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Sample records for ags gastric adenocarcinoma

  1. Apoptosis of AGS human gastric adenocarcinoma cells by methanolic extract of Dictamnus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Soo; Hong, Noo Ri; Ahn, Tae Seok; Kim, Hyungwoo; Jung, Myeong Ho; Kim, Byung Joo

    2015-01-01

    Background: The root bark of Dictamnus dasycarpus Turcz has traditionally been used in East Asia to treat skin diseases such as eczema, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis. However, it has also been reported to exhibit an anti-proliferative effect on cancer cells. Objective: To investigate the anti-cancer effects of a methanol extract of Dictamnus dasycarpus root bark (MEDD) on AGS cells (a human gastric adenocarcinoma cell-line). Materials and Methods: An 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium assay, a caspase activity assay, cell cycle analysis, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) measurements, and western blotting were used to investigate the anti-cancer effects of MEDD on AGS cells. Results: Treatment with MEDD significantly and concentration-dependently inhibited AGS cell growth. MEDD treatment in AGS cells led to increased accumulation of apoptotic sub-G1 phase cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Also, MEDD reduced the expressions of pro-caspase-3, -8 and -9, and increased the active form of caspase-3. Furthermore, subsequent Western blotting revealed elevated levels of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase protein. MEDD treatment reduced levels of MMP and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL proteins. Pretreatment with SB203580 (a specific inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases), SP600125 (a potent inhibitor of C-Jun N-terminal kinases), or PD98059 (a potent inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinases) did not modify the effects of MEDD treatment. However, pretreatment with LY294002 (a specific inhibitor of Akt) significantly enhanced MEDD-induced cell death. Conclusion: These results suggest that MEDD-mediated cell death is associated with the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and that inhibition of Akt signaling contributes to apoptosis induction by MEDD. PMID:26664023

  2. Extracts of Opuntia humifusa Fruits Inhibit the Growth of AGS Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, Sahng-Wook; Park, Jieun; Park, Kun-Young; Son, Yong-Suk; Han, Hyungchul

    2016-01-01

    Opuntia humifusa (OHF) has been used as a nutraceutical source for the prevention of chronic diseases. In the present study, the inhibitory effects of ethyl acetate extracts of OHF on the proliferation of AGS human gastric cancer cells and the mode of action were investigated. To elucidate the antiproliferative mechanisms of OHF in cancer cells, the expression of genes related to apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were determined with real-time PCR and western blot. The cytotoxic effect of OHF on AGS cells was observed in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to OHF (100 μg/mL) significantly induced (P<0.05) the G1 phase cell cycle arrest. Additionally, the apoptotic cell population was greater (P<0.05) in OHF (200 μg/mL) treated AGS cells when compared to the control. The expression of genes associated with cell cycle progression (Cdk4, Cdk2, and cyclin E) was significantly downregulated (P<0.05) by the OHF treatment. Moreover, the expression of Bax and caspase-3 in OHF treated cells was higher (P<0.05) than in the control. These findings suggest that OHF induces the G1 phase cell cycle arrest and activation of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway in AGS human gastric cancer cells. PMID:27069903

  3. In vitro and in vivo studies on antitumor effects of gossypol on human stomach adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line and MNNG induced experimental gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gunassekaran, G.R.; Kalpana Deepa Priya, D.; Gayathri, R.; Sakthisekaran, D.

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Gossypol is a well known polyphenolic compound used for anticancer studies but we are the first to report that gossypol has antitumor effect on MNNG induced gastric cancer in experimental animal models. {yields} Our study shows that gossypol inhibits the proliferation of AGS (human gastric adenocarcinoma) cell line. {yields} In animal models, gossypol extends the survival of cancer bearing animals and also protects the cells from carcinogenic effect. {yields} So we suggest that gossypol would be a potential chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agent for gastric cancer. -- Abstract: The present study has evaluated the chemopreventive effects of gossypol on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced gastric carcinogenesis and on human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line. Gossypol, C{sub 30}H{sub 30}O{sub 8}, is a polyphenolic compound that has anti proliferative effect and induces apoptosis in various cancer cells. The aim of this work was to delineate in vivo and in vitro anti-initiating mechanisms of orally administered gossypol in target (stomach) tissues and in human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line. In vitro results prove that gossypol has potent cytotoxic effect and inhibit the proliferation of adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line. In vivo results prove gossypol to be successful in prolonging the survival of MNNG induced cancer bearing animals and in delaying the onset of tumor in animals administrated with gossypol and MNNG simultaneously. Examination of the target (stomach) tissues in sacrificed experimental animals shows that administration of gossypol significantly reduces the level of tumor marker enzyme (carcino embryonic antigen) and pepsin. The level of Nucleic acid contents (DNA and RNA) significantly reduces, and the membrane damage of glycoprotein subsides, in the target tissues of cancer bearing animals, with the administration of gossypol. These data suggest that gossypol may create a beneficial effect in patients

  4. The inhibitory effect of flavonoids on interleukin-8 release by human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells infected with cag PAI (+) Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Szendzielorz, Kornelia; Mazur, Bogdan; Król, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is well known that the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach induces gastritis and causes an immune response. Exposure of gastric epithelial cell lines to this germ induces the secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8), which is a potent PMN-activating chemotactic cytokine. Interleukin-8 is usually elevated in gastric biopsy samples of patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis and significantly increases in the supernatant of in vitro cultivated biopsy samples of gastric mucosa with active H. pylori gastritis. Interleukin-8 is an activating factor for leucocytes and other pro-inflammatory factors, free radicals, and proteolytic enzymes. That is why natural compounds potentially useful in therapy are still investigated – among them flavonoids. They reveal anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities and significantly inhibit the gastric mucosa damage. The aim of the study Was the estimation of the anti-inflammatory effects of flavonoids on H. pylori-induced activation of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells (AGS). After infection of AGS cells by cag PAI (+) H. pylori in vitro, secretion of IL-8, effects of flavonoids on viability of AGS cells, and effects of flavonoids on increase of H. pylori were determined. Such flavones as chrysin, quercetin, kaemferide, flavanone, galangin, and kaempferol were examined. Results This study has shown an inhibitory effect of flavonoids on the release of IL-8 through infected AGS cells (except chrysin), and no toxic effects to AGS cells were observed. Galangin revealed antibacterial effects against H. pylori. Flavonoids limit the inflammatory process through the inhibition of IL-8 release in infected AGS cells with H. pylori. The strongest inhibitor of IL-8 was galangin. PMID:27833438

  5. Claudin-6 enhances cell invasiveness through claudin-1 in AGS human adenocarcinoma gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Torres-Martínez, A C; Gallardo-Vera, J F; Lara-Holguin, A N; Montaño, L F; Rendón-Huerta, E P

    2017-01-01

    Claudins participate in tissue barrier function. The loss of this barrier is associated to metalloproteases-related extracellular matrix and basal membranes degradation. Claudin-1 is a pro-MMP-2 activator and claudin-6 transfected AGS (AGS-Cld6) cells are highly invasive. Our aim was to determine if claudin-6 was direct or indirectly associated with MMP-2 activation and cell invasiveness. Cytofluorometry, cell fractioning, immunoprecipitation, gelatin-zymography, cell migration and invasiveness assays were performed, claudin-2, -6, -7 and -9 transfected AGS cells, anti-MMP-2, -9 and -14, anti-claudins specific antibodies and claudin-1 small interfering RNA were used. The results showed a significant (p<0.001) overexpression of claudin-1 in AGS-Cld6 cell membranes. A strong MMP-2 activity was identified in culture supernatants of AGS-Cld6. Claudin-1 co-localized with MMP-2 and MMP-14; interestingly a significant increase in cell membrane and cytosol MMP-14 expression was detected in AGS-Cld6 cells (p<0.05). Silencing of claudin-1 in AGS-Cld6 cells showed a 60% MMP-2 activity decrease in culture supernatants and a significant decrease (p<0.05) in cell migration and invasiveness. Our results suggest that claudin-6 induces MMP-2 activation through claudin-1 membrane expression, which in turn promotes cell migration and invasiveness.

  6. Antitumor effects of the flavone chalcone: inhibition of invasion and migration through the FAK/JNK signaling pathway in human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Su-Hsuan; Shih, Yuan-Wei

    2014-06-01

    Chalcones (benzylideneacetophenone) are cancer-preventive food components found in a human diet rich in fruits and vegetables. In this study, we first report the chemopreventive effect of chalcone in human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines: AGS. The results showed that chalcone could inhibit the abilities of the adhesion, invasion, and migration by cell-matrix adhesion assay, Boyden chamber invasion/migration assay, and wound-healing assay. Molecular data showed that the effect of chalcone in AGS cells might be mediated via sustained inactivation of the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 and 2 (JNK1/2) signal involved in the downregulation of the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Next, chalcone-treated AGS cells showed tremendous decrease in the phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of kappaBα (IκBα), the nuclear level of NF-κB, and the binding ability of NF-κB to NF-κB response element. Furthermore, treating FAK small interfering RNA (FAK siRNA) and specific inhibitor for JNK (SP600125) to AGS cells could reduce the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our results revealed that chalcone significantly inhibited the metastatic ability of AGS cells by reducing MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions concomitantly with a marked reduction on cell invasion and migration through suppressing and JNK signaling pathways. We suggest that chalcone may offer the application in clinical medicine.

  7. Laparoscopy in the management of gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, E C; Karpeh, M S; Conlon, K C; Brennan, M F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors determined the accuracy of laparoscopy in detecting metastatic disease in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The majority of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma in the United States present with advanced disease. They are at high risk for intraabdominal metastatic spread. METHODS: One hundred eleven patients with gastric adenocarcinoma underwent laparoscopy at Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from December 1991 to December 1995. All were judged to be free of intra-abdominal metastatic disease on preoperative computed tomographic scan imaging. RESULTS: Laparoscopic exploration was successful in 110 of 111 patients and accurately staged 94% of the patients with respect to metastatic disease with a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 100%. The prevalence rate of metastatic disease was 37%. Twenty-four patients underwent laparoscopy only and were discharged in an average 1.4 days versus 6.5 days in patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy without resection (p < 0.05). No patients undergoing laparoscopy only have returned for palliative surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopy should be performed in nonobstructed, nonbleeding patients with advanced gastric cancer in the United States. More than one third of these patients have unsuspected metastatic disease at time of operation. Laparoscopy is highly accurate in detecting occult metastases and identifies a unique population of stage IV patients who may benefit from newer induction chemotherapeutic approaches while avoiding unnecessary laparotomy. Images Figure 4. PMID:9060581

  8. The role of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Alén, Begoña O; Leal-López, Saúl; Alén, María Otero; Viaño, Patricia; García-Castro, Victoria; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Beiras, Andrés; Casanueva, Felipe F; Gallego, Rosalía; García-Caballero, Tomás; Camiña, Jesús P; Pazos, Yolanda

    2016-02-02

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide encoded by the ghrelin gene, and the GPR39 receptor were reported to be involved in the control of mitogenesis of gastric cancer cell lines; however, the relationship between the obestatin/GPR39 system and gastric cancer progression remains unknown. In the present study, we determined the expression levels of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas and explored their potential functional roles. Twenty-eight patients with gastric adenocarcinomas were retrospectively studied, and clinical data were obtained. The role of obestatin/GPR39 in gastric cancer progression was studied in vitro using the human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cell line. Obestatin exogenous administration in these GPR39-bearing cells deregulated the expression of several hallmarks of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, obestatin signaling promoted phenotypic changes via GPR39, increasingly impacting on the cell morphology, proliferation, migration and invasion of these cells. In healthy human stomachs, obestatin expression was observed in the neuroendocrine cells and GPR39 expression was localized mainly in the chief cells of the oxyntic glands. In human gastric adenocarcinomas, no obestatin expression was found; however, an aberrant pattern of GPR39 expression was discovered, correlating to the dedifferentiation of the tumor. Altogether, our data strongly suggest the involvement of the obestatin/GPR39 system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of human gastric adenocarcinomas and highlight the potential usefulness of GPR39 as a prognostic marker in gastric cancer.

  9. The role of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Alén, Begoña O.; Leal-López, Saúl; Alén, María Otero; Viaño, Patricia; García-Castro, Victoria; Mosteiro, Carlos S.; Beiras, Andrés; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Gallego, Rosalía; García-Caballero, Tomás; Camiña, Jesús P.; Pazos, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide encoded by the ghrelin gene, and the GPR39 receptor were reported to be involved in the control of mitogenesis of gastric cancer cell lines; however, the relationship between the obestatin/GPR39 system and gastric cancer progression remains unknown. In the present study, we determined the expression levels of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas and explored their potential functional roles. Twenty-eight patients with gastric adenocarcinomas were retrospectively studied, and clinical data were obtained. The role of obestatin/GPR39 in gastric cancer progression was studied in vitro using the human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cell line. Obestatin exogenous administration in these GPR39-bearing cells deregulated the expression of several hallmarks of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, obestatin signaling promoted phenotypic changes via GPR39, increasingly impacting on the cell morphology, proliferation, migration and invasion of these cells. In healthy human stomachs, obestatin expression was observed in the neuroendocrine cells and GPR39 expression was localized mainly in the chief cells of the oxyntic glands. In human gastric adenocarcinomas, no obestatin expression was found; however, an aberrant pattern of GPR39 expression was discovered, correlating to the dedifferentiation of the tumor. Altogether, our data strongly suggest the involvement of the obestatin/GPR39 system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of human gastric adenocarcinomas and highlight the potential usefulness of GPR39 as a prognostic marker in gastric cancer. PMID:26716511

  10. Decreased Dp71 expression is associated with gastric adenocarcinoma prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sipin; Tan, Jin; Tan, Sichuang; Zhao, Shuai; Cao, Xiaoxia; Chen, Zhikang; Weng, Qiaocheng; Zhang, Huali; Wang, Kang kai; Zhou, Jiang; Xiao, Xianzhong

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, dramatically decreased Dp71 protein and mRNA was found in 34 pairs of resected primary gastric adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry identified Dp71 expression suppressed in 72.2% of 104 gastric cancer patients. The decreased Dp71 expression was significantly correlated with cancer differentiation (P=0.001) and lymph vascular invasion (p=0.041). Decreased Dp71 expression was associated with a poor gastric adenocarcinoma prognosis (P=0.001). Significantly less Dp71 mRNA and protein were found in BGC823, SGC7901, AGS compared with GES-1. Via increasing lamin B1 mRNA and protein, enforced Dp71d and Dp71f expression resulted in SGC7901 proliferation inhibition. Co-IP proved interaction of Dp71 with lamin B1 in GES-1 cells. Further expression characterization showed reduced lamin B1 in gastric cancer tissue and cancer cells. Increasing lamin B1 expression results in the growth inhibition of SGC7901, which suggests that Dp71-lamin B1 protein complex plays an important role for the newly identified tumor suppressive function of Dp71. PMID:27449096

  11. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Participants With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-08

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  12. Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinomas exhibit gastric differentiation.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Emma; Liu, Xiuli; Xiao, Shu-Yuan

    2014-02-01

    Primary small bowel adenocarcinoma is rare. Although generally similar to colonic adenocarcinoma, some small bowel adenocarcinomas exhibit unique morphologic features, particularly those arising in association with Crohn disease. In this study, 15 sporadic small bowel adenocarcinomas and 11 Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinomas were examined for histology and immunohistochemical profile including cytokeratins (CK) 7 and 20, intestinal markers CDX2 and MUC2, and gastric epithelial markers MUC5AC and MUC6. We found that Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinomas frequently resemble gastric tubular adenocarcinoma histologically. In addition, when compared to sporadic small bowel adenocarcinoma, the former expressed MUC5AC and MUC6 with much higher frequency (82% vs. 7% and 73% vs. 0%, respectively). Ten of 11 Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinomas (91%) were positive for at least one gastric-type marker (MUC5AC or MUC6). Expression of CK7 was also more frequent in Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinoma (73% versus 27%) while expression of CK20 was less frequent (64% vs. 100%). There was no difference between sporadic and Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinoma in expression of CDX2 (100% vs. 91%) and MUC2 (93% vs. 73%). These observations suggest that there is a difference in the morphologic and immunohistochemical characteristics of sporadic versus Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinoma, particularly in their expression of gastric-type mucin. The findings also suggest that gastric differentiation in Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinoma is related to gastric metaplasia, a common phenomenon in Crohn disease.

  13. Cryptolepine, isolated from Sida acuta, sensitizes human gastric adenocarcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Firoj; Toume, Kazufumi; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Rahman, Mahmudur; Sadhu, Samir Kumar; Ishibashi, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Bioassay guided separation of Sida acuta whole plants led to the isolation of an alkaloid, cryptolepine (1), along with two kaempferol glycosides (2-3). Compound 1 showed strong activity in overcoming TRAIL-resistance in human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells at 1.25, 2.5 and 5 μm. Combined treatment of 1 and TRAIL sensitized AGS cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis at the aforementioned concentrations.

  14. Comprehensive molecular characterization of gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Adam J.; Thorsson, Vesteinn; Shmulevich, Ilya; Reynolds, Sheila M.; Miller, Michael; Bernard, Brady; Hinoue, Toshinori; Laird, Peter W.; Curtis, Christina; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Shen, Ronglai; Weinhold, Nils; Kelsen, David P.; Bowlby, Reanne; Chu, Andy; Kasaian, Katayoon; Mungall, Andrew J.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Sipahimalani, Payal; Cherniack, Andrew; Getz, Gad; Liu, Yingchun; Noble, Michael S.; Pedamallu, Chandra; Sougnez, Carrie; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Akbani, Rehan; Lee, Ju-Seog; Liu, Wenbin; Mills, Gordon B.; Yang, Da; Zhang, Wei; Pantazi, Angeliki; Parfenov, Michael; Gulley, Margaret; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Schneider, Barbara G.; Kim, Jihun; Boussioutas, Alex; Sheth, Margi; Demchok, John A.; Rabkin, Charles S.; Willis, Joseph E.; Ng, Sam; Garman, Katherine; Beer, David G.; Pennathur, Arjun; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Odze, Robert; Kim, Hark K.; Bowen, Jay; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Weaver, Stephanie; McLellan, Michael; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Sakai, Ryo; Getz, Gad; Sougnez, Carrie; Lawrence, Michael S.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Lichtenstein, Lee; Fisher, Sheila; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Ding, Li; Niu, Beifang; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Birol, Inanc; Bowlby, Reanne; Brooks, Denise; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Chu, Andy; Chu, Justin; Chuah, Eric; Chun, Hye-Jung E.; Clarke, Amanda; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Kasaian, Katayoon; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan A.; Lim, Emilia; Ma, Yussanne; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Mungall, Karen L.; Nip, Ka Ming; Robertson, A. Gordon; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Beroukhim, Rameen; Carter, Scott L.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Cho, Juok; Cibulskis, Kristian; DiCara, Daniel; Frazer, Scott; Fisher, Sheila; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gehlenborg, Nils; Heiman, David I.; Jung, Joonil; Kim, Jaegil; Lander, Eric S.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Lichtenstein, Lee; Lin, Pei; Meyerson, Matthew; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Saksena, Gordon; Schumacher, Steven E.; Sougnez, Carrie; Stojanov, Petar; Tabak, Barbara; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Voet, Doug; Rosenberg, Mara; Zack, Travis I.; Zhang, Hailei; Zou, Lihua; Protopopov, Alexei; Santoso, Netty; Parfenov, Michael; Lee, Semin; Zhang, Jianhua; Mahadeshwar, Harshad S.; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Seth, Sahil; Yang, Lixing; Xu, Andrew W.; Song, Xingzhi; Pantazi, Angeliki; Xi, Ruibin; Bristow, Christopher A.; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Seidman, Jonathan; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Akbani, Rehan; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Rao, Arvind; Weinstein, John N.; Kim, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ju-Seog; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon; Laird, Peter W.; Hinoue, Toshinori; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Bootwalla, Moiz S.; Lai, Phillip H.; Shen, Hui; Triche, Timothy; Van Den Berg, David J.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Herman, James G.; Getz, Gad; Chin, Lynda; Liu, Yingchun; Murray, Bradley A.; Noble, Michael S.; Askoy, B. Arman; Ciriello, Giovanni; Dresdner, Gideon; Gao, Jianjiong; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Lee, William; Ramirez, Ricardo; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Sinha, Rileen; Sumer, S. Onur; Sun, Yichao; Weinhold, Nils; Thorsson, Vésteinn; Bernard, Brady; Iype, Lisa; Kramer, Roger W.; Kreisberg, Richard; Miller, Michael; Reynolds, Sheila M.; Rovira, Hector; Tasman, Natalie; Shmulevich, Ilya; Ng, Santa Cruz Sam; Haussler, David; Stuart, Josh M.; Akbani, Rehan; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Rao, Arvind; Weinstein, John N.; Verhaak, Roeland G.W.; Mills, Gordon B.; Leiserson, Mark D. M.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Taylor, Barry S.; Black, Aaron D.; Bowen, Jay; Carney, Julie Ann; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Helsel, Carmen; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; McAllister, Cynthia; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Tabler, Teresa R.; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Penny, Robert; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Curely, Erin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Shelton, Troy; Shelton, Candace; Sherman, Mark; Benz, Christopher; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Fedosenko, Konstantin; Manikhas, Georgy; Potapova, Olga; Voronina, Olga; Belyaev, Smitry; Dolzhansky, Oleg; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Brzezinski, Jakub; Ibbs, Matthew; Korski, Konstanty; Kycler, Witold; ŁaŸniak, Radoslaw; Leporowska, Ewa; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Murawa, Dawid; Murawa, Pawel; Spychała, Arkadiusz; Suchorska, Wiktoria M.; Tatka, Honorata; Teresiak, Marek; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Abdel-Misih, Raafat; Bennett, Joseph; Brown, Jennifer; Iacocca, Mary; Rabeno, Brenda; Kwon, Sun-Young; Penny, Robert; Gardner, Johanna; Kemkes, Ariane; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Shelton, Troy; Shelton, Candace; Curley, Erin; Alexopoulou, Iakovina; Engel, Jay; Bartlett, John; Albert, Monique; Park, Do-Youn; Dhir, Rajiv; Luketich, James; Landreneau, Rodney; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Kelsen, David P.; Cho, Eunjung; Ladanyi, Marc; Tang, Laura; McCall, Shannon J.; Park, Young S.; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Ajani, Jaffer; Camargo, M. Constanza; Alonso, Shelley; Ayala, Brenda; Jensen, Mark A.; Pihl, Todd; Raman, Rohini; Walton, Jessica; Wan, Yunhu; Demchok, John A.; Eley, Greg; Mills Shaw, Kenna R.; Sheth, Margi; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean Claude; Davidsen, Tanja; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Sofia, Heidi J.; Burton, Robert; Chudamani, Sudha; Liu, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths, but analysis of its molecular and clinical characteristics has been complicated by histological and aetiological heterogeneity. Here we describe a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric adenocarcinomas as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. We propose a molecular classification dividing gastric cancer into four subtypes: tumours positive for Epstein–Barr virus, which display recurrent PIK3CA mutations, extreme DNA hypermethylation, and amplification of JAK2, CD274 (also known as PD-L1) and PDCD1LG2 (also knownasPD-L2); microsatellite unstable tumours, which show elevated mutation rates, including mutations of genes encoding targetable oncogenic signalling proteins; genomically stable tumours, which are enriched for the diffuse histological variant and mutations of RHOA or fusions involving RHO-family GTPase-activating proteins; and tumours with chromosomal instability, which show marked aneuploidy and focal amplification of receptor tyrosine kinases. Identification of these subtypes provides a roadmap for patient stratification and trials of targeted therapies. PMID:25079317

  15. Polystyrene nanoparticles internalization in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Tussellino, Margherita; Carotenuto, Rosa; Prisco, Marina; De Falco, Maria; Laforgia, Vincenza; Valiante, Salvatore

    2016-03-01

    The increase in the use of nanoparticles, as a promising tool for drug delivery or as a food additive, raises questions about their interaction with biological systems, especially in terms of evoked responses. In this work, we evaluated the kinetics of uptake of 44 nm (NP44) and 100 nm (NP100) unmodified polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-NPs) in gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells, as well as the endocytic mechanism involved, and the effect on cell viability and gene expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and inflammation processes. We showed that NP44 accumulate rapidly and more efficiently in the cytoplasm of AGS compared to NP100; both PS-NPs showed an energy dependent mechanism of internalization and a clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. Dose response treatments revealed a non-linear curve. PS-NPs also affected cell viability, inflammatory gene expression and cell morphology. NP44 strongly induced an up-regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 genes, two of the most important cytokines involved in gastric pathologies. Our study suggests that parameters such as time, size and concentration of NPs must be taken carefully into consideration during the development of drug delivery systems based on NPs and for the management of nanoparticles associated risk factors.

  16. Metachronous Colon Metastases from Gastric Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Ugo; Contino, Gianmarco; Chiappa, Antonio; Bertani, Emilio; Bianchi, Paolo P.; Fazio, Nicola; Renne, Giuseppe; Di Meglio, Giovanni; Andreoni, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The colon is a very rare metastatic localization. Here we report a case of colonic metastases from gastric adenocarcinoma whose clinical presentation was suggestive of a de novo adenocarcinoma of the ascending colon. The authors discuss that in the presence of a previous history of gastric cancer, immunohistochemical analysis on endoscopic biopsies may help in the definition of a differential diagnosis. Furthermore, this rare metastatic localization might suggest a poor prognosis and a more accurate diagnostic work-up. PMID:20740169

  17. [Gastric signet ring cell adenocarcinoma: A distinct entity].

    PubMed

    Tabouret, Tessa; Dhooge, Marion; Rouquette, Alexandre; Brezault, Catherine; Beuvon, Frédéric; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2014-04-01

    Gastric signet ring cell carcinoma (GSRC) is a distinct entity. Their incidence is increasing. The pathologist plays a central role in the identification of this entity. Diagnosis is based on an adenocarcinoma containing a majority of signet ring cells (above 50 %). The prognosis of GSRC is the same as gastric adenocarcinoma while GSRC appeared more aggressive. Signet ring cells present a low sensitivity to chemotherapy. This review aimed to discuss the histological, the prognostic and the therapeutic aspect of this entity.

  18. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma and gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bin; Du, Juan; Deng, Neng; Ren, Ji-Chen; Shu, Zhen-Bo

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, gene expression profiles were analyzed to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA) and gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA). A gene expression dataset (accession number GSE29272) was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus, and consisted of 62 GCA samples and 62 normal controls, as well as 72 GNCA samples and 72 normal controls. The two groups of differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) were compared to obtain common and unique DEGs. A differential analysis was performed using the Linear Models for Microarray Data package in R. Functional enrichment analysis was conducted for the DEGs using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks were constructed for the DEGs with information from the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes. Subnetworks were extracted from the whole network with Cytoscape. Compared with the control, 284 and 268 genes were differentially-expressed in GCA and GNCA, respectively, of which 194 DEGs were common between GCA and GNCA. Common DEGs [e.g., claudin (CLDN)7, CLDN4 and CLDN3] were associated with cell adhesion and digestion. GCA-unique DEGs [e.g., MAD1 mitotic arrest deficient like 1, cyclin (CCN)B1, CCNB2 and CCNE1] were associated with the cell cycle and the regulation of cell proliferation, while GNCA-unique DEGs (e.g., GATA binding protein 6 and hyaluronoglucosaminidase 1) were implicated in cell death. A PPI network with 141 nodes and 446 edges were obtained, from which two subnetworks were extracted. Genes [e.g., fibronectin 1, collagen type I α2 chain (COL1A2) and COL1A1] from the two subnetworks were implicated in extracellular matrix organization. These common DEGs could advance our understanding of the etiology of gastric cancer, while the unique DEGs in GCA and GNCA could better define the properties of specific cancers and provide potential biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis or therapy

  19. Association of adenocarcinomas of the distal esophagus, "gastroesophageal junction," and "gastric cardia" with gastric pathology.

    PubMed

    Wijetunge, Sulochana; Ma, Yanling; DeMeester, Steve; Hagen, Jeffrey; DeMeester, Tom; Chandrasoma, Parakrama

    2010-10-01

    Controversy exists as to whether adenocarcinomas occurring in the gastroesophageal junctional region and gastric cardia originate in the esophagus or the stomach. Esophageal adenocarcinoma is known to be strongly associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease; gastric adenocarcinoma with Helicobacter pylori gastritis, and gastric intestinal metaplasia. This study evaluates the association of these tumors with pathologic findings in the biopsies of the gastric body and the antrum. It is hypothesized that if these malignancies are esophageal, they should have little or no significant association with gastric pathology; if they are gastric, these patients should have a high prevalence of gastric pathology. Between 2004 and 2008, 234 patients were diagnosed with high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and/or adenocarcinoma; 107 were distal esophageal, 79 straddled the distal end of the tubular esophagus, and 48 were in the "gastric cardia." Simultaneous biopsies of the distal body and antrum were present in 185 patients; 49 had biopsy of either antrum or body. Gastric biopsies were assessed for inflammation, H. pylori infection, and intestinal metaplasia. During this period, 2146 patients had nonmalignant columnar epithelia in the esophagus with similar assessment of the stomach; these acted as a control group. The gastric biopsy was normal in 201/234 (85.9%) patients and showed significant inflammation, H. pylori infection, and/or gastric intestinal metaplasia in 33/234 (14.1%) patients. There was no gastritis, H. pylori infection, or intestinal metaplasia in 88/107 (82.2%) of the patients with distal esophageal HGD and/or adenocarcinoma, 70/79 (88.6%) with junctional HGD and/or adenocarcinoma, and 43/48 (85.9%) with "gastric cardiac" HGD and/or adenocarcinoma. The incidence of gastritis was significantly higher in the patients with HGD and/or adenocarcinoma (33/234 or 14.1%) than in the control population (146/2146 or 9.0%; P=0.01). This difference was largely the result of a

  20. Numb chin syndrome secondary to leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Riesgo, Vincent J.; Poveda, Julio; Rammohan, Kottil

    2015-01-01

    Numb chin syndrome (NCS) can be a sign of malignancy. Its association with gastric adenocarcinoma is rare. We report a case of a 27-year-old Hispanic female that presented with complaint of left sided headache associated with numbness of the left side of chin and lower gingiva. Initial brain MRI, whole body gallium scan, high resolution CT of chest and elevated protein in the CSF were suggestive of sarcoidosis. She was treated with IV steroids with transient clinical improvement. Two weeks later, her symptoms worsened and further evaluation revealed the diagnosis of a poorly differentiated metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma with leptomeningeal involvement. This case report aims to emphasize the importance of identifying NCS as a possible indication of an underlying malignant condition. Reported cases of NCS associated with metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma are very rare. PMID:25830044

  1. Gastric Metastases from Lung Adenocarcinoma Causing Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Abu Ghanimeh, Mouhanna; Albadarin, Sakher; Yousef, Osama

    2017-01-01

    Metastases to the stomach are rare. They are commonly asymptomatic, and the diagnosis is usually established during autopsy. We present a patient known to have stage IV lung adenocarcinoma who presented with melena and shock. Endoscopy revealed multiple gastric nodules, which were proved to be metastatic deposits from her lung cancer. The possibility of gastric metastases should be kept in mind in patients presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopy and biopsy remain the gold standard for diagnostic testing in such patients. PMID:28286791

  2. Opium: an emerging risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Ramin; Malekzadeh, Reza; Etemadi, Arash; Nasrollahzadeh, Dariush; Aghcheli, Karim; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Pawlita, Michael; Boffetta, Paolo; Dawsey, Sanford M; Abnet, Christian C; Kamangar, Farin

    2013-07-15

    Opium use has been associated with higher risk of cancers of the esophagus, bladder, larynx, and lung; however, no previous study has examined its association with gastric cancer. There is also little information on the associations between hookah (water pipe) smoking or the chewing of tobacco products and the risk of gastric cancer. In a case-control study in Golestan Province of Iran, we enrolled 309 cases of gastric adenocarcinoma (118 noncardia, 161 cardia and 30 mixed-location adenocarcinomas) and 613 matched controls. Detailed information on long-term use of opium, tobacco products and other covariates were collected using structured and validated lifestyle and food frequency questionnaires. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were obtained using conditional logistic regression models. Opium use was associated with an increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, with an adjusted OR (95% CI) of 3.1 (1.9-5.1), and this increased risk was apparent for both anatomic subsites (cardia and noncardia). There was a dose-response effect, and individuals with the highest cumulative opium use had the strongest association (OR: 4.5; 95% CI: 2.3-8.5). We did not find a statistically significant association between the use of any of the tobacco products and risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, overall or by anatomic subsite. We showed, for the first time, an association between opium use and gastric adenocarcinoma. Given that opium use is a traditional practice in many parts of the world, these results are of public health significance.

  3. NR4A2 Is Regulated by Gastrin and Influences Cellular Responses of Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Misund, Kristine; Selvik, Linn-Karina Myrland; Rao, Shalini; Nørsett, Kristin; Bakke, Ingunn; Sandvik, Arne K.; Lægreid, Astrid; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S.; Thommesen, Liv

    2013-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin is known to play a role in differentiation, growth and apoptosis of cells in the gastric mucosa. In this study we demonstrate that gastrin induces Nuclear Receptor 4A2 (NR4A2) expression in the adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J and AGS-GR, which both possess the gastrin/CCK2 receptor. In vivo, NR4A2 is strongly expressed in the gastrin responsive neuroendocrine ECL cells in normal mucosa, whereas gastric adenocarcinoma tissue reveals a more diffuse and variable expression in tumor cells. We show that NR4A2 is a primary early transient gastrin induced gene in adenocarcinoma cell lines, and that NR4A2 expression is negatively regulated by inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) and zinc finger protein 36, C3H1 type-like 1 (Zfp36l1), suggesting that these gastrin regulated proteins exert a negative feedback control of NR4A2 activated responses. FRAP analyses indicate that gastrin also modifies the nucleus-cytosol shuttling of NR4A2, with more NR4A2 localized to cytoplasm upon gastrin treatment. Knock-down experiments with siRNA targeting NR4A2 increase migration of gastrin treated adenocarcinoma AGS-GR cells, while ectopically expressed NR4A2 increases apoptosis and hampers gastrin induced invasion, indicating a tumor suppressor function of NR4A2. Collectively, our results uncover a role of NR4A2 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells, and suggest that both the level and the localization of NR4A2 protein are of importance regarding the cellular responses of these cells. PMID:24086717

  4. NR4A2 is regulated by gastrin and influences cellular responses of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Misund, Kristine; Selvik, Linn-Karina Myrland; Rao, Shalini; Nørsett, Kristin; Bakke, Ingunn; Sandvik, Arne K; Lægreid, Astrid; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S; Thommesen, Liv

    2013-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin is known to play a role in differentiation, growth and apoptosis of cells in the gastric mucosa. In this study we demonstrate that gastrin induces Nuclear Receptor 4A2 (NR4A2) expression in the adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J and AGS-GR, which both possess the gastrin/CCK2 receptor. In vivo, NR4A2 is strongly expressed in the gastrin responsive neuroendocrine ECL cells in normal mucosa, whereas gastric adenocarcinoma tissue reveals a more diffuse and variable expression in tumor cells. We show that NR4A2 is a primary early transient gastrin induced gene in adenocarcinoma cell lines, and that NR4A2 expression is negatively regulated by inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) and zinc finger protein 36, C3H1 type-like 1 (Zfp36l1), suggesting that these gastrin regulated proteins exert a negative feedback control of NR4A2 activated responses. FRAP analyses indicate that gastrin also modifies the nucleus-cytosol shuttling of NR4A2, with more NR4A2 localized to cytoplasm upon gastrin treatment. Knock-down experiments with siRNA targeting NR4A2 increase migration of gastrin treated adenocarcinoma AGS-GR cells, while ectopically expressed NR4A2 increases apoptosis and hampers gastrin induced invasion, indicating a tumor suppressor function of NR4A2. Collectively, our results uncover a role of NR4A2 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells, and suggest that both the level and the localization of NR4A2 protein are of importance regarding the cellular responses of these cells.

  5. Possible involvement of leptin and leptin receptor in developing gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Shen, Zhi-Xiang; Luo, He-Sheng; Shen, Lei

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of leptin and leptin receptor (ob-R) in intestinal-type gastric cancer and precancerous lesions, and to explore the possible mechanism and role of the leptin system in developing intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the expression of leptin and leptin receptor in archival samples of gastric adenocarcinoma and preneoplastic lesions, including intestinal metaplasia and mild to severe gastric epithelial dysplasia. Positive staining was identified and percentage of positive staining was graded. RESULTS: Dual expression of leptin and leptin receptor were detected in 80% (16/20) intestinal metaplasia, 86.3% (25/30) mild gastric epithelial dysplasia, 86.7% (26/30) moderate gastric epithelial dysplasia, 93.3% (28/30) severe gastric epithelial dysplasia, 91.3% (55/60) intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma and 30.0% (9/30) diffuse-type gastric carcinoma. The percentage of dual expression of leptin and leptin receptor in intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma was significantly higher than that in diffuse-type gastric adenocarcinoma (χ2 = 37.022, P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Our results indicate the presence of an autocrine loop of leptin system in the development of intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:16437696

  6. A case of gastric adenocarcinoma in a Shih Tzu dog: successful treatment of early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Chun; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Jee, Cho-Hee; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Moon, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Na-Hyun; Sur, Jung-Hyang; Cho, Kyu-Woan; Kang, Byeong-Teck; Ha, Jeongim; Jung, Dong-In

    2014-07-01

    A 9-year-old castrated male Shih Tzu dog was referred to us, because of chronic vomiting. The patient's hematological, radiographic, ultrasonographic, endoscopic and histological examinations were evaluated for diagnosis. Hematologic analysis indicated moderate anemia and azotemia. Based on the imaging studies, an oval-shaped mass was identified in the gastric pylorus area. A proliferative mass was found on endoscopic examination, and we performed biopsy using grasping forceps. The histopathological findings of the biopsy specimens indicated hypertrophic gastritis, and Y-U pyloroplasty was performed. However, histopathological examination of the surgically resected mass revealed tubular adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Then, carboplatin chemotherapy was performed 4 times for 13 weeks. Clinical signs, such as vomiting, were resolved gradually after surgery and chemotherapy, and the patient's condition was managed favorably until recently (30 months after surgery). This case report describes clinical features, imaging studies, endoscopic characteristics and histopathological and immunohistochemical features of gastric tubular adenocarcinoma as early gastric cancer in a dog.

  7. Her2+ and b-HCG Producing Undifferentiated Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Eivaz-Mohammadi, Sahar; Gonzalez-Ibarra, Fernando; Abdul, Waheed; Tarar, Omer; Malik, Khurram; Syed, Amer K

    2014-01-01

    A 25-year-old Hispanic female with a history of anemia, schizoaffective disorder, and psychosis was admitted for anemia associated with fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, night sweats, weight loss, and abdominal and lower back pain for the past two months. On routine management, she was found to have a positive serum b-HCG of 80.4 (0-5 mIU/mL) but the patient denied any sexual activity in her life. During her admission, U/S of the pelvis was noncontributory. CT angiogram of the chest was significant for prominent mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes, diffusely thickened stomach suggesting gastric malignancy with multiple hypoenhancing lesions in the liver and diffuse lytic lesions in the spine and sacrum suspicious for metastatic disease. The MRI of the abdomen confirmed the CT angiogram findings. After these findings, EGD was performed which showed lesions in the antrum, body of the stomach, fundus, and cardia on the lesser curvature of the stomach body correlating with carcinoma. The biopsy was positive for Her2, b-HCG producing poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma. Patient underwent one successful round of chemotherapy with Taxotene, Cisplatin, and 5-FU for Stage IV gastric adenocarcinoma.

  8. Novel Method for Differentiating Histological Types of Gastric Adenocarcinoma by Using Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheu, Jeng-Horng; Lin, Chia-Wen; Lin, Lien-Fu; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chau, Lai-Kwan; Chen, Wenlung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma, a single heterogeneous disease with multiple epidemiological and histopathological characteristics, accounts for approximately 10% of cancers worldwide. It is categorized into four histological types: papillary adenocarcinoma (PAC), tubular adenocarcinoma (TAC), mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC), and signet ring cell adenocarcinoma (SRC). Effective differentiation of the four types of adenocarcinoma will greatly improve the treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma to increase its five-year survival rate. We reported here the differentiation of the four histological types of gastric adenocarcinoma from the molecularly structural viewpoint of confocal Raman microspectroscopy. In total, 79 patients underwent laparoscopic or open radical gastrectomy during 2008–2011: 21 for signet ring cell carcinoma, 21 for tubular adenocarcinoma, 14 for papillary adenocarcinoma, 6 for mucinous carcinoma, and 17 for normal gastric mucosas obtained from patients underwent operation for other benign lesions. Clinical data were retrospectively reviewed from medical charts, and Raman data were processed and analyzed by using principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Two-dimensional plots of PCA and LDA clearly demonstrated that the four histological types of gastric adenocarcinoma could be differentiated, and confocal Raman microspectroscopy provides potentially a rapid and effective method for differentiating SRC and MAC from TAC or PAC. PMID:27472385

  9. Novel Method for Differentiating Histological Types of Gastric Adenocarcinoma by Using Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheu, Jeng-Horng; Lin, Chia-Wen; Lin, Lien-Fu; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chau, Lai-Kwan; Chen, Wenlung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma, a single heterogeneous disease with multiple epidemiological and histopathological characteristics, accounts for approximately 10% of cancers worldwide. It is categorized into four histological types: papillary adenocarcinoma (PAC), tubular adenocarcinoma (TAC), mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC), and signet ring cell adenocarcinoma (SRC). Effective differentiation of the four types of adenocarcinoma will greatly improve the treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma to increase its five-year survival rate. We reported here the differentiation of the four histological types of gastric adenocarcinoma from the molecularly structural viewpoint of confocal Raman microspectroscopy. In total, 79 patients underwent laparoscopic or open radical gastrectomy during 2008-2011: 21 for signet ring cell carcinoma, 21 for tubular adenocarcinoma, 14 for papillary adenocarcinoma, 6 for mucinous carcinoma, and 17 for normal gastric mucosas obtained from patients underwent operation for other benign lesions. Clinical data were retrospectively reviewed from medical charts, and Raman data were processed and analyzed by using principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Two-dimensional plots of PCA and LDA clearly demonstrated that the four histological types of gastric adenocarcinoma could be differentiated, and confocal Raman microspectroscopy provides potentially a rapid and effective method for differentiating SRC and MAC from TAC or PAC.

  10. Introducing crucial protein panel of gastric adenocarcinoma disease

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Rezaei-Tavirani, Majid; Mansouri, Vahid; Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad; Valizadeh, Reza; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Since interactome analysis of diseases can provide candidate biomarker panel related to the diseases, in this research, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis is used to introduce the involved crucial proteins in Gastric adenocarcinoma (GA). Background: Gastric adenocarcinoma (GA) is the most common type of stomach cancer. There is no efficient diagnostic molecular method for GA. Method: Applying Cytoscape software 3.4.0 and String Database, the PPI network was constructed for 200 genes. Based on centrality parameters, the critical nodes were screened. Gene ontology of the key proteins for pathway analysis and molecular function processing were done and the highlighted pathways and activities were discussed. Results: Among 200 initial genes, 141 genes were included in a main connected network. Seven crucial proteins, including tumor protein p53, epidermal growth factor receptor, albumin, v-erb-b2 erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 2, neuro/glioblastoma derived oncogene homolog (avian), v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1, v-src sarcoma (Schmidt-Ruppin A-2) viral oncogene homolog (avian) and catenin (cadherin-associated protein), beta 1, 88kDa, and Myogenic differentiation 1, were introduced as key nodes of the network. These identified proteins are mostly involved in pathways and activities related to cancer. Conclusion: In conclusion, the finding is corresponding to the significant roles of these introduced proteins in GA disease. This protein panel may be a useful probe in the management of GA. PMID:28331560

  11. Apoptotic effect of sodium acetate on a human gastric adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Zhang, X L; Jin, F; Wang, Q X; Xiao, R; Hao, Z H; Gui, Q D; Sun, J

    2016-10-05

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium acetate on the viability of the human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) epithelial cell line. AGS cells were exposed to a range of concentrations of sodium acetate for different periods of time, and the sodium acetate-induced cytotoxic effects, including cell viability, DNA fragmentation, apoptotic gene expression, and caspase activity, were assessed. The changes in these phenotypes were quantified by performing a lactate dehydrogenase cell viability assay, annexin V staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL), and several caspase activity assays. In vitro studies demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of sodium acetate on the AGS cell line were dose- and time-dependent manners. No differences were found between the negative control and sodium acetate-treated cells stained with annexin V and subjected to the TUNEL assay. However, caspase-3 activity was increased in AGS cells exposed to sodium acetate. Overall, it was concluded that sodium acetate exerted an apoptotic effect in AGS cells via a caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway.

  12. Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) is induced by gastrin and inhibits migration of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Selvik, Linn-Karina M; Rao, Shalini; Steigedal, Tonje S; Haltbakk, Ildri; Misund, Kristine; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S; Lægreid, Astrid; Thommesen, Liv

    2014-01-01

    Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1/Snf1lk) belongs to the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family of kinases, all of which play major roles in regulating metabolism and cell growth. Recent studies have shown that reduced levels of SIK1 are associated with poor outcome in cancers, and that this involves an invasive cellular phenotype with increased metastatic potential. However, the molecular mechanism(s) regulated by SIK1 in cancer cells is not well explored. The peptide hormone gastrin regulates cellular processes involved in oncogenesis, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. The aim of this study was to examine the role of SIK1 in gastrin responsive adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J, AGS-GR and MKN45. We show that gastrin, known to signal through the Gq/G11-coupled CCK2 receptor, induces SIK1 expression in adenocarcinoma cells, and that transcriptional activation of SIK1 is negatively regulated by the Inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER). We demonstrate that gastrin-mediated signalling induces phosphorylation of Liver Kinase 1B (LKB1) Ser-428 and SIK1 Thr-182. Ectopic expression of SIK1 increases gastrin-induced phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and enhances gastrin-induced transcription of c-fos and CRE-, SRE-, AP1- and NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter plasmids. We also show that gastrin induces phosphorylation and nuclear export of HDACs. Next we find that siRNA mediated knockdown of SIK1 increases migration of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS-GR. Evidence provided here demonstrates that SIK1 is regulated by gastrin and influences gastrin elicited signalling in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The results from the present study are relevant for the understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in gastric adenocarcinomas.

  13. CYR61 (CCN1) is a metastatic biomarker of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jing; Yu, Guanzhen; Shao, Genbao; Sun, Aiqin; Chen, Miao; Yang, Wannian; Lin, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA) is the most aggressive subtype of gastric cancer with a high metastatic rate. In this report, we collected tumor tissue samples from 214 GCA cases and examined expression of CYR61, a target gene product of the Hippo-YAP/TAZ pathway, in the GCA tumors by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining using the tissue microarray assay (TMA). The results have shown that CYR61 is overexpressed in 44% of the GCA tumor samples. Expression of CYR61 is inversely correlated with cumulative survival of GCA patients (p<0.001) and significantly associated only with metastatic pathological categories (with N category, p=0.052; with TNM stage, p=0.001). Furthermore, knockdown of CYR61 in gastric cancer AGS cells impairs the cancer cell migration and invasion, suggesting a driver role of CYR61 in metastasis. Thus, our studies have established CYR61 as a metastatic biomarker for prediction of poor prognosis of GCA and provided a potential molecular target for anti-metastatic therapy of GCA. PMID:27105510

  14. Co-expressed miRNAs in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Sally; López, Rocío; Andrade, Rafael E; Rodriguez-Urrego, Paula A; López-Kleine, Liliana; Torres, Maria Mercedes

    2016-08-01

    Co-expression networks may provide insights into the patterns of molecular interactions that underlie cellular processes. To obtain a better understanding of miRNA expression patterns in gastric adenocarcinoma and to provide markers that can be associated with histopathological findings, we performed weighted gene correlation network analysis (WGCNA) and compare it with a supervised analysis. Integrative analysis of target predictions and miRNA expression profiles in gastric cancer samples was also performed. WGCNA identified a module of co-expressed miRNAs that were associated with histological traits and tumor condition. Hub genes were identified based on statistical analysis and network centrality. The miRNAs 100, let-7c, 125b and 99a stood out for their association with the diffuse histological subtype. The 181 miRNA family and miRNA 21 highlighted for their association with the tumoral phenotype. The integrated analysis of miRNA and gene expression profiles showed the let-7 miRNA family playing a central role in the regulatory relationships.

  15. Clinical implications of chromosomal abnormalities in gastric adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chew-Wun; Chen, Gen-Der; Fann, Cathy S.-J.; Lee, Anna F.-Y.; Chi, Chin-Wen; Liu, Jacqueline M.; Weier, Ulli; Chen, Jeou-Yuan

    2003-06-23

    Gastric carcinoma (GC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and has a very poor prognosis. Genetic imbalances in 62 primary gastric adenocarcinomas of various histopathologic types and pathologic stages and six gastric cancer-derived cell lines were analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization, and the relationship of genomic abnormalities to clinical features in primary GC was evaluated at a genome-wide level. Eighty-four percent of the tumors and all six cell lines showed DNA copy number changes. The recurrent chromosomal abnormalities including gains at 15 regions and losses at 8 regions were identified. Statistical analyses revealed that gains at 17q24-qter (53 percent), 20q13-qter (48 percent), 1p32-p36 (42 percent), 22q12-qter (27 percent), 17p13-pter (24 percent), 16p13-pter (21 percent), 6p21-pter (19 percent), 20p12-pter (19 percent), 7p21-pter (18 percent), 3q28-qter (8 percent), and 13q13-q14 (8 percent), and losses at 18q12-qter (11 percent), 3p12 (8 percent), 3p25-pter (8 percent), 5q14-q23 (8 percent), and 9p21-p23 (5 percent), are associated with unique patient or tumor-related features. GCs of differing histopathologic features were shown to be associated with distinct patterns of genetic alterations, supporting the notion that they evolve through distinct genetic pathways. Metastatic tumors were also associated with specific genetic changes. These regions may harbor candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis of this malignancy.

  16. Expression profiling of CEACAM6 associated with the tumorigenesis and progression in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Deng, X; Liu, P; Zhao, Y; Wang, Q

    2014-09-26

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily and has been recently reported to affect the neoplastic, metastatic, and invasive ability of malignant cells by regulating intracellular signaling pathways during tumorigenesis and progression. We investigated the expression and amplification of CEACAM6 in relation to the clinicopathological and biological significance of gastric adenocarcinoma. Expression of CEACAM6 mRNA in 75 primary gastric adenocarcinom and 20 adjacent tissues compared to normal gastric mucosas were explored using real-time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemical assays were conducted to evaluate the expression and tissue distribution of CEACAM6 protein. Overexpression of CEACAM6 mRNA in both gastric adenocarcinoma (2.513 ± 0.869) and adjacent tissues (1.171 ± 0.428) was significantly higher than the relative expressions in non-neoplastic specimens (0.594 ± 0.513) (P < 0.01). CEACAM6 protein was present in 52 (69.33%) gastric adenocarcinomas, but not in normal gastric tissues. Adenocarcinomas with elevated CEACAM6 expression were significantly associated with lymph node metastases and advanced stages. There were no relationships between CEACAM6 expression and tumor size, histological differentiation, or different subtypes, respectively. Moreover, higher expression of CEACAM6 was found to be correlated with short postoperative survival time of patients with gastric cancer. Amplification and upregulation of CEACAM6 expression was observed in human gastric adenocarcinomas, which may be correlated with the generation or transformation of malignant cells, tumor aggressive progression, and clinical outcome. CEACAM6 may be a valuable biomarker screening for gastric tumor and novel predictor for patients in advanced stages of gastric cancer.

  17. Expression of SNCG, MAP2, SDF-1 and CXCR4 in gastric adenocarcinoma and their clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shufang; Shi, Lifang; Zhang, Yi; He, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the study was to detect the expression of SNCG, MAP2, SDF-1 and CXCR4 in gastric adenocarcinoma, and to evaluate their roles in the carcinogenesis of gastric adenocarcinoma, development, invasion and metastasis as well as their clinical significance. Methods: The expression of SNCG, MAP2, SDF-1 and CXCR4 was detected by SP immunohistochemical method in 225 cases of gastric adenocarcinoma and 105 cases of nonneoplastic adjacent gastric tissue. The expression of SNCG, MAP2, SDF-1 and CXCR4 mRNA was also detected by RT-PCR method in 50 cases of gastric adenocarcinoma and 30 cases of nonneoplastic adjacent gastric tissue. Results: The expression of SNCG, MAP2, SDF-1 and CXCR4 in the gastric adenocarcinoma was remarkably higher than those in the nonneoplastic adjacent gastric tissue (P < 0.01); The positive expression of SNCG and MAP2 was correlated with the depth of tumor invasion and the metastasis of lymph nodes (P < 0.05), and that of SDF-1 and CXCR4 was correlated with the metastasis of lymph nodes (P < 0.05). Conclusions: SNCG, MAP2, SDF-1 and CXCR4 may play an important role in the carcinogenesis, progression, invasion and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma. However, it still needs more exploration whether they can serve as promising therapeutic targets of gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:25400739

  18. Hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach – a different histology for not so different gastric adenocarcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Gálvez-Muñoz, Elisa; Gallego-Plazas, Javier; Gonzalez-Orozco, Verónica; Menarguez-Pina, Francisco; Ruiz-Maciá, José A; Morcillo, Miguel A

    2009-01-01

    Hepatoid adenocarcinoma is an extrahepatic tumor characterized by morphological similarities to hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach is a cancer with an extremely poor prognosis with few cases reported. Here, we describe a 75-year-old Spanish man referred to our hospital with a history of abdominal pain, general fatigue, anorexia and sickness. Initial study revealed anemia, and computed tomography scan and abdominal ultrasonography showed multiple metastases to the liver with hepatocellular carcinoma characteristics in a liver with no cirrhotic change. Further study included a serum level of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), which resulted markedly elevated, and a conclusive esophagogastroduodenoscopy describing an elevated tumour growing through the cardia and gastroesophageal junction with foci of necrosis and haemorrhage. Gastric biopsies of the tumor revealed poorly differenciated adenocarcinoma, with hepatoid differentiation. After a diagnosis of AFP-producing hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach with multiple liver metastases was made, pallitive total gastrectomy, without liver resection, was performed. Patient recovered well after surgery, and entered into a palliative systemich chemotherapy protocol. Although this illness is recognized as having poor prognosis, the patient remains alive 8 months after the operation. Accurate diagnosis of hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach is important, and should be suspected under certain circumstances. We describe this rare case of hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach, and review the literature concerning the clinicopathological aspects. PMID:19674468

  19. A case of esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from the ectopic gastric mucosa in the thoracic esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Shuji; Osada, Shinji; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Takao; Nagao, Narutoshi; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Asano, Nami; Yoshida, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    A 75-year old man was detected with a pediculate tumor in the upper esophagus. A biopsy determined that it was an adenocarcinoma. A subtotal esophagectomy with dissection of three-fields of lymph nodes was selected. The pathological study revealed it to be an esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from ectopic gastric mucosa of the fundus of the stomach. His post-operative course was uneventful and without sign of recurrence for 3.5 years. PMID:21139950

  20. Body size and composition and the risk of gastric and oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    MacInnis, Robert J; English, Dallas R; Hopper, John L; Giles, Graham G

    2006-05-15

    Although evidence has been mounting that obesity may be related to the increased incidence of oesophageal and gastric cardia malignancies, these reports (mainly case-control studies) have relied on imperfect measures of obesity such as body mass index (BMI), and generally have not clearly distinguished between anatomical subsites within the oesophagus and stomach. In a prospective study of people aged 27-75 years, we directly measured fat mass and fat-free mass (using bioelectrical impedance analysis), height, weight and waist and hip circumferences. Among 41,295 people followed on average for 11.3 years, 30 cases with cancers in the gastric cardia or lower third of the oesophagus and 68 cases with noncardia gastric adenocarcinomas were ascertained via the population cancer registry. The risk of adenocarcinoma of the lower oesophagus and gastric cardia was positively associated with BMI with a hazards ratio (HR) and (95% confidence interval) for people with BMI>or=30 kg/m2 compared with those<25 kg/m2, of 3.7 (1.1-12.4), an HR per 10 cm increase in waist circumference of 1.46 (1.05-2.04), and a HR per 10 kg increase on fat-free mass of 2.06 (1.15-3.69). Noncardia gastric adenocarcinoma showed little relationship with body size. We observed an increased risk of adenocarcinoma of the lower oesophagus and gastric cardia associated with increased BMI, central adiposity and the nonfat component of weight, but found no association with noncardia gastric adenocarcinoma. An increasing prevalence of obesity may be associated with the increasing incidence of gastro-oesophageal cancer observed in many populations.

  1. Mesothelin Expression in Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Its Relation to Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Song-Hee; Joo, Mee; Kim, Hanseong; Chang, Sunhee

    2017-01-01

    Background Although surgical resection with chemotherapy is considered effective for patients with advanced gastric cancer, it remains the third leading cause of cancer-related death in South Korea. Several studies have reported that mesothelial markers including mesothelin, calretinin, and Wilms tumor protein 1 (WT1) were positive in variable carcinomas, associated with prognosis, and were evaluated as potential markers for targeted therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the immunohistochemical expression of mesothelial markers (mesothelin, calretinin, and WT1) in gastric adenocarcinoma and their relations to clinocopathological features and prognosis. Methods We evaluated calretinin, WT1, and mesothelin expression by immunohistochemical staining in 117 gastric adenocarcinomas. Results Mesothelin was positively stained in 30 cases (25.6%). Mesothelin expression was related to increased depth of invasion (p = .002), lymph node metastasis (p = .013), and presence of lymphovascular (p = .015) and perineural invasion (p = .004). Patients with mesothelin expression had significantly worse disease-free survival rate compared with that of nonmesothelin expression group (p = .024). Univariate analysis showed that mesothelin expression is related to short-term survival. None of the 117 gastric adenocarcinomas stained for calretinin or WT1. Conclusions Mesothelin expression was associated with poor prognosis. Our results suggest that mesothelin-targeted therapy should be considered as an important therapeutic alternative for gastric adenocarcinoma patients with mesothelin expression. PMID:28196410

  2. Coexistence of Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Choriocarcinoma: Complete Response to Trastuzumab and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gunduz, Seyda; Elpek, Gulsum Ozlem; Uysal, Mukremin; Goksu, Sema Sezgin; Tatli, Murat; Arslan, Deniz; Coskun, Hasan Senol; Bozcuk, Hakan; Savas, Burhan; Ozdogan, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Gastric choriocarcinoma is a rare neoplasm and usually accompanies gastric adenocarcinoma. The prognosis is poor due to the aggressive course of the disease. A 57-year-old female patient with weight loss and abdominal pain was examined. The patient was operated following the examination, and pathological analysis revealed the presence of a gastric adenocarcinoma associated with choriocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a positive reaction with antibodies to beta-human chorionic gonadotropin and overexpression of the cErbB2 proto-oncogene. Staging revealed multiple metastases in the liver. A complete response was obtained with a combination of trastuzumab and chemotherapy. The diagnosis of gastric choriocarcinomas without pathological examination is difficult due to their rare occurrence. A complete response can be obtained with trastuzumab in the treatment of cases with overexpression of the cErbB2 protein. PMID:23525369

  3. Epigenetic regulation of GATA4 expression by histone modification in AFP-producing gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Nobuhisa; Kishimoto, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    AFP-producing adenocarcinoma is a variant of adenocarcinoma with high malignancy. Production of AFP suggests enteroblastic or hepatoid differentiation of cancer cells. GATA4 is a key molecule involved in the prenatal development of the stomach and liver. GATA4 is epigenetically silenced by hypermethylation of primer region in many types of cancers including gastric cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression and epigenetic regulation of GATA4 in AFP-producing adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that GATA4 was positive in 3/8 cases of AFP-producing gastric adenocarcinomas and in 28/30 cases of common type adenocarcinomas. Epigenetic modification of GATA4 promoter region was investigated with 3 AFP-producing and 4 common-type gastric cancer cell lines. GATA4 mRNA was detected in 1/3 of AFP-producing and 2/4 of common-type gastric cancer cell lines by RT-PCR. Methylation-specific PCR revealed no GATA4 methylation in any of the AFP-producing gastric cancers, whereas methylation was consistent with GATA4 expression in the common-type gastric cancers. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay for AFP-producing gastric cancers revealed that histones H3 and H4 were hypoacetylated in the GATA4-negative cells, while they were hyperacetylated in the GATA4-positive cells. Treatment with trichostain A, an inhibitor for histone deacetylase, induced acetylation of histones H3 and H4, and tri-methylation of lysine 4 of histone H3, which was associated with the active transcription of GATA4 in GATA4-negative AFP-producing cells. These results indicated that histone deacetylation is a silencing mechanism for GATA4 expression in AFP-producing gastric cancer cells. Differences between AFP-producing gastric cancer and common-type gastric cancer in terms of the mechanism of GATA4 regulation may be reflected in the phenotypic deviation of AFP-producing gastric cancer from common-type gastric cancer.

