSMB8 or PBK knockdown had no effect on gastric cancer cell proliferation but suppressed cell migration and invasion, respectively. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry analysis of 385 gastric cancer patients revealed that increased nuclear expression of PSMB8 and PBK was correlated with depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, and lower survival rates. Taken together, two gastric adenocarcinoma subtypes were predictive of prognosis. PSMB8 and PBK were predictive of gastric cancer prognosis and could be potential gastric cancer subtype-specific biomarkers. PMID:26894977

  1. Activation of NF-κB and AP-1 Mediates Hyperproliferation by Inducing β-Catenin and c-Myc in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Gastric Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Eunyoung; Park, Bohye; Lim, Joo Weon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-infected patients with gastritis or adenocarcinoma, proliferation of gastric epithelial cells is increased. Hyperproliferation is related to induction of oncogenes, such as β-catenin and c-myc. Even though transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1 are activated in H. pylori-infected cells, whether NF-κB or AP-1 regulates the expression of β-catenein or c-myc in H. pylori-infected cells has not been clarified. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1 mediates the expression of oncogenes and hyperproliferation of gastric epithelial cells. Materials and Methods Gastric epithelial AGS cells were transiently transfected with mutant genes for IκBα (MAD3) and c-Jun (TAM67) or treated with a specific NF-κB inhibitor caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) or a selective AP-1 inhibitor SR-11302 to suppress activation of NF-κB or AP-1, respecively. As reference cells, the control vector pcDNA was transfected to the cells. Wild-type cells or transfected cells were cultured with or without H. pylori. Results H. pylori induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1, cell proliferation, and expression of oncogenes (β-catenein, c-myc) in AGS cells, which was inhibited by transfection of MAD3 and TAM67. Wild-type cells and the cells transfected with pcDNA showed similar activities of NF-κB and AP-1, proliferation, and oncogene expression regardless of treatment with H. pylori. Both CAPE and SR-11302 inhibited cell proliferation and expression of oncogenes in H. pylori-infected cells. Conclusion H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1 regulates transcription of oncogenes and mediates hyperproliferation in gastric epithelial cells. PMID:26996564

  2. Use of lectin microarray to differentiate gastric cancer from gastric ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Li; Li, Yang-Guang; Lv, Yong-Chen; Guan, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Hui-Fan; Chi, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of lectin microarray for differentiating gastric cancer from gastric ulcer. METHODS: Twenty cases of human gastric cancer tissue and 20 cases of human gastric ulcer tissue were collected and processed. Protein was extracted from the frozen tissues and stored. The lectins were dissolved in buffer, and the sugar-binding specificities of lectins and the layout of the lectin microarray were summarized. The median of the effective data points for each lectin was globally normalized to the sum of medians of all effective data points for each lectin in one block. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric cancer tissues and their corresponding gastric ulcer tissues were subjected to Ag retrieval. Biotinylated lectin was used as the primary antibody and HRP-streptavidin as the secondary antibody. The glycopatterns of glycoprotein in gastric cancer and gastric ulcer specimens were determined by lectin microarray, and then validated by lectin histochemistry. Data are presented as mean ± SD for the indicated number of independent experiments. RESULTS: The glycosylation level of gastric cancer was significantly higher than that in ulcer. In gastric cancer, most of the lectin binders showed positive signals and the intensity of the signals was stronger, whereas the opposite was the case for ulcers. Significant differences in the pathological score of the two lectins were apparent between ulcer and gastric cancer tissues using the same lectin. For MPL and VVA, all types of gastric cancer detected showed stronger staining and a higher positive rate in comparison with ulcer, especially in the case of signet ring cell carcinoma and intra-mucosal carcinoma. GalNAc bound to MPL showed a significant increase. A statistically significant association between MPL and gastric cancer was observed. As with MPL, there were significant differences in VVA staining between gastric cancer and ulcer. CONCLUSION: Lectin microarray can differentiate the different

  3. An observational study suggesting clinical benefit for adjuvant postoperative chemoradiation in a population of over 500 cases after gastric resection with D2 nodal dissection for adenocarcinoma of the stomach

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung; Lim, Do Hoon; Lee, Jeeyun; Kang, Won Ki . E-mail: wkkang@smc.samsung.co.kr; MacDonald, John S.; Park, Chan Hyung; Park, Se Hoon; Lee, Se-Hoon; Kim, Kihyun; Park, Joon Oh; Kim, Won Seog; Jung, Chul Won; Park, Young Suk; Im, Young-Hyuck; Sohn, Tae Sung; Noh, Jae Hyung; Heo, Jin Seok; Kim, Yong Il; Park, Chul Keun; Park, Keunchil

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: The role of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in D2-resected gastric-cancer patients has not been defined yet. We investigated the effect of postoperative chemoradiotherapy on the relapse rate and survival rate of patients with D2-resected gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: From August 1995 to April 2001, 544 patients received postoperative CRT after curative D2 resection. During the same period of time, 446 patients received surgery without further adjuvant treatment. The adjuvant CRT consisted of 400 mg/m{sup 2} of fluorouracil plus 20 mg/m{sup 2} of leucovorin for 5 days, followed by 4,500 cGy of radiotherapy for 5 weeks, with fluorouracil and leucovorin on the first 4 and the last 3 days of radiotherapy. Two 5-day cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin were given 4 weeks after the completion of radiotherapy. Results: The median duration of overall survival was significantly longer in the CRT group than in the comparison group (95.3 months vs. 62.6 months), which corresponds to a hazard ratio for death of 0.80 (p = 0.0200) or a reduction of 20% in the risk of death in the CRT group. The 5-year survival rates were consistently longer in the CRT group at Stages II, IIIA, IIIB, and IV than those in the comparison group. The CRT was associated with increases in the median duration of relapse-free survival (75.6 months vs. 52.7 months; hazard ratio for relapse, 0.80, p = 0.0160). Conclusion: Our results highly suggest that the postoperative chemoradiotherapy in D2-resected gastric-cancer patients can prolong survival and decrease recurrence.

  4. EBV-Infection in Cardiac and Non-Cardiac Gastric Adenocarcinomas is Associated with Promoter Methylation of p16, p14 and APC, but not hMLH1

    PubMed Central

    Geddert, Helene; zur Hausen, Axel; Gabbert, Helmut E.; Sarbia, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Background: Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric carcinomas (GC) constitute a distinct clinicopathological entity of gastric cancer. In order to determine underlying distinct aberrant promoter methylation we tested cardiac and non-cardiac GC with regard to the presence of EBV. Methods: One hundred GC were tested by RNA-in situ hybridization for the presence of EBV by EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER). Aberrant promoter methylation was investigated by methylation-specific real-time PCR for p16, p14, APC and hMLH1. P16 protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: In our selected study cohort, EBER-transcripts were detected in 19.6% (18/92) of GC. EBV-positive GC revealed significantly more often gene hypermethylation of p16, p14 and APC (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001 and p = 0.02, respectively) than EBV-negative GC. The majority of GC with p16 hypermethylation showed a p16 protein loss (22/28). In contrast, no correlation between the presence of EBV and hMLH1 hypermethylation was found (p = 0.7). EBV-positive GC showed a trend towards non-cardiac location (p = 0.06) and lower stages (I/II) according to the WHO (p = 0.05). Conclusion: Hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes is significantly more frequent in EBV-associated GC compared to EBV-negative GC. Our data add new insights to the role of EBV in gastric carcinogenesis and underline that EBV-associated GC comprise a distinct molecular-pathologic as well as a distinct clinicopathological entity of GC. PMID:20978327

  5. Clinical epidemiology of gastric cancer in Hehuang valley of China: A 10-year epidemiological study of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Su; Li, Bin; Bai, Zhen-Zhong; Wu, Jun-Qi; Xie, Da-Wei; Ma, Ying-Cai; Ma, Xu-Xiang; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Guo, Xin-Jian

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical epidemiological characteristics of gastric cancer in the Hehuang valley, China, to provide a reference for treatment and prevention of regional gastric cancer. METHODS: Between February 2003 and February 2013, the records of 2419 patients with gastric cancer were included in this study. The patient’s characteristics, histological and pathological features, as well as the dietary habits of the patients, were investigated. RESULTS: The clinical data showed that adenocarcinoma was the leading histological type of gastric cancer in this area. Characteristics of gastric cancer in different ethnic groups and age showed that the 60.55-65.50 years group showed the high incidence of gastric cancer in all ethnic groups. There were more male gastric cancer patients than female. Intestinal was the most common type of gastric cancer in the Hehuang valley. There was no significant difference in the proportion of sex in terms of Helicobacter pylori infection. The impact of dietary habits on gastric cancer showed that regular consumption of fried or grilled food, consumption of high-salt, high-fat and spicy food and drinking strong Boiled brick-tea were three important factors associated with gastric cancer in males and females. CONCLUSION: Differences existed in race, sex, and age of patients according to the epidemiology of gastric cancer in the Hehuang valley. Moreover, dietary habits was also an important factor contributing to gastric cancer. PMID:25132766

  6. Serum biomarker panels for diagnosis of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Weihua; Ye, Fei; He, Liang; Cui, Lifeng; Cui, Miao; Hu, Yuan; Li, Wei; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, David Y; Suo, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Currently, serum biomarkers that are sufficiently sensitive and specific for early detection and risk classification of gastric adenocarcinomas are not known. In this study, ten serum markers were assessed using the Luminex system and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the diagnosis of gastric cancer and analysis of the relation between prognosis and metastases. Patients and methods A training set consisting of 228 gastric adenocarcinoma and 190 control samples was examined. A Luminex multiplex panel with nine biomarkers, consisting of three proteins discovered through our previous studies and six proteins previously reported to be cancer-associated, was constructed. One additional biomarker was detected using a commercial kit containing EDTA. Logistic regression, random forest (RF), and support vector machine (SVM) were used to identify the panel of discriminatory biomarkers in the training set. After selecting five proteins as candidate biomarkers, multivariate classification analyses were used to identify algorithms for diagnostic biomarker combinations. These algorithms were independently validated using a set of 57 gastric adenocarcinoma and 48 control samples. Results Serum pepsinogen I, serum pepsinogen II, A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 8 (ADAM8), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and serum IgG to Helicobacter pylori were selected as classifiers in the three algorithms. These algorithms differentiated between the majority of gastric adenocarcinoma and control serum samples in the training/test set with high accuracy (RF 79.0%, SVM 83.8%, logistic regression 76.2%). These algorithms also differentiated the samples in the validation set (accuracy: RF 82.5%, SVM 86.1%, logistic regression 78.7%). Conclusion A panel of combinatorial biomarkers comprising VEGF, ADAM8, IgG to H. pylori, serum pepsinogen I, and pepsinogen II were developed. The use of biomarkers is a less invasive method for the diagnosis of

  7. Gastric mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma with a good prognosis.

    PubMed

    Fukuba, Nobuhiko; Yuki, Takafumi; Ishihara, Shunji; Sonoyama, Hiroki; Tada, Yasumasa; Kusunoki, Ryusaku; Oka, Akihiko; Oshima, Naoki; Moriyama, Ichiro; Kawashima, Kousaku; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    A flat, elevated lesion measuring 5 mm in diameter was found in the gastric body of an 80-year-old man. A biopsy showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and endoscopic ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic mass located in the submucosa. Endoscopic submucosal dissection was subsequently performed, and a pathological examination revealed a tumor composed of adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma with submucosal infiltration. The pathological diagnosis was gastric mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). An additional gastrectomy procedure was performed, and no recurrence was noted for at least three years. This case is interesting with respect to the carcinogenesis of endocrine cell carcinoma and MANEC. PMID:25400179

  8. Regulation of Noxa-mediated apoptosis in Helicobacter pylori–infected gastric epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Suvasmita; Das, Lopamudra; Kokate, Shrikant Babanrao; Pratheek, B. M.; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Goswami, Chandan; Chattopadhyay, Ranajoy; Crowe, Sheila Eileen; Bhattacharyya, Asima

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori induces the antiapoptotic protein myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl1) in human gastric epithelial cells (GECs). Apoptosis of oncogenic protein Mcl1-expressing cells is mainly regulated by Noxa-mediated degradation of Mcl1. We wanted to elucidate the status of Noxa in H. pylori–infected GECs. For this, various GECs such as AGS, MKN45, and KATO III were either infected with H. pylori or left uninfected. The effect of infection was examined by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, in vitro binding assay, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. Infected GECs, surgical samples collected from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma as well as biopsy samples from patients infected with H. pylori showed significant up-regulation of both Mcl1 and Noxa compared with noninfected samples. Coexistence of Mcl1 and Noxa was indicative of an impaired Mcl-Noxa interaction. We proved that Noxa was phosphorylated at Ser13 residue by JNK in infected GECs, which caused cytoplasmic retention of Noxa. JNK inhibition enhanced Mcl1-Noxa interaction in the mitochondrial fraction of infected cells, whereas overexpression of nonphosphorylatable Noxa resulted in enhanced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in the infected epithelium. Because phosphorylation-dephosphorylation can regulate the apoptotic function of Noxa, this could be a potential target molecule for future treatment approaches for H. pylori–induced gastric cancer.—Rath, S., Das, L., Kokate, S. B., Pratheek, B. M., Chattopadhyay, S., Goswami, C., Chattopadhyay, R., Crowe, S. E., Bhattacharyya, A. Regulation of Noxa-mediated apoptosis in Helicobacter pylori–infected gastric epithelial cells. PMID:25404713

  9. Danusertib, a potent pan-Aurora kinase and ABL kinase inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death and inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving the PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated signaling pathway in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chun-Xiu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Yin-Xue; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Dong; Yang, Tianxing; Pan, Si-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with a poor response to current chemotherapy. Danusertib is a pan-inhibitor of the Aurora kinases and a third-generation Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent anticancer effects, but its antitumor effect and underlying mechanisms in the treatment of human gastric cancer are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of danusertib on cell growth, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the molecular mechanisms involved in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells. The results showed that danusertib had potent growth-inhibitory, apoptosis-inducing, and autophagy-inducing effects on AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Danusertib arrested AGS and NCI-N78 cells in G2/M phase, with downregulation of expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and upregulation of expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. Danusertib induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, with an increase in expression of proapoptotic protein and a decrease in antiapoptotic proteins in both cell lines. Danusertib induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and triggered activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Further, danusertib induced autophagy, with an increase in expression of beclin 1 and conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3-I) to LC3-II in both cell lines. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways as well as activation of 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase contributed to the proautophagic effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. SB202191 and wortmannin enhanced the autophagy-inducing effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. In addition, danusertib inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition with an increase in expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in expression

  10. Inhibition of Gastric Tumor Cell Growth Using Seed-targeting LNA as Specific, Long-lasting MicroRNA Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Staedel, Cathy; Varon, Christine; Nguyen, Phu Hung; Vialet, Brune; Chambonnier, Lucie; Rousseau, Benoît; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Evrard, Serge; Couillaud, Franck; Darfeuille, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate eukaryotic gene expression upon pairing onto target mRNAs. This targeting is influenced by the complementarity between the microRNA “seed” sequence at its 5′ end and the seed-matching sequences in the mRNA. Here, we assess the efficiency and specificity of 8-mer locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotides raised against the seeds of miR-372 and miR-373, two embryonic stem cell-specific microRNAs prominently expressed in the human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cell line. Provided that the pairing is perfect over all the eight nucleotides of the seed and starts at nucleotide 2 or 1 at the microRNA 5′ end, these short LNAs inhibit miR-372/373 functions and derepress their common target, the cell cycle regulator LATS2. They decrease cell proliferation in vitro upon either transfection at nanomolar concentrations or unassisted delivery at micromolar concentrations. Subcutaneously delivered LNAs reduce tumor growth of AGS xenografts in mice, upon formation of a stable, specific heteroduplex with the targeted miR-372 and -373 and LATS2 upregulation. Their therapeutic potential is confirmed in fast-growing, miR-372-positive, primary human gastric adenocarcinoma xenografts in mice. Thus, microRNA silencing by 8-mer seed-targeting LNAs appears a valuable approach for both loss-of-function studies aimed at elucidating microRNA functions and for microRNA-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:26151747

  11. Lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Hui; Zhao, Jun-Jun; Yuan, Zhao

    2016-03-14

    Lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma is a rare type of gastric cancer characterized by a carcinoma with intense stromal lymphocytic infiltration. Although lymphocytic infiltration is closely associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, concomitant occurrence with differentiated adenocarcinoma is relatively rare. The clinical manifestations of lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma (including EBV-positive and -negative forms) are similar to those of gastric cancer, and the diagnosis is based on pathologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical findings. This report describes the case of a 55-year-old female patient who presented with a 10-year history of recurrent and worsening abdominal pain and melena that had been occurring for 2 mo. An ulcerative lesion was detected in the stomach by endoscopic examination, which raised suspicion of early gastric cancer. A subsequent preoperative endoscopic biopsy showed adenocarcinoma, but the postoperative pathologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical analyses of the resected specimen revealed a final diagnosis of lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma. PMID:26973402

  12. Lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao-Hui; Zhao, Jun-Jun; Yuan, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma is a rare type of gastric cancer characterized by a carcinoma with intense stromal lymphocytic infiltration. Although lymphocytic infiltration is closely associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, concomitant occurrence with differentiated adenocarcinoma is relatively rare. The clinical manifestations of lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma (including EBV-positive and -negative forms) are similar to those of gastric cancer, and the diagnosis is based on pathologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical findings. This report describes the case of a 55-year-old female patient who presented with a 10-year history of recurrent and worsening abdominal pain and melena that had been occurring for 2 mo. An ulcerative lesion was detected in the stomach by endoscopic examination, which raised suspicion of early gastric cancer. A subsequent preoperative endoscopic biopsy showed adenocarcinoma, but the postoperative pathologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical analyses of the resected specimen revealed a final diagnosis of lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma. PMID:26973402

  13. Syndromic Gastric Polyps: At the Crossroads of Genetic and Environmental Cancer Predisposition.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Giardiello, Francis M; Offerhaus, G Johan; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Gastric polyps occur in 1-4 % of patients undergoing gastroscopy. Although most are sporadic, some gastric polyps are part of an underlying hereditary syndrome. Gastric polyps can be seen in each of the well-known gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes, but also in Lynch syndrome and in several rare not primarily gastrointestinal syndromes. In addition, Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach (GAPPS) is a recently described heritable syndrome characterized by isolated gastric polyposis and risk of gastric cancer.Some of these syndromes are associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer, whereas others are not. However, the neoplastic potential and the precursor status of these gastric polyps are not always clear, even in syndromes with a well-established risk of gastric cancer. For instance, the neoplastic potential of Peutz-Jeghers polyps is debatable, despite the well-established risk of gastric cancer in this syndrome. Also fundic gland polyps and gastric foveolar-type adenomas in FAP carry a low risk of malignant transformation. In contrast, gastric juvenile polyps are precursor lesions of gastric cancer in juvenile polyposis syndrome through neoplastic progression of juvenile polyps in these patients.Although these hereditary syndromes with gastric polyps are rare, recognition is important for individual patient management. Furthermore, the initiation and progression of these lesions can be influenced by environmental factors such as Helicobacter Pylori infection. This makes these rare lesions an appropriate model for understanding the clonal evolution of early gastric cancer in the wider population. PMID:27573780

  14. Isoprenaline Induces Periostin Expression in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Xiao; Xi, Hong-Qing; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Yang, Shao-Wei; Lu, Yan-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Periostin mediates critical steps in gastric cancer and is involved in various signaling pathways. However, the roles of periostin in promoting gastric cancer metastasis are not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance between periostin expression and gastric cancer progression and the role of stress-related hormones in the regulation of cancer development and progression. Materials and Methods Normal, cancerous and metastatic gastric tissues were collected from patients diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer. The in vivo expression of periostin was evaluated by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescent staining. Meanwhile, human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines MKN-45 and BGC-803 were used to detect the in vitro expression of periostin by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blotting. Results Periostin is expressed in the stroma of the primary gastric tumors and metastases, but not in normal gastric tissue. In addition, we observed that periostin is located mainly in pericryptal fibroblasts, but not in the tumor cells, and strongly correlated to the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA). Furthermore, the distribution patterns of periostin were broader as the clinical staging of tumors progressed. We also identified a role of stress-related signaling in promoting cancer development and progression, and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells. Conclusion These findings suggest that the distribution pattern of periostin was broader as the clinical staging of the tumor progressed and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells. PMID:26996552

  15. Fractal Analysis and the Diagnostic Usefulness of Silver Staining Nucleolar Organizer Regions in Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stepan, Alex; Simionescu, Cristiana; Pirici, Daniel; Ciurea, Raluca; Margaritescu, Claudiu

    2015-01-01

    Pathological diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma often requires complementary methods. On prostate biopsy tissue from 39 patients including benign nodular hyperplasia (BNH), atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH), and adenocarcinomas, we have performed combined histochemical-immunohistochemical stainings for argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) and glandular basal cells. After ascertaining the pathology, we have analyzed the number, roundness, area, and fractal dimension of individual AgNORs or of their skeleton-filtered maps. We have optimized here for the first time a combination of AgNOR morphological denominators that would reflect best the differences between these pathologies. The analysis of AgNORs' roundness, averaged from large composite images, revealed clear-cut lower values in adenocarcinomas compared to benign and atypical lesions but with no differences between different Gleason scores. Fractal dimension (FD) of AgNOR silhouettes not only revealed significant lower values for global cancer images compared to AAH and BNH images, but was also able to differentiate between Gleason pattern 2 and Gleason patterns 3–5 adenocarcinomas. Plotting the frequency distribution of the FDs for different pathologies showed clear differences between all Gleason patterns and BNH. Together with existing morphological classifiers, AgNOR analysis might contribute to a faster and more reliable machine-assisted screening of prostatic adenocarcinoma, as an essential aid for pathologists. PMID:26366372

  16. Gastric suction

    MedlinePlus

    ... al. Position paper update: gastric lavage for gastrointestinal decontamination. Clin Toxicol (Phila) . 2013;51(3); 140-146. ... 2012:chap 49. Zeringe M, Fowler GC. Gastrointesinal decontamination. In: Pfenninger JL, Fowler GC, eds. Pfenninger & Fowler's ...

  17. Gastric Banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastric banding before deciding to have the procedure. Advertisements for a device or procedure may not include ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  18. Gastric culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... test or procedure preparation (3 to 6 years) School age test or procedure preparation (6 to 12 ... immune system. The final results of the gastric culture test may take several weeks. Your provider will ...

  19. 13-acetoxysarcocrassolide induces apoptosis on human gastric carcinoma cells through mitochondria-related apoptotic pathways: p38/JNK activation and PI3K/AKT suppression.

    PubMed

    Su, Ching-Chyuan; Chen, Jeff Yi-Fu; Din, Zhong-Hao; Su, Jui-Hsin; Yang, Zih-Yan; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Robert Y L; Wu, Yu-Jen

    2014-10-01

    13-acetoxysarcocrassolide (13-AC), an active compound isolated from cultured Formosa soft coral Sarcophyton crassocaule, was found to possess anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities against AGS (human gastric adenocarcinoma cells) gastric carcinoma cells. The anti-tumor effects of 13-AC were determined by MTT assay, colony formation assessment, cell wound-healing assay, TUNEL/4,6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide (PI) staining and flow cytometry. 13-AC inhibited the growth and migration of gastric carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner and induced both early and late apoptosis as assessed by flow cytometer analysis. 13-AC-induced apoptosis was confirmed through observation of a change in ΔΨm, up-regulated expression levels of Bax and Bad proteins, down-regulated expression levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-xl and Mcl-1 proteins, and the activation of caspase-3, caspase-9, p38 and JNK. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 and JNK activity by pretreatment with SB03580 (a p38-specific inhibitor) and SP600125 (a JNK-specific inhibitor) led to rescue of the cell cytotoxicity of 13-AC-treated AGS cells, indicating that the p38 and the JNK pathways are also involved in the 13-AC-induced cell apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that 13-AC induces cell apoptosis against gastric cancer cells through triggering of the mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathway as well as activation of the p38 and JNK pathways. PMID:25342459

  20. H. Pylori in a gastric schwannoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lavy, Daniel S; Paulin, Ethan T; Parker, Mitchell I; Zhang, Bin; Parker, Glenn S; Schwartz, Mark R

    2016-04-01

    Schwannomas are benign, often asymptomatic, slow-growing tumors that originate from Schwann cells of the neural sheath. Although H. Pylori has been associated with gastric adenocarcinoma, there has never been a recorded association with schwannoma formation. We present a 64-year-old woman who underwent a laparoscopic partial wedge gastrectomy for an incidentally discovered gastric mass. Histologic examination was consistent with schwannoma; however, chronic inflammation with microorganisms morphologically consistent with H. Pylori was also present. This case suggests the first recorded case of H. Pylori in an immunohistochemically confirmed gastric schwannoma. PMID:27162787

  1. H. Pylori in a gastric schwannoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, Ethan T.; Parker, Mitchell I.; Zhang, Bin; Parker, Glenn S.; Schwartz, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign, often asymptomatic, slow-growing tumors that originate from Schwann cells of the neural sheath. Although H. Pylori has been associated with gastric adenocarcinoma, there has never been a recorded association with schwannoma formation. We present a 64-year-old woman who underwent a laparoscopic partial wedge gastrectomy for an incidentally discovered gastric mass. Histologic examination was consistent with schwannoma; however, chronic inflammation with microorganisms morphologically consistent with H. Pylori was also present. This case suggests the first recorded case of H. Pylori in an immunohistochemically confirmed gastric schwannoma. PMID:27162787

  2. Anti-metastasis effects of gallic acid on gastric cancer cells involves inhibition of NF-kappaB activity and downregulation of PI3K/AKT/small GTPase signals.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsieh-Hsun; Chang, Chi-Sen; Ho, Wei-Chi; Liao, Sheng-You; Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2010-01-01

    Polyphenols are natural antioxidants that are thought to contribute to prevention of cardiovascular disease and malignancy. Although many studies have been carried out to investigate the chemopreventive role of flavonoids, less attention has been focused on phenolic acids. In this study, the aim was to investigate the effect of phenolic acids found abundantly in vegetables, i.e. gallic acid (GA), caffeic acid (CA) and protocatechuic acid (PCA), on the inhibition of gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell metastasis. The results showed 0.01 mM GA induced the same level of cell toxicity as 4.0mM PCA. Using wound-healing assay and Boyden chamber assay, GA had potent inhibitory effects on AGS cell migration. The expression of MMP-2/9 of AGS cells was inhibited by 2.0 microM of GA. It is possible that the suppressive effect of GA on MMP-2/9 might involve the inhibition of NF-kappaB activity. Multiple proteins involved in metastasis and the cytoskeletal reorganization signal pathway, including Ras, Cdc42, Rac1, RhoA, RhoB, PI3K and p38MAPK, were also inhibited by GA. Furthermore, immunoreactivity assay of cytoskeletal F-actin demonstrated a significant inhibitory effect of GA treatment. In conclusion, GA may have the potential to be an effective agent for prevention and treatment of gastric cancer metastasis. PMID:20600540

  3. Anti-tumor Activity of Ferulago angulata Boiss. Extract in Gastric Cancer Cell Line via Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Shafagh; Akrami, Hassan; Gharaei, Roghaye; Jalili, Ali; Mahdiuni, Hamid; Golezar, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Ferulago angulata Boiss. known in Iran as Chavir, has some bioactive compounds having antioxidant activity. Because of its antioxidant activities, it sounded Chavir extract can be a good candidate for finding chemopreventive agents having inductive apoptosis properties on cancer cells. In this study, the cytotoxic effects and proapoptotic activities of Chavir’s leaf and flower extracts were investigated on human adenocarcinoma gastric cell line (AGS). The ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay was used to determine antioxidant activity of the extract. Cytotoxic effects of the extract were performed by trypan blue and neutral red assays. For apoptosis detection, we used Annexin V staining, flow cytometry and DNA fragmentation assays. The FRAP assay results showed that antioxidant activity of leaf extract was higher than flower extract. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis–inducing activity of flower and leaf extracts changed coordinately, indicating the cytotoxicity of chavir extracts is due probably to induce apoptosis. Our results revealed that the cytotoxic effects of F. angulate Boiss. extracts on AGS cell line is close to some other plant extracts such as Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS) and Scutellaria litwinowii. This is the first study on cytotoxic and apoptosis–inducing effects of chavir leaf and flower extracts against AGS cell line. The Further investigation can be identification of the agent(s) by which these effects is observed. PMID:25587323

  4. DNA profiles in mitotic cells from gastric adenomas.

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, C. A.; Kato, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative DNA measurements were done in mitotic figures from 17 gastric adenomas having slight (3 cases), moderate (8 cases), or severe dysplasia (3 cases) or foci of invasive adenocarcinoma (3 cases). Values higher than for normal diploid control cells (2c) or their estimated tetraploid values (4c) were found to increase gradually from slight dysplasia to invasive adenocarcinoma through moderate and severe dysplasia. While none of the adenomas having slight or moderate dysplasia demonstrated aneuploid mitoses (ie, values higher than 5c), 1% of the mitoses in severe dysplasia and 27% of those with invasive adenocarcinoma had values higher than 5c. The present results thus suggest that aneuploid mitotic figures may help to recognize those gastric adenomas having invasive growth. Images Figure 1 PMID:3348355

  5. Akt Inhibitor MK2206, Lapatinib Ditosylate, and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2-Positive Breast , Gastric, or Gastroesophageal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  6. Gastric Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma Occurring 50 Years after a Gastroenterostomy with Braun Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Hiroshi; Tate, Genshu; Yokomizo, Kazuaki; Umemoto, Takahiro; Matsubara, Taketo; Mizukami, Hiroki; Kigawa, Gaku; Matsumiya, Akihiko; Tanaka, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    A 75-year-old man was diagnosed with gastric cancer. Fifty years previously, he had undergone gastroenterostomy with a Braun enteroenterostomy. At present, a distal gastrectomy and small intestinal partial resection were performed. Intraoperatively, the tumor was localized to the previous stomal site. HE staining showed that the tumor comprised two elements: a tubular adenocarcinoma on the gastric side and a neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) on the jejunal side. The final pathologic diagnosis was mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma based on an immunohistochemical analysis of endocrine markers and an elevated Ki-67 labeling index. The risk of later cancer development cancer recurrence near the gastrojejunostomy site is well known. Potentially, chronic enterogastric bile reflux may irritate the gastric mucosa and act as a promoter. Gastric NEC has a strong malignant potential. We suspect that, in the present case, the constant exposure to secondary bile may have induced a gastric mucosal adenocarcinoma, which finally differentiated into a NEC. PMID:24987352

  7. Cytoprotective effect of American ginseng in a rat ethanol gastric ulcer model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Chang; Chen, Yi-Ming; Wang, Dean-Chuan; Chiu, Chien-Chao; Lin, Wan-Teng; Huang, Chih-Yang; Hsu, Mei-Chich

    2013-01-01

    Panax quinquefolium L. (American Ginseng, AG) is one of the most popular herbal medicines in the World. We aimed to investigate whether chronic (28-day) supplementation with AG could protect against ethanol-induced ulcer in gastric tissue. Furthermore, we investigated the possible molecular mechanisms leading to AG-mediated gastric mucosal protection. We randomized 32 male Wistar rats into four groups for treatment (n=8 per group): supplementation with water (vehicle) and low-dose (AG-1X), medium-dose (AG-2X) and high-dose (AG-5X) AG at 0, 250, 500, and 1250 mg/kg, respectively. In the first experiment, animals were fed vehicle or AG treatments for 4 weeks. At day 29, 75% ethanol was given orally to each animal at 10 mL/kg to induce gastric ulceration for 2 h. In a second experiment, animals were pretreated orally with each treatment for 1 hr before a single oral administration of ethanol (70%, 10 mL/kg). Trend analysis revealed that AG treatments inhibited ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. AG supplementation dose-dependently decreased the pro-inflammatory levels of interleukin 1β and cyclooxygenase 2 and the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins tBid, cytochrome C, and caspases-9 and -3 and increased the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and p-Bad. AG could have pharmacological potential for treating gastric ulcer. PMID:24378970

  8. LI-cadherin: a marker of gastric metaplasia and neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Grotzinger, C; Kneifel, J; Patschan, D; Schnoy, N; Anagnostopoulos, I; Faiss, S; Tauber, R; Wiedenmann, B; Gessner, R

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Intestinal metaplasia is considered a risk factor for the development of gastric adenocarcinomas of the intestinal type and is found in approximately 20% of gastric biopsies. Conventional histology only detects advanced stages of intestinal metaplasia.
AIMS—To study expression of the enterocyte specific adhesion molecule liver-intestinal (LI)-cadherin in intestinal metaplasia as well as in gastric cancer, and to evaluate its use as a diagnostic marker molecule.
PATIENTS—Gastric biopsies (n=77) from 30 consecutive patients (n=30; aged 28-90 years) as well as surgically resected tissue samples (n=24) of all types of gastric carcinomas were analysed.
METHODS—Single and double label immunofluorescence detection on cryosections of gastric biopsies; alkaline phosphatase antialkaline phosphatase method on paraffin embedded carcinoma tissue sections.
RESULTS—Of 77 biopsies (from 30 patients), 12 (from 10 patients) stained positive for LI-cadherin. LI-cadherin staining correlated with the presence of intestinal metaplasia. Conventional histological diagnosis however failed to detect subtle gastric intestinal metaplasia (three of 10 patients). In contrast, only LI-cadherin and villin were positive in these cases whereas sucrase-isomaltase also failed to detect intestinal metaplasia in four of 10 patients. Well differentiated gastric carcinomas showed intense staining for LI-cadherin while undifferentiated carcinomas showed only weak diffuse cytoplasmic staining.
CONCLUSIONS—To detect early metaplastic changes in the gastric mucosa, LI-cadherin has a sensitivity superior to sucrase-isomaltase and conventional histology and comparable with that of villin. Its specificity exceeds that of villin. Thus LI-cadherin represents a new, reliable, and powerful marker molecule for early detection of gastric intestinal metaplasia and well differentiated adenocarcinomas.


Keywords: stomach; intestinal metaplasia; cadherins; carcinogenesis

  9. Testicular metastasis from gastric carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Cai, Hui; Kang, Zheng-Chun; Wu, Hao; Hou, Jian-Guo; Ma, Li-Ye

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the most prevalent malignancy in the world, especially in China. GC has been postulated to spread via several different routes, including through hematogenous channels, lymphatic vessels, the seeding of peritoneal surfaces, direct extension through the gastric wall, and retrograde extension through the vas deferens or lymphatics. Testicular metastasis is rare. We show here a 53-year-old patient with GC who underwent a radical total gastrectomy approximately 22 mo ago after he presented with a sensation of heaviness and swelling of the right hemiscrotum. The diagnosis of metastatic adenocarcinoma was made after a right-side orchiectomy. We report the first case of testicular metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma in mainland China and summarize the clinicopathologic features of the disease based on previously published papers. PMID:26074716

  10. Solid adenocarcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Uniformly solid character of the lesions is usually indicative of a well differentiated tumor. No solid adenocarcinomas have observed in our series. However, rare cases have been described by others. In human pathology this diagnosis is usually based on detection of mucin after periodic acid-Schiff reaction with diastase (α-amylase) digestion.

  11. Safety and application of laparoscopic gastrectomy for benign gastric disease and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zia, MK; Morris-Stiff, G; Luhmann, A; Jeffries, R; Ehsan, O; Hassn, A

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Laparoscopic gastrectomy is rapidly expanding despite reservations by some surgeons regarding its safety and radicality. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrectomy for both benign and malignant disease with particular emphasis on technical feasibility, safety, effectiveness and complications. PATIENTS AND METHODS Review of prospectively collected data of patients who underwent laparoscopic gastrectomy from May 2005 to September 2009 under the care of one consultant surgeon. RESULTS A total of 61 laparoscopic gastrectomies were performed (35 men and 26 women) with a median age of 68 years (range, 41–90 years). There were 39 distal gastrectomies (19 adenocarcinoma, 6 gastrointestinal stromal tumour [GIST], 4 benign gastric outlet obstruction, 4 high-grade dysplasia in gastric adenomas, 4 non-healing ulcers, 2 gastric antral vascular ectasia [GAVE]); 15 sub-total gastrectomies (13 adenocarcinomas, 2 GIST); and 7 total gastrectomies (5 adenocarcinomas, 1 GIST, 1 carcinoid). Median follow-up was for 48 months (range, 1–72 months). There was one death, two major and six minor complications. All patients with complications made a satisfactory recovery. CONCLUSIONS Laparoscopic gastrectomy is associated with a low mortality (1.75%) and major morbidity (3.50%). Although technically demanding, especially when a D2 lymphadenectomy is performed, our results have shown that tailored laparoscopic resection based on tumour characteristics with either D1 or D2 lymphadenectomy results in good surgical and oncological outcomes. PMID:20810021

  12. [Gastric Acid].