  4. Prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Che, Keying; Zhao, Yang; Qu, Xiao; Pang, Zhaofei; Ni, Yang; Zhang, Tiehong; Du, Jiajun; Shen, Hongchang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Gastric carcinoma (GC) is a highly aggressive cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Histopathological evaluation pertaining to invasiveness is likely to provide additional information in relation to patient outcome. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides generated from 296 gastric adenocarcinoma patients with full clinical and pathological and follow-up information were systematically reviewed. The patients were grouped on the basis of tumor budding, single cell invasion, large cell invasion, mitotic count, and fibrosis. The association between histopathological parameters, different classification systems, and overall survival (OS) was statistically analyzed. Results Among the 296 cases that were analyzed, high-grade tumor budding was observed in 49.0% (145) of them. Single cell invasion and large cell invasion were observed in 62.8% (186) and 16.9% (50) of the cases, respectively. Following univariate analysis, patients with high-grade tumor budding had shorter OS than those with low-grade tumor budding (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.260, P<0.001). Similarly, the OS of patients with single cell invasion and large cell invasion was reduced (single cell invasion, HR: 3.553, P<0.001; large cell invasion, HR: 2.466, P<0.001). Following multivariate analysis, tumor budding and single cell invasion were observed to be independent risk factors for gastric adenocarcinoma (P<0.05). According to the Lauren classification, patients with intestinal-type adenocarcinoma had better outcomes than those with diffuse-type adenocarcinoma (HR: 2.563, P<0.001). Conclusion Tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma are associated with an unfavorable prognosis. PMID:28255247

  5. Gastric adenocarcinoma arising in gastritis cystica profunda presenting with selective loss of KCNE2 expression.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Natsumi; Kitazawa, Riko; Fujiishi, Koto; Nagai, Yusa; Haraguchi, Ryuma; Kitazawa, Sohei

    2013-02-28

    Gastritis cystica profunda (GCP) is a rare condition caused by ectopic entrapment of gastric glands, probably secondary to the disruption of muscularis mucosae. GCP is often associated with gastric adenocarcinoma, and loss of the KCNE2 subunit from potassium channel complexes is considered a common primary target molecule leads to both GCP and malignancy. In this study, we, for the first time, analyzed the expression of KCNE2 in surgically excised tissue from human gastric cancer associated with GCP and confirmed that reduced KCNE2 expression correlates with disease formation.

  6. Differentiating gastrointestinal stromal tumors from gastric adenocarcinomas and normal mucosae using confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheu, Jeng-Horng; Lin, Chia-Wen; Lin, Lien-Fu; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chen, Wenlung

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, and gastric adenocarcinomas are a common cancer worldwide. To differentiate GISTs from adenocarcinomas is important because the surgical processes for both are different; the former excises the tumor with negative margins, while the latter requires radical gastrectomy with lymph node dissection. Endoscopy with biopsy is used to distinguish GISTs from adenocarcinomas; however, it may cause tumor bleeding in GISTs. We reported here the confocal Raman microspectroscopy as an effective tool to differentiate GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal mucosae. Of 119 patients enrolled in this study, 102 patients underwent gastrectomy (40 GISTs and 62 adenocarcinomas), and 17 patients with benign lesions were obtained as normal mucosae. Raman signals were integrated for 100 s for each spot on the specimen, and 5 to 10 spots, depending on the sample size, were chosen for each specimen. There were significant differences among those tissues as evidenced by different Raman signal responding to phospholipids and protein structures. The spectral data were further processed and analyzed by using principal component analysis. A two-dimensional plot demonstrated that GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal gastric mucosae could be effectively differentiated from each other.

  7. Hypercalcemia as Initial Presentation of Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of Gastric Origin: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Kumar, Vinod; Kaur, Supreet; Maroules, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypercalcemia of malignancy due to metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma is extremely rare; in fact, to the best of our knowledge, only three case reports of hypercalcemia associated with metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma have been published in the literature to date. Herein, we report a rare case involving a 61-year-old African-American female who had hypercalcemia at initial presentation and who was later diagnosed with poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma with extensive liver metastases, without bone involvement. She was found to have elevated parathyroid hormone-related peptide and normal parathyroid hormone levels. Despite aggressive treatment, she died within a few months of diagnosis. PMID:27752397

  8. Methanolic Extract of Ganoderma lucidum Induces Autophagy of AGS Human Gastric Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Reis, Filipa S; Lima, Raquel T; Morales, Patricia; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2015-09-29

    Ganoderma lucidum is one of the most widely studied mushroom species, particularly in what concerns its medicinal properties. Previous studies (including those from some of us) have shown some evidence that the methanolic extract of G. lucidum affects cellular autophagy. However, it was not known if it induces autophagy or decreases the autophagic flux. The treatment of a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (AGS) with the mushroom extract increased the formation of autophagosomes (vacuoles typical from autophagy). Moreover, the cellular levels of LC3-II were also increased, and the cellular levels of p62 decreased, confirming that the extract affects cellular autophagy. Treating the cells with the extract together with lysossomal protease inhibitors, the cellular levels of LC3-II and p62 increased. The results obtained proved that, in AGS cells, the methanolic extract of G. lucidum causes an induction of autophagy, rather than a reduction in the autophagic flux. To our knowledge, this is the first study proving that statement.

  9. Chestnut extract induces apoptosis in AGS human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Sun Hyo

    2011-06-01

    In Korea, chestnut production is increasing each year, but consumption is far below production. We investigated the effect of chestnut extracts on antioxidant activity and anticancer effects. Ethanol extracts of raw chestnut (RCE) or chestnut powder (CPE) had dose-dependent superoxide scavenging activity. Viable numbers of MDA-MD-231 human breast cancer cells, DU145 human prostate cancer cells, and AGS human gastric cancer cells decreased by 18, 31, and 69%, respectively, following treatment with 200 µg/mL CPE for 24 hr. CPE at various concentrations (0-200 µg/mL) markedly decreased AGS cell viability and increased apoptotic cell death dose and time dependently. CPE increased the levels of cleaved caspase-8, -7, -3, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase in a dose-dependent manner but not cleaved caspase-9. CPE exerted no effects on Bcl-2 and Bax levels. The level of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein decreased within a narrow range following CPE treatment. The levels of Trail, DR4, and Fas-L increased dose-dependently in CPE-treated AGS cells. These results show that CPE decreases growth and induces apoptosis in AGS gastric cancer cells and that activation of the death receptor pathway contributes to CPE-induced apoptosis in AGS cells. In conclusion, CPE had more of an effect on gastric cancer cells than breast or prostate cancer cells, suggesting that chestnuts would have a positive effect against gastric cancer.

  10. Twist1 correlates with poor differentiation and progression in gastric adenocarcinoma via elevation of FGFR2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dong-Yuan; Guo, Qi-Sen; Li, Yan-Liang; Cui, Bin; Guo, Jun; Liu, Ji-Xiao; Li, Peng

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore the correlation between Twist-related protein (Twist)1, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)2 and gastric adenocarcinoma differentiation and progression. METHODS: We evaluated Twist1 and FGFR2 in 52 gastric adenocarcinoma samples by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction, and analyzed the correlation between Twist1, FGFR2 and cancer differentiation. We also detected Twist1 and FGFR2 expression in gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines, and evaluated Twist1 influence on FGFR2 expression. In addition, we studied the role of FGFR2 in Twist1-promoted cancer progression, including proliferation, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). RESULTS: Twist1 and FGFR2 were detected in almost all the gastric adenocarcinoma samples. Twist1 (P = 0.0213) and FGFR2 (P = 0.0310) mRNA levels had a significant association with gastric adenocarcinoma differentiation. Moreover, Twist1 and FGFR2 expression in poorly differentiated cells (SNU-1 and SNU-16) was notably higher than in well-differentiated cells (MKN-7 and MKN-28). In poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinomas, FGFR2 mRNA level was significantly positively correlated with Twist1 mRNA level (P = 0.004). Twist1 was proved to promote FGFR2 by regulating Twist1 expression by knockdown and overexpression. Additionally, Twist1 could induce proliferation, invasion and EMT in gastric cancer; of these, FGFR2 was required for invasion and EMT, rather than proliferation. CONCLUSION: Twist1 and FGFR2 are highly associated with differentiation of gastric adenocarcinoma; Twist1 can facilitate invasion and EMT in gastric adenocarcinoma via promotion of FGFR2 expression. PMID:25561797

  11. Association of tooth loss and oral hygiene with risk of gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Ramin; Malekzadeh, Reza; Etemadi, Arash; Nasrollahzadeh, Dariush; Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Khoshnia, Masoud; Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Pawlita, Michael; Boffetta, Paolo; Dawsey, Sanford M; Kamangar, Farin; Abnet, Christian C

    2013-05-01

    Poor oral health and tooth loss have been proposed as possible risk factors for some chronic diseases, including gastric cancer. However, a small number of studies have tested these associations. We conducted a case-control study in Golestan Province, Iran, that enrolled 309 cases diagnosed with gastric adenocarcinoma (118 noncardia, 161 cardia, and 30 mixed-locations) and 613 sex, age, and neighborhood matched controls. Data on oral health were obtained through physical examination and questionnaire including tooth loss, the number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth, and frequency of tooth brushing. ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were obtained using conditional logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders. Standard one degree-of-freedom linear trend test and a multiple degree-of-freedom global test of the effect of adding oral hygiene variables to the model were also calculated. Our results showed apparent associations between tooth loss and decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) score with risk of gastric cancer, overall and at each anatomic subsite. However, these associations were not monotonic and were strongly confounded by age. The results also showed that subjects who brushed their teeth less than daily were at significantly higher risk for gastric cardia adenocarcinoma ORs (95% CI) of 5.6 (1.6-19.3). We found evidence for an association between oral health and gastric cancer, but the nonmonotonic association, the relatively strong effect of confounder adjustment, and inconsistent results across studies must temper the strength of any conclusions.

  12. Poncirin Induces Apoptosis in AGS Human Gastric Cancer Cells through Extrinsic Apoptotic Pathway by up-Regulation of Fas Ligand.

    PubMed

    Saralamma, Venu Venkatarame Gowda; Nagappan, Arulkumar; Hong, Gyeong Eun; Lee, Ho Jeong; Yumnam, Silvia; Raha, Suchismita; Heo, Jeong Doo; Lee, Sang Joon; Lee, Won Sup; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Gon Sup

    2015-09-18

    Poncirin, a natural bitter flavanone glycoside abundantly present in many species of citrus fruits, has various biological benefits such as anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. The anti-cancer mechanism of Poncirin remains elusive to date. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effects of Poncirin in AGS human gastric cancer cells (gastric adenocarcinoma). The results revealed that Poncirin could inhibit the proliferation of AGS cells in a dose-dependent manner. It was observed Poncirin induced accumulation of sub-G1 DNA content, apoptotic cell population, apoptotic bodies, chromatin condensation, and DNA fragmentation in a dose-dependent manner in AGS cells. The expression of Fas Ligand (FasL) protein was up-regulated dose dependently in Poncirin-treated AGS cells Moreover, Poncirin in AGS cells induced activation of Caspase-8 and -3, and subsequent cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Inhibitor studies' results confirm that the induction of caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death in Poncirin-treated AGS cells was led by the Fas death receptor. Interestingly, Poncirin did not show any effect on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax and Bak) and anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-xL) in AGS-treated cells followed by no activation in the mitochondrial apoptotic protein caspase-9. This result suggests that the mitochondrial-mediated pathway is not involved in Poncirin-induced cell death in gastric cancer. These findings suggest that Poncirin has a potential anti-cancer effect via extrinsic pathway-mediated apoptosis, possibly making it a strong therapeutic agent for human gastric cancer.

  13. Targeted therapy of multiple liver metastases after resected solitary gastric metastasis and primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ling-yu; Liu, Ke-jun; Jiang, Zhe-long; Wu, Hai-ying; Wu, Shi-xiu

    2016-01-01

    Gastric metastases from lung adenocarcinoma are rare and usually asymptomatic. A 61-year-old woman was referred to our department because of a right lower pulmonary mass found on a chest X-ray film in August 2012. Right lower lobectomy was performed for pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Four months later, she developed epigastric discomfort. A fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scan showed a malignancy at the cardias of the stomach. A biopsy diagnosed poorly differentiated carcinoma and a gastric carcinoma was suspected. She underwent a subtotal gastrectomy and part of esophagectomy. The histologic diagnosis was metastasis from the pulmonary adenocarcinoma. She visited us again for her increasing level of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) after two months. FDG-PET/CT showed multiple malignant lesions in her liver, considering metastases from pulmonary origin. As she harbored activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation, she received erlotinib from April, 2013. She survives 4 years after the lung resection and is still on erotinib treatment with complete response. Although gastric metastasis from lung cancer is considered a late stage of the disease, a radical resection might provide survival in solitary metastasis. Moreover, systemic therapy was emphasized after local treatment in some late stage cases. PMID:27829227

  14. CDKN1A histone acetylation and gene expression relationship in gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wisnieski, Fernanda; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Santos, Leonardo Caires; Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Demachki, Sâmia; Artigiani, Ricardo; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Lourenço, Laércio Gomes; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Smith, Marília Cardoso

    2017-02-01

    CDKN1A is a tumor suppressor gene involved in gastric carcinogenesis and is a potential target for histone deacetylase inhibitor-based therapies. Upregulation of CDKN1A is generally observed in several cell lines after histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment; however, little is known about the histone acetylation status associated with this gene in clinical samples, including gastric tumor tissue samples. Therefore, our goal was to quantify the H3K9 and H4K16 acetylation levels associated with three CDKN1A regions in 21 matched pairs of gastric adenocarcinoma and corresponding adjacent non-tumor samples by chromatin immunoprecipitation and to correlate these data with the gene expression. Our results demonstrated that the -402, -20, and +182 CDKN1A regions showed a significantly increased acetylation level in at least one of the histones evaluated (p < 0.05, for all comparisons), and these levels were positively correlated in gastric tumors. However, an inverse correlation was detected between both H3K9 and H4K16 acetylation at the -402 CDKN1A region and mRNA levels in gastric tumors (r = -0.51, p = 0.02; r = -0.60, p < 0.01, respectively). Furthermore, increased H4K16 acetylation at the -20 CDKN1A region was associated with gastric tumors of patients without lymph node metastasis (p = 0.04). These results highlight the complexity of these processes in gastric adenocarcinoma and contribute to a better understanding of CDKN1A regulation in carcinogenesis.

  15. Identification of Annexin A1 protein expression in human gastric adenocarcinoma using proteomics and tissue microarray

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Xiu-Juan; Liu, Gui-Tao; Xia, Yu; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Wen, Hao

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the differential expression of Annexin A1 (ANXA1) protein in human gastric adenocarcinoma. This study was also designed to analyze the relationship between ANXA1 expression and the clinicopathological parameters of gastric carcinoma. METHODS: Purified gastric adenocarcinoma cells (GAC) and normal gastric epithelial cells (NGEC) were obtained from 15 patients with gastric cancer by laser capture microdissection. All of the peptide specimens were labeled as 18O/16O after trypsin digestion. Differential protein expressions were quantitatively identified between GAC and NGEC by nanoliter-reverse-phase liquid chromatography-mass/mass spectrometry (nano-RPLC-MS/MS). The expressions of ANXA1 in GAC and NGEC were verified by western blot analysis. The tissue microarray containing the expressed ANXA1 in 75 pairs of gastric carcinoma and paracarcinoma specimens was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The relationship between ANXA1 expression and clinicopathological parametes of gastric carcinoma was analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 78 differential proteins were identified. Western blotting revealed that ANXA1 expression was significantly upregulated in GAC (2.17/1, P < 0.01). IHC results showed the correlations between ANXA1 protein expression and the clinicopathological parameters, including invasive depth (T stage), lymph node metastasis (N stage), distant metastasis (M stage) and tumour-lymph node metastasis stage (P < 0.01). However, the correlations between ANXA1 protein expression and the remaining clinicopathological parameters, including sex, age, histological differentiation and the size of tumour were not found (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The upregulated ANXA1 expression may be associated with carcinogenesis, progression, invasion and metastasis of GAC. This protein could be considered as a biomarker of clinical prognostic prediction and targeted therapy of GAC. PMID:24282368

  16. Nuclear overexpression of the overexpressed in lung cancer 1 predicts worse prognosis in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue; Shen, Hongchang; Fu, Guobin; Zhao, Dandan; Wang, Weibo

    2017-02-07

    We have performed this retrospective study to elucidate whether elevated expression of the overexpressed in lung cancer 1 (OLC1) was related to the clinicopathological parameters and prognosis of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. Additionally, different effects of various subcellular OLC1 expression on gastric adeno-carcinogenesis were focused on in our study. Both overall and subcellular expression of OLC1 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry(IHC) via tissue microarrays from total 393 samples. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox's proportional hazard model were exerted to further explore the correlation between OLC1 and prognosis. Total overexpression of OLC1 was significantly associated with stage (P = 0.004) and differentiation (P = 0.009), and only the strong total expression could predict a poor prognosis (HR = 1.31, P = 0.04). There were significant associations found between nuclear overexpression and tumor invasion depth(P = 0.002), lymph node (P < 0.001), stage (P = 0.004), differentiation (P < 0.001) and smoking history (P = 0.045). Furthermore, over-expressed nuclear OLC1 protein could be an independent risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma (univariate: HR = 1.43, P = 0.003; multivariate: HR = 1.39, P = 0.011). In general, both total and nuclear overexpression of OLC1 could be the signs of gastric adeno-carcinogenesis, which might be served as the biomarkers for diagnosis at an early stage, even at the onset of tumorigenesis. Rather than the total expression, nuclear overexpression of OLC1 was correlated with most clinicopathological parameters and could predict a poor overall survival as an independent factor for prognosis, which made it a more effective and sensitive biomarker for gastric adenocarcinoma.

  17. "Big IGF-II"-induced hypoglycemia secondary to gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morbois-Trabut, L; Maillot, F; De Widerspach-Thor, A; Lamisse, F; Couet, C

    2004-06-01

    Non-islet cell tumor-related hypoglycemia is a rare phenomenon. We report the case of a 63 Year-old man admitted for hemiparesia and a capillary blood glucose of 20 mg/dL. The presence of an immature form of IGF-II that can mimic the effect of insulin, namely "big IGF-II", explained this patient's hypoglycaemia. A moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the cardia with metastatic extension to the stomach and the liver was demonstrated. Octreotide failed to control the hypoglycaemia, therefore prednisolone (2 mg/kg per day) and enteral feeding prevented new episodes of severe hypoglycaemia.

  18. C5b-9 Staining Correlates With Clinical and Tumor Stage in Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Yang, Wei-jun; Sun, Hai-jian; Wu, Yu-zhang

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is a critical part of the immune response, acting in defense against viral infections, clearance of immune complexes, and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Upregulated expression of the terminal complement complex, C5b-9, has been observed on various tumor cells, such as stomach carcinoma cells, and on cells in the necrotic regions of these tumors as well; however, whether and how C5b-9 is related to gastric cancer progression and severity remains unknown. In this study, human gastric adenocarcinoma (HGAC) tissues (n=47 cases) and patient-matched adjacent nontumoral parenchyma (n=20 cases) were evaluated by tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. The HGAC tissues showed upregulated C5b-9 expression. Multinomial logistic regression and likelihood ratio testing showed that overexpression of C5b-9 in HGAC tissue was significantly correlated with clinical stage (P=0.007) and tumor stage (P=0.005), but not with tumor distant organ metastasis, lymphoid nodal status, sex, or age. Patients with late-stage gastric adenocarcinoma had a higher amount of tumor cells showing positive staining for C5b-9 than patients with early-stage disease. These results may help in diagnosis and assessment of disease severity of human gastric carcinoma. PMID:26186252

  19. Downregulation of NDRG1 promotes invasion of human gastric cancer AGS cells through MMP-2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Li; Bai, Wen-Tao; Luo, Wen; Zhang, De-Xin; Yan, Yan; Xu, Zhi-Kai; Zhang, Fang-Lin

    2011-02-01

    The N-myc downstream-regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) has recently been proposed as a metastasis suppressor, but its precise role remains unclear. To investigate whether NDRG1 can indeed influence the metastasis progress, expression of endogenous NDRG1 was knocked down in human AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cells using RNA interference. Stable NDRG1 "silenced" transfectants showed similar growth rates as their control counterparts. By contrast, invasive ability in Matrigel invasion activity and Gelatinolytic activity by matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) were markedly increased in NDRG1 "silenced" cells. Moreover, re-expression of NDRG1 by recombinant adenovirus Ad-NDRG1 in NDRG1 "silenced" cells inhibited the increased invasive ability. Further study, we found the induction of MMP-2 by downregulation of NDRG1 was mediated by MT1-MMP. Altogether, our results imply that NDRG-1 could play a key role in the regulation of cellular invasion and metastasis, which may involve the upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases.

  20. P16-positive continuous minimal deviation adenocarcinoma and gastric type adenocarcinoma in a patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei-Xia; Kure, Shoko; Ishino, Kousuke; Kurose, Keisuke; Yoneyama, Koichi; Wada, Ryuichi; Naito, Zenya

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) in a 33-year-old female patient with synchronous uterine cervical minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) and gastric type adenocarcinoma (GTA). The patient was diagnosed with PJS at the age of 10. At the time of consultation, she complained of watery discharge. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis showed a poorly circumscribed mass in the uterine cervix. Histologically, both MDA and GTA components, as well as their transitional area, were observed. Both components were diffusely positive for MUC6, CK7 and, robustly, for p16. Moreover, the components were negative for ER, PgR and CEA, while HIK1083 and CK20 positive cells were found focally. Ki-67 labeling index in the MDA component was 5% while that in the GTA component was 50%. This case of GTA accompanied by MDA in a patient with PJS is distinct from the single previously-reported comparable case of which we are aware, with respect to the overexpression of p16 protein, an event considered rare in these tumors, and the continuity between the MDA and GTA components. This continuity favors the hypothesis that GTA arises from the dedifferentiation of MDA.

  1. Clinicopathological characteristics and prognostic analysis of Lauren classification in gastric adenocarcinoma in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background According to the Lauren classification, gastric adenocarcinomas are divided into diffuse and intestinal types. The causative attribution explaining the dismal prognosis of diffuse-type remains unknown. Methods We examined the archive of 1000 patients with gastric adenocarcinomas who received radical gastrectomy in our center and assessed the effect of the Lauren classification on survival in a multivariate approach. Moreover we compared the variation of clinical features between the diffuse-type and intestinal-type and explored the contributing factors for the prognostic difference. Results There were 805 resectable patients for the final analysis. Diffuse-type comprised of 48.7% in the gastric carcinoma in our group and showed poorer prognosis than intestinal-type (P=0.013). Multivariate analysis revealed that independent prognostic factors for gastric carcinoma patients were T stage (P<0.001), N stage (P<0.001) tumor size (P<0.001) and Lauren classification (P=0.003). For the clinical features, diffuse-type was significantly associated with younger age (p<0.001), female preponderance (p <0.001), distal location (P<0.001), advanced pT (p < 0.001), advanced pN (p < 0.001) and advanced TNM stage (p = 0.027). Conclusions Diffuse type adenocarcinoma carries a worse prognosis that may be partially explained by the tendency of this subtype to present at more advanced T and N stage. However, Lauren classification has prognostic significance that is independent of T and N stage as well as other prognostic variables based on the multivariate cox analysis. PMID:23497313

  2. A case of gastric adenocarcinoma with conspicuous binuclear cytologic features.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideaki; Furuya, Chiemi; Yamanouchi, Tsuyoshi; Ikemoto, Kenzo; Katoh, Tomoe; Onoda, Masahiko; Kondo, Tomoko; Oga, Atsunori

    2013-01-01

    Binuclear cells have been occasionally observed in nonneoplastic and carcinoma cells. However, in clinical cases, few reports have analyzed and discussed the origins and features, including the proliferative capacity, of binuclear cells. We describe the case of a 75-year-old man with gastric cancer with microscopically prominent binuclear cells in the resected tissue and ascitic fluid. Image cytometry and chromosomal analysis were performed on cells isolated from the ascitic fluid. The DNA histogram pattern showed aneuploidy and the fluorescence in situ hybridization pattern of centromeres 7 and 11 was similar to that of most other mononuclear cancer cells. Furthermore, the binuclear cells showed low proliferative capability based on 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation. Our results demonstrated that the binuclear cells were derived from mononuclear aneuploid cells through incomplete cell division, and, in this case, may have impaired proliferative capacity.

  3. Ectopic expression of RASSF2 and its prognostic role for gastric adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Luo, Deng; Ye, Ting; Li, Tian-Qian; Tang, Peng; Min, Sha-Dong; Zhao, Gong-Fang; Huang, Hua; Chang, Jiang; Wang, Yan; Lv, Lin; Lu, Ming-Liang; Zheng, Meng-Yao

    2012-03-01

    RASSF2 has recently been identified as a potential tumor suppressor that serves as a Ras effector in various types of human cancers. However, there have been few reports detailing this in gastric cancer. Samples of gastric adenocarcinoma from 276 Chinese patients with follow-up were analyzed for RASSF2 protein expression by immunohistochemistry. RASSF2 was expressed in up to 31.2% (86/276) of this group of gastric carcinoma. The expression of RASSF2 was significantly lower in carcinomas than in normal mucosas (P<0.05). RASSF2 corresponded positively with patient age, histological differentiation, depth of tumor invasion, regional lymph node and distant metastasis, and TNM stage (all P<0.05). Further multivariate analysis revealed that patient gender, depth of tumor invasion, distant metastasis, TNM stage and the expression of RASSF2 were independent prognostic factors for patients with gastric cancer. The Kaplan-Meier plot showed that the overall mean survival time of the patients with RASSF2-negative expression was shorter than that of patients with positive expression (χ(2)=156.874, P<0.0001). Moreover, RASSF2-negative expression had a much more significant effect on the survival of those patients with early stage tumors (χ(2)=127.167, P<0.0001), highlighted by a >50.9% reduction in 3-year survival compared to that of patients with RASSF2-positive expression. In late stages, the difference was also significant (χ(2)=6.246, P=0.019), with a 35.5% reduction in 3-year survival. It is suggested that RASSF2 plays an important role in the evolution of gastric adenocarcinoma and should be considered as a potential marker for its prognosis.

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam; Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92-1.01). The median V{sub 30} (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V{sub 20} (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V{sub 40} (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate

  5. Loss of heterozygosity at chromosomes 1p35-pter, 4q, and 18q and protein expression differences between adenocarcinomas of the distal stomach and gastric cardia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Man, Xiaohui; Lv, Zhi; Li, Deming; Sun, Zhe; Chen, Hong; Wang, Zhenning; Luo, Yang; Xu, Huimian

    2012-12-01

    Loss of heterozygosity of 1p35-pter, 4q, and 18q is frequent in gastric carcinoma, suggesting that these regions harbor tumor suppressor genes. However, the differences in these genetic alterations between adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia and adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach remain unclear. In this study, loss of heterozygosity at chromosomes 1p35-pter, 4q, and 18q were analyzed in adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia and adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach samples acquired by laser capture microdissection. The expression of several tumor suppressor gene proteins, runt-related transcription factor 3 (1p36), annexin A10 (4q33), SMAD family member 4 (18q21.1), and deleted in colorectal carcinoma (18q21.3), was evaluated immunohistochemically. The adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach and adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia lesions had a similar trend in total deletion frequency for chromosomes 1p35-pter (36.5% for adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach and 32.5% for adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia), 4q (42.3% for adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach and 47.5% for adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia), and 18q (38.5% for adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach and 45% for adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia). However, loss of heterozygosity patterns were clearly different in the 2 adenocarcinomas. Deletion mapping indicated that 4q32.2-4q34.3, 18q21.2-21.31, 18q22.3-23, and 1p35.2-1p36.13 were involved in adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach, whereas 4q13.3-4q22.3, 4q31.21-4q32.2, 18q21.31-18q22.1, and 1p35.2-1p36.13 were involved in adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia. Expression of ANXA10 (P = .038), SMAD family member 4 (P = .028), and deleted in colorectal carcinoma (P = .004) was less common in adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach than in adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia. Expression of runt-related transcription factor 3 (P = .795) showed no significant difference in the 2 tumors. The tumors differed in the profile of genetic alterations and

  6. Gastric adenocarcinoma in common variable immunodeficiency: features of cancer and associated gastritis may be characteristic of the condition.

    PubMed

    De Petris, Giovanni; Dhungel, Bal M; Chen, Longwen; Chang, Yu-Hui H

    2014-10-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. The aim of the study was to determine the morphological features of CVID-associated gastric adenocarcinoma (CAGA) and of the background gastritis. The population of gastric cancer patients with CVID of Mayo Clinic in the period 2000-2010 was studied; 6 cases of CVID (2 males, 4 females, average age 47 years, age range 26-71 years) were found in 5793 patients with gastric cancer in the study period. Each patient underwent gastric resection for which histology slides were reviewed. Chronic gastritis variables, CVID-related findings, and features of the adenocarcinoma were recorded. CAGA was of intestinal type, with high number of intratumoral lymphocytes (ITLs). Cancer was diagnosed in younger patients than in the overall population of gastric cancer. Severe atrophic metaplastic pangastritis with extensive dysplasia was present in the background in 4 cases, with features of lymphocytic gastritis in 2 cases. Features of CVID (plasma cells paucity in 4 of 6 cases, lymphoid nodules prominent in four cases) could be detected. In summary, gastric adenocarcinoma at young age with ITLs, accompanied by atrophic metaplastic pangastritis, should alert the pathologist of the possibility of CAGA. It follows that, in presence of those characteristics, the search of CVID-associated abnormalities should be undertaken in the nonneoplastic tissues.

  7. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma: successful management with plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Carr, D J; Kramer, B S; Dragonetti, D E

    1986-04-01

    A patient with metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma had progressive microangiopathic red blood cell changes, thrombocytopenia with increased marrow megakaryocytes, bleeding, altered mentation, and seizure. Coagulation parameters were inconsistent with disseminated intravascular coagulation; a clinical diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was made. Plasmapheresis resulted in improvement on two separate occasions. The diagnosis of tumor-associated TTP should be considered in cancer patients. Plasmapheresis may be more effective than plasma transfusion alone in this syndrome, perhaps via removal of tumor-induced immune complexes from the circulation. Aggressive management of this complication seems justified in cancer patients for whom effective chemotherapy exists.

  8. Cardiac tamponade as the first clinical sign of gastric adenocarcinoma: a rare condition.

    PubMed

    Arısoy, Arif; Memiç, Kadriye; Karavelioğlu, Yusuf; Sen, Fatma

    2014-06-01

    Cardiac tamponade originating from a primary gastric cancer (GC) is a rare condition. Patients are generally asymptomatic until the disease is advanced. We report a rare patient with cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of primary GC. A 46-year-old male was admitted with progressive dyspnea. Cardiac tamponade was diagnosed on two-dimensional ultrasonographic echocardiography. Pericardiocentesis yielded 1500 ml of bloody fluid. Pericardial cytologic examination was positive for malignant cells. The patient underwent abdominal computed tomography scan, which showed thickening of the gastric wall and several mesenteric lymph nodes. Endoscopic examination of the stomach disclosed malignant ulcer along the lesser curvature, and the biopsy showed diffuse type adenocarcinoma. Chemotherapy was initiated by the Oncology Department, and he had no pericardial effusion after six courses of systemic chemotherapy. In conclusion, this is a rare condition and difficult to diagnosis early. Thus, physicians should be aware of malignancy of the stomach when patients present with unexplained cardiac manifestations.

  9. Gastric type endocervical adenocarcinoma: an aggressive tumor with unusual metastatic patterns and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Karamurzin, Yevgeniy S.; Kiyokawa, Takako; Parkash, Vinita; Jotwani, Anjali R.; Patel, Prusha; Pike, Malcolm C.; Soslow, Robert A.; Park, Kay J.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric type adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix (GAS) is a rare variant of mucinous endocervical adenocarcinoma not etiologically associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, with minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) at the well-differentiated end of the morphologic spectrum. These tumors are reported to have worse prognosis than usual HPV-associated endocervical adenocarcinoma (UEA). A retrospective review of GAS was performed from the pathology databases of three institutions spanning 20 years. Stage, metastatic patterns, and overall survival were documented. Forty GAS cases were identified, with clinical follow-up data available for 38. The tumors were subclassified as MDA (n=13) and non-MDA GAS (n=27). Two patients were syndromic (one Li-Fraumeni, one Peutz-Jeghers). At presentation, 59% were advanced stage (FIGO II–IV), 50% had lymph node metastases, 35% had ovarian involvement, 20% had abdominal disease, 39% had at least one site of metastasis at the time of initial surgery, and 12% of patients experienced distant recurrence. The metastatic sites included lymph nodes, adnexa, omentum, bowel, peritoneum, diaphragm, abdominal wall, bladder, vagina, appendix, and brain. Follow-up ranged from 1.4 to 136.0 months (mean, 33.9 months); 20/38 (52.6%) had no evidence of disease, 3/38 (7.9%) were alive with disease, and 15/38 (39.5%) died of disease. Disease specific survival at 5 years was 42% for GAS vs. 91% for UEA. There were no survival differences between MDA and non-MDA GAS. GAS represents a distinct, biologically aggressive type of endocervical adenocarcinoma. The majority of patients present at advanced stage and pelvic, abdominal, and distant metastases are not uncommon. PMID:26457350

  10. A case of Helicobacter pylori-negative intramucosal well-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma with intestinal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Yoshihiko; Suto, Hiroyuki; Nosaka, Takuto; Saito, Yasushi; Naito, Tatsushi; Takahashi, Kazuto; Ofuji, Kazuya; Matsuda, Hidetaka; Ohtani, Masahiro; Hiramatsu, Katsushi; Nemoto, Tomoyuki; Imamura, Yoshiaki; Nakamoto, Yasunari

    2015-02-01

    A woman in her 30s visited our hospital with stool abnormality. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a depressed lesion on the greater curvature of the gastric antrum. The tumor was diagnosed as a well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma based on the analysis of the biopsy specimen. The rapid urease test, histological examination, and serum anti-Helicobacter pylori antibody indicated that the patient was Helicobacter pylori negative. Gastric mucosal atrophy was not evident on esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Complete cure en bloc resection was successfully performed. The tumor was confined to the mucosa (pT1a-M). Immunohistochemistry showed positive CD10, MUC2, and CDX2 expression and negative MUC5AC and MUC6 expression. Thus, the phenotype was diagnosed as the intestinal phenotype. Helicobacter pylori-negative, well-differentiated early gastric cancer with intestinal phenotype has not been previously reported. Here, we report a rare and valuable case of Helicobacter pylori-negative early gastric cancer with intestinal phenotype treated by endoscopic submucosal dissection.

  11. Identification of specific biomarkers for gastric adenocarcinoma by ITRAQ proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Zhi, Qiaoming; Liu, Songbai; Xue, Sheng-Li; Shen, Congcong; Li, Yangxin; Wu, Chaofan; Tang, Zaixiang; Chen, Weichang; Song, Jenny Lee; Bao, Meiyu; Song, Yao-Hua; Zhou, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers for gastric cancer (GC) by iTRAQ. Using proteins extracted from a panel of 4 pairs of gastric adenocarcinoma samples (stage III-IV, Her-2 negative), we identified 10 up regulated and 9 down regulated proteins in all four pairs of GC samples compared to adjacent normal gastric tissue. The up regulated proteins are mainly involved in cell motility, while the down regulated proteins are mitochondrial enzymes involved in energy metabolism. The expression of three up regulated proteins (ANXA1, NNMT, fibulin-5) and one of the down regulated proteins (UQCRC1) was validated by Western Blot in 97 GC samples. ANXA1 was up regulated in 61.36% of stage I/II GC samples compared to matched adjacent normal gastric tissue, and its expression increased further in stage III/IV samples. Knockdown of ANXA1 by siRNA significantly inhibited GC cell migration and invasion, whereas over expression of ANXA1 promoted migration and invasion. We found decreased expression of UQCRC1 in all stages of GC samples. Our data suggest that increased cell motility and decreased mitochondrial energy metabolism are important hallmarks during the development of GC. PMID:27941907

  12. Cooperativity of E-cadherin and Smad4 Loss to Promote Diffuse-type Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Won; Jang, Seok Hoon; Park, Dong Min; Lim, Na Jung; Deng, Chuxia; Kim, Dae Yong; Green, Jeffrey E.; Kim, Hark Kyun

    2014-01-01

    Loss of E-cadherin (CDH1), Smad4 and p53 have all been shown to play an integral role in gastric, intestinal and breast cancer formation. Compound conditional knockout mice for Smad4, p53, and E-cadherin were generated to define and compare the roles of these genes in gastric, intestinal and breast cancer development by crossing with Pdx-1-Cre, Villin-Cre and MMTV-Cre transgenic mice. Interestingly, gastric adenocarcinoma was significantly more frequent in Pdx-1-Cre;Smad4F/F;Trp53F/F;Cdh1F/+ mice than in Pdx-1-Cre;Smad4F/F;Trp53F/F;Cdh1+/+ mice, demonstrating that Cdh1 heterozygosity accelerates the development and progression of gastric adenocarcinoma, in combination with loss of Smad4 and p53. Pdx-1-Cre;Smad4F/F;Trp53F/F;Cdh1F/+ mice developed gastric adenocarcinomas without E-cadherin expression. However, intestinal and mammary adenocarcinomas with the same genetic background retained E-cadherin expression and were phenotypically similar to mice with both wild-type Cdh1 alleles. Lung metastases were identified in Pdx-1-Cre;Smad4F/F;Trp53F/F;Cdh1F/+ mice, but not in the other genotypes. Nuclear β-catenin accumulation was identified at the invasive tumor front of gastric adenocarcinomas arising in Pdx-1-Cre;Smad4F/F;Trp53F/F;Cdh1F/+ mice. This phenotype was less prominent in mice with intact E-cadherin or Smad4, indicating that the inhibition of β-catenin signaling by E-cadherin or Smad4 down-regulates signaling pathways involved in metastases in Pdx-1-Cre;Smad4F/F;Trp53F/F;Cdh1F/+ mice. Knockdown of β-catenin significantly inhibited migratory activity of Pdx-1-Cre;Smad4F/F;Trp53F/F;Cdh1F/+ cell lines. Thus, loss of E-cadherin and Smad4 cooperate with p53 loss to promote the development and metastatic progression of gastric adenocarcinomas, with similarities to human gastric adenocarcinoma. Implications This study demonstrates that inhibition of β-catenin is a converging node for the anti-metastatic signaling pathways driven by E-cadherin and Smad4 in Pdx-1

  13. The Effects of Aqueous Extract of Alpinia Galangal on Gastric Cancer Cells (AGS) and L929 Cells in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hadjzadeh, Mosa-Al-Reza; Ghanbari, Habib; Keshavarzi, Zakieh; Tavakol-Afshari, Jalil

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the incidence of gastric cancer is declining during the last half century, this cancer still is the second morbid cancer in the world after lung cancer. The incidence of gastric cancer is 26 per 100,000 in Iran. This study evaluated the effect of Alpinia galangal on AGS cells (human gastric adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line) and L929 cells (as a standard cell line originated from mouse fibroblast cells). Methods After culturing the cells in Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) medium, the cells were incubated with different doses of Alpinia galangal (0 (control), 125, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 µg/ml) in 24, 48 and 72 hour periods and then, cells viability were assessed using MTT based cell proliferation assay. Results After 24 hours, the percentage of living AGS cells compared to the control group showed no significant decrease at the concentrations of 125 and 250µg/ml. But in the rest concentrations were significant (p<0.05). Only, the percentage of surviving L929 cells at concentration of 125µg/ml of the extract was not significant, but these percentages in the other concentrations were significant. After 48 and 72h incubation, in the last three extract concentrations, the percentage of living AGS and L929 cells significantly decreased compared to control cells (p<0.05). Conclusion We have demonstrated, using cell culture model, anti-proliferative effect of aqueous extract of Alpinia galangal on human gastric tumor (AGS) and L929 cell lines. This effect was prominent in high concentrations. PMID:25250165

  14. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes carcinogenesis and invasion of gastric adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Jung Hwa; Park, Chan Hyuk; Yu, Dayeon; Lee, Yong Chan; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon; Lee, Sang Kil

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • HOTAIR expression was tested in fifty patients with gastric cancer. • Cell proliferation was measured after HOTAIR silencing in gastric cancer cell line. • siRNA–HOTAIR suppresses cell invasiveness and capacity of migration. • Knock down of HOTAR leads to decreased expression of EMT markers. • Inhibition of HOTAIR induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. - Abstract: Gastric cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide; however, the mechanism of carcinogenesis is complex and poorly understood. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR (HOX transcript antisense RNA) recently emerged as a promoter of metastasis in various cancers including gastric cancer. Here we investigated the impact of HOTAIR on apoptosis, cell proliferation and cell cycle to dissect the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. We examined the mechanism of invasion and metastasis and analyzed the clinical significance of HOTAIR. Downregulation of HOTAIR was confirmed by two different siRNAs. The expression of HOTAIR was significantly elevated in various gastric cancer cell lines and tissues compared to normal control. si-HOTAIR significantly reduced viability in MKN 28, MKN 74, and KATO III cells but not in AGS cells. si-HOTAIR induced apoptosis in KATO III cells. Lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis were more common in the high level of HOTAIR group. si-HOTAIR significantly decreased invasiveness and migration. si-HOTAIR led to differential expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition markers. We found that HOTAIR was involved in inhibition of apoptosis and promoted invasiveness, supporting a role for HOTAIR in carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer.

  15. Sinomenine inhibits proliferation of SGC-7901 gastric adenocarcinoma cells via suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    LV, YIFEI; LI, CHANGSHUN; LI, SHUANG; HAO, ZHIMING

    2011-01-01

    Sinomenine (SIN) is a bioactive alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum. Results of studies have shown that the anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive and anti-arthritic effects of SIN are partially attributed to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. COX-2 overexpression is associated with enhanced proliferation and angiogenesis of gastric cancer (GC). SGC-7901 cells were treated with different concentrations of SIN in order to observe its effect on the proliferation of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells and to explore the potential underlying molecular mechanism via the detection of COX-2 expression. Celecoxib was used as the positive control. Morphological alterations of the cells were observed microscopically. Cell proliferation was evaluated using MTT assay. COX-2 expression was detected using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that SIN inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In the presence of SIN or celecoxib, SGC-7901 cells became round and detached morphologically, indicating cell apoptosis. The expression of COX-2 was inhibited by SIN in a dose-dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein levels. Our findings indicate that the protective effects of SIN are mediated through the inhibition of COX-2 expression. These findings suggest a novel therapy to treat inflammation-mediated gastric adenocarcinomata. PMID:22848259

  16. Protective autophagy is involved in resistance towards MET inhibitors in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Magali; Medová, Michaela; Aebersold, Daniel M; Blaukat, Andree; Bladt, Friedhelm; Fey, Martin F; Zimmer, Yitzhak; Tschan, Mario P

    2013-02-08

    MET, also known as hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR), is a receptor tyrosine kinase with an important role, both in normal cellular function as well as in oncogenesis. In many cancer types, abnormal activation of MET is related to poor prognosis and various strategies to inhibit its function, including small molecule inhibitors, are currently in preclinical and clinical evaluation. Autophagy, a self-digesting recycling mechanism with cytoprotective functions, is induced by cellular stress. This process is also induced upon cytotoxic drug treatment of cancer cells and partially allows these cells to escape cell death. Thus, since autophagy protects different tumor cells from chemotherapy-induced cell death, current clinical trials aim at combining autophagy inhibitors with different cancer treatments. We found that in a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line GTL-16, where MET activity is deregulated due to receptor overexpression, two different MET inhibitors PHA665752 and EMD1214063 lead to cell death paralleled by the induction of autophagy. A combined treatment of MET inhibitors together with the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA or genetically impairing autophagy by knocking down the key autophagy gene ATG7 further decreased cell viability of gastric cancer cells. In general, we observed the induction of cytoprotective autophagy in MET expressing cells upon MET inhibition and a combination of MET and autophagy inhibition resulted in significantly decreased cell viability in gastric cancer cells.

  17. MicroRNA-181b targets cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 in gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Qian; Kong, Wei-Qing; Liu, Tao; Liu, Min; Li, Xin; Tang, Hua

    2012-07-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small endogenous non-coding RNAs that function as post-transcriptional regulators. In our previous study, we found that miR-181b was significantly downregulated in human gastric adenocarcinoma tissue samples compared to the adjacent normal gastric tissues. In this study, we confirm the down-regulation of miR-181b in human gastric cancer cell lines versus the gastric epithelial cells. Overexpression of miR-181b suppressed the proliferation and colony formation rate of gastric cancer cells. miR-181b downregulated the expression of cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) by binding its 3' untranslated region. Overexpression of CREB1 counteracted the suppression of growth in gastric cancer cells caused by ectopic expression of miR-181b. These results indicate that miR-181b may function as a tumor suppressor in gastric adenocarcinoma cells through negative regulation of CREB1.

  18. Association between the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8 and the prognosis of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, LING; YANG, XIGUI; YANG, XIANGSHAN; FAN, KAIXI; XIAO, PING; ZHANG, JING; WANG, XIUWEN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8) in gastric adenocarcinoma. TNFAIP8 expression levels in gastric adenocarcinoma tissue samples (with and without lymph node metastasis), adjacent normal tissue samples and metastatic lymph node tissue samples were detected by immunohistochemistry. The correlation between TNFAIP8 expression levels and clinicopathological data and gastric adenocarcinoma prognosis was analyzed. The results demonstrated that TNFAIP8 expression in gastric adenocarcinoma tissue samples and metastatic lymph node tissue samples markedly increased at a rate of 47.2% (50/106) and 81.7% (49/60), respectively, as compared with the adjacent normal tissue samples in which no TNGFAIP8 expression was detected (0%). This increase in TNFAIP8 expression was statistically significant. TNFAIP8 expression rates in the primary tumors (60%, 36/60) of patients with lymph node metastasis were significantly higher compared with the primary tumors of patients without lymph node metastasis (30.4%, 14/46). TNFAIP8 expression was associated with an increase in the severity of TNM stage, tumor grade, vascular invasion, lymph node metastasis and serum CA72-4 levels. The overall survival rate of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma and high TNFAIP8 expression was poorer compared with patients with low TNFAIP8 expression, and TNFAIP8 expression was negatively correlated with patient prognosis. The results also demonstrated that TNFAIP8 was an independent prognostic marker in gastric adenocarcinoma (relative risk, 1.736; P=0.029). In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that TNFAIP8 expression was associated with the occurrence, development and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma, and negatively correlated with the prognosis of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. TNFAIP8 may therefore serve as a prognostic factor for gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27347043

  19. Pembrolizumab, Combination Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy Before Surgery in Treating Adult Patients With Locally Advanced Gastroesophageal Junction or Gastric Cardia Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-30

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Gastric Cardia Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer

  20. Immune checkpoints programmed death 1 ligand 1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated molecule 4 in gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schlößer, Hans A.; Drebber, Uta; Kloth, Michael; Thelen, Martin; Rothschild, Sacha I.; Haase, Simon; Garcia-Marquez, Maria; Wennhold, Kerstin; Berlth, Felix; Urbanski, Alexander; Alakus, Hakan; Schauss, Astrid; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Theurich, Sebastian; Warnecke-Ebertz, Ute; Stippel, Dirk L.; Zippelius, Alfred; Büttner, Reinhard; Hallek, Michael; Hölscher, Arnulf H.; Zander, Thomas; Mönig, Stefan P.; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibition has been reported for several types of solid tumors and early studies in gastric adenocarcinoma are promising. A detailed knowledge about the natural biology of immune checkpoints in gastric adenocarcinoma is essential for clinical and translational evaluation of these drugs. This study is a comprehensive analysis of cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated molecule 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in gastric adenocarcinoma. PD-L1 and CTLA-4 were stained on tumor sections of 127 Caucasian patients with gastric adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and somatic mutation profiling was performed using targeted next-generation sequencing. Expression of PD-L1 and CTLA-4 on lymphocytes in tumor sections, tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN) and peripheral blood were studied by flow-cytometry and immune-fluorescence microscopy in an additional cohort. PD-L1 and CTLA-4 were expressed in 44.9% (57/127) and 86.6% (110/127) of the analyzed gastric adenocarcinoma samples, respectively. Positive tumor cell staining for PD-L1 or CTLA-4 was associated with inferior overall survival. Somatic mutational analysis did not reveal a correlation to expression of PD-L1 or CTLA-4 on tumor cells. Expression of PD-1 (52.2%), PD-L1 (42.2%) and CTLA-4 (1.6%) on tumor infiltrating T cells was significantly elevated compared to peripheral blood. Of note, PD-1 and PD-L1 were expressed far higher by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes than CTLA-4. In conclusion, specific immune checkpoint-inhibitors should be evaluated in this disease and the combination with molecular targeted therapies might be of benefit. An extensive immune monitoring should accompany these studies to better understand their mode of action in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27467911

  1. Tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography: association with N categories

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hang; Chen, Xiao-li; Li, Jun-ru; Li, Zhen-lin; Chen, Tian-wu; Pu, Hong; Yin, Long-lin; Xu, Guo-hui; Li, Zhen-wen; Reng, Jing; Zhou, Peng; Cheng, Zhu-zhong; Cao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the gross tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography could predict the presence of regional lymph node metastasis and could determine N categories. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 202 consecutive patients with gastric adenocarcinoma who had undergone gastrectomy 1 week after contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography were retrospectively identified. The gross tumor volume was evaluated on multidetector computed tomography images. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine whether the gross tumor volume could predict regional lymph node metastasis, and the Mann-Whitney U test was performed to compare the gross tumor volume among N categories. Additionally, a receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to identify the accuracy of the gross tumor volume in differentiating N categories. RESULTS: The gross tumor volume could predict regional lymph node metastasis (p<0.0001) in the univariate analysis, and the multivariate analyses indicated that the gross tumor volume was an independent risk factor for regional lymph node metastasis (p=0.005, odds ratio=1.364). The Mann-Whitney U test showed that the gross tumor volume could distinguish N0 from the N1-N3 categories, N0-N1 from N2-N3, and N0-N2 from N3 (all p<0.0001). In the T1-T4a categories, the gross tumor volume could differentiate N0 from the N1-N3 categories (cutoff, 12.3 cm3), N0-N1 from N2-N3 (cutoff, 16.6 cm3), and N0-N2 from N3 (cutoff, 24.6 cm3). In the T4a category, the gross tumor volume could differentiate N0 from the N1-N3 categories (cutoff, 15.8 cm3), N0-N1 from N2-N3 (cutoff, 17.8 cm3), and N0-N2 from N3 (cutoff, 24 cm3). CONCLUSION: The gross tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography could predict regional lymph node metastasis and N categories. PMID:27166769

  2. Adjuvant chemotherapy, p53, carcinoembryonic antigen expression and prognosis after D2 gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Feng; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Luo, Hui-Yan; Ren, Chao; Jin, Ying; Chen, Dong-Liang; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate adjuvant chemotherapy, p53 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expression and prognosis after D2 gastrectomy for stage II/III gastric adenocarcinoma. METHODS: A total of 286 patients with stage II or III gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent D2 radical gastrectomy between May 2007 and December 2010 were enrolled into this study. One hundred and sixty-nine of these patients received surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy, and 117 patients received surgery alone. Tumor expression of p53 and CEA proteins in all patients was evaluated immunohistochemically and correlated with clinicopathological parameters. The Kaplan-Meier curves for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) with log-rank testing were used to compare the survival difference. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was used for multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Patients with adjuvant chemotherapy had a significantly better median OS (50.87 mo vs 30.73 mo, P = 0.000) and median DFS (36.30 mo vs 25.60 mo, P = 0.001) than patients with surgery alone in the entire cohort. Consistent results with the entire cohort were found in stage II (P = 0.006 and P = 0.047), stage III (P = 0.005 and P = 0.030), and stage IIIB/IIIC patients (P = 0.000 and P = 0.001). The median OS and DFS advantages were confirmed by multivariate analysis (P = 0.000 and P = 0.008) and maintained when the analyses were restricted to fluoropyrimidine monotherapy (P = 0.003 and P = 0.001) and fluoropyrimidine plus platinum regimen (P = 0.001 and P = 0.007), however, not the fluoropyrimidine plus taxane (P = 0.198 and P = 0.777) or platinum plus taxane (P = 0.666 and P = 0.687) regimens. Median OS and median DFS did not differ significantly between the patients with p53(+) and p53(-) tumors (P = 0.608 and P = 0.064), or between patients with CEA(+) and CEA(-) tumors (P = 0.052 and P = 0.989), which were maintained when the analyses were restricted to surgery alone (p53: P = 0.864 and P = 0.431; CEA: P = 0.142 and

  3. Network pharmacology dissection of multiscale mechanisms of herbal medicines in stage IV gastric adenocarcinoma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Hao, Jian; Niu, Yang-Yang; Tian, Miao; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Cui-Hong; Ding, Xiu-Li; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Liu, Chang; Qin, Xue-Mei; Wu, Xiong-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increasing evidence has shown that Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM) has efficient therapeutic effects for advanced gastric adenocarcinoma, while the therapeutic mechanisms underlying this treatment remain unclear. In this study, the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the survival benefit of CHM treatment, and correlation analysis was applied to identify the most effective components in the formulas. A network pharmacological approach was developed to decipher the potential therapeutic mechanisms of CHM. CHM treatment was an independent protective factor. The hazard ratio was 0.364 (95% CI 0.245–0.540; P < 0.001). The median survival time was 18 months for patients who received CHM treatment, while for patients without CHM treatment was decreased to 9 months (P < 0.001). Thirteen out of the total 204 herbs were significantly correlated with favorable survival outcomes (P < 0.05), likely representing the most effective components in these formulas. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that the simultaneous manipulation of multiple targets in proliferation pathways (such as epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and insulin like growth factor 2) and the process of cancer metastasis (collagen families, fibronectin 1 and matrix metalloproteinases families) might largely account for the mechanisms of the 13 herbs against gastric adenocarcinoma. A network pharmacology method was introduced to decipher the underlying mechanisms of CHM, which provides a good foundation for herbal research based on clinical data. PMID:27583849

  4. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Shen; Lu Jiade; Zhang Qing Yang Zhe; Peng Lihua; Xiong, Fei

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and external beam RT (EBRT) in the treatment of locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 97 consecutive and nonselected patients with newly diagnosed Stage T3, T4, or N+ adenocarcinoma of the stomach underwent gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection between March 2003 and October 2005. Of the 97 patients, 51 received adjuvant concurrent chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, docetaxel, and cisplatin) and EBRT (EBRT group) and 46 received IORT (dose range, 12-15 Gy) immediately after gastrectomy and lymph node dissection before concurrent chemoradiotherapy (EBRT+IORT group). Results: After a median follow-up of 24 months, the 3-year locoregional control rate was 77% and 63% in the two groups with or without IORT, respectively (p = 0.05). The 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 47% and 36% in the EBRT group and 56% and 44% in the EBRT+IORT group, respectively (p > 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that the use of IORT, presence of residual disease after surgery, and pN category were independent prognostic factors for locoregional control and that IORT, pN, and pT categories were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (p < 0.05). Four patients experienced Grade 3 or 4 late complications, but no significant difference was observed between the two groups. Conclusions: Radical gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection and IORT followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy appeared to be feasible and well-tolerated in the treatment of locally advanced gastric cancer. The addition of IORT to the trimodality treatment significantly improved the 3-year locoregional control rate.

  5. Phase II Study of Oxaliplatin, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Advanced Gastric/Gastroesophageal Junction Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  6. Epigenomic Promoter Alterations Amplify Gene Isoform and Immunogenic Diversity in Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qamra, Aditi; Xing, Manjie; Padmanabhan, Nisha; Kwok, Jeffrey Jun Ting; Zhang, Shenli; Chang, Xu; Leong, Yan Shan; Lee Lim, Ai Ping; Tang, Qianqao; Ooi, WenFong; Suling Lin, Joyce; Nandi, Tannistha; Yao, Xiaosai; Ong, Xuewen; Lee, Minghui; Tay, Su Ting; Keng, Angie Tan Lay; Gondo Santoso, Erna; Ng, Cedric Chuan Young; Ng, Alvin; Jusakul, Apinya; Smoot, Duane; Ashktorab, Hassan; Rha, Sun Young; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Peng Yong, Wei; Chow, Pierce K H; Chan, Weng Hoong; Ong, Hock Soo; Soo, Khee Chee; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Wong, Wai Keong; Rozen, Steven G; Teh, Bin Tean; Kappei, Dennis; Lee, Jeeyun; Connolly, John; Tan, Patrick

    2017-03-20

    Promoter elements play important roles in isoform and cell-type specific expression. We surveyed the epigenomic promoter landscape of gastric adenocarcinoma (GC), analyzing 110 chromatin profiles (H3K4me3, H3K4me1, H3K27ac) of primary GCs, GC lines, and non-malignant gastric tissues. We identified ~2000 promoter alterations (somatic promoters), many deregulated in various epithelial malignancies and mapping frequently to alternative promoters within the same gene, generating potential pro-oncogenic isoforms (RASA3). Somatic promoter-associated N-terminal peptides displaying relative depletion in tumors exhibited high-affinity MHC binding predictions and elicited potent T-cell responses in vitro, suggesting a mechanism for reducing tumor antigenicity. In multiple patient cohorts, GCs with high somatic promoter usage also displayed reduced T-cell cytolytic marker expression. Somatic promoters are enriched in PRC2 occupancy, display sensitivity to EZH2 therapeutic inhibition, and are associated with novel cancer-associated transcripts. By generating tumor-specific isoforms and decreasing tumor antigenicity, epigenomic promoter alterations may thus drive intrinsic tumorigenesis and also allow nascent cancers to evade host immunity.

  7. Enhancement of Radiation Effects by Ursolic Acid in BGC-823 Human Adenocarcinoma Gastric Cancer Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Jiang, Man; Hu, Jing; Lv, Xin; Yu, Lixia; Qian, Xiaoping; Liu, Baorui

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that certain plant-derived polyphenols, i.e., ursolic acid (UA), which are reported to have antitumor activities, might be used to sensitize tumor cells to radiation therapy by inhibiting pathways leading to radiation therapy resistance. This experiment was designed to investigate the effects and possible mechanism of radiosensitization by UA in BGC-823 cell line from human adenocarcinoma gastric cancer in vitro. UA caused cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner, and we used a sub-cytotoxicity concentration of UA to test radioenhancement efficacy with UA in gastric cancer. Radiosensitivity was determined by clonogenic survival assay. Surviving fraction of the combined group with irradiation and sub-cytotoxicity UA significantly decreased compared with the irradiation group. The improved radiosensitization efficacy was associated with enhanced G2/M arrest, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), down-regulated Ki-67 level and improved apoptosis. In conclusion, as UA demonstrated potent antiproliferation effect and synergistic effect, it could be used as a potential drug sensitizer for the application of radiotherapy.

  8. Epigenomic profiling of primary gastric adenocarcinoma reveals super-enhancer heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Wen Fong; Xing, Manjie; Xu, Chang; Yao, Xiaosai; Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Lim, Mei Chee; Cao, Fan; Lim, Kevin; Babu, Deepak; Poon, Lai-Fong; Lin Suling, Joyce; Qamra, Aditi; Irwanto, Astrid; Qu Zhengzhong, James; Nandi, Tannistha; Lee-Lim, Ai Ping; Chan, Yang Sun; Tay, Su Ting; Lee, Ming Hui; Davies, James O J; Wong, Wai Keong; Soo, Khee Chee; Chan, Weng Hoong; Ong, Hock Soo; Chow, Pierce; Wong, Chow Yin; Rha, Sun Young; Liu, Jianjun; Hillmer, Axel M; Hughes, Jim R; Rozen, Steve; Teh, Bin Tean; Fullwood, Melissa Jane; Li, Shang; Tan, Patrick

    2016-09-28

    Regulatory enhancer elements in solid tumours remain poorly characterized. Here we apply micro-scale chromatin profiling to survey the distal enhancer landscape of primary gastric adenocarcinoma (GC), a leading cause of global cancer mortality. Integrating 110 epigenomic profiles from primary GCs, normal gastric tissues and cell lines, we highlight 36,973 predicted enhancers and 3,759 predicted super-enhancers respectively. Cell-line-defined super-enhancers can be subclassified by their somatic alteration status into somatic gain, loss and unaltered categories, each displaying distinct epigenetic, transcriptional and pathway enrichments. Somatic gain super-enhancers are associated with complex chromatin interaction profiles, expression patterns correlated with patient outcome and dense co-occupancy of the transcription factors CDX2 and HNF4α. Somatic super-enhancers are also enriched in genetic risk SNPs associated with cancer predisposition. Our results reveal a genome-wide reprogramming of the GC enhancer and super-enhancer landscape during tumorigenesis, contributing to dysregulated local and regional cancer gene expression.

  9. Epigenomic profiling of primary gastric adenocarcinoma reveals super-enhancer heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Wen Fong; Xing, Manjie; Xu, Chang; Yao, Xiaosai; Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Lim, Mei Chee; Cao, Fan; Lim, Kevin; Babu, Deepak; Poon, Lai-Fong; Lin Suling, Joyce; Qamra, Aditi; Irwanto, Astrid; Qu Zhengzhong, James; Nandi, Tannistha; Lee-Lim, Ai Ping; Chan, Yang Sun; Tay, Su Ting; Lee, Ming Hui; Davies, James O. J.; Wong, Wai Keong; Soo, Khee Chee; Chan, Weng Hoong; Ong, Hock Soo; Chow, Pierce; Wong, Chow Yin; Rha, Sun Young; Liu, Jianjun; Hillmer, Axel M.; Hughes, Jim R.; Rozen, Steve; Teh, Bin Tean; Fullwood, Melissa Jane; Li, Shang; Tan, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory enhancer elements in solid tumours remain poorly characterized. Here we apply micro-scale chromatin profiling to survey the distal enhancer landscape of primary gastric adenocarcinoma (GC), a leading cause of global cancer mortality. Integrating 110 epigenomic profiles from primary GCs, normal gastric tissues and cell lines, we highlight 36,973 predicted enhancers and 3,759 predicted super-enhancers respectively. Cell-line-defined super-enhancers can be subclassified by their somatic alteration status into somatic gain, loss and unaltered categories, each displaying distinct epigenetic, transcriptional and pathway enrichments. Somatic gain super-enhancers are associated with complex chromatin interaction profiles, expression patterns correlated with patient outcome and dense co-occupancy of the transcription factors CDX2 and HNF4α. Somatic super-enhancers are also enriched in genetic risk SNPs associated with cancer predisposition. Our results reveal a genome-wide reprogramming of the GC enhancer and super-enhancer landscape during tumorigenesis, contributing to dysregulated local and regional cancer gene expression. PMID:27677335

  10. Loss of gastric gland mucin-specific O-glycan is associated with progression of differentiated-type adenocarcinoma of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Shiratsu, Kazuo; Higuchi, Kayoko; Nakayama, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Gastric gland mucin secreted from the lower portion of the gastric mucosa contains unique O-linked oligosaccharides having terminal α1,4-linked N-acetylglucosamine (αGlcNAc) residues largely attached to a MUC6 scaffold. Previously, we generated A4gnt-deficient mice, which totally lack αGlcNAc, and showed that αGlcNAc functions as a tumor suppressor for gastric cancer. Here, to determine the clinicopathological significance of αGlcNAc in gastric carcinomas, we examined immunohistochemical expression of αGlcNAc and mucin phenotypic markers including MUC5AC, MUC6, MUC2, and CD10 in 214 gastric adenocarcinomas and compared those expression patterns with clinicopathological parameters and cancer-specific survival. The αGlcNAc loss was evaluated in MUC6-positive gastric carcinoma. Thirty-three (61.1%) of 54 differentiated-type gastric adenocarcinomas exhibiting MUC6 in cancer cells lacked αGlcNAc expression. Loss of αGlcNAc was significantly correlated with depth of invasion, stage, and venous invasion by differentiated-type adenocarcinoma. Loss of αGlcNAc was also significantly associated with poorer patient prognosis in MUC6-positive differentiated-type adenocarcinoma. By contrast, no significant correlation between αGlcNAc loss and any clinicopathologic variable was observed in undifferentiated-type adenocarcinoma. Expression of MUC6 was also significantly correlated with several clinicopathological variables in differentiated-type adenocarcinoma. However, unlike the case with αGlcNAc, its expression showed no correlation with cancer-specific survival in patients. In undifferentiated-type adenocarcinoma, we observed no significant correlation between mucin phenotypic marker expression, including MUC6, and any clinicopathologic variable. These results together indicate that loss of αGlcNAc in MUC6-positive cancer cells is associated with progression and poor prognosis in differentiated, but not undifferentiated, types of gastric adenocarcinoma.

  11. The extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathway in gastric adenocarcinomas assessed by tissue microarray.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Thiago S; Oshima, Celina T F; Segreto, Helena R C; Barrazueta, Luis M; Costa, Henrique O; Lima, Flavio O; Forones, Nora M; Ribeiro, Daniel A

    2011-10-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the immunoexpression of FasL, Fas, FADD, cleaved caspase 8, and cleaved caspase 3 in gastric cancer. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded gastric adenocarcinoma tissues from 87 patients, including adjacent normal tissues, were included on tissue microarray by immunohistochemistry. The tumor and the adjacent normal tissues were positive for FasL in 66.7% and 90.6%, for Fas in 52.8% and 52.4%, for FADD in 67.4% and 82.3%, for cleaved caspase 8 in 27.9% and 37.7%, and for cleaved caspase 3 in 33.7% and 8.3%, respectively. FasL and the FADD from tumor were statistically different in relation to the histological type. Cleaved caspase 8 was statistically different in relation to clinical stage (p=0.031). The FADD from normal tissue was statistically different in relation to age (p=0.039), sex (p=0.055), clinical stage (p=0.019), and Fas was different in relation to tumor size (p=0.012). In the tumor, we observed a correlation between FasL and Fas, FasL and FADD, and FasL and cleaved caspase 3. In the adjacent normal tissue, a correlation was observed between FasL and Fas, FasL and FADD. There was no association of another marker with sex, age, clinical stage, and survival. Our results suggest that these proteins mediate the early extrinsic apoptotic pathway in gastric cancer and adjacent normal mucosa. FasL protein binds to Fas protein and subsequently binds to death receptor FADD signaling activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. In this phase, there was inhibition of caspase 8 and, consequently, decreased apoptosis.

  12. Multinuclear giant cell formation is enhanced by down-regulation of Wnt signaling in gastric cancer cell line, AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Kim, Rockki; Ryu, Jae-Hyun; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Song, Ki-Joon; Jang, Shyh-Ing; Kee, Sun-Ho . E-mail: keesh@korea.ac.kr

    2005-08-01

    AGS cells, which were derived from malignant gastric adenocarcinoma tissue, lack E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion but have a high level of nuclear {beta}-catenin, which suggests altered Wnt signal. In addition, approximately 5% of AGS cells form multinuclear giant cells in the routine culture conditions, while taxol treatment causes most AGS cells to become giant cells. The observation of reduced nuclear {beta}-catenin levels in giant cells induced by taxol treatment prompted us to investigate the relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. After overnight serum starvation, the shape of AGS cells became flattened, and this morphological change was accompanied by decrease in Myc expression and an increase in the giant cell population. Lithium chloride treatment, which inhibits GSK3{beta} activity, reversed these serum starvation effects, which suggests an inverse relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Wnt signaling caused by the over-expression of ICAT, E-cadherin, and Axin enhanced giant cell formation. Therefore, down-regulation of Wnt signaling may be related to giant cell formation, which is considered to be a survival mechanism against induced cell death.

  13. Green and black tea inhibit cytokine-induced IL-8 production and secretion in AGS gastric cancer cells via inhibition of NF-κB activity.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Orozco, Fabiola; Stephens, Brian R; Neilson, Andrew P; Green, Rodney; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Bomser, Joshua A

    2010-10-01

    Consumption of tea is associated with a reduced risk for several gastrointestinal cancers. Inflammatory processes, such as secretion of IL-8 from the gastric epithelium in response to chronic chemokine or antigen exposure, serve both as a chemoattractant for white blood cells and a prerequisite for gastric carcinogenesis. In this study, the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS was used to investigate the effect of green tea extract, black tea extract, and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the most abundant catechin in tea, on cytokine-induced inflammation. AGS cells were stimulated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) to initiate inflammation, followed by exposure to either tea extracts or EGCG. We found that both green and black tea extracts at concentrations of 20 and 2 µM total catechins, respectively, significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited IL-1β-induced IL-8 production and secretion to a similar extent. Treatment of AGS cells with EGCG (8 µM) produced similar reductions in IL-1β-induced IL-8 production and secretion. Inhibition of NF-κB activity was found to be responsible, in part, for these observed effects. Our findings demonstrate that both green and black tea extracts with distinctly different catechin profiles, are capable of disrupting the molecular link between inflammation and carcinogenesis via inhibition of NF-κB activity in AGS cells.

  14. The overexpression of MDM4: an effective and novel predictor of gastric adenocarcinoma lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Guofan; Xue, Yingwei

    2016-01-01

    Background MDM4 is the important negative regulator of the tumor suppressor protein p53, which is overexpressed in various human cancers. This study evaluates the MDM4 expression in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma (GTAC) at the mRNA and protein levels and examines relationships among MDM4 expression, clinicopathological features, and prognosis. Results The qRT-PCR and the Western blot analysis showed that the MDM4 expression level was high in GTACN+ but not in GTACN−. The high expression level of MDM4 was significantly associated with age (P = 0.047), lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P < 0.001), pathological stage (P < 0.001), differentiation status (P = 0.001), and preoperative serum CA19-9 level (P < 0.001). Moreover, the survival analysis showed that Borrmann type, depth of invasion, LNM, and preoperative serum CA19-9 level were independent prognostic factors. The univariate analysis revealed that MDM4 expression influenced GTAC prognosis. Furthermore, the influence of overall prognosis relies on whether or not the high MDM4 expression level could lead to LNM. Materials and Methods We investigated MDM4 expression in primary GTAC and paired normal gastric tissues (30 pairs) through qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses. We also performed immunohistochemistry analysis on 336 paraffin-embedded GTAC specimens and 33 matched normal specimens. Conclusions MDM4 expression may result in LMN of GTAC. High MDM4 expression levels are associated with LMN of GTAC and influence the prognosis of patients with GTAC. PMID:27626496

  15. Influence of age and gender on association between -765G > C COX-2 genetic polymorphism and gastric adenocarcinoma risk: a case-control study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Masumeh; Aznab, Mozaffar; Abachi, Mina

    2012-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible influence of age and gender on association between -765G > C COX-2 genetic polymorphism and gastric adenocarcinoma risk in Iranian patients. Background The promoter polymorphism of COX-2 gene -765G > C has been described to play an important role in many cancers such as gastric cancer. Patients and methods We carried out single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis in Iranian samples including 91 patients and 91 control normal using PCR- RFLP technique. Results Statistical analysis revealed no significant association between GG, GC and CC genotypes and risk of gastric adenocarcinoma. However differences were considered significant (P=0.043) for female subjects with C carrier genotypes (GC and CC) and gastric adenocarcinoma when compared with male patients (P=0.645) and control groups (P=0.653). Also, there was a statistically significant difference between increasing of age and susceptibility for gastric adenocarcinoma (Odd Ratio=1.125, 95% CI=1.089-1.162). Conclusion These results suggested that Iranian C carrier females can be more susceptible for gastric adenocarcinoma in comparison with control group. Also increasing of age should be considered as a risk factor for this disease. PMID:24834195

  16. Establishment and characterization of a cisplatin-resistant cell line (IGSK-1) from a poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ohi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Naoto; Ninomiya, Kouzou; Nakajima, Masako; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Tachibana, Toshiaki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    We successfully established a spontaneously cisplatin-resistant tumor cell line (designated as IGSK-1) derived from original gastric carcinoma. The patient was a 75-year-old Japanese woman. The histopathological diagnosis was gastric poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma accompanied with metastatic foci in lymph nodes, pT3, N2 M0, stage IIIB. The IGSK-1 cells grew as adhesive and monolayered cultures on the bottom of dishes. The susceptibility of the IGSK-1 cells to anti-cancer drugs was examined using oxygen electrode apparatus (Daikin, Tsukuba, JPN), and the results suggested TXL was effective, and CDDP, CPT-11 and 5-FU were not effective. Gastrin and somatostatin secretions were confirmed by immunohistochemical staining and also radioimmunoassay. Immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay for serotonin suggested the IGSK-1 cells might incorporate serotonin from the growth media. Spontaneously cisplatin-resistant gastric carcinoma cell line secreted gastrin and somatostatin is very important material for chemotherapy.

  17. Inflammatory Serum Proteins Are Severely Altered in Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma Patients from the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashok; He, Mingfang; Xue, Jing; Wu, Jianzhong; Dun, Boying; Li, Gang; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Ji, Minghua; She, Jin-Xiong; Tang, Jinhai

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation is one of the major hallmarks of cancer. This study was designed to profile a panel of inflammatory mediators in gastric adenocarcinoma (GA) and to identify their potential differences separately in metastatic and non-metastatic patient subgroups. Methods Serum samples from 216 GA patients and 333 healthy controls from China were analyzed for six proteins using the Luminex multiplex assay. Results The serum levels for all the six proteins were significantly elevated in metastatic GA compared to non-metastatic GA. Two acute phase proteins (SAA and CRP) and a CXC chemokine (GRO) were significantly elevated in metastatic GA (p <0.01) but smaller changes were observed in non-metastatic GA compared to healthy controls. OPN is moderately increased in non-metastatic GA (2.05-fold) and more severely elevated in metastatic GA (3.34-fold). Surprisingly, soluble VCAM1 and AGP were significantly lower in both non-metastatic and metastatic GA patients compared to controls. Several individual proteins were shown to possess moderate diagnostic value for non-metastatic GA (AUC = 0.786, 0.833, 0.823 for OPN, sVCAM1 and AGP, respectively) and metastatic GA (AUC = 0.931, 0.720, 0.834 and 0.737 for OPN, sVCAM1, SAA and CRP, respectively). However, protein combinations further improve the diagnostic potential for both non-metastatic GA (best AUC = 0.946) and metastatic GA (best AUC = 0.963). The protein combination with best AUC value for both comparisons is OPN+sVCAM1+AGP+SAA. Conclusions These results suggest that several serum proteins are directly related to the severity of gastric cancer. Overall, stronger associations are observed with metastatic than non-metastatic GA as the protein changes are greater with the metastatic status. A combination of these serum proteins may serve as non-invasive markers to assess the severity status and stage of gastric cancer. PMID:25884401

  18. Impact of capillary invasion on the prognosis of gastric adenocarcinoma patients: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pan-Pan; Xu, Yuan-Wei; Zhang, Wei-Han; Liu, Kai; Chen, Xin-Zu; Yang, Kun; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Chen, Jia-Ping; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Capillary invasion (CI) has been found to play an important role in metastasis and recurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC). However, the prognostic significance of CI is still controversial. From January 2005 to December 2011, 1398 patients with GAC who underwent gastrectomy were retrospectively enrolled and divided into CI (+) and CI (−) groups. Clinicopathological features and survival outcomes were compared between these groups. In our study, 227 (16.2%) patients were CI (+). Patients with CI (+) had significantly more advanced tumors and worse prognosis than those with CI (−) (p < 0.001). CI was demonstrated as an independent prognostic factor (p = 0.023) in patients with GAC. When stratified by TNM stage, the prognosis of CI (+) group in stage III was remarkably worse than CI (−) group (p = 0.006), while the differences were not significant in stage I–II and stage IV (both p > 0.05). The nomograms indicated that CI was part of the individual prognostic prediction system. The predictive accuracy of CI and other characteristics was better than TNM alone (p < 0.001). Our finding suggested that CI was an independent prognostic factor in patients with GAC, and the nomogram based on CI and other clinicopathological factors was a valuable and accurate tool in individual prognostic prediction. PMID:27145279

  19. An unusual primary malignant tumor of the stomach: Fetal gut-like Gastric adenocarcinoma with "blastoma"-like component.

    PubMed

    Taher, Altaf; Denic, Nebojsa; Kalimuthu, Sangeetha N; Chetty, Runjan

    2017-03-15

    An unusual case of a polypoid, malignant gastric tumor in a 62-year man is presented. Endoscopy and subsequent polypectomy revealed an 8.5 x 6.5 x 4.5cm lesion in the body of the stomach. Microscopy showed surface dysplasia with an invasive adenocarcinoma displaying prominent tubulopapillary areas composed of large vacuolated cells, pleomorphic nuclei and occasional cytoplasmic hyaline globules. This component then blended with tubular structures lined by more primitive appearing vacuolated cells embedded within a stroma made up of cellular primitive, high-grade blastema-like areas and, less cellular more pleomorphic foci with spindle and several bizarre, large cells. Immunohistochemistry showed the adenocarcinoma and primitive tubules to be strongly SALL4 and epithelial marker positive, but only focal expression of α-fetoprotein and glypican-3. The stromal component made up of blastema-like areas displayed strong immunoreactivity for glypican-3. The pleomorphic stromal areas were negative for all markers, including epithelial and muscle markers. The overall morphology and expression of primitive oncofetal proteins, especially SALL4 and glypican-3, are in keeping with this being a primitive adenocarcinoma showing fetal gut-like differentiation with an accompanying blastoma-like component, a combination not previously described in a primary gastric cancer.

  20. Gastric Adenocarcinoma of the Fundic Gland Type Treated by Endoscopic Mucosal Resection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Daroca, Philip; Sikka, Sanjay; Wu, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma of the fundic gland type (GA-FG) is a rare entity that has only recently been described and defined. There is ongoing controversy regarding the malignant potential of this lesion. We report the case of a GA-FG in a 49-year-old Caucasian man who was referred to endoscopy for management of an incidentally found gastric polyp. Endoscopy showed a single polypoid lesion in the gastric fundus which was successfully removed with endoscopic resection. Grossly, the polyp measured 1.1 cm in greatest dimension. Microscopic examination showed irregularly branched neoplastic glands covered with a nonneoplastic foveolar epithelium. The continuity between the neoplastic glands and the fundic glands is clearly identified, indicating the tumor arose from the fundic glands. The tumor cells exhibited occasional oxyntic cytoplasm with enlarged atypical nuclei. The tumor invaded the submucosa with complete disruption of the muscularis mucosae and mild lymphocytic and fibroblastic stromal reaction. No necrosis, mitosis, or lymph-vascular invasion was identified. Although some authors have proposed reclassification of GA-FGs as oxyntic gland polyps/adenomas, in light of several reported cases with submucosal invasion as well as lymphatic invasion, we maintain that this neoplasm is best categorized as an extremely well-differentiated adenocarcinoma to reflect its invasive potential. PMID:27994902

  1. Molecular effects of Lapatinib in the treatment of HER2 overexpressing oesophago-gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Nadeera; Schulz, Laura; Paterson, Anna; Qain, Wendi; Secrier, Maria; Godfrey, Edmund; Cheow, Heok; O'Donovan, Maria; Lao-Sirieix, Pierre; Jobanputra, Minesh; Hochhauser, Daniel; Fitzgerald, Rebecca; Ford, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lapatinib, a dual EGFR and HER2 inhibitor has shown disappointing results in clinical trials of metastatic oesophago-gastric adenocarcinomas (OGAs), and in vitro studies suggest that MET, IGFR, and HER3 confer resistance. This trial applied Lapatinib in the curative neoadjuvant setting and investigated the feasibility and utility of additional endoscopy and biopsy for assessment of resistance mechanisms ex vivo and in vivo. Methods: Patients with HER2 overexpressing OGA were treated for 10 days with Lapatinib monotherapy, and then in combination with three cycles of Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine before surgery. Endoscopic samples were taken for molecular analysis at: baseline including for ex vivo culture +/− Lapatinib to predict in vivo response, post-Lapatinib monotherapy and at surgery. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and proteomic analysis was performed to assess cell kinetics and signalling activity. Results: The trial closed early (n=10) due to an anastomotic leak in two patients for which a causative effect of Lapatinib could not be excluded. The reduction in Phosphorylated-HER2 (P-HER2) and P-EGFR in the ex vivo-treated biopsy demonstrated good correlation with the in vivo response at day 10. Proteomic analysis pre and post-Lapatinib demonstrated target inhibition (P-ERBB2, P-EGFR, P-PI3K, P-AKT, and P-ERK) that persisted until surgery. There was also significant correlation between the activation of MET with the level of P-Erk (P=0.0005) and P-PI3K : T-PI3K (total PI3K) ratio (P=0.0037). There was no significant correlation between the activation status of IGFR and HER3 with downstream signalling molecules. Conclusions: Additional endoscopy and biopsy sampling for multiple biomarker endpoints was feasible and confirmed in vitro data that MET is likely to be a significant mechanism of Lapatinib resistance in vivo. PMID:26484410

  2. 64Cu DOTA-Trastuzumab PET/CT in Studying Patients With Gastric Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  3. Anti-metastatic activity of fangchinoline in human gastric cancer AGS cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhengrong; He, Tengfei; Zhao, Kui; Xing, Chungen

    2017-01-01

    Fangchinoline (FCL) is an active component isolated from the traditional medicinal plant Stephania tetrandra S. Moore, and has been reported to possess anti-cancer functions in several types of cancers; however, the effect of FCL on gastric cancer metastasis and its underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of FCL on the cell migration and invasion of human metastatic gastric cancer AGS cells and its mechanisms. Our study demonstrates that FCL dosage dependently suppressed the adhesion, migration and invasion capacities of human gastric cancer AGS cells without obvious cytotoxic effects. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot assays demonstrated that FCL greatly inhibited the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 at both the mRNA and protein levels, while it significantly increased the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) 1 and TIMP2 messenger RNAs. Our results also indicated that FCL repressed the phosphorylation of AKT in gastric cancer AGS cells. In summary, FCL may exert its anti-metastatic property in human gastric cancer cells in vitro by suppression of MMP-2 and MMP-9, increase of TIMP1 and TIMP2 genes, and inhibition of AKT phosphorylation. FCL may be a drug candidate for the treatment of gastric cancer metastasis.

  4. Helicobacter pylori-negative gastric cancer: advanced-stage undifferentiated adenocarcinoma located in the pyloric gland area.

    PubMed

    Okano, Akihiro; Kato, Shigeru; Ohana, Masaya

    2017-02-01

    The incidence of Helicobacter pylori-negative gastric cancer (HpNGC) is extremely low. A 78-year old female without H. pylori infection was diagnosed with type 4 advanced-stage gastric prepylorus cancer. Distal gastrectomy was performed as for HpNGC (cT3N0M0). Histological findings of the resected specimen showed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and signet ring cell carcinoma, which were located in the pyloric gland area, diffusely invaded beyond the serosa without lymph node metastasis (pT4aN0M0). Most cases of undifferentiated-type HpNGC are diagnosed in the early stage and are located in the fundic gland area. We report the first case of advanced-stage undifferentiated HpNGC located in the pyloric gland area.

  5. Saussurea lappa induces G2-growth arrest and apoptosis in AGS gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seong Gyu; Kim, Hwang-Phill; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Bae, Hyun-Su; Kim, Sung Hoon; Park, Chong-Hyeong; Lee, Jung Weon

    2005-03-18

    The molecular effects of Saussurea lappa extracts, a traditional medicine in Eastern Asia, on the fate of gastric carcinoma have not been understood. In this study, its cytostatic effects were examined using gastric AGS cancer cells. Its treatment resulted in apoptosis and G2-arrest in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The effects were attributed to the regulation of cyclins and pro-apoptotic molecules and suppression of anti-apoptotic molecules. Therefore, these results suggest that extracts of S. lappa root may be a candidate to deal with gastric cancers either by traditional herbal therapy or by combinational therapy with conventional chemotherapy.

  6. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase activities and tightening of tight junctions by diallyl disulfide in AGS human gastric carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Gi-Young; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Nam Deuk; Hwang, Hye Jin; Choi, Young-Whan; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2011-05-01

    The effect of diallyl disulfide (DADS), a major component of an oil-soluble allyl sulfide garlic (Allium sativum) derivative, on the correlation between anti-invasive activity and tightening of tight junctions (TJs) was investigated in human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cells. Our data indicated that the inhibitory effects of DADS on cell motility and invasiveness were found to be associated with increased tightness of the TJs, which was demonstrated by an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance. Activities of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-2 and -9 in AGS cells were dose-dependently inhibited by treatment with DADS, and this was also correlated with a decrease in expression of their mRNA and proteins; however, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and -2 mRNA levels and proteins were increased. Additionally, immunoblotting results indicated that DADS repressed the levels of claudin proteins (claudin-2, -3, and -4), major components of TJs that play key roles in control and selectivity of paracellular transport. Although further studies are needed, these results suggest that DADS treatment may inhibit tumor cell motility and invasion and, therefore, act as a dietary source to decrease the risk of cancer metastasis.

  7. Gastric adenocarcinoma of the fundic gland (chief cell-predominant type): A review of endoscopic and clinicopathological features

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, Masaki; Matsuda, Mitsuru; Yano, Masaaki; Hara, Yasumasa; Arihara, Fumitaka; Horita, Yosuke; Matsuda, Koichiro; Sakai, Akito; Noda, Yatsugi

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma of the fundic gland (chief cell-predominant type, GA-FG-CCP) is a rare variant of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, and has been proposed to be a novel disease entity. GA-FG-CCP originates from the gastric mucosa of the fundic gland region without chronic gastritis or intestinal metaplasia. The majority of GA-FG-CCPs exhibit either a submucosal tumor-like superficial elevated shape or a flat shape on macroscopic examination. Narrow-band imaging with endoscopic magnification may reveal a regular or an irregular microvascular pattern, depending on the degree of tumor exposure to the mucosal surface. Pathological analysis of GA-FG-CCPs is characterized by a high frequency of submucosal invasion, rare occurrences of lymphatic and venous invasion, and low-grade malignancy. Detection of diffuse positivity for pepsinogen-I by immunohistochemistry is specific for GA-FG-CCP. Careful endoscopic examination and detailed pathological evaluation are essential for early and accurate diagnosis of GA-FG-CCP. Nearly all GA-FG-CCPs are treated by endoscopic resection due to their small tumor size and low risk of recurrence or metastasis. PMID:28082804

  8. Germ Cell Tumor Targeting Chemotherapy in Gastric Adenocarcinoma with an Endodermal Sinus Tumor Component: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Eun; Choe, A Reum; Yoon, Sang Eun; Nam, Eun Mi; Park, Heejung; Lee, Kyoung Eun

    2017-01-01

    The most common sites for extragonadal germ cell tumors are the midline mediastinum, retroperitoneum and, much less frequently, the stomach. The stomach-originated primary germ cell tumor carries a poor prognosis, especially when metastasis occurs to the liver, with a mean survival time of 1 month. We describe the case of a 77-year-old male who presented with usual symptoms of gastric malignancy. Gastrectomy was performed. Histopathology of surgically resected tissue revealed a mixture of adenocarcinoma and endodermal sinus tumor components with α-fetoprotein production. After liver metastasis was identified, oxaliplatin and capecitabine were administered as palliative chemotherapy. The response was poor. For the second-line therapy, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) therapy was initiated. The overall response to these drugs was a partial response and the residual liver lesion was considered to be resectable. The patient died of pneumonia 11 months following the BEP session, representing an overall survival time of 22 months. Gastric adenocarcinoma with a germ cell tumor component is uncommon and an effective combination of chemotherapeutic agents is not yet clear. In this case, the patient received germ cell tumor-targeting chemotherapy and showed a durable response. Hence, germ cell-targeting cytotoxic agents have potential as the 'front-line regimen'.

  9. DNA polymeraseη protein expression predicts treatment response and survival of metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma patients treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background DNA polymerase η (pol η) is capable of bypassing DNA adducts produced by cisplatin or oxaliplatin and is associated with cellular tolerance to platinum. Previous studies showed that defective pol η resulted in enhanced cisplatin or oxaliplatin sensitivity in some cell lines. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of pol η protein expression in metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods Four gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines were chosen to explore the relationship between pol η protein expression and oxaliplatin sensitivity by western blotting and MTT assay. Eighty metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma patients treated with FOLFOX or XELOX regimen as first-line chemotherapy were analyzed, corresponding pretreatment formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues were used to detect pol η protein expression by immunohistochemistry. Relationship between pol η protein expression and clinical features and outcome of these patients was analyzed. Results A positive linear relationship between pol η protein expression and 48 h IC50 values of oxaliplatin in four gastric cancer cell lines was observed. Positivity of pol η protein expression was strongly associated with poor treatment response, as well as shorter survival at both univariate (8 versus 14 months; P < 0.001) and multivariate (hazard ratio, 4.555; 95% confidence interval, 2.461-8.429; P < 0.001) analysis in eighty metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma patients. Conclusions Our study indicates that polη is a predictive factor of treatment response and survival of metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma patients treated with FOLFOX or XELOX as first-line chemotherapy. Therefore confirming the value of polη in studies with prospective design is mandatory. PMID:21110884

  10. General and abdominal obesity and risk of esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Annika; Huerta, José-Maria; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; May, Anne M; Siersema, Peter D; Kaaks, Rudolf; Neamat-Allah, Jasmine; Pala, Valeria; Panico, Salvatore; Saieva, Calogero; Tumino, Rosario; Naccarati, Alessio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Ardanaz, Eva; Quirós, J Ramón; Ohlsson, Bodil; Johansson, Mattias; Wallner, Bengt; Overvad, Kim; Halkjaer, Jytte; Tjønneland, Anne; Fagherazzi, Guy; Racine, Antoine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Key, Tim J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Ferrari, Pietro; Freisling, Heinz; Lu, Yunxia; Riboli, Elio; Cross, Amanda J; Gonzalez, Carlos A; Boeing, Heiner

    2015-08-01

    General obesity, as reflected by BMI, is an established risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), a suspected risk factor for gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCC) and appears unrelated to gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCC). How abdominal obesity, as commonly measured by waist circumference (WC), relates to these cancers remains largely unexplored. Using measured anthropometric data from 391,456 individuals from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study and 11 years of follow-up, we comprehensively assessed the association of anthropometric measures with risk of EAC, GCC and GNCC using multivariable proportional hazards regression. One hundred twenty-four incident EAC, 193 GCC and 224 GNCC were accrued. After mutual adjustment, BMI was unrelated to EAC, while WC showed a strong positive association (highest vs. lowest quintile HR = 1.19; 95% CI, 0.63-2.22 and HR = 3.76; 1.72-8.22, respectively). Hip circumference (HC) was inversely related to EAC after controlling for WC, while WC remained positively associated (HR = 0.35; 0.18-0.68, and HR=4.10; 1.94-8.63, respectively). BMI was not associated with GCC or GNCC. WC was related to higher risks of GCC after adjustment for BMI and more strongly after adjustment for HC (highest vs. lowest quintile HR = 1.91; 1.09-3.37, and HR = 2.23; 1.28-3.90, respectively). Our study demonstrates that abdominal, rather than general, obesity is an indisputable risk factor for EAC and also provides evidence for a protective effect of gluteofemoral (subcutaneous) adipose tissue in EAC. Our study further shows that general obesity is not a risk factor for GCC and GNCC, while the role of abdominal obesity in GCC needs further investigation.

  11. HER2 Expression in Gastric Adenocarcinoma-a Study in a Tertiary Care Centre in South India.

    PubMed

    Aditi, Raj; Aarathi, Rau; Pradeep, Rudramurthy; Hemalatha, Lokanatha; Akshatha, C; Amar, Kumar

    2016-03-01

    According to the literature available, HER2(human epidermal growth factor 2)status in gastric carcinoma has been studied worldwide, however there is a paucity of published data from India. Hence, this study was taken up to evaluate HER2 overexpression in gastric adenocarcinoma patients and to assess the relationship between its expression and clinicopathological tumor parameters. Prospective study was conducted in a teaching hospital over a period of 27 months. Total or subtotal gastrectomy resection specimens and small biopsies were included in the study. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was carried out on all the cases to evaluate the expression of HER2 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Fluorescence Insitu Hybridization (FISH) was done for equivocal cases on IHC. The data was analyzed using Chi square test / Fisher's Exact Test. Odds ratio was computed between HER2 and other pathologic variables. HER2 overexpression was confirmed in 16 (27.6 %) cases of which 15 (93.8 %) cases were of intestinal type whereas only 1 (6.2 %) case of diffuse type adenocarcinoma. Hence, HER2 positivity was significantly more common in the intestinal type of gastric cancer compared to the diffuse type (p = 0.045). Positivity of HER2 was more in small biopsies as compared to the resection specimens in this study but the p value was not significant. There was no difference in HER2 overexpression in relation to the age, gender, tumor site, tumor differentiation and stage. HER2 overexpression is more prevalent in the intestinal subtype. The relatively high percentage of HER2 positive tumors may provide a useful target for immunotherapy of these cancers.

  12. Invasive mouse gastric adenocarcinomas arising from Lgr5+ stem cells are dependent on crosstalk between the Hedgehog/GLI2 and mTOR pathways

    PubMed Central

    Syu, Li-Jyun; Zhao, Xinyi; Zhang, Yaqing; Grachtchouk, Marina; Demitrack, Elise; Ermilov, Alexandre; Wilbert, Dawn M.; Zheng, Xinlei; Kaatz, Ashley; Greenson, Joel K.; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Merchant, Juanita L.; di Magliano, Marina Pasca; Samuelson, Linda C.; Dlugosz, Andrzej A.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is the third most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Here we report a novel, highly-penetrant mouse model of invasive gastric cancer arising from deregulated Hedgehog/Gli2 signaling targeted to Lgr5-expressing stem cells in adult stomach. Tumor development progressed rapidly: three weeks after inducing the Hh pathway oncogene GLI2A, 65% of mice harbored in situ gastric cancer, and an additional 23% of mice had locally invasive tumors. Advanced mouse gastric tumors had multiple features in common with human gastric adenocarcinomas, including characteristic histological changes, expression of RNA and protein markers, and the presence of major inflammatory and stromal cell populations. A subset of tumor cells underwent epithelial-mesenchymal transition, likely mediated by focal activation of canonical Wnt signaling and Snail1 induction. Strikingly, mTOR pathway activation, based on pS6 expression, was robustly activated in mouse gastric adenocarcinomas from the earliest stages of tumor development, and treatment with rapamycin impaired tumor growth. GLI2A-expressing epithelial cells were detected transiently in intestine, which also contains Lgr5+ stem cells, but they did not give rise to epithelial tumors in this organ. These findings establish that deregulated activation of Hedgehog/Gli2 signaling in Lgr5-expressing stem cells is sufficient to drive gastric adenocarcinoma development in mice, identify a critical requirement for mTOR signaling in the pathogenesis of these tumors, and underscore the importance of tissue context in defining stem cell responsiveness to oncogenic stimuli. PMID:26859571

  13. In vitro anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin in the Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen; Huang, Kai-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori causes extensive gastric epithelial cell inflammation which may progress to atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and even gastric adenocarcinoma. Apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone) is widely distributed in fruits and vegetables, and is a well-known antiinflammatory supplement with low cytotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin in H. pylori-infected MKN45 cells, for which IκBα, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), reactive oxygen species (ROS), interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-6, IL-1β, and mucin-2 (MUC-2) expressions were examined. Apigenin treatments (9.3-74 μM) significantly increased the IκBα expression, and thus inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation, and the inflammatory factor (COX-2, ICAM-1, ROS, IL-6, and IL-8) expressions decreased. The ROS levels decreased partially based on the intrinsic scavenging property of apigenin. In summary, apigenin treatments effectively inhibited NF-κB activation and the related inflammatory factor expressions, as well as increased MUC-2 expression in the H. pylori-infected MKN45 cells. The compound shows great potential as a candidate agent for the inhibition of H. pylori-induced extensive gastric epithelial cell inflammation.

  14. Differential expression of Pim-3, c-Myc, and p-p27 proteins in adenocarcinomas of the gastric cardia and distal stomach.

    PubMed

    Lou, Lei; Wang, Yuan; Cui, Jinfeng; Yan, Xia; Xue, Liying; Li, Yuehong

    2014-05-01

    Gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA) is distinct from adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach because of its different etiological factors, tumor characteristics, and biological behavior. However, its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to characterize the role of Pim-3, c-Myc, and p-p27 in the tumorigenesis and progression of different sites of gastric adenocarcinoma by determining its pathogenetic significance. The expression of Pim-3, c-Myc, and p-p27 proteins was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 140 resection specimens of gastric adenocarcinomas (78 GCAs , 62 DGAs and 20 normal gastric tissues). The level of expression of Pim-3, c-Myc, and p-p27 and the co-expression of all three markers (Pim-3+/c-Myc+/p-p27+) in GCA were significantly lower than that in DGA tumors (P < 0.05). Detailed analysis of the immunoreactivity patterns showed that in DGA, Pim-3 immunoreactivity was associated significantly with poor tumor differentiation, advanced tumor stage, and presence of lymph node metastasis. In addition, c-Myc overexpression correlated with tumor stage and lymph node metastasis, and positive p-p27 expression correlated with poor differentiation and tumor stage. The phenotype of Pim-3(+)/c-Myc(+)/p-p27(+) co-expression was closely correlated with tumor stage and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05). In contrast, GCA only demonstrated a close correlation of Pim-3 overexpression with poor tumor differentiation and tumor stage (P < 0.05). Our results demonstrate the presence of different expression patterns of Pim-3, c-Myc, p-p27, and Pim-3(+)/c-Myc(+)/p-p27(+) and their clinicopathologic significance in GCA and DGA tumors. Our results add support to the notion that distinct molecular mechanisms may be involved in the development and progression of adenocarcinomas from the gastric cardia and distal portion of stomach.

  15. Pantoprazole inhibits human gastric adenocarcinoma SGC-7901 cells by downregulating the expression of pyruvate kinase M2

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, YONGHUA; CHEN, MIN; HUANG, SHULING; ZOU, XIAOPING

    2016-01-01

    The Warburg effect is important in tumor growth. The human M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) is a key enzyme that regulates aerobic glycolysis in tumor cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that PKM2 is a potential target for cancer therapy. The present study investigated the effects of pantoprazole (PPZ) treatment and PKM2 transfection on human gastric adenocarcinoma SGC-7901 cells in vitro. The present study revealed that PPZ inhibited the proliferation of tumor cells, induced apoptosis and downregulated the expression of PKM2, which contributes to the current understanding of the functional association between PPZ and PKM2. In summary, PPZ may suppress tumor growth as a PKM2 protein inhibitor. PMID:26870273

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection in intestinal- and diffuse-type gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Parsonnet, J; Vandersteen, D; Goates, J; Sibley, R K; Pritikin, J; Chang, Y

    1991-05-01

    Gastric cancer can be divided into two histologic types: intestinal and diffuse. To determine whether Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium linked with gastritis, was associated with either cancer type, we reviewed histologic sections from stomachs of patients who had undergone gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Of 37 of the sections with evidence of intestinal-type cancer, 33 (89.2%) contained H pylori in noncancerous tissue compared with 7 (31.8%) of 22 of the sections with evidence of diffuse-type cancer (odds ratio = 17.7; P less than .001). This association remained strong when controlled for age, sex, site, and number of sections reviewed. The prevalence of H pylori in intestinal-type gastric cancer far exceeded the prevalence of H pylori in diffuse disease and that described in the normal US population. This finding suggests that H pylori may be a cofactor in development of intestinal-type gastric cancer.

  17. Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Enhances Cell Proliferation of Human Gastric Cancer AGS Cells.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Sekimoto, Teruki; Ogura, Ayaka; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third gasotransmitter, is endogenously generated by certain H2S synthesizing enzymes, including cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) from L-cysteine in the mammalian body. Several studies have shown that endogenous and exogenous H2S affects the proliferation of cancer cells, although the effects of H2S appear to vary with cell type, being either promotive or suppressive. In the present study, we determined whether endogenously formed H2S regulates proliferation in human gastric cancer AGS cells. CSE, but not CBS, was expressed in AGS cells. CSE inhibitors, DL-propargylglycine (PPG) and β-cyano-L-alanine (BCA), significantly suppressed the proliferation of AGS cells in a concentration-dependent manner. CSE inhibitors did not increase lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in the same concentration range. The inhibitory effects of PPG and BCA on cell proliferation were reversed by repetitive application of NaHS, a donor of H2S. Interestingly, nuclear condensation and fragmentation were detected in AGS cells treated with PPG or BCA. These results suggest that endogenous H2S produced by CSE may contribute to the proliferation of gastric cancer AGS cells, most probably through anti-apoptotic actions.

  18. Proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowers gastric adenocarcinoma TMK1 cell proliferation via bone morphogenetic protein signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Yu Le; Cho, C.H.

    2008-06-27

    Proteasome inhibitor is a novel class of cancer therapeutics, of which the mechanism of action is not fully understood. It is reported that proteasome inhibitor enhances bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in osteoblasts to stimulate bone formation. BMP signaling is also an important tumor-suppressing pathway in gastric carcinogenesis. We therefore sought to determine the anti-mitogenic effect of proteasome inhibition in relation to BMP signaling in gastric cancer cells. Results showed that proteasome inhibitor MG-132 significantly suppressed the proliferation and the colony-forming ability of gastric cancer TMK1 cells. In this connection, MG-132 activated BMP signaling, manifested as an increase in Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and up-regulation of p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} mRNA and protein expression. Knockdown of BMP receptor II by RNA interference abolished Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation, p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} induction, and the inhibition of cell proliferation induced by MG-132. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 up-regulated the expression of BMP1 and BMP4 and suppressed the expression of Smad6. Knockdown of Smad6 also mimicked the effect of MG-132 on BMP signaling. Collectively, these findings suggest that inhibition of proteasome suppresses gastric cancer cell proliferation via activation of BMP signaling. This discovery may open up a novel therapeutic avenue to proteasome inhibitors for the management of gastric cancer.

  19. Anti-gastric adenocarcinoma activity of 2-Methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, an anti-Helicobacter pylori compound from Impatiens balsamina L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen; Lin, Yi-Han

    2012-12-01

    2-Methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (MeONQ) from Impatiens balsamina L. exhibited strong anti-H. pylori activity in our previous study. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of MeONQ against gastric adenocarcinoma (MKN45 cell line) and propose the relevant mechanisms. MeONQ resulted in serious necrosis via superoxide anion catastrophe when the treatment doses were higher than 50μM, whereas apoptosis occurred at low treatment doses (25-50μM) through the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway. Necrosis is the dominant mode of cell death. MeONQ exhibited high ability to induce gastric adenocarcinoma necrosis, showing good potential as a candidate agent for H. pylori infection related disease therapy.

  20. Histopathological regression of gastric adenocarcinoma after neoadjuvant therapy: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Neves Filho, Eduardo Henrique Cunha; de Sant'Ana, Rosane Oliveira; Nunes, Luiz Vianney Saldanha Cidrão; Pires, Adriana Pinheiro Bezerra; da Cunha, Maria do Perpétuo Socorro Saldanha

    2017-02-01

    As the perioperative chemotherapy has been widely implemented on the management of gastric cancer patients, heterogeneity of clinical outcomes has been evidenced in parallel to different histopathological regression pattern of gastric cancer cells. Tumor histological response to preoperative therapy has been graded by various systems in order to categorize the amount of regressive changes induced by chemotherapy in relation to residual tumor. In this context, tumor regression grading (TRG) systems might provide important prognostic information as the variety of tumor response may imply on different clinical outcomes with impact in survival rates. Moreover, gastric cancer behavior varies enormously upon individual factors such as histological classification and tumor anatomic site of involvement that have been shown to affect the TRG interpretation. On the other hand, some studies have assessed the role of molecular markers as a predictor of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in terms of TRG. Thus, the aim of this review is to evaluate how TRG has been interpreted in gastric cancer, discuss their clinical and prognostic relevance and also address the molecular markers involved in this process.

  1. Evaluation of apoptosis induction using PARP cleavage on gastric adenocarcinoma and fibroblast cell lines by different strains of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Mojtahedi, Ali; Salehi, Rasoul; Navabakbar, Farahtaj; Tamizifar, Hasan; Tavakkoli, Hamid; Duronio, Vincent

    2007-11-15

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common pathogens affecting humans and is the major environmental factor in the development of gastric cancer increasing from 4 to 6 folds the risk of its development. Variations in cancer risk among H. pylori infected individuals may correlate to difference in H. pylori strains, variable host characteristics and specific interactions between host and microbial determinants. To determine the effect of different strains of H. pylori on cellular apoptosis this study was designed an in vitro model using AGS and HEF cell lines. After specified time intervals total cell proteins was extracted and subjected to SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting using anti poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) antibody. Decrease in densitometric value of PARP was indicative of higher level of apoptosis. The ability of apoptosis induction in AGS and HEF cell lines by wild type (cagA+/vacA+), cagA-/vacA+, vacA-/cagA+ and double negative (cagA-/vacA-) strains were significantly different. The assessed apoptosis in AGS cell line co-cultured with wild type strain was 3.22 +/- 0.2 in 24 h, 2.8 +/- 0.1 in 48 and 2.1 +/- 0.09 in 72 h of incubation time. Similar assessment with cagA-/vacA+ strains in AGS cells was 4.17 +/- 1.49 in 24 h, 3.32 +/- 0.45 in 48 h and 2.32 +/- 0.61 in 72 h incubation. A variation in apoptotic potential between the H. pylori strains on two cells (AGS and HEF) was observed. Based on present results, it is concluded that H. pylori strains as well as target cell types are important in pathogenesis and induction of apoptosis during a specified time interval.

  2. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Simpson, Peter T; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R; Clouston, Andrew D; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C; Neklason, Deborah W; Davis, Sean R; Walker, Robert L; Calzone, Kathleen A; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N; Hulick, Peter J; Weissman, Scott M; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sampson, Jone E; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K; Huntsman, David G; Foulkes, William D; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M; Edwards, Stacey L; French, Juliet D; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S; Worthley, Daniel L; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-05-05

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present.

  3. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L.; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S.; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J.; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R.M.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Simpson, Peter T.; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Clouston, Andrew D.; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A.; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F.; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C.; Neklason, Deborah W.; Davis, Sean R.; Walker, Robert L.; Calzone, Kathleen A.; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N.; Hulick, Peter J.; Weissman, Scott M.; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Sampson, Jone E.; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K.; Huntsman, David G.; Foulkes, William D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M.; Edwards, Stacey L.; French, Juliet D.; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S.; Worthley, Daniel L.; Schrader, Kasmintan A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present. PMID:27087319

  4. [Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma: Case report and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Suárez, Javier; Barrio-Fernández, Patricia; Ibáñez-Plágaro, Francisco Javier; Ribas-Ariño, Teresa; Calvo-Calleja, Pablo; Mostaza-Saavedra, Antonio Luis

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord metastases are very rare and usually associated with lung or breast cancer, with gastric origin being exceptional. Their clinical onset tends to be faster than that of primary intramedullary tumours. The most common early symptoms of intramedullary spinal cord metastasis are motor deficit in one or more limbs, pain, sensory loss, and sphincter disturbances. The appearance of a rapidly progressive Brown-Séquard syndrome in an oncology patient should orientate the diagnosis of this condition. The prognosis is very poor, with a median survival of 4 months. However, recent research has shown that surgery could offer a slight benefit in survival and functionality. The case is reported of a 61-year-old man with an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from a gastric carcinoma, as well as a literature review of this topic. It has been found that this case is the fourth one reported in the literature.

  5. Chemotherapy resistance in diffuse type gastric adenocarcinoma is mediated by RhoA activation in cancer stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Changhwan; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Park, Do Joong; Schultz, Nikolaus; Ryeom, Sandra W.; Yoon, Sam S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Lauren diffuse type of gastric adenocarcinoma (DGA), as opposed to the intestinal type (IGA), often harbor mutations in RHOA but little is known about the role of RhoA in DGA. Experimental Design We examined RhoA activity and RhoA pathway inhibition in DGA cell lines and in two mouse xenograft models. RhoA activity was also assessed in patient tumor samples. Results RhoA activity was higher in DGA compared to IGA cell lines, and was further increased when grown as spheroids to enrich for cancer stem-like cells (CSC) or when sorted using the gastric CSC marker CD44. RhoA shRNA or the RhoA inhibitor Rhosin decreased expression of the stem cell transcription factor, Sox2, and decreased spheroid formation by 78–81%. DGA spheroid cells had 3–5 fold greater migration and invasion than monolayer cells, and this activity was Rho-dependent. Diffuse GA spheroid cells were resistant in a cytotoxicity assay to 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin chemotherapy, and this resistance could be reversed with RhoA pathway inhibition. In two xenograft models, cisplatin inhibited tumor growth by 40–50%, RhoA inhibition by 32–60%, and the combination by 77–83%. In 288 patient tumors, increased RhoA activity correlated with worse OS in DGA patients (p=0.017) but not in IGA patients (p=0.612). Conclusions RhoA signaling promotes CSC phenotypes in DGA cells. Increased RhoA activity is correlated with worse OS in DGA patients and RhoA inhibition can reverse chemotherapy resistance in DGA CSC and in tumor xenografts. Thus the RhoA pathway is a promising new target in DGA patients. PMID:26482039

  6. Whole-exome sequencing to identify somatic mutations in peritoneal metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Li, Tingting; Huang, Haipeng; Lin, Tian; Hu, Yanfeng; Qi, Xiaolong; Yu, Jiang; Li, Guoxin

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis occurs in more than half of patients with unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer and is associated with the worst prognosis. The associated genomic events and pathogenesis remain ambiguous. The aim of the present study was to characterize the mutation spectrum of gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis and provide a basis for the identification of new biomarkers and treatment targets. Matched pairs of normal gastric mucosa and peritoneal tissue and matched pairs of primary tumor and peritoneal metastasis were collected from one patient for whole-exome sequencing (WES); Sanger sequencing was employed to confirm the somatic mutations. G>A and C>T mutations were the two most frequent transversions among the somatic mutations. We confirmed 48somatic mutations in the primary site and 49 in the peritoneal site. Additionally, 25 non-synonymous somatic variations (single-nucleotide variants, SNVs) and 2 somatic insertions/deletions (INDELs) were confirmed in the primary tumor, and 30 SNVs and 5 INDELs were verified in the peritoneal metastasis. Approximately 59% of the somatic mutations were shared between the primary and metastatic site. Five genes (TP53, BAI1, THSD1, ARID2, and KIAA2022) verified in our study were also mutated at a frequency greater than 5%in the COSMIC database. We also identified 9genes (ERBB4, ZNF721, NT5E, PDE10A, CA1, NUMB, NBN, ZFYVE16, and NCAM1) that were only mutated in metastasis and are expected to become treatment targets. In conclusion, we observed that the majority of the somatic mutations in the primary site persisted in metastasis, whereas several single-nucleotide polymorphisms occurred de novo at the second site. PMID:27270314

  7. THE PRESENCE OF METASTASES IN REGIONAL LYMPH NODES IS ASSOCIATED WITH TUMOR SIZE AND DEPTH OF INVASION IN SPORADIC GASTRIC ADENOCARCINOMA

    PubMed Central

    CAMBRUZZI, Eduardo; de AZEREDO, Andreza Mariane; KRONHART, Ardala; FOLTZ, Katia Martins; ZETTLER, Cláudio Galeano; PÊGAS, Karla Lais

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastric adenocarcinoma is more often found in men over 50 years in the form of an antral lesion. The tumor has heterogeneous histopathologic features and a poor prognosis (median survival of 15% in five years). Aim To estimate the relationship between the presence of nodal metastasis and other prognostic factors in sporadic gastric adenocarcinoma. Method Were evaluated 164 consecutive cases of gastric adenocarcinoma previously undergone gastrectomy (partial or total), without clinical evidence of distant metastasis, and determined the following variables: topography of the lesion, tumor size, Borrmann macroscopic configuration, histological grade, early or advanced lesions, Lauren histological subtype, presence of signet ring cell, degree of invasion, perigastric lymph node status, angiolymphatic/perineural invasion, and staging. Results Were found 21 early lesions (12.8%) and 143 advanced lesions (87.2%), with a predominance of lesions classified as T3 (n=99/60, 4%) and N1 (n=62/37, 8%). The nodal status was associated with depth of invasion (p<0.001) and tumor size (p<0.001). The staging was related to age (p=0.048), histological grade (p=0.003), and presence of signet ring cells (p = 0.007), angiolymphatic invasion (p = 0.001), and perineural invasion (p=0.003). Conclusion In gastric cancer, lymph node involvement, tumor size and depth of invasion are histopathological data associated with the pattern of growth/tumor spread, suggesting that a wide dissection of perigastric lymph nodes is a fundamental step in the surgical treatment of these patients. PMID:24676292

  8. Protein-directed one-pot synthesis of Ag microspheres with good biocompatibility and enhancement of radiation effects on gastric cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Peng; Yang, Da-Peng; Zhang, Chunlei; Lin, Jing; He, Meng; Bao, Le; Cui, Daxiang

    2011-09-01

    Biocompatible Ag@BSA microspheres were successfully synthesized via one-pot reaction in aqueous phase at room temperature by using BSA as soft templates. The individual Ag microsphere is composed of nanoscale Ag assemblies and shows enhanced radiation effects on gastric cancer cells.Biocompatible Ag@BSA microspheres were successfully synthesized via one-pot reaction in aqueous phase at room temperature by using BSA as soft templates. The individual Ag microsphere is composed of nanoscale Ag assemblies and shows enhanced radiation effects on gastric cancer cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10586h

  9. The Future Prospects of Immune Therapy in Gastric and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shaib, Walid L.; Nammour, Jean Paul A.; Gill, Harpaul; Mody, Mayur; Saba, Nabil F.

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of esophageal cancers is poor and novel approaches are urgently needed. Despite improvements in outcomes with transtuzumab and ramucirumab, these improvements added an average of only 2 to 3 months with a median overall survival reported to be around 1 year. Comprehensive genomic sequencing has defined some molecular alterations with potential targets, but the majority of patients still do not benefit from druggable targets. Breakthroughs in immune checkpoint blockade have provided new therapeutic options in many cancers. Programmed death ligand 1 (PDL1) overexpression, a possible biomarker predicting response to immune checkpoint inhibitors, approaches forty percent in esophageal and gastric cancers. Translational and molecular studies have shown that esophageal cancers are possible candidate malignancies for immune checkpoint inhibition. In this review, we plan to highlight the mechanisms, preclinical, and early clinical data that provide insight on the role of immune therapeutics in esophageal cancers. PMID:27854242

  10. FOLFOX-6 Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Esophagectomy and Post-operative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastric Cardia; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer

  11. A Phase I/II Study of Oblimersen Plus Cisplatin and Fluorouracil in Gastric & Esophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  12. Overexpression of YWHAZ as an independent prognostic factor in adenocarcinoma of the esophago-gastric junction

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Komatsu, Shuhei; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Miyamae, Mahito; Ohashi, Takuma; Okajima, Wataru; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Hirotaka; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that YWHAZ (14-3-3ζ), included in the 14-3-3 family of proteins, is implicated in the initiation and progression of cancers. To detect a novel treatment target for adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction (AEG), we tested whether YWHAZ acted as a cancer-promoting gene through its overexpression in AEG. We analyzed YWHAZ protein expression in 92 consecutive primary AEG tumors, which had been curatively resected in our institution between 2000 and 2010. Overexpression of the YWHAZ protein was frequently detected in primary AEG tumor samples (46% (42/92)). Overexpression of YWHAZ was significantly correlated with Siewert type III tumor, larger tumor size (≥40 mm) and higher rates of lymph node metastasis and recurrence. Patients with YWHAZ-overexpressing tumors had a worse overall rate of survival than those with non-expressing tumors (P = 0.011, log-rank test) in an intensity expression-dependent manner. Patients with YWHAZ-overexpression tumors had worse overall survival rates than those with lower-expression tumors. YWHAZ positivity was independently associated with a worse outcome in the multivariate analysis (P = 0.0015, hazard ratio 4.49 [1.736-13.06]). In conclusion, YWHAZ plays a crucial role in poor outcomes of patients with AEG through its overexpression, which highlights its usefulness as a prognosticator and potential therapeutic target and indicator in AEG. PMID:27904785

  13. Detection of carcinoembryonic antigen messenger RNA in blood using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to predict recurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The existence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood as an indicator of tumor recurrence has not been clearly established, particularly for gastric cancer patients. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the relationship between CTCs in peripheral blood at initial diagnosis and clinicopathologic findings in patients with gastric carcinoma. Methods Blood samples were obtained from 123 gastric carcinoma patients at initial diagnosis. mRNA was extracted and amplified for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) mRNA detection using real-time RT-PCR. Periodic 3-month follow-up examinations included serum CEA measurements and imaging. Results The minimum threshold for corrected CEA mRNA score [(CEA mRNA/GAPDH mRNA) × 106] was set at 100. Forty-five of 123 patients (36.6%) were positive for CEA mRNA expression. CEA mRNA expression significantly correlated with T stage and postoperative recurrence status (P = 0.001). Recurrent disease was found in 44 of 123 cases (35.8%), and 25 of these (56.8%) were positive for CEA mRNA. Of these patients, CEA mRNA was more sensitive than serum CEA in indicating recurrence. Three-year disease-free survival of patients positive for CEA mRNA was significantly poorer than of patients negative for CEA mRNA (P < 0.001). Only histological grade and CEA mRNA positivity were independent factors for disease-free survival using multivariate analysis. Conclusions CEA mRNA copy number in peripheral blood at initial diagnosis was significantly associated with disease recurrence in gastric adenocarcinoma patients. Real-time RT-PCR detection of CEA mRNA levels at initial diagnosis appears to be a promising predictor for disease recurrence in gastric adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:21040522

  14. Induction of apoptosis by Saussurea lappa and Pharbitis nil on AGS gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seong-Gyu; Koh, Seung-Hee; Jun, Chan-Yong; Nam, Chang-Gyu; Bae, Hyun-Su; Shin, Min-Kyu

    2004-10-01

    We performed this study to understand the molecular basis underlying the antitumor effects of Saussurea lappa, Pharbitis nil, Plantago asiatica and Taraxacum mongolicum, which have been used for herbal medicinal treatments against cancers in East Asia. We analyzed the effects of these medicinal herbs on proliferation and on expression of cell growth/apoptosis related molecules, with using an AGS gastric cancer cell line. The treatments of Saussurea lappa and Pharbitis nil dramatically reduced cell viabilities in a dose and time-dependent manner, but Plantago asiatica and Taraxacum mongolicum didn't. FACS analysis and Annexin V staining assay also showed that both Saussurea lappa and Pharbitis nil induce apoptotic cell death of AGS. Expression analyses via RT-PCR and Western blots revealed that Saussurea lappa, but not Pharbitis nil, increased expression of the p53 and its downstream effector p21Waf1, and that the both increased expression of apoptosis related Bax and cleavage of active caspase-3 protein. We also confirmed the translocation of Bax to mitochondria. Collectively, our data demonstrate that Saussurea lappa and Pharbitis nil induce growth inhibition and apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells, and these effects are correlated with down- and up-regulation of growth-regulating apoptotic and tumor suppressor genes, respectively.