    PubMed

    Ruíz Chávez, R

    1996-01-01

    Gastric acid, a product of parietal cells secretion, full fills multiple biological roles which are absolutely necessary to keep corporal homeostasis. The production of the acid depends upon an effector cellular process represented in the first step by histamine, acetilcholine and gastrin, first messengers of the process. These interact with specific receptors than in sequence activate second messengers -cAMP and the calcium-calmodulin system- which afterwards activate a kinase. An specific protein is then phosphorilated by this enzyme, being the crucial factor that starts the production of acid. Finally, a proton bomb, extrudes the acid towards the gastric lumen. The secretion process mentioned above, is progressive lyactivated in three steps, two of which are stimulators -cephalic and gastric phases- and the other one inhibitor or intestinal phase. These stages are started by mental and neurological phenomena -thought, sight, smell or memory-; by food, drugs or other ingested substances; and by products of digestion. Changes in regulation of acid secretion, in the structure of gastro-duodenal mucosal barrier by a wide spectrum of factors and agents including food, drugs and H. pylori, are the basis of acid-peptic disease, entity in which gastric acid plays a fundamental role. From the therapeutic point of view, so at the theoretical as at the practical levels, t is possible to interfere with the secretion of acid by neutralization of some of the steps of the effector cellular process. An adequate knowledge of the basics related to gastric acid, allows to create strategies for the clinical handling of associated pathology, specifically in relation to peptic acid disease in all of the known clinical forms. PMID:12165790

  13. Helicobacter pylori Update: Gastric Cancer, Reliable Therapy, and Possible Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection contributes to development of diverse gastric and extra-gastric diseases. The infection is necessary but not sufficient for development of gastric adenocarcinoma. Its eradication would eliminate a major worldwide cause of cancer death, so there is much interest in identifying how, if, and when this can be accomplished. There are several mechanisms by which H pylori contributes to development of gastric cancer. Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of many cancers associated with inflammation, which is induced by H pylori infection, yet the bacteria also cause genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells. H pylori eradication reduces both. However, many factors must be considered in determining whether treating this bacterial infection will prevent cancer or only reduce its risk—these must be considered in designing reliable and effective eradication therapies. Furthermore, H pylori infection has been proposed to provide some benefits, such as reducing the risks of obesity or childhood asthma, although there are no convincing data to support the benefits of H pylori infections. PMID:25655557

  14. Clinicopathological significance of gastric poorly differentiated medullary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hideaki; Yoshizawa, Tadashi; Morohashi, Satoko; Haga, Toshihiro; Wu, Yunyan; Ota, Rie; Takatsuna, Masafumi; Akasaka, Harue; Hakamada, Kenichi; Kijima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma of solid type is known to show a clinicopathological diversity, but its morphological characteristics have rarely been investigated. In this study, we defined poorly differentiated medullary carcinoma indicating the following three characteristics: (i) more than 90% of the entire tumor were composed of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in a medullary growth, (ii) the tumor exhibited an expansive growth at the tumor margin, and (iii) special types such as an α-fetoprotein-producing carcinoma, neuroendocrine carcinoma, and carcinoma with lymphoid stroma were excluded. Based on the definition, we subclassified the poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma of solid type into the two groups: medullary carcinoma and non-medullary carcinoma, and clinicopathologically analyzed 23 cases of medullary carcinomas and 38 cases of non-medullary carcinomas. The medullary carcinomas less frequently displayed lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, and lymph node metastasis, compared with the non-medullary carcinoma (P < 0.001, P = 0.002, and P < 0.001, respectively). The patients with medullary carcinomas significantly showed better disease-free survival (P = 0.017). This is the first study to demonstrate that poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of solid type can be subclassified into tumors with low and high malignant potentials. Gastric poorly differentiated medullary carcinoma is considered to be a novel histological type predicting good patients' prognosis. PMID:27108877

  15. Gastric Carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Borch, Kurt; Ahrén, Bo; Ahlman, Håkan; Falkmer, Sture; Granérus, Göran; Grimelius, Lars

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze tumor biology and the outcome of differentiated treatment in relation to tumor subtype in patients with gastric carcinoid. Background: Gastric carcinoids may be subdivided into ECL cell carcinoids (type 1 associated with atrophic gastritis, type 2 associated with gastrinoma, type 3 without predisposing conditions) and miscellaneous types (type 4). The biologic behavior and prognosis vary considerably in relation to type. Methods: A total of 65 patients from 24 hospitals (51 type 1, 1 type 2, 4 type 3, and 9 type 4) were included. Management recommendations were issued for newly diagnosed cases, that is, endoscopic or surgical treatment of type 1 and 2 carcinoids (including antrectomy to abolish hypergastrinemia) and radical resection for type 3 and 4 carcinoids. Results: Infiltration beyond the submucosa occurred in 9 of 51 type 1, 4 of 4 type 3, and 7 of 9 type 4 carcinoids. Metastases occurred in 4 of 51 type 1 (3 regional lymph nodes, 1 liver), the single type 2 (regional lymph nodes), 3 of 4 type 3 (all liver), and 7 of 9 type 4 carcinoids (all liver). Of the patients with type 1 carcinoid, 3 had no specific treatment, 40 were treated with endoscopic or surgical excision (in 10 cases combined with antrectomy), 7 underwent total gastrectomy, and 1 underwent proximal gastric resection. Radical tumor removal was not possible in 2 of 4 patients with type 3 and 7 of 9 patients with type 4 carcinoid. Five- and 10-year crude survival rates were 96.1% and 73.9% for type 1 (not different from the general population), but only 33.3% and 22.2% for type 4 carcinoids. Conclusion: Subtyping of gastric carcinoids is helpful in the prediction of malignant potential and long-term survival and is a guide to management. Long-term survival did not differ from that of the general population regarding type 1 carcinoids but was poor regarding type 4 carcinoids. PMID:15973103

  16. Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Varma, Krishnendra; Singh, Ujjwal Kumar; Jain, Mansi; Dhand, P L

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma is a rare entity. Here, we report the case of a 40-year-old female who presented with yellowish-brown, irregular, solid, elevated rashes over the pubis with a recent history off palliative colostomy for anorectal adenocarcinoma. Clinically, we suspected metastasis that was proved on biopsy. We report this case due to the rare presenting site (i.e., perineum) of a metastatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:26009722

  17. Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Krishnendra; Singh, Ujjwal Kumar; Jain, Mansi; Dhand, P. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma is a rare entity. Here, we report the case of a 40-year-old female who presented with yellowish-brown, irregular, solid, elevated rashes over the pubis with a recent history off palliative colostomy for anorectal adenocarcinoma. Clinically, we suspected metastasis that was proved on biopsy. We report this case due to the rare presenting site (i.e., perineum) of a metastatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:26009722

  18. AURKA regulates JAK2-STAT3 activity in human gastric and esophageal cancers.

    PubMed

    Katsha, Ahmed; Arras, Janet; Soutto, Mohammed; Belkhiri, Abbes; El-Rifai, Wael

    2014-12-01

    Aurora kinase A is a frequently amplified and overexpressed gene in upper gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas (UGCs). Using in vitro cell models of UGCs, we investigated whether AURKA can regulate Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3). Our data indicate that overexpression of AURKA in FLO-1 and AGS cells increase STAT3 phosphorylation at the Tyr705 site, whereas AURKA genetic depletion by siRNA results in decreased phosphorylation levels of STAT3 in FLO-1 and MKN45 cells. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that AURKA overexpression enhanced STAT3 nuclear translocation while AURKA genetic knockdown reduced the nuclear translocation of STAT3 in AGS and FLO-1 cells, respectively. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we demonstrated that AURKA expression induces transcriptional activity of STAT3. Pharmacological inhibition of AURKA by MLN8237 reduced STAT3 phosphorylation along with down-regulation of STAT3 pro-survival targets, BCL2 and MCL1. Moreover, by using clonogenic cells survival assay, we showed that MLN8237 single dose treatment reduced the ability of FLO-1 and AGS cells to form colonies. Additional experiments utilizing cell models of overexpression and knockdown of AURKA indicated that STAT3 upstream non-receptor tyrosine kinase Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) is mediating the effect of AURKA on STAT3. The inhibition of JAK2 using JAK2-specific inhibitor AZD1480 or siRNA knockdown, in presence of AURKA overexpression, abrogated the AURKA-mediated STAT3 activation. These results confirm that the AURKA-JAK2 axis is the main mechanism by which AURKA regulates STAT3 activity. In conclusion, we report, for the first time, that AURKA promotes STAT3 activity through regulating the expression and phosphorylation levels of JAK2. This highlights the importance of targeting AURKA as a therapeutic approach to treat gastric and esophageal cancers. PMID:24953013

  19. Challenges of deciphering gastric cancer heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Hudler, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is in decline in most developed countries; however, it still accounts for a notable fraction of global mortality and morbidity related to cancer. High-throughput methods are rapidly changing our view and understanding of the molecular basis of gastric carcinogenesis. Today, it is widely accepted that the molecular complexity and heterogeneity, both inter- and intra-tumour, of gastric adenocarcinomas present significant obstacles in elucidating specific biomarkers for early detection of the disease. Although genome-wide sequencing and gene expression studies have revealed the intricate nature of the molecular changes that occur in tumour landscapes, the collected data and results are complex and sometimes contradictory. Several aberrant molecules have already been tested in clinical trials, although their diagnostic and prognostic utilities have not been confirmed thus far. The gold standard for the detection of sporadic gastric cancer is still the gastric endoscopy, which is considered invasive. In addition, genome-wide association studies have confirmed that genetic variations are important contributors to increased cancer risk and could participate in the initiation of malignant transformation. This hypothesis could in part explain the late onset of sporadic gastric cancers. The elaborate interplay of polymorphic low penetrance genes and lifestyle and environmental risk factors requires additional research to decipher their relative impacts on tumorigenesis. The purpose of this article is to present details of the molecular heterogeneity of sporadic gastric cancers at the DNA, RNA, and proteome levels and to discuss issues relevant to the translation of basic research data to clinically valuable tools. The focus of this work is the identification of relevant molecular changes that could be detected non-invasively. PMID:26457012

  20. Challenges of deciphering gastric cancer heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hudler, Petra

    2015-10-01

    Gastric cancer is in decline in most developed countries; however, it still accounts for a notable fraction of global mortality and morbidity related to cancer. High-throughput methods are rapidly changing our view and understanding of the molecular basis of gastric carcinogenesis. Today, it is widely accepted that the molecular complexity and heterogeneity, both inter- and intra-tumour, of gastric adenocarcinomas present significant obstacles in elucidating specific biomarkers for early detection of the disease. Although genome-wide sequencing and gene expression studies have revealed the intricate nature of the molecular changes that occur in tumour landscapes, the collected data and results are complex and sometimes contradictory. Several aberrant molecules have already been tested in clinical trials, although their diagnostic and prognostic utilities have not been confirmed thus far. The gold standard for the detection of sporadic gastric cancer is still the gastric endoscopy, which is considered invasive. In addition, genome-wide association studies have confirmed that genetic variations are important contributors to increased cancer risk and could participate in the initiation of malignant transformation. This hypothesis could in part explain the late onset of sporadic gastric cancers. The elaborate interplay of polymorphic low penetrance genes and lifestyle and environmental risk factors requires additional research to decipher their relative impacts on tumorigenesis. The purpose of this article is to present details of the molecular heterogeneity of sporadic gastric cancers at the DNA, RNA, and proteome levels and to discuss issues relevant to the translation of basic research data to clinically valuable tools. The focus of this work is the identification of relevant molecular changes that could be detected non-invasively. PMID:26457012

  1. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine adenocarcinoma, by stage How is small intestine adenocarcinoma staged? Staging is a process that tells ... distant m etastasis (M). T categories for small intestine adenocarcinoma T categories of small intestine cancer describe ...

  2. Intramucosal gastric mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma completely resected with endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Yasushi; Nasu, Junichiro; Miura, Kou; Kono, Yoshiyasu; Kanzaki, Hiromitsu; Hori, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takehiro; Kita, Masahide; Tsuzuki, Takao; Matsubara, Minoru; Kawano, Seiji; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Tabata, Masahiro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    Composite tumors in the stomach composed of adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma are rare. We herein report a case of intramucosal gastric mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) that was treated with endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). A 77-year-old man who had previously received ESD for early gastric adenocarcinoma underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy for screening, which showed a depressed lesion on the lesser curvature of the antrum. The tumor was removed en bloc via ESD and pathologically diagnosed as MANEC. The tumor was located within the mucosal layer, and no lymphovascular invasion was evident. Seven months after the ESD procedure, the patient is currently feeling well without recurrence or metastasis. PMID:25876572

  3. Gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Do, Patrick H; Kang, Young S; Cahill, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Gastric infarction is an extremely rare occurrence owing to the stomach’s extensive vascular supply. We report an unusual case of gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery. We describe the imaging findings and discuss possible causes of this condition. PMID:27200168

  4. [A case of chronic pancreatitis occurring in gastric aberrant pancreas poorly distinguishable from gastric aberrant pancreas ductal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Sayaka; Miyaoka, Youichi; Fujiwara, Aya; Tsukano, Kousuke; Kotani, Satoshi; Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Kusunoki, Ryusaku; Ito, Satoko; Fujishiro, Hirofumi; Kohge, Nariaki; Onuma, Hideyuki

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 40s was referred to our hospital with abdominal pain. A gastric submucosal tumor (SMT) was diagnosed nine years previously, but the patient was lost to follow-up. Upon our evaluation, the SMT had enlarged, as demonstrated by esophagogastroduodenoscopy and abdominal computed tomography. Endoscopic ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic and isoechoic mosaic mass, which primarily occupied the third and fourth layers of the gastric wall. Aspiration cytodiagnosis was performed, the results of which led to a suspicion of adenocarcinoma arising from gastric ectopic pancreas. Next, we conducted segmental gastrectomy. Pathological examination showed adiponecrosis, a pancreatic stone, chronic inflammatory cell infiltration, and fibrosis. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis occurring in a gastric aberrant pancreas. PMID:26537325

  5. Protective effect of ascorbic acid in experimental gastric cancer: reduction of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    P.M.S.Oliveira, Claudia; Kassab, Paulo; Lopasso, Fabio P.; Souza, Heraldo P.; Janiszewski, Mariano; Laurindo, Francisco R. M.; Iriya, Kioshi; Laudanna, Antonio A.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Oxidative stress participates in the cell carcinogenesis by inducing DNA mutations. Our aim was to assess whether ascorbic acid, an antioxidant, could have a role in preventing ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) generation in experimental gastric carcinoma in a rat model. METHODS: Experimental gastric cancer was induced in twelve Wistar male rats (weighting 250-350 g) by profound duodeno-gastric reflux throught split gastrojenunostomy. The rats were allocated to the following groups: Group I (n = 6) was the control; Group II (n = 6) which was mantained with daily intake of tape water with Vitamin C (30 mg/Kg). After 6 or 12 months, samples of gastric tumor or non tumor mucosa were taken from the anastomosis of both groups. Oxidative stress was measured by superoxide quantification through lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence base and by staining with Nitrobluetetrazolium. The histopathologic confirmation of adenocarcinoma was made by eosin-hemathoxilin method. RESULTS: The intestinal type of gastric adenocarcinoma was microscopically identified in all animals of group I whereas only 3 rats of group II showed an adenocarcinoma without macroscopic evidence of them. The cancers were located in the anastomosis in all cases. Basal luminescence from tumor gastric tissue generated 38.4 ± 6.8 count per minute/mg/x106 (mean ± SD) and 14.9 ± 4.0 count per minute/mg/x106, respectively, in group I and II animals (P < 0.05). The Nitrobluetetrazolium method showed intense staining in tumor tissues but not in non neoplasic mucosa. CONCLUSION: Experimental gastric tumors seem to produce more reactive oxygen species than non neoplasic gastric tissue. The reduction of oxidative stress and gastric tumor incidence in rats were induced by the intake of ascorbic acid. Therefore, it may have a role in the prevention of gastric carcinoma. PMID:12632494

  6. Gastric mucosa in Mongolian and Japanese patients with gastric cancer and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Uchida, Tomohisa; Duger, Davaadorj; Adiyasuren, Battulga; Khasag, Oyuntsetseg; Tegshee, Tserentogtokh; Tsogt-Ochir, Byambajav

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the characteristics of gastric cancer and gastric mucosa in a Mongolian population by comparison with a Japanese population. METHODS: A total of 484 Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were enrolled to study gastric cancer characteristics in Mongolians. In addition, a total of 208 Mongolian and 3205 Japanese consecutive outpatients who underwent endoscopy, had abdominal complaints, no history of gastric operation or Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment, and no use of gastric secretion inhibitors such as histamine H2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors were enrolled. This study was conducted with the approval of the ethics committees of all hospitals. The triple-site biopsy method was used for the histologic diagnosis of gastritis and H. pylori infection in all Mongolian and Japanese cases. The infection rate of H. pylori and the status of gastric mucosa in H. pylori-infected patients were compared between Mongolian and Japanese subjects. Age (± 5 years), sex, and endoscopic diagnosis were matched between the two countries. RESULTS: Approximately 70% of Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were 50-79 years of age, and approximately half of the cancers were located in the upper part of the stomach. Histologically, 65.7% of early cancers exhibited differentiated adenocarcinoma, whereas 73.9% of advanced cancers displayed undifferentiated adenocarcinoma. The infection rate of H. pylori was higher in Mongolian than Japanese patients (75.9% vs 48.3%, P < 0.0001). When stratified by age, the prevalence was highest among young patients, and tended to decrease in patients aged 50 years or older. The anti-East-Asian CagA-specific antibody was negative in 99.4% of H. pylori-positive Mongolian patients. Chronic inflammation, neutrophil activity, glandular atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia scores were significantly lower in Mongolian compared to Japanese H. pylori-positive patients (P < 0.0001), with the exception of the intestinal

  7. Helicobacter pylori update: gastric cancer, reliable therapy, and possible benefits.

    PubMed

    Graham, David Y

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection contributes to the development of diverse gastric and extragastric diseases. The infection is necessary but not sufficient for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. Its eradication would eliminate a major worldwide cause of cancer death, therefore there is much interest in identifying how, if, and when this can be accomplished. There are several mechanisms by which H pylori contributes to the development of gastric cancer. Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of many cancers associated with inflammation, which is induced by H pylori infection, yet the bacteria also cause genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells. H pylori eradication reduces both. However, many factors must be considered in determining whether treating this bacterial infection will prevent cancer or only reduce its risk-these must be considered in designing reliable and effective eradication therapies. Furthermore, H pylori infection has been proposed to provide some benefits, such as reducing the risks of obesity or childhood asthma. When tested, these hypotheses have not been confirmed and are therefore most likely false. PMID:25655557

  8. Modeling Murine Gastric Metaplasia Through Tamoxifen-Induced Acute Parietal Cell Loss.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Jose B; Burclaff, Joseph; Mills, Jason C

    2016-01-01

    Parietal cell loss represents the initial step in the sequential progression toward gastric adenocarcinoma. In the setting of chronic inflammation, the expansion of the mucosal response to parietal cell loss characterizes a crucial transition en route to gastric dysplasia. Here, we detail methods for using the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen as a novel tool to rapidly and reversibly induce parietal cell loss in mice in order to study the mechanisms that underlie these pre-neoplastic events. PMID:27246044

  9. Oxygenated hemoglobin diffuse reflectance ratio for in vitro detection of human gastric pre-cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. Q.; Wei, H. J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, H. Q.; Wu, G. Y.; Xie, S. S.; Zhong, H. Q.; Li, X. Y.; Zhao, Q. L.; Guo, X.

    2010-07-01

    Oxygenated hemoglobin diffuse reflectance (DR) ratio (R540/R575) method based on DR spectral signatures is used for early diagnosis of malignant lesions of human gastric epithelial tissues in vitro. The DR spectra for four different kinds of gastric epithelial tissues were measured using a spectrometer with an integrating sphere detector in the spectral range from 400 to 650 nm. The results of measurement showed that the average DR spectral intensity for the epithelial tissues of normal stomach is higher than that for the epithelial tissues of chronic and malignant stomach and that for the epithelial tissues of chronic gastric ulcer is higher than that for the epithelial tissues of malignant stomach. The average DR spectra for four different kinds of gastric epithelial tissues show dips at 542 and 577 nm owing to absorption from oxygenated Hemoglobin (HbO2). The differences in the mean R540/R575 ratios of HbO2 bands are 6.84% between the epithelial tissues of normal stomach and chronic gastric ulcer, 14.7% between the epithelial tissues of normal stomach and poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma and 22.6% between the epithelial tissues of normal stomach and undifferentiated gastric adenocarcinoma. It is evident from results that there were significant differences in the mean R540/R575 ratios of HbO2 bands for four different kinds of gastric epithelial tissues in vitro ( P < 0.01).

  10. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  11. Adenoma-Like Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Raul S.; Cates, Justin M.M.; Washington, M. Kay; Beauchamp, R. Daniel; Coffey, Robert J.; Shi, Chanjuan

    2015-01-01

    Aims A subset of colorectal carcinomas (CRCs) architecturally and cytologically resembles adenomatous change, making them difficult to diagnose on biopsy. This subset has not been well-characterized to date. Methods and results For 35 carcinomas with adenomatous-like areas (cytologic and surface architectural appearance that would be insufficient to warrant a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma if evaluated on biopsy), we recorded staging information, molecular data, clinical outcome, whether precursor adenoma was present, and whether prior biopsy had been diagnosed as malignant. Despite advanced T-category in 23 (66%) tumors, only 7 (20%) had nodal metastases, and only 5 patients (15%) developed distant metastases. Fifteen cases (43%) had been diagnosed as adenoma on biopsy. Twenty-one resections (60%) showed no residual associated adenoma, including 9 called adenoma on biopsy. Median follow-up was 44 months. Four patients (12%) died of disease; 22 were alive at last follow-up. KRAS mutation was seen in 14/24 (58%), and 4/17 (24%) were microsatellite-unstable. Patients had significantly improved survival compared to a cohort of patients with conventional well-differentiated CRC after controlling for age and stage (p=0.011). Conclusions Adenoma-like adenocarcinoma is an uncommon variant of CRC with a low rate of metastasis and good prognosis. Biopsy diagnosis of this lesion may be challenging. PMID:25913616

  12. Discrimination of premalignant lesions and cancer tissues from normal gastric tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shuwen; Chen, Changshui; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2013-06-01

    The feasibility of early detection of gastric cancer using near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy (RS) by distinguishing premalignant lesions (adenomatous polyp, n=27) and cancer tissues (adenocarcinoma, n=33) from normal gastric tissues (n=45) is evaluated. Significant differences in Raman spectra are observed among the normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues at 936, 1003, 1032, 1174, 1208, 1323, 1335, 1450, and 1655 cm-1. Diverse statistical methods are employed to develop effective diagnostic algorithms for classifying the Raman spectra of different types of ex vivo gastric tissues, including principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and naive Bayesian classifier (NBC) techniques. Compared with PCA-LDA algorithms, PCA-NBC techniques together with leave-one-out, cross-validation method provide better discriminative results of normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues, resulting in superior sensitivities of 96.3%, 96.9%, and 96.9%, and specificities of 93%, 100%, and 95.2%, respectively. Therefore, NIR RS associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for early diagnosis of gastric premalignant lesions and cancer tissues in molecular level.

  13. Lauren classification and individualized chemotherapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    MA, JUNLI; SHEN, HONG; KAPESA, LINDA; ZENG, SHAN

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. During the last 50 years, the histological classification of gastric carcinoma has been largely based on Lauren's criteria, in which gastric cancer is classified into two major histological subtypes, namely intestinal type and diffuse type adenocarcinoma. This classification was introduced in 1965, and remains currently widely accepted and employed, since it constitutes a simple and robust classification approach. The two histological subtypes of gastric cancer proposed by the Lauren classification exhibit a number of distinct clinical and molecular characteristics, including histogenesis, cell differentiation, epidemiology, etiology, carcinogenesis, biological behaviors and prognosis. Gastric cancer exhibits varied sensitivity to chemotherapy drugs and significant heterogeneity; therefore, the disease may be a target for individualized therapy. The Lauren classification may provide the basis for individualized treatment for advanced gastric cancer, which is increasingly gaining attention in the scientific field. However, few studies have investigated individualized treatment that is guided by pathological classification. The aim of the current review is to analyze the two major histological subtypes of gastric cancer, as proposed by the Lauren classification, and to discuss the implications of this for personalized chemotherapy. PMID:27123046

  14. Urinary microRNA-30a-5p is a potential biomarker for ovarian serous adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Gong, Guanghui; Tan, Hong; Dai, Furong; Zhu, Xin; Chen, Yile; Wang, Junpu; Liu, Ying; Chen, Puxiang; Wu, Xiaoying; Wen, Jifang

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can serve as biomarkers in human cancer. To determine the clinical value of urinary miRNAs for ovarian serous adenocarcinoma, we collected urine samples from 39 ovarian serous adenocarcinoma patients, 26 patients with benign gynecological disease and 30 healthy controls. The miRNA microarray data showed that only miR-30a-5p was upregulated and 37 miRNAs were downregulated in the urine samples of ovarian serous adenocarcinoma patients, when compared to healthy controls, which was confirmed after conducting quantitative PCR. The upregulation of urinary miR-30a-5p was closely associated with early stage of ovarian serous adenocarcinoma as well as lymphatic metastasis. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis demonstrated the potential use of urinary miR-30a-5p as a diagnostic marker for ovarian serous adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, a lower urine level of miR-30a-5p was found in 20 gastric cancer and 20 colon carcinoma patients when compared to ovarian serous adenocarcinoma, suggesting that the upregulation of urinary miR-30a-5p may be specific for ovarian serous adenocarcinoma. miR-30a-5p was also upregulated in ovarian serous adenocarcinoma tissues and cell lines, while urinary miR-30a-5p from ovarian cancer patients was notably reduced following the surgical removal of ovarian serous adenocarcinoma, suggesting that urinary miR-30a-5p was derived from the ovarian serous adenocarcinoma tissue. Notably, miR-30a-5p was concentrated with exosomes from the ovarian cancer cell supernatant or urine from ovarian serous adenocarcinoma patients, supporting a pathway for excretion into the urine. The results also showed that the knockdown of miR-30a-5p significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of ovarian cancer cells. In summary, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provided the first evidence of increased miR-30a-5p in the urine of ovarian serous adeno-carcinoma patients, while the inhibition of miR-30a-5p suppressed the

  15. Experimental Gastric Carcinogenesis in Cebus apella Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tanielly Cristina Raiol; Andrade Junior, Edilson Ferreira; Rezende, Alexandre Pingarilho; Carneiro Muniz, José Augusto Pereira; Lacreta Junior, Antonio Carlos Cunha; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Demachki, Samia; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We established two gastric carcinogenesis models in New-World nonhuman primates. In the first model, ACP03 gastric cancer cell line was inoculated in 18 animals. In the second model, we treated 6 animals with N-methyl-nitrosourea (MNU). Animals with gastric cancer were also treated with Canova immunomodulator. Clinical, hematologic, and biochemical, including C-reactive protein, folic acid, and homocysteine, analyses were performed in this study. MYC expression and copy number was also evaluated. We observed that all animals inoculated with ACP03 developed gastric cancer on the 9th day though on the 14th day presented total tumor remission. In the second model, all animals developed pre-neoplastic lesions and five died of drug intoxication before the development of cancer. The last surviving MNU-treated animal developed intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma observed by endoscopy on the 940th day. The level of C-reactive protein level and homocysteine concentration increased while the level of folic acid decreased with the presence of tumors in ACP03-inoculated animals and MNU treatment. ACP03 inoculation also led to anemia and leukocytosis. The hematologic and biochemical results corroborate those observed in patients with gastric cancer, supporting that our in vivo models are potentially useful to study this neoplasia. In cell line inoculated animals, we detected MYC immunoreactivity, mRNA overexpression, and amplification, as previously observed in vitro. In MNU-treated animals, mRNA expression and MYC copy number increased during the sequential steps of intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis and immunoreactivity was only observed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer. Thus, MYC deregulation supports the gastric carcinogenesis process. Canova immunomodulator restored several hematologic measurements and therefore, can be applied during/after chemotherapy to increase the tolerability and

  16. Molecular Classification of Gastric Cancer: A new paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manish A.; Khanin, Raya; Tang, Laura; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Klimstra, David S.; Gerdes, Hans; Kelsen, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Gastric cancer may be subdivided into three distinct subtypes –proximal, diffuse, and distal gastric cancer– based on histopathologic and anatomic criteria. Each subtype is associated with unique epidemiology. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that these distinct gastric cancer subtypes may also be distinguished by gene expression analysis. Experimental Design Patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma being screened for a phase II preoperative clinical trial (NCI 5917) underwent endoscopic biopsy for fresh tumor procurement. 4–6 targeted biopsies of the primary tumor were obtained. Macrodissection was performed to ensure >80% carcinoma in the sample. HG-U133A GeneChip (Affymetrix) was used for cDNA expression analysis, and all arrays were processed and analyzed using the Bioconductor R-package. Results Between November 2003 and January 2006, 57 patients were screened to identify 36 patients with localized gastric cancer who had adequate RNA for expression analysis. Using supervised analysis, we built a classifier to distinguish the three gastric cancer subtypes, successfully classifying each into tightly grouped clusters. Leave-one-out cross validation error was 0.14, suggesting that >85% of samples were classified correctly. Gene set analysis with the False Discovery Rate set at 0.25 identified several pathways that were differentially regulated when comparing each gastric cancer subtype to adjacent normal stomach. Conclusions Subtypes of gastric cancer that have epidemiologic and histologic distinction are also distinguished by gene expression data. These preliminary data suggest a new classification of gastric cancer with implications for improving our understanding of disease biology and identification of unique molecular drivers for each gastric cancer subtype. PMID:21430069

  17. Gene Expression Profiling of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Jacob, Harrys K.C.; Jakharia, Aniruddha; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Kashyap, Manoj Kumar; Goel, Renu; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Dwivedi, Sutopa; Pathare, Swapnali; Dikshit, Jyoti Bajpai; Maharudraiah, Jagadeesha; Singh, Sujay; Sameer Kumar, Ghantasala S; Vijayakumar, M.; Veerendra Kumar, Kariyanakatte Veeraiah; Premalatha, Chennagiri Shrinivasamurthy; Tata, Pramila; Hariharan, Ramesh; Roa, Juan Carlos; Prasad, T.S.K; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, both in men and women. A genomewide gene expression analysis was carried out to identify differentially expressed genes in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues as compared to adjacent normal tissues. We used Agilent’s whole human genome oligonucleotide microarray platform representing ~41,000 genes to carry out gene expression analysis. Two-color microarray analysis was employed to directly compare the expression of genes between tumor and normal tissues. Through this approach, we identified several previously known candidate genes along with a number of novel candidate genes in gastric cancer. Testican-1 (SPOCK1) was one of the novel molecules that was 10-fold upregulated in tumors. Using tissue microarrays, we validated the expression of testican-1 by immunohistochemical staining. It was overexpressed in 56% (160/282) of the cases tested. Pathway analysis led to the identification of several networks in which SPOCK1 was among the topmost networks of interacting genes. By gene enrichment analysis, we identified several genes involved in cell adhesion and cell proliferation to be significantly upregulated while those corresponding to metabolic pathways were significantly downregulated. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study are candidate biomarkers for gastric adenoacarcinoma. PMID:27030788

  18. Epstein-Barr virus in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, M.; Land, C. E.; Uemura, Y.; Tokudome, T.; Tanaka, S.; Sato, E.

    1993-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is known to be related to lymphoid tumors and some types of epithelial tumors, including lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma with marked lymphocytic stroma. In this study, prevalence of EBV involvement in gastric cancer, and characteristics of tumors with such involvement, were investigated by EBV-encoded RNA 1 in situ hybridization applied to paraffin sections, including the tumor and adjacent gastric tissue, from 999 gastric carcinomas observed in 970 consecutive cases from a large Japanese hospital. EBV involvement occurred in 6.9 percent of lesions, a significantly lower proportion than has been observed in a North American series. Involvement was significantly more frequent among males, in tumors in the upper part of the stomach, and in adenocarcinomas of the moderately differentiated tubular and poorly differentiated solid or medullary types. Almost all carcinomas with marked lymphoid stroma were EBV-positive. Positive lesions were characterized by the presence of uniform hybridized signals in almost all carcinoma cells and by their absence from adjacent non-neoplastic tissue. Images Figure 1 PMID:8238241

  19. The descriptive epidemiology of gastric cancer in Central America and comparison with United States Hispanic populations

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Juan E.; Delgado Hurtado, Juan J.; Domínguez, Ricardo L.; de Cuéllar, Marisabel Valdez; Cruz, Carlos Balmore; Morgan, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Delineate the epidemiology of gastric adenocarcinoma in Central America and contrast it with Hispanic-Latino populations in the U.S. Methods Published literature and Central America Ministry of Health databases were used as primary data sources, including national, population-based and hospital-based registries. U.S. data was obtained from the NCI-SEER registry. Incident gastric adenocarcinoma cases were analyzed for available data between 1985–2011, including demographic variables and pathology information. Results In Central America, 19,741 incident gastric adenocarcinomas were identified. Two-thirds of cases were male, 20.5% were under age 55, and 58.5% were from rural areas. In the SEER database (n=7,871), 57.8% were male, and 28.9% were under age 55. Among the U.S. Hispanics born in Central America with gastric cancer (n=1,210), 50.3% of cases were male, and 38.1% were under age 55. Noncardia gastric cancer was more common in Central America (83.3%), among U.S. Hispanics (80.2%), and Hispanics born in Central America (86.3%). Cancers of the antrum were more common in Central America (73.6%), whereas cancers of the corpus were slightly more common among U.S. Hispanics (54.0%). Adenocarcinoma of the diffuse subtype was relatively common, both in Central America (35.7%), and U.S. Hispanics (69.5%), although Lauren classification was reported in only 50% of cases. Conclusions A significant burden of gastric adenocarcinoma is observed in Central America based upon limited available data. Differences are noted between Central America and U.S. Hispanics. Strengthening population-based registries is needed for improved cancer control in Central America, which may have implications for the growing U.S. Hispanic population. PMID:25412859

  20. Hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Ye, Min-Feng; Tao, Feng; Liu, Fang; Sun, Ai-Jing

    2013-07-21

    Hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach (HAS) is a rare form of gastric cancer that has unique clinicopathological features and an extremely poor prognosis. Here, we report on three patients with suspected gastric cancer who were referred to our hospital. Gastrointestinal fiberscopy on the three patients revealed two lesions in the antrum and a third lesion in the gastroesophageal junction. The alpha fetoprotein (AFP) serum levels were markedly elevated in all cases. At the time of diagnosis, two cases were advanced stages with lymph nodes and/or liver metastases. Two patients underwent exploratory laparotomy. A total gastrectomy was performed on the operable lesion, and an expanded gastrectomy was completed in the case with hepatic metastases. Histopathological analysis revealed that the tumors displayed two pathological changes: hepatoid-like foci and adenocarcinomatous. Furthermore, the tumor cells were immunohistochemically positive for AFP, alpha-1 antitrypsin, and alpha-1 antichymotrypsin. All three patients received chemotherapy. The follow-up duration ranged from 8-36 mo. Our experience and previous published studies have suggested that HAS is an aggressive type of adenocarcinoma. However, radical surgery and chemotherapy may positively impact clinical outcomes. PMID:23885160

  1. Hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XIAO-MEI; CHEN, GUI-QIU; LI, SHUN-LI; ZAI, TIAN-SHU

    2015-01-01

    Hepatoid adenocarcinoma (HAC) is a rare form of gastric cancer that has unique clinicopathological features and an extremely poor prognosis. The present case report describes a patient who was referred to the No. 461 Hospital of PLA (Changchun, China) due to nausea and occasional vomiting of acid/water. The patient was diagnosed with gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma and surgery was recommended. A total gastrectomy was performed on the operable lesion. Histopathological analysis revealed that the tumors exhibited two pathological changes: HAC and signet-ring cell carcinoma differentiation. Furthermore, the tumor cells were immunohistochemically positive for α-fetoprotein, cytokeratin low/high molecular weight, Cam5.2, cytokeratin 7, p53, epithelial membrane antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen. Previous studies and our experience have suggested that HAC is an aggressive type of adenocarcinoma; however, radical surgery and chemotherapy may positively impact clinical outcomes. PMID:26136947

  2. Pathophysiological mechanisms linking obesity and esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Leo; Long, Elizabeth; Beales, Ian LP

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades there has been a dramatic rise in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in the developed world. Over approximately the same period there has also been an increase in the prevalence of obesity. Obesity, especially visceral obesity, is an important independent risk factor for the development of gastro-esophageal reflux disease, Barrett’s esophagus and EAC. Although the simplest explanation is that this mediated by the mechanical effects of abdominal obesity promoting gastro-esophageal reflux, the epidemiological data suggest that the EAC-promoting effects are independent of reflux. Several, not mutually exclusive, mechanisms have been implicated, which may have different effects at various points along the reflux-Barrett’s-cancer pathway. These mechanisms include a reduction in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection enhancing gastric acidity and possibly appetite by increasing gastric ghrelin secretion, induction of both low-grade systemic inflammation by factors secreted by adipose tissue and the metabolic syndrome with insulin-resistance. Obesity is associated with enhanced secretion of leptin and decreased secretion of adiponectin from adipose tissue and both increased leptin and decreased adiponectin have been shown to be independent risk factors for progression to EAC. Leptin and adiponectin have a set of mutually antagonistic actions on Barrett’s cells which appear to influence the progression of malignant behaviour. At present no drugs are of proven benefit to prevent obesity associated EAC. Roux-en-Y reconstruction is the preferred bariatric surgical option for weight loss in patients with reflux. Statins and aspirin may have chemopreventative effects and are indicated for their circulatory benefits. PMID:25400997

  3. Inhibitory effects of rHP-NAP IgY against Helicobacter pylori attachment to AGS cell line.

    PubMed

    Borhani, Katayoun; Mohabati Mobarez, Ashraf; Khabiri, Ali Reza; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Khoramabadi, Nima

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major human pathogen related to gastric adenocarcinoma and gastroduodenal diseases. Treatment of H. pylori infections is complicated by the rise of antibiotic resistance, necessitating investigation of alternative therapies. One such alternative is passive immunization by oral administration of antibacterial immunoglobulin. In the present study, chicken immunoglobulin (IgY) was used for passive immunotherapy against a major virulence factor of H. pylori, namely recombinant HP-Nap protein. Recombinant HP-Nap was prepared and used to immunize hens. IgY was purified from the eggs by polyethylene glycol precipitation method with a total IgY-HP-NAP yield of 30 mg per egg. The inhibitory effect of specific IgY on H. pylori attachment was investigated in AGS cell line infected by the bacteria. The results demonstrate the potent effect of IgY- HP-NAP in inhibition of H. pylori attachment to the AGS cells. PMID:27265677

  4. Differential responses of scirrhous and well-differentiated gastric cancer cells to orthotopic fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro, M.; Chung, Y. S.; Kubo, T.; Hato, F.; Sowa, M.