  15. Clinical significance of immunogenic cell death biomarker rage and early growth response 1 in human primary gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, X-C; Gao, H; Zhang, W-B; Abuduhadeer, X; Wang, Y-H

    2013-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a pattern recognition receptor that binds multiple ligands derived from a damaged cell environment, contributes to multiple pathologies including cancer. Early growth response 1 (EGR1) is a tumor suppressor gene or a tumor promoter involved in tumorigenesis and progression of some cancers. However, there is some lack of knowledge about the expression and clinical significance of RAGE and EGR1 in human primary gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC). The present study was aimed to investigate the expression and clinical significance of RAGE and EGR1 in human GAC. One hundred and twenty cases of GAC tissues, adjacent non-cancer tissues (ANCT) and metastatic lymph node (MLN) tissues were collected. The expression of RAGE and EGR1 was assessed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) through tissue microarray procedure. The clinicopathologic characteristics of all patients were analyzed. As a result, the expression of RAGE in GAC and MLN tissues showed the positive staining mainly in the cytoplasm, with lower reactivity rate compared with the ANCT (P less than 0.001), while EGR1 expression had no significant difference between GAC, MLN tissues and ANCT (P=0.565). Moreover, the positive expression of RAGE was closely associated with the N stage of GAC patients, but did not correlate with their age, gender, tumor size, tumor sites, T stage, and metastatic lymph node (each P>0.05). In addition, Spearman Rank correlation analysis showed the positive correlation of RAGE expression with EGR1 in GAC tissues (r=0.658). Taken together, the expression of RAGE is decreased in GAC and MLN tissues, and is associated with the N stage of GAC patients, suggesting that RAGE may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of GAC.

  16. An Unusual Recurrence of Signet Ring Cell Gastric Adenocarcinoma Treated by Right Hemicolectomy, Pancreaticoduodenectomy, and IVC Resection: Controversies and Dilemmas of Following Standard Treatment Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Brammer, Kirsty; Zentler-Munro, Patrick L; Cunningham, David; Mudan, Satvinder

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 67-year-old male patient with a past history of previously resected T3 right adrenocortical carcinoma and T3N1 signet ring cell adenocarcinoma of the stomach who presented with recurrence of gastric cancer in the form of a large solitary mass in the right abdomen. He was treated with ECX (epirubicin, cisplatin and capecitabine) chemotherapy and multivisceral resection. This recurrence pattern is the first such description in the literature, and we discuss the controversies and arguments in favour of offering surgical resection. PMID:26848413

  17. Mutational landscape of gastric adenocarcinoma in Chinese: Implications for prognosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kexin; Yang, Da; Li, Xiangchun; Sun, Baocun; Song, Fengju; Cao, Wenfeng; Brat, Daniel J.; Gao, Zhibo; Li, Haixin; Liang, Han; Zhao, Yanrui; Zheng, Hong; Li, Miao; Buckner, Jan; Patterson, Scott D.; Ye, Xiang; Reinhard, Christoph; Bhathena, Anahita; Joshi, Deepa; Mischel, Paul S.; Croce, Carlo M.; Wang, Yi Michael; Raghavakaimal, Sreekumar; Li, Hui; Lu, Xin; Pan, Yang; Chang, Han; Ba, Sujuan; Luo, Longhai; Cavenee, Webster K.; Zhang, Wei; Hao, Xishan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a highly heterogeneous disease. To identify potential clinically actionable therapeutic targets that may inform individualized treatment strategies, we performed whole-exome sequencing on 78 GCs of differing histologies and anatomic locations, as well as whole-genome sequencing on two GC cases, each with three primary tumors and two matching lymph node metastases. The data showed two distinct GC subtypes with either high-clonality (HiC) or low-clonality (LoC). The HiC subtype of intratumoral heterogeneity was associated with older age, TP53 (tumor protein P53) mutation, enriched C > G transition, and significantly shorter survival, whereas the LoC subtype was associated with younger age, ARID1A (AT rich interactive domain 1A) mutation, and significantly longer survival. Phylogenetic tree analysis of whole-genome sequencing data from multiple samples of two patients supported the clonal evolution of GC metastasis and revealed the accumulation of genetic defects that necessitate combination therapeutics. The most recurrently mutated genes, which were validated in a separate cohort of 216 cases by targeted sequencing, were members of the homologous recombination DNA repair, Wnt, and PI3K-ERBB pathways. Notably, the drugable NRG1 (neuregulin-1) and ERBB4 (V-Erb-B2 avian erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 4) ligand-receptor pair were mutated in 10% of GC cases. Mutations of the BRCA2 (breast cancer 2, early onset) gene, found in 8% of our cohort and validated in The Cancer Genome Atlas GC cohort, were associated with significantly longer survivals. These data define distinct clinicogenetic forms of GC in the Chinese population that are characterized by specific mutation sets that can be investigated for efficacy of single and combination therapies. PMID:25583476

  18. Healthy lifestyle index and risk of gastric adenocarcinoma in the EPIC cohort study.

    PubMed

    Buckland, G; Travier, N; Huerta, J M; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Siersema, P D; Skeie, G; Weiderpass, E; Engeset, D; Ericson, U; Ohlsson, B; Agudo, A; Romieu, I; Ferrari, P; Freisling, H; Colorado-Yohar, S; Li, K; Kaaks, R; Pala, V; Cross, A J; Riboli, E; Trichopoulou, A; Lagiou, P; Bamia, C; Boutron-Ruault, M C; Fagherazzi, G; Dartois, L; May, A M; Peeters, P H; Panico, S; Johansson, M; Wallner, B; Palli, D; Key, T J; Khaw, K T; Ardanaz, E; Overvad, K; Tjønneland, A; Dorronsoro, M; Sánchez, M J; Quirós, J R; Naccarati, A; Tumino, R; Boeing, H; Gonzalez, C A

    2015-08-01

    Several modifiable lifestyle factors, including smoking, alcohol, certain dietary factors and weight are independently associated with gastric cancer (GC); however, their combined impact on GC risk is unknown. We constructed a healthy lifestyle index to investigate the joint influence of these behaviors on GC risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. The analysis included 461,550 participants (662 first incident GC cases) with a mean follow-up of 11.4 years. A healthy lifestyle index was constructed, assigning 1 point for each healthy behavior related to smoking status, alcohol consumption and diet quality (represented by the Mediterranean diet) for assessing overall GC and also body mass index for cardia GC and 0 points otherwise. Risk of GC was calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression models while adjusting for relevant confounders. The highest versus lowest score in the healthy lifestyle index was associated with a significant lower risk of GC, by 51% overall (HR 0.49 95% CI 0.35, 0.70), by 77% for cardia GC (HR 0.23 95% CI 0.08, 0.68) and by 47% for noncardia GC (HR 0.53 (95% CI 0.32, 0.87), p-trends<0.001. Population attributable risk calculations showed that 18.8% of all GC and 62.4% of cardia GC cases could have been prevented if participants in this population had followed the healthy lifestyle behaviors of this index. Adopting several healthy lifestyle behaviors including not smoking, limiting alcohol consumption, eating a healthy diet and maintaining a normal weight is associated with a large decreased risk of GC.

  19. Synchronous and metachronous gastric gist with pancreatic adenocarcinoma: report of 2 cases and a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Marco; de Stefano, Giorgio; Coppola, Nicola; Giorgio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) synchronous and metachronous, respectively, with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a GIST involved 3 years after a ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Data from the literature and our cases seem to suggest that incidental GIST may occur synchronously and metachronously with other cancers more frequently than expected. Thus, the patients with a diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma may have undergone a strict follow up for GIST.

  20. Gastric-type extremely well-differentiated adenocarcinoma arising in the blind pouch of a bypassed stomach, presenting as colonic pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Sarah; Manivel, Carlos J; Ramaswamy, Archana; Mesa, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma after gastric bypass is rare. Extremely well-differentiated adenocarcinoma (EWDA) of the stomach is a rare variant that has been mostly reported in Japan. We present a case of a 68-year-old man with EWDA arising in the bypassed stomach that presented as a colonic pseudo-obstruction (CPO). Several imaging, endoscopic and pathologic studies performed in the course of 2 months were non-diagnostic. An iatrogenic duodenal perforation during a diagnostic procedure led to an emergent exploratory laparotomy in which the dilated colonic segment was resected. Pathologic examination showed metastatic EWDA in the colonic wall. Post-operative complications led to the patient's demise. At autopsy the primary tumor was identified in the blind pouch of the bypassed stomach. A literature review on gastric EWDA and carcinomas arising in bypassed stomachs is discussed. EWDA of the stomach is rare, difficult to diagnose, and shows an aggressive clinical course discordant with its near-benign histology. Gastric cancer arising in a bypassed stomach is uncommon; when it occurs it is usually diagnosed at advanced stage. Surveillance of the blind pouch is not currently recommended. Malignant infiltration of the colonic wall should be included in the differential diagnosis of CPO of unclear etiology.

  1. Possible mechanism for the inhibition of gastric (H+ + K+)-adenosine triphosphatase by the proton pump inhibitor AG-1749

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaya, H.; Satoh, H.; Kubo, K.; Maki, Y.

    1989-02-01

    Mechanisms related to the inhibition of (H+ + K+)-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) by 2-(((3-methyl-4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)-2-pyridyl)methyl) sulfinyl)-1H-benzimidazole (AG-1749) were studied using canine gastric microsomes. AG-1749 (1-100 microM) inhibited the K+-stimulated ATP hydrolysis and vesicular accumulation of H+. AG-1749 bound to the microsomes concentration-dependently and decreased the number of free SH groups; the binding correlating with the enzyme inhibition. Both the binding and inhibition were antagonized by dithiothreitol. N-ethylmaleimide inhibited the (H+ + K+)-ATPase and decreased the binding of (/sup 14/C)AG-1749 to the microsomes. The inhibitory effect of AG-1749 gradually increased with incubation time, and was enhanced by lowering the pH. AG-2000 and AG-1812, acid-induced rearrangement products of AG-1749, inhibited (H+ + K+)-ATPase potently, rapidly and independently of pH; the inhibition was antagonized by dithiothreitol. We propose that AG-1749 is transformed into its active forms within the acidic compartment of the parietal cells and that the active compounds inhibit (H+ + K+)-ATPase activity by reacting with the SH groups of the enzyme.

  2. miR-107 and miR-25 simultaneously target LATS2 and regulate proliferation and invasion of gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Mingjun; Wang, Xiaolei; Li, Wanhu; Cui, Yongchun

    2015-05-08

    Although a series of oncogenes and tumor suppressors were identified in the pathological development of gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC), the underlying molecule mechanism were still not fully understood. The current study explored the expression profile of miR-107 and miR-25 in GAC patients and their downstream regulative network. qRT-PCR analysis was performed to quantify the expression of these two miRNAs in serum samples from both patients and healthy controls. Dual luciferase assay was conducted to verify their putative bindings with LATS2. MTT assay, cell cycle assay and transwell assay were performed to explore how miR-107 and miR-25 regulate proliferation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Findings of this study demonstrated that total miR-107 or miR-25 expression might be overexpressed in gastric cancer patients and they can simultaneously and synchronically regulate LATS2 expression, thereby affecting gastric cancer cell growth and invasion. Therefore, the miR-25/miR-107-LATS2 axis might play an important role in proliferation and invasion of the gastric cancer cells. - Highlights: • Total miR-107 and miR-25 expression is significantly increased in GAC patients. • Both miR-107 and miR-25 can promote proliferation and invasion of GAC cells. • Both miR-107 and miR-25 can target LATS2 and regulate its expression. • miR-107 and miR-25 regulate proliferation and invasion of GAC cells though LATS2.

  3. Apoptosis and G2/M arrest induced by Allium ursinum (ramson) watery extract in an AGS gastric cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-yan; Song, Guo-qing; Yu, Yan-qiu; Ma, Hai-ying; Ma, Ling; Jin, Yu-nan

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study was designed to determine whether Allium ursinum L (ramson) could inhibit the proliferation of human AGS gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, we attempted to determine whether this inhibition could occur by targeting regulatory elements of the cell cycle. Methods Flow cytometry was used to observe apoptosis and the cell cycle in AGS cell lines treated or not treated with ramson watery extract. Proteins related to the cell cycle were detected by Western blotting. Caspase activity was measured using a colorimetric assay kit according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Results Ramson watery extract induced apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest in AGS cells. Western blotting showed that cyclin B was inhibited by ramson watery extract. However, G1 phase-related proteins remain unchanged after treatment. Conclusion Our results indicate that ramson effectively sup pressed proliferation and induced apoptosis and G2/M arrest in AGS cells by regulating elements of the cell cycle. PMID:23836991

  4. Inhibition of {beta}-catenin-mediated transactivation by flavanone in AGS gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chi Hoon; Hahm, Eun Ryeong; Lee, Ju Hyung; Jung, Kyung Chae; Yang, Chul Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-06-17

    Recently, data which prove that Wnt pathway activation may be an early event in multistep carcinogenesis in the stomach have been accumulating. We examined the effect of flavanone against {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in AGS gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that flavanone inhibited {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by flavanone in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant {beta}-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3{beta}, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to {beta}-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that there is no change of {beta}-catenin distribution and of nuclear {beta}-catenin levels through flavanone. In addition, the binding of Tcf complexes to DNA is not influenced by flavanone. The {beta}-catenin/Tcf transcriptional target gene cyclinD1 was downregulated by flavanone. These data suggest that flavanone inhibits the transcription of {beta}-catenin/Tcf responsive genes, by modulating Tcf activity without disrupting {beta}-catenin/Tcf complex formation.

  5. Gastric Microbiome and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brawner, Kyle M.; Morrow, Casey D.; Smith, Phillip D.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer of the stomach is the fourth most common cancer worldwide. The single strongest risk factor for gastric cancer is Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastric inflammation. Among persons with H. pylori infection, strain-specific components, host immune responses, and environmental factors influence the risk for gastric disease, including adenocarcinoma of the stomach, although only a small proportion of infected persons develop the malignancy. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have uncovered a complex community of non-cultivatable inhabitants of the human stomach. The interaction between these inhabitants, collectively referred to as the gastric microbiota, and H. pylori likely impacts gastric immunobiology and possibly the sequelae of H. pylori infection. Thus, characterization of the gastric microbiota in subjects with and without H. pylori infection could provide new insight into gastric homeostasis and the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated disease, including gastric cancer. PMID:24855010

  6. Impact of PTEN on the expression of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF-binding proteins in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Ho-Keun; Kim, Sun-Young; Hwang, Pyoung-Han; Kim, Chan-Young; Yang, Doo-Hyun; Oh, Youngman; Lee, Dae-Yeol . E-mail: leedy@chonbuk.ac.kr

    2005-05-13

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently mutated or deleted in a variety of human cancers including human gastric cancer. PTEN functions primarily as a lipid phosphatase and plays a key role in the regulation of the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway, thereby modulating cell proliferation and cell survival. On the other hand, the IGF system plays an important role in cell proliferation and cell survival via the PI3 kinase/Akt and MAP kinase pathways in many cancer cells. To characterize the impact of PTEN on the IGF-IGFR-IGFBP axis in gastric cancer, we overexpressed PTEN using an adenovirus gene transfer system in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells, SNU-484 and SNU-663, which lack PTEN. Overexpression of PTEN inhibited serum-induced as well as IGF-I-induced cell proliferation as compared to control cells. PTEN overexpression resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of IGF-I, -II, and IGF-IR. Interestingly, amongst the six IGFBPs, only IGFBP-3 was upregulated by PTEN, whereas IGFBP-4 and -6 were reduced. The IGFBP-3 promoter activity assay and Western immunoblotting demonstrate that PTEN regulates IGFBP-3 at the transcriptional level. In addition, the PI3 kinase inhibitor, LY294002, upregulates IGFBP-3 expression but downregulates IGF-I and IGF-II, indicating that PTEN controls IGFBP-3 and IGFs by an Akt-dependent pathway. These findings suggest that PTEN may inhibit antiapoptotic IGF actions not only by blocking the IGF-IGFR-induced Akt activity, but also by regulating expression of components of the IGF system, in particular, upregulation of IGFBP-3, which is known to exert antiproliferative effects through IGF-dependent and IGF-independent mechanisms in cancer cells.

  7. Expression of CDX2 in gastric cardia adenocarcinoma and its correlation with H. pylori and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Chao; Xiao, Yinping; Liu, Zhaoyong

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastric cardia cancer (GCC) is located in the distal stomach, and strongly correlates with atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) infection. Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) is homeobox gene encoding an intestine-specific transcription factor usually expressed in the intestinal epithelium cells. However, in several recent published papers, CDX2 was found to be aberrantly expressed in gastric, thyroid and ovarian cancer. Results Higher expression of CDX2 was found in GCC tissues in comparison with non-malignant cardia mucosa (p<0.05). Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that CDX2 expression correlated with lymphatic metastasis. In addition, we found that CDX2 expression progressively increased with the level of H. pylori infection (p<0.05), and also correlated with cell proliferation, based on Ki67 staining. Methods To investigate the relationship between CDX2, cell proliferation and H. pylori infection, we detected CDX2, Ki62 and H.pylori expression in 83 non-malignant gastric cardia mucosacases and 60 GCC specimens in the Chaoshan area, a high-risk region for esophageal and gastric cardia cancer. Conclusion These findings provide pathological evidence that H. pylori infectionis a driving force of gastric cardia carcinogenesis by upregulating CDX2 and inducing inflammation. These results provide new pathological evidence that H. pylori infection induces GCC tumorigenesis. PMID:27384681

  8. [Atrophy in the mucosa neighboring an intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma by comparing the Sydney vs. OLGA systems].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Mendoza, Pablo; Hernández-Briseño, Liliana; Casarrubias-Ramírez, Moisés; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Ángeles-Garay, Ulises

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: el carcinoma gástrico ocasiona al año unas 700 000 muertes en el mundo. El objetivo de este artículo es evaluar la atrofia en la mucosa vecina al adenocarcinoma gástrico tipo intestinal comparando los sistemas Sídney y OLGA. Diferencias en el rendimiento diagnóstico impulsarían el empleo de alguno. Métodos: estudiamos 28 sujetos con adenocarcinoma gástrico tipo intestinal (Lauren), que comparamos con 32 casos sin neoplasia, ambos grupos con gastrectomía total. Dos patólogos evaluaron la atrofia en el epitelio de cuerpo y antro no neoplásico con los sistemas Sídney y OLGA. Se obtuvieron la media, mediana y distribución de frecuencias por escala de medición, así como la distribución de las variables del estudio. Se calculó la sensibilidad, especificidad y los valores predictivos para cáncer gástrico gracias a dicotomizar las escalas con resultado positivo y negativo para atrofia avanzada. Resultados: veinticuatro de 28 casos con adenocarcinoma gástrico tipo intestinal mostraron atrofia avanzada con OLGA con una sensibilidad y especificidad de 77 y 85 % respectivamente. Con el sistema Sídney, 4 de 28 mostraron atrofia avanzada con una sensibilidad y especificidad de 14 y 100 % respectivamente. Conclusiones: el sistema OLGA tiene elevada sensibilidad y especificidad (77 y 85 % respectivamente) para reconocer cambios preneoplásicos en la mucosa vecina al cáncer gástrico. Empero, OLGA no mostró atrofia avanzada en adenomas foveolares con displasia de alto grado, ni en adenocarcinomas en las porciones proximales del estómago.

  9. Chemotherapy vs supportive care alone for relapsed gastric, gastroesophageal junction, and oesophageal adenocarcinoma: a meta-analysis of patient-level data

    PubMed Central

    Janowitz, Tobias; Thuss-Patience, Peter; Marshall, Andrea; Kang, Jung Hun; Connell, Claire; Cook, Natalie; Dunn, Janet; Park, Se Hoon; Ford, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Second-line chemotherapy treatment of patients with relapsed gastric and oesophageal cancers in comparison with supportive care (SC) alone has been supported by recent phase 3 clinical trials, but a meta-analysis of patient-level data is lacking. Methods: We searched Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and the Web of Science for phase 3 clinical trials that compared second-line chemotherapy with SC alone for gastric and oesophageal cancers. A meta-analysis of the comprehensive patient-level data from the three identified trials was performed. Results: A total of 410 patients with gastric (n=301), gastroesophageal junction (n=76), or oesophageal (n=33) adenocarcinoma were identified. In all, 154 patients received single-agent docetaxel and 84 patients received single-agent irinotecan, each with SC. SC alone was given to 172 patients. Chemotherapy significantly reduced the risk of death (hazard ratio (HR)=0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.51–0.77, P<0.0001). This effect was observed for treatment with docetaxel (HR=0.71, 95% CI=0.56–0.89, P=0.003) and irinotecan (HR=0.49, 95% CI=0.36–0.67, P<0.001). Overall survival (OS) benefit was greatest for patients who progressed 3–6 months following first-line chemotherapy (HR=0.39, 95% CI=0.26–0.59, P<0.0001). Performance status (PS) 0–1 compared with PS 2 (HR=0.66, 95% CI=0.46–0.94, P=0.02), locally advanced disease compared with metastatic disease (HR=0.41, 95% CI=0.25–0.67, P=0.0004) and older age (HR=0.94 per 5 years, 95% CI=0.90–0.99, P=0.01) were significant predictors of improved OS. Progression of disease during first-line treatment (HR=1.24, 95% CI=0.96–1.59) or within the first 3 months of completion of first-line treatment (HR=1.42, 95% CI=1.09–1.83) were predictors of an increased risk of death compared with progression between 3 and 6 months (P=0.03). Health-related quality of life outcomes were reported in only one of the three trials

  10. gamma-Tocotrienol modulates the paracrine secretion of VEGF induced by cobalt(II) chloride via ERK signaling pathway in gastric adenocarcinoma SGC-7901 cell line.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sheng; Liu, Jia-Ren; Li, Yang; Wang, Qi; Liu, Hui-Kun; Yan, Ya-Geng; Chen, Bing-Qing; Sun, Wen-Guang

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic feature of solid tumors, and carcinoma cells are known to secrete many growth factors. These growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), play a major role in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. In this study, the effect of gamma-tocotrienol, a natural product commonly found in palm oil and rice bran, on the accumulation of HIF-1alpha protein and the paracrine secretion of VEGF in human gastric adenocarcinoma SGC-7901 cell line induced by cobalt(II) chloride (as a hypoxia mimic) was investigated. These results showed that cobalt(II) chloride induced the high expression of VEGF in SGC-7901 cells at dose of 150 micromol/L for 24h. Both basal level and cobalt(II) chloride-induced HIF-1alpha protein accumulation and VEGF paracrine secretion were inhibited in SGC-7901 cells treated with gamma-tocotrienol at 60 micromol/L treatment for 24 h. U0126, a MEK1/2 inhibitor, decreased the expression of HIF-1alpha protein and the paracrine secretion of VEGF under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In this study, gamma-tocotrienol also significantly inhibited the hypoxia-stimulated expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-ERK1/2). The mechanism seems to involve in inhibiting hypoxia-mediated activation of p-ERK1/2, it leads to a marked decrease in hypoxia-induced HIF-1alpha protein accumulation and VEGF secretion. These data suggest that HIF-1alpha/VEGF could be a promising target for gamma-tocotrienol in an effective method of chemoprevention and chemotherapy in human gastric cancer.

  11. MiR-101-3p Suppresses HOX Transcript Antisense RNA (HOTAIR)-induced Proliferation and Invasion Through Directly Targeting SRF in Gastric Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Jin; Wu, Zhenfeng; Chen, Che; Liu, Jiayun; Wu, Guannan; Zhai, Jing; Liu, Fukun; Li, Gang

    2017-03-02

    MiR-101-3p was identified as a tumor suppressor in several cancers, but its exact role in gastric adenocarcinoma is still largely unknown. In this study, we found that, compared with the RGM-1 human normal gastric epithelial cells, miR-101-3p was significantly downregulated in all the 6 human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines, including BGC-823, MNK-45, MGC-803, SGC-7901, AGS and HGC-27. Overexpression miR-101-3p suppressed both the proliferation and invasion of AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of miR-101-3p displayed an opposite effect. In addition, miR-101-3p could directly target and suppress the expression SRF gene, which is a transcription factor of HOTAIR, a well-characterized tumor promoter lncRNA. MiR-101-3p negatively regulated SRF-mediated transcription of HOTAIR. Moreover, either silence of SRF or silence of HOTAIR could counteract the promotion of gastric adenocarcinoma cell proliferation and invasion by miR-101-3p inhibition. Our findings indicate that miR-101-3p suppresses HOTAIR-induced proliferation and invasion through directly targeting SRF in gastric carcinoma cells.

  12. The proportion of signet ring cell component in patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma correlates with the degree of response to preoperative chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Charalampakis, Nikolaos; Nogueras González, Graciela M.; Elimova, Elena; Wadhwa, Roopma; Shiozaki, Hironori; Shimodaira, Yusuke; Blum, Mariela A.; Rogers, Jane E.; Harada, Kazuto; Matamoros, Aurelio; Sagebiel, Tara; Das, Prajnan; Minsky, Bruce D.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Weston, Brian; Bhutani, Manoop S.; Estrella, Jeannelyn S.; Badgwell, Brian D.; Ajani, Jaffer A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma (LGAC), who get preoperative therapy, have heterogeneous/unpredictable outcomes. Predictive clinical variables/biomarkers are not established. Methods We analyzed 107 LGAC patients who had chemoradiation and surgery. LGACs were grouped for: (1) presence/absence of signet ring cell histology (SRC) and (2) histologic grade: G2 or G3. %SRC were assessed (0%, 1–10%, 11–49%, and 50–100%) and correlated with pathologic complete response (pathCR) or

  13. FcRgamma chain does not replace CD3zeta chain in CD3zeta-deficient T lymphocytes of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Santalla, Mercedes; Krishnan, Sandeep; Valeri, Anna P; Aguilera-Montilla, Noemi; Fisher, Carolyn U; Perez-Blas, Mercedes; Gutierrez-Calvo, Alberto; Lasa, Inmaculada; Granell-Vicent, Javier; Tsokos, George C; Martin-Villa, José M

    2007-03-01

    Defective CD3zeta chain expression has been reported in T lymphocytes of patients with inflammatory diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus or osteoarthritis, and with cancer. In lupus, the absent CD3zeta chain is replaced by the FcRgamma chain, rendering the T cells hyper responsive. However, there are no data on T lymphocytes from patients with cancer. In this study, the presence of the FcRgamma chain and its associated kinase, Syk, was analysed in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma and healthy subjects. Western blot and immunoprecipitation experiments were carried out with total cell or lipid raft extracts from fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells or T lymphocytes, and Herpesvirus saimiri-derived T-cell lines (of blood or tissue origin). Our results revealed that the absent CD3zeta chain in cancer T lymphocytes was not replaced by FcRgamma either in fresh T cells or T-cell lines, in contrast to lupus T cells. This altered expression of signalling molecules in T lymphocytes of cancer patients, would explain their low proliferative capacity. Our T-cell lines represent tools to unveil the signalling abnormalities of cancer T lymphocytes.

  14. A Prognostic Model Using Inflammation- and Nutrition-Based Scores in Patients With Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma Treated With Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Meng-Che; Wang, Shih-Hor; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Lin, Yu-Hung; Lan, Jui; Rau, Kun-Ming

    2016-04-01

    The outcomes of patients with metastatic gastric cancer (mGC) are poor. Recent studies have identified the prognostic impact of inflammatory response and nutritional status on survival for patients with gastric cancer. This study aims to create a prognostic model using inflammatory- and nutrition-based scores to predict survival in patients with mGC treated with chemotherapy.After institutional review board approval, patients who had mGC and were treated with chemotherapy from 2007 to 2012 at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Significantly predictive factors were identified by multivariate Cox regression analyses. Based on these variables, a prognostic model using inflammatory- and nutrition-based scores was constructed to predict survival. Kaplan-Meier curves were plotted to estimate overall survival. The c-statistic values with 95% confidence interval (CI) were also calculated to access their predicting performances.Our study consisted of 256 patients with a median age of 60 years and a median follow-up visit of 18.5 months. Multivariate analyses showed that neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS), and Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) were independently related to survival. After computing these scores, patients were classified into favorable-, intermediate-, and poor-risk groups. The median overall survival were 27.6 versus 13.2 versus 8.2 months in favorable, intermediate, and poor-risk groups, respectively. The 2-year survival rate was 52% versus 16% versus 3% in favorable-, intermediate-, and poor-risk groups, respectively. (P < 0.001). The c-statistic value of our model at 2 years is 0.8 (95% CI, 0.75-0.86).NLR, mGPS, and PG-SGA were independently related to survival. Our prognostic model using inflammatory- and nutrition-based scores could provide prognostic information to patients and physicians.

  15. Plasma and dietary carotenoid, retinol and tocopherol levels and the risk of gastric adenocarcinomas in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Jenab, M; Riboli, E; Ferrari, P; Friesen, M; Sabate, J; Norat, T; Slimani, N; Tjønneland, A; Olsen, A; Overvad, K; Boutron-Ruault, M-C; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Boeing, H; Schulz, M; Linseisen, J; Nagel, G; Trichopoulou, A; Naska, A; Oikonomou, E; Berrino, F; Panico, S; Palli, D; Sacerdote, C; Tumino, R; Peeters, P H; Numans, M E; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Büchner, F L; Lund, E; Pera, G; Chirlaque, M D; Sánchez, M-J; Arriola, L; Barricarte, A; Quirós, J R; Johansson, I; Johansson, A; Berglund, G; Bingham, S; Khaw, K-T; Allen, N; Key, T; Carneiro, F; Save, V; Giudice, G Del; Plebani, M; Kaaks, R; Gonzalez, C A

    2006-01-01

    Despite declining incidence rates, gastric cancer (GC) is a major cause of death worldwide. Its aetiology may involve dietary antioxidant micronutrients such as carotenoids and tocopherols. The objective of this study was to determine the association of plasma levels of seven common carotenoids, their total plasma concentration, retinol and α- and γ-tocopherol, with the risk of gastric adenocarcinoma in a case–control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a large cohort involving 10 countries. A secondary objective was to determine the association of total sum of carotenoids, retinol and α-tocopherol on GCs by anatomical subsite (cardia/noncardia) and histological subtype (diffuse/intestinal). Analytes were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in prediagnostic plasma from 244 GC cases and 645 controls matched by age, gender, study centre and date of blood donation. Conditional logistic regression models adjusted by body mass index, total energy intake, smoking and Helicobacter pylori infection status were used to estimate relative cancer risks. After an average 3.2 years of follow-up, a negative association with GC risk was observed in the highest vs the lowest quartiles of plasma β-cryptoxanthin (odds ratio (OR)=0.53, 95% confidence intervals (CI)=0.30–0.94, Ptrend=0.006), zeaxanthin (OR=0.39, 95% CI=0.22–0.69, Ptrend=0.005), retinol (OR=0.55, 95% CI=0.33–0.93, Ptrend=0.005) and lipid-unadjusted α-tocopherol (OR=0.59, 95% CI=0.37–0.94, Ptrend=0.022). For all analytes, no heterogeneity of risk estimates or significant associations were observed by anatomical subsite. In the diffuse histological subtype, an inverse association was observed with the highest vs lowest quartile of lipid-unadjusted α-tocopherol (OR=0.26, 95% CI=0.11–0.65, Ptrend=0.003). These results show that higher plasma concentrations of some carotenoids, retinol and α-tocopherol are associated with reduced risk

  16. Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Fluorouracil, Leucovorin, and Irinotecan versus Epirubicin, Cisplatin, and Capecitabine in Patients with Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Feng; Zheng, Hanrui; Wu, Yifan; Wheeler, John; Zeng, Xiaoxi; Fu, Ping; Li, Qiu

    2016-01-01

    No standard treatment has been accepted widely for the first-/second-line therapy for advanced gastric cancer (AGC). The current study aimed to determine a preferred strategy between FOLFIRI (fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan) and ECX (epirubicin, cisplatin,and capecitabine) for AGC from the cost-effectiveness perspective. According to a French intergroup study, two groups (ECX arm and FOLFIRI arm) and three health states (progression-free survival (PFS), progressive disease (PD) and death) were analyzed in the current Markov model. All the medical costs were calculated from a Chinese societal perspective. Although FOLFIRI was an acceptable first-line therapy in the treatment of AGC with a better time-to treatment failure (TTF) compared to ECX, ECX arm (ECX followed by FOLFIRI) gained 0.08 quality-adjusted life months (QALMs) more effectiveness benefit compared with FOLFIRI arm (FOLFIRI followed by ECX). Additionally, a lower cost was found in ECX arm ($23,813.13 versus $24,983.70). Hence, the strategy of FOLFIRI arm is dominated by ECX arm ($4,125.8 per QALM in FOLIRI arm; $3,879.724 per QALM in ECX arm). ECX followed by FOLFIRI was a preferred strategy with more effectiveness and lower cost compared with FOLFIRI followed by ECX for the treatment of AGC. PMID:27824060

  17. Phase II Trial of Preoperative Irinotecan-Cisplatin Followed by Concurrent Irinotecan-Cisplatin and Radiotherapy for Resectable Locally Advanced Gastric and Esophagogastric Junction Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Fernando; Galan, Maica; Tabernero, Josep; Cervantes, Andres; Vega-Villegas, M. Eugenia; Gallego, Javier; Laquente, Berta; Rodriguez, Edith; Carrato, Alfredo; Escudero, Pilar; Massuti, Bartomeu; Alonso-Orduna, Vicente; Cardenal, Adelaida; Saenz, Alberto; Giralt, Jordi; Yuste, Ana Lucia

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To determine in a Phase II trial whether preoperative irinotecan-cisplatin (IC) followed by concurrent IC therapy and radiotherapy (IC/RT) improved outcome in patients with resectable, locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma (GC) or esophagogastric junction cancer (EGJC). Patients and Methods: Patients with resectable Stage II-IV, M0 GC or EGJC made up the study population. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR). Two courses of IC (irinotecan, 65mg/m{sup 2}; cisplatin, 30mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 8 every 21 days) were given. Patients without progression then received IC/RT, consisting of daily radiotherapy (45Gy) with concurrent IC (irinotecan, 65mg/m{sup 2}; cisplatin, 30mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22). Surgical resection was performed, if feasible, 5-8 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. Results: Twenty-three patients were included in the study: 10 with EGJC and 13 with GC. Two patients (9%) achieved pCR. The incidences of Grade 3-4 toxicities were as follows: IC: neutropenia 35% (febrile 13%), anemia 22%, diarrhea 22%, emesis 8%; IC/RT: neutropenia 52% (febrile 5%), asthenia 19%, anemia 9%, emesis 9%, diarrhea 5%, cardiotoxicity 5%. No patients died during IC or IC/RT. R0 resection was achieved in 15 patients (65%). Median survival was 14.5 months, and the actuarial 2-year survival rate was 35%. Conclusions: Preoperative IC followed by IC/RT resulted in moderate response and resection rates with mild toxicity in patients with GC and EGJC.

  18. Multicentre phase II pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of OSI-7904L in previously untreated patients with advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Falk, S; Anthoney, A; Eatock, M; Van Cutsem, E; Chick, J; Glen, H; Valle, J W; Drolet, D W; Albert, D; Ferry, D; Ajani, J

    2006-08-21

    A two-stage Simon design was used to evaluate the response rate of OSI-7904L, a liposome encapsulated thymidylate synthase inhibitor, in advanced gastric and/or gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma (A-G/GEJA), administered intravenously at 12 mg m(-2) over 30 min every 21 days. Fifty patients were treated. Median age was 64 years (range 35-82), 62% were male and 89% had ECOG PS of 0/1. A total of 252 cycles were administered; median of 4 per patient (range 1-21). Twelve patients required dose reductions, mainly for skin toxicity. Investigator assessed response rate was 17.4% (95% CI 7.8-31.4) with one complete and seven partial responses in 46 evaluable patients. Twenty-one patients (42%) had stable disease. Median time to progression and survival were 12.4 and 36.9 weeks, respectively. NCI CTCAE Grade 3/4 neutropenia (14%) and thrombocytopenia (4%) were uncommon. The main G3/4 nonhaematological toxicities were skin-related 22%, stomatitis 14%, fatigue/lethargy 10%, and diarrhea 8%. Pharmacokinetic data showed high interpatient variability. Patients with higher AUC were more likely to experience G3/4 toxicity during cycle 1 while baseline homocysteine did not predict toxicity. Response did not correlate with AUC. Elevations in 2'-dU were observed indicating target inhibition. Analysis of TS genotype, TS protein and expression did not reveal any correlation with outcome. OSI-7904L has activity in A-G/GEJA similar to other active agents and an acceptable safety profile.

  19. FBXO32, a new TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway target gene, is epigenetically inactivated in gastric cardia adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, W; Zhang, M; Guo, Y; Shen, S; Guo, X; Dong, Z

    2015-01-01

    FBXO32 has recently been identified as a TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway target gene, involved in regulating cell survival and may be transcriptionally silenced by epigenetic mechanisms in some kind of carcinomas. The present study was to investigate the role and promoter methylation status of FBXO32 in gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA), and determine the prognostic significance of FBXO32 in GCA. Bisulfite Conversion-Specific and Methylation-Specific PCR, real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining methods were used to detect the methylation status and expression of FBXO32 in GCA samples. The frequency of FBXO32 methylation in GCA tumor tissues (44.6%) was significantly higher than that in corresponding normal tissues (3.6%) and was associated with TNM stage, pathological differentiation, distant metastasis or recurrence and upper gastrointestinal cancers (UGIC) family history. Decreased mRNA and protein expression of FBXO32 was observed in GCA tumor tissues and was associated with FBXO32 promoter methylation status. A positive correlation between FBXO32 and p-Smad2/3, Smad4 protein expression was also found in clinical specimens. GCA patients in stage III and IV, with positive UGIC family history, and hypermethylation and down-expression of FBXO32 were most likely to develop metastatic disease and also showed the worse survival. In all, aberrant hypermethylation of FBXO32 may be one of the mechanisms that lead to loss or down expression of the gene in GCA, FBXO32 may be a functional tumor suppressor and reactivation of FBXO32 gene may has therapeutic potential and may be used as a prognostic marker for GCA patients.

  20. Catechin-based procyanidins from Peumus boldus Mol. aqueous extract inhibit Helicobacter pylori urease and adherence to adenocarcinoma gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Pastene, Edgar; Parada, Víctor; Avello, Marcia; Ruiz, Antonieta; García, Apolinaria

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the anti-Helicobacter pylori effect of an aqueous extract from dried leaves of Peumus boldus Mol. (Monimiaceae) was evaluated. This extract displayed high inhibitory activity against H. pylori urease. Therefore, in order to clarify the type of substances responsible for such effect, a bioassay-guided fractionation strategy was carried out. The active compounds in the fractions were characterized through different chromatographic methods (RP-HPLC; HILIC-HPLC). The fraction named F5 (mDP = 7.8) from aqueous extract was the most active against H. pylori urease with an IC50  = 15.9 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL. HPLC analysis evidenced that F5 was composed mainly by catechin-derived proanthocyanidins (LC-MS and phloroglucinolysis). The anti-adherent effect of boldo was assessed by co-culture of H. pylori and AGS cells. Both the aqueous extract and F5 showed an anti-adherent effect in a concentration-dependent manner. An 89.3% of inhibition was reached at 2.0 mg GAE/mL of boldo extract. In conjunction, our results suggest that boldo extract has a potent anti-urease activity and anti-adherent effect against H. pylori, properties directly linked with the presence of catechin-derived proanthocyanidins.

  1. A phase IIa study of rhLTα-Da in combination with cisplatin and fluorouracil for patients with metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma or gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Hua; Wang, Yun; Chen, Zhen-Dong; Chen, Jian-Hua; Qin, Feng-Zhan; Jiang, Wen-Qi; Li, Yu-Hong

    2016-11-01

    Recombinant human lymphotoxin-α derivative (rhLTα-Da) is a lymphotoxin-α derivative missing 27 N-terminal amino acid residues. This multicenter phase IIa trial was conducted to evaluate the safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of rhLTα-Da with cisplatin (DDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) for metastatic esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC) and gastric adenocarcinoma (GC). Two different rhLTα-Da doses (10 µg/m(2)/d and 20 µg/m(2)/d) in combination with DDP and 5-Fu were evaluated in this study. The first 6 ESCC and 6 GC patients were given 10 µg/m(2)/d rhLTα-Da followed by DDP (15 mg/m(2)/d) and 5-Fu (750 mg/m(2)/d) on days 1-5. The next 6 ESCC and 6 GC patients were given 20 µg/m(2)/d rhLTα-Da after fewer than 2 of the 6 patients who received the 10 µg/m(2)/d dose exhibited dose-limiting rhLTα-Da-related toxicities. The treatment was 21 days a cycle until a maximum of 6. The rhLTα-Da pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. Twelve ESCC and 12 GC patients were enrolled. The toxicities were controllable and reversible. The most common adverse events related to rhLTα-Da were chills (37.5 %, 9/24) and fever (16.7 %, 4/24) (all grades 1-2). The overall response rates in the 10- and 20-µg/m(2)/d groups were 50 % (6/12) and 33.3 % (4/12), respectively, and the overall response rates of the ESCC and GC patients were 66.7 % (8/12) and 16.7 % (2/12), respectively. rhLTα-Da in combination with DDP and 5-Fu exhibited a tolerable toxicity profile. The addition of rhLTα-Da may enhance the anti-tumor efficacy of platinum-based chemotherapy in metastatic ESCC.

  2. Negative regulation of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by naringenin in AGS gastric cancer cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ju Hyung; Park, Chi Hoon; Jung, Kyung Chae; Rhee, Ho Sung; Yang, Chul Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-09-30

    Functional activation of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling plays an important role in early events in carcinogenesis. We examined the effect of naringenin against {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that naringenin inhibited {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by naringenin in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant {beta}-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3{beta}, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to {beta}-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that the {beta}-catenin distribution and the levels of nuclear {beta}-catenin and Tcf-4 proteins were unchanged after naringenin treatment. Moreover, the binding activities of Tcf complexes to consensus DNA were not affected by naringenin. Taken together, these data suggest that naringenin inhibits {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in gastric cancer with unknown mechanisms.

  3. β-Carotene and lutein inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of NF-κB and IL-8 expression in gastric epithelial AGS cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngha; Seo, Ji Hye; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) are involved in the pathogenesis of gastric inflammation. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a potent mediator of the inflammatory response by activating and recruiting neutrophils to the site of infection. Oxidant-sensitive transcription factor NF-κB regulates the expression of IL-8 in the immune and inflammatory events. Carotenoids (carotenes and oxygenated carotenoids) show antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Low intake of β-carotene leads to high risk of gastric cancer. Oxygenated carotenoid lutein inhibited NF-κB activation in experimental uveitis. The present study aims to investigate whether β-carotene and lutein inhibit H(2)O(2)-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of IL-8 in gastric epithelial AGS cells. The cells were treated with carotenoids 2 h prior to the treatment of H(2)O(2). mRNA expression was analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real time RT-PCR analyses. IL-8 level in the medium was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-κB activation was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. ROS levels of the cells were detected by confocal microscopic analysis for fluorescent dichlorofluorescein. As a result, H(2)O(2 )induced the activation of NF-κB and expression of IL-8 in AGS cells time-dependently. β-Carotene and lutein showed inhibitory effects on H(2)O(2)-induced increase in intracellular ROS levels, activation of NF-κB, and IL-8 expression in AGS cells. In conclusion, supplementation of carotenoids such as β-carotene and lutein may be beneficial for the treatment of oxidative stress-mediated gastric inflammation.

  4. Enhanced immunogenicity and antitumour effects with heterologous prime-boost regime using vaccines based on MG7-Ag mimotope of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, T; Liang, S; Meng, F; Han, Q; Guo, C; Sun, L; Chen, Y; Liu, Z; Yu, Z; Xie, H; Ding, J; Fan, D

    2006-05-01

    MG7-Ag, gastric cancer-associated antigen, has been shown to be immunogenic and has been used as marker molecule for prognosis. In a previous study, we developed an oral DNA vaccine based on MG7-Ag mimotope. However, we failed to detect cellular immune response using the oral MG7-Ag mimotope DNA vaccine. To induce significant T cell response, we developed a recombinant adenovirus vaccine based on MG7-Ag mimotope and evaluated the efficacy and protective effects of heterologous prime-boost immunization protocol with an oral DNA vaccine previously developed. We found that both vaccines were able to elicit a significant humoral response against MG7-Ag, while the highest serum titre MG7 antibody was detected in mice immunized with the heterologous prime-boost immunization protocol. Enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay demonstrated that the heterologous prime-boost immunization strategy was more efficient in inducing T cell response than the homologous prime-boost strategy. In the tumour challenge assay, 2 of 5 mice immunized with the heterologous prime-boost protocol were tumour free, while none of the mice in homologous prime-boost groups or control groups was tumour free. Those tumour-bearing mice in the heterologous prime-boost regime had smaller tumour masses than their counterparts in the homologous prime-boost groups or control groups. Therefore, our study suggests that vaccines against MG7-Ag induce significant immune response against gastric cancer, and that the heterologous prime-boost protocol using different types of vaccines could achieve better protective effect than the homologous prime-boost protocol.

  5. Identification of Volatile Biomarkers of Gastric Cancer Cells and Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection based on Sensing Interface of Au-Ag Alloy coated MWCNTs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yixia; Gao, Guo; Liu, Huijuan; Fu, Hualin; Fan, Jun; Wang, Kan; Chen, Yunsheng; Li, Baojie; Zhang, Chunlei; Zhi, Xiao; He, Lin; Cui, Daxiang

    2014-01-01

    Successful development of novel electrochemical biosensing interface for ultrasensitive detection of volatile biomarkers of gastric cancer cells is a challenging task. Herein we reported to screen out novel volatile biomarkers associated with gastric cancer cells and develop a novel Au-Ag alloy composites-coated MWCNTs as sensing interface for ultrasensitive detection of volatile biomarkers. MGC-803 gastric cancer cells and GES-1 gastric mucous cells were cultured in serum-free media. The sample preparation approaches and HS-SPME conditions were optimized for screening volatile biomarkers. Volatiles emitted from the headspace of the cells/medium culture were identified using GC-MS. The Au-Ag nanoparticles-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes were prepared as a sensing interface for detection of volatile biomarkers. Results showed that eight different volatile metabolites were screened out between MGC-803 cells and GES-1 cells. Two compounds such as 3-octanone and butanone were specifically present in the headspace of the MGC-803 cells. Three volatiles such as 4-isopropoxybutanol, nonanol and 4-butoxy 1-butanol coexisted in the headspace of both the MGC-803 cells and the GES-1 cells, their concentrations in the headspace of the GES-1cells were markedly higher than those in the MGC-803 cells, three volatiles such as formic acid propyl ester, 1.4-butanediol and 2, 6, 11-trimethyl dodecane solely existed in the headspace of the GES-1 cells. The nanocomposites of MWNTs loaded with Au-Ag nanoparticles were prepared as a electrochemical sensing interface for detection of two volatile biomarkers, cyclic voltammetry studies showed that the fabricated sensor could detect 3-octanone in the range of 0~0.0025% (v/v) and with a detection limitation of 0.3 ppb, could detect butanone in the range of 0 ~ 0.055% (v/v), and with a detection limitation of 0.5 ppb, and exhibited good selectivity. The novel electrochemical biosensor combined with volatile biomarkers of gastric cancer

  6. Effect of Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate on Helicobacter pylori-Induced Apoptosis in AGS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chien-Yi; Kou, Hwang-Shang; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Huang, Meng-Chuan; Hu, Huang-Ming; Wu, Meng-Chieh; Lu, Chien-Yu; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Kuo, Fu-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products are wildly used in human life. Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is an essential additive in plastic manufacturing and is used as plasticizer for many products including plastic food packaging. DEHP is a teratogenic compound and can cause potent reproductive toxicity. DEHP can also cause liver damage, peroxisome proliferation, and carcinogenesis. DEHP is also strongly associated with peptic ulcers and gastric cancer; however, the underlying effect and mechanism of DEHP on the gastrointestinal tract are not entirely clear. The oral infection route of H. pylori parallels the major ingestion route of DEHP into the human body. Therefore, we wanted to study the effect of DEHP and H. pylori exposure on the human gastric epithelial cell line, AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma). The viability of the AGS cell line was significantly lower in 80 μM-DEHP and H. pylori (MOI = 100 : 1) coexposure than DEHP or H. pylori alone. DEHP and H. pylori coexposure also induced caspase-3 activation, and increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and DNA fragmentation in AGS cells. These results indicate that DEHP can enhance H. pylori cytotoxicity and induce gastric epithelial cell apoptosis. Therefore, it is possible that DEHP and H. pylori coexposure might enhance the disruption of the gastric mucosa integrity and potentially promote the pathogenesis of gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:24454344

  7. DAG/PKCδ and IP3/Ca²⁺/CaMK IIβ Operate in Parallel to Each Other in PLCγ1-Driven Cell Proliferation and Migration of Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells, through Akt/mTOR/S6 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lianzhi; Zhuang, Luhua; Zhang, Bingchang; Wang, Fen; Chen, Xiaolei; Xia, Chun; Zhang, Bing

    2015-12-01

    Phosphoinositide specific phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) activates diacylglycerol (DAG)/protein kinase C (PKC) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)/Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II) axes to regulate import events in some cancer cells, including gastric adenocarcinoma cells. However, whether DAG/PKCδ and IP3/Ca(2+)/CaMK IIβ axes are simultaneously involved in PLCγ1-driven cell proliferation and migration of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells and the underlying mechanism are not elucidated. Here, we investigated the role of DAG/PKCδ or CaMK IIβ in PLCγ1-driven cell proliferation and migration of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells, using the BGC-823 cell line. The results indicated that the inhibition of PKCδ and CaMK IIβ could block cell proliferation and migration of BGC-823 cells as well as the effect of inhibiting PLCγ1, including the decrease of cell viability, the increase of apoptotic index, the down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 expression level, and the decrease of cell migration rate. Both DAG/PKCδ and CaMK IIβ triggered protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/S6 pathway to regulate protein synthesis. The data indicate that DAG/PKCδ and IP3/Ca(2+)/CaMK IIβ operate in parallel to each other in PLCγ1-driven cell proliferation and migration of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells through Akt/mTOR/S6 pathway, with important implication for validating PLCγ1 as a molecular biomarker in early gastric cancer diagnosis and disease surveillance.

  8. Constitutive hypophosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 and down-regulation of c-Jun in human gastric adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Sung, Joseph Joe Yiu; Yu Le; Li Zhijie; Chu, Kent Man; Cho, C.H.

    2008-08-22

    Hyperphosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases-1/2 (ERK1/2) is known to promote cancer cell proliferation. We therefore investigated the constitutive phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and the expression of its downstream targets c-Fos, c-Jun, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in biopsied human gastric cancer tissues. Results showed that ERK1/2 phosphorylation and c-Jun expression were significantly lowered in gastric cancer compared with the non-cancer adjacent tissues. The expression of c-Fos, however, was not altered while COX-2 was significantly up-regulated. To conclude, we demonstrate that hypophosphorylation of ERK1/2 may occur in gastric cancer. Such discovery may have implication in the application of pathway-directed therapy for this malignant disease.

  9. Involvement of Aquaporin 3 in Helicobacter pylori-Related Gastric Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Guoxin; Shen, Lizong

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is one of the most common and lethal malignant cancers worldwide, and numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection plays a key role in the development of gastric carcinomas. Our previous studies showed that aquaporin 3 (AQP3) is overexpressed in gastric carcinoma and promotes the migration and proliferation of human gastric carcinoma cells, suggesting that AQP3 may be a potentially important determinant of gastric carcinoma. However, the role of AQP3 in H. pylori carcinogenesis is unknown. Methods The AQP3 protein and H. pylori were detected in human gastric tissues by immunohistochemistry and modified Giemsa staining respectively. AQP3 knockdown was obtained by small interfering (si) RNA. Western blot assays and RT-PCR were used to evaluate the change of AQP3 in the human gastric cancer AGS and SGC7901 cell lines after co-culture with H. pylori. Sprague Dawley rats were orally inoculated with H. pylori to establish a rat model colonized by H. pylori. Results The present study found that AQP3 expression correlated with H. pylori infection status in gastric cancer tissues and corresponding normal mucosa, and H. pylori co-culture upregulated AQP3 expression in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells in vitro via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. H. pylori infection also increased AQP3 expression in gastric mucosa colonized by H. pylori in a Sprague Dawley rat model. Conclusions These findings provide further information to understand the mechanism of H. pylori carcinogenesis and a potential strategy for the treatment of H. pylori-associated gastric carcinoma. PMID:23152856

  10. Downregulated microRNA-200a promotes EMT and tumor growth through the wnt/β-catenin pathway by targeting the E-cadherin repressors ZEB1/ZEB2 in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cong, Ningning; Du, Ping; Zhang, Anling; Shen, Fajuan; Su, Juan; Pu, Peiyu; Wang, Tao; Zjang, Jie; Kang, Chunsheng; Zhang, Qingyu

    2013-04-01

    In a previous study, we found that microRNA (miRNA)-200a suppresses Wnt/β-catenin signaling by interacting with β-catenin, thereby inhibiting migration, invasion and proliferation. However, the mechanism involved in this suppression remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of miR-200a regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in gastric carcinoma cells, and confirmed the tumor suppressor role of miR-200a in vivo. The expressions of miRNA-200a, -200b and -200c, identified by fluorescent in situ hybridization, were downregulated and inversely correlated with WHO grades of gastric adenocarcinoma (GA). The expression of the potential miR-200a target genes ZEB1 and ZEB2 was detected immunohistochemically. These examinations used the same tissue microarrays to analyze the relationships between miR-200a and potential target genes. The expression of miR-200a and ZEB1/ZEB2 in the same GA tissue microarrays was inversely related. Restored miR-200a expression inhibited tumor growth in nude mice harboring subcutaneous SGC7901 xenografts. The expression of N-cadherin, β-catenin, Twist1 and Snail2 decreased, and E-cadherin levels increased, when miR-200a was elevated, as tested by fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Similar results were observed in vivo. We found upregulated miR-200a expression to increase E-cadherin and suppress the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by targeting ZEB1 and ZEB2 in GA, thus delaying tumor growth in vivo. The effect of miR-200a on Wnt/β-catenin signaling may provide a therapeutic target against EMT.

  11. Promoter hypermethylation-mediated downregulation of miR-770 and its host gene MEG3, a long non-coding RNA, in the development of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Dong, Zhiming; Liu, Shengnan; Qiao, Yiling; Kuang, Gang; Guo, Yanli; Shen, Supeng; Liang, Jia

    2017-03-27

    Maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3) is an imprinted gene located at 14q32 which encodes an lncRNA and is downregulated in an expanding list of cancer cell lines and primary human cancers. The miR-770 is transcribed from the intronic sequence of MEG3 and MEG3 may be the host gene for miR-770. However, the biological role of MEG3 and miR-770 in gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA) development and prognosis is poorly defined. The present study was to investigate the function and methylation status of MEG3 in GCA, and further to detect the functional association of miR-770 and its host gene MEG3 in GCA carcinogenesis and prognosis. MEG3 and miR-770 was significantly downregulated in GCA patients and cell lines, and their expression was associated with TNM stage and lymph node metastasis. Overexpression of MEG3 and miR-770 inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. Furthermore, the expression level of MEG3 and miR-770 was significantly increased in cancer cells after treated with 5-Aza-dC. The aberrant hypermethylation of proximal promoter and enhancer region of MEG3 was detected in GCA tissues. In addition, the proximal promoter and enhancer region hypermethylation and dysregulation of MEG3 and miR-770 were associated with poorer GCA patients' survival. These findings suggest that miR-770 and its host gene MEG3 may play tumor suppressor role and hypermethylation of proximal promoter and enhancer region may be one of the critical mechanisms in inactivation of MEG3 and miR-770 in GCA development. MEG3 and miR-770 may be used as potential biomarkers in predicting GCA patients' prognosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy of preoperative chemotherapy regimens in patients with initially unresectable locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma: capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) or with epirubicin (EOX)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhuang, Rong-yuan; Yu, Yi-yi; Yu, Shan; Hou, Jun; Ji, Yuan; Sun, Yi-hong; Shen, Kun-tang; Shen, Zhen-bin; Liu, Feng-lin; Zhao, Nai-qing; Liu, Tian-shu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the effectiveness of EOX (capecitabine, oxaliplatin and epirubicin) compared with XELOX (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) as preoperative chemotherapy for initially unresectable locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods This is a prospective observational study. Patients with unresectable locally advanced gastric cancer were performed EOX regimen or XELOX regimen at the discretion of the investigators. They were assessed for response every 2 cycles by CT (computed tomography) scan. A multidisciplinary team reassessed resectability after 4 cycles. The primary endpoint was the response rate. Secondary end points included the R0 resection rate, survival and adverse events. Results From November 2008 to May 2015, 242 patients were enrolled; 112 of them were assigned to EOX regimen and 130 to XELOX regimen. The response rates were 33.0% and 33.8% respectively in EOX group and XELOX group (P = 0.997). After 4 cycles of chemotherapy, 63 patients (56.3%) in EOX group and 81 patients (62.3%) in XELOX group received radical operation (P = 0.408). There was no significant difference in progress-free survival (PFS, 12.0m vs. 15.4m, P = 0.925) and overall survival (OS, 25.7m vs. 29.0m, P = 0.783) in two groups. In addition, more adverse effects occurred in EOX group, such as more leucopenia (22.3% vs. 10.0%, P = 0.014), neutropenia (23.2% vs. 11.5%, P = 0.025), fatigue (11.6% vs. 3.8%, P = 0.041) and vomiting (10.7% vs. 2.3%, P = 0.015). Conclusions For unresectable locally advanced gastric cancer patients, XELOX regimen showed similar effects in response rate, radical resection rate and survival benefits, but with less toxicity effects. PMID:27602586

  13. A case of gastric cancer with heterogeneous components of EB virus (+)/TP53 (+) and EB virus (-)/TP53 (-).

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ikuo; Kan, Kazuomi; Doi, Sadayuki; Motoki, Yoshiyuki; Onodera, Masayuki; Hirota, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric adenocarcinoma is a histological subtype of gastric adenocarcinoma, in which all of the carcinoma cells are basically positive for EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) by in situ hybridization. Although its typical histology has some overlap with gastric carcinoma with lymphoid stroma, absence of massive lymphoid infiltrate is sometimes observed either in whole or in part. EBV-associated adenocarcinoma is one of the four representative molecular pathological subtypes recently identified by comprehensive genomic analysis of gastric adenocarcinomas. According to the analysis, typical EBV-associated gastric adenocarcinoma constitutes an independent molecular pathological subgroup, which is mutually exclusive to TP53-mutated adenocarcinoma with chromosomal instability, another molecular pathological subtype in gastric adenocarcinomas. Here, we report a rare case of gastric cancer heterogeneously composed of EBER (+)/TP53 (+) and EBER (-)/TP53 (-) portions. The EBER (+)/TP53 (+) component with massive lymphoid infiltrate surrounded the EBER (-)/TP53 (-) component showing well to moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma. Although collision of two independent gastric cancers could be the simplest and most possible explanation for this situation, we discussed another possibility. In the case of gastric collision tumors, concurrent development of EBER (+) gastric adenocarcinomas and EBER (-) gastric adenocarcinomas in a single stomach is a rare incident. Since presence of the EBER (+)/TP53 (+) tumor component is atypical in itself, we also discussed the mechanism of development of the clone.

  14. Sulforaphene promotes Bax/Bcl2, MAPK-dependent human gastric cancer AGS cells apoptosis and inhibits migration via EGFR, p-ERK1/2 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Arindam; Biswas, Raktim; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Jongkee; Ahn, Jin-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer migration and invasion considered as main causes of this cancer-related death around the world. Sulforaphene (4-isothiocyanato-4R-(methylsulfinyl)-1-butene), a structural analog of sulforaphane, has been found to exhibit anticancer potential against different cancers. Our aim was to investigate whether dietary isothiocyanate sulforaphene (SFE) can promote human gastric cancer (AGS) cells apoptosis and inhibit migration. Cells were treated with various concentrations of SFE and cell viability, morphology, intracellular ROS, migration and different signaling protein expressions were investigated. The results indicate that SFE decreases AGS cell viability and induces apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Intracellular ROS generation, dose- and time-dependent Bax/Bcl2 alteration and signaling proteins like cytochrome c, Casp-3, Casp-8 and PARP-1 higher expression demonstrated the SFE-induced apoptotic pathway in AGS cells. Again, SFE induced apoptosis also accompanied by the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) like JNK and P-38. Moreover, dose-dependent EGFR, p-ERK1/2 down-regulation and cell migration inhibition at non-toxic concentration confirms SFE activity in AGS cell migration inhibition. Thus, this study demonstrated effective chemotherapeutic potential of SFE by inducing apoptisis as well as inhibiting migration and their preliminary mechanism for human gastric cancer management.

  15. HER2 amplification in gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma: correlation of two antibodies using gastric cancer scoring criteria, H score, and digital image analysis with fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Radu, Oana M; Foxwell, Tyler; Cieply, Kathleen; Navina, Sarah; Dacic, Sanja; Nason, Katie S; Davison, Jon M

    2012-04-01

    We assessed 103 resected gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas for HER2 amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 2 commercial immunohistochemical assays. Of 103, 30 (29%) were FISH-amplified. Both immunohistochemical assays had greater than 95% concordance with FISH. However, as a screening test for FISH amplification, the Ventana Medical Systems (Tucson, AZ) 4B5 antibody demonstrated superior sensitivity (87%) compared with the DAKO (Carpinteria, CA) A0485 (70%). Of the cases, 28 were immunohistochemically 3+ or immunohistochemically 2+/FISH-amplified with the 4B5 assay compared with only 22 cases with the A0485 assay, representing a large potential difference in patient eligibility for anti-HER2 therapy. Cases with low-level FISH amplification (HER2/CEP17, 2.2-4.0) express lower levels of HER2 protein compared with cases with high-level amplification (HER2/CEP17, ≥4.0), raising the possibility of a differential response to anti-HER2 therapy. The H score and digital image analysis may have a limited role in improving HER2 test performance.

  16. Probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum UCO-979C biofilm formation on AGS and Caco-2 cells and Helicobacter pylori inhibition.

    PubMed

    Salas-Jara, M J; Sanhueza, E A; Retamal-Díaz, A; González, C; Urrutia, H; García, A

    2016-11-01

    The ability of the human isolate Lactobacillus fermentum UCO-979C to form biofilm and synthesize exopolysaccharide on abiotic and biotic models is described. These properties were compared with the well-known Lactobacillus casei Shirota to better understand their anti-Helicobacter pylori probiotic activities. The two strains of lactobacilli synthesized exopolysaccharide as detected by the Dubois method and formed biofilm on abiotic and biotic surfaces visualized by crystal violet staining and scanning electron microscopy. Concomitantly, these strains inhibited H. pylori urease activity by up to 80.4% (strain UCO-979C) and 66.8% (strain Shirota) in gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells, but the two species showed equal levels of inhibition (~84%) in colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. The results suggest that L. fermentum UCO-979C has probiotic potential against H. pylori infections. However, further analyses are needed to explain the increased activity observed against the pathogen in AGS cells as compared to L. casei Shirota.

  17. Association between serum vitamin D levels and gastric cancer: A retrospective chart analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Neil; Companioni, Rafael Ching; Tiba, Melik; Alkhawam, Hassan; Catalano, Carmine; Sogomonian, Robert; Baum, Joel; Walfish, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine whether there is an increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma associated with vitamin D deficiency (VDd). METHODS A retrospective case control study was performed of all patients diagnosed with gastric adenocarcinoma between 2005 and 2015. After we excluded the patients without a documented vitamin D level, 49 patients were included in our study. RESULTS The average age of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma and documented vitamin D level was 64 years old (95%CI: 27-86) and average vitamin D level was 20.8 mg/dL (95%CI: 4-44). Compared to a matched control group, the prevalence of VDd/insufficiency in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma was significantly higher than normal vitamin D levels (83.7% vs 16.3%). Forty-one patients (83.7%) with adenocarcinoma showed VDd/insufficiency compared to 18 (37%) patients with normal vitamin D level without gastric cancer (OR: 8.8, 95%CI: 5-22, P value < 0.0001). The average age of males with gastric adenocarcinoma diagnosis was 60 years old vs 68 years old for females (P = 0.01). Stage II gastric adenocarcinoma was the most prevalent in our study (37%). CONCLUSION We reported a positive relationship between VDd and gastric adenocarcinoma, that is to say, patients with decreased VDd levels have an increased propensity for gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27672427

  18. Effectiveness of Magnifying Narrow-Band Imaging Endoscopy for Differential Diagnosis between the High-Risk Mixed-Type and Low-Risk Simple-Type of Low-Grade, Well-Differentiated Gastric Tubular Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Takamura, Asako; Watanabe, Gen; Sugitani, Suzuko; Ajioka, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds. Magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging (NBI-ME) is useful for diagnosing differentiated early gastric cancer (D-EGC). D-EGC is classified as high- or low-grade based on its glandular architectural and cytological atypia. Low-grade, well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma (LG-tub1) mixed with high-grade tub1 (HG-tub1) and/or other histological types (M-LG-tub1) may indicate a primitive high-risk malignant lesion compared to histologically simple-type LG-tub1 (S-LG-tub1). Because LG-tub1 is occasionally difficult to diagnose due to its unclear demarcation under conventional white light endoscopy, early precise diagnoses are important. Methods. We compared NBI-ME and postendoscopic submucosal dissection histological findings for 30 S-LG-tub1 and 15 M-LG-tub1 lesions. We classified the NBI-ME findings of S-LG-tub1 (and not D-EGC) into four patterns. The differential diagnosis between M-LG-tub1 and S-LG-tub1 depended on the presence of more than one of these patterns without or with other patterns (referred to as “limited-to-four-pattern [LFP] sign-positive” and “sign-negative”, resp.). Result. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values, and intraobserver and interobserver agreement, using the “LFP sign” for the differential diagnosis between M-LG-tub1 and S-LG-tub1, were 87.9%, 91.7%, 88.9%, 96.7%, 73.3%, and k = 0.842 and k = 0.737, respectively. Conclusion. NBI-ME may be useful in differentiating between high-risk M-LG-tub1 and low-risk S-LG-tub1. PMID:27127502

  19. Synchronous Appearance of Adenocarcinoma and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) of the Stomach: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pushparaj, Magesh; Masih, Dipti; Pulimood, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histological type of gastric tumour, accounting for approximately 95% of all gastric carcinomas. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. Synchronous adenocarcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) occurring in the stomach is rare and very few cases have been reported in literature. Synchronous tumours in the stomach are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. A 63-year-old gentleman was diagnosed with a gastric adenocarcinoma on endoscopic biopsy and underwent surgery. Postoperative histopathologic examination revealed 2 synchronous tumours with both adenocarcinoma and GIST. The adenocarcinoma was determined to be the aggressive tumour based on histologic features. GIST was categorized as a very low risk of malignancy, based on its size and mitosis. The patient underwent chemotherapy for adenocarcinoma. He is under follow up and is currently disease free. Careful histopathologic evaluation is required to detect co-existing rare synchronous tumours. Presence of the second tumour may require additional procedures or protocols. PMID:27042477

  20. Synchronous Appearance of Adenocarcinoma and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) of the Stomach: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Pushparaj, Magesh; Masih, Dipti; Pulimood, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histological type of gastric tumour, accounting for approximately 95% of all gastric carcinomas. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. Synchronous adenocarcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) occurring in the stomach is rare and very few cases have been reported in literature. Synchronous tumours in the stomach are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. A 63-year-old gentleman was diagnosed with a gastric adenocarcinoma on endoscopic biopsy and underwent surgery. Postoperative histopathologic examination revealed 2 synchronous tumours with both adenocarcinoma and GIST. The adenocarcinoma was determined to be the aggressive tumour based on histologic features. GIST was categorized as a very low risk of malignancy, based on its size and mitosis. The patient underwent chemotherapy for adenocarcinoma. He is under follow up and is currently disease free. Careful histopathologic evaluation is required to detect co-existing rare synchronous tumours. Presence of the second tumour may require additional procedures or protocols.

  1. Conjugation of toll-like receptor-7 agonist to gastric cancer antigen MG7-Ag exerts antitumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Ning-Ning; Diao, Yu-Wen; Liu, Yu; Gao, Dong; Li, Wang; Wan, Yan-Yan; Zhong, Jing-Jing; Jin, Guang-Yi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of our tumor vaccines on reversing immune tolerance and generating therapeutic response. METHODS: Vaccines were synthesized by solid phase using an Fmoc strategy, where a small molecule toll-like receptor-7 agonist (T7) was conjugated to a monoclonal gastric cancer 7 antigen mono-epitope (T7-MG1) or tri-epitope (T7-MG3). Cytokines were measured in both mouse bone marrow dendritic cells and mouse spleen lymphocytes after exposed to the vaccines. BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally immunized with the vaccines every 2 wk for a total of three times, and then subcutaneously challenged with Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells. Three weeks later, the mice were killed, and the tumors were surgically removed and weighed. Serum samples were collected from the mice, and antibody titers were determined by ELISA using an alkaline phosphate-conjugated detection antibody for total IgG. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity was detected by the lactate dehydrogenase method using natural killer cells as effectors and antibody-labeled EAC cells as targets. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte activities were also detected by the lactate dehydrogenase method using lymphocytes as effectors and EAC cells as targets. RESULTS: Vaccines were successfully synthesized and validated by analytical high performance liquid chromatography and electrospray mass spectrometry, including T7, T7-MG1, and T7-MG3. Rapid inductions of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-12 in bone marrow dendritic cells and interferon γ and interleukin-12 in lymphocytes occurred in vitro after T7, T7-MG1, and T7-MG3 treatment. Immunization with T7-MG3 reduced the EAC tumor burden in BALB/c mice to 62.64% ± 5.55% compared with PBS control (P < 0.01). Six or nine weeks after the first immunization, the monoclonal gastric cancer 7 antigen antibody increased significantly in the T7-MG3 group compared with the PBS control (P < 0.01). As for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

  2. Genetic variants in DNA repair pathway genes and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and gastric adenocarcinoma in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Qing; Hu, Nan; Hyland, Paula L; Gao, Ying; Wang, Zhao-Ming; Yu, Kai; Su, Hua; Wang, Chao-Yu; Wang, Le-Min; Chanock, Stephen J; Burdett, Laurie; Ding, Ti; Qiao, You-Lin; Fan, Jin-Hu; Wang, Yuan; Xu, Yi; Shi, Jian-Xin; Gu, Fangyi; Wheeler, William; Xiong, Xiao-Qin; Giffen, Carol; Tucker, Margaret A; Dawsey, Sanford M; Freedman, Neal D; Abnet, Christian C; Goldstein, Alisa M; Taylor, Philip R

    2013-07-01

    The DNA repair pathways help to maintain genomic integrity and therefore genetic variation in the pathways could affect the propensity to develop cancer. Selected germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the pathways have been associated with esophageal cancer and gastric cancer (GC) but few studies have comprehensively examined the pathway genes. We aimed to investigate associations between DNA repair pathway genes and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and GC, using data from a genome-wide association study in a Han Chinese population where ESCC and GC are the predominant cancers. In sum, 1942 ESCC cases, 1758 GC cases and 2111 controls from the Shanxi Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer Genetics Project (discovery set) and the Linxian Nutrition Intervention Trials (replication set) were genotyped for 1675 SNPs in 170 DNA repair-related genes. Logistic regression models were applied to evaluate SNP-level associations. Gene- and pathway-level associations were determined using the resampling-based adaptive rank-truncated product approach. The DNA repair pathways overall were significantly associated with risk of ESCC (P = 6.37 × 10(-4)), but not with GC (P = 0.20). The most significant gene in ESCC was CHEK2 (P = 2.00 × 10(-6)) and in GC was CLK2 (P = 3.02 × 10(-4)). We observed several other genes significantly associated with either ESCC (SMUG1, TDG, TP53, GTF2H3, FEN1, POLQ, HEL308, RAD54B, MPG, FANCE and BRCA1) or GC risk (MRE11A, RAD54L and POLE) (P < 0.05). We provide evidence for an association between specific genes in the DNA repair pathways and the risk of ESCC and GC. Further studies are warranted to validate these associations and to investigate underlying mechanisms.

  3. Association of MMP7 −181A→G Promoter Polymorphism with Gastric Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kesh, Kousik; Subramanian, Lakshmi; Ghosh, Nillu; Gupta, Vinayak; Gupta, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Samir; Mahapatra, Nitish R.; Swarnakar, Snehasikta

    2015-01-01

    Elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase7 (MMP7) has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in cancer invasion. The −181A→G (rs11568818) polymorphism in the MMP7 promoter modulates gene expression and possibly affects cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the impact of −181A→G polymorphism on MMP7 promoter activity and its association with gastric cancer risk in eastern Indian case-control cohorts (n = 520). The GG genotype as compared with the AA genotype was predisposed (p = 0.02; odds ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.1–3.3) to gastric cancer risk. Stratification analysis showed that tobacco addiction enhanced gastric cancer risk in GG subjects when compared with AA subjects (p = 0.03, odds ratio = 2.46, and 95% confidence interval = 1.07–5.68). Meta-analysis revealed that tobacco enhanced the risk for cancer more markedly in AG and GG carriers. Activity and expression of MMP7 were significantly higher in GG than in AA carriers. In support, MMP7 promoter-reporter assays showed greater transcriptional activity toward A to G transition under basal/nicotine-induced/cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) overexpressed conditions in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Moreover, nicotine (a major component of tobacco) treatment significantly up-regulated MMP7 expression due to enhanced CREB phosphorylation followed by its nuclear translocation in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed higher binding of phosphorylated CREB with the −181G than the −181A allele. Altogether, specific binding of phosphorylated CREB to the G allele-carrying promoter enhances MMP7 gene expression that is further augmented by nicotine due to increased CREB phosphorylation and thereby increases the risk for gastric cancer. PMID:25847246

  4. [Role of postoperative chemoradiotherapy in the therapeutic management of adenocarcinomas of the stomach and oesogastric junction].

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, H; Bahri, M; Dhouib, F; Daoud, J

    2016-12-01

    The available data in the literature show that for gastric adenocarcinoma or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma, postoperative chemoradiotherapy improves disease-free survival after surgery with D0 or D1 lymph node dissection (and perhaps D2) as well as in case of positive node or R1 resection. With the publications of perioperative chemotherapy trials, the role of postoperative radiotherapy in the therapeutic arsenal of gastric adenocarcinoma or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma becomes difficult to define. Postoperative radiotherapy is indicated in case of R1 resection.

  5. Early gastric cancer in Menetrier's disease.

    PubMed

    Remes-Troche, Jose Maria; Zapata-Colindres, Juan Carlos; Starkman, Ivethe; De Anda, Jazmin; Arista-Nasr, Julian; Valdovinos-Diaz, Miguel Angel

    2009-01-01

    Uncommon conditions such as pernicious anaemia and hypertrophic gastropathies have been considered as risk factors for gastric cancer; however, the exact increase in risk is unknown. Menetrier's disease is a rare hyperproliferative disorder of the stomach caused by an overexpression of tumour growth factor α, a ligand for the tyrokinase epidermal growth factor receptor, resulting in a selective expansion of surface mucous cells in the body and fundus of the stomach. There have been nearly 200 cases of Menetrier's disease reported in the literature yet less than 15 have been associated with gastric adenocarcinoma. Here, we report an early stage gastric adenocarcinoma detected incidentally in a patient recently diagnosed with Menetrier's disease.

  6. Activation of the Notch1/STAT3/Twist signaling axis promotes gastric cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kai-Wen; Hsieh, Rong-Hong; Huang, Kuo-Hung; Fen-Yau Li, Anna; Chi, Chin-Wen; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Tseng, Min-Jen; Wu, Kou-Juey; Yeh, Tien-Shun

    2012-08-01

    Gastric carcinoma is one of the most common malignancies and a lethal cancer in the world. Notch signaling and transcription factors STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) and Twist regulate tumor development and are critical regulators of gastric cancer progression. Herein, the relationship among Notch, STAT3 and Twist pathways in the control of gastric cancer progression was studied. We found that Twist and phosphorylated STAT3 levels were promoted by the activated Notch1 receptor in human stomach adenocarcinoma SC-M1, embryonic kidney HEK293 and erythroleukemia K562 cells. Notch1 signaling dramatically induced Twist promoter activity through a C promoter binding factor-1-independent manner and STAT3 phosphorylation. Overexpression of Notch1 receptor intracellular domain (N1IC) enhanced the interaction between nuclear STAT3 and Twist promoter in cells. Gastric cancer progression of SC-M1 cells was promoted by N1IC through STAT3 phosphorylation and Twist expression including colony formation, migration and invasion. STAT3 regulated gastric cancer progression of SC-M1 cells via Twist. N1IC also elevated the progression of other gastric cancer cells such as AGS and KATO III cells through STAT3 and Twist. The N1IC-promoted tumor growth and lung metastasis of SC-M1 cells in mice were suppressed by the STAT3 inhibitor JSI-124 and Twist knockdown. Furthermore, Notch1 and Notch ligand Jagged1 expressions were significantly associated with phosphorylated STAT3 and Twist levels in gastric cancer tissues of patients. Taken together, these results suggest that Notch1/STAT3/Twist signaling axis is involved in progression of human gastric cancer and modulation of this cascade has potential for the targeted combination therapy.

  7. Inhibition of gastric H,K-ATPase activity and gastric epithelial cell IL-8 secretion by the pyrrolizine derivative ML 3000

    PubMed Central

    Smolka, Adam J; Goldenring, James R; Gupta, Sandeep; Hammond, Charles E

    2004-01-01

    Background ML 3000 ([2,2-dimethyl-6-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolizine-5-yl]-acetic acid) is an inhibitor of both cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase in vitro, and shows promise as a novel non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Unlike conventional NSAIDs which are associated with gastric ulcerogenic effects, ML 3000 causes little or no damage to the gastric mucosa, even though it significantly depresses gastric prostaglandin synthesis. Methods As part of an effort to clarify mechanisms underlying the gastric sparing properties of ML 3000, we studied the effects of ML 3000 on H,K-ATPase activity in vitro, on acid accumulation in isolated gastric parietal cells, and on IL-8 secretion by gastric epithelial cells in culture. Results SCH28080-sensitive H,K-ATPase activity in highly-purified pig gastric microsomes was dose-dependently inhibited by ML 3000 (IC50 = 16.4 μM). Inhibition was reversible, and insensitive to ML 3000 acidification in the pH range 2.0–8.0. In rabbit gastric parietal cells, ML 3000 dose-dependently inhibited histamine-stimulated acid accumulation (IC50 = 40 μM) and forskolin-stimulated acid accumulation (IC50 = 45 μM). Lastly, in human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells, ML 3000 dose-dependently inhibited both baseline and IL-1β-stimulated (20 ng/ml) IL-8 secretion with IC50s of 0.46 μM and 1.1 μM respectively. Conclusion The data indicate that ML 3000 affects acid-secretory mechanisms downstream of cAMP mobilization induced by histamine H2 receptor activation, that it directly inhibits H,K-ATPase specific activity, and that baseline gastric epithelial cell IL-8 secretory inhibition may be mediated by ML 3000 inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase activity. We conclude that these gastric function inhibitory data may underlie the gastric sparing properties of ML 3000. PMID:15028114

  8. Inhibitory effect of ibuprofen on tumor survival and angiogenesis in gastric cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Akrami, Hassan; Aminzadeh, Saman; Fallahi, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have suggested effectiveness of long-term and regular use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen and aspirin, in preventing and treatment of certain cancers including prostate, colon, breast, lung, and gastric cancers. We have studied the potential anti-turmeric effect of ibuprofen in adenocarcinoma gastric cell line (AGS). The effects of ibuprofen were investigated on cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and expression of stemness marker genes using real-time RT-PCR, DNA laddering, and tube formation assays via ECM gel and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Annexin-V-FLUOS and propidium iodide (PI) were used to stain the apoptotic cells. Our findings indicate that ibuprofen at the concentrations of 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 μM is able to reduce the cancerous characteristics of the AGS cells by inducing apoptosis, inhibition of cell proliferation, and angiogenesis. Real-time RT-PCR showed that ibuprofen altered the expression of several genes including Akt, P53, PCNA, Bax, and Bcl2 in the AGS cells. In addition, reduction in CD44 and OCT3/4 transcript levels revealed that ibuprofen reduces the stemness of the AGS cells and therefore it could be used as a potential anti-tumor drug.

  9. Familial Gastric Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Namrata; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Duda, Dan G.; Hong, Theodore S.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Mullen, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Although the majority of gastric carcinomas are sporadic, approximately 10% show familial aggregation, and a hereditary cause is determined in 1%–3% cases. Of these, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is the most recognized predisposition syndrome. Although rare, the less commonly known syndromes also confer a markedly increased risk for development of gastric cancer. Identification and characterization of these syndromes require a multidisciplinary effort involving oncologists, surgeons, genetic counselors, biologists, and pathologists. This article reviews the molecular genetics, clinical and pathologic features, surveillance guidelines, and preventive measures of common and less common hereditary gastric cancer predisposition syndromes. Implications for Practice: Although the majority of gastric adenocarcinomas are sporadic with many of those related to chronic Helicobacter pylori infection, approximately 10% of the cases show familial aggregation, and a specific hereditary cause is determined in 1%–3% cases. This review describes the molecular genetics, clinical and pathologic features, surveillance guidelines, and preventive measures of common and less common hereditary gastric cancer predisposition syndromes. Ultimately, a better understanding of the biology of these conditions should allow early identification and intervention as part of a multidisciplinary approach involving oncologists, surgeons, genetic counselors, and pathologists. PMID:26424758

  10. Gastric cáncer: Overview.

    PubMed

    Piazuelo, M Blanca; Correa, Pelayo

    2013-07-01

    Gastric cancer ranks fourth in incidence and second in mortality among all cancers worldwide. Despite the decrease in incidence in some regions of the world, gastric cancer continues to present a major clinical challenge due to most cases being diagnosed in advanced stages with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. The development of gastric cancer is a complex and multifactorial process involving a number of etiological factors and multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations. Among the predisposing factors are: Helicobacter pylori infection, high salt intake, smoking, and in a small percentage of patients, a familial genetic component. More than 95% of stomach cancer cases are adenocarcinomas, which are classified into two major histologic types: intestinal and diffuse. Intestinal type adenocarcinoma is preceded by a sequence of gastric lesions known as Correa´s cascade and is the histologic type associated with the global decrease in gastric cancer rates. Diffuse type adenocarcinomas have a more aggressive behavior and worse prognosis than those of the intestinal type. According to the anatomical location, adenocarcinomas are classified as proximal (originating in the cardia) and distal (originating in the body and antrum). This classification seems to recognize two different clinical entities. Surgical resection of the tumor at an early stage is the only effective treatment method. Therefore, the identification and surveillance of patients at risk may play a significant role in survival rates. Anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy has been shown to be an effective measure in the prevention of gastric cancer.

  11. Gastric inverted hyperplastic polyp: A rare cause of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jin Tak; Lee, Seung Woo; Kim, Dong Pil; Choi, Seung Hwa; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Park, Jun Kyu; Jang, Sun Hee; Park, Yun Jung; Sung, Ye Gyu; Sul, Hae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric inverted hyperplastic polyp (IHP) is a rare gastric polyp characterized by the downward growth of hyperplastic mucosal components into the submucosal layer. Macroscopically, a gastric IHP resembles a subepithelial tumor (SET); as a result, accurately diagnosing gastric IHP is difficult. This issue has clinical significance because gastric IHP can be misdiagnosed as SET or as malignant neoplasm In addition, adenocarcinoma can accompany benign gastric IHP. Although in most cases, gastric IHPs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally, these polyps may cause anemia secondary to chronic bleeding. Here, we report one case involving gastric IHP accompanied by chronic iron deficiency anemia that was successfully managed using endoscopic submucosal dissection. PMID:27099452

  12. Effect of Rumex Aquaticus Herba Extract Against Helicobacter pylori-Induced Inflammation in Gastric Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Jeong Hoon; Khin, Phyu Phyu; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the characteristics of Helicobacter pylori and the effect of Rumex Aquaticus Herba extract on the expression of cytokines in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. Cultured human adenocarcinoma gastric cells (AGS) were infected by H. pylori in RPMI 1640 media. Cell growth was measured by trypan blue assay. Western blot analysis was performed to investigate effect of extract containing Quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucuronopyranoside (ECQ) on the expression of inflammatory factors and the inhibition on cell growth. Furthermore, we compared the inhibitory effects with various combinations of clarithromycin, amoxicillin, omeprazole, and ECQ. The urease test with Christensen's Urea Agar was performed to identify the urease activity of H. pylori and the effect ECQ has on urease activity. When the cells were exposed to H. pylori, the trypan blue assay revealed a decrease in the rate of cell growth. Western blot analysis showed that H. pylori-infected cells had increased levels of degraded IκB-α and inflammatory factors. Pretreatment with ECQ inhibited interleukin expression induced by H. pylori in a dose-dependent manner. A combination of ECQ and antibiotics inhibited cytokine expression more effectively than other treatments. H. pylori displayed significant urease activity. ECQ did not significantly inhibit urease activity. These data suggest that H. pylori infection has cytotoxic effects against AGS cells, and ECQ may inhibit the production of proinflammatory cytokines in H. pylori-infected AGS cells.

  13. Gastroprotective activities of adlay (Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) on the growth of the stomach cancer AGS cell line and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheng-Pei; Hsia, Shih-Min; Lee, Ming-Yi; Chen, Hong-Jhang; Cheng, Faiwen; Chan, Lu-Chi; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lin, Yun-Lian; Chiang, Wenchang

    2011-06-08

    Adlay (Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) seeds have long been used to treat warts, chapped skin, rheumatism, and neuralgia in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Recently, studies demonstrated its anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, antitumor, and antiallergic activities. In the present study, we first report the gastroprotective effects of dehulled adlay (DA) seeds, which consist of bran (AB) and endosperm (AE). The DA ethanolic extract (DAE) was prepared, along with the AB and AE ethanolic extracts (ABE and AEE), and the inhibitory effects of these extracts were tested on the AGS gastric cancer cell line. Results indicated that the ABE showed better antiproliferative activity, and 19 compounds were purified from AB in a further phenolic-compound-guided separation. Among the isolated compounds, caffeic and chlorogenic acids significantly suppressed the growth of AGS cells. In addition, the antiulcer activity of DA was examined in an indomethacin-induced gastric lesion model. The ulcer index (UI) and oxidative biomarkers in animals decreased, while the non-protein sulfhydryl (NPSH) groups were elevated when given DA. This is the first investigation of antiulcer activity of adlay, and we demonstrated that the antioxidative-active phenolic acids in DA contribute to some portion of the gastroprotective effects.

  14. α-Lipoic Acid Inhibits Expression of IL-8 by Suppressing Activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-Infected Gastric Epithelial AGS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Hyun; Cho, Soon Ok

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial cytokine response, associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), is important in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced inflammation. H. pylori induces the production of ROS, which may be involved in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/Stat), and oxidant-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and thus, expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in gastric epithelial cells. α-lipoic acid, a naturally occurring thiol compound, is a potential antioxidant. It shows beneficial effects in treatment of oxidant-associated diseases including diabetes. The present study is purposed to investigate whether α-lipoic acid inhibits expression of inflammatory cytokine IL-8 by suppressing activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. Gastric epithelial AGS cells were pretreated with or without α-lipoic acid for 2 h and infected with H. pylori in a Korean isolate (HP99) at a ratio of 300:1. IL-8 mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR analysis. IL-8 levels in the medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-κB-DNA binding activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Phospho-specific and total forms of MAPK and Jak/Stat were assessed by Western blot analysis. ROS levels were determined using dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. As a result, H. pylori induced increases in ROS levels, mRNA, and protein levels of IL-8, as well as the activation of MAPK [extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), p38], Jak/Stat (Jak1/2, Stat3), and NF-κB in AGS cells, which was inhibited by α-lipoic acid. In conclusion, α-lipoic acid may be beneficial for prevention and/or treatment of H. pylori infection-associated gastric inflammation. PMID:26632410

  15. Association of Genetic Polymorphisms in the LncRNAs with Gastric Cancer Risk in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    He, Bang-Shun; Sun, Hui-Ling; Xu, Tao; Pan, Yu-Qin; Lin, Kang; Gao, Tian-Yi; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Shu-Kui

    2017-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified that polymorphisms in 8q24 confer susceptibility to gastric cancer. Polymorphisms in the lncRNA PRNCR1, PCAT1, and CCAT2 transcribed from the 8q24 locus have a potential risk for gastric cancer. Methods: To evaluate whether there is such an association in Chinese population, a case-control study enrolled 494 patients and 494 healthy controls was carried out. Sequenom MassARRAY platform was used for genotyping. Results: This study showed that rs16901946 G allele was associated with increased risk of gastric cancer (AG: adjusted OR = 1.33, 95% CI =1.02-1.73, p=0.033; GG: adjusted OR = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.11-3.86, p=0.023, AG/GG: adjusted OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.08-1.1.79, p=0.011; additive model: adjusted OR = 1.37; 95% CI = 1.10-1.70, p=0.004). Stratified analysis revealed that the increased risk was more evident in the cohort of younger subjects (adjusted OR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.18-2.87, p=0.007), males (adjusted OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.15-2.08, p=0.004), positive Helicobacter pylori infection (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.02-2.03, p=0.041), gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (adjusted OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.10-2.35, p=0.014), and tumor stage T1-T2 (adjusted OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.10-2.28, p=0.013). Conclusions: Our study suggested that rs16901946 G allele carriers have an increased risk of gastric cancer, and the risk could be enhanced by the interactions between the polymorphism and age, sex, Helicobacter pylori infection. PMID:28367233

  16. Molecular classifiers for gastric cancer and nonmalignant diseases of the gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Meireles, Sibele I; Cristo, Elier B; Carvalho, Alex F; Hirata, Roberto; Pelosof, Adriane; Gomes, Luciana I; Martins, Waleska K; Begnami, Maria D; Zitron, Cláudia; Montagnini, André L; Soares, Fernando A; Neves, E Jordão; Reis, Luiz F L

    2004-02-15

    High incidence of gastric cancer-related death is mainly due to diagnosis at an advanced stage in addition to the lack of adequate neoadjuvant therapy. Hence, new tools aimed at early diagnosis would have a positive impact in the outcome of the disease. Using cDNA arrays having 376 genes either identified previously as altered in gastric tumors or known to be altered in human cancer, we determined expression signature of 99 tissue fragments representing normal gastric mucosa, gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and adenocarcinomas. We first validated the array by identifying molecular markers that are associated with intestinal metaplasia, considered as a transition stage of gastric adenocarcinomas of the intestinal type as well as markers that are associated with diffuse type of gastric adenocarcinomas. Next, we applied Fisher's linear discriminant analysis in an exhaustive search of trios of genes that could be used to build classifiers for class distinction. Many classifiers could distinguish between normal and tumor samples, whereas, for the distinction of gastritis from tumor and for metaplasia from tumor, fewer classifiers were identified. Statistical validations showed that trios that discriminate between normal and tumor samples are powerful classifiers to distinguish between tumor and nontumor samples. More relevant, it was possible to identify samples of intestinal metaplasia that have expression signature resembling that of an adenocarcinoma and can now be used for follow-up of patients to determine their potential as a prognostic test for malignant transformation.

  17. [Lymphoma of the residual gastric stump].

    PubMed

    La Torre, F; Nicastro, A; Crescenzi, U; Persico Stella, L; Clarioni, A; Pontone, P; Montori, A

    1993-03-01

    The authors report a case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (lymphoplasmocytoid type) arisen on the gastric stump of a patient operated 18 years before according to Billroth II gastric resection for peptic ulcer. They underline the extraordinary rarity of the event because this type of neoplasia never arises on the gastric stump, where would be more likely to find, due to irritative chemical stimuli of the biliary reflux, phenomena of intestinal metaplasia or severe dysplasia highly predisposing to adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, they stress the importance of a "deep" bioptic examination for a diagnosis as early as possible of this type of pathology.

  18. Crosstalk between mismatch repair and base excision repair in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, Valeria; Leuzzi, Giuseppe; Basile, Giorgia; D'Errico, Mariarosaria; Fortini, Paola; Franchitto, Annapaola; Viti, Valentina; Brown, Ashley R; Parlanti, Eleonora; Pascucci, Barbara; Palli, Domenico; Giuliani, Alessandro; Palombo, Fabio; Sobol, Robert W; Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2016-06-20

    DNA repair gene expression in a set of gastric cancers suggested an inverse association between the expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) gene MLH1 and that of the base excision repair (BER) gene DNA polymerase β (Polβ). To gain insight into possible crosstalk of these two repair pathways in cancer, we analysed human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cells over-expressing Polβ or Polβ active site mutants, alone or in combination with MLH1 silencing. Next, we investigated the cellular response to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and the purine analogue 6-thioguanine (6-TG), agents that induce lesions that are substrates for BER and/or MMR. AGS cells over-expressing Polβ were resistant to 6-TG to a similar extent as when MLH1 was inactivated while inhibition of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) was required to detect resistance to MMS. Upon either treatment, the association with MLH1 down-regulation further amplified the resistant phenotype. Moreover, AGS cells mutated in Polβ were hypersensitive to both 6-TG and MMS killing and their sensitivity was partially rescued by MLH1 silencing. We provide evidence that the critical lethal lesions in this new pathway are double strand breaks that are exacerbated when Polβ is defective and relieved when MLH1 is silenced. In conclusion, we provide evidence of crosstalk between MLH1 and Polβ that modulates the response to alkylation damage. These studies suggest that the Polβ/MLH1 status should be taken into consideration when designing chemotherapeutic approaches for gastric cancer.

  19. Importance of gastrin in the pathogenesis and treatment of gastric tumors

    PubMed Central

    Burkitt, Michael D; Varro, Andrea; Pritchard, D Mark

    2009-01-01

    In addition to regulating acid secretion, the gastric antral hormone gastrin regulates several important cellular processes in the gastric epithelium including proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion, tissue remodelling and angiogenesis. Elevated serum concentrations of this hormone are caused by many conditions, particularly hypochlorhydria (as a result of autoimmune or Helicobacter pylori (H pylori)-induced chronic atrophic gastritis or acid suppressing drugs) and gastrin producing tumors (gastrinomas). There is now accumulating evidence that altered local and plasma concentrations of gastrin may play a role during the development of various gastric tumors. In the absence of H pylori infection, marked hypergastrinemia frequently results in the development of gastric enterochromaffin cell-like neuroendocrine tumors and surgery to remove the cause of hypergastrinemia may lead to tumor resolution in this condition. In animal models such as transgenic INS-GAS mice, hypergastrinemia has also been shown to act as a cofactor with Helicobacter infection during gastric adenocarcinoma development. However, it is currently unclear as to what extent gastrin also modulates human gastric adenocarcinoma development. Therapeutic approaches targeting hypergastrinemia, such as immunization with G17DT, have been evaluated for the treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma, with some promising results. Although the mild hypergastrinemia associated with proton pump inhibitor drug use has been shown to cause ECL-cell hyperplasia and to increase H pylori-induced gastric atrophy, there is currently no convincing evidence that this class of agents contributes towards the development of gastric neuroendocrine tumors or gastric adenocarcinomas in human subjects. PMID:19115463

  20. Gastric giardiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Doglioni, C.; De Boni, M.; Cielo, R.; Laurino, L.; Pelosio, P.; Braidotti, P.; Viale, G.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the prevalence of gastric giardiasis in patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and to define the clinicopathological correlates of gastric Giardia lamblia infection. METHODS: Consecutive gastric biopsy specimens (n = 15,023) from 11,085 patients, taken at Feltre City Hospital (north eastern Italy) from January 1986 to December 1991, were histologically and immunocytochemically examined for the occurrence of G lamblia trophozoites. Three gastric biopsy specimens from patients harbouring G lamblia infection, who repeated endoscopy before treatment, were also examined electron microscopically. RESULTS: Forty one patients (0.37% of the population study) harboured gastric giardiasis. All patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy because of dyspepsia, epigastric pain, or abdominal distension. Only two patients had diarrhoea at the time of investigation. Giardiasis was clinically unsuspected in all cases, although the nine patients who also had duodenal biopsies performed had concomitant intestinal giardiasis. Gastric giardiasis was invariably associated with chronic atrophic gastritis. Intestinal metaplasia of the gastric mucosa and Helicobacter pylori infection were found in 32 and 37 of the 41 patients with gastric giardiasis, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The invariable association of gastric giardiasis with chronic atrophic gastritis, most often showing intestinal metaplasia and H pylori infection, indicates that a decreased gastric acidity is a prerequisite for localisation of G lamblia to the gastric mucosa. Though its possible role as a gastric pathogen remains to be elucidated, these findings suggest that trophozoites should be carefully searched for when examining gastric biopsy specimens showing chronic atrophic gastritis. Images PMID:1452790

  1. Association of MMP7 -181A→G Promoter Polymorphism with Gastric Cancer Risk: INFLUENCE OF NICOTINE IN DIFFERENTIAL ALLELE-SPECIFIC TRANSCRIPTION VIA INCREASED PHOSPHORYLATION OF cAMP-RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN (CREB).

    PubMed

    Kesh, Kousik; Subramanian, Lakshmi; Ghosh, Nillu; Gupta, Vinayak; Gupta, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Samir; Mahapatra, Nitish R; Swarnakar, Snehasikta

    2015-06-05

    Elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase7 (MMP7) has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in cancer invasion. The -181A→G (rs11568818) polymorphism in the MMP7 promoter modulates gene expression and possibly affects cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the impact of -181A→G polymorphism on MMP7 promoter activity and its association with gastric cancer risk in eastern Indian case-control cohorts (n = 520). The GG genotype as compared with the AA genotype was predisposed (p = 0.02; odds ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-3.3) to gastric cancer risk. Stratification analysis showed that tobacco addiction enhanced gastric cancer risk in GG subjects when compared with AA subjects (p = 0.03, odds ratio = 2.46, and 95% confidence interval = 1.07-5.68). Meta-analysis revealed that tobacco enhanced the risk for cancer more markedly in AG and GG carriers. Activity and expression of MMP7 were significantly higher in GG than in AA carriers. In support, MMP7 promoter-reporter assays showed greater transcriptional activity toward A to G transition under basal/nicotine-induced/cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) overexpressed conditions in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Moreover, nicotine (a major component of tobacco) treatment significantly up-regulated MMP7 expression due to enhanced CREB phosphorylation followed by its nuclear translocation in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed higher binding of phosphorylated CREB with the -181G than the -181A allele. Altogether, specific binding of phosphorylated CREB to the G allele-carrying promoter enhances MMP7 gene expression that is further augmented by nicotine due to increased CREB phosphorylation and thereby increases the risk for gastric cancer.

  2. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer.

  3. A randomized Phase II trial of systemic chemotherapy with and without trastuzumab followed by surgery in HER2-positive advanced gastric or esophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma with extensive lymph node metastasis: Japan Clinical Oncology Group study JCOG1301 (Trigger Study).

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kozo; Tokunaga, Masanori; Mizusawa, Junki; Machida, Nozomu; Katayama, Hiroshi; Shitara, Kohei; Tomita, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Kenichi; Boku, Narikazu; Sano, Takeshi; Terashima, Masanori; Sasako, Mitsuru

    2015-11-01

    Pre-operative chemotherapy with S-1 plus cisplatin is considered to be acceptable as one of the standard treatment options for gastric cancer patients with extensive lymph node metastases in Japan. Addition of trastuzumab to chemotherapy is shown to be effective for HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer patients, and we have commenced a randomized Phase II trial in March 2015 to evaluate S-1 plus cisplatin plus trastuzumab compared with S-1 plus cisplatin alone in the neoadjuvant setting for HER2-positive gastric cancer patients with ELM, which are followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 for 1 year. A total of 130 patients will be accrued from 41 Japanese institutions over 3 years. The primary endpoint is overall survival. The secondary endpoints are progression-free survival, response rate of pre-operative chemotherapy, proportion of patients with R0 resection, proportion of patients who complete the pre-operative chemotherapy and surgery, proportion of patients who complete the protocol treatment including post-operative chemotherapy, pathological response rate and adverse events. This trial has been registered in the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN 000016920.

  4. Primary appendiceal mucinous adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Behera, Prativa Kumari; Rath, Pramod Kumar; Panda, Rabiratna; Satpathi, Sanghamitra; Behera, Rajan

    2011-04-01

    Primary Adenocarcinomas of the appendix are extremely rare tumor. We report a case of primary mucinous adenocarcinoma in a 40 year old lady misdiagnosed as having acute appendicitis. All the routine investigations were within normal limit. USG of abdomen showed dilated appendix with little fluid collection adjacent to it and no other abnormality was seen which suggested acute appendicitis. Appendicectomy was done and excised appendix was sent for histopathological examination. Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the appendix was confirmed after histopathological examination. Right hemicolectomy was done as a second stage procedure. As some cases are incidentally discovered, this case emphasizes that histological examination of all appendicectomy specimens is mandatory.

  5. Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Thomas; Zaanan, Aziz; Mary, Florence; Afchain, Pauline; Manfredi, Sylvain; Evans, Thomas Ronald Jeffry

    2016-09-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinomas (SBAs) are rare tumors, but their incidence is increasing. The most common primary location is the duodenum. Even though SBAs are more often sporadic, some diseases are risk factors. Early diagnosis of small bowel adenocarcinoma remains difficult, despite significant radiologic and endoscopic progress. After R0 surgical resection, the main prognostic factor is lymph node invasion. An international randomized trial (BALLAD [Benefit of Adjuvant Chemotherapy For Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma] study) will evaluate the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. For metastatic disease, retrospectives studies suggest that platinum-based chemotherapy is the most effective treatment. Phase II studies are ongoing to evaluate targeted therapy in metastatic SBA.

  6. Gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, H.O. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiation therapy for gastric cancer; Experimental stomach cancer: Drug selection based on in vitro testing; Western surgical adjuvant trials in gastric cancers: Lessons from current trials to be applied in the future; and Chemotherapy of gastric cancer.

  7. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma.

  8. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26309895

  9. Prostate Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ali

    2017-03-30

    Prostate ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a rare subtype of prostate adenocarcinoma that shows more aggressive behavior than conventional prostatic acinar adenocarcinoma. PDA demonstrates similar clinical and paraclinical features such as prostatic acinar adenocarcinoma; therefore, clinical distinction of the 2 entities is very difficult (if not impossible) and histopathology plays an important role in the diagnosis of the disease. This review discusses all the necessary information needed for the diagnosis and prognosis of PDA including the morphologic features of PDA, an introduction about the known variants of PDA with helpful hints in grading of each variant, tips on differential diagnosis of PDA from the common morphologic mimickers, a detailed discussion on the value of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of PDA, and pathologic features that are helpful in determining the outcome.

  10. An observational study suggesting clinical benefit for adjuvant postoperative chemoradiation in a population of over 500 cases after gastric resection with D2 nodal dissection for adenocarcinoma of the stomach

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung; Lim, Do Hoon; Lee, Jeeyun; Kang, Won Ki . E-mail: wkkang@smc.samsung.co.kr; MacDonald, John S.; Park, Chan Hyung; Park, Se Hoon; Lee, Se-Hoon; Kim, Kihyun; Park, Joon Oh; Kim, Won Seog; Jung, Chul Won; Park, Young Suk; Im, Young-Hyuck; Sohn, Tae Sung; Noh, Jae Hyung; Heo, Jin Seok; Kim, Yong Il; Park, Chul Keun; Park, Keunchil

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: The role of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in D2-resected gastric-cancer patients has not been defined yet. We investigated the effect of postoperative chemoradiotherapy on the relapse rate and survival rate of patients with D2-resected gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: From August 1995 to April 2001, 544 patients received postoperative CRT after curative D2 resection. During the same period of time, 446 patients received surgery without further adjuvant treatment. The adjuvant CRT consisted of 400 mg/m{sup 2} of fluorouracil plus 20 mg/m{sup 2} of leucovorin for 5 days, followed by 4,500 cGy of radiotherapy for 5 weeks, with fluorouracil and leucovorin on the first 4 and the last 3 days of radiotherapy. Two 5-day cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin were given 4 weeks after the completion of radiotherapy. Results: The median duration of overall survival was significantly longer in the CRT group than in the comparison group (95.3 months vs. 62.6 months), which corresponds to a hazard ratio for death of 0.80 (p = 0.0200) or a reduction of 20% in the risk of death in the CRT group. The 5-year survival rates were consistently longer in the CRT group at Stages II, IIIA, IIIB, and IV than those in the comparison group. The CRT was associated with increases in the median duration of relapse-free survival (75.6 months vs. 52.7 months; hazard ratio for relapse, 0.80, p = 0.0160). Conclusion: Our results highly suggest that the postoperative chemoradiotherapy in D2-resected gastric-cancer patients can prolong survival and decrease recurrence.

  11. Upregulation of microRNA-574-3p in a human gastric cancer cell line AGS by TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Renwen; Wang, Mingqi; Sui, Pengcheng; Ding, Lei; Yang, Qing

    2017-03-20

    The mechanisms that regulate miR-574-3p expression in cells remain elusive. In the present study, we used real-time PCR assay to demonstrate TGF-β1-induced miR-574-3p upregulation in AGS cells, which was inhibited by TGF-β receptor I inhibitor SB431542. We used a computer search to identify Smad binding sites upstream of the miR-574-3p precursor sequence. We demonstrated that silencing Smad4, but not Smad2 or Smad3, significantly inhibited the TGF-β1-induced miR-574-3p upregulation in AGS cells. Furthermore, TGF-β1 significantly increased the activity of a dual-luciferase reporter that contains the Smad binding sites upstream of the miR-574 precursor sequence. Silencing Smad4 significantly inhibited the TGF-β1-induced increase in the activity of the reporter in AGS cells. ChIP assay showed that Smad4 directly bound to the promoter of miR-574-3p. MiR-574-3p inhibition was effective in eliminating the inhibition of AGS cell proliferation induced by TGF-β1, suggesting that TGF-β1 inducing upregulation of miR-574-3p is functionally significant.

  12. Microsatellite instability in adenocarcinomas of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Relation to clinicopathological data and family history.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, G.; Rotter, M.; Vogelsang, H.; Bischoff, P.; Becker, K. F.; Mueller, J.; Brauch, H.; Siewert, J. R.; Höfler, H.

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed 66 adenocarcinomas arising in the upper gastrointestinal tract for microsatellite instability at eight microsatellite loci to investigate the role of these genetic alterations in the etiology of these tumors. We identified alterations in at least one locus in 11/46 adenocarcinomas of the stomach, in 2/15 adenocarcinomas arising in Barrett's esophagus, and in 1/5 adenocarcinomas of the duodenum and jejunum. Microsatellite instability in gastric tumors was found in 5/22 of intestinal, 1/3 of mixed, and 5/21 of diffuse type tumors. No relationship to the tumor stage (TNM), age, and survival time of the patients was observed. One patient had two synchronous gastric tumors both exhibiting microsatellite instability at multiple loci. His family history revealed four individuals in the maternal line afflicted with gastric carcinoma in three generations. Our data show that microsatellite instability is a genetic event in 11 to 24% of tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The observation of microsatellite instability and a familial clustering of gastric tumors may suggest a genetic predisposition for a subset of gastric tumors, which may be identified by microsatellite analysis. Images Figure 1 PMID:7677173

  13. Spontaneous Rupture of Adenocarcinoma of Meckel’s Diverticulum- A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Meckel’s diverticulum is a true diverticulum from remnant of vitelline duct. It is most common congenital anomaly of intestine. It is associated with intestinal atresia and anorectal anomalies. It contains heterotrophic epithelium. Most common heterotrophic mucosa is gastric followed by pancreatic tissue. Adenocarcinoma arising from Meckel’s diverticulum is very rare. Spontaneous perforation of adenocarcinoma rarely reported. Most of perforation reported in Meckel’s diverticulum diagnosed during intraoperative period. This is a case report of spontaneous rupture of adenocarcinoma of Meckel’s diverticulum, which was managed with primary resection and ileostomy. PMID:26672729

  14. Dual Roles of Gastric Gland Mucin-specific O-glycans in Prevention of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Gastric gland mucin is secreted from gland mucous cells, including pyloric gland cells and mucous neck cells located in the lower layer of the gastric mucosa. These mucins typically contain O-glycans carrying terminal α1,4-linked N-acetylglucosamine residues (αGlcNAc) attached to the scaffold protein MUC6, and biosynthesis of the O-glycans is catalyzed by the glycosyltransferase, α1,4-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (α4GnT). We previously used expression cloning to isolate cDNA encoding α4GnT, and then demonstrated that αGlcNAc functions as natural antibiotic against Helicobacter pylori, a microbe causing various gastric diseases including gastric cancer. More recently, it was shown that αGlcNAc serves as a tumor suppressor for differentiated-type adenocarcinoma. This review summarizes these findings and identifies dual roles for αGlcNAc in gastric cancer. PMID:24761044

  15. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjustable gastric banding; Bariatric surgery - laparoscopic gastric banding; Obesity - gastric banding; Weight loss - gastric banding ... gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must ...

  16. Immunotherapy for gastric premalignant lesions and cancer.

    PubMed

    Zorzetto, Valerio; Maddalo, Gemma; Basso, Daniela; Farinati, Fabio

    2012-06-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis, a precancerous change for gastric cancer, shows a loss of appropriate glands, Helicobacter pylori infection and autoimmune gastritis being the two main etiologic factors. While H. pylori eradication is the mandatory treatment for the former, no etiologic treatment is available for the latter, in which a Th1-type response, modulated by Tregs and Th17 cells, is involved. H. pylori-related atrophic gastritis is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, while autoimmune atrophic gastritis is also linked to a substantial risk of gastric type I carcinoid, related to the chronic stimulus exerted by hypergastrinemia on enterochromaffin-like cells. Several studies have been published on gastric cancer treatment through an active specific immunotherapy, aimed at improving the immunoregulatory response and increasing the circulating tumor-specific T cells. No study on immunotherapy of carcinoids is available but, in our experience, the administration of an antigastrin 17 vaccine induced carcinoid regression in two out of three patients treated.

  17. Use of lectin microarray to differentiate gastric cancer from gastric ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Li; Li, Yang-Guang; Lv, Yong-Chen; Guan, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Hui-Fan; Chi, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of lectin microarray for differentiating gastric cancer from gastric ulcer. METHODS: Twenty cases of human gastric cancer tissue and 20 cases of human gastric ulcer tissue were collected and processed. Protein was extracted from the frozen tissues and stored. The lectins were dissolved in buffer, and the sugar-binding specificities of lectins and the layout of the lectin microarray were summarized. The median of the effective data points for each lectin was globally normalized to the sum of medians of all effective data points for each lectin in one block. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric cancer tissues and their corresponding gastric ulcer tissues were subjected to Ag retrieval. Biotinylated lectin was used as the primary antibody and HRP-streptavidin as the secondary antibody. The glycopatterns of glycoprotein in gastric cancer and gastric ulcer specimens were determined by lectin microarray, and then validated by lectin histochemistry. Data are presented as mean ± SD for the indicated number of independent experiments. RESULTS: The glycosylation level of gastric cancer was significantly higher than that in ulcer. In gastric cancer, most of the lectin binders showed positive signals and the intensity of the signals was stronger, whereas the opposite was the case for ulcers. Significant differences in the pathological score of the two lectins were apparent between ulcer and gastric cancer tissues using the same lectin. For MPL and VVA, all types of gastric cancer detected showed stronger staining and a higher positive rate in comparison with ulcer, especially in the case of signet ring cell carcinoma and intra-mucosal carcinoma. GalNAc bound to MPL showed a significant increase. A statistically significant association between MPL and gastric cancer was observed. As with MPL, there were significant differences in VVA staining between gastric cancer and ulcer. CONCLUSION: Lectin microarray can differentiate the different

  18. Inhibition of Gastric Tumor Cell Growth Using Seed-targeting LNA as Specific, Long-lasting MicroRNA Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Staedel, Cathy; Varon, Christine; Nguyen, Phu Hung; Vialet, Brune; Chambonnier, Lucie; Rousseau, Benoît; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Evrard, Serge; Couillaud, Franck; Darfeuille, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate eukaryotic gene expression upon pairing onto target mRNAs. This targeting is influenced by the complementarity between the microRNA “seed” sequence at its 5′ end and the seed-matching sequences in the mRNA. Here, we assess the efficiency and specificity of 8-mer locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotides raised against the seeds of miR-372 and miR-373, two embryonic stem cell-specific microRNAs prominently expressed in the human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cell line. Provided that the pairing is perfect over all the eight nucleotides of the seed and starts at nucleotide 2 or 1 at the microRNA 5′ end, these short LNAs inhibit miR-372/373 functions and derepress their common target, the cell cycle regulator LATS2. They decrease cell proliferation in vitro upon either transfection at nanomolar concentrations or unassisted delivery at micromolar concentrations. Subcutaneously delivered LNAs reduce tumor growth of AGS xenografts in mice, upon formation of a stable, specific heteroduplex with the targeted miR-372 and -373 and LATS2 upregulation. Their therapeutic potential is confirmed in fast-growing, miR-372-positive, primary human gastric adenocarcinoma xenografts in mice. Thus, microRNA silencing by 8-mer seed-targeting LNAs appears a valuable approach for both loss-of-function studies aimed at elucidating microRNA functions and for microRNA-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:26151747

  19. Osteogenesis Imperfecta, Pseudoachalasia, and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mizrak, Dilsa; Alkan, Ali; Erdogdu, Batuhan; Utkan, Gungor

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare, inherited skeletal disorder characterized by abnormalities of type 1 collagen. Malignancy is rarely reported in patients with OI and it was suggested that this disease can protect against cancer. Here, we report a 41-year-old woman with symptoms of achalasia where repeated treatment of pneumatic dilation and stent replacement was unsuccessful; therefore, surgery was performed. Pathology showed gastric adenocarcinoma unexpectedly. Chemotherapy was given after assessing dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) enzyme activity, which can be deficient in OI patients. This is the first report of gastric cancer mimicking achalasia in a patient with OI. PMID:25874139

  20. A Novel Endoscopic Technique to Diagnose Gastric Cancer in Excluded Stomach after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Pitea, Teodor C.

    2017-01-01

    Access to the bypassed portion of the stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass remains a challenge. We present a case of 64-year-old woman who presented with gastric outlet obstruction. We used a novel endoscopic technique to access the bypassed stomach by creating a jejunogastrostomy using a specialized stent, which allowed the insertion of a pediatric gastroscope to examine the bypassed portion of the stomach. Stomach biopsies revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with signet cell features. PMID:28331875

  1. Targeting Smoothened Sensitizes Gastric Cancer to Chemotherapy in Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huifa; Tian, Yongsheng; Yu, Xiangyang

    2017-01-01

    Background The Hedgehog pathway receptor smoothened (SMO) has critical roles in tumor progression. However, whether SMO is a key factor regulating gastric cancer chemotherapy resistance is unknown. Material/Methods We investigated the potential functions of SMO in inducing gastric cancer paclitaxel resistance in clinical samples, gastric cancer cell lines (424GC and AGS), and subcutaneous syngeneic mouse models. Results We found high SMO expression in paclitaxel-resistant gastric cancer clinical samples. Paclitaxel gastric cancer cells had higher SMO expression than in drug-sensitive cells. Upregulating SMO expression induced paclitaxel resistance in gastric cells lines via enhancing cell proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis. The combination of IPI-926, an inhibitor of SMO, with paclitaxel decreased cell viability of paclitaxel-resistant gastric cancer cells in vitro and controlled tumor growth in animal models. Conclusions The Hedgehog pathway receptor SMO is an important regulator of gastric cancer paclitaxel resistance and could be a target for sensitizing paclitaxel-resistant tumors. PMID:28350784

  2. Coexistence of gastrointestinal stromal tumor, esophageal and gastric cardia carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wu, Xu-Dong; Shi, Quan; Jia, Jing

    2013-03-28

    Gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma are distinct neoplasms originating from different cell layers; therefore, simultaneous development of such carcinomas is relatively rare. Auxiliary examinations revealed coexistence of esophageal and gastric cardia carcinoma with lymph node metastasis in a 77-year-old man. Intraoperatively, an extraluminal tumor (about 6.0 cm × 5.0 cm × 6.0 cm) at the posterior wall of the gastric body, a tumor (about 2.5 cm × 2.0 cm) in the lower esophagus, and an infiltrative and stenosing tumor (about 1.0 cm × 2.0 cm) in the gastric cardia were detected. Wedge resection for extraluminal gastric tumor, radical esophagectomy for lower esophageal tumor, and cardiac resection with gastroesophageal (supra-aortic arch anastomoses) were performed. Postoperative histological examination showed synchronous occurrence of gastric GIST, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry indicated strong staining for c-Kit/CD117, Dog-1, Ki-67 and smooth muscle, while expression of S-100 and CD34 was negative.