    1996-01-01

    Scirrhous gastric cancer cells proliferate rapidly with fibrosis, when the cancer cells invade into the submucosa of the stomach. To investigate the mechanisms responsible for the rapid proliferation, the growth interaction between gastric cancer cells and fibroblasts was examined. Human gastric cancer cell lines established from scirrhous carcinoma or well-differentiated adenocarcinoma were used. Human fibroblast cell lines were obtained from various organs. The growth interaction between gastric cancer cells and fibroblasts was examined by calculating the number of cancer cells or by measuring [3H]thymidine incorporation of cancer cells. Gastric fibroblasts specifically stimulated the growth of scirrhous gastric cancer cells, but not that of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma cells. The growth factor(s) produced from gastric fibroblasts were then partially purified and characterised. The growth-promoting factor(s) had apparent molecular weights of 10000 dalton and was sensitive both to heat and proteinase treatment. No inhibition for the factor(s) was achieved with defined anti-growth factor antibodies. In this study, differential responses of scirrhous and well-differentiated gastric cancer cells to orthotopic fibroblasts were shown. Rapid proliferation of scirrhous gastric carcinoma should be partly controlled by orthotopic fibroblasts. The growth factor(s) from gastric fibroblasts, which was distinct from various defined growth factors such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF), transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) may play an important role in the progression of scirrhous gastric cancer cells. PMID:8855981

  5. Treatment and survival in a population-based sample of patients diagnosed with gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Mooney, Margaret M; Clegg, Limin X; Harlan, Linda C

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To examine the extent of use of specific therapies in clinical practice, and their relationship to therapies validated in clinical trials. METHODS: The US National Cancer Institutes’ Patterns of Care study was used to examine therapies and survival of patients diagnosed in 2001 with histologically-confirmed gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma (n = 1356). The study re-abstracted data and verified therapy with treating physicians for a population-based stratified random sample. RESULTS: Approximately 62% of patients had stomach adenocarcinoma (SAC), while 22% had gastric-cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA), and 16% lower esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Stage IV/unstaged esophageal cancer patients were most likely and stage I-III stomach cancer patients least likely to receive chemotherapy as all or part of their therapy; gastric-cardia patients received chemotherapy at a rate between these two. In multivariable analysis by anatomic site, patients 70 years and older were significantly less likely than younger patients to receive chemotherapy alone or chemoradiation for all three anatomic sites. Among esophageal and stomach cancer patients, receipt of chemotherapy was associated with lower mortality; but no association was found among gastric-cardia patients. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the relatively low use of clinical trials-validated anti-cancer therapies in community practice. Use of chemotherapy-based treatment was associated with lower mortality, dependent on anatomic site. Findings suggest that physicians treat lower esophageal and SAC as two distinct entities, while gastric-cardia patients receive a mix of the treatment strategies employed for the two other sites. PMID:18506920

  6. Translocation of Helicobacter pylori CagA into Gastric Epithelial Cells by Type IV Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenbreit, Stefan; Püls, Jürgen; Sedlmaier, Bettina; Gerland, Elke; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2000-02-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori is a causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease in humans. Strains producing the CagA antigen (cagA+) induce strong gastric inflammation and are strongly associated with gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. We show here that such strains translocate the bacterial protein CagA into gastric epithelial cells by a type IV secretion system, encoded by the cag pathogenicity island. CagA is tyrosine-phosphorylated and induces changes in the tyrosine phosphorylation state of distinct cellular proteins. Modulation of host cells by bacterial protein translocation adds a new dimension to the chronic Helicobacter infection with yet unknown consequences.

  7. Identification of differentially expressed serum proteins in gastric adenocarcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Mir, Sartaj Ahmad; Renuse, Santosh; Manda, Srikanth S.; Pinto, Sneha M.; Puttamallesh, Vinuth N.; Solanki, Hitendra Singh; Manju, H.C.; Syed, Nazia; Sharma, Rakesh; Christopher, Rita; Vijayakumar, M.; Kumar, K.V. Veerendra; Prasad, T.S. Keshava; Ramaswamy, Girija; Kumar, Rekha V.; Chatterjee, Aditi; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha

    2015-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer with poor prognosis. Blood based biomarkers of gastric cancer have the potential to improve diagnosis and monitoring of these tumors. Proteins that show altered levels in the circulation of gastric cancer patients could prove useful as putative biomarkers. We used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to identify proteins that show altered levels in the sera of patients with gastric cancer. Our study resulted in identification of 643 proteins, of which 48 proteins showed increased levels and 11 proteins showed decreased levels in serum from gastric cancer patients compared to age and sex matched healthy controls. Proteins that showed increased expression in gastric cancer included inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4), Mannose-binding protein C (MBL2), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2), serum amyloid A protein (SAA1), Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1) and extracellular superoxide dismutase [Cu–Zn] (SOD3). We used multiple reaction monitoring assays and validated elevated levels of ITIH4 and SAA1 proteins in serum from gastric cancer patients. Biological significance Gastric cancer is a highly aggressive cancer associated with high mortality. Serum-based biomarkers are of considerable interest in diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases including cancers. Gastric cancer is often diagnosed at advanced stages resulting in poor prognosis and high mortality. Pathological diagnosis using biopsy specimens remains the gold standard for diagnosis of gastric cancer. Serum-based biomarkers are of considerable importance as they are minimally invasive. In this study, we carried out quantitative proteomic profiling of serum from gastric cancer patients to identify proteins that show altered levels in gastric cancer patients. We identified more than 50 proteins that showed altered levels in gastric cancer patient sera. Validation in a large cohort of well

  8. The role of neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment for adenocarcinoma of the upper gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Both locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the stomach and gastro-esophageal junction are associated with poor prognosis due to the lack of effective treatment. Recently multimodal treatment consisting of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy is reported to improve survival when compared to surgery alone. Neoadjuvant therapy in these locally advanced tumors allows for early tumor responses and the extent of tumor regression that can be achieved is considered a significant prognostic factor. This, in turn, increases the resectability of these tumors. Also due to the high frequency of lymph node metastasis, patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma should undergo a D2 lymphadenectomy. Postoperative chemoradiation and perioperative chemotherapy have been studied in gastric adenocarcinomas and showed a survival benefit. However, the surgical techniques used in these trials are no longer considered to be standard by today's surgical practice. In addition, there are no standard recommendations for adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation after R0 resection and adequate lymph node dissection. PMID:21810561

  9. Runx3 Expression Inhibits Proliferation and Distinctly Alters mRNA Expression of Bax in AGS and A549 Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torshabi, Maryam; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Tabatabaei Yazdi, Mojtaba; Ostad, Seyyed Naser; Gharemani, Mohammad Hosein

    2011-01-01

    Runx3, a member of Runt-related transcription factor (Runx) proteins with tumor suppressor effect, is a tissue–restricted and cancer related transcription factor that regulate cell proliferation and growth, as well as differentiation. In the present study, exogenous Run3 was transiently expressed in AGS (human gastric adenocarcinoma), with undetectable Runx3 protein and in A549 (human lung carcinoma) with low levels of endogenous Runx3 protein. The GFP tagged Runx3 was transfected into AGS and A549 cells using fugene6 and PolyFect and Runx3 expression was confirmed by fluorescent microscopy and RT-PCR. The effect of Runx3 transfection on cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay and the results were confirmed by the trypan blue dye exclusion method. The effect of Runx3 expression on mRNA expression of BCL2-associated X protein (Bax) was evaluated using RT-PCR. In AGS and A549 cells, Runx3 expression inhibited cell proliferation (p < 0.01). The growth inhibition was less in A549 cells. We show that Runx3 expression increases Bax mRNA expression in AGS cells when compared with control (p < 0.05), but no significant differences in mRNA expression was observed in both examined cells. Runx3 expression has antiproliferative effect in AGS cell perhaps via increase in expression of Bax. The effect of Runx3 on A549 cells’ viability which has endogenous level of Runx3 is not related to Bax. These findings implicate a complex regulation by Runx3 in inhibition of cell proliferation utilizing Bax. PMID:24250365

  10. Adenocarcinoma of the cervical stump

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, H.M.; Niloff, J.M.; Buttlar, C.A.; Welch, W.R.; Marck, A.; Feuer, E.J.; Lahman, E.A.; Jenison, E.; Knapp, R.C. )

    1989-11-01

    Sixteen women with adenocarcinoma of the cervical stump were treated over a 15-year period. The median survivals of 40 months for stage IB and 17 months for stages II and III were significantly worse compared with those for patients treated for cervical adenocarcinoma of the intact uterus or squamous carcinoma of the cervical stump. The poor results were due to both local and distant failure. Implications regarding tumor radiosensitivity and adjuvant therapy in these high-risk patients are discussed.

  11. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  12. CO-029 is overexpressed in gastric cancer and mediates the effects of EGF on gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongyu; Wu, Yulian; Zheng, Wen; Lu, Shiliu

    2015-03-01

    Tetraspanins are cell-surface glycoproteins and have received attention recently as both suppressors and promoters of metastasis. CO-029 is a member of the tetraspanin family and is implicated to be a metastasis-promoting tetraspanin in some cancers. However, the role of CO-029 in gastric cancer remains unexplored. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of CO-029 in gastric cancer tissues and to determine whether CO-029 is involved in the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We collected clinical samples and found that the expression of CO-029 was increased both at the mRNA level and protein level in gastric cancer tissues in comparison to normal and tumor-adjacent tissues, as demonstrated by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis, respectively. Furthermore, we performed an in vitro experiment using AGS cells and observed that EGF promoted AGS cell proliferation and enhanced the invasion ability of the AGS cells, as shown by MTT assay and cell invasion assay, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, our results reveal for the first time, that CO-029 expression was affected by EGF in a concentration- time-dependent manner. The knockdown of CO-029 attenuated the effects of EGF on gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion. These findings suggest that CO-029 is an oncogene in human gastric cancer and that CO-029 at least partially mediates the effects of EGF on gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Our data may provide a novel target for therapeutic intervention in human gastric cancer. PMID:25592989

  13. A Patient with CTLA-4 Haploinsufficiency Presenting Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Seiichi; Okada, Satoshi; Tsumura, Miyuki; Sakata, Sonoko; Ueno, Yoshitaka; Imai, Kohsuke; Morio, Tomohiro; Ohara, Osamu; Chayama, Kazuaki; Kobayashi, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-antigen 4 (CTLA-4) is an essential negative regulator expressed on regulatory T cells (Tregs) and activated T cells. Germline heterozygous mutations in CTLA4 lead to haploinsufficiency of CTLA-4, resulting in the development of an autosomal dominant immune dysregulation syndrome with incomplete penetrance. We report here a Japanese patient with this disorder who has a novel heterozygous single nucleotide insertion, 76_77insT (p. L28SfsX40), in the CTLA4 gene. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the patient showed decreased frequency of CTLA-4(high) cells in CD4(+)FOXP3(+) cells following CD3/CD28 stimulation. The patient experienced hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent pneumonia, esophageal candidiasis, cytomegalovirus-positive chronic gastritis, chronic and severe diarrhea, and type 1 diabetes mellitus. Moreover, the patient developed multifocal gastric cancer, histologically poorly and well-differentiated adenocarcinomas, associated with chronic atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Previously, 23 symptomatic cases with heterozygous CTLA4 mutations have been reported. Including the case presented here, 3 of the 24 cases (12.5%) developed gastric cancer. Notably, 2 of 3 patients presented similarly multifocal adenocarcinomas associated with atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Predisposition to gastric cancer has been also reported in CVID patients. These clinical observations suggest that gastric cancer is a disease commonly associated with autosomal dominant immune dysregulation syndrome due to CTLA4 mutation. PMID:26644313

  14. Use of anti-inflammatory drugs and lower esophageal sphincter relaxing drugs and risk of esophageal and gastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Fortuny, Joan; Johnson, Christine; Bohlke, Kari; Chow, Wong-Ho; Hart, Gene; Kucera, Gena; Mujumdar, Urvi; Ownby, Dennis; Wells, Karen; Yood, Marianne Ulcickas; Engel, Lawrence S.

    2007-01-01

    Background and aims The incidence of esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma has increased in western countries in recent decades for largely unknown reasons. We investigated whether use of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxing drugs was related to an increased risk of esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, and whether use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was related to a reduced risk of esophageal and gastric cancers. Methods We examined these associations using administrative databases in a case-control study in two integrated health care delivery systems. Cases were incident esophageal adenocarcinomas (n= 163) and squamous cell carcinomas (n= 114), and gastric cardia (n= 176) and non-cardia adenocarcinomas (n= 320), diagnosed between 1980 and 2002 in one health system and between 1993 and 2002 in the other. Matched controls (n= 3996) were selected. Complete prescription information was available for the study period. Results Prescription of corticosteroids was associated with a decreased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (OR= 0.6, 95% CI= 0.4-0.9), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR= 0.4, 95% CI= 0.2-0.6) and gastric non-cardia carcinoma (OR= 0.4, 95% CI=0.3-0.6). Ever use of pharmacy-purchased aspirin was associated with 30-60% decreased risks of the studied cancers. As a group, LES-relaxing drugs showed little evidence of association with increased risk of any esophageal or gastric cancer. Conclusions Corticosteroid and aspirin use were associated with significantly decreased risks of esophageal and gastric cancer. Lower esophageal sphincter relaxing drugs as a group did not affect these risks, although we had limited power to assess individual drugs. The possibility that corticosteroids and aspirin may reduce esophageal cancer risk warrants further consideration. PMID:17644046

  15. bak deletion stimulates gastric epithelial proliferation and enhances Helicobacter felis-induced gastric atrophy and dysplasia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, C. A.; Abuderman, A. A.; Burkitt, M. D.; Williams, J. M.; O'Reilly, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter infection causes a chronic superficial gastritis that in some cases progresses via atrophic gastritis to adenocarcinoma. Proapoptotic bak has been shown to regulate radiation-induced apoptosis in the stomach and colon and also susceptibility to colorectal carcinogenesis in vivo. Therefore we investigated the gastric mucosal pathology following H. felis infection in bak-null mice at 6 or 48 wk postinfection. Primary gastric gland culture from bak-null mice was also used to assess the effects of bak deletion on IFN-γ-, TNF-α-, or IL-1β-induced apoptosis. bak-null gastric corpus glands were longer, had increased epithelial Ki-67 expression, and contained fewer parietal and enteroendocrine cells compared with the wild type (wt). In wt mice, bak was expressed at the luminal surface of gastric corpus glands, and this increased 2 wk post-H. felis infection. Apoptotic cell numbers were decreased in bak-null corpus 6 and 48 wk following infection and in primary gland cultures following cytokine administration. Increased gastric epithelial Ki-67 labeling index was observed in C57BL/6 mice after H. felis infection, whereas no such increase was detected in bak-null mice. More severe gastric atrophy was observed in bak-null compared with C57BL/6 mice 6 and 48 wk postinfection, and 76% of bak-null compared with 25% of C57BL/6 mice showed evidence of gastric dysplasia following long-term infection. Collectively, bak therefore regulates gastric epithelial cell apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation, mucosal thickness, and susceptibility to gastric atrophy and dysplasia following H. felis infection. PMID:26159699

  16. Adjuvant therapy for gastric cancer: Current and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Marcus; Leong, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    The management of gastric cancer continues to evolve. Whilst surgery alone is effective when tumours present early, a large proportion of patients are diagnosed with loco-regionally advanced disease, resulting in high loco-regional and distant relapse rates, with subsequent poor survival. Early attempts at improving outcomes following resection were disappointing; however, randomized trials have now established either post-operative chemoradiotherapy (INT0116) or peri-operative chemotherapy as standard adjuvant therapies in the Western world. There remain, however, significant differences in the approach to management between the West and East. In Asia, where there is the highest incidence of gastric cancer, extended resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy represents the standard of care. This review discusses current standard adjuvant therapy in gastric adenocarcinoma, as well as recent and ongoing trials investigating novel (neo)adjuvant approaches, which hope to build on the successes of previous studies. PMID:25320509

  17. A protein and mRNA expression-based classification of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Setia, Namrata; Agoston, Agoston T; Han, Hye S; Mullen, John T; Duda, Dan G; Clark, Jeffrey W; Deshpande, Vikram; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Srivastava, Amitabh; Lennerz, Jochen K; Hong, Theodore S; Kwak, Eunice L; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2016-07-01

    The overall survival of gastric carcinoma patients remains poor despite improved control over known risk factors and surveillance. This highlights the need for new classifications, driven towards identification of potential therapeutic targets. Using sophisticated molecular technologies and analysis, three groups recently provided genetic and epigenetic molecular classifications of gastric cancer (The Cancer Genome Atlas, 'Singapore-Duke' study, and Asian Cancer Research Group). Suggested by these classifications, here, we examined the expression of 14 biomarkers in a cohort of 146 gastric adenocarcinomas and performed unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis using less expensive and widely available immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Ultimately, we identified five groups of gastric cancers based on Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positivity, microsatellite instability, aberrant E-cadherin, and p53 expression; the remaining cases constituted a group characterized by normal p53 expression. In addition, the five categories correspond to the reported molecular subgroups by virtue of clinicopathologic features. Furthermore, evaluation between these clusters and survival using the Cox proportional hazards model showed a trend for superior survival in the EBV and microsatellite-instable related adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, we offer as a proposal a simplified algorithm that is able to reproduce the recently proposed molecular subgroups of gastric adenocarcinoma, using immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization techniques. PMID:27032689

  18. Lower expression of PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) association with poor prognosis of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yachao; Deng, Jingyu; Zhang, Li; Xie, Xingming; Guo, Xiaofan; Sun, Changyu; Zhang, Rupeng; Liang, Han

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) in gastric cancer (GC), and its potential influence on the prognosis of GC patients. Methods: At present study, we examined the immunohistochemical expression of PHLPP1 on tissue microarrays (TMAs) containing 135 gastric adenocarcinoma tissues and 135 matched adjacent non-tumor tissues. In addition, both semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting analysis (WB) were adopted to detect of the expression of PHLPP1 in the GC cell lines (AGS, SUN-1, KATO-III, BGC-823, MGC-803, SGC-7901, and HGC-27) and the normal gastric cell line GES-1. Survival analysis was used to investigate the efficiency of the prognostic evaluation of PHLPP1 expression in GC patients. Results: Positive expression rate of PHLPP1 in the primary GC tissues was significantly lower than that in adjacent non-tumor tissues (55.6% vs. 87.4%, P<0.001). Both gene transcription (mRNA) and Protein expression of PHLPP1 in the GC cell lines were significantly lower than those in the GES-1 cell line, respectively. The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients presented PHLPP1 negative expression in the GC tissues had significantly lower overall survival rate than those presented PHLPP1 positive expression in the GC tissues (P=0.008). With the multivariate survival analysis (Cox regression), PHLPP1 expression in the GC tissue was identified as an independent predictor of the survival of patients. Conclusions: This study indicated that aberrant PHLPP1 expression was observed in GC tissues, which was significantly associated with the poor prognostic outcomes of GC patients. PMID:26884964

  19. Sigmoid colonic metastasis by lymphatic spread occurring with unilateral Krukenberg tumor considered to be caused by stage IA early gastric cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    FUJIMOTO, DAISUKE; HIRONO, YASUO; GOI, TAKANAORI; YAMAGUCHI, AKIO

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies in Asia, and the second most common cause of cancer-associated mortality in Japan. Colorectal metastases originating from gastric adenocarcinoma are extremely rare. The present study reports an unusual case of lymphogenous sigmoid metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma occurring in a 58-year-old female patient. Endoscopic and radiological findings were indicative of 0-IIc+IIa early gastric cancer, and radical distal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection was performed. The pathological diagnosis was stage IA gastric adenocarcinoma (T1bN0M0), according to the Japanese classification of gastric cancer. A follow-up examination at 18 months post surgery revealed a recurrence of paraaortic lymph node metastasis, detected by abdominal computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. The patient received chemotherapy with S-1 and cisplatin. Subsequently, radiotherapy was administered to the paraaortic lymph nodes at levels Th11-L3. Follow-up abdominal CT and PET/CT revealed an enlarged left ovary, and abnormal uptake in the left ovary and sigmoid colon. An oophorectomy and sigmoidectomy with D3 lymph node dissection were performed. The pathological diagnosis was metastatic adenocarcinoma; this was identical to the gastric pathology in the previous pathological report. The patient continued treatment with chemotherapy. Although sigmoid colonic metastasis from gastric cancer is extremely rare, metastasis from gastric cancer must be considered during the differential diagnosis of cases involving a colorectal mass and a previous history of gastric cancer. PMID:26870264

  20. Differentiating bronchioloalveolar carcinoma from adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schraufnagel, D; Peloquin, A; Paré, J A; Wang, N S

    1982-01-01

    The recognition of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) as distinct from adenocarcinoma of the lung, is controversial. Using strict pathologic criteria, 43 consecutive patients with BAC were matched by year of diagnosis and compared with a similar number of patients with adenocarcinoma, and for contrast, with those with squamous and oat cell carcinoma of the lung. We demonstrated that BAC is not sex related, and is not as smoking related as the other neoplasms. Unlike epidermoid carcinoma, BAC does not show a predilection for those occupations requiring manual labor. Also, BAC is frequently distinguishable radiologically from the other three by being smaller and peripheral. A pleural tag and an air bronchogram in a mass are rather specific, and BAC is less likely to have large airway involvement and adenopathy. The percentage of patients who were free of tumor after 2 yr was greater in the BAC group than in the others, but the overall survival rate between the BAC group and the adenocarcinoma group was not. Based on inter-observer variability, there is some overlap pathologically between these 2 groups. However, when the overlap between the adenocarcinoma and the BAC groups is compared with that between the adenocarcinoma and the squamous cell carcinoma groups, the difference is not significant. We conclude that BAC should be considered a distinct clinical entity. PMID:6278997

  1. The Prevalence of Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia and Distribution of Helicobacter pylori Infection, Atrophy, Dysplasia, and Cancer in Its Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Olmez, Sehmus; Aslan, Mehmet; Erten, Remzi; Sayar, Suleyman; Bayram, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM) is frequently encountered and is considered a precursor of gastric adenocarcinoma. In the Van region of Turkey, gastric adenocarcinoma incidence is high but the prevalence of gastric IM is not known. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a main factor leading to atrophy, IM, and cancer development in the stomach. The aim of the current study was to investigate the prevalence of IM and its subtypes and the prevalence of H. pylori infection, atrophy, dysplasia, and cancer in gastric IM subtypes. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted on 560 IM among the 4050 consecutive patients who were undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with biopsy between June 2010 and October 2014. Clinical records and endoscopic and histopathologic reports of patients with IM were analyzed. Results. The prevalence of gastric IM was 13.8%. The prevalence of incomplete IM was statistically significantly higher than complete IM. Type III IM was the most frequent subtype. Conclusions. Gastric IM is a common finding in patients undergoing EGD with biopsy in this region. High prevalence of incomplete type IM, especially type III, can be associated with the high prevalence of gastric cancer in our region. PMID:26635875

  2. The Prevalence of Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia and Distribution of Helicobacter pylori Infection, Atrophy, Dysplasia, and Cancer in Its Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Olmez, Sehmus; Aslan, Mehmet; Erten, Remzi; Sayar, Suleyman; Bayram, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM) is frequently encountered and is considered a precursor of gastric adenocarcinoma. In the Van region of Turkey, gastric adenocarcinoma incidence is high but the prevalence of gastric IM is not known. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a main factor leading to atrophy, IM, and cancer development in the stomach. The aim of the current study was to investigate the prevalence of IM and its subtypes and the prevalence of H. pylori infection, atrophy, dysplasia, and cancer in gastric IM subtypes. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted on 560 IM among the 4050 consecutive patients who were undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with biopsy between June 2010 and October 2014. Clinical records and endoscopic and histopathologic reports of patients with IM were analyzed. Results. The prevalence of gastric IM was 13.8%. The prevalence of incomplete IM was statistically significantly higher than complete IM. Type III IM was the most frequent subtype. Conclusions. Gastric IM is a common finding in patients undergoing EGD with biopsy in this region. High prevalence of incomplete type IM, especially type III, can be associated with the high prevalence of gastric cancer in our region. PMID:26635875

  3. Role of the CacyBP/SIP protein in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHAI, HUIHONG; MENG, JUAN; JIN, HAIFENG; LI, YUANFEI; WANG, JINBO

    2015-01-01

    Various reports indicate that calcyclin binding protein/Siah-1-interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP) is an important protein in tumorigenesis, but whether CacyBP/SIP promotes or suppresses cancer may depend on the cell type. In order to investigate whether CacyBP/SIP is significant in gastric cancerous tumorigenesis, the present study used immunohistochemistry to analyze 181 gastric cancer tissue samples, as well as 181 healthy tissue samples from the same gastric cancer patients. The immunohistochemical results were compared against patient data and pathological analysis of the tissue slices, including gender, age, degree of tumor differentiation and tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage. In addition, the level of CacyBP/SIP expression was detected in three frozen tissue samples of gastric adenocarcinoma using western blot analysis. Of the 181 cases analyzed in the present study, 80 cases were identified as non-metastatic gastric cancer and 101 cases were identified as gastric cancer that had metastasized to the lymph nodes. Tissue biopsies from the two sets of patients were examined using immunohistochemistry to identify the level of CacyBP/SIP expression in metastatic and primary gastric cancer tissues. Statistical analyses were performed on all data. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CacyBP/SIP was expressed in 31% (56/181) of gastric adenocarcinoma tissue samples and 7% (12/181) of adjacent non-cancerous gastric tissues (P<0.05). Furthermore, the expression levels of CacyBP/SIP were higher in cancerous tissue compared with the adjacent non-cancerous gastric tissue using western blotting. No association was identified between CacyBP/SIP expression and patient age (P=0.975), gender (P=0.185), degree of tumor differentiation (P=0.076) or TNM stage (P=0.979). Among the 101 patients with metastatic gastric cancer, CacyBP/SIP was expressed at primary sites in 31% (31/101) of cases and at metastatic sites in 26% (26/101) of cases (P=0.434). However, among the

  4. Endoscopic resection of gastric and esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balmadrid, Bryan; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) techniques have reduced the need for surgery in early esophageal and gastric cancers and thus has lessened morbidity and mortality in these diseases. ESD is a relatively new technique in western countries and requires rigorous training to reproduce the proficiency of Asian countries, such as Korea and Japan, which have very high complete (en bloc) resection rates and low complication rates. EMR plays a valuable role in early esophageal cancers. ESD has shown better en bloc resection rates but it is easier to master and maintain proficiency in EMR; it also requires less procedural time. For early esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett’s, ESD and EMR techniques are usually combined with other ablative modalities, the most common being radiofrequency ablation because it has the largest dataset to prove its success. The EMR techniques have been used with some success in early gastric cancers but ESD is currently preferred for most of these lesions. ESD has the added advantage of resecting into the submucosa and thus allowing for endoscopic resection of more aggressive (deeper) early gastric cancer. PMID:26510452

  5. Early gastric stump cancer following distal gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, K; Kondo, H; Saito, D; Shirao, K; Yamaguchi, H; Yokota, T; Yamao, G; Sano, T; Sasako, M; Yoshida, S

    1998-01-01

    Background—Gastric stump cancer (GSC) is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage, and consequently the prognosis is poor. 
Aims—To investigate the clinicopathological characteristics of GSC at an early stage to assist in its identification, and thereby improve its prognosis. 
Methods—Forty three patients with resected early GSC were compared with 156 patients with resected primary early cancer in the upper third of the stomach. 
Results—Sixty five per cent (28/43) of the early GSC patients showed the elevated type endoscopically, although the frequency of the depressed type in GSC has tended to increase in the past five years. This occurred in less than 26% (40/156) of the primary early cancers. Half of the early GSCs were located on the lesser curvature (47%), and revealed differentiated adenocarcinoma (81%) histologically. The male:female ratio of early GSC cases was about 6:1, which was much higher than that in patients with primary early cancer. The five year survival rates of patients with early GSCs and early primary cancers were 84% and 95%, respectively. GSC had a favourable prognosis, if it was detected at an early stage. 
Conclusion—To detect early GSC, our results suggest that special attention should be given to elevated as well as depressed lesions on the lesser curvature of the stomach, particularly in men, during endoscopic examinations. 

 Keywords: gastric stump cancer; early gastric cancer; prognosis; endoscopy PMID:9863478

  6. [A Case of Early Gastric Cancer with Nodular Tumor-like Scalp Metastasis].

    PubMed

    Song, Young Wook; Kim, Woo Sub; Yun, Gee Young; Park, Sun Wook; Kang, Sun Hyung; Moon, Hee Seok; Sung, Jae Kyu; Jeong, Hyun Yong

    2016-07-25

    Many neoplasms, including lung cancer, breast cancer, melanoma, and gastrointestinal tract malignancy, possess potential for skin metastasis. Skin metastases can represent the first presentation of such malignancies and may be observed incidentally during routine exam. Skin metastases from gastric adenocarcinoma are uncommon, with a prevalence rate of 0.04-0.8%. Cutaneous metastases from gastric cancer are generally observed as the initial symptom of advanced gastric cancer. Early detection and treatment can increase patient survival. A 42-year-old woman visited our department with nodule about 1 cm in size on the right frontal scalp noticed incidentally after laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy and adjuvant systemic chemo-therapy for early gastric cancer about 16 months prior. The patient was diagnosed with skin metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma. Complete excision of the skin lesion and additional chemotherapy were performed. Herein, we report a case of nodular tumor-like scalp metastasis from early gastric cancer with a brief review of the literature. PMID:27443622

  7. The role of endoscopic ultrasound on the preoperative T staging of gastric cancer: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Han, Chaoqun; Lin, Rong; Shi, Huiying; Liu, Jun; Qian, Wei; Ding, Zhen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-09-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is used for preoperative assessment of gastric cancer. However, recent studies suggested that EUS staging accuracy is lower than previously thought. We aimed to assess EUS efficacy and image characteristics in preoperative gastric cancer T staging.A retrospective review of clinical and imaging features of 232 gastric carcinoma patients who underwent preoperative EUS assessment of T stage was performed. Only cases with tumor-free resection margin status and no metastases were enrolled. Comparisons of preoperative EUS and postoperative histopathological stagings were also performed to identify vital EUS image features for evaluating gastric carcinoma.EUS accuracy for T staging was 64.2% (149/232) with the highest accuracy for T3 (75.0%). Enlarged lymph nodes, well differentiated histological type and Borrmann IV type were associated with diagnostic accuracy in predicting tumor invasion. Although no factors were associated with overstaging, circumferential lesions ≥1/2, signet ring cell adenocarcinoma, and Borrmann IV type had significantly higher risks of understaging. Gastric wall outer edge irregularity was also an indicator of serosal involvement with a sensitivity of 82.0%. The pancreas and colon were more frequent disease extension sites than previously predicted.Although EUS is likely the best and most accurate option that we have used to stage gastric cancer, the finding that factors including circumferential lesions, signet ring cell adenocarcinoma, and Borrmann IV type carcinoma were more frequently related to incorrect staging warrants attention. PMID:27603347

  8. Gastric tissue biopsy and culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - gastric tissue; Biopsy - gastric tissue ... of organisms that cause infection. A gastric tissue culture may be considered normal if it does not show certain bacteria. Stomach acids normally prevent too much bacteria from growing.

  9. Update on gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Maria; Stanley, Adrian J

    2014-01-01

    Although less common than oesophageal variceal haemorrhage, gastric variceal bleeding remains a serious complication of portal hypertension, with a high associated mortality. In this review we provide an update on the aetiology, classification and management of gastric varices, including acute bleeding, prevention of rebleeding and primary prophylaxis. We describe the optimum management strategies for gastric varices including drug, endoscopic and radiological therapies, focusing on recent published evidence. PMID:24891929

  10. Rebamipide inhibits gastric cancer growth by targeting survivin and Aurora-B

    SciTech Connect

    Tarnawski, A.; E-mail: andrzej.tarnawski@med.va.gov; Pai, R.; Chiou, S.-K.; Chai, J.; Chu, E.C.

    2005-08-19

    Rebamipide accelerates healing of gastric ulcers and gastritis but its actions on gastric cancer are not known. Survivin, an anti-apoptosis protein, is overexpressed in stem, progenitor, and cancer cells. In gastric cancer, increased and sustained survivin expression provides survival advantage and facilitates tumor progression and resistance to anti-cancer drugs. Aurora-B kinase is essential for chromosome alignment and mitosis progression but surprisingly its role in gastric cancer has not been explored. We examined in human gastric cancer AGS cells: (1) survivin expression, (2) localization of survivin and Aurora-B (3) cell proliferation, and (4) effects of specific survivin siRNA and/or rebamipide (free radical scavenging drug) on survivin and Aurora-B expression and cell proliferation. Survivin and Aurora-B are strongly expressed in human AGS gastric cancer cells and co-localize during mitosis. Survivin siRNA significantly reduces AGS cell viability. Rebamipide significantly downregulates in AGS cell survivin expression, its association with Aurora-B and cell proliferation. Rebamipide-induced downregulation of survivin is at the transcription level and does not involve ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

  11. Exocrine and endocrine modulation in common gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Colarossi, Cristina; Del Col, Laura; Perin, Tiziana; Talamini, Renato; Sigon, Roberto; Cannizzaro, Renato; Aiello, Eleonora; Buonadonna, Angela; Italia, Fabrizio; Massi, Daniela; Carbone, Antonino; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2012-05-01

    Diagnostic and prognostic implications of endocrine differentiation were evaluated in 103 common gastric adenocarcinomas and undifferentiated carcinomas. Maturely differentiated exocrine and endocrine phenotypes were evaluated by using gastric exocrine and endocrine markers along with intestinal exocrine and endocrine markers. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that 66 tumors (64%) were positive for generic endocrine markers such as chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin. The 14 patients with more than 20% tumor cells positive for at least 1 endocrine marker experienced a poorer prognosis than patients with no (n = 37) or 1% to 20% (n = 52) positivity. The 16 carcinomas expressing the maturely differentiated exocrine gastric phenotype significantly correlated with poorer outcome compared with carcinomas with mature exocrine intestinal (n = 22) or mixed/gastrointestinal (n = 64) phenotypes. Among tumors expressing chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin, the maturely differentiated endocrine gastric phenotype (n = 26) was a negative prognostic factor compared with mature endocrine intestinal (n = 21) and mixed/gastrointestinal (n = 5) phenotypes. Endocrine differentiation and maturely exocrine/endocrine gastric phenotypes are associated with an unfavorable prognosis and may identify subsets of patients for tailored therapy. PMID:22523208

  12. Microbiome and potential targets for chemoprevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neto, Antonio Galvao; Whitaker, April; Pei, Zhiheng

    2016-02-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the deadliest cancers, with a dismal prognosis. It is increasingly recognized that esophageal cancer is a heterogeneous disease. It can be subdivided into two distinct groups: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, based on histological appearance. In the Western world, the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma was considerably higher than esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) until the 1990s when, due to a dramatic increase, the incidence of EA surpassed that of squamous cell carcinoma. EA typically follows a well-established stepwise evolution from chronic inflammation due to reflux esophagitis (RE) that progresses to metaplasia (Barrett's esophagus [BE]) to dysplasia, which often culminates in EA. The pathophysiology of EA is complex and involves diverse factors, including gastroesophageal reflux, gastric acid secretion, dysfunction of the antireflux barrier, gastric emptying disturbances, and abnormalities in esophageal defense mechanisms. The current understanding of the etiology of EA is mainly derived from epidemiological studies of risk factors such as cigarette smoking, obesity, gastroesophageal reflux disorders (GERD), and low fruit and vegetable consumption. Numerous studies have been done, but the factors that drive the dynamic increase in the incidence of EA remain elusive. The advent of widespread antibiotic use occurred in the 1950s, preceding the surge of EA. Based on this temporal sequence, it has been hypothesized that antibiotics alter the microbiome to which the esophagus is exposed in patients who have GERD and that chronic exposure to this abnormal microbiome (ie, changes in species diversity or abundance) accounts for the increase in EA. If changes in the proposed factors alter the stepwise progression (RE-BE-dysplasia-EA), they may represent potential targets for chemoprevention. New discoveries will help improve our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of these cancers, and aid in finding novel therapeutic

  13. Effects of EGFR Inhibitor on Helicobacter pylori Induced Gastric Epithelial Pathology in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Jean E.; Jeremy, Anthony H.T.; Duval, Cedric; Dixon, Michael F.; Danjo, Kazuma; Carr, Ian M.; Pritchard, D. Mark; Robinson, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori transactivates the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and predisposes to gastric cancer development in humans and animal models. To examine the importance of EGFR signalling to gastric pathology, this study investigated whether treatment of Mongolian gerbils with a selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, EKB-569, altered gastric pathology in chronic H. pylori infection. Gerbils were infected with H. pylori and six weeks later received either EKB-569-supplemented, or control diet, for 32 weeks prior to sacrifice. EKB-569-treated H. pylori-infected gerbils had no difference in H. pylori colonisation or inflammation scores compared to infected animals on control diet, but showed significantly less corpus atrophy, mucous metaplasia and submucosal glandular herniations along with markedly reduced antral and corpus epithelial proliferation to apoptosis ratios. EKB-569-treated infected gerbils had significantly decreased abundance of Cox-2, Adam17 and Egfr gastric transcripts relative to infected animals on control diet. EGFR inhibition by EKB-569 therefore reduced the severity of pre-neoplastic gastric pathology in chronically H. pylori-infected gerbils. EKB-569 increased gastric epithelial apoptosis in H. pylori-infected gerbils which counteracted some of the consequences of increased gastric epithelial cell proliferation. Similar chemopreventative strategies may be useful in humans who are at high risk of developing H. pylori- induced gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:25437333

  14. HER2 status in advanced gastric carcinoma: A retrospective multicentric analysis from Sicily

    PubMed Central

    IENI, A.; BARRESI, V.; GIUFFRÈ, G.; CARUSO, R.A.; LANZAFAME, S.; VILLARI, L.; SALOMONE, E.; ROZ, E.; CABIBI, D.; FRANCO, V.; CERTO, G.; LABATE, A.; NAGAR, C.; MAGLIOLO, E.; BROGGI, B.; FAZZARI, C.; ITALIA, F.; TUCCARI, G.

    2013-01-01

    According to the ToGA trial, HER2 has been shown to be predictive for the success of treatment with trastuzumab in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). A number of studies have analyzed HER-2/neu overexpression in gastric carcinoma and identified the rate of HER2 positivity to be markedly varied. To date, the prevalence of HER2 overexpression in Sicilian people with AGC is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, a retrospective immunohistochemical analysis of HER2 was performed in a cohort of 304 AGC samples that were obtained from the archives of 10 Sicilian anatomopathological diagnostic units in order to verify the positive rate of HER2-positive cases. Furthermore, the characteristics of histotype, grade, stage and Ki-67 expression were also analyzed. HER2 overexpression was encountered in 17.43% of all the gastric adenocarcinomas, which was consistent with the results that have been reported elsewhere in the literature. A progressive increase in HER2 overexpression was observed, from the poorly cohesive histotype to the tubular adenocarcinomas and gastric hepatoid adenocarcinomas. HER2 overexpression was significantly associated with a high grade, advanced stage and high Ki-67 labeling index. Further investigations performed jointly by pathologists and oncologists within the geographical area of the present study should confirm that the association of trastuzumab with chemotherapy results in an improvement of survival in patients with AGC. PMID:24260051

  15. Unanswered questions in the management of gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma: an overview from the medical oncologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manish A

    2013-01-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma have multiple treatment options; however, are victims of lack of consensus and wide variation in treatment, sometimes within the same hospital. While there is a consensus that surgery alone is inadequate for locally advanced disease, locoregional treatment has become the point for debate. Only in 2010 was the reclassification of GEJ cancers as esophageal cancers. Treatment options remain as varied as the classification of GEJ cancers: preoperative chemoradiotherapy, definitive chemoradiation, perioperative chemotherapy, and resection followed by postoperative chemoradiation. Several studies have examined the varying treatment paradigms; however, many fall short due to methodology or sample size. The MAGIC study determined perioperative chemotherapy to be an acceptable standard treatment option for patients with gastric cancer, althouth a significant portion of enrolled patients had distal esophageal and GEJ adenocarcinoma. The CROSS study concluded combination chemotherapy and radiation before resection beneficial. Preoperative therapy in cases of GEJ is beneficial for survival, but not as much impact is seen as in esophageal SCC, which exhibits an increased sensitivity to CRT. There is concurrence with two phase III studies from Japan and Korea on the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer. However, the applicability of these studies to GEJ adenocarcinoma remains a question, especially with the significantly different epidemiology of increased proximal and GEJ tumors in the West compared to Asia. To move forward with this increasingly prevalent disease, we will need to do more than understand the multiple treatment paradigms-we will need to select a strategy and examine it. PMID:23714486

  16. Histopathological study using computer database of 10 000 consecutive gastric specimens: (2) malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2016-02-01

    Using a computer database, the author investigated the histopathology of 10 000 consecutive gastric specimens collected in the last 12 years 2002-2013 at his pathology laboratory in a relatively large hospital in Japan. Examination of histological sections was done when appropriate. The gastric specimens were made up of 8579 benign conditions and 1421 malignant lesions. The latter comprised gastric carcinoma in 1342 cases (94.4%), gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in 34 (2.4%), mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma in 25 (1.8%), non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma in 19 (1.3%), and metastatic carcinoma in 1 case (0.1%). Of the 1342 cases of gastric carcinoma, the histological type was as follows: tubular adenocarcinoma in 755 cases, papillary adenocarcinoma in 176, mucinous adenocarcinoma in 147, signet ring cell carcinoma in 145, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in 114, adenosquamous carcinoma in 4, and metastatic small cell carcinoma from the lung in 1. In surgically resected cases, the number of early gastric carcinomas was 258 and of advanced carcinoma, 521 cases. In GIST (n = 34), there were 2 cases of the epithelioid type and 32 of the spindle cell type. The size of GIST ranged from 1-15 cm, with a mean of 5.6 cm. KIT (CD117) was positive in 34/34 cases, CD34 in 31/34, desmin 2/34, and S100 4/34. A genetic analysis was performed in 6 cases of GIST, all of which showed point mutation of KIT and/or PDGFRA genes. In MALT lymphoma (n = 25), centrocyte-like cells and lymphoepithelial lesions were seen in every case. Helicobactor pylori infection was noted in 92%. In non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 19), 17 cases were of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and 1 was peripheral T-cell lymphoma, while 1 was NK-cell lymphoma. PMID:25667235

  17. Ectopic expression of B and T lymphocyte attenuator in gastric cancer: a potential independent prognostic factor in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xing-Yu; Wen, Xi-Zhi; Tan, Xiao-Jing; Hou, Jing-Hui; Ding, Ya; Wang, Ke-Feng; Dong, Jun; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Ying-Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Shi

    2015-01-01

    It has been confirmed that B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA; also known as CD272) is a novel co--inhibitory molecule that exhibits a critical role in restraining cell-mediated antitumor immunity. The present study aimed to investigate the expression and prognostic significance of BTLA in gastric adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed to investigate BTLA expression in gastric cancer tissues and normal mucosal tissues. In total, 123 pathologically confirmed specimens were obtained from stage IIIa gastric cancers. A correlation test, Kaplan-Meier curves, and a Cox proportional hazards regression model were used to analyze the data. No BTLA staining in the normal tissues was found, while BTLA-stained gastric carcinoma cells were detected in 75.6% (93/123) of the gastric cancer specimens. High expression levels of BTLA were detected in 31.7% (39/123) of the specimens, while low expression levels were detected in 68.3% (84/123) of the specimens. High BTLA expression levels were associated with shorter survival time, as confirmed by univariate and multivariate analyses. These findings provide a basis for the concept that high BTLA expression levels in gastric cancer, identified by IHC, are an independent biomarker for the poor prognosis of patients with gastric cancer. PMID:25334051

  18. The JAK/STAT signaling cascade in gastric carcinoma (Review).

    PubMed

    Khanna, Puja; Chua, Pei Jou; Bay, Boon Huat; Baeg, Gyeong Hun

    2015-11-01

    Gastric carcinoma remains one of the most prevalent forms of cancer worldwide, despite the decline in incidence rates, increased awareness of the disease and advancement in treatment strategies. Helicobacter pylori infection, dietary factors, lifestyle influences and various genetic aberrations have been shown to contribute to the development and progression of gastric cancer. Recent studies on the genomic landscape of gastric adenocarcinoma have identified several key signaling molecules, including epidermal growth factor receptor family (ErbB) members, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor family (VEGFR) members and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway components, that have been implicated in the molecular pathogenesis of gastric cancers. However, clinical trials with compounds that target these molecules have failed to show a significant improvement in overall survival rates when supplemented with conventional therapies. Therefore, it is essential to identify effective prognostic and/or diagnostic biomarkers and develop molecular targeted therapies. The JAK/STAT cascade is a principal signal transduction pathway in cytokine and growth factor signaling, regulating various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival. Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that dysregulated JAK/STAT signaling is a driving force in the pathogenesis of various solid cancers as well as hematopoietic malignancies. Hence, a large number of preclinical and clinical studies of drugs targeting this pathway are currently underway. Notably, aberrant JAK/STAT signaling has also been implicated in gastric cancers. In this review, we focus on the ongoing research on the JAK/STAT cascade in gastric carcinoma and discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting JAK/STAT signaling for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26398764

  19. What exists beyond cagA and vacA? Helicobacter pylori genes in gastric diseases

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Débora Menezes; Pereira, Eliane dos Santos; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is present in more than half the world’s population and has been associated with several gastric disorders, such as gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The clinical outcome of this infection depends on host and bacterial factors where H. pylori virulence genes seem to play a relevant role. Studies of cagA and vacA genes established that they were determining factors in gastric pathogenesis. However, there are gastric cancer cases that are cagA-negative. Several other virulence genes have been searched for, but these genes remain less well known that cagA and vacA. Thus, this review aimed to establish which genes have been suggested as potentially relevant virulence factors for H. pylori-associated gastrointestinal diseases. We focused on the cag-pathogenicity island, genes with adherence and motility functions, and iceA based on the relevance shown in several studies in the literature. PMID:26457016

  20. FBXL5 targets cortactin for ubiquitination-mediated destruction to regulate gastric cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Cen, Gang; Ding, Hong-Hua; Liu, Bin; Wu, Wei-Dong

    2014-09-01

    Cortactin, an actin-interacting protein, is implicated in cytoskeletal architecture and often amplified in several types of cancer including gastric adenocarcinomas. Downregulation of cortactin decreases cell migration and invasion. However, how to regulate cortactin in gastric cancer remains largely unknown. Here, we report that FBXL5 interacts with and targets cortactin for ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Furthermore, we showed that FBXL5-induced cortactin degradation is mediated by extracellular regulated signal kinase (ERK). Serine phosphorylation sites mutant, cortactinS405A/S418A, prevent FBXL5-induced cortactin degradation. Moreover, CortactinS405A/S418A exhibited stronger effects in promoting gastric cancer cell migration when compared to wild-type cortactin. Taken together, our data suggested a novel molecular mechanism for the negative regulation of cortactin by FBXL5 in gastric cancer cells migration. PMID:24867096

  1. [A Case of Surgical Resection of Isolated Pulmonary Metastasis from Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Murata, Tomohiro; Koshiishi, Haruya; Imaizumi, Ken; Okuno, Keisuke; Nakata, Takuya; Hirano, Takayuki; Tokura, Michiyo; Matsuyama, Takatoshi; Hoshino, Mayumi; Kakimoto, Masaki; Goto, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Tetsunori

    2015-11-01

    We report a rare case of surgical resection for pulmonary metastasis from gastric cancer. A 71-year-old man underwent total gastrectomy for gastric cancer in October 2012. After the operation, he received S-1 chemotherapy for 1 year. In January 2014, computed tomography of the chest showed a nodule shadow with a cavity at S3 in the right lung. Because it showed a tendency to gradually enlarge, we performed an operation in September 2014. The nodule was diagnosed as metastatic adenocarcinoma from gastric cancer on pathology. The patient is being treated with S-1 chemotherapy during follow-up. The pulmonary metastases of gastric cancer often develop along with carcinomatous lymphangiosis or carcinomatous pleurisy, and isolated pulmonary metastasis is rare. A consensus has not been reached about the usefulness of surgical resection, and the accumulation of further cases is required. PMID:26805105

  2. Clinical pathology of metastatic gastric carcinoma to the breast: A report of two cases and a review of literature

    PubMed Central

    TIAN, QIUHONG; ZENG, JINSHENG; TAO, XUEQIN; ZHANG, ZHANMIN; ZHOU, XIAODONG; WANG, YITING

    2016-01-01

    The breast is an unusual site for metastasis from a gastric carcinoma. The present study reports two cases of metastatic gastric carcinoma to the breast. The first patient, a 37-year-old woman, initially presented with gastric adenocarcinoma, prior to developing metastatic cancer to the breast 4 years later. The second female patient presented with a breast mass, and a modified radical mastectomy was performed; however, the subsequent pathological examination revealed the mass to be a metastatic signet ring cell carcinoma. An abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a diffuse gastric wall thickening that was consistent with gastric cancer. The findings suggest that immunohistochemistry is a useful tool to differentiate between primary breast tumors and gastrointestinal carcinomas that have metastasized to the breast. Additional studies are required in order to define the optimal treatment. PMID:27123067

  3. Body iron status and gastric cancer risk in the EURGAST study.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Nunes, Ana; Agudo, Antonio; Aranda, Núria; Arija, Victoria; Cross, Amanda J; Molina, Esther; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Siersema, Peter; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Mattiello, Amalia; Tumino, Rosario; Saieva, Calogero; Naccarati, Alessio; Ohlsson, Bodil; Sjöberg, Klas; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Cadeau, Claire; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boeing, Heiner; Steffen, Annika; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Key, Tim; Lu, Yunxia; Riboli, Elio; Peeters, Petra H; Gavrila, Diana; Dorronsoro, Miren; Quirós, José Ramón; Barricarte, Aurelio; Jenab, Mazda; Zamora-Ros, Raúl; Freisling, Heinz; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Jakszyn, Paula

    2015-12-15

    Although it appears biologically plausible for iron to be associated with gastric carcinogenesis, the evidence is insufficient to lead to any conclusions. To further investigate the relationship between body iron status and gastric cancer risk, we conducted a nested case-control study in the multicentric European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. The study included 456 primary incident gastric adenocarcinoma cases and 900 matched controls that occurred during an average of 11 years of follow-up. We measured prediagnostic serum iron, ferritin, transferrin and C-reactive protein, and further estimated total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) and transferrin saturation (TS). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the risk of gastric cancer by iron metrics were estimated from multivariable conditional logistic regression models. After adjusting for relevant confounders, we observed a statistically significant inverse association between gastric cancer and ferritin and TS indices (ORlog2  = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.72-0.88; OR10%increment  = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.78-0.97, respectively). These associations appear to be restricted to noncardia gastric cancer (ferritin showed a p for heterogeneity = 0.04 and TS had a p for heterogeneity = 0.02), and no differences were found by histological type. TIBC increased risk of overall gastric cancer (OR50 µg/dl  = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.02-1.2) and also with noncardia gastric cancer (p for heterogeneity = 0.04). Additional analysis suggests that time between blood draw and gastric cancer diagnosis could modify these findings. In conclusion, our results showed a decreased risk of gastric cancer related to higher body iron stores as measured by serum iron and ferritin. Further investigation is needed to clarify the role of iron in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26135329

  4. Lateral hypothalamic lesions cause gastric injury by stimulating gastric contractility.

    PubMed

    Garrick, T; Grijalva, C V; Trauner, M

    1993-07-01

    Changes in gastric contractility following lateral hypothalamic (LH) lesions with and without bilateral cervical vagotomy were measured in urethan-anesthetized rats. LH lesions were induced with direct current passed through stereotaxically placed electrodes. Gastric contractility was recorded continuously for 4 h with acutely implanted strain gauge force transducers and analyzed by computer. LH lesions consistently stimulated gastric contractility and caused more gastric mucosal injury than control conditions. Vagotomy blocked both gastric mucosal injury and high-amplitude gastric contractions. In rats with LH lesions and exogenously infused intragastric hydrochloric acid, atropine methyl nitrate inhibited high-amplitude gastric contractions and gastric erosions. These findings indicate that LH lesions stimulate vagally mediated high-amplitude gastric contractions, which, in the presence of hydrochloric acid, cause gastric mucosal erosions. PMID:8338162

  5. Correlation between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Ying; Wang, Min; Lin, Ying-Min; Wu, Dong; Zhu, Jing-Yu; Gao, Lang; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yin, Teng-Fei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia. METHODS: Patients included in this study underwent a colonoscopy and esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) along with histopathological measurement between March 2012 and March 2015 at Qi-Lu Hospital of Shandong University, who also had results of H. pylori detection. A total of 233 cases were selected. Demographic data, H. pylori infection status (including results of rapid urease tests and gastric mucosa pathological examinations) and histopathological examination results of gastric and colorectal mucosa were gathered and analyzed. The statistical analysis focused on the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms among patients with various histopathological categories of the stomach. ORs and their 95%CI were calculated to describe the strengths of the associations. RESULTS: The incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIEN) (OR = 2.400, 95%CI: 0.969-5.941), adenoma with HGIEN (5.333, 1.025-27.758) and adenocarcinoma (1.455, 0.382-5.543) were all higher for patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis than for those in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma with HGIEN (3.218, 0.767-13.509) was higher in patients with intestinal metaplasia than in the control group, while the incidence rates of adenoma without HGIEN (0.874, 0.414-1.845) and adenocarcinoma (0.376, 0.096-1.470) were lower in the intestinal metaplasia group than in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (3.111, 1.248-7.753) was significantly higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group than in the control group, while the rates of adenoma with HGIEN (1.481, 0.138-15.941) and adenocarcinoma (2.020, 0.561-7.272) were higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group. Incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (1.067, 0.264-4.314), adenoma with HGIEN (2.667, 0

  6. Treatment of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orditura, Michele; Galizia, Gennaro; Sforza, Vincenzo; Gambardella, Valentina; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Andreozzi, Francesca; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; Mabilia, Andrea; Lieto, Eva; Ciardiello, Fortunato; De Vita, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The authors focused on the current surgical treatment of resectable gastric cancer, and significance of peri- and post-operative chemo or chemoradiation. Gastric cancer is the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Surgery remains the only curative therapy, while perioperative and adjuvant chemotherapy, as well as chemoradiation, can improve outcome of resectable gastric cancer with extended lymph node dissection. More than half of radically resected gastric cancer patients relapse locally or with distant metastases, or receive the diagnosis of gastric cancer when tumor is disseminated; therefore, median survival rarely exceeds 12 mo, and 5-years survival is less than 10%. Cisplatin and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy, with addition of trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients, is the widely used treatment in stage IV patients fit for chemotherapy. Recent evidence supports the use of second-line chemotherapy after progression in patients with good performance status PMID:24587643

  7. Decreased Expression of AZGP1 Is Associated with Poor Prognosis in Primary Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-bing; Li, Yuan-fang; Jiang, Shan-shan; Wang, Wei; Pan, Ke; Zheng, Yan; Zhao, Bai-wei; Wang, Dan-dan; Chen, Yong-ming; Yang, Lei; Zhou, Zhi-wei; Xia, Jian-chuan

    2013-01-01

    Background 2-Zinc-glycoprotein 1 (AZGP1) is a multidisciplinary protein that participates in many important functions in the human body, including fertilization, immunoregulation and lipid mobilization. Recently, it has been shown that AZGP1 is also involved in carcinogenesis and tumor differentiation. In this study, we investigated the expression levels and prognostic value of AZGP1 in primary gastric cancers. Methods and Results We examined the expression of AZGP1 in 35 paired cancerous and matched adjacent noncancerous gastric mucosa tissues by real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blotting. Furthermore, we analyzed AZGP1 expression in 248 patients who underwent resection procedures between 2005 and 2007 using immunohistochemistry. The relationships between the AZGP1 expression levels, the clinicopathological factors, and patient survival were investigated. AZGP1 expression was significantly reduced at both the mRNA (P = 0.023) and protein levels (P = 0.019) in tumor tissue samples, compared with expression in matched adjacent non-tumor tissue samples. The immunohistochemical staining data showed that AZGP1 expression was significantly decreased in 52.8% (131/248) of gastric adenocarcinoma cases. Clinicopathological analysis showed that the reduced expression of AZGP1 was significantly correlated with tumor location (P = 0.011), histological grade (P = 0.005) and T stage (P = 0.008). Kaplan–Meier survival curves revealed that the reduced expression of AZGP1 was associated with a poor prognosis in gastric adenocarcinoma patients (P = 0.009). Multivariate Cox analysis identified AZGP1 expression was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival of gastric adenocarcinoma patients (HR = 1.681, 95% CI = 1.134–2.494, P = 0.011). Conclusions Our study suggests that AZGP1 might serve as a candidate tumor suppressor and a potential prognostic biomarker in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:23935945

  8. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA in gastric carcinoma specimens in a high-risk region of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fakhraei, Farzaneh; Haghshenas, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Vahid; Rafiei, Alireza; Naghshvar, Farshad; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer worldwide and is associated with high mortality rates. The incidence of gastric cancer varies widely in different geographical regions. For example, in Iran, the most northern and northwestern regions are considered to be high-risk areas for gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes among patients with gastric carcinoma in Mazandaran province, Northern Iran, which is a high-risk area. A total of 100 paraffin-embedded tissue samples were obtained from 70 males and 30 females with gastric carcinoma, diagnosed between 2006 and 2013, in the Imam Khomeini Hospital (Sari, Iran). GP5+/GP6+ general primers were applied for detection of HPV DNA in the specimens. Positive samples were then selected and high-risk HPV genotyping was performed. The samples were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and five (5%) samples were identified to be positive for HPV DNA [four male (5.7%) and one female (3.3%)]. Three (60%) samples were positive for HPV-16, one (20%) sample was positive for HPV-18 and one (20%) sample was positive for HPV-45. Following pathological diagnosis, 88 samples were identified as gastric adenocarcinoma, nine samples were gastric lymphoma, and three samples were gastric and esophagus adenocarcinoma. According to the findings of the present study and the rate of HPV infection in patients with gastric carcinoma, an association between HPV infection and gastric carcinoma in subjects from Northern Iran was not identified. PMID:27588180

  9. Association between ERCC5 gene polymorphisms and gastric cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Guo, B W; Yang, L; Zhao, R; Hao, S Z

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the role of ERCC5 gene polymorphisms (rs17655 and rs751402) in the development of gastric cancer in a Chinese population. A total of 142 gastric cancer patients whose diagnoses were confirmed by pathology, and 274 control subjects were recruited from Tangshan Gongren Hospital between March 2013 and March 2015. Genotyping of ERCC5 rs17655 and rs751402 polymorphisms was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Compared with the control subjects, we found that gastric cancer patients were more likely to be older, smoke tobacco, drink alcohol, and suffer from Helicobacter pylori infection. Using a chi-square test, a significant difference was observed in the distribution ofERCC5 rs751402 genotypes between patient and control groups (chi-square = 7.79, P = 0.02). In addition, unconditional multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the AA genotype of rs751402 significantly increased gastric cancer risk compared to the GG genotype [odds ratio (OR) = 2.61, 95%CI = 1.23-5.49; P = 0.005]. Moreover, we found that the AA genotype correlated with elevated risk of gastric cancer when compared to the GG+AG genotype under a recessive model (OR = 2.21, 95%CI = 1.11-4.39; P = 0.01). In conclusion, we suggest that the ERCC5 rs751402 polymorphism is associated with development of gastric cancer. PMID:27323183

  10. Tests of gastric neuromuscular function.

    PubMed

    Parkman, Henry P; Jones, Michael P

    2009-05-01

    Tests of gastric neuromuscular function are used to evaluate patients with symptoms referable to the upper digestive tract. These symptoms can be associated with alterations in the rates of gastric emptying, impaired accommodation, heightened gastric sensation, or alterations in gastric myoelectrical function and contractility. Management of gastric neuromuscular disorders requires an understanding of pathophysiology and treatment options as well as the appropriate use and interpretation of diagnostic tests. These tests include measures of gastric emptying; contractility; electrical activity; regional gastric motility of the fundus, antrum, and pylorus; and tests of sensation and compliance. Tests are also being developed to improve our understanding of the afferent sensory pathways from the stomach to the central nervous system that mediate gastric sensation in health and gastric disorders. This article reviews tests of gastric function and provides a basic description of the tests, the methodologies behind them, descriptions of the physiology that they assess, and their clinical utility. PMID:19293005

  11. hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b differential expression as potential biomarker of gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Amanda Ferreira; Cruz, Aline MP; Magalhães, Leandro; Pereira, Adenilson L; Anaissi, Ana KM; Alves, Nélisson CF; Albuquerque, Paulo JBS; Burbano, Rommel MR; Demachki, Samia; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression profiles of hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b in gastric mucosal samples and their values as gastric carcinogenesis biomarkers. METHODS: The expression levels of hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b in normal gastric mucosa, non-atrophic chronic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma were analysed using quantitative real-time PCR. The difference between hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b expression profiles in the grouped samples was evaluated by ANOVA and Student’s t-test tests. The results were adjusted for multiple testing by using Bonferroni’s correction. P values ≤ 0.05 were considered statistically significant. To evaluate hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b expressions as potential biomarkers of gastric carcinogenesis, we performed a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and the derived area under the curve, and a Categorical Principal Components Analysis. In silico identification of the genetic targets of hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b was performed using different prediction tools, in order to identify possible genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. RESULTS: The expression levels of hsa-miR-29c were higher in normal gastric mucosal samples, and decreased progressively in non-atrophic chronic gastritis samples, intestinal metaplasia samples and intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma samples. The expression of hsa-miR-29c in the gastric lesions showed that non-atrophic gastritis have an intermediate profile to gastric normal mucosa and intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma, and that intestinal metaplasia samples presented an expression pattern similar to that in intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. This microRNA (miRNA) has a good discriminatory accuracy between normal gastric samples and (1) intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma; and (2) intestinal metaplasia, and regulates the DMNT3A oncogene. hsa-miR-135b is up-regulated in non-atrophic chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia samples

  12. Expression of oestrogen and progesterone receptors in gastric cancer: a flow cytometric study.

    PubMed

    Karat, D; Brotherick, I; Shenton, B K; Scott, D; Raimes, S A; Griffin, S M

    1999-06-01

    Increased expression of oestrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors have been reported in gastric adenocarcinoma, although results have been variable. Immunohistochemical staining methodologies, in particular in the detection of ER, have been inconsistent with many tumours being classified ER-negative. In this study we have used flow cytometry to quantify expression of ER and PR in gastric adenocarcinoma and examine their relationships with established prognostic indicators. Cytokeratin-positive cells obtained from tumour biopsies of 50 patients with gastric cancer and ten control patients were labelled with biotinylated ER or PR antibodies followed by streptavidin PE. Flow cytometry was seen to increase the detection of ER levels in gastric cancer with more receptor-positive patients in this study than in results published to date. We believe this is related to the sensitivity of the flow cytometric assay with the detection of small shifts in ER level detected using cytokeratin gating. On analysis, the data showed no significant correlations with tumour stage and grade, and no differences were seen between normal mucosa and gastric cancer samples. PMID:10376983

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection and stem cells at the origin of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Bessède, E; Dubus, P; Mégraud, F; Varon, C

    2015-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori infection is now recognized as the main and specific infectious cause of cancer in the world. It is responsible for gastric adenocarcinomas of both intestinal and diffuse types, which are the long-term consequences of the chronic infection of the gastric mucosa. Case-control studies have shown an association between the two, recognized as early as 1994 and further substantiated by interventional studies in which H. pylori eradication has led to the prevention of at least part of the gastric cancers. Experimental studies have highlighted the role of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) and particularly mesenchymal stem cells, in the neoplastic process in about a quarter of the cases and possibly an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the other cases. Different studies have confirmed that chronic infection with H. pylori induces a chronic inflammation and subsequent damage of the gastric epithelial mucosa, leading to BMDC recruitment. Once recruited, these cells home and differentiate by cell-cell fusion with local gastric epithelial cells, bearing local stem cell failure and participating in tissue regeneration. The context of chronic infection and inflammation leads to an EMT and altered tissue regeneration and differentiation from both local epithelial stem cells and BMDC. EMT induces the emergence of CD44+ cells possessing mesenchymal and stem cell properties, resulting in metaplastic and dysplastic lesions to give rise, after additional epigenetic and mutational events, to the emergence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and adenocarcinoma. PMID:25043305

  14. AGS II

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Interest in rare K decays, neutrino oscillations and other fields have generated an increasing demand for running, and improved intensity and duty cycle, at the AGS. Current projects include acceleration of polarized protons and light ions (up to mass 32). Future plans are for a booster to increase intensity and allow heavy ions (up to mass 200), and a stretcher to give 100% duty cycle. A later upgrade could yield an average current of 32 ..mu.. amps. 6 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Metachronous Primary Adenocarcinoma of Lung During Adjuvant Imatinib Mesylate Therapy for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Meng-jie; Weng, Shan-Shan; Cao, Ying; Li, Xiao-Fen; Wang, Liu-Hong; Xu, Jing-Hong; Yuan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor in gastrointestinal tracts; however, the synchronous or metachronous coexistence of GIST with additional primary malignancy is not common. Here, we present an unusual case of gastric GIST with metachronous primary lung adenocarcinoma diagnosed during his adjuvant treatment with oral receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (400 mg daily). After 6-month use of imatinib, the patient suffered from dry cough and dyspnea. Subsequent lung biopsy demonstrated adenocarcinoma with diffuse interstitial changes. Our research emphasizes the possibility of an additional primary tumor with GIST, and reminds the clinicians to strengthen the surveillance of the additional cancer during the follow-up of GIST patients. PMID:26356712

  16. Study of gastric cancer samples using terahertz techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Molis, Gediminas; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Carvalho Silva, Catia D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Valusis, Gintaras; Granja, Pedro L.

    2014-08-01

    In the present work, samples of healthy and adenocarcinoma-affected human gastric tissue were analyzed using transmission time-domain THz spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and spectroscopic THz imaging at 201 and 590 GHz. The work shows that it is possible to distinguish between normal and cancerous regions in dried and paraffin-embedded samples. Plots of absorption coefficient α and refractive index n of normal and cancer affected tissues, as well as 2-D transmission THz images are presented and the conditions for discrimination between normal and affected tissues are discussed.

  17. Immunohistochemical study of DNA topoisomerase II in human gastric disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Yabuki, N.; Sasano, H.; Kato, K.; Ohara, S.; Toyota, T.; Nagura, H.; Miyaike, M.; Nozaki, N.; Kikuchi, A.