  3. First reports of esophageal adenocarcinoma with white globe appearance in Japanese and Caucasian patients

    PubMed Central

    Tonai, Yusuke; Ishihara, Ryu; Yamasaki, Yasushi; Kanesaka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Hanaoka, Noboru; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Uedo, Noriya; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Better endoscopic diagnosis in case of Barrett’s esophagus is still needed. White globe appearance (WGA) is a novel endoscopic marker for gastric adenocarcinoma, with high sensitivity for differentiating between gastric cancer/high-grade dysplasia and other lesions. We report 2 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma with WGA. In Case 1, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed a 10-mm esophageal adenocarcinoma in a 48-year-old Japanese woman with short-segment Barrett’s esophagus. A small (< 1 mm) white globular lesion, typical of WGA, was observed under the epithelium by magnifying narrow-band imaging. A dilated neoplastic gland with eosinophilic material and necrotic epithelial fragments was identified at the site of the WGA by histologic examination. In Case 2, EGD revealed a 5-mm esophageal adenocarcinoma in a 60-year-old Caucasian man with long-segment Barrett’s esophagus. A typical WGA was observed by magnifying narrow-band imaging and similar histologic findings were identified at the site of the WGA. WGA could be a reliable endoscopic finding for target biopsy in esophageal adenocarcinoma, if its specificity is as high as in gastric cancer. The clinical implications of WGA in patients with Barrett’s esophagus should be investigated further. PMID:27747281

  4. Danusertib, a potent pan-Aurora kinase and ABL kinase inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death and inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving the PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated signaling pathway in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chun-Xiu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Yin-Xue; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Dong; Yang, Tianxing; Pan, Si-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with a poor response to current chemotherapy. Danusertib is a pan-inhibitor of the Aurora kinases and a third-generation Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent anticancer effects, but its antitumor effect and underlying mechanisms in the treatment of human gastric cancer are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of danusertib on cell growth, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the molecular mechanisms involved in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells. The results showed that danusertib had potent growth-inhibitory, apoptosis-inducing, and autophagy-inducing effects on AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Danusertib arrested AGS and NCI-N78 cells in G2/M phase, with downregulation of expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and upregulation of expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. Danusertib induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, with an increase in expression of proapoptotic protein and a decrease in antiapoptotic proteins in both cell lines. Danusertib induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and triggered activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Further, danusertib induced autophagy, with an increase in expression of beclin 1 and conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3-I) to LC3-II in both cell lines. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways as well as activation of 5' AMP-activated protein kinase contributed to the proautophagic effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. SB202191 and wortmannin enhanced the autophagy-inducing effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. In addition, danusertib inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition with an increase in expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in expression of

  5. Danusertib, a potent pan-Aurora kinase and ABL kinase inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death and inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving the PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated signaling pathway in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chun-Xiu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Yin-Xue; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Dong; Yang, Tianxing; Pan, Si-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with a poor response to current chemotherapy. Danusertib is a pan-inhibitor of the Aurora kinases and a third-generation Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent anticancer effects, but its antitumor effect and underlying mechanisms in the treatment of human gastric cancer are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of danusertib on cell growth, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the molecular mechanisms involved in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells. The results showed that danusertib had potent growth-inhibitory, apoptosis-inducing, and autophagy-inducing effects on AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Danusertib arrested AGS and NCI-N78 cells in G2/M phase, with downregulation of expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and upregulation of expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. Danusertib induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, with an increase in expression of proapoptotic protein and a decrease in antiapoptotic proteins in both cell lines. Danusertib induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and triggered activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Further, danusertib induced autophagy, with an increase in expression of beclin 1 and conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3-I) to LC3-II in both cell lines. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways as well as activation of 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase contributed to the proautophagic effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. SB202191 and wortmannin enhanced the autophagy-inducing effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. In addition, danusertib inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition with an increase in expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in expression

  6. Immunomodulatory Effects of Psyllium Extract on Helicobacter pylori Interaction With Gastric Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, Javed; Jafri, Wasim; Mehmood, Malik Hassan; Abbas, Zaigham; Tariq, Kanwal

    2016-10-01

    Natural plant product Psyllium has anti-inflammatory activity that can modulate the function of cytokines. We determined the effect of Psyllium husk extract on interleukin (IL)-8 and NF-κB secretion by gastric epithelial cells in response to Helicobacter pylori Human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (AGS) cells were pretreated with Psyllium extract in different concentrations before H pylori infection. Cell culture supernatant was analyzed for IL-8 and NF-κB by ELISA. RNA from cells was used for real-time polymerase chain reaction for messenger RNA expression of IL-8. Psyllium extract 5 and 10 μg/mL markedly (P < .001) lowered basal IL-8 by 64.71% and 74.51%, respectively, and H pylori-stimulated IL-8 was also (P < .001) lowered by 41.67% and 66.67%, respectively. Psyllium 5 and 10 μg/mL also reduced (P < .0001) cagA-positive H pylori-induced IL-8 mRNA expression by 42.3% and 67.6%, respectively. Psyllium also reduced (P = .0001) NF-κB in response to H pylori strains confirming its role as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  7. 18F-FLT PET/CT in Patients with Gastric Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Małkowski, Bogdan; Staniuk, Tomasz; Śrutek, Ewa; Zegarski, Wojciech; Studniarek, Michał

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of 18F-FLT PET/CT in the detection and differentiation of gastric cancers (GC). 104 consecutive patients (57 cases of adenocarcinoma tubulare (G2 and G3), 17 cases of mucinous adenocarcinoma, 6 cases of undifferentiated carcinoma, 14 cases of adenocarcinoma partim mucocellulare, and 10 cases of end stage gastric cancer) with newly diagnosed advanced gastric cancer were examined with FLT PET/CT. For quantitative and comparative analyses, the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was calculated for both the tumors and noninvaded gastric wall. Results. There were found, in the group of adenocarcinoma tubulare, SUVmax 1.5–23.1 (7.46 ± 4.57), in mucinous adenocarcinoma, SUVmax 2.3–10.3 (5.5 ± 2.4), in undifferentiated carcinoma, SUVmax 3.1–13.6 (7.28 ± 3.25), in adenocarcinoma partim mucocellulare, SUVmax 2–25.3 (7.7 ± 6.99), and, in normal gastric wall, SUVmax 1.01–2.55 (1.84 ± 0.35). For the level of 2.6 cut-off value between the normal wall and neoplasm FLT uptake from ROC analysis, all but five gastric cancers showed higher accumulation of FLT than noninfiltrated mucosa. Conclusion. Gastric cancer presents higher accumulation of 18F-FLT than normal, distended gastric mucosa. Significantly higher accumulation was shown in cancers better differentiated and with higher cellular density. PMID:24454342

  8. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Helicobacter pylori Eradication for the Prevention of Gastric Neoplasia. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;7:CD005583].

    PubMed

    Libãnio, Diogo; Azevedo, Luís Filipe

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma. Identification of individuals with this infection and its eradication may be considered as a primary prevention strategy to reduce the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma; however, the magnitude of benefit and the effectiveness of this strategy are still unclear. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials was conducted comparing the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma in infected individuals submitted to Helicobacter pylori eradication and individuals not submitted to this therapy. The results of the six included randomized clinical trials (all conducted in countries with high gastric cancer incidence) suggest that Helicobacter pylori eradication is associated with a relative risk reduction of 34% in gastric cancer incidence. However, generalization of the results to countries with lower gastric cancer incidence should be cautious and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in this context remains uncertain.

  9. From inflammation to gastric cancer: Role of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a multifactorial disease and a leading cause of mortality and the risk factors for this include environmental factors and factors that influence host-pathogen interaction and complex interplay between these factors. Gastric adenocarcinomas are of two types, namely intestinal and diffuse type, and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been suspected of being causally linked to the initiation of chronic active gastritis, which leads to adenocarcinoma of the intestinal type. Even though most individuals with H. pylori infection do not show any clinical symptoms, long-term infection leads to inflammation of gastric epithelium and approximately 10% of infected patients develop peptic ulcers and 1–3% of patients develop gastric adenocarcinoma. Among the several mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis, CagA and peptidoglycan of H. pylori, which enter the infected gastric epithelial cells play an important role by triggering oncogenic pathways. Inflammation induced by H. pylori in gastric epithelium, which involves the cyclooxygenase-2/prostaglandin E2 pathway and IL-1β, is also an important factor that triggers chronic active gastritis and adenocarcinoma. H. pylori infection induced oxidative stress and dysregulated E-cadherin/β-catenin/p120 interactions and function also play a critical role in tumorigenesis. Environmental and dietary factors, in particular salt intake, are known to modify the pathogenesis induced by H. pylori. Gastric cancer induced by H. pylori appears to involve several mechanisms, making this mode of tumorigenesis a highly complicated process. Nevertheless, there are many events in this tumorigenesis that remain to be clarified and investigated. PMID:28356927

  10. Enhancement of adherence of Helicobacter pylori to host cells by virus: possible mechanism of development of symptoms of gastric disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Nakano, Takashi; Suzuki, Youichi; Ooi, Yukimasa; Sano, Kouichi

    2017-03-10

    It remains unclear why gastric disease does not develop in all cases of Helicobacter pylori infection. In this study, we analyzed whether simian virus 5 (SV5) enhanced adherence of H. pylori to adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (AGS). H. pylori in AGS (harboring SV5) and SV5-infected Vero cells, and an agglutination of H. pylori mixed with SV5 were observed by light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The adherent rate of H. pylori to SV5-infected Vero cells and treated with an anti-SV5 antibody was determined. H. pylori adhered to the surface of AGS cells near SV5 particles, as shown by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The adherence of H. pylori to SV5-infected Vero cells was significantly enhanced compared with that to Vero cells. In contrast, the adherence of H. pylori to Vero cells was decreased by treatment with the anti-SV5 antibody. Agglutination of H. pylori mixed with SV5 was observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Agglutination did not occur when SV5 was treated with the anti-SV5 antibody before mixing. These findings demonstrated that SV5 enhanced the adherence of H. pylori to host cells, suggesting that a persistently infected virus may be a factor enhancing the pathogenicity of H. pylori in humans.

  11. Anti-tumor Activity of Ferulago angulata Boiss. Extract in Gastric Cancer Cell Line via Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Shafagh; Akrami, Hassan; Gharaei, Roghaye; Jalili, Ali; Mahdiuni, Hamid; Golezar, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Ferulago angulata Boiss. known in Iran as Chavir, has some bioactive compounds having antioxidant activity. Because of its antioxidant activities, it sounded Chavir extract can be a good candidate for finding chemopreventive agents having inductive apoptosis properties on cancer cells. In this study, the cytotoxic effects and proapoptotic activities of Chavir’s leaf and flower extracts were investigated on human adenocarcinoma gastric cell line (AGS). The ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay was used to determine antioxidant activity of the extract. Cytotoxic effects of the extract were performed by trypan blue and neutral red assays. For apoptosis detection, we used Annexin V staining, flow cytometry and DNA fragmentation assays. The FRAP assay results showed that antioxidant activity of leaf extract was higher than flower extract. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis–inducing activity of flower and leaf extracts changed coordinately, indicating the cytotoxicity of chavir extracts is due probably to induce apoptosis. Our results revealed that the cytotoxic effects of F. angulate Boiss. extracts on AGS cell line is close to some other plant extracts such as Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS) and Scutellaria litwinowii. This is the first study on cytotoxic and apoptosis–inducing effects of chavir leaf and flower extracts against AGS cell line. The Further investigation can be identification of the agent(s) by which these effects is observed. PMID:25587323

  12. Anti-tumor Activity of Ferulago angulata Boiss. Extract in Gastric Cancer Cell Line via Induction of Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Shafagh; Akrami, Hassan; Gharaei, Roghaye; Jalili, Ali; Mahdiuni, Hamid; Golezar, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Ferulago angulata Boiss. known in Iran as Chavir, has some bioactive compounds having antioxidant activity. Because of its antioxidant activities, it sounded Chavir extract can be a good candidate for finding chemopreventive agents having inductive apoptosis properties on cancer cells. In this study, the cytotoxic effects and proapoptotic activities of Chavir's leaf and flower extracts were investigated on human adenocarcinoma gastric cell line (AGS). The ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay was used to determine antioxidant activity of the extract. Cytotoxic effects of the extract were performed by trypan blue and neutral red assays. For apoptosis detection, we used Annexin V staining, flow cytometry and DNA fragmentation assays. The FRAP assay results showed that antioxidant activity of leaf extract was higher than flower extract. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing activity of flower and leaf extracts changed coordinately, indicating the cytotoxicity of chavir extracts is due probably to induce apoptosis. Our results revealed that the cytotoxic effects of F. angulate Boiss. extracts on AGS cell line is close to some other plant extracts such as Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS) and Scutellaria litwinowii. This is the first study on cytotoxic and apoptosis-inducing effects of chavir leaf and flower extracts against AGS cell line. The Further investigation can be identification of the agent(s) by which these effects is observed.

  13. Gastric suction

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric lavage; Stomach pumping; Nasogastric tube suction; Bowel obstruction - suction ... A tube is inserted through your nose or mouth, down the food pipe (esophagus), and into the stomach. Your ...

  14. The chronological sequence of somatic mutations in early gastric carcinogenesis inferred from multiregion sequencing of gastric adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chul-Hyun; Cho, Yu Kyung; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Rhee, Je-Keun; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Sug-Hyung; Kim, Tae-Min

    2016-01-01

    Mutation profiles and intratumoral heterogeneity are not well understood for benign gastric adenomas, some of which progress into malignant gastric adenocarcinomas. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing of three microsatellite stable (MSS) and two microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) gastric adenomas with three regional tumor biopsies per case. We observed that the mutation abundance of benign gastric adenomas was comparable to those of gastric adenocarcinomas, suggesting that the mutational makeup for gastric carcinogenesis may already be achieved in benign adenomas. The extent of intratumoral heterogeneity was more substantial for MSS genomes in that only 1% - 14% of somatic mutations were common across the regional biopsies or ‘public’, while 50% - 94% of mutations were public in MSI-H gastric adenomas. We observed biallelic, loss-of-functional events of APC with truncating mutations and/or 5q losses for all cases, mostly as public events. All MSS gastric adenomas also harbored ARID2 truncating mutations, often as multiple, region-specific ones indicative of convergent evolution. Hotspot missense mutations on known cancer genes such as ERBB2 and KRAS were largely observed as region-specific aberrations. These findings suggest that biallelic functional APC inactivation initiates the gastric carcinogenesis and is followed by mutations of histone modifiers and then activation of known cancer-related genes. As the first exome-wide multi-region mutational profiling of gastric adenomas, our study provides clues on the chronological sequence of somatic mutations and their clonal architectures in early gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27175599

  15. Gastric sarcoidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Akinyemi, Emmanuel; Rohewal, Upinder; Tangorra, Matthew; Abdullah, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    A 58-year-old Jamaican male presented with acute-onset, right-sided facial droop and slurred speech. He had an episode of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleed on the second day of admission and endoscopy with biopsy of antral ulcer revealed gastric sarcoidosis. This case demonstrates the rare entity of gastric sarcoidosis presenting acutely with an upper GI bleed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16775918

  16. Villoglandular papillary adenocarcinoma: case report

    PubMed Central

    Salek, Ghizlane; Lalya, Issam; Rahali, Driss Moussaoui; Dehayni, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Villoglandular papillary adenocarcinoma (VPA) is a very rare subtype of adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix, but a well-recognized variant of cervical adenocarcinoma with a favorable prognosis and generally occurring in women of child-bearing age. Herein, we report a case of VPA diagnosed and managed successfully with conservative measure. This management is particularly desirable in young women to preserve reproductive capability. PMID:28293348

  17. Early gastric cancer in Menetrier’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Remes-Troche, Jose Maria; Zapata-Colindres, Juan Carlos; Starkman, Ivethe; De Anda, Jazmin; Arista-Nasr, Julian; Valdovinos-Diaz, Miguel Angel

    2009-01-01

    Uncommon conditions such as pernicious anaemia and hypertrophic gastropathies have been considered as risk factors for gastric cancer; however, the exact increase in risk is unknown. Menetrier’s disease is a rare hyperproliferative disorder of the stomach caused by an overexpression of tumour growth factor α, a ligand for the tyrokinase epidermal growth factor receptor, resulting in a selective expansion of surface mucous cells in the body and fundus of the stomach. There have been nearly 200 cases of Menetrier’s disease reported in the literature yet less than 15 have been associated with gastric adenocarcinoma. Here, we report an early stage gastric adenocarcinoma detected incidentally in a patient recently diagnosed with Menetrier’s disease. PMID:21686802

  18. Esophageal adenocarcinoma arising in cervical inlet patch with synchronous Barrett's esophagus-related dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mariko; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Ikemura, Masako; Shibahara, Junji; Seto, Yasuyuki; Fukayama, Masashi

    2014-08-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinomas usually develop in Barrett's esophagus, typically through the metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence, but adenocarcinomas can occur from heterotopic gastric mucosa in cervical esophagus (inlet patch). This report describes the first case of synchronous presentation of adenocarcinoma arising from cervical inlet patch and Barrett's esophagus-related dysplasia in a 76-year-old man. Surveillance CT detected a 3-cm polypoid mass in the cervical esophagus. Endoscopic biopsies confirmed a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma of the cervical esophagus. Barrett's esophagus was present also in the lower esophagus. Histologic examination of the surgically resected specimen revealed the polypoid mass as composed of tubular adenocarcinoma, and was associated with non-neoplastic columnar mucosa representing pre-existing inlet patch. Another isolated cervical inlet patch with intestinal metaplasia was also recognized. In the lower esophagus, high-grade dysplasia was noted within the Barrett's esophagus. Immunohistochemically, the adenocarcinoma associated with inlet patch had intestinal immunophenotype (CDX2-, CD10- and MUC2-positive), whereas the Barrett's esophagus-related high-grade dysplasia showed mixed immunophenotype (MUC5AC- and MUC6-positive, with scattered MUC2-positive goblet cells). Previous studies and our findings suggest that intestinal metaplasia might predispose to the development of adenocarcinoma in the inlet patch. Therefore, endoscopists and pathologists should be aware of rare malignant transformation of inlet patches, especially those with intestinal metaplasia.

  19. Whole-genome reconstruction and mutational signatures in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is the second highest cause of global cancer mortality. To explore the complete repertoire of somatic alterations in gastric cancer, we combined massively parallel short read and DNA paired-end tag sequencing to present the first whole-genome analysis of two gastric adenocarcinomas, one with chromosomal instability and the other with microsatellite instability. Results Integrative analysis and de novo assemblies revealed the architecture of a wild-type KRAS amplification, a common driver event in gastric cancer. We discovered three distinct mutational signatures in gastric cancer - against a genome-wide backdrop of oxidative and microsatellite instability-related mutational signatures, we identified the first exome-specific mutational signature. Further characterization of the impact of these signatures by combining sequencing data from 40 complete gastric cancer exomes and targeted screening of an additional 94 independent gastric tumors uncovered ACVR2A, RPL22 and LMAN1 as recurrently mutated genes in microsatellite instability-positive gastric cancer and PAPPA as a recurrently mutated gene in TP53 wild-type gastric cancer. Conclusions These results highlight how whole-genome cancer sequencing can uncover information relevant to tissue-specific carcinogenesis that would otherwise be missed from exome-sequencing data. PMID:23237666

  20. The different functions and clinical significances of caveolin-1 in human adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Pin; Chen, Fuchun; Pan, Qi; Zhao, Xianda; Zhao, Chen; Cho, William Chi-Shing; Chen, Honglei

    2017-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a major structural protein of caveolae, is an integral membrane protein which plays an important role in the progression of carcinoma. However, whether Cav-1 acts as a tumor promoter or a tumor suppressor still remains controversial. For example, the tumor-promoting function of Cav-1 has been found in renal cancer, prostate cancer, tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), lung SCC and bladder SCC. In contrast, Cav-1 also plays an inhibitory role in esophagus adenocarcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma and cutaneous SCC. The role of Cav-1 is still controversial in thyroid cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric adenocarcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, breast cancer, pancreas cancer, oral SCC, laryngeal SCC, head and neck SCC, esophageal SCC and cervical SCC. Besides, it has been reported that the loss of stromal Cav-1 might predict poor prognosis in breast cancer, gastric cancer, pancreas cancer, prostate cancer, oral SCC and esophageal SCC. However, the accumulation of stromal Cav-1 has been found to be promoted by the progression of tongue SCC. Taken together, Cav-1 seems playing a different role in different cancer subtypes even of the same organ, as well as acting differently in the same cancer subtype of different organs. Thus, we hereby explore the functions of Cav-1 in human adenocarcinoma and SCC from the perspective of clinical significances and pathogenesis. We envision that novel targets may come with the further investigation of Cav-1 in carcinogenesis. PMID:28243118

  1. [Gastric lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Ruskoné-Fourmestraux, A

    1997-04-15

    The stomach is the most common site involved in primary gastrointestinal lymphoma. Gastric lymphoma originates from the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue so called MALT. It comprises a group of distinctive clinicopathological entities which are important to take in account for clinical behavior. In recent years, new diagnostic tools and modern modes of treatment have improved their overall prognosis. One of the most exciting recent discoveries is the hypothesis that an infection by a bacterium. Helicobacter pylori has a decisive role in gastric lymphoma.

  2. [Gastric volvulus].

    PubMed

    Solórzano, J; Acosta, D; Morales, H; Vásquez, F; Mora, G; Chávez, M; Andrade, D; Joutteaux, R; Sánchez, I; García, D; Valenzuela, E

    2006-10-01

    Gastric volvulus is a rare condition in pediatric population in which there is an abnormal rotation of one part of the stomach around itself. It's a surgical emergency. We report a six year old female admitted in the emergency due to upper abdominal distention, nausea without vomiting, physical exam revealed upper abdominal distention and abdominal tenderness, no bowel sounds. Laparotomy was performed and a gastric volvulus with occlusive vascular involvement was found. In the post operative period she required a second laparotomy due to adhesions in small bowel.

  3. [Gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Belén Fraile, M; Serra Bartual, M; Segarra Sánchez, J; Richart Rufino, M J

    1991-11-01

    Gastric cancer represents a disorder which incidence has come down last years. Its etiology is unknown, but diet is the principal determinant risk of suffering it. Clinic history is not much useful, because in the early stage symptoms can fail and in the late stage are inespecific. Election diagnosis is endoscopy. Surgery is the only curative treatment. By these features, it would be useful to left under vigilance to: a) patients 40 years older with dispepsia; b) patients following gastric operations; c) patients with disorders presenting aclorhidria. The authors report a clinic case that can be of frequent presentation in primary assistance.

  4. [Gastric cleansing].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann Serret, Alina; Alcaraz Bravo, Judit; Carballo Alvarez, Montse; Fernández Vargas, Carmen

    2006-10-01

    Numerous cases in emergency wards are due to the ingestion of potentially toxic substances. One of the most utilized procedures under these circumstances is gastric cleansing. This procedure is a technique habitually practiced by nursing personnel but is not without its risks. Therefore, the motive of this article is to make known the indications, contraindications, related complications of gastric cleansing and its integral patient care process in order to offer quality care methods which enable their being performed in an effective and efficient manner, under the maximum security conditions with the minimum inconveniences for the patient while at the same time describing the system most commonly used by our service.

  5. Helicobacter pylori Update: Gastric Cancer, Reliable Therapy, and Possible Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection contributes to development of diverse gastric and extra-gastric diseases. The infection is necessary but not sufficient for development of gastric adenocarcinoma. Its eradication would eliminate a major worldwide cause of cancer death, so there is much interest in identifying how, if, and when this can be accomplished. There are several mechanisms by which H pylori contributes to development of gastric cancer. Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of many cancers associated with inflammation, which is induced by H pylori infection, yet the bacteria also cause genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells. H pylori eradication reduces both. However, many factors must be considered in determining whether treating this bacterial infection will prevent cancer or only reduce its risk—these must be considered in designing reliable and effective eradication therapies. Furthermore, H pylori infection has been proposed to provide some benefits, such as reducing the risks of obesity or childhood asthma, although there are no convincing data to support the benefits of H pylori infections. PMID:25655557

  6. Review of Atrophic Gastritis and Intestinal Metaplasia as a Premalignant Lesion of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yo Han; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are the main precursor lesions of gastric cancer as the incidence of gastric cancer increases in the gastric mucosa involved with AG and IM. The prevalence of AG and IM vary depending on countries, even it represents diverse results in the same nation. Usually AG is antecedent of IM but the etiologies of AG and IM are not always the same. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic methods to detect AG and IM are different. Furthermore, the management strategy of AG and IM has not been established, yet. Helicobacter pylori infection has been proved as the most important cause of AG and IM. Thus the eradication of H. pylori is very important to prevent the progression to gastric cancer which is still placed in the high rank in morbidity and mortality among cancers. However, the reversibility of AG and IM by eradication of H. pylori which was assumed to be certain by meta-analysis is; however, controversial now. Therefore, the understanding and early diagnosis of AG and IM are very important, especially, in high incidence area of gastric cancer such as Republic of Korea. PMID:25853101

  7. Identification of IL11RA and MELK amplification in gastric cancer by comprehensive genomic profiling of gastric cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Takeno, Sylvia Santomi; Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Araújo, Taíssa Maíra Thomaz; Lima, Eleonidas Moura; Melaragno, Maria Isabel; Demachki, Samia; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marília Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify common copy number alterations on gastric cancer cell lines. METHODS Four gastric cancer cell lines (ACP02, ACP03, AGP01 and PG100) underwent chromosomal comparative genome hybridization and array comparative genome hybridization. We also confirmed the results by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis using the bacterial artificial chromosome clone and quantitative real time PCR analysis. RESULTS The amplification of 9p13.3 was detected in all cell lines by both methodologies. An increase in the copy number of 9p13.3 was also confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. Moreover, the interleukin 11 receptor alpha (IL11RA) and maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) genes, which are present in the 9p13.3 amplicon, revealed gains of the MELK gene in all the cell lines studied. Additionally, a gain in the copy number of IL11RA and MELK was observed in 19.1% (13/68) and 55.9% (38/68) of primary gastric adenocarcinoma samples, respectively. CONCLUSION The characterization of a small gain region at 9p13.3 in gastric cancer cell lines and primary gastric adenocarcinoma samples has revealed MELK as a candidate target gene that is possibly related to the development of gastric cancer. PMID:27920471

  8. The Clinical Evidence Linking Helicobacter pylori to Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moss, Steven F

    2017-03-01

    Gastric cancer has long been recognized to be accompanied and preceded by chronic gastritis, lasting decades. Arguably, the most important development in our understanding of gastric cancer pathogenesis over the past 50 years has been the realization that, for most cases of gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori is the cause of the underlying gastritis. Gastritis can promote gastric carcinogenesis, typically via the Correa cascade of atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia. Nested case-control studies have shown that H pylori infection increases the risk of gastric cancer significantly, both of the intestinal and diffuse subtypes, and that H pylori is responsible for approximately 90% of the world's burden of noncardia gastric cancer. Based largely on randomized studies in high gastric cancer prevalence regions in East Asia, it appears that primary and tertiary intervention to eradicate H pylori can halve the risk of gastric cancer. Some public health authorities now are starting screening and treatment programs to reduce the burden of gastric cancer in these high-risk areas. However, there is currently much less enthusiasm for initiating similar attempts in the United States. This is partially because gastric cancer is a relatively less frequent cause of cancer in the United States, and in addition there are concerns about theoretical downsides of H pylori eradication, principally because of the consistent inverse relationship noted between H pylori and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Nevertheless, establishing a link between chronic H pylori infection and gastric cancer has led to novel insights into cancer biology, the gastrointestinal microbiome, and on individual and population-based gastric cancer prevention strategies.

  9. Urinary microRNA-30a-5p is a potential biomarker for ovarian serous adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Gong, Guanghui; Tan, Hong; Dai, Furong; Zhu, Xin; Chen, Yile; Wang, Junpu; Liu, Ying; Chen, Puxiang; Wu, Xiaoying; Wen, Jifang

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can serve as biomarkers in human cancer. To determine the clinical value of urinary miRNAs for ovarian serous adenocarcinoma, we collected urine samples from 39 ovarian serous adenocarcinoma patients, 26 patients with benign gynecological disease and 30 healthy controls. The miRNA microarray data showed that only miR-30a-5p was upregulated and 37 miRNAs were downregulated in the urine samples of ovarian serous adenocarcinoma patients, when compared to healthy controls, which was confirmed after conducting quantitative PCR. The upregulation of urinary miR-30a-5p was closely associated with early stage of ovarian serous adenocarcinoma as well as lymphatic metastasis. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis demonstrated the potential use of urinary miR-30a-5p as a diagnostic marker for ovarian serous adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, a lower urine level of miR-30a-5p was found in 20 gastric cancer and 20 colon carcinoma patients when compared to ovarian serous adenocarcinoma, suggesting that the upregulation of urinary miR-30a-5p may be specific for ovarian serous adenocarcinoma. miR-30a-5p was also upregulated in ovarian serous adenocarcinoma tissues and cell lines, while urinary miR-30a-5p from ovarian cancer patients was notably reduced following the surgical removal of ovarian serous adenocarcinoma, suggesting that urinary miR-30a-5p was derived from the ovarian serous adenocarcinoma tissue. Notably, miR-30a-5p was concentrated with exosomes from the ovarian cancer cell supernatant or urine from ovarian serous adenocarcinoma patients, supporting a pathway for excretion into the urine. The results also showed that the knockdown of miR-30a-5p significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of ovarian cancer cells. In summary, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provided the first evidence of increased miR-30a-5p in the urine of ovarian serous adeno-carcinoma patients, while the inhibition of miR-30a-5p suppressed the

  10. Gastric bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Bariatric surgery - gastric bypass - discharge; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass - discharge; Gastric bypass - Roux-en-Y - discharge; Obesity ... Gloy VL, Briel M, Bhatt DL, et al. Bariatric surgery versus non-surgical treatment for obesity: a systematic ...

  11. [Synchronous adenocarcinoma and lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma in the stomach: a case presentation and literature review].

    PubMed

    Aranguibel, D; Benítez, S; Guillen, I; Villarreal, L; Bandres, D; Bastidas, G

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the main causes of death in the world. In Venezuela, gastric tumors represent 37% of all malignant tumors of the digestive system, but only 1,6% to 3,1% of these cases are lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma. Synchronous neoplastic lesions are also rare. The clinical case presented herein, a man with two synchronous tumor lesions, is the first of its kind in this country. Despite their incipient aspect, the histologic study reported two malignant tumors of epithelial origin: well-differentiated adenocarcinoma and lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma.

  12. Gastrin stimulates MMP-1 expression in gastric epithelial cells: putative role in gastric epithelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J Dinesh; Steele, Islay; Moore, Andrew R; Murugesan, Senthil V; Rakonczay, Zoltan; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Pritchard, D Mark; Dimaline, Rodney; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Varro, Andrea; Dockray, Graham J

    2015-07-15

    The pyloric antral hormone gastrin plays a role in remodeling of the gastric epithelium, but the specific targets of gastrin that mediate these effects are poorly understood. Glandular epithelial cells of the gastric corpus express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, which is a potential determinant of tissue remodeling; some of these cells express the CCK-2 receptor at which gastrin acts. We have now examined the hypothesis that gastrin stimulates expression of MMP-1 in the stomach. We determined MMP-1 transcript abundance in gastric mucosal biopsies from Helicobacter pylori negative human subjects with normal gastric mucosal histology, who had a range of serum gastrin concentrations due in part to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The effects of gastrin were studied on gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells using Western blot and migration assays. In human subjects with increased serum gastrin due to PPI usage, MMP-1 transcript abundance was increased 2-fold; there was also increased MMP-7 transcript abundance but not MMP-3. In Western blots, gastrin increased proMMP-1 abundance, as well that of a minor band corresponding to active MMP-1, in the media of AGS-GR cells, and the response was mediated by protein kinase C and p42/44 MAP kinase. There was also increased MMP-1 enzyme activity. Gastrin-stimulated AGS-GR cell migration in both scratch wound and Boyden chamber assays was inhibited by MMP-1 immunoneutralization. We conclude that MMP-1 expression is a target of gastrin implicated in mucosal remodeling.

  13. Systemic treatment of gastric and esophageal adenocarcinoma in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the treatment of cancer of the stomach and of the lower esophagus in older individuals. The incidence of both malignancies increases with age and, at present, the biology of the diseases, including sensitivity to chemotherapy, does not seem to change with age. The treatment of these cancers in patients 70 and over includes assessment of life expectancy secondary to physiologic age and evaluation of the individual’s tolerance to stress. For this purpose a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is the best validated instrument. For individuals whose life expectancy without cancer exceeds that with cancer, the estimate of the risk of chemotherapy complications may reveal those patients in need of additional care and those patients in whom the risk of treatment may exceed the potential benefits. All older individuals receiving chemotherapy may need adjustment of the doses to the glomerular filtration rate, support with myelopoietic growth factors, and special care to prevent severe and irreversible neurotoxicity. PMID:25642340

  14. Genomic similarity between gastroesophageal junction and esophageal Barrett's adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kuick, Rork; Thomas, Dafydd G.; Nadal, Ernest; Lin, Jules; Chang, Andrew C.; Reddy, Rishindra M.; Orringer, Mark B.; Taylor, Jeremy M. G.; Wang, Thomas D.; Beer, David G.

    2016-01-01

    The current high mortality rate of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) reflects frequent presentation at an advanced stage. Recent efforts utilizing fluorescent peptides have identified overexpressed cell surface targets for endoscopic detection of early stage Barrett's-derived EAC. Unfortunately, 30% of EAC patients present with gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinomas (GEJAC) and lack premalignant Barrett's metaplasia, limiting this early detection strategy. We compared mRNA profiles from 52 EACs (tubular EAC; tEAC) collected above the gastroesophageal junction with 70 GEJACs, 8 normal esophageal and 5 normal gastric mucosa samples. We also analyzed our previously published whole-exome sequencing data in a large cohort of these tumors. Principal component analysis, hierarchical clustering and survival-based analyses demonstrated that GEJAC and tEAC were highly similar, with only modest differences in expression and mutation profiles. The combined expression cohort allowed identification of 49 genes coding cell surface targets overexpressed in both GEJAC and tEAC. We confirmed that three of these candidates (CDH11, ICAM1 and CLDN3) were overexpressed in tumors when compared to normal esophagus, normal gastric and non-dysplastic Barrett's, and localized to the surface of tumor cells. Molecular profiling of tEAC and GEJAC tumors indicated extensive similarity and related molecular processes. Identified genes that encode cell surface proteins overexpressed in both Barrett's-derived EAC and those that arise without Barrett's metaplasia will allow simultaneous detection strategies. PMID:27363029

  15. Challenges of deciphering gastric cancer heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Hudler, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is in decline in most developed countries; however, it still accounts for a notable fraction of global mortality and morbidity related to cancer. High-throughput methods are rapidly changing our view and understanding of the molecular basis of gastric carcinogenesis. Today, it is widely accepted that the molecular complexity and heterogeneity, both inter- and intra-tumour, of gastric adenocarcinomas present significant obstacles in elucidating specific biomarkers for early detection of the disease. Although genome-wide sequencing and gene expression studies have revealed the intricate nature of the molecular changes that occur in tumour landscapes, the collected data and results are complex and sometimes contradictory. Several aberrant molecules have already been tested in clinical trials, although their diagnostic and prognostic utilities have not been confirmed thus far. The gold standard for the detection of sporadic gastric cancer is still the gastric endoscopy, which is considered invasive. In addition, genome-wide association studies have confirmed that genetic variations are important contributors to increased cancer risk and could participate in the initiation of malignant transformation. This hypothesis could in part explain the late onset of sporadic gastric cancers. The elaborate interplay of polymorphic low penetrance genes and lifestyle and environmental risk factors requires additional research to decipher their relative impacts on tumorigenesis. The purpose of this article is to present details of the molecular heterogeneity of sporadic gastric cancers at the DNA, RNA, and proteome levels and to discuss issues relevant to the translation of basic research data to clinically valuable tools. The focus of this work is the identification of relevant molecular changes that could be detected non-invasively. PMID:26457012

  16. [A case of chronic pancreatitis occurring in gastric aberrant pancreas poorly distinguishable from gastric aberrant pancreas ductal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Sayaka; Miyaoka, Youichi; Fujiwara, Aya; Tsukano, Kousuke; Kotani, Satoshi; Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Kusunoki, Ryusaku; Ito, Satoko; Fujishiro, Hirofumi; Kohge, Nariaki; Onuma, Hideyuki

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 40s was referred to our hospital with abdominal pain. A gastric submucosal tumor (SMT) was diagnosed nine years previously, but the patient was lost to follow-up. Upon our evaluation, the SMT had enlarged, as demonstrated by esophagogastroduodenoscopy and abdominal computed tomography. Endoscopic ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic and isoechoic mosaic mass, which primarily occupied the third and fourth layers of the gastric wall. Aspiration cytodiagnosis was performed, the results of which led to a suspicion of adenocarcinoma arising from gastric ectopic pancreas. Next, we conducted segmental gastrectomy. Pathological examination showed adiponecrosis, a pancreatic stone, chronic inflammatory cell infiltration, and fibrosis. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis occurring in a gastric aberrant pancreas.

  17. Modeling Murine Gastric Metaplasia Through Tamoxifen-Induced Acute Parietal Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Saenz, Jose B.; Burclaff, Joseph; Mills, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    Parietal cell loss represents the initial step in the sequential progression toward gastric adenocarcinoma. In the setting of chronic inflammation, the expansion of the mucosal response to parietal cell loss characterizes a crucial transition en route to gastric dysplasia. Here, we detail methods for using the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen as a novel tool to rapidly and reversibly induce parietal cell loss in mice in order to study the mechanisms that underlie these pre-neoplastic events. PMID:27246044

  18. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huangying

    2016-01-01

    Gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms (g-NENs) are a group of heterogeneous tumors arising from the endocrine cells of stomach. Most g-NENs progresses slowly and have a long disease course; however, some other g-NENs grow rapidly, similar to the progression of gastric adenocarcinoma. g-NENs have complex and diverse clinical manifestations and their prognosis and treatment strategies depend highly on clinical subtype, pathological grade, tumour stage, and other factors. Due to their low prevalence, most clinicians have limited knowledge about g-NENs. Missed diagnosis and excessive/inadequate treatment is common in clinical settings. Thus, the diagnosis and treatment of g-NENs needs to be further standardized.

  19. Distinct metaplastic and inflammatory phenotypes in autoimmune and adenocarcinoma-associated chronic atrophic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sangho; Choi, Eunyoung; Petersen, Christine P; Roland, Joseph T; Federico, Alessandro; Ippolito, Rossana; D'Armiento, Francesco P; Nardone, Gerardo; Nagano, Osamu; Saya, Hideyuki; Romano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background Autoimmune gastritis (AIG) and adenocarcinoma-associated chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) are both associated with oxyntic atrophy, but AIG patients demonstrate an increased risk of carcinoid tumors rather than the elevated risk of adenocarcinoma observed with CAG. We therefore sought to compare the characteristics of the metaplastic mucosa in AIG and CAG patients. Methods We examined markers for metaplasia (spasmolytic polypeptide expressing metaplasia (SPEM) and intestinal metaplasia) as well as proliferation (Ki67) and immune cell populations (neutrophils, macrophages, and eosinophils) in gastric sections from 16 female patients with autoimmune thyroiditis and AIG and 17 patients with CAG associated with gastric adenocarcinoma. Results Both AIG and CAG patients demonstrated prominent SPEM and intestinal metaplasia. However, AIG patients displayed significantly lower numbers of infiltrating macrophages and significantly reduced mucosal cell proliferation as compared to CAG patients. Conclusions These findings indicate that, while both AIG and CAG patients display prominent oxyntic atrophy and metaplasia, the AIG patients do not show proliferative metaplastic lineages that would predispose to adenocarcinoma.

  20. Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Helicobacter pylori-Associated Premalignant and Malignant Gastric Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Joseph J. Y.; Leung, Wai K.; Go, Minnie Y. Y.; To, Ka F.; Cheng, Alfred S. L.; Ng, Enders K. W.; Chan, Francis K. L.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in various stages of the Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis pathway has not been elucidated. We investigated the distribution and intensity of COX-2 expression in premalignant and malignant gastric lesions, and monitored the changes after H. pylori eradication. Gastric biopsies from H. pylori-infected patients with chronic active gastritis, gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia (IM), gastric adenocarcinoma, and noninfected controls were studied. Expression of COX-2 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Endoscopic biopsies were repeated 1 year after successful eradication of H. pylori in a group of IM patients for comparing COX-2 expression and progression of IM. In all H. pylori-infected patients, COX-2 expression was predominantly found in the foveolar and glandular epithelium and, to a lesser extent, in the lamina propria. In the noninfected group, only 35% of cases demonstrated weak COX-2 expression. Intensity of COX-2 was not significantly different between the chronic active gastritis, gastric atrophy, IM, and gastric adenocarcinoma groups. In 17 patients with IM, COX-2 expressions in the epithelial cells and stromal cells were reduced 1 year after H. pylori eradication. However, the changes in COX-2 expression did not correlate with progression/regression of IM. Both premalignant and malignant gastric lesions demonstrate strong COX-2 expression. Successful eradication of H. pylori leads to down-regulation of COX-2 expression but failed to reverse IM at 1 year. PMID:10980112

  1. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: a state of the art review.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Sauid; Nunn, Lois

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. It is now well- established that Helicobacter pylori infection predispose individuals toward gastric adenocarcinoma later in life. It has since been classified as a class I carcinogen by the World Health Organization. Research suggests that the oncogenic effects of Helicobacter pylori can occur through a variety of mechanisms, including the indirect inflammatory effects of Helicobacter pylori on the gastric mucosa and the direct epigenetic effects of Helicobacter pylori on individual cells. Whilst infected with Helicobacter pylori, a combination of environmental and host-dependent factors determines the likelihood of developing gastric cancer. Controversy remains regarding the effects of eradication of Helicobacter pylori on the prevention of further progression of gastric lesions and the possibility for regression of atrophic gastritis. The aim of this review is to synthesis different elements that contribute to the step-wise progression of normal gastric mucosa to gastric adenocarcinoma. This review helps clinicians to better identify those infected individuals who are at high risk of developing gastric cancer and implement the necessary investigations and treatment.

  2. Oxygenated hemoglobin diffuse reflectance ratio for in vitro detection of human gastric pre-cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. Q.; Wei, H. J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, H. Q.; Wu, G. Y.; Xie, S. S.; Zhong, H. Q.; Li, X. Y.; Zhao, Q. L.; Guo, X.

    2010-07-01

    Oxygenated hemoglobin diffuse reflectance (DR) ratio (R540/R575) method based on DR spectral signatures is used for early diagnosis of malignant lesions of human gastric epithelial tissues in vitro. The DR spectra for four different kinds of gastric epithelial tissues were measured using a spectrometer with an integrating sphere detector in the spectral range from 400 to 650 nm. The results of measurement showed that the average DR spectral intensity for the epithelial tissues of normal stomach is higher than that for the epithelial tissues of chronic and malignant stomach and that for the epithelial tissues of chronic gastric ulcer is higher than that for the epithelial tissues of malignant stomach. The average DR spectra for four different kinds of gastric epithelial tissues show dips at 542 and 577 nm owing to absorption from oxygenated Hemoglobin (HbO2). The differences in the mean R540/R575 ratios of HbO2 bands are 6.84% between the epithelial tissues of normal stomach and chronic gastric ulcer, 14.7% between the epithelial tissues of normal stomach and poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma and 22.6% between the epithelial tissues of normal stomach and undifferentiated gastric adenocarcinoma. It is evident from results that there were significant differences in the mean R540/R575 ratios of HbO2 bands for four different kinds of gastric epithelial tissues in vitro ( P < 0.01).

  3. Discrimination of premalignant lesions and cancer tissues from normal gastric tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shuwen; Chen, Changshui; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2013-06-01

    The feasibility of early detection of gastric cancer using near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy (RS) by distinguishing premalignant lesions (adenomatous polyp, n=27) and cancer tissues (adenocarcinoma, n=33) from normal gastric tissues (n=45) is evaluated. Significant differences in Raman spectra are observed among the normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues at 936, 1003, 1032, 1174, 1208, 1323, 1335, 1450, and 1655 cm-1. Diverse statistical methods are employed to develop effective diagnostic algorithms for classifying the Raman spectra of different types of ex vivo gastric tissues, including principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and naive Bayesian classifier (NBC) techniques. Compared with PCA-LDA algorithms, PCA-NBC techniques together with leave-one-out, cross-validation method provide better discriminative results of normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues, resulting in superior sensitivities of 96.3%, 96.9%, and 96.9%, and specificities of 93%, 100%, and 95.2%, respectively. Therefore, NIR RS associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for early diagnosis of gastric premalignant lesions and cancer tissues in molecular level.

  4. Loss of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor contributes to gastric cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Anders, M; Vieth, M; Röcken, C; Ebert, M; Pross, M; Gretschel, S; Schlag, P M; Wiedenmann, B; Kemmner, W; Höcker, M

    2009-01-01

    Loss of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) has previously been observed in gastric cancer. The role of CAR in gastric cancer pathobiology, however, is unclear. We therefore analysed CAR in 196 R0-resected gastric adenocarcinomas and non-cancerous gastric mucosa samples using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor was found at the surface and foveolar epithelium of all non-neoplastic gastric mucosa samples (n=175), whereas only 56% of gastric cancer specimens showed CAR positivity (P<0.0001). Loss of CAR correlated significantly with decreased differentiation, increased infiltrative depths, presence of distant metastases, and was also associated with reduced carcinoma-specific survival. To clarify whether CAR impacts the tumorbiologic properties of gastric cancer, we subsequently determined the role of CAR in proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cell lines by application of specific CAR siRNA or ectopic expression of a human full-length CAR cDNA. These experiments showed that RNAi-mediated CAR knock down resulted in increased proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cell lines, whereas enforced ectopic CAR expression led to opposite effects. We conclude that the association of reduced presence of CAR in more severe disease states, together with our findings in gastric cancer cell lines, suggests that CAR functionally contributes to gastric cancer pathogenesis, showing features of a tumour suppressor. PMID:19142187

  5. Gastric hyperplastic polyp with focal cancer.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Adam Roman; Guzinska-Ustymowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports a rare case of early adenocarcinoma within the gastric hyperplastic polyp, that was completely resected during an endoscopic procedure, and discusses current recommendations in such cases. Endoscopic resection of polyps with focal dysplasia or cancer is commonly indicated, as long as the procedure can be performed safely. After complete excision of a polyp with atypical focal lesion, endoscopic surveillance is suggested. The frequency of surveillance endoscopy should depend on the precise histopathological diagnosis and possibility of confirming the completeness of the endoscopic resection. If the completeness of the procedure is confirmed both macro- and microscopically, gastric resection does not have to be performed. A follow-up esophago-gastroduodenoscopy should be performed at 1 year and then at 3 years.

  6. Gastric hyperplastic polyp with focal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, Adam Roman; Guzinska-Ustymowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a rare case of early adenocarcinoma within the gastric hyperplastic polyp, that was completely resected during an endoscopic procedure, and discusses current recommendations in such cases. Endoscopic resection of polyps with focal dysplasia or cancer is commonly indicated, as long as the procedure can be performed safely. After complete excision of a polyp with atypical focal lesion, endoscopic surveillance is suggested. The frequency of surveillance endoscopy should depend on the precise histopathological diagnosis and possibility of confirming the completeness of the endoscopic resection. If the completeness of the procedure is confirmed both macro- and microscopically, gastric resection does not have to be performed. A follow-up esophago-gastroduodenoscopy should be performed at 1 year and then at 3 years. PMID:25361760

  7. Fatal submucosal invasive gastric adenosquamous carcinoma detected at surveillance after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Shirahige, Akinori; Suzuki, Haruhisa; Oda, Ichiro; Sekiguchi, Masau; Mori, Genki; Abe, Seiichiro; Nonaka, Satoru; Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Sekine, Shigeki; Kushima, Ryoji; Saito, Yutaka; Fukagawa, Takeo; Katai, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old man was under annual surveillance esophagogastroduodenoscopy after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer (EGC). Two years after the initial ESD, a 0-IIc type metachronous EGC lesion, 8 mm in size, without an ulcer scar, was found in the gastric antrum. The estimated tumor depth was up to the mucosa, and biopsy revealed well and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. ESD was performed for this lesion and en bloc resection with negative margins was achieved. Histopathological examination revealed an adenosquamous carcinoma 8 mm in size invading the deep submucosal layer (1600 μm), with lymphovascular invasion, consistent with the diagnosis of non-curative resection. Additional gastrectomy was recommended for this patient; however, two months after the ESD, preoperative computed tomography revealed multiple liver metastases, and the patient was considered as an unsuitable candidate for surgical resection. Systemic chemotherapy was therefore started; however, the patient died of gastric cancer 27 mo after the second ESD. Early gastric adenosquamous carcinoma localized to the mucosa and submucosa is extremely rare and its clinical behavior is not well known. The present report is very significant in that it underscores the distinct possibility of gastric adenosquamous carcinoma being very aggressive and fatal even when detected at an early cancer. PMID:25892891

  8. Experimental Gastric Carcinogenesis in Cebus apella Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tanielly Cristina Raiol; Andrade Junior, Edilson Ferreira; Rezende, Alexandre Pingarilho; Carneiro Muniz, José Augusto Pereira; Lacreta Junior, Antonio Carlos Cunha; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Demachki, Samia; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We established two gastric carcinogenesis models in New-World nonhuman primates. In the first model, ACP03 gastric cancer cell line was inoculated in 18 animals. In the second model, we treated 6 animals with N-methyl-nitrosourea (MNU). Animals with gastric cancer were also treated with Canova immunomodulator. Clinical, hematologic, and biochemical, including C-reactive protein, folic acid, and homocysteine, analyses were performed in this study. MYC expression and copy number was also evaluated. We observed that all animals inoculated with ACP03 developed gastric cancer on the 9th day though on the 14th day presented total tumor remission. In the second model, all animals developed pre-neoplastic lesions and five died of drug intoxication before the development of cancer. The last surviving MNU-treated animal developed intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma observed by endoscopy on the 940th day. The level of C-reactive protein level and homocysteine concentration increased while the level of folic acid decreased with the presence of tumors in ACP03-inoculated animals and MNU treatment. ACP03 inoculation also led to anemia and leukocytosis. The hematologic and biochemical results corroborate those observed in patients with gastric cancer, supporting that our in vivo models are potentially useful to study this neoplasia. In cell line inoculated animals, we detected MYC immunoreactivity, mRNA overexpression, and amplification, as previously observed in vitro. In MNU-treated animals, mRNA expression and MYC copy number increased during the sequential steps of intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis and immunoreactivity was only observed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer. Thus, MYC deregulation supports the gastric carcinogenesis process. Canova immunomodulator restored several hematologic measurements and therefore, can be applied during/after chemotherapy to increase the tolerability and

  9. Molecular Classification of Gastric Cancer: A new paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manish A.; Khanin, Raya; Tang, Laura; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Klimstra, David S.; Gerdes, Hans; Kelsen, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Gastric cancer may be subdivided into three distinct subtypes –proximal, diffuse, and distal gastric cancer– based on histopathologic and anatomic criteria. Each subtype is associated with unique epidemiology. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that these distinct gastric cancer subtypes may also be distinguished by gene expression analysis. Experimental Design Patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma being screened for a phase II preoperative clinical trial (NCI 5917) underwent endoscopic biopsy for fresh tumor procurement. 4–6 targeted biopsies of the primary tumor were obtained. Macrodissection was performed to ensure >80% carcinoma in the sample. HG-U133A GeneChip (Affymetrix) was used for cDNA expression analysis, and all arrays were processed and analyzed using the Bioconductor R-package. Results Between November 2003 and January 2006, 57 patients were screened to identify 36 patients with localized gastric cancer who had adequate RNA for expression analysis. Using supervised analysis, we built a classifier to distinguish the three gastric cancer subtypes, successfully classifying each into tightly grouped clusters. Leave-one-out cross validation error was 0.14, suggesting that >85% of samples were classified correctly. Gene set analysis with the False Discovery Rate set at 0.25 identified several pathways that were differentially regulated when comparing each gastric cancer subtype to adjacent normal stomach. Conclusions Subtypes of gastric cancer that have epidemiologic and histologic distinction are also distinguished by gene expression data. These preliminary data suggest a new classification of gastric cancer with implications for improving our understanding of disease biology and identification of unique molecular drivers for each gastric cancer subtype. PMID:21430069

  10. Inhibitory effects of rHP-NAP IgY against Helicobacter pylori attachment to AGS cell line.

    PubMed

    Borhani, Katayoun; Mohabati Mobarez, Ashraf; Khabiri, Ali Reza; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Khoramabadi, Nima

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major human pathogen related to gastric adenocarcinoma and gastroduodenal diseases. Treatment of H. pylori infections is complicated by the rise of antibiotic resistance, necessitating investigation of alternative therapies. One such alternative is passive immunization by oral administration of antibacterial immunoglobulin. In the present study, chicken immunoglobulin (IgY) was used for passive immunotherapy against a major virulence factor of H. pylori, namely recombinant HP-Nap protein. Recombinant HP-Nap was prepared and used to immunize hens. IgY was purified from the eggs by polyethylene glycol precipitation method with a total IgY-HP-NAP yield of 30 mg per egg. The inhibitory effect of specific IgY on H. pylori attachment was investigated in AGS cell line infected by the bacteria. The results demonstrate the potent effect of IgY- HP-NAP in inhibition of H. pylori attachment to the AGS cells.

  11. The number of Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells is increased in Helicobacter pylori gastritis and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae Jung

    2010-01-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization induces vigorous innate and specific immune responses; however, the infection is not removed, a state of chronic active gastritis persists for life if untreated. Recent studies have shown that CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress the immune response to H. pylori. Persistent H. pylori-associated gastritis is closely associated with gastric carcinogenesis. We investigated the number of Tregs in the context of H. pylori colonization in chronic gastritis, examined the relationship between it and histopathological findings and compared it with that of gastric dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. This study was based on the analysis of gastric biopsy specimens from 126 cases of H. pylori-associated gastritis, 16 cases of H. pylori-negative gastritis, 17 cases of gastric dysplasia, and 25 cases of gastric adenocarcinoma. The number of Tregs was elevated in H. pylori-associated gastritis, where it was positively correlated with the grade of chronic inflammation and the number of lymphoid follicles. It was significantly elevated in adenocarcinomas compared to chronic gastritis and gastric dysplasia. In summary, the number of Tregs is increased in H. pylori-associated gastritis and gastric cancer.

  12. Translocation of Helicobacter pylori CagA into Gastric Epithelial Cells by Type IV Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenbreit, Stefan; Püls, Jürgen; Sedlmaier, Bettina; Gerland, Elke; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2000-02-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori is a causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease in humans. Strains producing the CagA antigen (cagA+) induce strong gastric inflammation and are strongly associated with gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. We show here that such strains translocate the bacterial protein CagA into gastric epithelial cells by a type IV secretion system, encoded by the cag pathogenicity island. CagA is tyrosine-phosphorylated and induces changes in the tyrosine phosphorylation state of distinct cellular proteins. Modulation of host cells by bacterial protein translocation adds a new dimension to the chronic Helicobacter infection with yet unknown consequences.

  13. The role of chemotherapy in gastric cancer-related microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of a previously well 46-year-old man who presented with microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia (MAHA) of unknown origin. After extensive investigations, he was diagnosed with cancer-related microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia (CR-MAHA) secondary to gastric adenocarcinoma. Initial treatment with plasmapheresis was ineffective, but the patient’s haematological abnormalities improved markedly with chemotherapy directed against his gastric cancer. Our case amplifies previous experience of gastric cancer-associated MAHA which responded to treatment with chemotherapy. We review current understanding of the proposed pathophysiology of CR-MAHA and conclude that this condition is ideally treated with chemotherapy. PMID:28280630

  14. Membrane bile acid receptor TGR5 predicts good prognosis in ampullary adenocarcinoma patients with hyperbilirubinemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min-Chan; Chen, Yi-Ling; Wang, Tzu-Wen; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids are potential carcinogens in gastrointestinal cancer, and interact with nuclear and membrane receptors to initiate downstream signaling. The effect of TGR5 [also known as G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1)] on cancer progression is dependent on the tissue where it is activated. In this report, the function of TGR5 expression in cancer was studied using a bioinformatic approach. TGR5 expression in ampullary adenocarcinoma and normal duodenum was compared by western blotting, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). High GPBAR1 gene expression was found to be an indicator of worse prognosis in gastric and breast cancer patients, and an indication of better prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. The level of GPBAR1 gene expression was higher in bile-acid exposed cancer than in other types of cancer, and was increased in well-differentiated ampullary adenocarcinoma. Negative, weak or mild expression of TGR5 was correlated with younger age, higher plasma level of total/direct bilirubin, higher plasma concentration of CA-125, advanced tumor stage and advanced AJCC TNM stage. The disease-specific survival rate was highest in ampullary adenocarcinoma patients with high TGR5 expression and high total bilirubin level. In summary, TGR5 functions as a tumor-suppressor in patients with ampullary adenocarcinoma and preoperative hyperbilirubinemia. Further study of the suppressive mechanism may provide a new therapeutic option for patients with ampullary adenocarcinoma. PMID:27510297

  15. On-chip lectin microarray for glycoprofiling of different gastritis types and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Bibhas; Chattopadhyay, Gautam; Mishra, Debasish; Das, Tamal; Chakraborty, Suman; Maiti, Tapas K.

    2014-01-01

    An on-chip lectin microarray based glycomic approach is employed to identify glyco markers for different gastritis and gastric cancer. Changes in protein glycosylation have impact on biological function and carcinogenesis. These altered glycosylation patterns in serum proteins and membrane proteins of tumor cells can be unique markers of cancer progression and hence have been exploited to diagnose various stages of cancer through lectin microarray technology. In the present work, we aimed to study the alteration of glycan structure itself in different stages of gastritis and gastric cancer thoroughly. In order to perform the study from both serum and tissue glycoproteins in an efficient and high-throughput manner, we indigenously developed and employed lectin microarray integrated on a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip platform. We analyzed serum and gastric biopsy samples from 8 normal, 15 chronic Type-B gastritis, 10 chronic Type-C gastritis, and 6 gastric adenocarcinoma patients and found that the glycoprofile obtained from tissue samples was more distinctive than that of the sera samples. We were able to establish signature glycoprofile for the three disease groups, that were absent in healthy normal individuals. In addition, our findings elucidated certain novel signature glycan expression in chronic gastritis and gastric cancer. In silico analysis showed that glycoprofile of chronic gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma formed close clusters, confirming the previously hypothesized linkage between them. This signature can be explored further as gastric cancer marker to develop novel analytical tools and obtain in-depth understanding of the disease prognosis. PMID:24959308

  16. Zerumbone inhibits tumor angiogenesis via NF-κB in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Ken; Matsuo, Yoichi; Shamoto, Tomoya; Shibata, Takahiro; Koide, Shuji; Morimoto, Mamoru; Guha, Sushovan; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Takahashi, Hiroki; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2014-01-01

    Zerumbone derived from a subtropical ginger, Zingiber zerumbet Smith, was previously reported to have antitumor growth and anti-inflammatory properties in some types of cancer. However, the effects of zerumbone against cancer angiogenesis have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we clarified the role of zerumbone in gastric cancer angiogenesis. We examined the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in gastric cancer cell lines both in the basal state and following zerumbone treatment by real-time RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Changes in gastric cancer cell proliferation in response to zerumbone treatment were measured by WST-1 assay. Additionally, the effects of zerumbone on NF-κB activity were examined in AGS cells. Finally, the effects of zerumbone on angiogenesis in AGS cells were measured by in vitro angiogenesis assay in which human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and fibroblasts were cocultured with AGS cells. Among the 6 gastric cancer cell lines tested, AGS cells exhibited the highest expression of VEGF. Cell proliferation, VEGF expression and NF-κB activity in AGS cells were all significantly inhibited by zerumbone. Moreover, the tube formation area of HUVECs was increased by coculture with AGS cells, and this effect was inhibited by zerumbone. Both VEGF expression and NF-κB activity in AGS cells were reduced by treatment with zerumbone, thereby inhibiting angiogenesis. Thus, zerumbone may become a new anti-angiogenic and antitumor drug in the treatment of gastric cancer.

  17. [Endoscopic diagnosis of Barrett's adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Yoshio, H; Takashi, Y; Mitsuyo, H; Nobuhiko, Y; Tatsurou, T; Kazuhiko, S; Yoko, H; Shigemasa, I; Hisanaga, M; Osamu, H; Katsuyoshi, S; Seishi, U; Matsushita, H; Masahiko, T

    1999-03-01

    Biopsy specimens can reveal that esophageal cancer is an adenocarcinoma but they cannot show that its origin is Barrett's mucosa. Therefore we must show during endoscopy that the tumor exists in Barrett's mucosa. We reported that Barrett's esophagus could be clearly diagnosed at endoscopy as the columnar mucosa lying on the longitudinal vessels in the lower esophagus. We define Barrett's esophagus as "the columnar mucosa in the esophagus which exists continuously more than 2 cm in circumference from the stomach." Short-segment Barrett's esophagus (SSBE) is "the columnar mucosa which exists in the esophagus continuously from the stomach but its length has a part under 2 cm in length." Endoscopically Barrett's adenocarcinoma is visualized as a lesion with a reddish and uneven mucosal surface. Barrett's adenocarcinomas occur in the SSBE as well. Endoscopic observation at periodic intervals is necessary not only for cases with Barrett's esophagus but also with SSBE. A further examination is necessary to determine the application of EMR for superficial Barrett's adenocarcinoma.

  18. Chronic Gastric Ischemia Leading to Gastric Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Lundsmith, Emma; Zheng, Matthew; McCue, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, and hypertension presented with 3 months of diffuse abdominal pain that worsened with meals, weight loss, and dysphagia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and computed tomography revealed findings consistent with chronic gastric ischemia secondary to atherosclerosis. Gastric ischemia eventually led to perforation. We discuss causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and management of gastric ischemia, an underdiagnosed and potentially fatal condition that requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. PMID:28119945

  19. Radiation therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukiyama, I.; Akine, Y.; Kajiura, Y.; Ogino, T.; Yamashita, K.; Egawa, S.; Hijikata, J.; Kitagawa, T.

    1988-07-01

    A retrospective study of 75 patients with advanced inoperable gastric cancers, referred to the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1962 and 1982, was performed. According to the Borrmann classification based on X ray findings, Type 1 was found in 3 patients, Type 2 in 5, Type 3 in 40, and Type 4 in 15. Twelve patients could not be classified. The histological type was papillary adenocarcinoma in 7 patients, tubular adenocarcinoma in 23, mucinous carcinoma in 6, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in 14, signet ring cell carcinoma in 12 and others in 13. The site of remote metastasis in 19 patients was Virchow's lymph node in 8 patients, Douglas pouch in 3, liver and lung in 2 each and others in 4. All patients were treated by a either telecobalt 60 unit or a linear accelerator using 6 Mv photon and the total dose to primary lesion was 4000 cGy in 5 weeks to 7000 cGy in 8-9 weeks. Complete response (CR) was achieved in 6 patients or 8.0%, partial response (PR) in 46 or 61.3%, and no change (NC) in 23 or 30.7%. The response rate based on the sum of CR and PR was about 70%. The 50% survival period in months was 26.5, 7.3, and 3.2, respectively for patients with CR, PR, and NC. For the response of advanced gastric cancer to chemotherapy in the National Cancer Center Hospital, the combined use of UFT and Mitomycin C gave the highest rate, 46%. As for as local response is concerned, the response rate to radiation was 70%, a better result than that of chemotherapy alone.