    1996-01-01

    Topoisomerase II (topo II) separates chromosomes at the end of mitosis and is also the target for various chemotherapeutic agents. Expression of this enzyme has been demonstrated to increase rapidly at the end of the S to G2/M phase and decrease after the completion of mitosis. We immunolocalized topo II in specimens of both normal and neoplastic human gastric mucosas to evaluate expression of this enzyme. Three different antibodies were used for the immunostaining of topo II (anti-topo II alpha isoform, anti-topo II beta isoform and anti-topo II alpha and -beta isoforms). There were no significant differences in topo II labeling index (LI) between frozen and paraffin-embedded tissue sections obtained from the same cases. Topo II LI was significantly correlated with Ki67 LI in all of the specimens examined. The area of cells positive for Topo II was much narrower than that of Ki67 in the normal gastric glands, and the pattern of Topo II immunolocalization in both adenomas and adenocarcinomas was also essentially the same as that of Ki67. The topo II LI values (positive cells/1000 cells) for normal gastric gland, adenoma, intestinal-type adenocarcinoma, and diffuse-type adenocarcinoma were 114.7 +/- 2.2, 266.7 +/- 18.8, 277.6 +/- 19.2, and 324.5 +/- 5.3, respectively. Significant differences in topo II LI and topo II/Ki67 index were observed between normal and neoplastic mucosas (P < 0.0001) and between adenomas or intestinal-type adenocarcinoma and diffuse-type adenocarcinoma (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). Simultaneous measurement of topo II alpha and nuclear DNA content by two-parameter flow cytometry revealed that the Jurkat cell line established from acute lymphocytic leukemia cells expressed the enzyme in cells at other than S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle whereas topo-II alpha-positive cells were predominantly observed in S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle in the cells from normal lymph nodes. These findings suggest that dys-regulation or

  18. Endometrioid endometrial adenocarcinoma recurring as carcinosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Shaco-Levy, Ruthy; Piura, Benjamin

    2008-04-01

    Müllerian carcinosarcoma is currently regarded as a metaplastic (sarcomatous) carcinoma. Only five cases of pure ovarian adenocarcinoma recurring as carcinosarcoma have been documented in the literature. There are no documented cases of endometrial adenocarcinoma recurring as metaplastic carcinoma. We report of a case of endometrial adenocarcinoma, endometrioid type, recurring as metaplastic carcinoma showing sarcomatous differentiation. The tumor evolution in this case supports the prevailing opinion that Müllerian carcinosarcomas are derived from carcinomas and represent tumor progression. PMID:18412798

  19. Helminth co-infection in Helicobacter pylori infected INS-GAS mice attenuates gastric premalignant lesions of epithelial dysplasia and glandular atrophy and preserves colonization resistance of the stomach to lower bowel microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Whary, Mark T.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Lofgren, Jennifer; Shi, Hai Ning; Taylor, Nancy S.; Correa, Pelayo; Versalovic, James; Wang, Timothy C.; Fox, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Higher prevalence of helminth infections in H. pylori infected children was suggested to potentially lower the life-time risk for gastric adenocarcinoma. In rodent models, helminth co-infection does not reduce Helicobacter-induced inflammation but delays progression of pre-malignant gastric lesions. Because gastric cancer in INS-GAS mice is promoted by intestinal microflora, the impact of Heligmosomoides polygyrus co-infection on H. pylori-associated gastric lesions and microflora were evaluated. Male INS-GAS mice co-infected with H. pylori and H. polygyrus for 5 months were assessed for gastrointestinal lesions, inflammation-related mRNA expression, FoxP3+ cells, epithelial proliferation, and gastric colonization with H. pylori and Altered Schaedler Flora. Despite similar gastric inflammation and high levels of proinflammatory mRNA, helminth co-infection increased FoxP3+ cells in the corpus and reduced H. pylori-associated gastric atrophy (p<0.04), dysplasia (p<0.02) and prevented H. pylori-induced changes in the gastric flora (p<0.05). This is the first evidence of helminth infection reducing H. pylori-induced gastric lesions while inhibiting changes in gastric flora, consistent with prior observations that gastric colonization with enteric microbiota accelerated gastric lesions in INS-GAS mice. Identifying how helminths reduce gastric premalignant lesions and impact bacterial colonization of the H. pylori infected stomach could lead to new treatment strategies to inhibit progression from chronic gastritis to cancer in humans. PMID:24513446

  20. CD90 is upregulated in gastric cancer tissues and inhibits gastric cancer cell apoptosis by modulating the expression level of SPARC protein.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guang Chao; Gao, Lu; He, Junyu; Long, Yuehua; Liao, Shan; Wang, Haiyun; Li, Xujuan; Yi, Wei; Pei, Zhen; Wu, Minghua; Xiang, Juanjuan; Peng, Shuping; Ma, Jian; Zhou, Ming; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Xiang, Bo; Xiong, Wei; Tang, Ke; Cao, Li; Li, Xiaoling; Li, Guiyuan; Zhou, Yanhong

    2015-11-01

    Cluster of differentiation 90 (CD90) (Thy-1) plays important roles in the oncogenesis in various types of malignancies. In the present study, we investigated the expression of CD90 in gastric cancer (GC) tissues by q-PCR, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and western blot technologies. The results showed that CD90 was overexpressed in gastric cancer tissues compared with the level in the adjacent non‑cancerous tissues. To explore the possible mechanism of CD90 in GC, we elucidated the effect of CD90 on the apoptosis of AGS gastric cancer cells, and found that a considerable decrease in apoptotic cells was observed for AGS cells with CD90 overexpression. Meanwhile, the rate of apoptotic cells was increased in the AGS cells with CD90 interference (siCD90) compared with that in the AGS cells. Cell apoptosis is closely related to a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium ion (Ca2+) concentrations. Our results showed that overexpression of CD90 in the AGS gastric cancer cells led to an increase in ΔΨm and a decrease in intracellular ROS and Ca2+ concentrations. At the same time, siCD90 reduced ΔΨm and the increase in intracellular ROS and Ca2+ concentrations. Furthermore, we identified and confirmed that CD90 functions by modulating the expression level of secreted protein, acidic, cysteine‑rich (osteonectin) (SPARC) in vitro through LC‑MS/MS analyses and western blot technology. In summary, our results suggest that CD90 is upregulated in gastric cancer and inhibits gastric cancer cell apoptosis by modulating the expression level of SPARC protein. PMID:26329007

  1. Application of Gold Nanorods for Photothermal Therapy in Ex Vivo Human Oesophagogastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mohan; Harris-Birtill, David C C; Zhou, Yu; Gallina, Maria E; Cass, Anthony E G; Hanna, George B; Elson, Daniel S

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles are chemically fabricated and tuned to strongly absorb near infrared (NIR) light, enabling deep optical penetration and therapy within human tissues, where sufficient heating induces tumour necrosis. In our studies we aim to establish the optimal gold nanorod (GNR) concentration and laser power for inducing hyperthermic effects in tissues and test this photothermal effect on ex vivo human oesophagogastric adenocarcinoma. The ideal GNR concentration and NIR laser power that would elicit sufficient hyperthermia for tumour necrosis was pre-determined on porcine oesophageal tissues. Human ex vivo oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma tissues were incubated with GNR solutions and a GNR-free control solution with corresponding healthy tissues for comparison, then irradiated with NIR light for 10 minutes. Temperature rise was found to vary linearly with both the concentration of GNRs and the laser power. Human ex vivo oesophageal and gastric tissues consistently demonstrated a significant temperature rise when incubated in an optimally concentrated GNR solution (3 x 10(10) GNRs/ml) prior to NIR irradiation delivered at an optimal power (2 W/cm2). A mean temperature rise of 27 degrees C was observed in tissues incubated with GNRs, whereas only a modest 2 degrees C rise in tissues not exposed to any GNRs. This study evaluates the photothermal effects of GNRs on oesophagogastric tissue examines their application in the minimally invasive therapeutics of oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas. This could potentially be an effective method of clinically inducing irreversible oesophagogastric tumour photodestruction, with minimal collateral damage expected in (healthy) tissues free from GNRs. PMID:27280246

  2. Hepatitis B virus infection is associated with gastric cancer in China: an endemic area of both diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wei, X-L; Qiu, M-Z; Jin, Y; Huang, Y-X; Wang, R-Y; Chen, W-W; Wang, D-S; Wang, F; Luo, H-Y; Zhang, D-S; Wang, F-H; Li, Y-H; Xu, R-H

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection was demonstrated to be a risk factor of several cancers of the digestive system. In addition, liver cirrhosis, which could possibly result from chronic HBV infection, was associated with a higher risk of gastric cancer. However, the association of HBV infection and gastric cancer has not been investigated. Methods: A retrospective case–control study with 580 cases and 580 controls matched for age, sex and year of diagnosis was conducted. The associations between gastric cancer and HBV infection were explored with univariate and multivariate unconditional logistic regression analysis. Results: Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was positively associated with gastric cancer (AOR (95% CI): 1.49 (1.06–2.10)). This association remained significant in patients without family history of gastric cancer (AOR (95% CI): (1.06–2.11)). For HBsAg-negative population, being anti-HBc positive/anti-HBs negative, which possibly indicated occult HBV infection, was also found to have some associations with gastric cancer. In addition, some synergistic effects between HBV infection and blood type A in gastric cancer were identified. Conclusions: The HBV infection was positively related with gastric cancer, especially for patients without family history of gastric cancer. Further prospective studies are warranted to confirm this relationship. PMID:25695484

  3. Gastric Cancer Presenting as a Krukenberg Tumor at 22 Weeks' Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashutosh; Attar, Bashar M; Demetria, Melchor

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is rare during pregnancy, and often advanced upon presentation. A Krukenberg tumor presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in the pregnant patient. We present a case of a 38-year-old woman at 22 weeks' gestation who presented with worsening epigastric pain, and was found to have a left pelvic mass on ultrasound, which was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. She went into active labor and delivered a viable infant via vaginal delivery. An exploratory laparotomy revealed a large mass originating from her left ovary and diffuse thickening of the lesser curvature of the stomach. Frozen section investigation revealed the presence of signet cell adenocarcinoma. Subsequent upper endoscopy showed linitis plastica, while biopsy confirmed the presence of adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, the occurrence of gastric cancer in pregnancy is rare despite extremely common symptoms. The management poses a challenge because of the need for early treatment, and the continuation of the pregnancy. PMID:25580361

  4. Gastric Cancer with a Very High Serum CA 19-9 Level.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kazuya; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Kawakami, Takako; Nagase, Atsushi; Matsuda, Minoru; Onodea, Kazuhiko; Yamaguchi, Hidenori; Higuchi, Mineko; Furukawa, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) is a sensitive marker for pancreatic and hepatobiliary malignancies. The highest frequency of elevated serum CA 19-9 levels is found among patients with pancreatic cancer. CA 19-9 has recently been demonstrated to be a marker of digestive tract malignancies. We report the case of a patient with a gastric cancer and a very high serum CA 19-9 level. During laparotomy, a large mass was found in the antrum. A distal gastrectomy with D2 dissection of the lymph nodes was performed. Histological examination, including immunohistochemistry, revealed an adenocarcinoma of the stomach producing CA 19-9. To the best of our knowledge, no patient with an extremely high serum CA 19-9 level resulting from a gastric adenocarcinoma has been reported previously. PMID:21577374

  5. Simultaneous quadruple modal nonlinear optical imaging for gastric diseases diagnosis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Jian; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-03-01

    We report the development of a unique simultaneous quadruple-modal nonlinear optical microscopy (i.e., stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), second-harmonic generation (SHG), two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), and third-harmonic generation (THG)) platform for characterization of the gastric diseases (i.e., gastritis, intestinal metaplasia (IM), intestinal type adenocarcinoma). SRS highlights the goblet cells found in IM. SHG images the distribution of collagen in lamina propria. Collagen is found to aggregate for intestinal type adenocarcinoma. TPEF reveals the cell morphology and can reflect the damage inside glands caused by the diseases. THG visualizes the nuclei with high spatial resolution, which facilitates the identification of neutrophils that are usually used as a feature of inflammation. This work shows that the co-registration of quadruple-modal images can be an effective means for diagnosis and characterization of gastric diseases at the cellular and molecular levels.

  6. Pattern-Recognition Receptors and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Castaño-Rodríguez, Natalia; Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Mitchell, Hazel M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been associated with an increased risk of several human malignancies, a classic example being gastric adenocarcinoma (GC). Development of GC is known to result from infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, which initially induces acute inflammation and, in a subset of patients, progresses over time to chronic inflammation, gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and finally intestinal-type GC. Germ-line encoded receptors known as pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) are critical for generating mature pro-inflammatory cytokines that are crucial for both Th1 and Th2 responses. Given that H. pylori is initially targeted by PRRs, it is conceivable that dysfunction within genes of this arm of the immune system could modulate the host response against H. pylori infection, and subsequently influence the emergence of GC. Current evidence suggests that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) (TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) (NOD1, NOD2, and NLRP3), a C-type lectin receptor (DC-SIGN), and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RIG-I and MDA-5), are involved in both the recognition of H. pylori and gastric carcinogenesis. In addition, polymorphisms in genes involved in the TLR (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, and CD14) and NLR (NOD1, NOD2, NLRP3, NLRP12, NLRX1, CASP1, ASC, and CARD8) signaling pathways have been shown to modulate the risk of H. pylori infection, gastric precancerous lesions, and/or GC. Further, the modulation of PRRs has been suggested to suppress H. pylori-induced inflammation and enhance GC cell apoptosis, highlighting their potential relevance in GC therapeutics. In this review, we present current advances in our understanding of the role of the TLR and NLR signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of GC, address the involvement of other recently identified PRRs in GC, and discuss the potential implications of PRRs in GC immunotherapy

  7. Microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, B.G.; Pulitzer, D.R.; Moehlmann, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    In order to detect regions of DNA containing tumor suppressor genes involved in the development of gastric cancer, we evaluated loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 78 gastric adenocarcinomas. A total of 46 microsatellite markers were employed, which detected at least one site per arm of each autosome in the human genome, including several markers linked to known tumor suppressor genes (TP53, APC, DCC, RB1, and BRCA1). We detected elevated rates of LOH at D3S1478 on chromosome 3p21 (44%, or 22 of 50 cases), at D12S78 at 12q14q24.33 (39%), and 37% at D9S157 on 9p, three sites not previously known to be affected in gastric cancer. Another locus on chromosome 12q, D12S97, showed LOH in 40% of informative cases. LOH was detected on chromosome 17p near TP53 in 66% of informative cases (23 of 35). Microsatellite instability (MI) was observed in 22% of the cancers. Tumors varied greatly in percentage of sites exhibiting MI, from 0% to 77% of sites tested. These findings expand the description of the genetic lesions occurring in gastric cancer.

  8. Laparoscopic gastric cancer surgery: Current evidence and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Son, Taeil; Hyung, Woo Jin

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic gastrectomy has been widely accepted as a standard alternative for the treatment of early-stage gastric adenocarcinoma because of its favorable short-term outcomes. Although controversies exist, such as establishing clear indications, proper preoperative staging, and oncologic safety, experienced surgeons and institutions have applied this approach, along with various types of function-preserving surgery, for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer. With technical advancement and the advent of state-of-the-art instruments, indications for laparoscopic gastrectomy are expected to expand as far as locally advanced gastric cancer. Laparoscopic gastrectomy appears to be promising; however, scientific evidence necessary to generalize this approach to a standard treatment for all relevant patients and care providers remains to be gathered. Several multicenter, prospective randomized trials in high-incidence countries are ongoing, and results from these trials will highlight the short- and long-term outcomes of the approach. In this review, we describe up-to-date findings and critical issues regarding laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer. PMID:26811620

  9. Localized amyloidosis of the stomach mimicking a superficial gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Miwako; Fujino, Yasuteru; Muguruma, Naoki; Murayama, Noriaki; Okamoto, Koichi; Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Kishi, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Uehara, Hisanori; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2016-06-01

    A 73-year-old man was referred to our hospital for further examination of a depressed lesion in the stomach found by cancer screening gastroscopy. A barium upper gastrointestinal series showed an area of irregular mucosa measuring 15 mm on the anterior wall of the gastric body. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a 15 mm depressed lesion on the anterior wall of the lower gastric body. We suspected an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma from the appearance and took some biopsies. However, histology of the specimens revealed amyloidal deposits in the submucosal layer without malignant findings. Congo red staining was positive for amyloidal protein and green birefringence was observed under polarized light microscopy. Congo red staining with prior potassium permanganate incubation confirmed the light chain (AL) amyloid type. There were no amyloid deposits in the colon or duodenum. Computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no remarkable findings. Thus, this case was diagnosed as a localized gastric amyloidosis characterized by AL type amyloid deposition in the mucosal or submucosal layer. As the clinical outcome of gastric AL amyloidosis seems favorable, this case is scheduled for periodic examination to recognize potential disease progression and has been stable for 2 years. PMID:27170299

  10. Detection of cancer cells and tumor markers in gastric lavage of patients with gastric cancer: Do these findings have a clinicopathological significance and oncological implication?

    PubMed

    Virgilio, Edoardo; Giarnieri, Enrico; Montagnini, Monica; D'Urso, Rosaria; Proietti, Antonella; Mesiti, Alessandra; Giovagnoli, Maria Rosaria; Mercantini, Paolo; Cavallini, Marco; Balducci, Genoveffa

    2016-09-01

    Although decreasing in the incidence over the last years, currently gastric adenocarcinoma represents the second cause of cancer related-death worldwide. Further knowledge and novel therapies are desperately needed in order to make the prognosis of these patients more acceptable. Infact, even though in recent years numerous staging parameters have been largely studied and unanimously recognized for their clinical and prognostic value, today too many shadows still exist around the capacity to predict exactly the natural history or post-treatment behavior of this cancer even among patients of the same stage. This study has identified the presence of isolated cancer cells as well as tumor markers (CEA, Ca 19.9, Ca 72.4 and Ca 50) from the gastric lavage of patients affected by gastric adenocarcinoma. Such findings led to the hypothesis that endoluminal exfoliation of neoplastic cells and the release of their products (tumor markers) into the gastric juice might be an expression of neoplastic behavior as well as aggressive malignancy. Should this hypothesis become a reality, some important progress could be made in the knowledge, staging, prediction as well as management and follow-up of this inauspicious type of cancer. PMID:27515187

  11. Nucleolar organizer regions as discriminators for the diagnosis of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Schned, A R

    1993-10-01

    This study sought to determine whether nucleolar organizer region (NOR) counts might be of diagnostic use specifically in the frequently difficult identification of well-differentiated prostate cancer. Total silver-stained NOR (AgNOR) counts on sections were done in 50 consecutive nuclei from 22 cases of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma composed exclusively of Gleason grades 1 or 2 and in 50 consecutive nuclei in foci of benign glands on the same slide. Malignant nuclei contained a mean of 4.84 AgNORs; benign nuclei, 3.39 AgNORs. This difference was statistically highly significant (P < .0001), but there was considerable overlap of mean AgNOR counts between malignant and benign groups. Thus, to obtain a rule requiring a specificity of greater than 95% using the mean AgNOR count as a definition of malignancy, the maximum sensitivity possible was only 32%. Despite the overlap in mean AgNOR counts, however, in all but one case the mean count for malignant nuclei was greater than that for benign nuclei. This suggests that the diagnostic potential of AgNOR counts might be better realized by a comparison of counts between a suspicious focus and an adjacent focus of benign glands. PMID:8215819

  12. Occupation and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J F; Podas, T

    2003-05-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations-for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  13. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must ... panel on weight loss surgery: executive report update. Obesity . 2009;17:842-62. PMID: 19396063 www.ncbi. ...

  14. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... or "sleeve" out of the rest. The new, banana-shaped stomach is much smaller than the original ... of your stomach, leaving you with a smaller banana-shaped stomach called the gastric sleeve. Because it's ...

  15. Occupation and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J; Podas, T

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations—for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  16. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the syndrome is recommended. What are the estimated cancer risks associated with HDGC? Not everyone who ... the lifetime risk for diffuse gastric cancer is estimated to be 70% to 80% for men and ...

  17. Gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... your legs to help prevent blood clots from forming. You will receive shots of medicine to prevent ... diversion with duodenal switch Dumping syndrome References Buchwald H. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. In: Buchwald ...

  18. A functional and transcriptomic analysis of NET1 bioactivity in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background NET1, a RhoA guanine exchange factor, is up-regulated in gastric cancer (GC) tissue and drives the invasive phenotype of this disease. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of NET1 in GC by monitoring the proliferation, motility and invasion of GC cells in which NET1 has been stably knocked down. Additionally, we aimed to determine NET1-dependent transcriptomic events that occur in GC. Methods An in vitro model of stable knockdown of NET1 was achieved in AGS human gastric adenocarcinoma cells via lentiviral mediated transduction of short-hairpin (sh) RNA targeting NET1. Knockdown was assessed using quantitative PCR. Cell proliferation was assessed using an MTS assay and cell migration was assessed using a wound healing scratch assay. Cell invasion was assessed using a transwell matrigel invasion assay. Gene expression profiles were examined using affymetrix oligonucleotide U133A expression arrays. A student's t test was used to determine changes of statistical significance. Results GC cells were transduced with NET1 shRNA resulting in a 97% reduction in NET1 mRNA (p < 0.0001). NET1 knockdown significantly reduced the invasion and migration of GC cells by 94% (p < 0.05) and 24% (p < 0.001) respectively, while cell proliferation was not significantly altered following NET1 knockdown. Microarray analysis was performed on non-target and knockdown cell lines, treated with and without 10 μM lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) allowing us to identify NET1-dependent, LPA-dependent and NET1-mediated LPA-induced gene transcription. Differential gene expression was confirmed by quantitative PCR. Shortlisted NET1-dependent genes included STAT1, TSPAN1, TGFBi and CCL5 all of which were downregulatd upon NET1 downregulation. Shortlisted LPA-dependent genes included EGFR and PPARD where EGFR was upregulated and PPARD was downregulated upon LPA stimulation. Shortlisted NET1 and LPA dependent genes included IGFR1 and PIP5K3. These LPA induced genes were downregulated in

  19. CT of Gastric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guniganti, Preethi; Bradenham, Courtney H; Raptis, Constantine; Menias, Christine O; Mellnick, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms among adult patients seeking care in the emergency department, and, with the increased use of computed tomography (CT) to image patients with these complaints, radiologists will more frequently encounter a variety of emergent gastric pathologic conditions on CT studies. Familiarity with the CT appearance of emergent gastric conditions is important, as the clinical presentation is often nonspecific and the radiologist may be the first to recognize gastric disease as the cause of a patient's symptoms. Although endoscopy and barium fluoroscopy remain important tools for evaluating patients with suspected gastric disease in the outpatient setting, compared with CT these modalities enable less comprehensive evaluation of patients with nonspecific complaints and are less readily available in the acute setting. Endoscopy is also more invasive than CT and has greater potential risks. Although the mucosal detail of CT is relatively poor compared with barium fluoroscopy or endoscopy, CT can be used with the appropriate imaging protocols to identify inflammatory conditions of the stomach ranging from gastritis to peptic ulcer disease. In addition, CT can readily demonstrate the various complications of gastric disease, including perforation, obstruction, and hemorrhage, which may direct further clinical, endoscopic, or surgical management. We will review the normal anatomy of the stomach and discuss emergent gastric disease with a focus on the usual clinical presentation, typical imaging appearance, and differentiating features, as well as potential imaging pitfalls. PMID:26562229

  20. Occult gastric cancer with distant metastasis proven by random gastric biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hyuk; Lim, Kyu-Hyoung; Song, Seo-Young; Lee, Hui-Young; Park, Sung Chul; Kang, Chang Don; Lee, Sung Joon; Choi, Dong Wook; Park, Sung Bae; Ryu, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Krukenberg tumor, a rare metastatic ovarian tumor arising from gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma mainly, tends to occur in premenopausal females. Finding the origin of a Krukenberg tumor is crucial for determining prognosis. In Eastern countries, the most common origin of Krukenberg tumor is stomach cancer, which is generally diagnosed via endoscopic biopsy to investigate an abnormal mucosal lesion. Here, we describe a case of huge adnexal mass in a 33-year-old woman who presented with abdominal distension. Two independent endoscopic examinations performed by experts in two tertiary university hospitals revealed no abnormal mucosal lesion. The patient was diagnosed with a Krukenberg tumor according to findings from random endoscopic biopsies taken from normal-looking gastric mucosa in our hospital. It is very rare to be diagnosed via a random biopsy in cases where three well-trained endoscopists had not found any mucosal lesion previously. Thus, in this case, random biopsy was helpful in finding the origin of a Krukenberg tumor. PMID:27122678

  1. Conjunctival metastatic adenocarcinoma of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Li, He J; Tsaousis, Konstantinos T; Hoopes, Phillip; Mamalis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a presumed metastatic adenocarcinoma discovered in the conjunctival limbus of a 75-year-old male with a history of prostate adenocarcinoma. After an initial clinical diagnosis of pinguecula and unsuccessful topical steroid therapy, the lesion was excised and sent for pathological evaluation and special staining. The histopathological evaluation was consistent with a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma, without evidence of lacrimal tissue. Surprisingly, results from special staining were most consistent with lung adenocarcinoma rather than that from a prostate origin. Systemic radiographic evaluation did not locate the primary tumour, and the patient did not present with any symptoms consistent with malignancy. Watchful waiting was chosen as the therapeutic strategy to manage the patient. This is the first report of an adenocarcinoma, likely metastatic, at the conjunctival limbus. PMID:27190113

  2. Urachal Adenocarcinoma in a Dog.

    PubMed

    Shrader, S; Lauridson, J; King, Z; Loch, J

    2016-05-01

    An 8-year-old neutered female Labrador retriever was presented with a 3-year history of intermittent haematuria. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the urinary bladder revealed a 2 × 3 × 0.5 cm intraluminal mass arising at the dome. The mass was excised via partial cystectomy. Histopathological examination revealed neoplastic epithelial cells arranged in sheets, irregularly-branching tubules and acini within a fibrovascular stroma. Neoplastic cells were cuboidal to polygonal with abundant foamy amphophilic cytoplasm, typically with a single, large, clear intracytoplasmic vacuole and eccentric nucleus ('signet ring' cells). Neoplastic tubules were often ectatic and contained abundant mucin. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells had weak, cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for cytokeratin 7 and rare, but strong, nuclear immunoreactivity for CDX2. Based on the cellular morphology, immunolabelling characteristics and anatomical location, a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma of urachal origin was made. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of urachal adenocarcinoma in a dog. PMID:27009748

  3. Experimental study on Qizhu formula for modulating survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis, in MGC-803 gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    WEN, HAO; WANG, XIAOHUA; SHAN, ZHAOWEI

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of action of Qizhu formula, a Chinese medicinal empirical formula, in modulating the action of survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis, in MGC-803 gastric cancer cells. Western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were applied to detect the effect of varying concentrations of Qizhu formula in the modulation of the expression of survivin in MGC-803 human gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The western blot analysis results demonstrated that Qizhu formula exerted no significant effects on the protein expression of the β-actin housekeeping gene, whereas it exerted a significant inhibitory effect on the protein expression of the apoptosis-related survivin gene at concentrations of 250 μg/ml and, particularly, 500 μg/ml. RT-PCR was used to detect the effect of Qizhu formula on survivin mRNA in MGC-803 human gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The ratio of survivin/β-actin in the 0.1% dimethylsulfoxide and the 125, 250 and 500 μg/ml groups of Qizhu formula was 0.4543, 0.4025, 0.2415 and 0.2235, respectively. Therefore, Qizhu formula exerted a distinct inhibitory effect on the mRNA expression of survivin in MGC-803 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, Qizhu formula may modulate the apoptosis of MGC-803 human gastric adenocarcinoma cells, which is associated with the downregulation of survivin mRNA and protein expression. PMID:24772318

  4. New Insights in Histogenetic Pathways of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gurzu, Simona; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Orlowska, Janina; Szentirmay, Zoltan; Jung, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this paper was to describe 3 possible histogenetic pathways for poorly cohesive (diffuse) carcinomas and 2 for intestinal-type gastric carcinomas (GCs), which might influence the behavior of GC. In the present observational study, 102 patients with early (n = 50) and advanced GCs (n = 52) were evaluated, and the histogenetic background was analyzed. All of the cases were sporadic GCs. For particular aspects, Maspin, E-cadherin, and SLUG immunostains were performed. For our final conclusions, the results were correlated with literature data. In early stages, poorly cohesive carcinomas can display 3 histogenetic pathways, with particular molecular behaviors: “carcinoma with intraepithelial pagetoid onset” (with or without a switch from E-cadherin to SLUG positivity), “carcinoma with early lymphatic invasion” (carcinoma limited to mucosa but with carcinomatosis of the lymph vessels from subjacent layers), and “microglandular-type poorly cohesive carcinoma” (the onset is similar with adenocarcinoma but abrupt dedifferentiation can be seen in the submucosa, with persistence of a dual component in the deep layers). The intestinal type carcinoma can be developed on the background of superficially located dysplasia (“classic adenocarcinoma”) or in the submucosal heterotopic mucosa (“adenocarcinoma arising from the mucosal infolding in the submucosa”). Based on personal observations correlated with literature data, 5 histopathogenetic pathways are proposed with specific denominations. Each of them can partially explain the aberrant behavior of early gastric cancer. PMID:26496316

  5. General Information about Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Gastric Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  6. Establishment of a gastric cell-based assay system for exploring inhibitors of octanoylated ghrelin production.

    PubMed

    Oiso, Shigeru; Nobe, Miyuki; Yamaguchi, Yuhei; Umemoto, Shigeru; Nakamura, Kazuo; Kariyazono, Hiroko

    2013-10-01

    Ghrelin, a gastric hormone, is a growth hormone-releasing peptide. Its serine-3 acylation with octanoic acid is essential for its orexigenic activity, and therefore, inhibition of the acylation of ghrelin may help in decreasing appetite and preventing obesity. This study aimed to establish a human gastric cell-based assay system to evaluate candidate inhibitors of octanoylated ghrelin production. In human gastric carcinoma AGS cells, obligatory factors for the posttranslational modification of ghrelin, such as certain prohormone convertases responsible for processing of proghrelin to the mature ghrelin and the enzyme-catalyzing acyl-modification of ghrelin, were well expressed, but ghrelin was expressed at low levels. Accordingly, we transfected a ghrelin-expressing vector into AGS cells and isolated a stable ghrelin-expressing cell line (AGS-GHRL8). AGS-GHRL8 cells secreted octanoylated ghrelin in accordance with the concentrations of octanoic acid in the culture medium. Given that ingested heptanoic acid is used for the acyl-modification of ghrelin, we evaluated whether heptanoic acid inhibits production of octanoylated ghrelin in AGS-GHRL8 cells. Butyric acid was used as a control. Indeed, heptanoic acid predictably decreased the secretion of octanoylated ghrelin, whereas butyric acid did not. The AGS-GHRL8 line established in this study will facilitate the screening of inhibitors of octanoylated ghrelin production. PMID:23704134

  7. GASTRIC MOTOR DISTURBANCES IN PATIENTS WITH IDIOPATHIC RAPID GASTRIC EMPTYING

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Manduca, Armando; Lake, David S.; Fidler, Jeff; Edwards, Phillip; Grimm, Roger C.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The mechanisms of “idiopathic” rapid gastric emptying, which is associated with functional dyspepsia and functional diarrhea, are not understood. Our hypotheses were that increased gastric motility and reduced postprandial gastric accommodation contribute to rapid gastric emptying. Methods Fasting and postprandial (300kCal nutrient meal) gastric volumes were measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 20 healthy people and 17 with functional dyspepsia; 7 had normal and 10 had rapid gastric emptying. In 17 healthy people and patients, contractility was analyzed by spectral analysis of a time-series of gastric cross-sectional areas. Logistic regression models analyzed whether contractile parameters, fasting volume, and postprandial volume change could discriminate between health and patients with normal or rapid gastric emptying. Results While upper gastrointestinal symptoms were comparable, patients with rapid emptying had a higher (p = 0.002) body mass index (BMI) than normal gastric emptying. MRI visualized propagating contractions at ~ 3 cpm in healthy people and patients. Compared to controls (0.16 ± 0.02, Mean ± SEM), the amplitude of gastric contractions in the entire stomach was higher (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.2–14.0) in patients with rapid (0.24 ± 0.03) but not normal gastric emptying (0.10 ± 0.03). Similar differences were observed in the distal stomach. However, the propagation velocity, fasting gastric volume, and the postprandial volume change were not significantly different between patients and controls. Conclusions MRI provides a noninvasive and refined assessment of gastric volumes and contractility in humans. Increased gastric contractility may contribute to rapid gastric emptying in functional dyspepsia. PMID:21470342

  8. Prognostic Significance of MiR-34a Expression in Patients with Gastric Cancer after Radical Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Wen-Tao; Ma, Xiao-Bin; Zan, Ying; Wang, Xi-Jing; Dong, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Background: MiR-34a dysregulation has been implicated in tumorigenesis and progression of gastric cancer, but its role in prognosis of patients with gastric cancer remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic significance of miR-34a in gastric cancer patients after radical gastrectomy. Methods: Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression of miR-34a in human gastric cancer cell lines and tissues in 76 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma from China. Results are assessed for association with clinical features and overall survival (OS) using Kaplan–Meier analysis. Prognostic values of miR-34a expression and clinical outcomes were evaluated by Cox regression analysis. A molecular prognostic stratification scheme incorporating miR-34a expression was determined using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: The results show that the expression level of miR-34a was decreased in human gastric cancer cell lines and tissues, and down-regulated expression of miR-34a was associated with Lauren classification (P = 0.034). Decreased miR-34a expression in gastric cancer tissues was positively correlated with poor OS of gastric cancer patients (P = 0.013). Further multivariate Cox regression analysis suggested that miR-34a expression was an independent prognostic indicator for gastric cancer (P = 0.027). Applying the prognostic value of miR-34a expression to tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage system showed a better prognostic value in patients with gastric cancer than miR-34a expression (P = 0.0435) or TNM stage (P = 0.0249) alone. Conclusion: The results reinforce the critical role for the down-regulated miR-34a expression in gastric cancer and suggest that miR-34a could be a prognostic indicator for this disease. PMID:26415802

  9. Neuroendocrine liver metastasis in gastric mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma with trilineage cell differentiation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjin; Xiao, Weihua; Ma, Haifen; Sun, Mingfei; Chen, Hongtan; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) is a rare disease, which mostly occurs in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. Here we report a case of gastric MANEC with tri-lineage differentiation in which only the neuroendocrine component had metastasized to the liver. Liver and gastric masses were detected by abdominal computed tomography, and the preoperative relationship between liver and gastric masses was unknown. The histopathological analysis after operation confirmed the gastric mass to be MANEC, whereas the liver mass was actually the metastatic neuroendocrine component of the gastric MANEC. In the pathologic diagnosis, tri-lineage differentiation, including tubular adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma was observed in the gastric MANEC tissues. The mitotic and Ki-67 labeling indexes of the resected tumor tissue were high, and thus, the tumor was classified as a grade G3 neuroendocrine carcinoma, which has a poor prognosis. Multiple low-density masses were found in the right lobe of the liver 2.5 months after operation. PMID:25337287

  10. Neuroendocrine liver metastasis in gastric mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma with trilineage cell differentiation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjin; Xiao, Weihua; Ma, Haifen; Sun, Mingfei; Chen, Hongtan; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) is a rare disease, which mostly occurs in the gastroin testinal tract and pancreas. Here we report a case of gastric MANEC with tri-lineage differentiation in which only the neuroendocrine component had metastasized to the liver. Liver and gastric masses were detected by abdominal computed tomography, and the preoperative relationship between liver and gastric masses was unknown. The histopathological analysis after operation confirmed the gastric mass to be MANEC, whereas the liver mass was actually the metastatic neuroendocrine component of the gastric MANEC. In the pathologic diagnosis, tri-lineage differentiation, including tubular adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma was observed in the gastric MANEC tissues. The mitotic and Ki-67 labeling indexes of the resected tumor tissue were high, and thus, the tumor was classified as a grade G3 neuroendocrine carcinoma, which has a poor prognosis. Multiple low-density masses were found in the right lobe of the liver 2.5 months after operation. PMID:25337287

  11. Mechanism for ammonia-induced promotion of gastric carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsujii, M; Kawano, S; Tsuji, S; Takei, Y; Tamura, K; Fusamoto, H; Kamada, T

    1995-03-01

    Although an association is suggested between gastric cancer and prior infection with Helicobacter pylori (HP), the role of HP in gastric carcinogenesis remains obscure. HP has potent urease activity and produces ammonia, a factor causing HP-related gastroduodenal mucosal lesions. In this study, rats were examined in an effort to determine effects of ammonia on gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). After pretreatment with MNNG (83 mg/l) for 24 weeks, a solution of either 0.01% ammonia or plain tap water was administered to the animals as drinking water for an additional 24 weeks. The administration of the 0.01% ammonia solution significantly increased the incidence and number of cancers in the glandular stomach. The numbers of cases in which these cancers penetrated the muscle layer or deeper and of low-grade differentiated adenocarcinomas were significantly higher in rats receiving the ammonia solution. Continuing administration of ammonia accelerated cell proliferation in the gastric mucosa, but had no effect on the serum gastrin level. Therefore, gastric ammonia, which stimulates mucosal cell proliferation, appears to be an important promoter in carcinogenesis in rats and possibly in the HP-related gastric carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:7697814

  12. CDH1 mutations in gastric cancer patients from northern Brazil identified by Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS)

    PubMed Central

    El-Husny, Antonette; Raiol-Moraes, Milene; Amador, Marcos; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, André M.; Montagnini, André; Barbosa, Silvanira; Silva, Artur; Assumpção, Paulo; Ishak, Geraldo; Santos, Sidney; Pinto, Pablo; Cruz, Aline; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer is considered to be the fifth highest incident tumor worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. Developing regions report a higher number of sporadic cases, but there are only a few local studies related to hereditary cases of gastric cancer in Brazil to confirm this fact. CDH1 germline mutations have been described both in familial and sporadic cases, but there is only one recent molecular description of individuals from Brazil. In this study we performed Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to assess CDH1 germline mutations in individuals who match the clinical criteria for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC), or who exhibit very early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Among five probands we detected CDH1 germline mutations in two cases (40%). The mutation c.1023T > G was found in a HDGC family and the mutation c.1849G > A, which is nearly exclusive to African populations, was found in an early-onset case of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mutations described highlight the existence of gastric cancer cases caused by CDH1 germline mutations in northern Brazil, although such information is frequently ignored due to the existence of a large number of environmental factors locally. Our report represent the first CDH1 mutations in HDGC described from Brazil by an NGS platform. PMID:27192129

  13. CDH1 mutations in gastric cancer patients from northern Brazil identified by Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS).

    PubMed

    El-Husny, Antonette; Raiol-Moraes, Milene; Amador, Marcos; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, André M; Montagnini, André; Barbosa, Silvanira; Silva, Artur; Assumpção, Paulo; Ishak, Geraldo; Santos, Sidney; Pinto, Pablo; Cruz, Aline; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-05-13

    Gastric cancer is considered to be the fifth highest incident tumor worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. Developing regions report a higher number of sporadic cases, but there are only a few local studies related to hereditary cases of gastric cancer in Brazil to confirm this fact. CDH1 germline mutations have been described both in familial and sporadic cases, but there is only one recent molecular description of individuals from Brazil. In this study we performed Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to assess CDH1 germline mutations in individuals who match the clinical criteria for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC), or who exhibit very early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Among five probands we detected CDH1 germline mutations in two cases (40%). The mutation c.1023T > G was found in a HDGC family and the mutation c.1849G > A, which is nearly exclusive to African populations, was found in an early-onset case of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mutations described highlight the existence of gastric cancer cases caused by CDH1 germline mutations in northern Brazil, although such information is frequently ignored due to the existence of a large number of environmental factors locally. Our report represent the first CDH1 mutations in HDGC described from Brazil by an NGS platform. PMID:27192129

  14. Advanced gastric cancer and a concomitant pregnancy associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Takumi; Isii, Keisuke; Suzuki, Mina; Takakuwa, Koichi; Shibazaki, Yasuhiko; Ozawa, Tsunenori; Narisawa, Rintaro; Sekizuka, Naoto; Tanaka, Kenichi

    2004-07-01

    Gastric cancer associated with pregnancy is extremely rare and the prognosis is generally grave. A 31-year-old Japanese women, 41 weeks pregnant, displayed disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), although clinical symptoms and diagnostic examinations did not indicate an obstetrical cause. She went into labor spontaneously and vaginally delivered a 3248-g normal female infant, after receiving a blood transfusion. On the day 5 postpartum, a gastroduodenal fiberscope examination indicated advanced gastric cancer. She was also diagnosed with bilateral chronic subdural hematoma and underwent an operation to allow drainage. It was not possible to treat her curatively, so she was treated conservatively for DIC. She died on day 13 postpartum. Necropsy of the iliac bone indicated bone marrow metastasis of adenocarcinoma. This is the first known case of a pregnant woman with DIC occurring as the first manifestation of advanced gastric cancer. PMID:15232763

  15. Neo-adjuvant chemo(radio)therapy in gastric cancer: Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Biondi, Alberto; Lirosi, Maria C; D'Ugo, Domenico; Fico, Valeria; Ricci, Riccardo; Santullo, Francesco; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cananzi, Ferdinando Cm; Persiani, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    In the last 20 years, several clinical trials on neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy as a therapeutic approach for locally advanced gastric cancer have been performed. Even if more data are necessary to define the roles of these approaches, the results of preoperative treatments in the combined treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma are encouraging because this approach has led to a higher rate of curative surgical resection. Owing to the results of most recent randomized phase III studies, neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced resectable gastric cancer has satisfied the determination of level I evidence. Remaining concerns pertain to the choice of the optimal therapy regimen, strict patient selection by accurate pre-operative staging, standardization of surgical procedures, and valid criteria for response evaluation. New well-designed trials will be necessary to find the best therapeutic approach in pre-operative settings and the best way to combine old-generation chemotherapeutic drugs with new-generation molecules. PMID:26690252

  16. Deep sequencing of gastric carcinoma reveals somatic mutations relevant to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Globally, gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death, with the majority of the health burden borne by economically less-developed countries. Methods Here, we report a genetic characterization of 50 gastric adenocarcinoma samples, using affymetrix SNP arrays and Illumina mRNA expression arrays as well as Illumina sequencing of the coding regions of 384 genes belonging to various pathways known to be altered in other cancers. Results Genetic alterations were observed in the WNT, Hedgehog, cell cycle, DNA damage and epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition pathways. Conclusions The data suggests targeted therapies approved or in clinical development for gastric carcinoma would be of benefit to ~22% of the patients studied. In addition, the novel mutations detected here, are likely to influence clinical response and suggest new targets for drug discovery. PMID:21781349

  17. Neo-adjuvant chemo(radio)therapy in gastric cancer: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Alberto; Lirosi, Maria C; D’Ugo, Domenico; Fico, Valeria; Ricci, Riccardo; Santullo, Francesco; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cananzi, Ferdinando CM; Persiani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, several clinical trials on neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy as a therapeutic approach for locally advanced gastric cancer have been performed. Even if more data are necessary to define the roles of these approaches, the results of preoperative treatments in the combined treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma are encouraging because this approach has led to a higher rate of curative surgical resection. Owing to the results of most recent randomized phase III studies, neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced resectable gastric cancer has satisfied the determination of level I evidence. Remaining concerns pertain to the choice of the optimal therapy regimen, strict patient selection by accurate pre-operative staging, standardization of surgical procedures, and valid criteria for response evaluation. New well-designed trials will be necessary to find the best therapeutic approach in pre-operative settings and the best way to combine old-generation chemotherapeutic drugs with new-generation molecules. PMID:26690252

  18. [Difficulty in Preoperative Diagnosis of Residual Gastric Cancer after Distal Gastrectomy for Duodenal Ulcer].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masanori; Nakai, Koji; Inoue, Kentaro; Hijikawa, Takeshi; Kitade, Hiroaki; Yoshioka, Kazuhiko; Kon, Masanori

    2015-10-01

    A 67-year-old man underwent distal gastrectomy via the Billroth Ⅱ method (B-Ⅱ) for a duodenal ulcer. He presented with appetite loss and nausea in May 2014. Gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed wall thickness around gastrojejunostomy and the gastric mucosal fold. Biopsy and re-biopsy revealed a group 2 tumor. Laparotomy for diagnosis was performed because of stenosis and tumor progression. Intraoperative frozen section examination revealed adenocarcinoma in the lymph nodes of the jejunum. Residual gastrectomy with reconstruction using the Roux-en-Y method was performed for residual gastric cancer. Histopathological findings revealed pT4a, pN0, pM1 for the tumor in the lymph nodes of the jejunum, pStage Ⅳ. A distorted gastrojejunostomy site and the presence of anastomotic strictures are important for the rapid diagnosis of residual gastric cancer. PMID:26489571

  19. Immunohistochemical expression of p53, Bcl-2, COX-2, C-erb-B2, EPO-R, beta-catenin, and E-cadherin in non tumoral gastric mucous membrane.

    PubMed

    Sereno, M; García-Cabezas, M A; De Castro, J; Cejas, P; Saenz, E Casado; Belda-Iniesta, C; Feijoo, J Barriuso; Larrauri, J; Nistal, M; Baron, M Gonzalez

    2006-01-01

    Different authors have investigated the immunohistochemical expression of some proteins in the adenocarcinoma of the stomach, including cell cycle regulators proteins like p53 and Bcl-2; growth factors (c-erb-B2 and EPO-R); angiogenesis-related markers such as COX-2 and cellular adhesion molecules (beta-catenin and E-cadherin). While these proteins have been studied in gastric adenocarcinoma, their immunophenotyping in non tumoral gastric mucous membrane remains unexplored. In the present study, we investigated the expression, function and behavior of these proteins in normal gastric mucous membrane to contribute to gain further knowledge on the significance of their loss or overexpression in malignant gastric tumors. PMID:17213037

  20. Effect of gastric acid suppressants on human gastric motility

    PubMed Central

    Parkman, H; Urbain, J; Knight, L; Brown, K; Trate, D; Miller, M; Maurer, A; Fisher, R

    1998-01-01

    Background—The effect of histamine H2 receptor antagonists on gastric emptying is controversial. 
Aims—To determine the effects of ranitidine, famotidine, and omeprazole on gastric motility and emptying. 
Patients and methods—Fifteen normal subjects underwent simultaneous antroduodenal manometry, electrogastrography (EGG), and gastric emptying with dynamic antral scintigraphy (DAS). After 30 minutes of fasting manometry and EGG recording, subjects received either intravenous saline, ranitidine, or famotidine, followed by another 30 minutes recording and then three hours of postprandial recording after ingestion of a radiolabelled meal. Images were obtained every 10-15 minutes for three hours to measure gastric emptying and assess antral contractility. Similar testing was performed after omeprazole 20 mg daily for one week. 
Results—Fasting antral phase III migrating motor complexes (MMCs) were more common after ranitidine (9/15 subjects, 60%), famotidine (12/15, 80%), and omeprazole (8/12, 67%) compared with placebo (4/14, 29%; p<0.05). Postprandially, ranitidine, famotidine, and omeprazole slowed gastric emptying, increased the amplitude of DAS contractions, increased the EGG power, and increased the antral manometric motility index. 
Conclusions—Suppression of gastric acid secretion with therapeutic doses of gastric acid suppressants is associated with delayed gastric emptying but increased antral motility. 

 Keywords: gastric motility; gastric emptying; histamine H2 receptor antagonists; proton pump inhibitors; gastric acid secretion; scintigraphy PMID:9536950

  1. Immunotherapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matsueda, Satoko; Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the majority of cases gastric cancer is advanced at diagnosis and although medical and surgical treatments have improved, survival rates remain poor. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a powerful and promising clinical approach for treatment of cancer and has shown major success in breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Here, we provide an overview of concepts of modern cancer immunotherapy including the theory, current approaches, remaining hurdles to be overcome, and the future prospect of cancer immunotherapy in the treatment of gastric cancer. Adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies have all been used with some initial successes in gastric cancer. However, to date the results in gastric cancer have been disappointing as current approaches often do not stimulate immunity efficiently allowing tumors continue to grow despite the presence of a measurable immune response. Here, we discuss the identification of targets for immunotherapy and the role of biomarkers in prospectively identifying appropriate subjects or immunotherapy. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immunosurveillance and produce an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We show how advances have provided tools for overcoming the mechanisms of immunosuppression including the use of monoclonal antibodies to block negative regulators normally expressed on the surface of T cells which limit activation and proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. Immunotherapy has greatly improved and is becoming an important factor in such fields as medical care and welfare for human being. Progress has been rapid ensuring that the future of immunotherapy for gastric cancer is bright. PMID:24587645

  2. Mixed gastric carcinoma with intestinal and cribriform patterns: a distinctive pathologic appearance associated with poor prognosis in advanced stages and a potential mimicker of metastatic breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lino-Silva, Leonardo Saúl; Salcedo Hernández, Rosa Angélica; Molina-Frías, Ernesto

    2013-02-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is characterized by marked heterogeneity at cytological and architectural level and frequently shows overlap between microscopic patterns. This article describes a peculiar pattern of gastric adenocarcinoma, previously unreported, that combines intestinal type adenocarcinoma with areas of cribriform pattern that resembles both architectural and cytological in situ ductal carcinoma of the breast and to the best of the authors' knowledge, there are no earlier reports of this pattern in the stomach, which has been named "gastric carcinoma with cribriform component (CGA). The authors analyzed 12 cases of intestinal type adenocarcinoma with areas at least 20% of cribriform pattern (range from 20% to 90%) that was present in 9% of intestinal type gastric adenocarcinomas in their institution. There is slight predilection for male sex, and the median age of presentation is 55.8 years. The phenotype by immunohistochemistry is the same as with conventional (non-CGA) carcinomas. CGA shows more frequent lymphovascular invasion (P = .039), perineural invasion (P = .027) and resembles both in situ and invasive cribriform carcinoma of the breast. In clinical stage III the overall 3-year survival of CGA was worse than those with non-CGA component (38.6% vs 25%; 3-year survival, P = .010) and proves to be an independent adverse factor for overall survival in a multivariate analysis. Compared with conventional gastric carcinomas, CGA is deep infiltrating, has more nodal metastases, more lymphovascular and perineural invasion, and has decreased overall survival. Thus, proper recognition and report is important, even in small biopsies or small foci. PMID:22744963

  3. Genomic Landscape of Somatic Alterations in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nan; Kadota, Mitsutaka; Liu, Huaitian; Abnet, Christian C; Su, Hua; Wu, Hailong; Freedman, Neal D; Yang, Howard H; Wang, Chaoyu; Yan, Chunhua; Wang, Lemin; Gere, Sheryl; Hutchinson, Amy; Song, Guohong; Wang, Yuan; Ding, Ti; Qiao, You-Lin; Koshiol, Jill; Dawsey, Sanford M; Giffen, Carol; Goldstein, Alisa M; Taylor, Philip R; Lee, Maxwell P

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer and esophageal cancer are the second and sixth leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Multiple genomic alterations underlying gastric cancer and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) have been identified, but the full spectrum of genomic structural variations and mutations have yet to be uncovered. Here, we report the results of whole-genome sequencing of 30 samples comprising tumor and blood from 15 patients, four of whom presented with ESCC, seven with gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA), and four with gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma. Analyses revealed that an A>C mutation was common in GCA, and in addition to the preferential nucleotide sequence of A located 5 prime to the mutation as noted in previous studies, we found enrichment of T in the 5 prime base. The A>C mutations in GCA suggested that oxidation of guanine may be a potential mechanism underlying cancer mutagenesis. Furthermore, we identified genes with mutations in gastric cancer and ESCC, including well-known cancer genes, TP53, JAK3, BRCA2, FGF2, FBXW7, MSH3, PTCH, NF1, ERBB2, and CHEK2, and potentially novel cancer-associated genes, KISS1R, AMH, MNX1, WNK2, and PRKRIR Finally, we identified recurrent chromosome alterations in at least 30% of tumors in genes, including MACROD2, FHIT, and PARK2 that were often intragenic deletions. These structural alterations were validated using the The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset. Our studies provide new insights into understanding the genomic landscape, genome instability, and mutation profile underlying gastric cancer and ESCC development. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1714-23. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26857264

  4. Usefulness of magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging for diagnosis of depressed gastric lesions.

    PubMed

    Sumie, Hiroaki; Sumie, Shuji; Nakahara, Keita; Watanabe, Yasutomo; Matsuo, Ken; Mukasa, Michita; Sakai, Takeshi; Yoshida, Hikaru; Tsuruta, Osamu; Sata, Michio

    2014-01-01

    The usefulness of magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging (ME-NBI) for the diagnosis of early gastric cancer is well known, however, there are no evaluation criteria. The aim of this study was to devise and evaluate a novel diagnostic algorithm for ME-NBI in depressed early gastric cancer. Between August, 2007 and May, 2011, 90 patients with a total of 110 depressed gastric lesions were enrolled in the study. A diagnostic algorithm was devised based on ME-NBI microvascular findings: microvascular irregularity and abnormal microvascular patterns (fine network, corkscrew and unclassified patterns). The diagnostic efficiency of the algorithm for gastric cancer and histological grade was assessed by measuring its mean sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy. Furthermore, inter- and intra-observer variation were measured. In the differential diagnosis of gastric cancer from non-cancerous lesions, the mean sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of the diagnostic algorithm were 86.7, 48.0, 94.4, 26.7, and 83.2%, respectively. Furthermore, in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated adenocarcinoma from differentiated adenocarcinoma, the mean sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of the diagnostic algorithm were 61.6, 86.3, 69.0, 84.8, and 79.1%, respectively. For the ME-NBI final diagnosis using this algorithm, the mean κ values for inter- and intra-observer agreement were 0.50 and 0.77, respectively. In conclusion, the diagnostic algorithm based on ME-NBI microvascular findings was convenient and had high diagnostic accuracy, reliability and reproducibility in the differential diagnosis of depressed gastric lesions. PMID:24649321

  5. Preparation, characterization, and photocatalytic activity of porous AgBr@Ag and AgBrI@Ag plasmonic photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Tian, Baozhu; Zhang, Jinlong; Xiong, Tianqing; Wang, Tingting

    2014-02-01

    Porous AgBr@Ag and AgBrI@Ag plasmonic photocatalysts were synthesized by a multistep route, including a dealloying method to prepare porous Ag, a transformation from Ag to AgBr and AgBrI, and a photo-reduction process to form Ag nanoparticles on the surface of AgBr and AgBrI. It was found that the porous structure kept unchanged during Ag was transferred into AgBr, AgBrI, AgBr@Ag, and AgBrI@Ag. Both porous AgBr@Ag and porous AgBrI@Ag showed much higher visible-light photocatalytic activity than cubic AgBr@Ag for the degradation of methyl orange, which is because the interconnected pore channels not only provide more reactive sites but also favor the transportation of photo-generated electrons and holes. For AgBrI@Ag, AgBrI solid solution formed at the interface of AgBr and AgI, and the phase junction can effectively separate the photo-generated electrons and holes, favorable to the improvement of photocatalytic activity. The optimal I content for obtaining the highest activity is ∼10 at.%.

  6. Gastric Cancer Staging with Dual Energy Spectral CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zilai; Pang, Lifang; Ding, Bei; Yan, Chao; Zhang, Huan; Du, Lianjun; Wang, Baisong; Song, Qi; Chen, Kemin; Yan, Fuhua

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical utility of dual energy spectral CT (DEsCT) in staging and characterizing gastric cancers. Materials and Methods 96 patients suspected of gastric cancers underwent dual-phasic scans (arterial phase (AP) and portal venous phase (PP)) with DEsCT mode. Three types of images were reconstructed for analysis: conventional polychromatic images, material-decomposition images, and monochromatic image sets with photon energies from 40 to 140 keV. The polychromatic and monochromatic images were compared in TNM staging. The iodine concentrations in the lesions and lymph nodes were measured on the iodine-based material-decomposition images. These values were further normalized against that in aorta and the normalized iodine concentration (nIC) values were statistically compared. Results were correlated with pathological findings. Results The overall accuracies for T, N and M staging were (81.2%, 80.0%, and 98.9%) and (73.9%, 75.0%, and 98.9%) determined with the monochromatic images and the conventional kVp images, respectively. The improvement of the accuracy in N-staging using the keV images was statistically significant (p<0.05). The nIC values between the differentiated and undifferentiated carcinoma and between metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes were significantly different both in AP (p = 0.02, respectively) and PP (p = 0.01, respectively). Among metastatic lymph nodes, nIC of the signet-ring cell carcinoma were significantly different from the adenocarcinoma (p = 0.02) and mucinous adenocarcinoma (p = 0.01) in PP. Conclusion The monochromatic images obtained with DEsCT may be used to improve the N-staging accuracy. Quantitative iodine concentration measurements may be helpful for differentiating between differentiated and undifferentiated gastric carcinoma, and between metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes. PMID:23424614

  7. Fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy for in vivo diagnosis of gastric dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianfeng; Lin, Kan; Zheng, Wei; Ho, Khek Yu; Teh, Ming; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-06-23

    This study aims to assess the clinical utility of a rapid fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy technique developed for enhancing in vivo diagnosis of gastric precancer during endoscopic examination. We have developed a real-time fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy system capable of simultaneously acquiring both fingerprint (FP) (i.e., 800-1800 cm(-1)) and high-wavenumber (HW) (i.e., 2800-3600 cm(-1)) Raman spectra from gastric tissue in vivo at endoscopy. A total of 5792 high-quality in vivo FP/HW Raman spectra (normal (n = 5160); dysplasia (n = 155), and adenocarcinoma (n = 477)) were acquired in real-time from 441 tissue sites (normal (n = 396); dysplasia (n = 11), and adenocarcinoma (n = 34)) of 191 gastric patients (normal (n = 172); dysplasia (n = 6), and adenocarcinoma (n = 13)) undergoing routine endoscopic examinations. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) together with leave-one-patient-out cross validation (LOPCV) were implemented to develop robust spectral diagnostic models. The FP/HW Raman spectra differ significantly between normal, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma of the stomach, which can be attributed to changes in proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and the bound water content. PLS-DA and LOPCV show that the fiber-optic FP/HW Raman spectroscopy provides diagnostic sensitivities of 96.0%, 81.8% and 88.2%, and specificities of 86.7%, 95.3% and 95.6%, respectively, for the classification of normal, dysplastic and cancerous gastric tissue, superior to either the FP or HW Raman techniques alone. Further dichotomous PLS-DA analysis yields a sensitivity of 90.9% (10/11) and specificity of 95.9% (380/396) for the detection of gastric dysplasia using FP/HW Raman spectroscopy, substantiating its clinical advantages over white light reflectance endoscopy (sensitivity: 90.9% (10/11), and specificity: 51.0% (202/396)). This work demonstrates that the fiber-optic FP/HW Raman spectroscopy technique has great promise for enhancing in vivo diagnosis of gastric

  8. Adenocarcinoma cells isolated from patients in the presence of cerium and transferrin in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zende-Del, A; Gholami, MR; Abdollahpour, F; Ahmadvand, H

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Cerium as a trace element in the periodic table is a member of the lanthanide group. Cerium ionic radius and its binding properties are similar to ferric ions, which may be bound to transferrin. So it can be considered as a competitive element to iron and can interfere with iron absorption. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of Cerium in presence of transferrin on gastric adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. Methods: The adenocarcinoma cells were obtained from patients after a pathological confirmation, then they were cultured in DMEM environment and cytotoxic effect of different concentrations of cerium were measured (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 µM) in the presence and absence of transferrin, on periods 24 and 48 hours by MTT and LDH cytotoxic assay. Results: The results of MTT and LDH measurements showed that Cerium itself has a cytotoxic effect on cancer cells isolated from the patient as well as it increases significantly in the presence of transferrin carrying a mortality rate of cancer cells (P <.05). Conclusion: Cerium is competitive element in the mechanism of iron absorption and can interfere and inhibit the growth of adenocarcinoma cancer cells; also, the use of Cerium and transferrin simultaneously may cause a greater inhibitory effect. PMID:26664465

  9. High-Throughput Sequencing of miRNAs Reveals a Tissue Signature in Gastric Cancer and Suggests Novel Potential Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Darnet, Sylvain; Moreira, Fabiano C; Hamoy, Igor G; Burbano, Rommel; Khayat, André; Cruz, Aline; Magalhães, Leandro; Silva, Artur; Santos, Sidney; Demachki, Samia; Assumpção, Monica; Assumpção, Paulo; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer has a high incidence and mortality rate worldwide; however, the use of biomarkers for its clinical diagnosis remains limited. The microRNAs (miRNAs) are biomarkers with the potential to identify the risk and prognosis as well as therapeutic targets. We performed the ultradeep miRnomes sequencing of gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric antrum without tumor samples. We observed that a small set of those samples were responsible for approximately 80% of the total miRNAs expression, which might represent a miRNA tissue signature. Additionally, we identified seven miRNAs exhibiting significant differences, and, of these, hsa-miR-135b and hsa-miR-29c were able to discriminate antrum without tumor from gastric cancer regardless of the histological type. These findings were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that hsa-miR-135b and hsa-miR-29c are potential gastric adenocarcinoma occurrence biomarkers with the ability to identify individuals at a higher risk of developing this cancer, and could even be used as therapeutic targets to allow individualized clinical management. PMID:26157332

  10. High-Throughput Sequencing of miRNAs Reveals a Tissue Signature in Gastric Cancer and Suggests Novel Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Darnet, Sylvain; Moreira, Fabiano C; Hamoy, Igor G; Burbano, Rommel; Khayat, André; Cruz, Aline; Magalhães, Leandro; Silva, Artur; Santos, Sidney; Demachki, Samia; Assumpção, Monica; Assumpção, Paulo; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer has a high incidence and mortality rate worldwide; however, the use of biomarkers for its clinical diagnosis remains limited. The microRNAs (miRNAs) are biomarkers with the potential to identify the risk and prognosis as well as therapeutic targets. We performed the ultradeep miRnomes sequencing of gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric antrum without tumor samples. We observed that a small set of those samples were responsible for approximately 80% of the total miRNAs expression, which might represent a miRNA tissue signature. Additionally, we identified seven miRNAs exhibiting significant differences, and, of these, hsa-miR-135b and hsa-miR-29c were able to discriminate antrum without tumor from gastric cancer regardless of the histological type. These findings were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that hsa-miR-135b and hsa-miR-29c are potential gastric adenocarcinoma occurrence biomarkers with the ability to identify individuals at a higher risk of developing this cancer, and could even be used as therapeutic targets to allow individualized clinical management. PMID:26157332

  11. Prognostic and predictive markers in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Le, Nha; Sund, Malin; Vinci, Alessio

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is characterized by a poor prognosis and a low median survival, despite improvements observed for many other solid tumours. Intensive research efforts have been undertaken during the last decades to discover new prognostic and treatment predictive biomarkers for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The mainstay of medical treatment for the disease has been the well-tolerated nucleoside analogue, gemcitabine. The only targeted agent currently used in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients is the epithelial growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib in combination with gemcitabine. Recently, treatment regimens such as a combination of fluorouracil-leucovorin-irinotecan-oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and the combination of nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine have been introduced for metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Although these treatment regimens significantly improve survival of patients, there are no good predictive biomarkers available that can be used to identify who would benefit most from them. Therefore, the search for predictive biomarkers that would facilitate personalization of chemotherapy is highly relevant. PMID:26769569

  12. [A Case of Unresectable Local Recurrence of Gastric Cancer Successfully Resected after Pre-Operative Chemotherapy with Trastuzumab].

    PubMed

    Okubo, Satoshi; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomoki; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Yamazaki, Makoto; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2015-11-01

    A 69-year-old man was diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer and underwent total gastrectomy (tubular adenocarcinoma, tub2, pT3N0M0, stageⅡA). Eight months after the surgery, recurrence on the anastomosis was observed. Tumor invasion of the aortic artery was suspected, and the patient was considered inoperable. He was treated with S-1/CDDP plus trastuzumab therapy as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen. After 4 courses of the chemotherapy, significant tumor reduction was observed, and the patient underwent anastomosis resection. Chemotherapy with trastuzumab appears to be an effective NAC treatment for HER2-positive, advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26805275

  13. [An atypical presentation of bronchial adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Langouo Fontsa, M; Cstoth, I; Berghmans, T; Feoli, F; Meert, A-P

    2013-01-01

    Currently, adenocarcinoma represents 41 % of primary lung cancers in women and 34 % in men. Thyroid metastases of lung cancer are rare and usually asymptomatic. We report the case of a patient presenting with stridor secondary to an enlarged multiple nodular thyroid accompanied by cervical lymphadenopathies accompanied by an enlarged and multiple nodular thyroid and by stridor. The final diagnosis was thyroid metastases of primary lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:23951859

  14. Accuracy of staging laparoscopy in detecting peritoneal dissemination in patients with gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Simon, M; Mal, F; Perniceni, T; Ferraz, J-M; Strauss, C; Levard, H; Louvet, C; Fuks, D; Gayet, B

    2016-04-01

    Despite staging laparoscopy (SL) with peritoneal lavage is recommended in US Guidelines in patients with potentially resectable gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma, this procedure is not systematically proposed in French Guidelines. Therefore, we decided to analyze the results of systematic SL in patients considered for preoperative chemotherapy. From 2005 to 2011, 116 consecutive patients with distal esophagus, esogastric junction, and gastric adenocarcinoma ≥T3 or N+ without detectable metastatic dissemination by computed tomography (CT) scan imaging underwent SL before neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Positive and negative SLs were compared according to tumor characteristics. SL was positive in 15 cases (12.9%) including 14 with peritoneal seeding (localized in five, diffuse in nine). SL was positive in 7 (24.1%) of 29 patients with poorly differentiated tumor, in 9 (32.1%) of 28 patients with signet ring cells, in 7 (50%) of 14 patients with gastric linitis tumor, and in 15 (16.3%) of 92 patients with T3 or T4 tumor. All the lesions of distal esophagus extending to the cardia had a negative SL. Among the 14 patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis at SL, nine (65%) had signs of peritoneal seeding on initial CT scan. One (0.8%) patient had a small bowel perforation closed laparoscopically. If systematic SL before preoperative chemotherapy does not seem justified because of its low accuracy, it should be performed in patients with poorly differentiated tumor, signet ring cell, and gastric linitis plastica components on biopsy and when CT scan is suggestive of T4 tumor, ascites, or peritoneal nodule. PMID:25758761

  15. Effect of urokinase-type plasminogen activator system in gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis

    PubMed Central

    DING, YOUCHENG; ZHANG, HUI; LU, AIGUO; ZHOU, ZHUQING; ZHONG, MINGAN; SHEN, DONGWEI; WANG, XUJING; ZHU, ZHENGGANG

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is a primary cause of mortality in patients with gastric cancer. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) has been demonstrated to be associated with tumor cell metastasis through the degradation of the extracellular matrix. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of the uPA system in gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis. Expression of uPA, uPA receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in four gastric cell lines (AGS, SGC7901, MKN45 and MKN28) was measured by semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting. uPA activity was detected using a uPA activity kit. Peritoneal implantation models of rats were established by injecting four gastric cancer cell lines for the selection of the cancer cells with a high planting potential. Biological behaviors, including adhesion, migration and invasion, were determined using a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Expression of the uPA system was observed to be highest in the SGC7901 cells among the four gastric cell lines. uPA activity was observed to be highest in the MKN45 cells and lowest in the AGS cells. Furthermore, peritoneal implantation analysis demonstrated that no peritoneal tumors were identified in the AGS cells, whilst the tumor masses observed in the SGC7901 and MKN45 cells were of different sizes. The survival times of the rats injected with the MKN28 and SGC7901 cells were longer than those of the rats injected with the MKN45 cells. Antibodies for uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 in the uPA system had the ability to inhibit the adhesion, migration and invasion of peritoneal metastasis in the gastric cancer cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that the uPA system was positively associated with peritoneal metastasis in gastric cancer. PMID:27313768

  16. Diagnosis and therapies for gastric non-invasive neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Motohiko

    2015-01-01

    There has been a great discrepancy of pathological diagnosis for gastric non-invasive neoplasia/dysplasia between Japanese and western pathologists. In Japan, lesions that most western pathologists diagnose as dysplasia are often considered adenocarcinoma based on nuclear and structural atypia regardless of the presence of invasion. In the Vienna classification, gastric non-invasive intraepithelial neoplasia (NIN) were divided into low grade and high grade (including intra-mucosal cancer of Japanese criteria). The diagnosis by both endoscopy and pathology of biopsy specimen is difficult. Recent advances of diagnostic modality such as magnified endoscopy and imaged enhanced endoscopy is expected to improve the diagnostic yield for NIN. There are two treatment strategies for NIN, observation and diagnostic therapy by endoscopic resection (ER). ER is acceptable because of its less invasiveness and high local control rate, on the other hand, cancer-developing rate of low-grade NIN is reported to be low. Therefore there is controversy for the treatment of gastric NIN. Prospective study based on unified pathological definition is required in the future. PMID:26640329

  17. Lung adenocarcinoma and human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ching; Chen, Jen-Hau; Richard, Kradin; Chen, Pao-Yang; Christiani, David C

    2004-09-15

    Over the past three decades, the incidence of lung adenocarcinoma has increased worldwide. Most individuals with lung adenocarcinoma (especially women) are nonsmokers. Reported risk factors for the development of lung adenocarcinoma include cigarette smoking; exposure to cooking fumes, air pollution, second-hand smoke, asbestos, and radon; nutritional status; genetic susceptibility; immunologic dysfunction; tuberculosis infection; and asthma. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a known risk factor for the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), but it has not been thoroughly assessed as a potential risk factor for the development of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. More than 50% of people are infected with HPV during their lifetimes, either via intrauterine or postnatal infection. Recent studies involving Taiwanese patients have demonstrated a possible association between HPV infection and the risk of developing pulmonary adenocarcinoma. HPV transmission pathways have not yet been conclusively identified. The observation of certain types of HPV in association with cervical and oral SCC raises the possibility of sexual transmission of HPV from the cervix to the oral cavity, with subsequent transmission to the larynx and then to the lung. HPV infection and metaplasia in lung tissue may increase an individual's susceptibility to the tumorigenesis of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Further epidemiologic and pathologic investigations will be necessary to establish a causal relation. PMID:15368331

  18. Melanoma with gastric metastases.

    PubMed

    Wong, Katherine; Serafi, Sam W; Bhatia, Abhijit S; Ibarra, Irene; Allen, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman with a history of malignant melanoma who presented with dyspnea and fatigue was found to have metastases to the stomach detected on endoscopy. Primary cutaneous malignant melanoma with gastric metastases is a rare occurrence, and it is often not detected until autopsy because of its non-specific manifestations. PMID:27609722

  19. Models of gastric emptying.

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, D F

    1977-01-01

    Some empirical and theoretical models of the emptying behaviour of the stomach are presented. The laws of Laplace, Hooke, and Poisseuille are used to derive a new model of gastric emptying. Published data on humans are used to test the model and evaluate empirical constants. It is shown that for meals with an initial volume of larger than or equal to 300 ml, the reciprocal of the cube root of the volume of meal remaining is proportional to the time the meal is in the stomach.For meals of initial volume of less than 300 ml the equation has to be corrected for the fact that the 'resting volume' of gastric contents is about 28 ml. The more exact formula is given in the text. As this model invokes no neural or hormonal factors, it is suggested that the gastric emptying response to the volume of a meal does not depend on these factors. The gastric emptying response to the composition of the meal does depend on such factors and a recent model of this process is used to evaluate an empirical constant. PMID:856678

  20. A human natural antibody to adenocarcinoma that inhibits tumour cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Koda, K.; Nakajima, N.; Saito, N.; Yasutomi, J.; McKnight, M. E.; Glassy, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    We characterized a natural human antibody to adenocarcinomas and investigated the biological role of this Ab/Ag complex in cancer expansion. Human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) were generated with hybridoma fusion methods using regional nodal lymphocytes of colon carcinoma patients. Among 1036 HuMAbs, only one, termed SK1, an IgM, was adenocarcinoma specific in the immunohistochemical study. The antigen recognized by SK1 (Ag-SK1) was a glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 42-46 kDa. The expression of Ag-SK1 on carcinoma cells varied according to the cell growth periods but was independent of cell cycle state as elucidated by two-colour fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. A dot-blot analysis showed that the concentration of Ag-SK1 per total protein differed considerably among eight colon carcinoma cells examined and that the difference was closely correlated with the invasion capacity of the cells as assessed by a microchemotaxis assay. Furthermore, up to 87% of cell migration was inhibited by SK1 in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggested that Ag-SK1 is metabolized and expressed on highly invasive carcinoma cells. In addition, it appears that, although rare, some patients do mount an anti-cancer antigen response in their draining lymph nodes. A HuMAb such as SK1 may be a good candidate for the treatment of cancer invasion and metastasis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9823972

  1. Role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in gastric cancer: An in-depth literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chiurillo, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the most common cancers worldwide and one of the leading cause for cancer-related deaths. Gastric adenocarcinoma is a multifactorial disease that is genetically, cytologically and architecturally more heterogeneous than other gastrointestinal carcinomas. The aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is involved in the development and progression of a significant proportion of gastric cancer cases. This review focuses on the participation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in gastric cancer by offering an analysis of the relevant literature published in this field. Indeed, it is discussed the role of key factors in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and their downstream effectors regulating processes involved in tumor initiation, tumor growth, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Available data indicate that constitutive Wnt signalling resulting from Helicobacter pylori infection and inactivation of Wnt inhibitors (mainly by inactivating mutations and promoter hypermethylation) play an important role in gastric cancer. Moreover, a number of recent studies confirmed CTNNB1 and APC as driver genes in gastric cancer. The identification of specific membrane, intracellular, and extracellular components of the Wnt pathway has revealed potential targets for gastric cancer therapy. High-throughput “omics” approaches will help in the search for Wnt pathway antagonist in the near future. PMID:25992323

  2. Association of COX2 gene hypomethylation with intestinal type gastric cancer in samples of patients from northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Cynthia Farias Vieira; Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; da Silva, Juarez Nóbrega; Cardoso Smith, Marilia de Arruda; de Araújo, Rubistenia Miranda; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Lima, Eleonidas Moura

    2014-02-01

    To verify the methylation status of THBS1, GPX3, and COX2 genes and to evaluate their association with Helicobacter pylori in gastric adenocarcinomas. Methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme PCR assay was performed in 16 diffuse type gastric cancer samples, 23 intestinal type, and 15 normal stomach tissue. The presence of H. pylori was performed by amplification of the fragment of the 16S rRNA. Statistical analyses were performed using Fisher's exact test. The hypermethylation of GPX3, THBS1, and COX2 occurred in 18 (n = 7), 5 (n = 2), and 36 % (n = 14) of gastric cancer samples, respectively, whereas in normal samples, it was found in 13, 7, and 67 %. The presence of H. pylori was detected in 67 % of gastric cancer samples and 67 % in normal gastric samples. The methylation of THBS1 and GPX3 was not significantly different between the types of tumors, normal sample, the presence of H. pylori, or clinicopathological variables studied (P > 0.05). However, the methylation status of the gene COX2 is significantly different between normal tissue and intestinal type gastric cancer (P = 0.02). Therefore, our results suggest that the methylation status of the gene COX2 is associated with the intestinal type of gastric cancer. PMID:24014049

  3. Gastric cancers of Western European and African patients show different patterns of genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection with H. pylori is important in the etiology of gastric cancer. Gastric cancer is infrequent in Africa, despite high frequencies of H. pylori infection, referred to as the African enigma. Variation in environmental and host factors influencing gastric cancer risk between different populations have been reported but little is known about the biological differences between gastric cancers from different geographic locations. We aim to study genomic instability patterns of gastric cancers obtained from patients from United Kingdom (UK) and South Africa (SA), in an attempt to support the African enigma hypothesis at the biological level. Methods DNA was isolated from 67 gastric adenocarcinomas, 33 UK patients, 9 Caucasian SA patients and 25 native SA patients. Microsatellite instability and chromosomal instability were analyzed by PCR and microarray comparative genomic hybridization, respectively. Data was analyzed by supervised univariate and multivariate analyses as well as unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis. Results Tumors from Caucasian and native SA patients showed significantly more microsatellite instable tumors (p < 0.05). For the microsatellite stable tumors, geographical origin of the patients correlated with cluster membership, derived from unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis (p = 0.001). Several chromosomal alterations showed significantly different frequencies in tumors from UK patients and native SA patients, but not between UK and Caucasian SA patients and between native and Caucasian SA patients. Conclusions Gastric cancers from SA and UK patients show differences in genetic instability patterns, indicating possible different biological mechanisms in patients from different geographical origin. This is of future clinical relevance for stratification of gastric cancer therapy. PMID:21226972