  20. Heterotopic Gastric Mucosa in the Distal Part of Esophagus in a Teenager: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lupu, Vasile Valeriu; Ignat, Ancuta; Paduraru, Gabriela; Mihaila, Doina; Burlea, Marin; Ciubara, Anamaria

    2015-10-01

    Heterotopic gastric mucosa (HGM) of the esophagus is a congenital anomaly consisting of ectopic gastric mucosa. It may be connected with disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, exacerbated by Helicobacter pylori. The diagnosis of HGM is confirmed via endoscopy with biopsy. Histopathology provides the definitive diagnosis by demonstrating gastric mucosa adjacent to normal esophageal mucosa. HGM located in the distal esophagus needs differentiation from Barrett's esophagus. Barrett's esophagus is a well-known premalignant injury for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Malignant progression of HGM occurs in a stepwise pattern, following the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence.We present a rare case of a teenage girl with HGM located in the distal esophagus, associated with chronic gastritis and biliary duodenogastric reflux. Endoscopy combined with biopsies is a mandatory method in clinical evaluation of metaplastic and nonmetaplastic changes within HGM of the esophagus.

  1. Comprehensive characterization of the genomic alterations in human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Juan; Yin, Yanbin; Ma, Qin; Wang, Guoqing; Olman, Victor; Zhang, Yu; Chou, Wen-Chi; Hong, Celine S.; Zhang, Chi; Cao, Sha; Mao, Xizeng; Li, Ying; Qin, Steve; Zhao, Shaying; Jiang, Jing; Hastings, Phil; Li, Fan; Xu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most prevalent and aggressive cancers worldwide, and its molecular mechanism remains largely elusive. Here we report the genomic landscape in primary gastric adenocarcinoma of human, based on the complete genome sequences of five pairs of cancer and matching normal samples. In total, 103,464 somatic point mutations, including 407 nonsynonymous ones, were identified and the most recurrent mutations were harbored by Mucins (MUC3A and MUC12) and transcription factors (ZNF717, ZNF595 and TP53). 679 genomic rearrangements were detected, which affect 355 protein-coding genes; and 76 genes show copy number changes. Through mapping the boundaries of the rearranged regions to the folded three-dimensional structure of human chromosomes, we determined that 79.6% of the chromosomal rearrangements happen among DNA fragments in close spatial proximity, especially when two endpoints stay in a similar replication phase. We demonstrated evidences that microhomology-mediated break-induced replication was utilized as a mechanism in inducing ~40.9% of the identified genomic changes in gastric tumor. Our data analyses revealed potential integrations of Helicobacter pylori DNA into the gastric cancer genomes. Overall a large set of novel genomic variations were detected in these gastric cancer genomes, which may be essential to the study of the genetic basis and molecular mechanism of the gastric tumorigenesis. PMID:25422082

  2. Gastric stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Ovali, Gülgün Yilmaz; Tarhan, Serdar; Serter, Selim; Pabuşçu, Yüksel

    2005-06-01

    Gastric stromal tumors are rare neoplasms of the stomach. In this report we present a gastric stromal tumor with an exophytic growth pattern, and describe magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography findings.

  3. Spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) associated with gastric cancer in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Halldórsdóttir, Anna Margrét; Sigurdardóttrir, Margrét; Jónasson, Jón Gunnlaugur; Oddsdóttir, Margrét; Magnússon, Jónas; Lee, Jeffrey R; Goldenring, James R

    2003-03-01

    Recent studies have described a spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplastic cell lineage (SPEM) in the gastric fundic mucosa associated with both chronic H. pylori infection and gastric adenocarcinoma. We investigated the association of SPEM both with early gastric adenocarcinoma and in biopsies taken from patients prior to diagnosis of cancer. Two cohorts were examined. First, gastric resections from 29 patients with early gastric cancer were examined. Second, biopsies taken from 18 patients prior to the diagnosis of gastric cancer were compared with their respective resection specimens as well as with control biopsies from a cohort of 19 patients diagnosed with gastritis without subsequent development of cancer. The presence of SPEM and intestinal metaplasia (IM) adjacent to and distant from the cancer was compared and spasmolytic polypeptide (SP) immunostaining within dysplastic/cancerous cells was identified. SPEM was present adjacent to cancer in all early cancer cases where the tumor was located in the body or at the body/antrum junction, and was present in the body mucosa distant from the cancer in 76% of cases. Intestinal metaplasia was found adjacent to the tumor in 76% of cases and in body sections in 52% of resections. SP immunostaining was noted within cancer cells in 62% of tumors, and within dysplastic cells in 76% of resections where dysplasia was present. SPEM was present in 82% of the biopsies obtained prior to the diagnosis of cancer, compared with only 37% in the gastritis cohort. IM was present in only 57% of biopsies. In conclusion, SPEM is strongly associated with early gastric cancers and is observed in gastric biopsies prior to the development of cancer. In addition, early gastric cancers demonstrated a high incidence of SP expression. These results suggest that SPEM merits consideration as an important pre-neoplastic gastric lesion.

  4. From Reflux Esophagitis to Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rhonda F

    Reflux esophagitis causes Barrett's metaplasia, an abnormal esophageal mucosa predisposed to adenocarcinoma. Medical therapy for reflux esophagitis focuses on decreasing gastric acid production with proton pump inhibitors. We have reported that reflux esophagitis in a rat model develops from a cytokine-mediated inflammatory injury, not from a caustic chemical (acid) injury. In this model, refluxed acid and bile stimulate the release of inflammatory cytokines from esophageal squamous cells, recruiting lymphocytes first to the submucosa and later to the luminal surface. Emerging studies on acute reflux esophagitis in humans support this new concept, suggesting that reflux-induced cytokine release may be a future target for medical therapies. Sometimes, reflux esophagitis heals with Barrett's metaplasia, a process facilitated by reflux-related nitric oxide (NO) production and Sonic Hedgehog (Hh) secretion by squamous cells. We have shown that NO reduces expression of genes that promote a squamous cell phenotype, while Hh signaling induces genes that mediate the development of the columnar cell phenotypes of Barrett's metaplasia. Agents targeting esophageal NO production or Hh signaling conceivably could prevent the development of Barrett's esophagus. Persistent reflux promotes cancer in Barrett's metaplasia. We have reported that acid and bile salts induce DNA damage in Barrett's cells. Bile salts also cause NF-x03BA;B activation in Barrett's cells, enabling them to resist apoptosis in the setting of DNA damage and likely contributing to carcinogenesis. Oral treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid prevents the esophageal DNA damage and NF-x03BA;B activation induced by toxic bile acids. Altering bile acid composition might be another approach to cancer prevention.

  5. Repression of PES1 expression inhibits growth of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieping; Zhou, Xiaodong; Lan, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Guobin; Jiang, Xuping; Huang, Zongming

    2016-03-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. However, precise molecular mechanisms underlining its development are far from clear. We recently reported that PES1 promoted development of breast cancer and ovarian cancer as an oncogene. In this study, we reported that ablation of endogenous PES1 resulted in significant suppression of cell proliferation and growth and led to cell cycle arrest in G2 or G1 phase, respectively, in two gastric cancer cell lines (AGS and N87) in vitro. Meanwhile, silencing of PES1 obviously decreased expressions of cyclin D1, HIF-1α, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions and increased p21WAF1 expression. Re-expression of PES1 in these two kinds of PES1 knockdown cells rescued these effects. In vivo, repression of endogenous PES1 expression suppressed gastric tumor growth in nude mice. In addition, 40.7 % (24/59) of gastric cancer tissues showed PES1 expression via immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. However, there were not any positive PES1 stainings in matched adjacent tissues. Our results demonstrated that repression of PES1 changed expressions of some cell proliferation- and angiogenesis-related genes and inhibited gastric cancer growth, and PES1 expression increased in gastric cancer tissues. These results suggest that PES1 may play an important role in development of gastric cancer. PES1 may be a potential target for gastric cancer therapy.

  6. Microbiome and Potential Targets for Chemoprevention of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Antonio Galvao; Whitaker, April; Pei, Zhiheng

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the deadliest cancers, with a dismal prognosis. It is increasingly recognized that esophageal cancer is a heterogeneous disease. It can be subdivided into two distinct groups: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, based on histological appearance. In the Western world, the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma was considerably higher than esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) until the 1990s when, due to a dramatic increase, the incidence of EA surpassed that of squamous cell carcinoma. EA typically follows a well-established stepwise evolution from chronic inflammation due to reflux esophagitis (RE) that progresses to metaplasia (Barrett’s esophagus- BE) to dysplasia, which often culminates in EA. The pathophysiology of EA is complex and involves diverse factors, including gastroesophageal reflux, gastric acid secretion, dysfunction of the antireflux barrier, gastric emptying disturbances, and abnormalities in esophageal defense mechanisms. The current understanding of the etiology of EA is mainly derived from epidemiological studies of risk factors such as cigarette smoking, obesity, gastroesophageal reflux disorders (GERD), and low fruit and vegetable consumption. Numerous studies have been done but the factors that drive the dynamic increase in the incidence of EA remain elusive. The advent of widespread antibiotic use occurred in the 1950s, preceding the surge of EA. Based on this temporal sequence, it has been hypothesized that antibiotics alter the microbiome to which the esophagus is exposed in patients who have GERD and that chronic exposure to this abnormal microbiome (i.e., changes in species diversity or abundance) accounts for the increase in EA. If changes in the proposed factors alter the stepwise progression (RE-BE-dysplasia- EA), they may represent potential targets for chemoprevention. New discoveries will help improve our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of these cancers, and aid in finding novel

  7. Helicobacter pylori and oesophageal and gastric cancers in a prospective study in China

    PubMed Central

    Kamangar, F; Qiao, Y-L; Blaser, M J; Sun, X-D; Katki, H; Fan, J-H; Perez-Perez, G I; Abnet, C C; Zhao, P; Mark, S D; Taylor, P R; Dawsey, S M

    2006-01-01

    In a cohort of 29 584 residents of Linxian, China, followed from 1985 to 2001, we conducted a case–cohort study of the magnitude of the association of Helicobacter pylori seropositivity with cancer risk in a random sample of 300 oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas, 600 gastric cardia adenocarcinomas, all 363 diagnosed gastric non-cardia adenocarcinomas, and a random sample of the entire cohort (N=1050). Baseline serum was evaluated for IgG antibodies to whole-cell and CagA H. pylori antigens by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Risks of both gastric cardia and non-cardia cancers were increased in individuals exposed to H. pylori (Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals=1.64; 1.26–2.14, and 1.60; 1.15–2.21, respectively), whereas risk of oesophageal squamous cell cancer was not affected (1.17; 0.88–1.57). For both cardia and non-cardia cancers, HRs were higher in younger individuals. With longer time between serum collection to cancer diagnosis, associations became stronger for cardia cancers but weaker for non-cardia cancers. CagA positivity did not modify these associations. The associations between H. pylori exposure and gastric cardia and non-cardia adenocarcinoma development were equally strong, in contrast to Western countries, perhaps due to the absence of Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinomas in Linxian, making all cardia tumours of gastric origin, rather than a mixture of gastric and oesophageal malignancies. PMID:17179990

  8. Gastric microbiota features associated with cancer risk factors and clinical outcomes: A pilot study in gastric cardia cancer patients from Shanxi, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guoqin; Hu, Nan; Wang, Lemin; Wang, Chaoyu; Han, Xiao-You; Humphry, Mike; Ravel, Jacques; Abnet, Christian C; Taylor, Philip R; Goldstein, Alisa M

    2017-03-20

    Little is known about the link between gastric microbiota and the epidemiology of gastric cancer. In order to determine the epidemiologic and clinical relevance of gastric microbiota, we used 16 S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing analysis to characterize the composition and structure of the gastric microbial community of 80 paired samples (non-malignant and matched tumor tissues) from gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA) patients in Shanxi, China. We also used PICRUSt to predict microbial functional profiles. Compared to patients without family history of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) cancer in the non-malignant gastric tissue microbiota, patients with family history of UGI cancer had higher Helicobacter pylori (Hp) relative abundance (median: 0.83 vs. 0.38, p = 0.01) and lower alpha diversity (median observed species: 51 vs. 85, p = 0.01). Patients with higher (vs. lower) tumor grade had higher Hp relative abundance (0.73 vs. 0.18, p = 0.03), lower alpha diversity (observed species, 66 vs. 89, p = 0.01), altered beta diversity (weighted UniFrac, p = 0.002) and significant alterations in relative abundance of five KEGG functional modules in non-malignant gastric tissue microbiota. Patients without metastases had higher relative abundance of Lactobacillales than patients with metastases (0.05 vs. 0.01, p = 0.04) in non-malignant gastric tissue microbiota. These associations were observed in non-malignant tissues but not in tumor tissues. In conclusion, this study showed a link of gastric microbiota to a major gastric cancer risk factor and clinical features in GCA patients from Shanxi, China. Studies with both healthy controls and gastric cardia and noncardia cancer cases across different populations are needed to further examine the association between gastric cancer and the microbiota.

  9. Gastrin stimulates MMP-1 expression in gastric epithelial cells: putative role in gastric epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J. Dinesh; Steele, Islay; Moore, Andrew R.; Murugesan, Senthil V.; Rakonczay, Zoltan; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Pritchard, D. Mark; Dimaline, Rodney; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Varro, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The pyloric antral hormone gastrin plays a role in remodeling of the gastric epithelium, but the specific targets of gastrin that mediate these effects are poorly understood. Glandular epithelial cells of the gastric corpus express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, which is a potential determinant of tissue remodeling; some of these cells express the CCK-2 receptor at which gastrin acts. We have now examined the hypothesis that gastrin stimulates expression of MMP-1 in the stomach. We determined MMP-1 transcript abundance in gastric mucosal biopsies from Helicobacter pylori negative human subjects with normal gastric mucosal histology, who had a range of serum gastrin concentrations due in part to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The effects of gastrin were studied on gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells using Western blot and migration assays. In human subjects with increased serum gastrin due to PPI usage, MMP-1 transcript abundance was increased 2-fold; there was also increased MMP-7 transcript abundance but not MMP-3. In Western blots, gastrin increased proMMP-1 abundance, as well that of a minor band corresponding to active MMP-1, in the media of AGS-GR cells, and the response was mediated by protein kinase C and p42/44 MAP kinase. There was also increased MMP-1 enzyme activity. Gastrin-stimulated AGS-GR cell migration in both scratch wound and Boyden chamber assays was inhibited by MMP-1 immunoneutralization. We conclude that MMP-1 expression is a target of gastrin implicated in mucosal remodeling. PMID:25977510

  10. Hepatoid Adenocarcinoma of the Urachus

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Carlos Andrés; Carrascal, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the urachus is a rare condition. We present the case of a 51-year-old female who developed abdominal pain and hematuria. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reported an urachal mass with invasion to the bladder that was resected by partial cystectomy. On light microscopy the tumor resembled liver architecture, with polygonal atypical cells in nest formation and trabecular structures. Immunochemistry was positive for alfa-fetoprotein (AFP) and serum AFP was elevated. Hepatoid adenocarcinomas have been reported in multiple organs, being most commonly found in the stomach and the ovaries. Bladder compromise has been rarely described in the literature, and it has been associated with poor prognosis, low remission rates, and early metastasis. PMID:27803830

  11. Oncocytic Adenocarcinoma of the Orbit.

    PubMed

    Harris, Gerald J; Paul, Sean; Hunt, Bryan C

    Oncocytic adenocarcinoma of the orbit is a rare tumor, with 1 case of nonlacrimal sac, nonlacrimal gland origin, and a poor outcome previously reported. An 85-year-old man with a 2-month history of left-sided epiphora, enlarging eyelid nodules, and diplopia in left gaze was found on imaging to have a poorly circumscribed, nodular mass of uniform radiodensity in the inferomedial orbit. Incisional biopsy revealed morphologic and immunohistochemical features of oncocytic adenocarcinoma with origin in the caruncle suspected, and CT of the neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no metastases or remote primary tumor source. Based on multidisciplinary consensus, orbital exenteration with adjuvant radiation therapy was performed, and there was no evidence of residual or recurrent tumor 2 years after treatment.

  12. Role of the CacyBP/SIP protein in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Huihong; Meng, Juan; Jin, Haifeng; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Jinbo

    2015-05-01

    Various reports indicate that calcyclin binding protein/Siah-1-interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP) is an important protein in tumorigenesis, but whether CacyBP/SIP promotes or suppresses cancer may depend on the cell type. In order to investigate whether CacyBP/SIP is significant in gastric cancerous tumorigenesis, the present study used immunohistochemistry to analyze 181 gastric cancer tissue samples, as well as 181 healthy tissue samples from the same gastric cancer patients. The immunohistochemical results were compared against patient data and pathological analysis of the tissue slices, including gender, age, degree of tumor differentiation and tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage. In addition, the level of CacyBP/SIP expression was detected in three frozen tissue samples of gastric adenocarcinoma using western blot analysis. Of the 181 cases analyzed in the present study, 80 cases were identified as non-metastatic gastric cancer and 101 cases were identified as gastric cancer that had metastasized to the lymph nodes. Tissue biopsies from the two sets of patients were examined using immunohistochemistry to identify the level of CacyBP/SIP expression in metastatic and primary gastric cancer tissues. Statistical analyses were performed on all data. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CacyBP/SIP was expressed in 31% (56/181) of gastric adenocarcinoma tissue samples and 7% (12/181) of adjacent non-cancerous gastric tissues (P<0.05). Furthermore, the expression levels of CacyBP/SIP were higher in cancerous tissue compared with the adjacent non-cancerous gastric tissue using western blotting. No association was identified between CacyBP/SIP expression and patient age (P=0.975), gender (P=0.185), degree of tumor differentiation (P=0.076) or TNM stage (P=0.979). Among the 101 patients with metastatic gastric cancer, CacyBP/SIP was expressed at primary sites in 31% (31/101) of cases and at metastatic sites in 26% (26/101) of cases (P=0.434). However, among the

  13. Optimal lymphadenectomy for esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oezcelik, A

    2013-08-01

    Recently published data have shown that an extended lymphadenectomy during the en bloc esophagectomy leads to a significant increased long-term survival for esophageal adenocarcinoma. On the other hand some studies indicate that the increased survival is based on stage migration and that the surgical complication rate is increased after extended lymphadenectomy. The aim of this review was to give an overview about all aspects of an extended lymphadenectomy in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. The review of the literature shows clearly that the number of involved lymph nodes is an independent prognostic factor in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, an extended lymphadenectomy leads to an increased long-term survival. Some studies describe that 23 lymph nodes should be removed to predict survival; other studies 18 lymph nodes or 15 lymph nodes. Opponents indicate that the survival benefit is based on stage migration. The studies with a large study population have performed a Cox regression analyzes and identified the number of lymph nodes removed as an independent factor for improved survival, which means it is significant independently from other parameters. Under these circumstances is stage migration not an option to explain the survival benefit. An important difficulty is, that there is no standardized definition of an extended lymphadenectomy, which means the localization and number of removed lymph nodes differ depending from the performing centre. The controversies regarding the survival benefit of the lymphadenectomy is based on the lack of standardisation of the lymphadenectomy. The main goal of further studies should be to generate a clear definition of an extended lymphadenectomy in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  14. [Gastric and intestinal bezoars].

    PubMed

    Larbi, Noureddine; Kaâbi, Samarra; Ben Salah, Khiareddine

    2003-12-01

    The authors report a retrospective study of 10 cases of gastric and small bowel bezoars. There was one gastric trichobezoar diagnosed by an abdominal mass and 9 small bowel obstruction due to phytobezoars. All patients underwent surgery: the gastric trichobezoar was removed through a gastrotomy; small bowel bezoars were treated either by enterotomy (n = 3), fragmentation (n = 5) or bowel resection (n = 1). Non operative treatment is efficient in gastric phytobezoars. Surgery is advisable for trichobezoars and small bowel bezoars. Prevention is main and patients who have gastric surgery must be alarmed from consumption of cactus in our country Tunisia.

  15. Influence of Prognostic Factors for Recurrence of Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Mehmedagic, Indira; Hasukic, Sefik; Agic, Mirha; Kadric, Nedzad; Hasukic, Ismar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Gastric cancer is the second most important neoplasm in the world. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for gastric cancer, and recognized by the International Union against Cancer (International Union Against Cancer – UICC) TNM classification of the parameters of the tumor and lymph node. Prognostic factors related to characteristics of the tumor by histopathologic findings have an impact on the planning of the operation. According to the results of most studies it is possible to predict survival and recurrence based on histological type and TNM classification of tumors on the one hand and the surgical procedure on the other. Aim: The aim of the research was to analyze prognostic factors that influenced the frequency of recurrence in gastric surgery patients. Patients and methods: The five year study covered a population of 100 treated patients of adenocarcinoma of the stomach at the Department of Surgery, University Clinical Center Tuzla. The first group were characteristics of tumors in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. Lymphadenectomy and splenectomy, types of surgery were the second group of prognostic factors. Results: Histological type and TNM stage of tumor as prognostic factors had a significant impact on local tumor recurrence. The type of surgery had no statistically significant value for tumor recurrence (p = 0.7520). Conclusion: Statistical analysis of prognostic factors related to histopathologic characteristics of tumors and the type of surgery gave the results that had an impact on recurrence in gastric surgery patients. The most important prognostic factors were TNM stage of tumor and histological type of tumor that influenced the incidence of recurrence. PMID:28210017

  16. Toll-like receptors 1, 2, 4 and 6 in esophageal epithelium, Barrett's esophagus, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lehenkari, Petri P.; Saarnio, Juha; Karttunen, Tuomo J.; Kauppila, Joonas H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize microbial and endogenous ligands and have already shown to play a role in esophageal cancer. In this study, we evaluated especially TLRs that sense bacterial cell wall components in Barrett's esophagus, dysplasia and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Methods TLRs 1, 2, 4 and 6 were stained immunohistochemically and assessed in esophageal specimens from patients with esophageal dysplasia (n = 30) or adenocarcinoma (n = 99). Structures and lesions were evaluated including normal esophagus (n = 88), gastric (n = 67) or intestinal metaplasia (n = 51) without dysplasia, and low-grade (n = 42) or high-grade dysplasia (n = 37), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (n = 99). Results We found TLR1, TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 expression in all lesions. TLR expression increased in Barrett's mucosa and dysplasia. There was profound increase of TLR expression from gastric- to intestinal-type columnar epithelium. In cancers, high nuclear and cytoplasmic staining of TLR4 associated with metastatic disease and poor prognosis. Conclusions TLR1, TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 are upregulated during malignant changes of esophageal columnar epithelium. Increased TLR4 expression associates with advanced stage and poor prognosis in esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27008696

  17. Metastatic adenocarcinoma of unknown primary origin.

    PubMed

    Hammar, S P

    1998-12-01

    Adenocarcinomas account for up to 60% of all metastatic neoplasms of unknown primary origin. In general, adenocarcinomas are the most difficult metastatic tumor to accurately identify the primary site. Some metastatic adenocarcinomas have distinctive histological features that allow for their site determination (eg, colonic adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma), although the majority of metastatic adenocarcinomas have histological features that are not distinctive enough to allow for a specific diagnosis of their origin. For this reason, electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry have been used to help identify the exact type (origin) of metastatic adenocarcinomas. Relatively specific ultrastructural features used to diagnose metastatic adenocarcinomas of unknown primary origin include tubular myelin, intranuclear surfactant apoprotein tubular inclusions, Clara cell granules, uniform short microvilli with filamentous cores and core rootlets, Langerhans cells associated with neoplastic cells, cytoplasmic hyaline globules, lipid droplets, glycogen, and cytoplasmic crystals. Only a few of these ultrastructural features are absolutely specific. Relatively specific immunohistochemical tests used to diagnose metastatic adenocarcinomas of unknown primary origin include prostate-specific antigen, thyroglobulin, estrogen and progesterone receptor proteins, thyroid transcription factor-I, and surfactant apoproteins. Of these, prostate-specific antigen and thyroglobulin are the most specific. The purpose of this article is to discuss the use of electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry in the site-specific diagnosis of metastatic adenocarcinomas of unknown primary origin.

  18. Metachronous Primary Adenocarcinoma of Lung During Adjuvant Imatinib Mesylate Therapy for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Meng-jie; Weng, Shan-Shan; Cao, Ying; Li, Xiao-Fen; Wang, Liu-Hong; Xu, Jing-Hong; Yuan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor in gastrointestinal tracts; however, the synchronous or metachronous coexistence of GIST with additional primary malignancy is not common. Here, we present an unusual case of gastric GIST with metachronous primary lung adenocarcinoma diagnosed during his adjuvant treatment with oral receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (400 mg daily). After 6-month use of imatinib, the patient suffered from dry cough and dyspnea. Subsequent lung biopsy demonstrated adenocarcinoma with diffuse interstitial changes. Our research emphasizes the possibility of an additional primary tumor with GIST, and reminds the clinicians to strengthen the surveillance of the additional cancer during the follow-up of GIST patients. PMID:26356712

  19. Outlook on epigenetic therapeutic approaches for treatment of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hudler, Petra

    2017-02-03

    The incidence of gastric cancer has been declining globally in the last decades. Despite the improvements in the diagnostic procedures, most cases are still detected at advanced stages due to lack of specific symptoms associated with early phases of tumour development. Consequently, gastric cancer poses a major health burden worldwide due to high mortality rates. Continuing advances in high-throughput technologies are revealing an intricate network of genetic and epigenetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. In addition, several risk factors, both environmental and genetic, have been recognized, which promote accumulation of diverse alterations affecting the expression of oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, DNA repair genes, and other genes, implicated in normal gastric cell functions. A plethora of aberrant molecular events found in patients with this disease and intragenic heterogeneity of tumours from individuals are delaying the development of targeted biological therapies. Frequent occurrence of characteristic CpG island methylator phenotypes (CIMP phenotypes) in gastric cancers, particularly in association with Helicobacter pylori or EBV infection, could lead to introduction of epigenetic modulators into standard treatment regimens used against early and advanced forms of adenocarcinomas. This review highlights aberrant DNA methylation events in the development of gastric tumours and addresses the different aspects associated with the application of therapeutic epigenetic modulation in the management of the disease.

  20. Application of Gold Nanorods for Photothermal Therapy in Ex Vivo Human Oesophagogastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mohan; Harris-Birtill, David C C; Zhou, Yu; Gallina, Maria E; Cass, Anthony E G; Hanna, George B; Elson, Daniel S

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles are chemically fabricated and tuned to strongly absorb near infrared (NIR) light, enabling deep optical penetration and therapy within human tissues, where sufficient heating induces tumour necrosis. In our studies we aim to establish the optimal gold nanorod (GNR) concentration and laser power for inducing hyperthermic effects in tissues and test this photothermal effect on ex vivo human oesophagogastric adenocarcinoma. The ideal GNR concentration and NIR laser power that would elicit sufficient hyperthermia for tumour necrosis was pre-determined on porcine oesophageal tissues. Human ex vivo oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma tissues were incubated with GNR solutions and a GNR-free control solution with corresponding healthy tissues for comparison, then irradiated with NIR light for 10 minutes. Temperature rise was found to vary linearly with both the concentration of GNRs and the laser power. Human ex vivo oesophageal and gastric tissues consistently demonstrated a significant temperature rise when incubated in an optimally concentrated GNR solution (3 x 10(10) GNRs/ml) prior to NIR irradiation delivered at an optimal power (2 W/cm2). A mean temperature rise of 27 degrees C was observed in tissues incubated with GNRs, whereas only a modest 2 degrees C rise in tissues not exposed to any GNRs. This study evaluates the photothermal effects of GNRs on oesophagogastric tissue examines their application in the minimally invasive therapeutics of oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas. This could potentially be an effective method of clinically inducing irreversible oesophagogastric tumour photodestruction, with minimal collateral damage expected in (healthy) tissues free from GNRs.

  1. Esophageal and gastric cancers with metastases induced in dogs by N-ethyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine.

    PubMed

    Sasajima, K; Kawachi, T; Sano, T; Sugimura, T; Shimosato, Y

    1977-06-01

    Three 6-month-old male beagle dogs were given a solution of 150 microng N-ethyl-N'-nitrosoguanidine (ENNG)/ml to drink ad libitum for 9 months. They all developed esophageal squamous cell carcinomas and gastric adenocarcinomas. The stomach adenocarcinomas were mostly in the antrum along the lesser curvature and were either well differentiated or poorly differentiated, with or without signet ring cells. The well-differentiated adenocarcinomas metastasized to the liver, and the poorly differentiated ones metastasized to the lymph nodes. The gastric mucosa in the antrum was atrophic, and the muscularis mucosae was fibrotic. Esophageal lesions were multicentric moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinomas, and they developed without diffuse hyperplastic changes of the epithelium. One dog with a large ulcerated carcinoma of the esophagus had metastases in the lung, liver, peritoneum, and abdominal lymph nodes. One dog also had a hemangiosarcoma with hepatic metastasis and spindle cell sarcoma in the stomach and duodenum, respectively.

  2. Transcriptomic Microenvironment of Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bossé, Yohan; Sazonova, Olga; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Bastien, Nathalie; Conti, Massimo; Pagé, Sylvain; Trahan, Sylvain; Couture, Christian; Joubert, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    Background: Tissues surrounding tumors are increasingly studied to understand the biology of cancer development and identify biomarkers.Methods: A unique geographic tissue sampling collection was obtained from patients that underwent curative lobectomy for stage I pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Tumor and nontumor lung samples located at 0, 2, 4, and 6 cm away from the tumor were collected. Whole-genome gene expression profiling was performed on all samples (n = 5 specimens × 12 patients = 60). Analyses were carried out to identify genes differentially expressed in the tumor compared with adjacent nontumor lung tissues at different distances from the tumor as well as to identify stable and transient genes in nontumor tissues with respect to tumor proximity.Results: The magnitude of gene expression changes between tumor and nontumor sites was similar with increasing distance from the tumor. A total of 482 up- and 843 downregulated genes were found in tumors, including 312 and 566 that were consistently differentially expressed across nontumor sites. Twenty-nine genes induced and 34 knocked-down in tumors were also identified. Tumor proximity analyses revealed 15,700 stable genes in nontumor lung tissues. Gene expression changes across nontumor sites were subtle and not statistically significant.Conclusions: This study describes the transcriptomic microenvironment of lung adenocarcinoma and adjacent nontumor lung tissues collected at standardized distances relative to the tumor.Impact: This study provides further insights about the molecular transitions that occur from normal tissue to lung adenocarcinoma and is an important step to develop biomarkers in nonmalignant lung tissues. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 389-96. ©2016 AACR.

  3. Rebamipide inhibits gastric cancer growth by targeting survivin and Aurora-B

    SciTech Connect

    Tarnawski, A.; E-mail: andrzej.tarnawski@med.va.gov; Pai, R.; Chiou, S.-K.; Chai, J.; Chu, E.C.

    2005-08-19

    Rebamipide accelerates healing of gastric ulcers and gastritis but its actions on gastric cancer are not known. Survivin, an anti-apoptosis protein, is overexpressed in stem, progenitor, and cancer cells. In gastric cancer, increased and sustained survivin expression provides survival advantage and facilitates tumor progression and resistance to anti-cancer drugs. Aurora-B kinase is essential for chromosome alignment and mitosis progression but surprisingly its role in gastric cancer has not been explored. We examined in human gastric cancer AGS cells: (1) survivin expression, (2) localization of survivin and Aurora-B (3) cell proliferation, and (4) effects of specific survivin siRNA and/or rebamipide (free radical scavenging drug) on survivin and Aurora-B expression and cell proliferation. Survivin and Aurora-B are strongly expressed in human AGS gastric cancer cells and co-localize during mitosis. Survivin siRNA significantly reduces AGS cell viability. Rebamipide significantly downregulates in AGS cell survivin expression, its association with Aurora-B and cell proliferation. Rebamipide-induced downregulation of survivin is at the transcription level and does not involve ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

  4. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology: insights from in vivo and ex vivo models

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori induces diverse human pathological conditions, including superficial gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma and its precursors. The treatment of these conditions often relies on the eradication of H. pylori, an intervention that is increasingly difficult to achieve and that does not prevent disease progression in some contexts. There is, therefore, a pressing need to develop new experimental models of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology to support novel drug development in this field. Here, we review the current status of in vivo and ex vivo models of gastric H. pylori colonization, and of Helicobacter-induced gastric pathology, focusing on models of gastric pathology induced by H. pylori, Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter suis in rodents and large animals. We also discuss the more recent development of gastric organoid cultures from murine and human gastric tissue, as well as from human pluripotent stem cells, and the outcomes of H. pylori infection in these systems. PMID:28151409

  5. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Invading the Duodenum and Presenting as Idiopathic Gastroparesis with Nausea and Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Cengia, Brent T.; Stuart, Paula S.

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with a 5-month history of nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. Prior esophagogastrodudenoscopy showed retained food and delayed gastric emptying, but abdominal computed tomography was normal. The working diagnosis was idiopathic gastroparesis. Subsequently, an electrogastrogram test showed normal 3-cycle-per-minute activity, although it was suggestive of obstructive gastroparesis. Repeat esophagogastrodudenoscopy showed obstruction at the postbulbar duodenum. Repeat abdominal computed tomography revealed a 2.2 x 1.6-cm mass in the pancreaticoduodenal groove narrowing the descending duodenum and aspiration of the mass revealed adenocarcinoma. PMID:27807571

  6. [Characteristic of inflammatory infiltrate of gastric mucosa in patients with grade II-III gastric dysplasia and of stomach cancer].

    PubMed

    Evtushenko, V A; Vusik, M V; Karakeshisheva, M B; Pleshko, R I; Ermolaeva, L A

    2008-01-01

    The study included 85 inpatients and outpatients in whom composition of inflammatory infiltrate from gastric mucosa (GM) was determined at the Oncological Research Institute, Tomsk Research Centre of the Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. The patients were allocated to 4 groups depending on nosological form of the disease. Group 1 comprised 21 patients with grade II-III GM epithelial dysplasia, group 2 - 24 patients having stomach cancer (histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma), group 3 - 19 patients with stage II-III mucinous gastric carcinoma, group 4 - 20 allegedly healthy subjects without signs of gastrointestinal pathology. It was shown that dysplastic processes in GM are associated with an increase of neutrophil, eosinophil, macrophage, and mast cell count along with a drop in the number of lymphocytes and plasmocytes. Stroma of invasive stomach cancer underwent intense inflammatory infiltration accompanied by a rise in the number of lymphocytes, plasmocytes, and neutrophils. Mucinous gastric carcinoma was characterized by an increase of the number of neutrophils and macrophages. Patients having adenocarcinoma of the stomach showed enhanced plasmocytic infiltration by plasmocytes with a low number of eosinophils and mast cells. It is concluded that characteristics of inflammatory GM infiltrate may be useful for the objective assessment of stomach cancer risk in patients with GM dysplasia, formation of a high oncological risk group, adequate dynamic monitoring and treatment of these patients.

  7. Gastric syphilis - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Tais Ferreira; Novis, Camila Freitas Lobo; Bottino, Caroline Bertolini; D'Acri, Antonio Macedo; Lima, Ricardo Barbosa; Martins, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    Gastric syphilis is an uncommon extracutaneous manifestation of syphilis, occurring in less than 1% of patients, presenting nonspecific clinical manifestations. In general, it occurs on secondary stage. The critical point is the recognition of the syphilitic gastric involvement, without which there may be incorrect diagnosis of malignancy of the digestive tract. In this report, a case of secondary syphilis with gastric involvement that had complete remission with benzathine penicillin will be described. PMID:27828649

  8. Duodenal Neoplasms of Gastric Phenotype: An Immunohistochemical and Genetic Study With a Practical Approach to the Classification.

    PubMed

    Hida, Risa; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Hirahashi, Minako; Kumagai, Reiko; Nishiyama, Kenichi; Gi, Toshihiro; Esaki, Motohiro; Kitazono, Takanari; Oda, Yoshinao

    2017-03-01

    Duodenal neoplasm of gastric phenotype (DNGP) is very rare, and details of its histopathologic, genetic, and biological features are still unclear. Frequent gene mutations in GNAS, KRAS, and APC have been reported in pyloric gland adenomas and fundic gland-type neoplasms (initially reported as low-grade adenocarcinomas) of the stomach. Here we retrospectively analyzed 16 cases of extra-ampullary DNGP (benign to malignant), and we examined the mucin immunoprofile and oncogene mutations (GNAS, KRAS, APC, BRAF, and CTNNB1). The 16 DNGPs were histologically classified into adenomas (5 pyloric gland adenomas and 2 foveolar-type adenomas), neoplasms of uncertain malignant potential (NUMPs, n=6), and invasive adenocarcinomas (n=3). NUMPs consisted of slightly atypical epithelial cells with pale, eosinophilic, or basophilic cytoplasm growing in an anastomosing or branching glandular pattern, often with expansive submucosal extension. In contrast to invasive adenocarcinomas, NUMPs lacked significant nuclear irregularity, desmoplastic stromal reaction, lymphovascular invasion, and metastasis; their features were reminiscent of fundic gland-type neoplasms of the stomach. Immunophenotypically, most of NUMPs were predominantly positive for MUC6 with variable expressions of pepsinogen-I, HKATPase, human gastric mucin, and MUC5AC. Molecular analyses revealed the gene mutations of GNAS in 6 (38%) of 16 DNGPs (4 [57%] adenomas, 1 [16%] NUMP, and 1 [33%] invasive adenocarcinoma) and APC in 4 of 15 (27%) DNGPs: no adenomas, 2 (33%) NUMPs, and 2 (67%) invasive adenocarcinomas. BRAF mutation was present in only 1 (16%) NUMP, and KRAS and CTNNB1 mutations were absent. In conclusion, gastric-phenotype adenomas and NUMPs of the duodenum are similar to their counterparts of the stomach, in terms of histologic, genetic, and clinicopathologic features. We propose the term "NUMP" as an intermediate category between adenoma and definitely invasive adenocarcinoma. Our findings may provide novel

  9. What exists beyond cagA and vacA? Helicobacter pylori genes in gastric diseases

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Débora Menezes; Pereira, Eliane dos Santos; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is present in more than half the world’s population and has been associated with several gastric disorders, such as gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The clinical outcome of this infection depends on host and bacterial factors where H. pylori virulence genes seem to play a relevant role. Studies of cagA and vacA genes established that they were determining factors in gastric pathogenesis. However, there are gastric cancer cases that are cagA-negative. Several other virulence genes have been searched for, but these genes remain less well known that cagA and vacA. Thus, this review aimed to establish which genes have been suggested as potentially relevant virulence factors for H. pylori-associated gastrointestinal diseases. We focused on the cag-pathogenicity island, genes with adherence and motility functions, and iceA based on the relevance shown in several studies in the literature. PMID:26457016

  10. Uterine adenocarcinoma with feline leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Jin; Lee, Hyun-A; Hong, Sunhwa; Kim, Okjin

    2011-12-01

    Feline endometrial adenocarcinomas are uncommon malignant neoplasms that have been poorly characterized to date. In this study, we describe a uterine adenocarcinoma in a Persian cat with feline leukemia virus infection. At the time of presentation, the cat, a female Persian chinchilla, was 2 years old. The cat underwent surgical ovariohystectomy. A cross-section of the uterine wall revealed a thickened uterine horn. The cat tested positive for feline leukemia virus as detected by polymerase chain reaction. Histopathological examination revealed uterine adenocarcinoma that had metastasized to the omentum, resulting in thickening and the formation of inflammatory lesions. Based on the histopathological findings, this case was diagnosed as a uterine adenocarcinoma with abdominal metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a uterine adenocarcinoma with feline leukemia virus infection.

  11. Gastrin and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Waldum, Helge L.; Sagatun, Liv; Mjønes, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer although occurring in reduced frequency is still an important disease, partly because of the bad prognosis when occurring in western countries. This decline in occurrence may mainly be due to the reduced prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection, which is the most important cause of gastric cancer. There exist many different pathological classifications of gastric carcinomas, but the most useful seems to be the one by Lauren into intestinal and diffuse types since these types seldom transform into the other and also have different epidemiology. During the nearly 30 years that have passed since the groundbreaking description of Hp as the cause of gastritis and gastric cancer, a continuous search for the mechanism by which Hp infection causes gastric cancer has been done. Interestingly, it is mainly atrophic gastritis of the oxyntic mucosa that predisposes to gastric cancer possibly by inducing hypoacidity and hypergastrinemia. There are many arguments in favor of an important role of gastrin and its target cell, the enterochromaffin-like cell, in gastric carcinogenesis. The role of gastrin in gastric carcinogenesis implies caution in the long-term treatment with inhibitors of gastric acid secretion inducing secondary hypergastrinemia, in a common disease like gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:28144230

  12. Genetics and molecular pathology of gastric malignancy: Development of targeted therapies in the era of personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Van Ness, Michael; Gregg, Jeffrey; Wang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Gastric malignancy constitutes a major cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Despite recent advances in surgical techniques combined with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy approaches, patients with advanced disease still have poor outcomes. An emerging understanding of the molecular pathways that characterize cell growth, cell cycle, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis has provided novel targets in gastric cancer therapy. In this review, recent advances in the understanding of molecular tumorigenesis for common gastric malignancies are discussed. We also briefly review the current targeted therapies in the treatment of gastric malignancies. Practical insights are highlighted including HER2 testing and target therapy in gastric adenocarcinoma, morphologic features and molecular signatures of imatinib-resistance GISTs, and recent investigations aimed at tumor-specific therapy for neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:22943015

  13. A Case of Advanced Gastric Cancer with Para-Aortic Lymph Node Metastasis from Co-Occurring Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miyeong; Lee, Young-Joon; Park, Ji-Ho; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Hong, Soon-Chan; Jung, Eun-Jung; Ju, Young-tae; Jeong, Chi-Young; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Ha, Woo-Song

    2017-01-01

    An 84-year-old man was diagnosed with two synchronous adenocarcinomas, a Borrmann type IV advanced gastric adenocarcinoma in his antrum and a well-differentiated Borrmann type I carcinoma on the anterior wall of the higher body of his stomach. Pre-operatively, computed tomography of the abdomen revealed the presence of advanced gastric cancer with peri-gastric and para-aortic lymph node (LN) metastasis. He planned for palliative total gastrectomy owing to the risk of obstruction by the antral lesion. We performed a frozen biopsy of a para-aortic LN during surgery and found that the origin of the para-aortic LN metastasis was from undiagnosed prostate cancer. Thus, we performed radical total gastrectomy and D2 LN dissection. Post-operatively, his total prostate-specific antigen levels were high (227 ng/mL) and he was discharged 8 days after surgery without any complications. PMID:28337367

  14. High dietary salt intake exacerbates Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gaddy, Jennifer A; Radin, Jana N; Loh, John T; Zhang, Feng; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Algood, Holly M Scott; Cover, Timothy L

    2013-06-01

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach with Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, and H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis is dependent on the actions of a bacterial oncoprotein known as CagA. Epidemiological studies have shown that high dietary salt intake is also a risk factor for gastric cancer. To investigate the effects of a high-salt diet, we infected Mongolian gerbils with a wild-type (WT) cagA(+) H. pylori strain or an isogenic cagA mutant strain and maintained the animals on a regular diet or a high-salt diet. At 4 months postinfection, gastric adenocarcinoma was detected in 100% of the WT-infected/high-salt-diet animals, 58% of WT-infected/regular-diet animals, and none of the animals infected with the cagA mutant strain (P < 0.0001). Among animals infected with the WT strain, those fed a high-salt diet had more severe gastric inflammation, higher gastric pH, increased parietal cell loss, increased gastric expression of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), and decreased gastric expression of hepcidin and hydrogen potassium ATPase (H,K-ATPase) compared to those on a regular diet. Previous studies have detected upregulation of CagA synthesis in response to increased salt concentrations in the bacterial culture medium, and, concordant with the in vitro results, we detected increased cagA transcription in vivo in animals fed a high-salt diet compared to those on a regular diet. Animals infected with the cagA mutant strain had low levels of gastric inflammation and did not develop hypochlorhydria. These results indicate that a high-salt diet potentiates the carcinogenic effects of cagA(+) H. pylori strains.

  15. Body iron status and gastric cancer risk in the EURGAST study.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Nunes, Ana; Agudo, Antonio; Aranda, Núria; Arija, Victoria; Cross, Amanda J; Molina, Esther; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Siersema, Peter; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Mattiello, Amalia; Tumino, Rosario; Saieva, Calogero; Naccarati, Alessio; Ohlsson, Bodil; Sjöberg, Klas; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Cadeau, Claire; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boeing, Heiner; Steffen, Annika; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Key, Tim; Lu, Yunxia; Riboli, Elio; Peeters, Petra H; Gavrila, Diana; Dorronsoro, Miren; Quirós, José Ramón; Barricarte, Aurelio; Jenab, Mazda; Zamora-Ros, Raúl; Freisling, Heinz; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Jakszyn, Paula

    2015-12-15

    Although it appears biologically plausible for iron to be associated with gastric carcinogenesis, the evidence is insufficient to lead to any conclusions. To further investigate the relationship between body iron status and gastric cancer risk, we conducted a nested case-control study in the multicentric European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. The study included 456 primary incident gastric adenocarcinoma cases and 900 matched controls that occurred during an average of 11 years of follow-up. We measured prediagnostic serum iron, ferritin, transferrin and C-reactive protein, and further estimated total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) and transferrin saturation (TS). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the risk of gastric cancer by iron metrics were estimated from multivariable conditional logistic regression models. After adjusting for relevant confounders, we observed a statistically significant inverse association between gastric cancer and ferritin and TS indices (ORlog2  = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.72-0.88; OR10%increment  = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.78-0.97, respectively). These associations appear to be restricted to noncardia gastric cancer (ferritin showed a p for heterogeneity = 0.04 and TS had a p for heterogeneity = 0.02), and no differences were found by histological type. TIBC increased risk of overall gastric cancer (OR50 µg/dl  = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.02-1.2) and also with noncardia gastric cancer (p for heterogeneity = 0.04). Additional analysis suggests that time between blood draw and gastric cancer diagnosis could modify these findings. In conclusion, our results showed a decreased risk of gastric cancer related to higher body iron stores as measured by serum iron and ferritin. Further investigation is needed to clarify the role of iron in gastric carcinogenesis.

  16. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA in gastric carcinoma specimens in a high-risk region of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fakhraei, Farzaneh; Haghshenas, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Vahid; Rafiei, Alireza; Naghshvar, Farshad; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer worldwide and is associated with high mortality rates. The incidence of gastric cancer varies widely in different geographical regions. For example, in Iran, the most northern and northwestern regions are considered to be high-risk areas for gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes among patients with gastric carcinoma in Mazandaran province, Northern Iran, which is a high-risk area. A total of 100 paraffin-embedded tissue samples were obtained from 70 males and 30 females with gastric carcinoma, diagnosed between 2006 and 2013, in the Imam Khomeini Hospital (Sari, Iran). GP5+/GP6+ general primers were applied for detection of HPV DNA in the specimens. Positive samples were then selected and high-risk HPV genotyping was performed. The samples were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and five (5%) samples were identified to be positive for HPV DNA [four male (5.7%) and one female (3.3%)]. Three (60%) samples were positive for HPV-16, one (20%) sample was positive for HPV-18 and one (20%) sample was positive for HPV-45. Following pathological diagnosis, 88 samples were identified as gastric adenocarcinoma, nine samples were gastric lymphoma, and three samples were gastric and esophagus adenocarcinoma. According to the findings of the present study and the rate of HPV infection in patients with gastric carcinoma, an association between HPV infection and gastric carcinoma in subjects from Northern Iran was not identified. PMID:27588180

  17. hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b differential expression as potential biomarker of gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Amanda Ferreira; Cruz, Aline MP; Magalhães, Leandro; Pereira, Adenilson L; Anaissi, Ana KM; Alves, Nélisson CF; Albuquerque, Paulo JBS; Burbano, Rommel MR; Demachki, Samia; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression profiles of hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b in gastric mucosal samples and their values as gastric carcinogenesis biomarkers. METHODS: The expression levels of hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b in normal gastric mucosa, non-atrophic chronic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma were analysed using quantitative real-time PCR. The difference between hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b expression profiles in the grouped samples was evaluated by ANOVA and Student’s t-test tests. The results were adjusted for multiple testing by using Bonferroni’s correction. P values ≤ 0.05 were considered statistically significant. To evaluate hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b expressions as potential biomarkers of gastric carcinogenesis, we performed a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and the derived area under the curve, and a Categorical Principal Components Analysis. In silico identification of the genetic targets of hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b was performed using different prediction tools, in order to identify possible genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. RESULTS: The expression levels of hsa-miR-29c were higher in normal gastric mucosal samples, and decreased progressively in non-atrophic chronic gastritis samples, intestinal metaplasia samples and intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma samples. The expression of hsa-miR-29c in the gastric lesions showed that non-atrophic gastritis have an intermediate profile to gastric normal mucosa and intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma, and that intestinal metaplasia samples presented an expression pattern similar to that in intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. This microRNA (miRNA) has a good discriminatory accuracy between normal gastric samples and (1) intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma; and (2) intestinal metaplasia, and regulates the DMNT3A oncogene. hsa-miR-135b is up-regulated in non-atrophic chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia samples

  18. Altered expression of PTCH and HHIP in gastric cancer through their gene promoter methylation: novel targets for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Tian, Ye; Zuo, Yun; Tu, Jian-Cheng; Feng, Yu-Fang; Qu, Chen-Jiang

    2013-04-01

    Human hedgehog-interacting protein (HHIP) and protein patched homolog (PTCH) are two negative regulators of the hedgehog signal, however, the mechanism of action in gastric cancer is unknown. Methylation of TSG promoters has been considered as a causative mechanism of tumorigenesis. In the present study, we first determined the expression of PTCH and HHIP mRNA and protein in gastric cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues, and then detected methylation of the two genes to associate their expression and gene promoter methylation in gastric cancer. Expression in gastric cancer tissues and the cancer cells (AGS) were evaluated by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), qRT-PCR and IHC, while the methylation expression was valued by methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and bisulfite sequencing PCR (BSP). Cell viability and apoptosis were analyzed by MTT assay and flow cytometry following treatment with 5-aza-dc. Results showed that PTCH and HHIP expression was reduced in gastric cancer tissues that were not associated with clinical features. Moreover, methylation of the promoters was reversely correlated with the expression. Following treatment with 5-aza-dc, AGS reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis, which is associated with upregulation of HHIP expression. The data demonstrated that loss of expression of HHIP and PTCH is associated with the methylation of gene promoters. In addition, 5-aza-dc-induced apoptosis correlated with the upregulation of HHIP expression in AGS. The findings demonstrated that the PTCH and HHIP genes may be novel targets for the control of gastric cancer.

  19. Protein Profiling Gastric Cancer and Neighboring Control Tissues Using High-Content Antibody Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Sill, Martin; Schröder, Christoph; Shen, Ying; Marzoq, Aseel; Komel, Radovan; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Nienhüser, Henrik; Schmidt, Thomas; Kastelic, Damjana

    2016-01-01

    In this study, protein profiling was performed on gastric cancer tissue samples in order to identify proteins that could be utilized for an effective diagnosis of this highly heterogeneous disease and as targets for therapeutic approaches. To this end, 16 pairs of postoperative gastric adenocarcinomas and adjacent non-cancerous control tissues were analyzed on microarrays that contain 813 antibodies targeting 724 proteins. Only 17 proteins were found to be differentially regulated, with much fewer molecules than the numbers usually identified in studies comparing tumor to healthy control tissues. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), S100 calcium binding protein A9 (S100A9), interleukin-10 (IL‐10) and mucin 6 (MUC6) exhibited the most profound variations. For an evaluation of the proteins’ capacity for discriminating gastric cancer, a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis was performed, yielding an accuracy (area under the curve) value of 89.2% for distinguishing tumor from non-tumorous tissue. For confirmation, immunohistological analyses were done on tissue slices prepared from another cohort of patients with gastric cancer. The utility of the 17 marker proteins, and particularly the four molecules with the highest specificity for gastric adenocarcinoma, is discussed for them to act as candidates for diagnosis, even in serum, and targets for therapeutic approaches. PMID:27600085

  20. Gastric cancer in the setting of persistently elevated human chorionic gonadotropin: a case report.

    PubMed

    Walker, Latoya R; Erler, Brian

    2011-01-01

    A 35-year-old woman presented to the emergency room for the evaluation of failed surgical and medical management of a suspected ectopic pregnancy. When imaging studies were performed, she had lymphadenopathy and diffuse sclerosis of the osseous framework. Multiple biopsies were performed and revealed poorly differentiated metastatic carcinoma with signet ring features. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy confirmed the findings of a Stage IV gastric adenocarcinoma. Signs and symptoms of gastric carcinoma are vague. However, to our knowledge, an elevation in human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is not an associated finding. Persistence of hCG has many causes from abnormal pregnancy to menopause and other forms of cancer.

  1. Study of gastric cancer samples using terahertz techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Molis, Gediminas; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Carvalho Silva, Catia D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Valusis, Gintaras; Granja, Pedro L.

    2014-08-01

    In the present work, samples of healthy and adenocarcinoma-affected human gastric tissue were analyzed using transmission time-domain THz spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and spectroscopic THz imaging at 201 and 590 GHz. The work shows that it is possible to distinguish between normal and cancerous regions in dried and paraffin-embedded samples. Plots of absorption coefficient α and refractive index n of normal and cancer affected tissues, as well as 2-D transmission THz images are presented and the conditions for discrimination between normal and affected tissues are discussed.

  2. Pediatric primary gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harris, G J; Laszewski, M J

    1992-04-01

    Primary gastric lymphoma in the pediatric population is rare. We have described a case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Burkitt's type) manifested as a gastric mass. Despite its rarity in children, this tumor should be treated aggressively, since long-term survival has been reported.

  3. Gastric mucosal hyperplasia via upregulation of gastrin induced by persistent activation of gastric innate immunity in major histocompatibility complex class II deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, T; Nishio, A; Okazaki, K; Uza, N; Ueno, S; Kido, M; Inoue, S; Kitamura, H; Kiriya, K; Ohashi, S; Asada, M; Tamaki, H; Matsuura, M; Kawasaki, K; Suzuki, K; Uchida, K; Fukui, H; Nakase, H; Watanabe, N; Chiba, T

    2006-01-01

    Background and aim Major histocompatibility complex class II deficient (Aα0/0) mice have decreased CD4+ T cells, making them immunologically similar to patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Both patients with AIDS and Aα0/0 mice have hypertrophic gastric folds. To clarify the mechanism of gastric mucosal hyperplasia, we investigated the pathophysiology and the role of the innate immunity in the stomach of Aα0/0 mice. Methods Stomachs from 1–6 month old Aα0/0 mice, kept under specific pathogen free conditions, were examined at 1 month intervals histologically and immunohistochemically. Gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, Toll‐like receptors (TLRs), cyclooxygenase (COX)‐2, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the gastric mucosa was investigated. Serum gastrin levels and gastric acidity were measured. Bacterial culture of the stomach was performed. To clarify the roles of hypergastrinaemia in the gastric mucosa, a gastrin receptor antagonist (AG041R) was administered. Results Aα0/0 mice had a diffusely thick corpus mucosa with infiltration of CD11b+ granulocytes and macrophages. Anti‐Ki67 staining demonstrated expansion of the proliferating neck zone. Gene expression of interleukin 1β, interferon γ, TLR‐2, TLR‐4, and COX‐2 were upregulated, and MPO activity was increased. Only a small amount of non‐pathogenic bacteria was detected in the stomach. Serum gastrin levels and Reg‐Iα positive cells in the gastric mucosa increased, despite normal gastric acidity. After treatment with AG041R, gastric mucosal thickness was significantly reduced. Conclusion Persistent activation of innate immunity in the stomach induced gastric mucosal hyperplasia through upregulation of gastrin synthesis in Aα0/0 mice, suggesting a pathophysiology similar to the gastric changes in patients with AIDS. PMID:16322110

  4. Treatment of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orditura, Michele; Galizia, Gennaro; Sforza, Vincenzo; Gambardella, Valentina; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Andreozzi, Francesca; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; Mabilia, Andrea; Lieto, Eva; Ciardiello, Fortunato; De Vita, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The authors focused on the current surgical treatment of resectable gastric cancer, and significance of peri- and post-operative chemo or chemoradiation. Gastric cancer is the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Surgery remains the only curative therapy, while perioperative and adjuvant chemotherapy, as well as chemoradiation, can improve outcome of resectable gastric cancer with extended lymph node dissection. More than half of radically resected gastric cancer patients relapse locally or with distant metastases, or receive the diagnosis of gastric cancer when tumor is disseminated; therefore, median survival rarely exceeds 12 mo, and 5-years survival is less than 10%. Cisplatin and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy, with addition of trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients, is the widely used treatment in stage IV patients fit for chemotherapy. Recent evidence supports the use of second-line chemotherapy after progression in patients with good performance status PMID:24587643

  5. NDRG1 expression is related to the progression and prognosis of gastric cancer patients through modulating proliferation, invasion and cell cycle of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaojing; Xu, Xiaoyang; Ma, Jinguo; Xue, Xiaoying; Li, Zhenhua; Deng, Peng; Zhang, Shuanglong; Zhi, Yu; Chen, Jing; Dai, Dongqiu

    2014-09-01

    N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) has been proposed as a tumor suppressor gene in many different types of tumors, but its potential function and corresponding mechanism are not yet fully elucidated. This study aims to detect the possible function of NDRG1 in gastric cancer progression. In this study, 112 paired gastric cancer tissues and corresponding nonmalignant gastric tissues were utilized to identify the differential protein expression of NDRG1 by immunohistochemistry and its clinical significance was analyzed. Furthermore, 49 of 112 paired gastric specimens were used to detect the differential mRNA expression by real-time PCR. The over expression of NDRG1 in human gastric cancer cell line AGS by PcDNA3.1-NDRG1 transfection was utilized to detect the role of NDRG1 in regulating the biological behavior of gastric cancer. NDRG1 expression was significantly decreased in primary gastric cancer tissues, compared with its corresponding nonmalignant gastric tissues (p < 0.05), and its decreased expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (p < 0.01), invasion depth (p < 0.01) and differentiation (p < 0.05). Additionally, the overall survival rate of gastric cancer patients with high expression of NDRG1 was higher than those with low expression during the follow-up period. NDRG1 overexpression suppressed cells proliferation, invasion and induced a G1 cell cycle arrest in gastric cancer. Furthermore, the down-regulation of NDRG1 in gastric cancer metastatic progression was correlated to E-cadherin and MMP-9. Our results verify that NDRG1 acts as a tumor suppressor gene and may play an important role in the metastasis progression and prognosis of gastric cancer.

  6. Simultaneous quadruple modal nonlinear optical imaging for gastric diseases diagnosis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Jian; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-03-01

    We report the development of a unique simultaneous quadruple-modal nonlinear optical microscopy (i.e., stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), second-harmonic generation (SHG), two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), and third-harmonic generation (THG)) platform for characterization of the gastric diseases (i.e., gastritis, intestinal metaplasia (IM), intestinal type adenocarcinoma). SRS highlights the goblet cells found in IM. SHG images the distribution of collagen in lamina propria. Collagen is found to aggregate for intestinal type adenocarcinoma. TPEF reveals the cell morphology and can reflect the damage inside glands caused by the diseases. THG visualizes the nuclei with high spatial resolution, which facilitates the identification of neutrophils that are usually used as a feature of inflammation. This work shows that the co-registration of quadruple-modal images can be an effective means for diagnosis and characterization of gastric diseases at the cellular and molecular levels.