  4. Alteration of the bioenergetic phenotype of mitochondria is a hallmark of breast, gastric, lung and oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Isidoro, Antonio; Martínez, Marta; Fernández, Pedro L; Ortega, Alvaro D; Santamaría, Gema; Chamorro, Margarita; Reed, John C; Cuezva, José M

    2004-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that the expression of the beta-catalytic subunit of the mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase (beta-F1-ATPase) is depressed in liver, kidney and colon carcinomas, providing further a bioenergetic signature of cancer that is associated with patient survival. In the present study, we performed an analysis of mitochondrial and glycolytic protein markers in breast, gastric and prostate adenocarcinomas, and in squamous oesophageal and lung carcinomas. The expression of mitochondrial and glycolytic markers varied significantly in these carcinomas, when compared with paired normal tissues, with the exception of prostate cancer. Overall, the relative expression of beta-F1-ATPase was significantly reduced in breast and gastric adenocarcinomas, as well as in squamous oesophageal and lung carcinomas, strongly suggesting that alteration of the bioenergetic function of mitochondria is a hallmark of these types of cancer. PMID:14683524

  5. Esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett's dysplasia: a case report of double occurrence and prolonged survival after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vats, Hemender S; Banerjee, Tarit K; Resnick, Jeffrey; Khan, Qaseem

    2006-09-01

    A relatively young patient with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), obesity, smoking, and alcohol intake presented with widespread metastatic disease in lymph nodes, liver and lungs from a lower esophageal adenocarcinoma extending into the gastroesophageal junction associated with Barrett's mucosa and dysplasia.A complete response was achieved with six cycles of chemotherapy that sustained for more than 4 years without further recurrence. Unfortunately, there was presence of esophageal metaplasia after complete response which eventually converted to low to high grade dysplasia and ultimately to a second primary localized lower esophageal adenocarcinoma that was treated with thoracoabdominal esophagectomy and lymphadenectomy. No evidence of disease recurrence was seen 2 years later. The pathogenesis of a recent increase in the incidence of GERD, Barrett's esophagus and lower esophageal adenocarcinoma are discussed. Surgery, radiotherapy and combination chemotherapy are effective in the early stages leading to tumor shrinkage and prolongation of life and even cure in some cases. Lower esophageal adenocarcinoma is frequently associated with Barrett's high-grade dysplasia. Since there has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of Barrett's dysplasia, appropriate surveillance with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and preventive strategies, such as the use of aspirin, cyclo-oxygenase II inhibitors and other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs known to be chemopreventive agents against colon, esophagus, gastric and bladder cancers, need to be studied. PMID:16988098

  6. Mimics of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kaza, Ravi K.; Azar, Shadi F.; Ruma, Julie A.; Francis, Isaac R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Several uncommon primary pancreatic tumors, inflammatory conditions, metastasis to the pancreas and peripancreatic masses can mimic the appearance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Differentiation between these lesions and PDA can be challenging, due to the overlap in imaging features; however, familiarity with their typical imaging features and clinical presentation may be helpful in their differentiation, as in some cases, invasive diagnostic tests or unnecessary surgery can be avoided. The different pathologies that can mimic PDA include inflammatory conditions such as the various forms of pancreatitis (chronic-focal mass-forming, autoimmune and groove pancreatitis), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, solid pseudopapillary tumors, metastasis (solid non-lymphomatous and hematologic), congenital variants (annular pancreas), as well as peripancreatic lesions (accessory spleen, adrenal masses, duodenal masses, lymph nodes and vascular lesions), and certain rare pancreatic tumors (e.g., acinar cell tumors, solid serous tumors, hamartoma and solitary fibrous tumors). The clinical presentation and imaging features of the most commonly encountered mimics of PDA are discussed in this presentation with representative illustrations. PMID:24060833

  7. Laparoscopic transhiatal approach for resection of an adenocarcinoma in long-segment Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Konishi, Hirotaka; Kinoshita, Osamu; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Morimura, Ryo; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Komatsu, Shuhei; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kazuma; Sakakura, Chouhei; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma and is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease, which is often preceded by a hiatal hernia. We describe a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma arising in long-segment BE (LSBE) associated with a hiatal hernia that was successfully treated with a laparoscopic transhiatal approach (LTHA) without thoracotomy. The patient was a 42-year-old male who had previously undergone laryngectomy and tracheal separation to avoid repeated aspiration pneumonitis. An ulcerative lesion was found in a hiatal hernia by endoscopy and superficial esophageal cancer was also detected in the lower thoracic esophagus. The histopathological diagnosis of biopsy samples from both lesions was adenocarcinoma. There were difficulties with the thoracic approach because the patient had severe kyphosis and muscular contractures from cerebral palsy. Therefore, we performed subtotal esophagectomy by LTHA without thoracotomy. Using hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery, the esophageal hiatus was divided and carbon dioxide was introduced into the mediastinum. A hernial sac was identified on the cranial side of the right crus of the diaphragm and carefully separated from the surrounding tissues. Abruption of the thoracic esophagus was performed up to the level of the arch of the azygos vein via LTHA. A cervical incision was made in the left side of the permanent tracheal stoma, the cervical esophagus was divided, and gastric tube reconstruction was performed via a posterior mediastinal route. The operative time was 175 min, and there was 61 mL of intra-operative bleeding. A histopathological examination revealed superficial adenocarcinoma in LSBE. Our surgical procedure provided a good surgical view and can be safely applied to patients with a hiatal hernia and kyphosis. PMID:26269688

  8. Differences in the expression of mucus-associated antigens between proximal and distal human colon adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Bara, J.; Nardelli, J.; Gadenne, C.; Prade, M.; Burtin, P.

    1984-01-01

    An immunohistological study showed differences in the expression of mucus-associated gastric M1 and intestinal M3 antigens between the proximal (100 cases) and distal (200 cases) colonic adenocarcinomas. Such a regional difference was not observed in the normal colon. A total of 55% and 78% of proximal tumours produced M1 and M3 antigens, respectively (versus 13% and 47% in the distal tumours). The high percentage of M1 positive proximal cancers could be explained by the higher percentage (i) of mucus-producing tumours, such as signet ring cell (6% vs 1%) or mucinous adenocarcinomas (29% vs 11%); and (ii) of M1(+) well-differentiated adenocarcinomas (45% vs 8.5%) and the presence of undifferentiated carcinoma producing M1 antigens (12% vs 0%). These latter carcinomas were found in older patients (mean age 78 years vs 66 years). These results suggest that, on the proximal side, the stem cells were more often engaged in a differentiation process involving the expression of M antigens than were those of the distal side. Moreover, the proximal stem cells more frequently produce a foetal differentiation program showing simultaneous expression of M3 and M1 antigens (in 48% of proximal tumours, vs 11.5% for the distal side). Around 12% of proximal adenocarcinomas (vs 2% of distal tumours) contained stem cells engaged in a cell differentiation program not observed in the normal adult or foetal colon, involving the predominant expression of M1 antigens associated with an undifferential histological pattern. Images Figure 2 PMID:6324842

  9. LKB1 inhibits the proliferation of gastric cancer cells by suppressing the nuclear translocation of Yap and β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lian-Gang; Bian, Shi-Bo; Cui, Jian-Xin; Xi, Hong-Qing; Zhang, Ke-Cheng; Qin, Hong-Zhen; Zhu, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is known to suppress the proliferation, energy metabolism and mesenchymal transition of various cancer cells, and is involved in the regulation of Hippo-Yes-associated protein (Yap) and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. However, the role of LKB1 in gastric cancer (GC) was not fully understood. Thus, in the present study, we studied LKB1 and found that protein expression (0.37±0.061 vs. 0.59±0.108, P=0.006) and the protein ratio of p-Yap/Yap (0.179±0.085 vs. 0.8±0.126, P=0.001) were reduced in 54 gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) tissues compared with the matched adjacent non-cancerous tissues, using western blotting and RT-qPCR assays. LKB1 expression was also observed decreased in 109 GAC tissues compared with 54 adjacent non-cancerous tissues (χ2=4.678, P=0.0306), and negatively correlated with the nuclear expression of Yap (r=-0.6997) and β-catenin (r=-0.3510), using immunohistochemical analysis. In GC patients, LKB1 expression was negatively associated with tumor size, tumor infiltration, lymph node metastasis and the TNM stage. LKB1 expression was determined to be positively correlated with longer overall survival of GC patients using Kaplan-Meier analysis (P=0.001). Subsequently, LKB1 expression in human GAC AGS cells was enhanced with a full‑length LKB1 transfection. In vitro and in vivo proliferation was inhibited in LKB1-overexpressing GC cells compared with the control cells. Yap and β-catenin expression were assessed by western blotting and RT-qPCR, and were found to be increased in the cytoplasm but decreased in the nucleus in LKB1-overexpressing GC cells compared with the control cells. The increase in cytoplasmic β-catenin was reversed by the silencing of LKB1 or Yap with shRNAs in LKB1-overexpressing GC cells. Moreover, Yap and β-catenin mRNA were barely altered by LKB1 overexpression. Thus, we concluded that LKB1 expression was reduced in GAC tissues but that it correlated positively with better

  10. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer This page lists ... stomach (gastric) cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Cyramza (Ramucirumab) Docetaxel ...

  11. Gastric Aspiration Models

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Bruce A.; Alluri, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    The procedures described below are for producing gastric aspiration pneumonitis in mice with alterations for rats and rabbits described parenthetically. We use 4 different injury vehicles delivered intratracheally to investigate the inflammatory responses to gastric aspiration: Normal saline (NS) as the injury vehicle controlNS + HCl, pH = 1.25 (acid)NS + gastric particles, pH ≈ 5.3 (part.)NS + gastric particles + HCl, pH = 1.25 (acid + part.) The volume, pH, and gastric particle concentration all affect the resulting lung injury. In mice, we generally use an injury volume of 3.6 ml/kg (rat: 1.2 ml/kg, rabbit: 2.4 ml/kg), an injury pH (for the acid-containing vehicles) of 1.25, and a gastric particulate concentration (in the particulate-containing vehicles) of 10 mg/ml (rat: 40 mg/ml). In our hands this results in a maximal, non-lethal lung injury with ≤ 10% mortality for the most injurious vehicle (i.e., acid + part.) The maximum tolerable particulate concentration needs to be determined empirically for any new strains to be used, especially in genetically-altered mice, because an altered inflammatory response may have detrimental affects on mortality. We have extensive experience utilizing these procedures in the outbred strain, CD-1, as well as many genetically-altered inbred stains on the C57BL/6 background. Choice of strain should be carefully considered, especially in terms of strain-specific immune bias, to assure proper data interpretation. The size of the mouse should be ≥ 20 g at the time of injury. Smaller mice can be attempted, if necessary, but the surgical manipulation becomes increasingly more difficult and the surgery survival rate decreases substantially. There are no size or strain constraints for rat and rabbit models, but we generally use Long-Evans rats at 250–300 g and New Zealand White rats at ≈ 2 kg at the time of initial injury.

  12. Clinical epidemiology of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Tiing Leong; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and the fourth most common cancer globally. There are, however, distinct differences in incidence rates in different geographic regions. While the incidence rate of gastric cancer has been falling, that of gastric cardia cancers is reportedly on the rise in some regions. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor of non-cardia gastric cancer, and data has emerged concerning the role of H. pylori eradication for primary prevention of gastric cancer. Dietary, lifestyle and metabolic factors have also been implicated. Although addressing these other factors may contribute to health, the actual impact in terms of cancer prevention is unclear. Once irreversible histological changes have occurred, endoscopic surveillance would be necessary. A molecular classification system offers hope for molecularly tailored, personalised therapies for gastric cancer, which may improve the prognosis for patients. PMID:25630323

  13. Prognostic Significance of Signet Ring Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Sharven; Jayarajan, Senthil N.; Davey, Adam; Willis, Alliric I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Studies in Asia have questioned the dictum that signet ring cell carcinoma (SRC) has a worse prognosis than other forms of gastric cancer. Our study determined differences in presentation and outcomes between SRC and gastric adenocarcinoma (AC) in the United States. Patients and Methods The National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was reviewed for SRC and AC from 2004 to 2007. Results We reviewed 10,246 cases of patients with gastric cancer, including 2,666 of SRC and 7,580 of AC. SRC presented in younger patients (61.9 v 68.7 years; P < .001) and less often in men (52.7% v 68.7%; P < .001). SRC patients were more frequently black (11.3% v 10.9%), Asian (16.4% v 13.2%), American Indian/Alaska Native (0.9% v 0.8%), or Hispanic (23.3% v 14.0%; P < .001). SRC was more likely to be stage T3-4 (45.8% v 33.3%), have lymph node spread (59.7% v 51.8%), and distant metastases (40.2% v 37.6%; P < .001). SRC was more likely to be found in the lower (30.7% v 24.2%) and middle stomach (30.6% v 20.7%; P < .001). Median survival was not different between the two (AC, 14.0 months v SRC, 13.0 months; P = .073). Multivariable analyses demonstrated SRC was not associated with mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.05; 95% CI, 0.96 to 1.11; P = .150). Mortality was associated with age (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.02; P < .001), black race (HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20; P = .026), and tumor grade. Variables associated with lower mortality risk included Asian race (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.91; P < .001) and surgery (HR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.39; P < .001). Conclusion In the United States, SRC significantly differs from AC in extent of disease at presentation. However, when adjusted for stage, SRC does not portend a worse prognosis. PMID:22927530

  14. FDA Approval Summary: Ramucirumab for Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Casak, Sandra J; Fashoyin-Aje, Ibilola; Lemery, Steven J; Zhang, Lillian; Jin, Runyan; Li, Hongshan; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Huanyu; He, Kun; Dougherty, Michele; Novak, Rachel; Kennett, Sarah; Khasar, Sachia; Helms, Whitney; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The FDA approved ramucirumab (CYRAMZA; Eli Lilly and Company) for previously treated patients with advanced or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma initially as monotherapy (April 21, 2014) and subsequently as combination therapy with paclitaxel (November 5, 2014). In the monotherapy trial, 355 patients in the indicated population were randomly allocated (2:1) to receive ramucirumab or placebo, 8 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks. In the combination trial, 665 patients were randomly allocated (1:1) to receive ramucirumab or placebo, 8 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks, in combination with paclitaxel, 80 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 of 28-day cycles. Overall survival (OS) was increased in patients who received ramucirumab in both the monotherapy [HR, 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.60-0.998; log rank P = 0.047] and combination trials (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.68-0.96; P = 0.017). The most common adverse reactions were hypertension and diarrhea in the monotherapy trial and fatigue, neutropenia, diarrhea, and epistaxis in the combination trial. Because of concerns about the robustness of the monotherapy trial results, FDA approved the original application after receiving the results of the combination trial confirming the OS effect. Based on exploratory exposure-response analyses, there is residual uncertainty regarding the optimal dose of ramucirumab. PMID:26048277

  15. Linked color imaging technology facilitates early detection of flat gastric cancers.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Hisashi; Miura, Yoshimasa; Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Takezawa, Takahito; Ino, Yuji; Okada, Masahiro; Osawa, Hiroyuki; Lefor, Alan K; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2015-12-01

    Conventional endoscopy can miss flat early gastric cancers (0-IIb) because they may not be visible. We treated a patient with synchronous flat early gastric cancers missed by conventional white-light endoscopy (WLE). A 74-year-old Japanese male was referred for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of a depressed-type early gastric cancer (0-IIc) on the posterior wall of the antrum. Linked color imaging (LCI) detected two flat reddish lesions (0-IIb) measuring 30 mm and 10 mm in diameter in the distal body and prepyloric area, respectively, which had not been detected by conventional WLE. LCI clearly demonstrated the line of demarcation between the malignant lesion and the surrounding mucosa without magnification. Flat early gastric cancers were suspected because both lesions had irregular surface patterns using magnifying blue laser imaging (BLI). An additional depressed lesion (0-IIc) was detected by laser WLE along the greater curvature in the antrum. Magnifying BLI suggested a malignant lesion. Histological examination of biopsy specimens revealed atypical glands in all four lesions. ESD of these lesions was performed. Pathological examination of the resected specimens confirmed well-differentiated adenocarcinoma localized to the mucosa in all four lesions. Flat early gastric cancers became clearly visible using new endoscopic technology. PMID:26560036

  16. Total laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with transvaginal specimen extraction is feasible in advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sumer, Fatih; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Ertugrul, Ismail; Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Karagul, Servet

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) is an ever-evolving advanced laparoscopic technique. NOSE minimizes surgical injury, involving a low risk of wound complications, fewer incisional hernias, faster recovery and less postoperative pain. Laparoscopic gastrectomy combined with NOSE is a procedure that can potentiate the advantages of both minimal invasive techniques. We aim to demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with transvaginal specimen extraction in advanced gastric cancer. Case A 72-year-old woman with a 2 cm adenocarcinoma in gastric antrum was treated by laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy and lymph node dissection. A totally laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy was constructed. Specimen was extracted through the posterior fornix of vagina without difficulty. Histopathology confirmed pT3pN0 tumor. After a 10-month follow-up the patient was asymptomatic and getting adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Conclusions Transvaginal specimen extraction after laparoscopic gastric resection for advanced gastric cancer is a feasible procedure. It is offered to selected patients and of course only to female patients. Natural orifice surgery may provide faster recovery and decrease the wound related complications which may cause a delay on postoperative adjuvant chemo–radio therapies. We have presented, as far as we know, the first human case of a transvaginal extraction of an advanced gastric cancer after laparoscopic gastrectomy. PMID:26413924

  17. Identification of CEACAM5 as a Biomarker for Prewarning and Prognosis in Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinfeng; Fan, Xing; Chen, Ning; Zhou, Fenli; Dong, Jiaqiang; Nie, Yongzhan; Fan, Daiming

    2015-12-01

    MGd1, a monoclonal antibody raised against gastric cancer cells, possesses a high degree of specificity for gastric cancer (GC). Here we identified that the antigen of MGd1 is CEACAM5, and used MGd1 to investigate the expression of CEACAM5 in non-GC and GC tissues (N=643), as a biomarker for prewarning and prognosis. The expression of CEACAM5 was detected by immunohistochemistry in numerous tissues; its clinicopathological correlation was statistically analyzed. CEACAM5 expression was increased progressively from normal gastric mucosa to chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and finally to GC (p<0.05). In gastric precancerous lesions (intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia), CEACAM5-positive patients had a higher risk of developing GC as compared with CEACAM5-negative patients (OR = 12.68, p<0.001). Besides, CEACAM5 was found positively correlated with invasion depth of gastric adenocarcinoma (p<0.001). In survival analysis, CEACAM5 was demonstrated to be an independent prognostic predictor for patients with GC of clinical stage IIIA/IV (p=0.033). Our results demonstrate that CEACAM5 is a promising biomarker for GC prewarning and prognostic evaluation. PMID:26374829

  18. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer using endoscopy with Fuji Intelligent Color Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shi-Jie; Shen, Lei; Luo, He-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Demarcation of early gastric cancers is sometimes unclear. Indigo carmine chromoendoscopy has usually been used as a diagnostic method for tumor margins as it enhances mucosal irregularities and differences in color. Fuji Intelligent Color Enhancement (FICE), a recently developed virtual chromoendoscopic system, can explore the entire mucosal surface (of structures and vessels). Here we report a case of a patient with early gastric cancer who underwent a successful endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) using endoscopy with FICE. A 58-year-old man with early gastric cancer underwent an ESD. Demarcation of the lesion was not clear through normal endoscopy. Therefore, an endoscopy was performed with FICE, which clearly revealed the demarcation. An ESD was carried out after spots were marked circumferentially. We identified the positional relationship between the demarcation and all markings on the magnifying model. A resection of the lesion was performed on the area outside the markings. Finally, the lesion was Histopathologically diagnosed as a well-differentiated adeno-carcinoma confined in the mucosal region, and the margins were free from carcinoma. FICE, especially combined with the magnifying model, is useful in the identification of the demarcation of early gastric cancer. This method may be useful in increasing the rate of complete resection by ESD for early gastric cancer. PMID:23386167

  19. [Biologic and molecular genetic properties of a transplantable human primary gastric cancer in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Chen, S S

    1989-05-01

    A human primary gastric cancer tissue (adenocarcinoma II-III) was transplanted into nude mice (SWISS/DF. nu/nu). It has been transferred for 8 generations at 56 sites in 28 nude mice with transplantable rate of 100%. The transplanted tumor is designated as transplantable human primary gastric cancer-1 in nude mice (THPGC-1). The growth of THPGC-1 is rather rapid and the size of transplanted tumor reaches 1 cm2, 4-5 weeks after transfer. The morphology and histochemistry of the original tumor were retained well in the initial and serial transplanted tumors. THPGC-1 could secret carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). After intravenous or intraperitoneal injection of 131I-antiCEA monoclonal antibody into the THPGC-1 bearing nude mice, the radiolabeled antibody was concentrated and localized in the tumor as shown by gamma-camera analysis. Similar pattern of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme was observed both in primary gastric cancer tissue and THPGC-1 tissue. Chromosomal examination revealed that THPGC-1 was human aneuploid ones. Southern blot analysis showed that the pattern of repetitive DNA bands and the structures of 28s, rDNA, c-H-ras and c-myc genes in THPGC-1 were identical to the original primary gastric cancer DNA. The results suggest that THPGC-1 be a reliable model for the research of the molecular biology of cancer cells and experimental gastric cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:2693024

  20. A case of early gastric cancer with bone metastases: are bone marrow micrometastases significant?

    PubMed

    Soufleris, K; Pilpilidis, I; Tzilves, D; Moschos, J; Gatopoulou, A; Patakiouta, F; Tarpagos, A; Katsos, I

    2007-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is currently the 14th cause of death worldwide. Early gastric cancer, defined as cancer not penetrating deeper than the submucosa, is considered to carry an excellent prognosis with 5-year survival rates reaching more than 90%. Cases of bone metastases due to intramucosal gastric cancer are very rarely described. A case of a 70-year old male presenting with confirmed bone metastases 7 years after a curative resection for a mucosal gastric carcinoma is discussed. The patient was investigated with bone marrow biopsy and bone scan and showed no other signs of disease. The clinicopathologic features included poor differentiation, signet ring cells presence, no lymph node involvement and a negative second laparotomy two years after the initial surgery. Studies concerning the presence of residual disease in the form of bone marrow micrometastases are briefly reviewed emphasizing that intramucosal gastric cancer still carries the p sibility for metastasis, many years after a curative resection, mandating long term alertness from the attending physician. PMID:17715641

  1. Gastric cancer review

    PubMed Central

    Carcas, Lauren Peirce

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is an aggressive disease that continues to have a daunting impact on global health. Despite an overall decline in incidence over the last several decades, gastric cancer remains the fourth most common type of cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. This review aims to discuss the global distribution of the disease and the trend of decreasing incidence of disease, delineate the different pathologic subtypes and their immunohistochemical (IHC) staining patterns and molecular signatures and mutations, explore the role of the pathogen H. pylori in tumorgenesis, discuss the increasing incidence of the disease in the young, western populations and define the role of biologic agents in the treatment of the disease. PMID:25589897

  2. A human gallbladder adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Johzaki, H; Iwasaki, H; Nishida, T; Isayama, T; Kikuchi, M

    1989-12-01

    A cell strain (FU-GBC-1) was established from cancerous ascites of a 68-year-old male patient with well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder. By light and electron microscopy, the cultured cells showed the morphologic features of adenocarcinoma characterized by gland-like structures, intracellular microcystic spaces, and mucous production. Immunoperoxidase stains showed that FU-GBC-1 cells expressed several epithelial tumor antigens including CA 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). The cell strain has been in continuous culture up to passage 44 for 1 1/2 years, with the population doubling time of 120 hours. The cytogenetic analysis by a G-band technique showed a constant loss of chromosome Y in FU-GBC-1 cells. The modal chromosome number at passage 12 was 82 with a range of 77 to 85. Flow cytometry with an ethidium bromide technique additionally confirmed aneuploid DNA content (4C) in the cultured cells at passage 12 and 35. Inoculation of FU-GBC-1 cells into the dermis of BALB/c nude mice produced transplantable adenocarcinoma identical to the original tumor. Because no continuous cell lines of the well-differentiated type of gallbladder adenocarcinoma have been reported in the literature currently, the newly established cell strain we report may yield a useful system for studying the morphologic and biologic characteristics of gallbladder adenocarcinoma. PMID:2680052

  3. Risk factors for adenocarcinoma of the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Brownson, R.C.; Reif, J.S.; Keefe, T.J.; Ferguson, S.W.; Pritzl, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The relation between various risk factors and adenocarcinoma of the lung was evaluated in a case-control study. Subjects were selected from the Colorado Central Cancer Registry from 1979-1982 in the Denver metropolitan area. A total of 102 (50 males and 52 females) adenocarcinoma case interviews and 131 (65 males and 66 females) control interviews were completed. The control group consisted of persons with cancers of the colon and bone marrow. The risk estimates associated with cigarette smoking were significantly elevated among males (odds ratio (OR) = 4.49) and females (OR = 3.95) and were found to increase significantly (p less than 0.01) with increasing levels of cigarette smoking for both males and females. For adenocarcinoma in females, the age- and smoking-adjusted odds ratios at different levels of passive smoke exposure followed an increasing overall trend (p = 0.05). After additional adjustment for potential confounders, prior cigarette use remained the most significant predictor of risk of adenocarcinoma among males and females. Analysis restricted to nonsmoking females revealed a risk of adenocarcinoma of 1.68 (95% confidence interval (Cl) = 0.39-2.97) for passive smoke exposure of four or more hours per day. Neither sex showed significantly elevated risk for occupational exposures, although males bordered on significance (OR = 2.23, 95% Cl = 0.97-5.12). The results suggest the need to develop cell type-specific etiologic hypotheses.

  4. A gastric acid secretion model.

    PubMed Central

    de Beus, A M; Fabry, T L; Lacker, H M

    1993-01-01

    A theory of gastric acid production and self-protection is formulated mathematically and examined for clinical and experimental correlations, implications, and predictions using analytic and numerical techniques. In our model, gastric acid secretion in the stomach, as represented by an archetypal gastron, consists of two chambers, circulatory and luminal, connected by two different regions of ion exchange. The capillary circulation of the gastric mucosa is arranged in arterial-venous arcades which pass from the gastric glands up to the surface epithelial lining of the lumen; therefore the upstream region of the capillary chamber communicates with oxyntic cells, while the downstream region communicates with epithelial cells. Both cell types abut the gastric lumen. Ion currents across the upstream region are calculated from a steady-state oxyntic cell model with active ion transport, while the downstream ion fluxes are (facilitated) diffusion driven or secondarily active. Water transport is considered iso-osmotic. The steady-state model is solved in closed form for low gastric lumen pH. A wide variety of previously performed static and dynamic experiments on ion and CO2 transport in the gastric lumen and gastric blood supply are for the first time correlated with each other for an (at least) semiquantitative test of current concepts of gastric acid secretion and for the purpose of model verification. Agreement with the data is reported with a few outstanding and instructive exceptions. Model predictions and implications are also discussed. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8396457

  5. Podocalyxin as a Prognostic Marker in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Laitinen, Alli; Böckelman, Camilla; Hagström, Jaana; Kokkola, Arto; Fermér, Christian; Nilsson, Olle; Haglund, Caj

    2015-01-01

    Background Podocalyxin-like 1 (PODXL) is a cell-adhesion glycoprotein associated with aggressive tumor phenotype and poor prognosis in several forms of cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate PODXL expression in gastric cancer by use of two different antibodies. Methods By tumor-tissue microarrays and immunohistochemistry we evaluated PODXL expression in tumor specimens from 337 patients who underwent surgery for gastric adenocarcinoma at Helsinki University Hospital. We used two different antibodies: HPA2110, which is a polyclonal antibody and an in-house monoclonal antibody called HES9, to investigate the association of PODXL expression with clinicopathologic variables and patient survival. Results PODXL staining was positive by the polyclonal antibody in 153 (57.5%) cases and by the monoclonal antibody in 212 (76%). Polyclonal antibody expression was associated with intestinal cancer type (p<0.001). Monoclonal antibody staining was associated with age over 66 (p = 0.001), with intestinal cancer (p<0.001), and with small tumor size (≤ 5 cm; p = 0.024). Both antibodies were associated with high S-phase fraction (p = 0.022; p = 0.010), and high tumor proliferation index (Ki-67; p = 0.003; p = 0.001). PODXL positivity by the polyclonal antibody indicated reduced gastric-cancer-specific 5-year survival of 24.0% (95% CI 16.9–31.1), compared to 43.3% (95% CI 33.7–52.9) for patients with PODXL negativity (p = 0.001). The result remained significant in multivariable analysis (HR = 3.17; 95% CI 1.37–7.34, p = 0.007). Conclusion In gastric cancer, PODXL expression by the polyclonal antibody HPA2110 is an independent marker of poor prognosis. PMID:26674770

  6. ECL-cell carcinoids and carcinoma in patients homozygous for an inactivating mutation in the gastric H(+) K(+) ATPase alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Fossmark, Reidar; Calvete, Oriol; Mjønes, Patricia; Benitez, Javier; Waldum, Helge L

    2016-07-01

    A family with a missense variant of the ATP4A gene encoding the alpha subunit of the gastric proton pump (H(+) K(+) ATPase) has recently been described. Homozygous siblings were hypergastrinemic (median gastrin 486 pM) and had gastric tumours diagnosed at a median age of 33 years. In the current histopathological study, we further characterized the tumours found in the gastric corpus. The tumours had the histological appearance of carcinoids (NET G1 or G2) and were immunoreactive for the general neuroendocrine markers chromogranin A (CgA) and synaptophysin as well as the ECL-cell markers vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and histidine decarbozylase (HDC). One of the tumours consisted of a NET G2 component, but also had a component with glandular growth, which morphologically was classified as an intestinal type adenocarcinoma. Many glands of the adenocarcinoma contained a large proportion of cells positive for neuroendocrine markers, especially the small vesicle marker synaptophysin and the cytoplasmic enzyme HDC. In conclusion, patients homozygous for an inactivating ATP4A mutation develop gastric ECL-cell carcinoids in their 3rd or 4th decade. The adenocarcinoma may be classified as neuroendocrine with ECL-cell differentiation. PMID:27150581

  7. Small colonic microsatellite unstable adenocarcinomas and high-grade epithelial dysplasias in sessile serrated adenoma polypectomy specimens: a study of eight cases.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Neal S

    2006-01-01

    Eight sessile serrated adenoma (SSA), right colon polypectomies with focal invasive adenocarcinoma or high-grade dysplasia were studied to identify features indicating a high risk of transformation and characterize the morphologic features of serrated dysplasia; 6 cases had invasive adenocarcinoma; 2 were high-grade dysplasia. All 8 were microsatellite unstable-high and had absent hMLH1 nuclear immunoreactivity. The mean patient age at polypectomy was 69.5 years (range, 57.1-83.9 years). Mean polyp maximum dimension was 8.5 mm (range, 6-12 mm). The majority of each polyp was nonmalignant SSA. All 8 cases had an abrupt transition from benign to high-grade in situ or invasive malignancy. In the 6 invasive adenocarcinomas, the neoplasm extended directly down into the submucosa without lateral intramucosal spread. The mean maximum dimension of the invasive adenocarcinoma was 2.9 mm (range, 2-4 mm). All 8 cases had high-grade serrated-type dysplasia. The nonmalignant SSAs had marked expansion of the proliferative zone. Crypts adjacent to malignancy had moderately enlarged nuclei, irregular nuclear membranes, and overly prominent nucleoli. SSA crypts were lined by a variety of gastric-type cells; no cell type predominated. Foci of adjacent crypts had similar cytologic features. Small proximal SSAs can transform into adenocarcinoma without a component of adenomatous dysplasia. PMID:16483002

  8. Reference genes for quantitative RT-PCR data in gastric tissues and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Wisnieski, Fernanda; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; dos Santos, Leonardo Caires; Gigek, Carolina de Oliveira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Pontes, Thaís Brilhante; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; de Assumpção, Mônica Barauna; Demachki, Sâmia; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the suitability of reference genes in gastric tissue samples and cell lines. METHODS: The suitability of genes ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, RPL29, and 18S rRNA was assessed in 21 matched pairs of neoplastic and adjacent non-neoplastic gastric tissues from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma, 27 normal gastric tissues from patients without cancer, and 4 cell lines using reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The ranking of the best single and combination of reference genes was determined by NormFinder, geNorm™, BestKeeper, and DataAssist™. In addition, GenEx software was used to determine the optimal number of reference genes. To validate the results, the mRNA expression of a target gene, DNMT1, was quantified using the different reference gene combinations suggested by the various software packages for normalization. RESULTS: ACTB was the best reference gene for all gastric tissues, cell lines and all gastric tissues plus cell lines. GAPDH + B2M or ACTB + B2M was the best combination of reference genes for all the gastric tissues. On the other hand, ACTB + B2M was the best combination for all the cell lines tested and was also the best combination for analyses involving all the gastric tissues plus cell lines. According to the GenEx software, 2 or 3 genes were the optimal number of references genes for all the gastric tissues. The relative quantification of DNMT1 showed similar patterns when normalized by each combination of reference genes. The level of expression of DNMT1 in neoplastic, adjacent non-neoplastic and normal gastric tissues did not differ when these samples were normalized using GAPDH + B2M (P = 0.32), ACTB + B2M (P = 0.61), or GAPDH + B2M + ACTB (P = 0.44). CONCLUSION: GAPDH + B2M or ACTB + B2M is the best combination of reference gene for all the gastric tissues, and ACTB + B2M is the best combination for the cell lines tested. PMID:24222956

  9. The expression of IGF-1R in Helicobacter pylori-infected intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Noriko; Kozu, Karina; Kobayashi, Shun; Nishiyama, Ryu; Okubo, Rie; Akai, Yuichi; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Kinukawa, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of IGF-1R has been demonstrated in gastrointestinal cancers, and its expression is reported as the result of the loss of tumor suppressors. IL-16 is involved in the pathophysiological process of chronic inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study is to determine the changes in the expression of IGF-1R in intestinal metaplasia (IM) and gastric cancer (GC) as well as the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and IL-16 on cell proliferation and IGF-1R expression in gastric cells. AGS cells were incubated with combinations of IL-16 and H. pylori. Gastric cell proliferation was studied by BrdU uptake. In H. pylori infected mucosa, IGF-1R was significantly higher in IM than chronic gastritis (CG), and also higher in GC than CG and IM. H. pylori significantly decreased BrdU uptake. IL-16 increased BrdU uptake and IGF-1R on AGS cells which had been decreased by H. pylori. Co-incubation with IL-16 increased the expression of IGF-1R mRNA in H. pylori infected cells. We conclude that the expression of IGF-1R in H. pylori infected gastric mucosa may indicate an early stage of carcinogenesis. The IL-16 secretion by H. pylori can be a trigger for the expression of IGF-1R, and it may also be a factor for gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27499580

  10. ZnRF3 Induces Apoptosis of Gastric Cancer Cells by Antagonizing Wnt and Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hongzhen; Cai, Aizhen; Xi, Hongqing; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Lin

    2015-11-01

    A large proportion of malignant cancers of the stomach are gastric adenocarcinoma type. In spite of many studies, the molecular basis for this cancer is still unclear. Deregulated cell proliferative signaling via Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog pathways is considered important in the pathogenesis of many cancers including the gastric cancer. Recent studies identified ZnRF3 protein, which is a E3-ubiquitin ligase and which is either deleted or mutated in cancers, to inhibit Wnt signaling. However, the significance of ZnRF3 in the control of gastric cancer and whether it also regulates Hedgehog signaling pathway, is not known. In the present study, we assessed the expression of ZnRF3 in gastric tumors and paracancerous tissues from 58 patients (44 male and 14 female) of different ages and related this to patient survival. We observed a clear relationship between ZnRF3 expression in paracancerous tissue and tumor size. Also, ZnRF3 expression was much higher in tumors from aged patients. Male patients showed higher mortality than the females. Mechanistic studies using normal gastric cells (GES1) and gastric cancer cells (MGC-803) infected with either AdZnRF3 or AdGFP viral vectors, revealed that ZnRF3 overexpression causes significantly more apoptosis and lowered proliferation of cancer cells. ZnRF3 overexpression led to greatly reduced levels of Lgr5, a component of Wnt signaling and also Gli1, a component of Hedgehog signaling. Thus, ZnRF3 negatively influences both the Wnt and Hedgehog proliferative pathways, and probably this way it negatively regulates cancer progression. These results suggest the importance of normal ZnRF3 function in checking the progression of cancer cell growth and indicate that a lack of this protein can lead to poorer clinical outcomes for gastric cancer patients. PMID:27352324

  11. Serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 is a biomarker of poor prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, C H; Park, H J; Lee, J R; Kim, H K; Jeon, T Y; Jo, H-J; Kim, D H; Kim, G H; Park, D Y

    2014-01-01

    Background: In a previous study, we reported that serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 (serpinA1) is upregulated in Snail-overexpressing gastric cancer. Although serpinA1 has been studied in several types of cancer, little is known about its roles and mechanisms of action. In this study, we examined the role of serpinA1 in the migration and invasion of gastric cancers and determined its underlying mechanism. Methods: Expression levels were assessed by western blot analyses and real-time PCR. Snail binding to serpinA1 promoter was analysed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. The roles of serpinA1 were studied using cell invasion and migration assays. In addition, the clinicopathologic and prognostic significance of serpinA1 expression were validated in 400 gastric cancer patients using immunohistochemical analysis. Results: Overexpression of Snail resulted in upregulation of serpinA1 in gastric cancer cell lines, AGS and MKN45, whereas knockdown of Snail inhibited serpinA1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that overexpression of Snail increased Snail recruitment to the serpinA1 promoter. Overexpression of serpinA1 increased the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, whereas knockdown of serpinA1 decreased invasion and migration. Moreover, serpinA1 increased mRNA levels and release of metalloproteinase-8 in gastric cancer cells. Serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 was observed in the cytoplasm of tumour cells and the stroma by immunohistochemistry. Enhanced serpinA1 expression was significantly associated with increased tumour size, advanced T stage, perineural invasion, lymphovascular invasion, lymph node metastases, and shorter overall survival. Conclusions: Serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 induces the invasion and migration of gastric cancer cells and its expression is associated with the progression of gastric cancer. These results may provide a potential target to prevent invasion and

  12. A potential association between exposure to hepatitis B virus and small bowel adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    DeFilippis, Ersilia M.; Mehta, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) has never been described as a risk factor for small bowel adenocarcinoma, although infection is a known risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. From May 2009 to December 2014, we implemented an institution-wide screening program for hepatitis B viral serologies prior to starting chemotherapy. Evidence of exposure [hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) positivity in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity] was highest in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (21.1%), followed by small bowel cancer (12.5%). The small bowel adenocarcinoma cases with anti-HBc positivity were reviewed. Special attention was paid to known risk factors for small bowel cancers. One patient had a diagnosis of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). However, the other patients had no genetic syndromes, history of inflammatory bowel disease or other chronic inflammation to explain their risk. We postulate exposure to bile acids, tumorigenesis of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and/or damage to the intestinal mucosa secondary to HBV exposure/infection as potential mechanisms for development of small bowel adenocarcinoma. More research is warranted to further elucidate this association. PMID:27284484

  13. A potential association between exposure to hepatitis B virus and small bowel adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    DeFilippis, Ersilia M; Mehta, Mamta; Ludwig, Emmy

    2016-06-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) has never been described as a risk factor for small bowel adenocarcinoma, although infection is a known risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. From May 2009 to December 2014, we implemented an institution-wide screening program for hepatitis B viral serologies prior to starting chemotherapy. Evidence of exposure [hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) positivity in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity] was highest in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (21.1%), followed by small bowel cancer (12.5%). The small bowel adenocarcinoma cases with anti-HBc positivity were reviewed. Special attention was paid to known risk factors for small bowel cancers. One patient had a diagnosis of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). However, the other patients had no genetic syndromes, history of inflammatory bowel disease or other chronic inflammation to explain their risk. We postulate exposure to bile acids, tumorigenesis of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and/or damage to the intestinal mucosa secondary to HBV exposure/infection as potential mechanisms for development of small bowel adenocarcinoma. More research is warranted to further elucidate this association. PMID:27284484

  14. [New WHO classification of lung adenocarcinoma and preneoplasia].

    PubMed

    Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Rouquette, Isabelle; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Travis, William D

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 WHO classification of tumors of the lung, pleura, thymus and heart has just been published with numerous important changes from the 2004 WHO classification. The most significant changes involve (1) use of immunohistochemistry throughout the classification, (2) integration of molecular testing for personalized strategies for advanced lung cancer patients, (3) a new classification for small biopsies and cytology, (4) a new classification of lung adenocarcinoma as proposed by the 2011 IASLC/ATS/ERS, (5) restriction of the diagnosis of large cell carcinoma only to resected tumors that lack any clear morphologic or immunohistochemical differentiation. Regarding adenocarcinoma, the terms bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) and mixed subtype adenocarcinoma have been suppressed and replaced for the former by the term adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) as a preinvasive lesion to join atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH). A new category has been defined, the minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA), and invasive adenocarcinomas are now classified according to the predominant subtype after subtyping by semi-quantitatively percentage of various subtypes present in 5% increments. The term "lepidic" is restricted to a non-invasive component (previously classified as BAC) present as part of an invasive adenocarcinoma. "Invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma" is used for formerly adenocarcinomas classified as mucinous BAC, excluding tumors that meet criteria for AIS or MIA. The subtypes of clear cell and signet ring adenocarcinoma are discontinued, as well the term of mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, included in the category of colloid adenocarcinoma. Thus new classification of lung adenocarcinoma is sustained by genetics and has clinical impact for therapeutic strategies. PMID:26791238

  15. ETS2 and Twist1 promote invasiveness of Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric cancer cells by inducing Siah2

    PubMed Central

    Das, Lopamudra; Kokate, Shrikant Babanrao; Rath, Suvasmita; Rout, Niranjan; Singh, Shivaram Prasad; Crowe, Sheila Eileen; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Bhattacharyya, Asima

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most potent factors leading to gastric carcinogenesis. The seven in absentia homologue (Siah2) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase which has been implicated in various cancers but its role in H. pylori-mediated gastric carcinogenesis has not been established. We investigated the involvement of Siah2 in gastric cancer metastasis which was assessed by invasiveness and migration of H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cancer cells. Cultured gastric cancer cells (GCCs) MKN45, AGS and Kato III showed significantly induced expression of Siah2, increased invasiveness and migration after being challenged with the pathogen. Siah2-expressing stable cells showed increased invasiveness and migration after H. pylori infection. Siah2 was transcriptionally activated by E26 transformation-specific sequence 2 (ETS2)- and Twist-related protein 1 (Twist1) induced in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. These transcription factors dose-dependently enhanced the aggressiveness of infected GCCs. Our data suggested that H. pylori-infected GCCs gained cell motility and invasiveness through Siah2 induction. As gastric cancer biopsy samples also showed highly induced expression of ETS2, Twist1 and Siah2 compared with noncancerous gastric tissue, we surmise that ETS2- and Twist1-mediated Siah2 up-regulation has potential diagnostic and prognostic significance and could be targeted for therapeutic purpose. PMID:27048589

  16. ETS2 and Twist1 promote invasiveness of Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric cancer cells by inducing Siah2.

    PubMed

    Das, Lopamudra; Kokate, Shrikant Babanrao; Rath, Suvasmita; Rout, Niranjan; Singh, Shivaram Prasad; Crowe, Sheila Eileen; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Bhattacharyya, Asima

    2016-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most potent factors leading to gastric carcinogenesis. The seven in absentia homologue (Siah2) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase which has been implicated in various cancers but its role in H. pylori-mediated gastric carcinogenesis has not been established. We investigated the involvement of Siah2 in gastric cancer metastasis which was assessed by invasiveness and migration of H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cancer cells. Cultured gastric cancer cells (GCCs) MKN45, AGS and Kato III showed significantly induced expression of Siah2, increased invasiveness and migration after being challenged with the pathogen. Siah2-expressing stable cells showed increased invasiveness and migration after H. pylori infection. Siah2 was transcriptionally activated by E26 transformation-specific sequence 2 (ETS2)- and Twist-related protein 1 (Twist1) induced in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. These transcription factors dose-dependently enhanced the aggressiveness of infected GCCs. Our data suggested that H. pylori-infected GCCs gained cell motility and invasiveness through Siah2 induction. As gastric cancer biopsy samples also showed highly induced expression of ETS2, Twist1 and Siah2 compared with noncancerous gastric tissue, we surmise that ETS2- and Twist1-mediated Siah2 up-regulation has potential diagnostic and prognostic significance and could be targeted for therapeutic purpose. PMID:27048589

  17. AGS experiments - 1994, 1995, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the following information on the Brookhaven AGS Accelerator complex: FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; FY 1997 AGS schedule (working copy); AGS beams 1997; AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program (in progress); a listing of experiments by number; two-phage summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and listing of AGS experimenters begins here.

  18. Mixed adeno(neuro)endocrine carcinoma arising from the ectopic gastric mucosa of the upper thoracic esophagus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of mixed adenoendocrine carcinoma of the upper thoracic esophagus arising from ectopic gastric mucosa. A 64-year-old man who had been diagnosed with an esophageal tumor on the basis of esophagoscopy was referred to our hospital. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the presence of ectopic gastric mucosa and an adjacent pedunculated lesion located on the posterior wall of the upper thoracic esophagus. Subtotal esophagectomy with three-field lymph node dissection was performed. A microscopic examination revealed that there was a partially intermingling component of neuroendocrine carcinoma adjacent to a tubular adenocarcinoma which was conterminous with the area of the ectopic gastric mucosa. Although the tubular adenocarcinoma was confined to the mucosa and submucosa, the neuroendocrine carcinoma had invaded the submucosaand there was vascular permeation. Each component accounted for 30% or more of the tumor, so the final histopathological diagnosis was mixed adenoendocrine carcinoma of the upper thoracic esophagus arising from ectopic gastric mucosa. Adjuvant chemotherapy was not performed, because the postoperative tumor stage was IA. The patient was well and had no evidence of recurrence 16 months after surgery. PMID:24139488

  19. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcer].

    PubMed

    Maaroos, H I

    1994-01-01

    In connection with longitudinal ulcer studies and the demonstration of Helicobacter pylori as the main cause of chronic gastritis, new aspects of gastric ulcer recurrences and healing become evident. This extends the possibilities to prognosticate the course of gastric ulcer and to use more effective treatment. PMID:7937016

  20. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Vismodegib in Treating Patients With Advanced Stomach Cancer or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-16

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  1. Chylothorax and lymphedema as the initial manifestations of gastric carcinoma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    WU, JIE; LV, LIANG; ZHOU, KUNYAN; HUO, JIRONG

    2016-01-01

    Chylothorax is the accumulation of lymph fluid in the pleura. Gastric carcinoma with chylothorax and lymphedema as the initial manifestations has rarely been reported, with only 14 cases reported to date. The mechanisms of gastric carcinoma generating chylothorax have not yet been determined. The current study reports the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with chylothorax and lower extremity lymphedema, and reviews the existing literature. A chest radiograph performed on the present patient revealed large pleural effusion and chylothorax was diagnosed. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy identified an irregular apophysis lesion and a biopsy confirmed poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma. The patient was discharged at her request, and subsequently succumbed to the disease 4.5 months later. Based on the findings of the present study, as well as those of the literature, we proposed a novel form of gastric carcinoma infiltrating the body. Chylothorax and lymphedema may be a consequence of gastric carcinoma cells infiltrating the lymphatic circulatory system; therefore, the differential diagnosis of chylothorax and lymphedema of unknown cause should consider gastric carcinoma, regardless of gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:27073560

  2. Variations of Weight Loss Following Gastric Bypass and Gastric Band

    PubMed Central

    Puzziferri, Nancy; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Livingston, Edward H.; Carmody, Thomas J.; Provost, David A.; Rush, A. John

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare and describe the weight loss outcomes from gastric bypass and gastric band so as to define the variation of excess weight loss (EWL) among individual patients, the time to onset of effect, and the durability of weight loss in severely obese adults. Summary Background Data Gastric bypass and gastric band are the most common operations for obesity performed in the United States, but few reports have compared these 2 procedures. Methods Patients (N = 1733, aged 18–65 years) met National Institutes of Health criteria for obesity surgery and underwent either gastric bypass or gastric band between March 1997 and November 2006. The selection of bypass versus band was based on patient/surgeon discussion. The evaluable sample consisted of 1518 patients. The percentage of EWL was assessed over 2 years. Successful weight loss was defined a priori as ≥40% EWL in each of four 6-month postoperative measurement periods. The analyses included a mixed model and generalized estimating equation (GEE) model with repeated measures. Odds ratios and descriptive analyses were also provided. Results Gastric bypass was associated with less individual variation in weight loss than gastric band. Both procedures were associated with a significant EWL benefit (Treatment Group effect P < 0.0001), but they differed in terms of time to effect (Treatment Group × Period interaction effect P < 0.0001). The mean EWL for gastric bypass was greater at each measurement period (6, 12, 18, 24 months) compared with gastric band (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, at each of the postoperative measurement periods within each treatment group (bypass and band), the mean EWL was greater for those who had preoperative body mass index (BMI) ≤50 kg/m2 than for those who had preoperative BMI >50 kg/m2 (P < 0.0001). Gastric bypass was consistently associated with a greater likelihood of at least a 40% EWL in each of the 6-month postoperative measurement periods (GEE, P < 0.0001). The odds ratio

  3. Hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach: Nine case reports and treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    XIAO, CHENG; WU, FUSHENG; JIANG, HAN; TENG, LISONG; SONG, FANG; WANG, QIANGFENG; YANG, HUANXIA

    2015-01-01

    Hepatoid adenocarcinoma (HAC), an extrahepatic tumor, has notable morphological similarities to hepatocellular carcinoma, which has been reported in gastrointestinal tract organs, including the rectum, gallbladder, lung, ovary and urinary bladder. HAC of the stomach (GHAC) is a rare variant of gastric cancer, characterized by aggressive behavior and extremely poor prognosis. Correct diagnosis depends on clinicopathological and immunohistochemical studies. In the present study, we reported nine cases of GHAC who were treated in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, China, from January 2009 to December 2013. All patients underwent radical gastrectomy; among them, one patient had stage I, one had stage II and seven had stage III. Elevated serum α-fetoprotein was observed in eight cases. Until now, only one patient has succumbed, four patients have liver metastases, one has lung metastasis and four remain disease-free. Relatively longer survival requires accurate diagnosis at an earlier stage and active multimodality treatment, including radical gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26622718

  4. Relationship Between Interleukin-10 Gene C-819T Polymorphism and Gastric Cancer Risk: Insights From a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xigang; Huang, Qingxian; Li, Xianglin; Liu, Fang; Wang, Dan; Yan, Dong; Wang, Bin; Yang, Chunhua; Mi, Jia; Tian, Geng

    2016-01-01

    Background As a pleiotropic cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10) plays a regulatory role in carcinogenesis and tumor growth. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the susceptibility of the IL-10 gene C-819T polymorphism to gastric cancer. Material/Methods Study identification and data extraction were independently completed by 2 authors. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated and summarized. Results In total, 11 articles including 1960 gastric cancer patients and 3705 controls were qualified. Overall analyses revealed a 13% reduced risk of gastric cancer conferred by the −819T allele relative to the −819C allele (OR=0.87; 95% CI: 0.77–0.97; P=0.016), without heterogeneity (I2=35.1%). In subgroup analyses, a significant difference was identified in East Asian populations (OR=0.85; 95% CI: 0.73–0.98; P=0.029, I2=43.6%), for gastric adenocarcinoma (OR=0.80; 95% CI: 0.66–0.96; P=0.017, I2=0.0%), and in population-based studies (OR=0.81; 95% CI: 0.70–0.93; P=0.003, I2=0.0%). The visual funnel plots and Egger’s tests suggested no evidence of publication bias. Conclusions Extending previous findings, we demonstrate a protective role of the IL-10 gene −819T allele in susceptibility to gastric cancer, and this role was more evident for gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27516059

  5. Primary Gastric Chorioadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baraka, Bahaaeldin A; Al Kharusi, Suad S; Al Bahrani, Bassim J; Bhathagar, Gunmala

    2016-09-01

    Primary gastric chorioadenocarcinoma (PGC) is a rare and rapidly invasive tumor. Choriocarcinoma is usually known to be of endometrial origin and gestational; however, it has been reported in other extragenital organs, such as the gall bladder, prostate, lung, liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Human chorionic gonadotropin related neoplasms of the stomach are seldom discussed in the literature. We report a case of PGC in a 56-year-old man treated with a standard non-gestational choriocarcinoma chemotherapy regimen, EMA/CO (etoposide, methotrexate, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, vincristine), with a complete response and good tolerability. PMID:27602194

  6. Primary Gastric Chorioadenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baraka, Bahaaeldin A.; Al Kharusi, Suad S.; Al Bahrani, Bassim J.; Bhathagar, Gunmala

    2016-01-01

    Primary gastric chorioadenocarcinoma (PGC) is a rare and rapidly invasive tumor. Choriocarcinoma is usually known to be of endometrial origin and gestational; however, it has been reported in other extragenital organs, such as the gall bladder, prostate, lung, liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Human chorionic gonadotropin related neoplasms of the stomach are seldom discussed in the literature. We report a case of PGC in a 56-year-old man treated with a standard non-gestational choriocarcinoma chemotherapy regimen, EMA/CO (etoposide, methotrexate, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, vincristine), with a complete response and good tolerability. PMID:27602194

  7. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  8. Gene expression profiling analysis of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H.; Ma, J.; Wu, J.; Chen, L.; Sun, F.; Qu, C.; Zheng, D.; Xu, S.

    2016-01-01

    The present study screened potential genes related to lung adenocarcinoma, with the aim of further understanding disease pathogenesis. The GSE2514 dataset including 20 lung adenocarcinoma and 19 adjacent normal tissue samples from 10 patients with lung adenocarcinoma aged 45-73 years was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two groups were screened using the t-test. Potential gene functions were predicted using functional and pathway enrichment analysis, and protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks obtained from the STRING database were constructed with Cytoscape. Module analysis of PPI networks was performed through MCODE in Cytoscape. In total, 535 upregulated and 465 downregulated DEGs were identified. These included ATP5D, UQCRC2, UQCR11 and genes encoding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which are mainly associated with mitochondrial ATP synthesis coupled electron transport, and which were enriched in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. Other DEGs were associated with DNA replication (PRIM1, MCM3, and RNASEH2A), cell surface receptor-linked signal transduction and the enzyme-linked receptor protein signaling pathway (MAPK1, STAT3, RAF1, and JAK1), and regulation of the cytoskeleton and phosphatidylinositol signaling system (PIP5K1B, PIP5K1C, and PIP4K2B). Our findings suggest that DEGs encoding subunits of NADH, PRIM1, MCM3, MAPK1, STAT3, RAF1, and JAK1 might be associated with the development of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26840709

  9. A potential role for Helicobacter pylori heat shock protein 60 in gastric tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chen-Si; He, Pei-Juin; Tsai, Nu-Man; Li, Chi-Han; Yang, Shang-Chih; Hsu, Wei-Tung; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Wu, Chang-Jer; Cheng, Tain-Lu; Liao, Kuang-Wen

    2010-02-05

    Helicobacter pylori has been found to promote the malignant process leading to gastric cancer. Heat shock protein 60 of H. pylori (HpHSP60) was previously been identified as a potent immunogene. This study investigates the role of HpHSP60 in gastric cancer carcinogenesis. The effect of HpHSP60 on cell proliferation, anti-death activity, angiogenesis and cell migration were explored. The results showed that HpHSP60 enhanced migration by gastric cancer cells and promoted tube formation by umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs); however, HpHSP60 did not increase cell proliferation nor was this protein able to rescue gastric cancer cells from death. Moreover, the results also indicated HpHSP60 had different effects on AGS gastric cancer cells or THP-1 monocytic cells in terms of their expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are known to be important to cancer development. We propose that HpHSP60 may trigger the initiation of carcinogenesis by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine release and by promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Thus, this extracellular pathogen-derived HSP60 is potentially a vigorous virulence factor that can act as a carcinogen during gastric tumorigenesis.

  10. Phylogeographic origin of Helicobacter pylori determines host-adaptive responses upon coculture with gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sheh, Alexander; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Merrell, D Scott; Correa, Pelayo; Wilson, Keith T; Fox, James G

    2013-07-01

    While Helicobacter pylori infects over 50% of the world's population, the mechanisms involved in the development of gastric disease are not fully understood. Bacterial, host, and environmental factors play a role in disease outcome. To investigate the role of bacterial factors in H. pylori pathogenesis, global gene expression of six H. pylori isolates was analyzed during coculture with gastric epithelial cells. Clustering analysis of six Colombian clinical isolates from a region with low gastric cancer risk and a region with high gastric cancer risk segregated strains based on their phylogeographic origin. One hundred forty-six genes had increased expression in European strains, while 350 genes had increased expression in African strains. Differential expression was observed in genes associated with motility, pathogenicity, and other adaptations to the host environment. European strains had greater expression of the virulence factors cagA, vacA, and babB and were associated with increased gastric histologic lesions in patients. In AGS cells, European strains promoted significantly higher interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression than did African strains. African strains significantly induced apoptosis, whereas only one European strain significantly induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that gene expression profiles of clinical isolates can discriminate strains by phylogeographic origin and that these profiles are associated with changes in expression of the proinflammatory and protumorigenic cytokine IL-8 and levels of apoptosis in host epithelial cells. These findings support the hypothesis that bacterial factors determined by the phylogeographic origin of H. pylori strains may promote increased gastric disease. PMID:23630959

  11. MYC, FBXW7 and TP53 copy number variation and expression in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MYC deregulation is a common event in gastric carcinogenesis, usually as a consequence of gene amplification, chromosomal translocations, or posttranslational mechanisms. FBXW7 is a p53-controlled tumor-suppressor that plays a role in the regulation of cell cycle exit and reentry via MYC degradation. Methods We evaluated MYC, FBXW7, and TP53 copy number, mRNA levels, and protein expression in gastric cancer and paired non-neoplastic specimens from 33 patients and also in gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines. We also determined the invasion potential of the gastric cancer cell lines. Results MYC amplification was observed in 51.5% of gastric tumor samples. Deletion of one copy of FBXW7 and TP53 was observed in 45.5% and 21.2% of gastric tumors, respectively. MYC mRNA expression was significantly higher in tumors than in non-neoplastic samples. FBXW7 and TP53 mRNA expression was markedly lower in tumors than in paired non-neoplastic specimens. Moreover, deregulated MYC and FBXW7 mRNA expression was associated with the presence of lymph node metastasis and tumor stage III-IV. Additionally, MYC immunostaining was more frequently observed in intestinal-type than diffuse-type gastric cancers and was associated with MYC mRNA expression. In vitro studies showed that increased MYC and reduced FBXW7 expression is associated with a more invasive phenotype in gastric cancer cell lines. This result encouraged us to investigate the activity of the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in both cell lines. Both gelatinases are synthesized predominantly by stromal cells rather than cancer cells, and it has been proposed that both contribute to cancer progression. We observed a significant increase in MMP-9 activity in ACP02 compared with ACP03 cells. These results confirmed that ACP02 cells have greater invasion capability than ACP03 cells. Conclusion In conclusion, FBXW7 and MYC mRNA may play a role in aggressive biologic behavior of gastric cancer cells and may be a useful

  12. Periampullary adenocarcinoma: analysis of 5-year survivors.

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, C J; Sohn, T A; Cameron, J L; Hruban, R H; Lillemoe, K D; Pitt, H A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This single-institution experience retrospectively reviews the outcomes in a group of patients treated 5 or more years ago by pancreaticoduodenectomy for periampullary adenocarcinoma. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Controversy exists regarding the benefit of resection for periampullary adenocarcinoma, particularly for pancreatic tumors. Many series report only Kaplan-Meier actuarial 5-year survival rates. There are believed to be discrepancies between the actuarial 5-year survival data and the actual 5-year survival rates. METHODS: From April 1970 through May 1992, 242 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenal resection for periampullary adenocarcinoma at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Follow-up was complete through May 1997. All pathology specimens were reviewed and categorized. Actual 5-year survival rates were calculated. The demographic, intraoperative, pathologic, and postoperative features of patients surviving > or =5 years were compared with those of patients who survived <5 years. RESULTS: Of the 242 patients with resected periampullary adenocarcinoma, 149 (62%) were pancreatic primaries, 46 (19%) arose in the ampulla, 30 (12%) were distal bile duct cancers, and 17 (7%) were duodenal cancers. There was a 5.3% operative mortality rate during the 22 years of the review, with a 2% operative mortality rate in the last 100 patients. There were 58 5-year survivors, 28 7-year survivors, and 7 10-year survivors. The tumor-specific 5-year actual survival rates were pancreatic 15%, ampullary 39%, distal bile duct 27%, and duodenal 59%. When compared with patients who did not survive 5 years, the 5-year survivors had a significantly higher percentage of well-differentiated tumors (14% vs. 4%; p = 0.02) and higher incidences of negative resection margins (98% vs. 73%, p < 0.0001) and negative nodal status (62% vs. 31%, p < 0.0001). The tumor-specific 10-year actuarial survival rates were pancreatic 5%, ampullary 25%, distal bile duct 21%, and duodenal 59%. CONCLUSIONS

  13. Exposure to gastric juice may not cause adenocarcinogenesis of the esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Peng; Li, Jian-Sheng; Zhang, Lian-Feng; Chen, Yong-Zhong; Gong, Jun

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effects of gastric juice on the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). METHODS: A animal model of duodenogastroesophageal reflux was established in Sprague-Dawley rats undergoing esophagoduodenostomy. The development of EAC and forestomach adenocarcinoma was investigated 40 wk after the treatment. Intraluminal pH and bile of the forestomach were measured. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in pH (t = 0.117, P = 0.925) or bile (χ2 = 0.036, P = 0.85) in the forestomach before and 40 wk after esophagoduodenostomy. There were also no significant differences between the model and controls during esophagoduodenostomy or 40 wk after esophagoduodenostomy. The incidence of intestinal metaplasia (88%) and intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia and adenocarcinoma (28%) in the esophagus in the model was higher than in the controls 40 wk after surgery (χ2 = 43.06, P < 0.001 and χ2 = 9.33, P = 0.002, respectively) and in the forestomach in the model (χ2 = 32.05, P < 0.001 and χ2 = 8.14, P = 0.004, respectively). The incidence rates of inflammation in the esophagus and forestomach were 100% and 96%, respectively (χ2 = 1.02, P = 0.31) in the model, which was higher than in the esophageal control (6.8%) (χ2 = 42.70, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Gastric juice exposure may not cause intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia or adenocarcinoma of the forestomach and may not be related to EAC. PMID:23613638

  14. Synchronous Large Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor and Adenocarcinoma in the Stomach Treated with Imatinib Mesylate Followed by Total Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Munekage, Eri; Munekage, Masaya; Maeda, Michihiro; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Kouichi; Obatake, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Michiya; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Herein we report on a case of synchronous large gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and adenocarcinoma of the stomach treated with radical surgery following neoadjuvant therapy with imatinib mesylate. A 58-year-old man was referred to our hospital with a large mass in the peritoneal cavity. Abdominal computed tomography showed a large mass measuring 21×20×14 cm in the left upper peritoneal cavity. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a large elevated lesion in the upper body and a depressed lesion in the lower gastric body near the lesser curvature. Biopsy specimens revealed GIST in the large elevated lesion and signet-ring cell carcinoma in the depressed lesion. Because of the large size of the GIST, the patient was treated with neoadjuvant therapy with imatinib mesylate (400 mg/day) for 5 months. After confirmation of a marked decrease in tumor size following imatinib mesylate therapy, the patient underwent total gastrectomy and regional lymph-node dissection with distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of high-risk GIST and signet-ring cell carcinoma invading the muscularis propria with one lymph-node metastasis. At the time of writing, the patient was receiving postoperative chemotherapy using oral fluoropyrimidine (S-1) without evidence of disease recurrence for 4 months after surgery. In addition to the present case, we provide a retrospective review of another 15 patients who were diagnosed with synchronous GIST in the stomach and primary gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27069170

  15. Effects of IL-10 haplotype and atomic bomb radiation exposure on gastric cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomonori; Ito, Reiko; Cologne, John; Maki, Mayumi; Morishita, Yukari; Nagamura, Hiroko; Sasaki, Keiko; Hayashi, Ikue; Imai, Kazue; Yoshida, Kengo; Kajimura, Junko; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Ohishi, Waka; Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Nakachi, Kei

    2013-07-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the cancers that reveal increased risk of mortality and incidence in atomic bomb survivors. The incidence of gastric cancer in the Life Span Study cohort of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) increased with radiation dose (gender-averaged excess relative risk per Gy = 0.28) and remains high more than 65 years after exposure. To assess a possible role of gene-environment interaction, we examined the dose response for gastric cancer incidence based on immunosuppression-related IL-10 genotype, in a cohort study with 200 cancer cases (93 intestinal, 96 diffuse and 11 other types) among 4,690 atomic bomb survivors participating in an immunological substudy. Using a single haplotype block composed of four haplotype-tagging SNPs (comprising the major haplotype allele IL-10-ATTA and the minor haplotype allele IL-10-GGCG, which are categorized by IL-10 polymorphisms at -819A>G and -592T>G, +1177T>C and +1589A>G), multiplicative and additive models for joint effects of radiation and this IL-10 haplotyping were examined. The IL-10 minor haplotype allele(s) was a risk factor for intestinal type gastric cancer but not for diffuse type gastric cancer. Radiation was not associated with intestinal type gastric cancer. In diffuse type gastric cancer, the haplotype-specific excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation was statistically significant only in the major homozygote category of IL-10 (ERR = 0.46/Gy, P = 0.037), whereas estimated ERR for radiation with the minor IL-10 homozygotes was close to 0 and nonsignificant. Thus, the minor IL-10 haplotype might act to reduce the radiation related risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. The results suggest that this IL-10 haplotyping might be involved in development of radiation-associated gastric cancer of the diffuse type, and that IL-10 haplotypes may explain individual differences in the radiation-related risk of gastric cancer. PMID:23772925

  16. Effect of World Health Organization (WHO) Histological Classification on Predicting Lymph Node Metastasis and Recurrence in Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ji Fu; Xu, Wen Na; Noh, Sung Hoon; Lu, Wei Qin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The World Health Organization (WHO) histological classification for gastric cancer is widely accepted and used. However, its impact on predicting lymph node metastasis and recurrence in early gastric cancer (EGC) is not well studied. MATERIAL AND METHODS From 1987 to 2005, 2873 EGC patients with known WHO histological type who had undergone curative resection were enrolled in this study. In all, 637 well-differentiated adenocarcinomas (WD), 802 moderately-differentiated adenocarcinomas (MD), 689 poorly-differentiated adenocarcinomas (PD), and 745 signet-ring cell adenocarcinomas (SRC) were identified. RESULTS The distribution of demographic and clinical features in early gastric cancer among WD, MD, PD, and SRC were significantly different. Lymph node metastasis was observed in 317 patients (11.0%), with the lymph node metastasis rate being 5.3%, 14.8%, 17.0%, and 6.3% in WD, MD, PD, and SRC, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that gender, tumor size, gross appearance, depth of invasion, and WHO classification were significantly associated with lymph node metastasis. Recurrence was observed in 83 patients (2.9%), with the recurrence rate being 2.2%, 4.5%, 3.0%, and 1.6% in WD, MD, PD, and SRC, respectively. Multivariate analysis confirmed that MD, elevated gross type, and lymph node metastasis were independent risk factors for recurrence in EGC. MD patients showed worse disease-free survival than non-MD patients (P=0.001). CONCLUSIONS WHO classification is useful and necessary to evaluate during the perioperative management of EGC. Treatment strategies for EGC should be made prudently according to WHO classification, especially for MD patients. PMID:27595490

  17. [Molecular Subtypes of Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Hatogai, Ken; Doi, Toshihiko

    2016-03-01

    Gastric cancer has been classified based on the pathological characteristics including microscopic configuration and growth pattern. Although these classifications have been used in studies investigating prognosis and recurrence pattern, they are not considered for decisions regarding the therapeutic strategy. In the ToGA study, trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, demonstrated clinical efficacy for gastric cancer with HER2 overexpression or HER2 gene amplification. Based on these findings of the ToGA study, the definition of HER2-positive gastric cancer was established. Thereafter, several molecular targeted agents, including agents targeting other receptor tyrosine kinases, have been investigated in gastric cancer. However, to date no biomarker, except HER2, has been established. Based on the recent technological development in the field of gene analysis, a comprehensive molecular evaluation of gastric cancer was performed as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, and a new molecular classification was proposed that divided gastric cancer into the following 4 subtypes: tumors positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite instability tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Each subtype has specific molecular alterations including gene mutation and amplification, DNA methylation, and protein overexpression. Additionally, some subtypes were suggested to be correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics or as targets of some molecular targeted agents that are currently under development. The new molecular classification is expected to be a roadmap for patient stratification and clinical trials on molecular targeted therapies in gastric cancer. PMID:27067842

  18. Other Helicobacters and gastric microbiota.

    PubMed

    De Witte, Chloë; Schulz, Christian; Smet, Annemieke; Malfertheiner, Peter; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2016-09-01

    This article aimed to review the literature from 2015 dealing with gastric and enterohepatic non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter species (NHPH). A summary of the gastric microbiota interactions with H. pylori is also presented. An extensive number of studies were published during the last year and have led to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of infections with NHPH. These infections are increasingly reported in human patients, including infections with H. cinaedi, mainly characterized by severe bacteremia. Whole-genome sequencing appears to be the most reliable technique for identification of NHPH at species level. Presence of NHPH in laboratory animals may influence the outcome of experiments, making screening and eradication desirable. Vaccination based on UreB proteins or bacterial lysate with CCR4 antagonists as well as oral glutathione supplementation may be promising strategies to dampen the pathogenic effects associated with gastric NHPH infections. Several virulent factors such as outer membrane proteins, phospholipase C-gamma 2, Bak protein, and nickel-binding proteins are associated with colonization of the gastric mucosae and development of gastritis. The development of high-throughput sequencing has led to new insights in the gastric microbiota composition and its interaction with H. pylori. Alterations in the gastric microbiota caused by the pH-increasing effect of a H. pylori infection may increase the risk for gastric cancer. PMID:27531542

  19. Genetic Evolution of a Helicobacter pylori Acid-Sensing Histidine Kinase and Gastric Disease.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Uma; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Suarez, Giovanni; Azah, Ayeetin; Krezel, Andrzej M; Varga, Matthew G; Forsyth, Mark H; Peek, Richard M

    2016-08-15

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, which develops within a hypochlorhydric environment. We sequentially isolated H. pylori (strain J99) from a patient who developed corpus-predominant gastritis and hypochlorhydia over a 6-year interval. Archival J99 survived significantly better under acidic conditions than recent J99 strains. H. pylori arsRS encodes a 2-component system critical for stress responses; recent J99 isolates harbored 2 nonsynonymous arsS mutations, and arsS inactivation abolished acid survival. In vivo, acid-resistant archival, but not recent J99, successfully colonized high-acid-secreting rodents. Thus, genetic evolution of arsS may influence progression to hypochlorhydia and gastric cancer. PMID:27190191

  20. Laparoscopic resection of synchronous gastric cancer and primary small intestinal lymphoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ding-Wei; Pan, Yu; Yan, Jia-Fei; Mou, Yi-Ping

    2014-05-28

    Synchronous gastric cancer and primary small intestinal lymphoma are extremely rare. A 49-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with a history of upper abdominal pain for two weeks and was diagnosed with synchronous cancer. During hospitalization, the patient underwent laparoscopic distal gastrectomy + resection of bilateral ovaries + partial resection of both small intestine and descending colon. Pathological examination revealed a synchronous cancer consisting of early gastric cancer with poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma located in mucosa, with lymph node metastasis (3+/29) (T1N1M0, stage IB); and diffuse large B cell lymphoma of small intestine involving descending colon and bilateral ovaries, with lymph node metastasis (2+/5) (Ann Arbor IIE). The patient recovered well, without any obvious complications and was discharged on post-operative day 7. The patient received six cycles of chemotherapy after operation. She has been doing well with no evidence of recurrence for 13 mo. PMID:24876758

  1. Endoscopic Raman Spectroscopy for Molecular Fingerprinting of Gastric Cancer: Principle to Implementation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Currently, positive endoscopic biopsy is the standard criterion for gastric cancer diagnosis but is invasive, often inconsistent, and delayed although early detection and early treatment is the most important policy. Raman spectroscopy is a spectroscopic technique based on inelastic scattering of monochromatic light. Raman spectrum represents molecular composition of the interrogated volume providing a direct molecular fingerprint. Several investigations revealed that Raman spectroscopy can differentiate normal, dysplastic, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissue with high sensitivity and specificity. Moreover, this technique can indentify malignant ulcer and showed the capability to analyze the carcinogenesis process. Automated on-line Raman spectral diagnostic system raised possibility to use Raman spectroscopy in clinical field. Raman spectroscopy can be applied in many fields such