  7. Gastric Cancer Presenting as a Krukenberg Tumor at 22 Weeks' Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashutosh; Attar, Bashar M; Demetria, Melchor

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is rare during pregnancy, and often advanced upon presentation. A Krukenberg tumor presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in the pregnant patient. We present a case of a 38-year-old woman at 22 weeks' gestation who presented with worsening epigastric pain, and was found to have a left pelvic mass on ultrasound, which was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. She went into active labor and delivered a viable infant via vaginal delivery. An exploratory laparotomy revealed a large mass originating from her left ovary and diffuse thickening of the lesser curvature of the stomach. Frozen section investigation revealed the presence of signet cell adenocarcinoma. Subsequent upper endoscopy showed linitis plastica, while biopsy confirmed the presence of adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, the occurrence of gastric cancer in pregnancy is rare despite extremely common symptoms. The management poses a challenge because of the need for early treatment, and the continuation of the pregnancy. PMID:25580361

  8. [An unusual secondary localization of bronchial adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Mirallie, E; Courant, O; Sagan, C; Letessier, E; Paineau, J; Visset, J

    1993-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of metastatic carcinoma of the large bowel, secondary to a primary bronchogenic adenocarcinoma. Abdominal pain developed in a 44-year old man 5 months after lobectomy for lung adenocarcinoma. The diagnosis of a large caecal extraluminal mass was established by means of sonography, scanner and laparoscopy. Palliative resection (brain metastases) was performed. Postoperative histological examination revealed the resected tumor to be identical to the lung adenocarcinoma. The patient eventually died 4 months after resection (complication of intracranial hypertension). Diagnosis and therapeutic features of metastatic extra-thoracic lung carcinoma are discussed.

  9. [Mesocolic excision for colonic adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Debove, Clotilde; Lefèvre, Jérémie H; Parc, Yann

    2017-02-01

    On the same principle than total mesorectal excision in rectal cancer, the effect of complete mesocolic excision on short and long-term outcomes is actually evaluated for colonic adenocarcinoma. This method, usually performed for left colectomy, offers a surgical specimen of higher quality, with a larger number of lymph nodes harvested. For right colectomy, surgical specifications make it less common complete mesocolic excision and conventional surgery offer comparable outcomes, as regards to postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. No differences are identified between laparoscopic and open surgery. On oncologic outcomes, only two studies report a higher free-disease survival after complete mesocolic excision. Then, there is evidence that complete mesocolic excision offers a higher rate of specimen with extensive lymph node resection, without increased morbidity rate. However, there is limited evidence that it leads to improve long-term oncological outcomes.

  10. Helminth co-infection in Helicobacter pylori infected INS-GAS mice attenuates gastric premalignant lesions of epithelial dysplasia and glandular atrophy and preserves colonization resistance of the stomach to lower bowel microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Whary, Mark T.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Lofgren, Jennifer; Shi, Hai Ning; Taylor, Nancy S.; Correa, Pelayo; Versalovic, James; Wang, Timothy C.; Fox, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Higher prevalence of helminth infections in H. pylori infected children was suggested to potentially lower the life-time risk for gastric adenocarcinoma. In rodent models, helminth co-infection does not reduce Helicobacter-induced inflammation but delays progression of pre-malignant gastric lesions. Because gastric cancer in INS-GAS mice is promoted by intestinal microflora, the impact of Heligmosomoides polygyrus co-infection on H. pylori-associated gastric lesions and microflora were evaluated. Male INS-GAS mice co-infected with H. pylori and H. polygyrus for 5 months were assessed for gastrointestinal lesions, inflammation-related mRNA expression, FoxP3+ cells, epithelial proliferation, and gastric colonization with H. pylori and Altered Schaedler Flora. Despite similar gastric inflammation and high levels of proinflammatory mRNA, helminth co-infection increased FoxP3+ cells in the corpus and reduced H. pylori-associated gastric atrophy (p<0.04), dysplasia (p<0.02) and prevented H. pylori-induced changes in the gastric flora (p<0.05). This is the first evidence of helminth infection reducing H. pylori-induced gastric lesions while inhibiting changes in gastric flora, consistent with prior observations that gastric colonization with enteric microbiota accelerated gastric lesions in INS-GAS mice. Identifying how helminths reduce gastric premalignant lesions and impact bacterial colonization of the H. pylori infected stomach could lead to new treatment strategies to inhibit progression from chronic gastritis to cancer in humans. PMID:24513446

  11. Localized amyloidosis of the stomach mimicking a superficial gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Miwako; Fujino, Yasuteru; Muguruma, Naoki; Murayama, Noriaki; Okamoto, Koichi; Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Kishi, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Uehara, Hisanori; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2016-06-01

    A 73-year-old man was referred to our hospital for further examination of a depressed lesion in the stomach found by cancer screening gastroscopy. A barium upper gastrointestinal series showed an area of irregular mucosa measuring 15 mm on the anterior wall of the gastric body. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a 15 mm depressed lesion on the anterior wall of the lower gastric body. We suspected an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma from the appearance and took some biopsies. However, histology of the specimens revealed amyloidal deposits in the submucosal layer without malignant findings. Congo red staining was positive for amyloidal protein and green birefringence was observed under polarized light microscopy. Congo red staining with prior potassium permanganate incubation confirmed the light chain (AL) amyloid type. There were no amyloid deposits in the colon or duodenum. Computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no remarkable findings. Thus, this case was diagnosed as a localized gastric amyloidosis characterized by AL type amyloid deposition in the mucosal or submucosal layer. As the clinical outcome of gastric AL amyloidosis seems favorable, this case is scheduled for periodic examination to recognize potential disease progression and has been stable for 2 years.

  12. Microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, B.G.; Pulitzer, D.R.; Moehlmann, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    In order to detect regions of DNA containing tumor suppressor genes involved in the development of gastric cancer, we evaluated loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 78 gastric adenocarcinomas. A total of 46 microsatellite markers were employed, which detected at least one site per arm of each autosome in the human genome, including several markers linked to known tumor suppressor genes (TP53, APC, DCC, RB1, and BRCA1). We detected elevated rates of LOH at D3S1478 on chromosome 3p21 (44%, or 22 of 50 cases), at D12S78 at 12q14q24.33 (39%), and 37% at D9S157 on 9p, three sites not previously known to be affected in gastric cancer. Another locus on chromosome 12q, D12S97, showed LOH in 40% of informative cases. LOH was detected on chromosome 17p near TP53 in 66% of informative cases (23 of 35). Microsatellite instability (MI) was observed in 22% of the cancers. Tumors varied greatly in percentage of sites exhibiting MI, from 0% to 77% of sites tested. These findings expand the description of the genetic lesions occurring in gastric cancer.

  13. Pattern-Recognition Receptors and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Castaño-Rodríguez, Natalia; Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Mitchell, Hazel M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been associated with an increased risk of several human malignancies, a classic example being gastric adenocarcinoma (GC). Development of GC is known to result from infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, which initially induces acute inflammation and, in a subset of patients, progresses over time to chronic inflammation, gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and finally intestinal-type GC. Germ-line encoded receptors known as pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) are critical for generating mature pro-inflammatory cytokines that are crucial for both Th1 and Th2 responses. Given that H. pylori is initially targeted by PRRs, it is conceivable that dysfunction within genes of this arm of the immune system could modulate the host response against H. pylori infection, and subsequently influence the emergence of GC. Current evidence suggests that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) (TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) (NOD1, NOD2, and NLRP3), a C-type lectin receptor (DC-SIGN), and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RIG-I and MDA-5), are involved in both the recognition of H. pylori and gastric carcinogenesis. In addition, polymorphisms in genes involved in the TLR (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, and CD14) and NLR (NOD1, NOD2, NLRP3, NLRP12, NLRX1, CASP1, ASC, and CARD8) signaling pathways have been shown to modulate the risk of H. pylori infection, gastric precancerous lesions, and/or GC. Further, the modulation of PRRs has been suggested to suppress H. pylori-induced inflammation and enhance GC cell apoptosis, highlighting their potential relevance in GC therapeutics. In this review, we present current advances in our understanding of the role of the TLR and NLR signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of GC, address the involvement of other recently identified PRRs in GC, and discuss the potential implications of PRRs in GC immunotherapy

  14. Colonic adenocarcinoma with metastasis to the gingiva.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Alvarez, Carlos; Iglesias-Rodríguez, Begoña; Pazo-Irazu, Susana; Delgado-Sánchez-Gracián, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic tumors involve the oral cavity, and the most common primary sites are the breast and lung. Most cases affect the mandible and maxilla in that order, although some of them can be located in the soft perioral tissues. We report the case of a 62-year-old male who had been diagnosed with sigmoid adenocarcinoma with nodal and liver metastasis, who presented 6 months later with a gingival polypoid tumor, at first considered as a primary neoplasm of gingiva, that was diagnosed in a biopsy as metastatic intestinal adenocarcinoma. The histological evaluation is essential to separate adenocarcinoma from the commoner in this site squamous cell carcinoma, and the immunohistochemical techniques are useful to distinguish metastatic tumor versus primary adenocarcinoma from the minor salivary glands of the area. The intraoral spread of a disseminated neoplasm is generally a sign of bad prognosis, although a longer survival can be expected if a radical surgical treatment of a solitary metastasis is carried out.

  15. Expression of the Ets-1 proto-oncogene in human gastric carcinoma: correlation with tumor invasion.

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, T.; Ito, M.; Ohtsuru, A.; Naito, S.; Nakashima, M.; Fagin, J. A.; Yamashita, S.; Sekine, I.

    1996-01-01

    The proto-oncogene Ets-1 is a transcription factor known to control the expression of a number of genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling and has been postulated to play a role in cell migration and tumor invasion. To elucidate the involvement of Ets-1 in human gastric carcinomas, we examined 11 cases of gastric adenoma and 110 cases of gastric carcinoma by immunohistochemistry and compared the degree of Ets-1 expression with the depth of carcinoma invasion. Ets-1 was not expressed either in the normal gastric epithelium or in gastric adenomas. Among the 110 cases with gastric adenocarcinoma, 70 (63.6%) showed positive staining for the Ets-1 protein. In mucosal carcinomas, only 3 of 26 cases (11.5%) showed positive immunostaining for Ets-1. In contrast, 67 of 84 cases (79.8%) with submucosal or more invasive carcinomas showed immunopositivity and intense staining for Ets-1 in the tumor cells. The pattern of Ets-1 immunostaining in mucosal carcinomas was weak and differed from that of other local invasive carcinomas (P < 0.001). Histologically, signet-ring cell and mucinous carcinomas expressed relatively weak positivity for Ets-1. Ets-1 expression correlated significantly with the presence of lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). In situ hybridization, using an Ets-1 oligonucleotide probe, also confirmed the presence of Ets-1 mRNA in gastric carcinomas. Expression of Ets-1 mRNA was also detected in four different kinds of cultured human gastric carcinoma cell lines by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method. These findings suggest that Ets-1 is overexpressed in gastric mucosal cells that have undergone malignant conversion and that Ets-1 is one of the factors involved in the penetration of gastric carcinoma beyond the muscularis mucosa. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8952528

  16. Time trend analysis of gastric cancer incidence in Japan by histological types, 1975-1989

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, S; Yoshimura, T

    2001-01-01

    Since different histological types (HT) of gastric cancer (GC) may differ in their aetiology, time trend analysis by HT may afford an insight into aetiology. From the Gastric Cancer Registry of Japan, 161 067 cases diagnosed were retrieved between 1975 and 1989 to calculate the annual relative frequencies, stratified by age group and sex, of HT according to the Lauren and the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer (JRSGC) classifications. Age- and sex-specific incidence rates by HT were estimated by multiplying the corresponding national cancer incidence rates of GC by the relative frequencies. Logistic regression models stratified by sex and age group were fitted to determine the time trends of HT. Using the Lauren classification, a decreasing trend of the intestinal type and a stable trend of the diffuse type were found. By the JRSGC classification, significant decreasing trends for most age groups were found for papillary and mucinous adenocarcinomas. Tubular adenocarcinomas (well differentiated type) showed a decreasing trend only in younger age groups. Tubular (moderately differentiated type), poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas, and signet ring cell carcinoma were statistically stable during the period. Considering changes in lifestyles of the Japanese, the result suggests that there are three aetiological types of GC. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11161407

  17. Downregulation of microRNA-193-3p inhibits tumor proliferation migration and chemoresistance in human gastric cancer by regulating PTEN gene.

    PubMed

    Jian, Bin; Li, Zhongfu; Xiao, Dachun; He, Gan; Bai, Lian; Yang, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the functional mechanisms of microRNA-193-3p (miR-193-3p) in human gastric cancer. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to assess whether miR-193-3p was aberrantly expressed in gastric cancer cells and clinical samples from gastric cancer patients. Gastric cancer cell line AGS and MKN-45 cells were stably transduced with lentivirus to downregulate endogenous miR-193-3p. The modulation of miR-193-3p downregulation on gastric cancer proliferation, migration, chemo-drug responses, and tumor explant were assessed by MTT, wound-healing, 5-FU chemoresistance and in vivo tumorigenicity assays, respectively. Downstream target of miR-193-3p, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in gastric cancer, was assessed by dual-luciferase reporter assay, qRT-PCR, and western blot. PTEN was knocked down by siRNA in AGS and MKN-45 cells to assess its direct impact on miR-193-3p modulation in gastric cancer. MiR-193-3p was aberrantly upregulated in both gastric cell lines and human gastric tumors. In AGS and MKN-45 cells, miR-193-3p downregulation reduced cancer proliferation, migration and 5-FU chemoresistance in vitro, and tumorigenicity in vivo. PTEN was confirmed to be targeted by miR-193-3p in gastric cancer. PTEN inhibition in AGS and MKN-45 cells directly reversed the anti-tumor modulations of miR-193-3p downregulation on gastric cancer proliferation, migration, and 5-FU chemoresistance. We presented clear evidence showing miR-193-3p played critical role in regulating human gastric cancer through direct targeting on PTEN gene.

  18. Metastatic Colonic Adenocarcinoma in Breast: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kothadia, Jiten P.; Arju, Rezina; Kaminski, Monica; Ankireddypalli, Arvind; Duddempudi, Sushil; Chow, Jonathan; Giashuddin, Shah

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic adenocarcinoma to the breast from an extramammary site is extremely rare. In the literature, the most current estimate is that extramammary metastases account for only 0.43% of all breast malignancies and that, of these extramammary sites, colon cancer metastases form a very small subset. Most commonly seen metastasis in breast is from a contralateral breast carcinoma, followed by metastasis from hematopoietic neoplasms, malignant melanoma, sarcoma, lung, prostate, and ovary and gastric neoplasms. Here we present two rare cases, in which colonic adenocarcinomas were found to metastasize to the breast. In both cases, core biopsies were obtained from the suspicious areas identified on mammogram. Histopathology revealed neoplastic proliferation of atypical glandular components within benign breast parenchyma which were morphologically consistent with metastatic adenocarcinoma. By immunohistochemical staining, it was confirmed that the neoplastic components were immunoreactive to colonic markers and nonreactive to breast markers, thus further supporting the morphologic findings. It is extremely important to make this distinction between primary breast cancer and a metastatic process, in order to provide the most effective and appropriate treatment for the patient and to avoid any harmful or unnecessary surgical procedures. PMID:25883818

  19. Genetics of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Strand, Matthew S; Lockhart, Albert Craig; Fields, Ryan C

    2017-04-01

    Gastric cancer represents a major cause of cancer mortality worldwide despite a declining incidence. New molecular classification schemes developed from genomic and molecular analyses of gastric cancer have provided a framework for understanding this heterogenous disease, and early findings suggest these classifications will be relevant for designing and implementing new targeted therapies. The success of targeted therapy and immunotherapy in breast cancer and melanoma, respectively, has not been duplicated in gastric cancer, but trastuzumab and ramucirumab have demonstrated efficacy in select populations. New markers that predict therapeutic response are needed to improve patient selection for both targeted and immunotherapies.

  20. Pathologic classification of adenocarcinoma of lung.

    PubMed

    Van Schil, Paul E; Sihoe, Alan D L; Travis, William D

    2013-10-01

    Recently, the 1999/2004 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of adenocarcinoma became less useful from a clinical standpoint as most adenocarcinomas belonged to the mixed subtype and the term bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) gave rise to much confusion among clinicians. For these reasons a new adenocarcinoma classification was introduced in 2011 by a joint working group of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS). This represents an international, multidisciplinary effort joining pathologists, molecular biologists, pulmonary physicians, thoracic oncologists, radiologists, and thoracic surgeons. Currently, a distinction is made between pre-invasive lesions, minimally invasive and invasive lesions. The confusing term BAC is not used anymore and new subcategories include adenocarcinoma in situ and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma. Several aspects of this classification are discussed with main emphasis on its correlation with imaging techniques and its impact on diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. On chest computed tomography (CT) a distinction is made between solid and subsolid nodules, the latter comprising ground glass opacities (GGO), and partly solid lesions. Several studies incorporating CT and positron emission tomographic (PET) data show a good imaging-pathologic correlation. With the implementation of screening programs early lung cancer has become a hotly debated topic and sublobar resection is currently reconsidered for early lesions without lymph node involvement. This new classification will also have an impact on the TNM classification. Thoracic surgeons will continue to play a major role in the application, evaluation and further refinement of this new adenocarcinoma classification.

  1. Role of peptidylarginine deiminase type 4 in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Jiang; Song, Xiuqi

    2016-01-01

    Peptidylarginine deiminase type 4 (PADI4) post-translationally converts peptidylarginine to citrulline, appearing to be overexpressed in numerous carcinomas. The current study aimed to investigate the expression of PADI4 in gastric cancer tissues and its effect on the biological activities of SGC-7901 and AGS tumor cell lines. The expression of PADI4 was determined in gastric cancer and normal gastric mucosa tissues using western blot analysis and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Gastric cancer cell lines were divided into the following groups: Mock group (subjected to transfection reagent); negative group [subjected to small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection]; PADI4 siRNA group (subjected to PADI4 siRNA transfection); 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) group (subjected to 5-Fu); and 5-Fu + siRNA transfection group (subjected to 5-Fu and PADI4 siRNA transfection). The effects of silencing PADI4 with the above measures on the proliferation and invasion of SGC-7901 and AGS cells were determined by MTT and Transwell chamber assays. In addition, propidium iodide staining was performed to detect the effects of PADI4 on the cell cycle. A significant increase in the expression of PADI4 mRNA in gastric cancer tissue compared with normal mucosa tissue was identified (P<0.05). The proliferation and invasion of SGC-7901 and AGS cells were significantly decreased in the PADI4 siRNA group. Furthermore, flow cytometry DNA analysis revealed that silencing PADI4 resulted in significant S phase arrest and marked decrease of cells in the G2/M phase. PADI4 siRNA coupled with 5-Fu significantly enhanced its inhibitory effect on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells. In conclusion, PADI4 demonstrated high expression in gastric cancer and served an important role in the biological activities of gastric cancer cells involving cell proliferation, invasion and cell cycle. As a result, PADI4 may be a valid cancer susceptibility gene and potential target for cancer

  2. [Intestinal type adenocarcinoma of the nose and paranasal sinuses. Histological and immunohistochemical study of 14 cases].

    PubMed

    Bonato, M; Piantanida, R; Riva, C; Cis, C; Capella, C

    1989-01-01

    Fourteen cases of intestinal-type adenocarcinomas (IADC) of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses were studied at the Regional Hospital of Varese during the period from 1973 to 1988. They were 13 males and 1 female, mean age 57.5 years; the five year survival was 25% and tumors were preferentially located in the ethmoidal sinus. Morphological study and the use of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies made it possible to define the structural features of IADC and to detect specific antigenic markers such as CAR-5 (a glycoprotein contained within intestinal goblet-cells) and M1 (a glycoprotein contained within gastric foveolar cells). For comparison 10 cases of colonic adenocarcinomas and 14 cases of non-AIDC carcinomas of the nose and paranasal sinuses were also examined. The parallel morphological and immuno-histochemical investigations based on specific markers demonstrated that it was impossible to differentiate IADC from large bowel adenocarcinoma for both the structural pattern and antigenic expression. Moreover, AIDC also showed a CAR-5 and M1 immunoreactivity (IR) different from that displayed by the nasal carcinomas of different histotypes. From a histopathological standpoint IADC appears to be a distinctive entity even when compared to salivary gland tumors. In addition, the present immunohistochemical investigation demonstrates that gastric and intestinal glycoproteic antigens (M1 and CAR-5 respectively) occur in the normal nasosinusal mucosa. Both CAR-5 and M1 were observed in the mucous produced by nasal goblet cells with a distribution pattern resembling that of colonic goblet cells. Therefore, the present data confirm the similarity between nasal and colonic goblet cells which has already been pinpointed in previous morphological and ultrastructural studies. The common antigenic expression shared by the naso-sinusal and colonic mucosa might suggest a histogenetic hypothesis alternative to those of the malformative or metaplastic origin of naso

  3. Effects of IL-10 haplotype and atomic bomb radiation exposure on gastric cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomonori; Ito, Reiko; Cologne, John; Maki, Mayumi; Morishita, Yukari; Nagamura, Hiroko; Sasaki, Keiko; Hayashi, Ikue; Imai, Kazue; Yoshida, Kengo; Kajimura, Junko; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Ohishi, Waka; Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Nakachi, Kei

    2013-07-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the cancers that reveal increased risk of mortality and incidence in atomic bomb survivors. The incidence of gastric cancer in the Life Span Study cohort of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) increased with radiation dose (gender-averaged excess relative risk per Gy = 0.28) and remains high more than 65 years after exposure. To assess a possible role of gene-environment interaction, we examined the dose response for gastric cancer incidence based on immunosuppression-related IL-10 genotype, in a cohort study with 200 cancer cases (93 intestinal, 96 diffuse and 11 other types) among 4,690 atomic bomb survivors participating in an immunological substudy. Using a single haplotype block composed of four haplotype-tagging SNPs (comprising the major haplotype allele IL-10-ATTA and the minor haplotype allele IL-10-GGCG, which are categorized by IL-10 polymorphisms at -819A>G and -592T>G, +1177T>C and +1589A>G), multiplicative and additive models for joint effects of radiation and this IL-10 haplotyping were examined. The IL-10 minor haplotype allele(s) was a risk factor for intestinal type gastric cancer but not for diffuse type gastric cancer. Radiation was not associated with intestinal type gastric cancer. In diffuse type gastric cancer, the haplotype-specific excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation was statistically significant only in the major homozygote category of IL-10 (ERR = 0.46/Gy, P = 0.037), whereas estimated ERR for radiation with the minor IL-10 homozygotes was close to 0 and nonsignificant. Thus, the minor IL-10 haplotype might act to reduce the radiation related risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. The results suggest that this IL-10 haplotyping might be involved in development of radiation-associated gastric cancer of the diffuse type, and that IL-10 haplotypes may explain individual differences in the radiation-related risk of gastric cancer.

  4. Occupation and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J; Podas, T

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations—for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  5. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... or "sleeve" out of the rest. The new, banana-shaped stomach is much smaller than the original ... of your stomach, leaving you with a smaller banana-shaped stomach called the gastric sleeve. Because it's ...

  6. Gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... your legs to help prevent blood clots from forming. You will receive shots of medicine to prevent ... diversion with duodenal switch Dumping syndrome References Buchwald H. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. In: Buchwald ...

  7. A Concurrence of Adenocarcinoma with Micropapillary Features and Composite Glandular-Endocrine Cell Carcinoma in the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Park, Cheon-Soo; Kwak, Jae-Young; Park, Eun-Hwa; Kwak, Jin-Ho; Jang, Hyuk-Jae; Choi, Kun-Moo; Han, Myung-Sik

    2016-01-01

    We report a unique case of synchronous double primary gastric cancer consisting of adenocarcinoma components with micropapillary features and composite glandular-endocrine cell carcinoma components. The patient was a 53-year-old man presenting with a 6-month history of epigastric pain and diarrhea. A subtotal gastrectomy was performed. Histologically, one tumor was composed of micropapillary carcinoma components (50%) with tight clusters of micropapillary aggregates lying in the empty spaces, admixed with moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma components. MUC-1 was expressed at the stromal edge of the micropapillary component. The other tumor was composed of atypical carcinoid-like neuroendocrine carcinoma (50%), adenocarcinoid (30%), and adenocarcinoma components (20%). The neuroendocrine components were positive for CD56, synaptophysin, chromogranin, and creatine kinase. The adenocarcinoid components were positive for both carcinoembryonic antigen and neuroendocrine markers (amphicrine differentiation). This case is unique, due to the peculiar histologic micropapillary pattern and the histologic spectrum of adenocarcinoma adenocarcinoid-neuroendocrine carcinoma of the synchronous composite tumor. PMID:28053814

  8. Inhibition of monoacylglycerol lipase attenuates nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastric hemorrhages in mice.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Steven G; Nomura, Daniel K; O'Neal, Scott T; Long, Jonathan Z; Mahadevan, Anu; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Grider, John R; Lichtman, Aron H

    2011-09-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used analgesics, but can cause gastric and esophageal hemorrhages, erosion, and ulceration. The endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid; eCB) system possesses several potential targets to reduce gastric inflammatory states, including cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB(1)), cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB(2)), and enzymes that regulate the eCB ligands 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide; AEA). In the presented study, we tested whether 4-nitrophenyl 4-(dibenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl(hydroxy)methyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (JZL184), a selective inhibitor of the primary catabolic enzyme of 2-AG, monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), would protect against NSAID-induced gastric damage. Food-deprived mice administered the nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitor diclofenac sodium displayed gastric hemorrhages and increases in proinflammatory cytokines. JZL184, the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole (positive control), or the primary constituent of marijuana, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), significantly prevented diclofenac-induced gastric hemorrhages. JZL184 also increased stomach levels of 2-AG, but had no effect on AEA, arachidonic acid, or the prostaglandins E(2) and D(2). MAGL inhibition fully blocked diclofenac-induced increases in gastric levels of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, as well as IL-10. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of CB(1) or CB(2) revealed that the gastroprotective effects of JZL184 and THC were mediated via CB(1). The antihemorrhagic effects of JZL184 persisted with repeated administration, indicating a lack of tolerance. These data indicate that increasing 2-AG protects against gastric damage induced by NSAIDs, and its primary catabolic enzyme MAGL offers a promising target for the development of analgesic therapeutics possessing gastroprotective properties.

  9. Identification of novel genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mottaghi-Dastjerdi, N; Soltany-Rezaee-Rad, M; Sepehrizadeh, Z; Roshandel, G; Ebrahimifard, F; Setayesh, N

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common and life-threatening types of malignancies. Identification of the differentially expressed genes in GC is one of the best approaches for establishing new diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Furthermore, these investigations could advance our knowledge about molecular biology and the carcinogenesis of this cancer. To screen for the overexpressed genes in gastric adenocarcinoma, we performed suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) on gastric adenocarcinoma tissue and the corresponding normal gastric tissue, and eight genes were found to be overexpressed in the tumor compared with those of the normal tissue. The genes were ribosomal protein L18A, RNase H2 subunit B, SEC13, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A1, tetraspanin 8, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4, and mitochondrially encoded ATP synthase 6. The common functions among the identified genes include involvement in protein synthesis, involvement in genomic stability maintenance, metastasis, metabolic improvement, cell signaling pathways, and chemoresistance. Our results provide new insights into the molecular biology of GC and drug discovery: each of the identified genes could be further investigated as targets for prognosis evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, evaluation of the response to new anticancer drugs, and determination of the molecular pathogenesis of GC.

  10. [A case of metastatic gastric cancer originating from transverse colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Nushijima, Youichirou; Nakano, Katsutoshi; Sugimoto, Keishi; Nakaguchi, Kazunori; Kan, Kazuomi; Maruyama, Hirohide; Doi, Sadayuki; Okamura, Shu; Murata, Kohei

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic gastric cancer is uncommon, and metastasis of colorectal cancer to the stomach is extremely rare. We report a case of metastatic gastric cancer that originated from transverse colon cancer. A 52-year-old woman underwent a left hemicolectomy and D3 lymph node dissection based on a diagnosis of transverse colon cancer. The pathology results were as follows: mucinous adenocarcinoma, type 2, 6 × 11 cm, ss, ly1 v1, pm (-), dm (-), n1 (+), P0, H0, M0, Stage IIIa. The patient received XELOX as postoperative adjuvant therapy for 6 months. One year and 3 months after the left hemicolectomy, gastroscopy revealed a submucosal tumor in the lower body of the stomach and an incipient cancer in the cardia of the stomach, and a colonoscopy revealed an incipient cancer in the transverse colon. An endoscopic ultrasonography fine needle aspiration biopsy of the submucosal tumor in the lower body of the stomach was performed. Histology showed that this tumor was a mucinous adenocarcinoma similar to the primary transverse colon cancer, which led to a diagnosis of metastatic gastric cancer originating from transverse colon cancer. Distant metastasis was not detected. Endoscopic submucosal dissection of the incipient gastric cancer was performed, as were distal gastrectomy and partial colectomy. Peritoneal dissemination and para-aortic lymph node recurrence were detected 7 months after the second surgery.

  11. Laparoscopic transhiatal approach for resection of an adenocarcinoma in long-segment Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Konishi, Hirotaka; Kinoshita, Osamu; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Morimura, Ryo; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Komatsu, Shuhei; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kazuma; Sakakura, Chouhei; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma and is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease, which is often preceded by a hiatal hernia. We describe a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma arising in long-segment BE (LSBE) associated with a hiatal hernia that was successfully treated with a laparoscopic transhiatal approach (LTHA) without thoracotomy. The patient was a 42-year-old male who had previously undergone laryngectomy and tracheal separation to avoid repeated aspiration pneumonitis. An ulcerative lesion was found in a hiatal hernia by endoscopy and superficial esophageal cancer was also detected in the lower thoracic esophagus. The histopathological diagnosis of biopsy samples from both lesions was adenocarcinoma. There were difficulties with the thoracic approach because the patient had severe kyphosis and muscular contractures from cerebral palsy. Therefore, we performed subtotal esophagectomy by LTHA without thoracotomy. Using hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery, the esophageal hiatus was divided and carbon dioxide was introduced into the mediastinum. A hernial sac was identified on the cranial side of the right crus of the diaphragm and carefully separated from the surrounding tissues. Abruption of the thoracic esophagus was performed up to the level of the arch of the azygos vein via LTHA. A cervical incision was made in the left side of the permanent tracheal stoma, the cervical esophagus was divided, and gastric tube reconstruction was performed via a posterior mediastinal route. The operative time was 175 min, and there was 61 mL of intra-operative bleeding. A histopathological examination revealed superficial adenocarcinoma in LSBE. Our surgical procedure provided a good surgical view and can be safely applied to patients with a hiatal hernia and kyphosis. PMID:26269688

  12. Gastroduodenal adenocarcinomas and rectal adenoma in a cougar (Felis concolor) infected with Helicobacter-like organisms and spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoshikazu; Aono, Itsushi; Ohya, Tatsuo; Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Kadota, Koichi

    2002-02-01

    A 14-year-old female cougar died from gastroduodenal adenocarcinomas and rectal adenoma. At necropsy, polypoid tumor masses of various sizes were scattered on the mucosal surfaces of the stomach, duodenum, and rectum. Histologically, the gastric tumor was diagnosed as an intestinal type adenocarcinoma and the tumor cells metastasized to the mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and lung. Helicobacter-like organisms were detected in the lumina lined by foveolar epithelium. In the duodenum, the carcinoma cells were localized in the limina propria and many of them were intensely positive for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In contrast, the rectal adenoma had a lower number of PCNA-positive cells. In the rectum, chronic inflammation with numerous spirochetes was also noted. These results indicated that the occurrence of the gastrointestinal tumors might be associated with the bacterial infection described above.

  13. Loss of RUNX3 increases osteopontin expression and promotes cell migration in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hui-Chuan; Liu, Yu-Peng; Shan, Yan-Shen; Huang, Chi-Ying; Lin, Forn-Chia; Lin, Li-Ching; Lee, Ling; Tsai, Chen-Hsun; Hsiao, Michael; Lu, Pei-Jung

    2013-11-01

    Loss of RUNX3 expression is frequently observed in gastric cancer and is highly associated with lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of gastric cancer remain unknown. In this study, we found that the protein levels of RUNX3 and osteopontin (OPN) are inversely correlated in gastric cancer clinical specimens and cell lines. Furthermore, similar inverse trends between RUNX3 and OPN messenger RNA (mRNA) expression were demonstrated in six out of seven normal-tumor-paired gastric cancer clinical specimens. In addition, low RUNX3 and high OPN expression were associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients. Ectopic expression of green fluorescent protein-RUNX3 reduced OPN protein and mRNA expression in the AGS and SCM-1 gastric cancer cell lines. In contrast, knockdown of RUNX3 in GES-1, a normal gastric epithelial cell line, increased OPN expression. Although three RUNX3-binding sequences have been identified in the OPN promoter region, direct binding of RUNX3 to the specific binding site, -142 to -137bp, was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The binding of RUNX3 to the OPN promoter significantly decreased OPN promoter activity. The knockdown of OPN or overexpression of RUNX3 inhibited cell migration in AGS and SCM-1 cells; however, the coexpression of RUNX3 and OPN reversed the RUNX3-reduced migration ability in AGS and SCM-1 cells. In contrast, the knockdown of both RUNX3 and OPN inhibited RUNX3-knockdown-induced migration of GES-1 cells. Together, our data demonstrated that RUNX3 is a transcriptional repressor of OPN and that loss of RUNX3 upregulates OPN, which promotes migration in gastric cancer cells.

  14. Does the interval of screening endoscopy affect survival in gastric cancer patients?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jieun; Kim, Su Mi; Ha, Man Ho; Seo, Jeong Eun; Choi, Min-Gew; Lee, Jun Ho; Sohn, Tae Sung; Kim, Sung; Jung, Sin-Ho; Bae, Jae Moon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer remains the second most common cancer in Korea; however, its mortality has decreased due to earlier diagnosis. In Korea, screening endoscopy has been performed nationwide since 1999. The aim of this study was to elucidate the benefit of screening endoscopy on actual survival in gastric cancer patients and to determine the optimal interval of screening endoscopy. We analyzed 1651 patients diagnosed with gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent surgical treatment between June 2008 and December 2014. Patients were divided into 4 groups according to the interval of screening endoscopy prior to their gastric cancer diagnosis. (Group I = within 1 year, Group II = >1 but <2 years, Group III = more than 2 years, Group IV = no prior endoscopic examination). Patient demographics, clinicopathologic characteristics, and postoperative surgical outcomes including overall survival were compared. The 5-year gastric cancer-specific survival rates of groups I and II were significantly higher than groups III and IV (90.9% vs 85.4%, P = 0.002, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that screening interval was an independent factor for the diagnosis of advanced gastric cancer. The risk of advanced gastric cancer decreased in group I (odds ratio: 0.515, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.369–0.719; P < 0.001) and group II (odds ratio: 0.678, 95% CI 0.517–0.889, P = 0.005). Screening endoscopy was helpful in increasing the survival of gastric cancer patients. A 2-year endoscopic screening interval is suitable to detect early-stage gastric cancer. PMID:27930534

  15. Gastric cancer and trastuzumab: first biologic therapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gunturu, Krishna S.; Woo, Yanghee; Beaubier, Nike; Remotti, Helen E.

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains difficult to cure and has a poor overall prognosis. Chemotherapy and multimodality therapy has shown some benefit in the treatment of gastric cancer. Current therapies for gastric cancer have their limitations; thus, we are in need of newer treatment options including targeted therapies. Here, we review the biologic therapy with trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)+ gastric cancer. PMID:23450234

  16. Neo-adjuvant chemo(radio)therapy in gastric cancer: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Alberto; Lirosi, Maria C; D’Ugo, Domenico; Fico, Valeria; Ricci, Riccardo; Santullo, Francesco; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cananzi, Ferdinando CM; Persiani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, several clinical trials on neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy as a therapeutic approach for locally advanced gastric cancer have been performed. Even if more data are necessary to define the roles of these approaches, the results of preoperative treatments in the combined treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma are encouraging because this approach has led to a higher rate of curative surgical resection. Owing to the results of most recent randomized phase III studies, neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced resectable gastric cancer has satisfied the determination of level I evidence. Remaining concerns pertain to the choice of the optimal therapy regimen, strict patient selection by accurate pre-operative staging, standardization of surgical procedures, and valid criteria for response evaluation. New well-designed trials will be necessary to find the best therapeutic approach in pre-operative settings and the best way to combine old-generation chemotherapeutic drugs with new-generation molecules. PMID:26690252

  17. Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct, gastric type, arising in the intrapancreatic common bile duct could progress to colloid carcinoma: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Ohata, Akihiko; Koda, Kenji; Maruyama, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB) exists in a pathway of multistep-carcinogenesis toward cholangiocarcinoma. Four subtypes are observed in IPNB, pancreatobiliary type, intestinal type, gastric type, and oncocytic type, similarly to the corresponding disease in the pancreas, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). IPNB can present with or without macroscopically visible mucin secretion. IPNB usually progresses to tubular adenocarcinoma. However, there are a limited number of well-described cases of gastric-type IPNB progressing not to tubular adenocarcinoma but to colloid carcinoma. Herein, we present a case of an 82-year-old female patient with gastric-type IPNB in the intrapancreatic common bile duct without macroscopically visible mucin secretion, which progressed to colloid carcinoma. As IPNB, especially without visible mucin secretion, is considered to be a heterogeneous group of diseases, such an unexpected association could occur.

  18. CDH1 mutations in gastric cancer patients from northern Brazil identified by Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS).

    PubMed

    El-Husny, Antonette; Raiol-Moraes, Milene; Amador, Marcos; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, André M; Montagnini, André; Barbosa, Silvanira; Silva, Artur; Assumpção, Paulo; Ishak, Geraldo; Santos, Sidney; Pinto, Pablo; Cruz, Aline; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-05-13

    Gastric cancer is considered to be the fifth highest incident tumor worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. Developing regions report a higher number of sporadic cases, but there are only a few local studies related to hereditary cases of gastric cancer in Brazil to confirm this fact. CDH1 germline mutations have been described both in familial and sporadic cases, but there is only one recent molecular description of individuals from Brazil. In this study we performed Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to assess CDH1 germline mutations in individuals who match the clinical criteria for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC), or who exhibit very early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Among five probands we detected CDH1 germline mutations in two cases (40%). The mutation c.1023T > G was found in a HDGC family and the mutation c.1849G > A, which is nearly exclusive to African populations, was found in an early-onset case of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mutations described highlight the existence of gastric cancer cases caused by CDH1 germline mutations in northern Brazil, although such information is frequently ignored due to the existence of a large number of environmental factors locally. Our report represent the first CDH1 mutations in HDGC described from Brazil by an NGS platform.

  19. CDH1 mutations in gastric cancer patients from northern Brazil identified by Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS)

    PubMed Central

    El-Husny, Antonette; Raiol-Moraes, Milene; Amador, Marcos; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, André M.; Montagnini, André; Barbosa, Silvanira; Silva, Artur; Assumpção, Paulo; Ishak, Geraldo; Santos, Sidney; Pinto, Pablo; Cruz, Aline; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer is considered to be the fifth highest incident tumor worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. Developing regions report a higher number of sporadic cases, but there are only a few local studies related to hereditary cases of gastric cancer in Brazil to confirm this fact. CDH1 germline mutations have been described both in familial and sporadic cases, but there is only one recent molecular description of individuals from Brazil. In this study we performed Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to assess CDH1 germline mutations in individuals who match the clinical criteria for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC), or who exhibit very early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Among five probands we detected CDH1 germline mutations in two cases (40%). The mutation c.1023T > G was found in a HDGC family and the mutation c.1849G > A, which is nearly exclusive to African populations, was found in an early-onset case of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mutations described highlight the existence of gastric cancer cases caused by CDH1 germline mutations in northern Brazil, although such information is frequently ignored due to the existence of a large number of environmental factors locally. Our report represent the first CDH1 mutations in HDGC described from Brazil by an NGS platform. PMID:27192129

  20. Evidence of cell fusion in carcinogen-induced mice gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yongjia; Hsu, Yiling; He, Xianghui; Lu, Ning; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Zhixiang; Zhu, Liwei

    2015-07-01

    The role of bone marrow-derived cells in gastric cancer formation was not fully understood. In this study, bone marrow from female green fluorescent protein transgenic mice was transplanted into male wild-type mice to generate sex-mismatched chimeric mice. The chimeric mice were treated with carcinogen to induce gastric cancer. At time of sacrifice, 18.2 % (2/11) of mice showed severe dysplasia and 25 % (3/12) of mice successfully induced with cancer. Fluorescence in situ hybridization results showed that bone marrow-derived cells participated in renewal of gastric mucosa and cell fusion was observed in both precancerous lesions and adenocarcinoma, but no sign of fusion was observed in squamous cell carcinoma. Our findings suggest that bone marrow-derived cells participate in renewal of gastric mucosa during chronic damage and might have acquired the phenotype of gastric epithelial cells through cell fusion. Fusion between gastric epithelial cells and bone marrow-derived cells was involved in increased carcinogenesis.

  1. Signet Cell in the Brain: A Case Report of Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis as the Presenting Feature of Gastric Signet Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Talha; Idrisov, Evgeny A; Maqsood, Aadil; Asad-Ur-Rahman, FNU; Abusaada, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Malignant infiltration of pia and arachnoid mater, referred to as leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC), is a rare complication of gastric carcinoma. The most common underlying malignancy in patients with LMC are leukemia, breast cancer, lymphoma, and lung cancer. We report a case of gastric adenocarcinoma that presented with LMC in the absence of overt gastrointestinal signs or symptoms. A 56-year-old Hispanic woman presented to the hospital with a three-week history of intermittent headaches and visual blurring. An initial brain imaging showed infarction in the distribution of right posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) along with communicating hydrocephalus. She underwent ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement with improvement in her symptoms. Two months later she presented again with deterioration in her mental status. Imaging studies and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis confirmed the diagnosis of LMC. Further studies determined the primary tumor to be signet ring cell gastric adenocarcinoma. However, she did not have any preceding gastrointestinal symptoms. In light of the poor prognosis, the patient's family proceeded with comfort care measures. Our case portrays a rare presentation of gastric adenocarcinoma with LMC without other distant organ metastatic involvement. It also illustrates the occult nature of gastric carcinoma and signifies the importance of neurologic assessment of patients, with or at risk of gastric carcinoma. ​It also raises a theoretical concern for VP shunt as a potential conduit of malignant cells from the abdomen to the central nervous system, which may serve as an important susbtrate for future research.

  2. Serum pepsinogens and risk of gastric and esophageal cancers in the General Population Nutrition Intervention Trial cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jian-Song; Kamangar, Farin; Qiao, You-Lin; Taylor, Philip R.; Liang, Hao; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Liu, Bin; Fan, Jin-Hu; Abnet, Christian C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Low serum pepsinogen I (PGI) and low pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratio (PGI/II ratio) are markers of gastric fundic atrophy. We aimed to prospectively test the association between serum PGI/II ratio and risks of gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma, gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Design Case-cohort study nested in a prospective cohort with over 15 years of follow-up. Setting Rural region of the People’s Republic of China. Subjects Men and women aged 40-69 at study baseline. Main outcome measures Adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between serum PGI/II ratio and caner risk Results Compared to subjects with PGI/II ratio of > 4, those with ≤4 had HRs (95%CIs) of 2.72 (1.77-4.20) and 2.12 (1.42-3.16) for noncardia and cardia gastric cancers, respectively. Risk of both cancers were also increased when other cut points ranging from 3 to 6, or when we used quartile models, or nonlinear continuous models. Risk of ESCC was marginally increased in those with PGI/II ratio ≤4, with HR (95% CI) of 1.56 (0.99-2.47), but quartile models and continuous models showed no increased risk. The nonlinear continuous models suggested that any single cut point collapsed subjects with dissimilar gastric cancer risks, and that using cut points was not an efficient use of data in evaluating these associations. Conclusion In this prospective study, we found similar and significantly increased risks of noncardia and cardia gastric adenocarcinomas in subjects with low PGI/II ratio, but little evidence for an association with ESCC risk. PMID:19136509

  3. Gastric peritoneal carcinomatosis - a retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hwee Leong; Chia, Claramae Shulyn; Tan, Grace Hwei Ching; Choo, Su Pin; Tai, David Wai-Meng; Chua, Clarinda Wei Ling; Ng, Matthew Chau Hsien; Soo, Khee Chee; Teo, Melissa Ching Ching

    2017-01-01

    AIM To characterize patients with gastric peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) and their typical clinical and treatment course with palliative systemic chemotherapy as the current standard of care. METHODS We performed a retrospective electronic chart review of all patients with gastric adenocarcinoma with PC diagnosed at initial metastatic presentation between January 2010 and December 2014 in a single tertiary referral centre. RESULTS We studied a total of 271 patients with a median age of 63.8 years and median follow-up duration of 5.1 mo. The majority (n = 217, 80.1%) had the peritoneum as the only site of metastasis at initial presentation. Palliative systemic chemotherapy was eventually planned for 175 (64.6%) of our patients at initial presentation, of which 171 were initiated on it. Choice of first-line regime was in accordance with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guidelines for Gastric Cancer Treatment. These patients underwent a median of one line of chemotherapy, completing a median of six cycles in total. Chemotherapy disruption due to unplanned hospitalizations occurred in 114 (66.7%), while cessation of chemotherapy occurred in 157 (91.8%), with 42 cessations primarily attributable to PC-related complications. Patients who had initiation of systemic chemotherapy had a significantly better median overall survival than those who did not (10.9 mo vs 1.6 mo, P < 0.001). Of patients who had initiation of systemic chemotherapy, those who experienced any disruptions to chemotherapy due to unplanned hospitalizations had a significantly worse median overall survival compared to those who did not (8.7 mo vs 14.6 mo, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Gastric PC carries a grim prognosis with a clinical course fraught with disease-related complications which may attenuate any survival benefit which palliative systemic chemotherapy may have to offer. As such, investigational use of regional therapies is warranted and required validation in patients with isolated PC to

  4. A review on gastric diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The gastric fundal diverticulae are rare. They can present with variable symptoms. We are enclosing a literature review on gastric fundal diverticulum. Lessons have emerged which may help in the management of this rare condition in future. PMID:22257431

  5. What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? For some people with small intestine cancer, ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Stops Working More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  6. What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? It’s important to have honest, open discussions ... Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  7. Abnormal expression of paxillin correlates with tumor progression and poor survival in patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Paxillin (PXN) has been found to be aberrantly regulated in various malignancies and involved in tumor growth and invasion. The clinicopathological and prognostic significance of PXN in gastric cancer is still unclear. Methods The expression of PXN was determined in paired gastric cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues by Western blotting and real-time PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression of PXN in 239 gastric cancer patients. Statistical analysis was applied to investigate the correlation between PXN expression and clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis in patients. Additionally, the effects of PXN on gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration were also evaluated. Results PXN was up-regulated in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines as compared with adjacent normal tissues and normal gastric epithelial cell line GES-1. Overexpression of PXN was correlated with distant metastasis (P = 0.001) and advanced tumor stage (P = 0.021) in gastric cancer patients. Patients with high PXN expression tended to have poor prognosis compared with patients with low PXN expression (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that PXN expression was an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.020). Moreover, ectopic expression of PXN promotes cell proliferation and migration in AGS cells whereas knockdown of PXN inhibits cell proliferation and migration in SGC7901 cells. Conclusions PXN plays an important role in tumor progression and may be used as a potential prognostic indicator in gastric cancer. PMID:24180516

  8. A rare case of metastatic germ cell tumor to stomach and duodenum masquerading as signet ring cell adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Sridhar; Patil, Prachi; Mehta, Shaesta; Ramadwar, Mukta

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinomas are the most common cancers affecting stomach. However gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), lymphomas and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can also affect the stomach. But stomach is relatively rare site of involvement by metastasis. In this case report a rare metastasis of germ cell tumor (GCT) into stomach is described which clinically and endoscopically masquerade as primary gastric cancers. But detailed clinical examination and vigilant histopathological reporting proves the origin of tumor distant from stomach and thereby change the whole approach of management. PMID:27668229

  9. Gastric cancer: basic aspects.

    PubMed

    Resende, Carlos; Thiel, Alexandra; Machado, José C; Ristimäki, Ari

    2011-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a world health burden, ranging as the second cause of cancer death worldwide. Etiologically, GC arises not only from the combined effects of environmental factors and susceptible genetic variants but also from the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations. In the last years, molecular oncobiology studies brought to light a number of genes that are implicated in gastric carcinogenesis. This review is intended to focus on the recently described basic aspects that play key roles in the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants of the genes IL-10, IL-17, MUC1, MUC6, DNMT3B, SMAD4, and SERPINE1 have been reported to modify the risk of developing GC. Several genes have been newly associated with gastric carcinogenesis, both through oncogenic activation (GSK3β, CD133, DSC2, P-Cadherin, CDH17, CD168, CD44, metalloproteinases MMP7 and MMP11, and a subset of miRNAs) and through tumor suppressor gene inactivation mechanisms (TFF1, PDX1, BCL2L10, XRCC, psiTPTE-HERV, HAI-2, GRIK2, and RUNX3). It also addressed the role of the inflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its importance as a potential molecular target for therapy.

  10. Primary gastric lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Akwaa, Ahmad M; Siddiqui, Neelam; Al-Mofleh, Ibrahim A

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this review is to describe the various aspects of primary gastric lymphoma and the treatment options currently available. METHODS: After a systematic search of Pubmed, Medscape and MDconsult, we reviewed and retrieved literature regarding gastric lymphoma. RESULTS: Primary gastric lymphoma is rare however, the incidence of this malignancy is increasing. Chronic gastritis secondary to Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection has been considered a major predisposing factor for MALT lymphoma. Immune histochemical marker studies and molecular biology utilizing polymerase chain reaction have facilitated appropriate diagnosis and abolished the need for diagnostic surgical resection. Advances in imaging techniques including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Endoscopic Ultrasonography (EUS) have helped evaluation of tumor extension and invasion. The clinical course and prognosis of this disease is dependent on histopathological sub-type and stage at the time of diagnosis. Controversy remains regarding the best treatment for early stages of this disease. Chemotherapy, surgery and combination have been studied and shared almost comparable results with survival rate of 70%-90%. However, chemotherapy possesses the advantage of preserving gastric anatomy. Radiotherapy alone has been tried and showed good results. Stage IIIE, IVE disease treatment is solely by chemotherapy and surgical resection has been a remote consideration. CONCLUSION: We conclude that methods of diagnosis and staging of the primary gastric lymphoma have dramatically improved. The modalities of treatment are many and probably chemotherapy is superior because of high success rate, preservation of stomach and tolerable complications. PMID:14695759

  11. Radiographic and endoscopic regression of metastatic gastric cancer to the colon in the setting of 5-aminosalicylic acid use

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Shannon J.; Zhang, Xuefeng; Jaffe, Tracy; Shimpi, Rahul A.

    2016-01-01

    Colonic metastases from gastric cancer are a rare phenomenon and sparsely reported in the literature. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman who presented with vague abdominal symptoms and initial computer tomography (CT) imaging suggestive of a colonic apple-core lesion with serial colonoscopic biopsies diagnostic of metastatic signet ring cell gastric adenocarcinoma. This case is unique given the evolving CT and endoscopic findings that suggested a regression in colonic wall thickening in the setting of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) use prior to histologic diagnosis. PMID:28078130

  12. Intramural hemorrhage simulating gastric neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sheward, S E; Davis, M; Amparo, E G; Gogel, H K

    1988-01-01

    We report a case of benign gastric ulcer with secondary extensive intramural hemorrhage causing a radiographic appearance consistent with a large ulcerated gastric neoplasm. This is the second such case reported and the first studied with sonography and computed tomographic scan. A brief review of the literature on intramural gastric hematoma is presented.

  13. Adenocarcinoma of Meckel's cave: case report.

    PubMed

    Tacconi, L; Arulampalam, T; Johnston, F; Symon, L

    1995-12-01

    A rare localization of adenocarcinoma in Meckel's cave is reported in a 58-year-old woman, who had a 5-month history of pain and altered sensation in the second division of the left trigeminal nerve. Removal of the lesion was achieved by a subtemporal route. Histology showed this to be an adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent investigations for a primary tumor; the investigations were all negative, and the patient was subsequently treated with a course of radiotherapy. At 4-month follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence, and she remains symptomatically well. The various mechanisms of secondary localization are discussed.

  14. Impact of NPR-A expression in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia; Qu, Jingkun; Yang, Ya; Li, Min; Zhang, Mingxin; Cui, Xiaohai; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    Background: The receptors for the cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR-A), have been reported to be expressed in lung cancer, prostate cancer, ovarian cancer. NPR-A expression and signaling is important for tumor growth, its deficiency protect C57BL/6 mice from lung, skin, and ovarian cancers, and these result suggest that NPR-A is a new target for cancer therapy. Recently, NPR-A has been demonstrated to be expressed in pre-implantation embryos and in ES cells, it has a novel role in the maintenance of self-renewal and pluripotency of ES cells. However, the direct role of NPR-A signaling in gastric cancer remains unclear. Method: NPR-A expression was downregulated by transfection of shRNA. The proliferation of gastric cancer cells was measured by Hoechst 33342 stain. Cell proliferation and invasion were determined via BrdU and transwell assays, respectively. Results: Down-regulation of NPR-A expression by shNPR-A induced apoptosis, inhibited proliferation and invasion in AGS cells. The mechanism of shNPR-A-induced anti-AGS effects was linked to NPR-A-induced expression of KCNQ1, a gene to be overexpressed in AGS and significantly reduced by shNPR-A. Conclusion: Collectively, these results suggest that NPR-A promotes gastric cancer development in part by regulating KCNQ1. Our findings also suggest that NPR-A is a target for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:25419351

  15. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in human gastric epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Monica Catarina; Costa, Carla; Silva, Susana; Costa, Solange; Dhawan, Alok; Oliveira, Paula A; Teixeira, João P

    2014-02-01

    Manufacturing or using nanomaterials may result in exposure of workers to nanoparticles. Potential routes of exposure include skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract. The lack of health-based standards for nanomaterials combined with their increasing use in many different workplaces and products emphasize the need for a reliable temporary risk assessment tool. Therefore, the aim of this work was to explore the effects of different doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on human gastric epithelial cells in vitro. We analyzed proliferation by MTT assay, apoptosis by Tunel, migration by injury assay, oxidative stress by determining GSH/GSSG ratio and DNA damage by Comet assay on nanoparticle-treated AGS human gastric epithelial cell line in comparison to controls. We show and discuss the tumor-like phenotypes of nanoparticles-exposed AGS cells in vitro, as increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis. Our results demonstrate for the first time that nanoparticles induce tumor-like phenotypes in human gastric epithelial cells.

  16. Immunotherapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsueda, Satoko; Graham, David Y

    2014-02-21

    Gastric cancer is the second most common of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the majority of cases gastric cancer is advanced at diagnosis and although medical and surgical treatments have improved, survival rates remain poor. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a powerful and promising clinical approach for treatment of cancer and has shown major success in breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Here, we provide an overview of concepts of modern cancer immunotherapy including the theory, current approaches, remaining hurdles to be overcome, and the future prospect of cancer immunotherapy in the treatment of gastric cancer. Adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies have all been used with some initial successes in gastric cancer. However, to date the results in gastric cancer have been disappointing as current approaches often do not stimulate immunity efficiently allowing tumors continue to grow despite the presence of a measurable immune response. Here, we discuss the identification of targets for immunotherapy and the role of biomarkers in prospectively identifying appropriate subjects or immunotherapy. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immunosurveillance and produce an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We show how advances have provided tools for overcoming the mechanisms of immunosuppression including the use of monoclonal antibodies to block negative regulators normally expressed on the surface of T cells which limit activation and proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. Immunotherapy has greatly improved and is becoming an important factor in such fields as medical care and welfare for human being. Progress has been rapid ensuring that the future of immunotherapy for gastric cancer is bright.

  17. [Gastric cancer detection using kubelka-Munk spectral function of DNA and protein absorption bands].

    PubMed

    Li, Lan-quan; Wei, Hua-jiang; Guo, Zhou-yi; Yang, Hong-qin; Xie, Shu-sen; Chen, Xue-mei; Li, Li-bo; He, Bol-hua; Wu, Guo-yong; Lu, Jian-jun

    2009-09-01

    Differential diagnosis for epithelial tissues of normal human gastric, undifferentiation gastric adenocarcinoma, gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma were studied using the Kubelka-Munk spectral function of the DNA and protein absorption bands at 260 and 280 nm in vitro. Diffuse reflectance spectra of tissue were measured using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The results of measurement showed that for the spectral range from 250 to 650 nm, pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were significant differences in the averaged value of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the DNA absorption bands at 260 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 68.5% (p < 0.05), 146.5% (p < 0.05), 282.4% (p < 0.05), 32.4% (p < 0.05), 56.00 (p < 0.05) and 83.0% (p < 0.05) respectively. And pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were significant differences in the averaged value of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the protein absorption bands at 280 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 86.8% (p < 0.05), 262.9% (p < 0.05), 660.1% (p < 0.05) and 34% (p < 0.05), 72. 2% (p < 0.05), 113.5% (p < 0.05) respectively. And pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were

  18. Nucleic acid-sensing toll-like receptors 3, 7 and 8 in esophageal epithelium, barrett’s esophagus, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Helminen, Olli; Huhta, Heikki; Lehenkari, Petri P.; Saarnio, Juha; Karttunen, Tuomo J.; Kauppila, Joonas H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are immunological receptors recognizing various microbial and endogenous ligands, such as DNA, RNA, and other microbial and host components thus activating immunological responses. The expression of TLRs in esophageal adenocarcinoma is not well known. The aim of this study was to evaluate expression patterns of those TLRs that sense nucleic acids in Barrett’s esophagus with and without dysplasia and in esophageal adenocarcinoma. TLRs 3, 7 and 8 were stained immunohistochemically and evaluated in a cohort of patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma or dysplasia. Specimens with normal esophagus (n = 88), gastric (n = 67) or intestinal metaplasia (n = 51) without dysplasia, and low-grade (n = 42) or high-grade dysplasia (n = 37) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (n = 99) were studied. We used immunofluorescence to confirm the subcellular localization of TLRs. We found abundant expression of TLR3, 7 and 8 in esophageal squamous epithelium, columnar metaplasia, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. Cytoplasmic expression of TLR3, TLR7 or TLR8 did not associate to clinicopathological parameters or prognosis in esophageal cancer. High nuclear expression of TLR8, confirmed with immunofluorescence, in cancer cells was observed in tumors of high T-stage (p < 0.01) and in tumors with organ metastasis (p < 0.001). High nuclear TLR8 expression was associated with poor prognosis (p < 0.001). The expression of TLR3, TLR7 and TLR8 increased toward dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. We demonstrated nuclear localization of TLR8, which associates with metastasis and poor prognosis. TLR3 and TLR7 do not seem to have prognostic significance in esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27467941

  19. Should peri-gastrectomy gastric acidity be our focus among gastric cancer patients?

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Xu, A-Man; Li, Tuan-Jie; Han, Wen-Xiu; Xu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the necessity and correctness of acid suppression pre- and post-gastrectomy among gastric carcinoma (GC) patients. METHODS: From June 2011 to April 2013, 99 patients who were diagnosed with GC or adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction (type II or III) and needed surgical management were enrolled. They all underwent gastrectomy by the same operators [35 undergoing total gastrectomy (TG) plus Roux-en-Y reconstruction, 34 distal gastrectomy (DG) plus Billroth I reconstruction, and 30 proximal gastrectomy (PG) plus gastroesophagostomy]. We collected and analyzed their gastrointestinal juice and tissues from the pre-operational day to the 5th day post-operation, and 6 mo post-surgery. Gastric pH was detected with a precise acidity meter. Gastric juice contents including potassium, sodium and bicarbonate ions, urea nitrogen, direct and indirect bilirubin, and bile acid were detected using Automatic Biochemical Analyzer. Data regarding tumor size, histological type, tumor penetration and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage were obtained from the pathological records. Reflux symptoms pre- and 6 mo post-gastrectomy were evaluated by reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ) and gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire (GERD-Q). SPSS 16.0 was applied to analyze the data. RESULTS: Before surgery, gastric pH was higher than the threshold of hypoacidity (4.25 ± 1.45 vs 3.5, P = 0.000), and significantly affected by age, tumor size and differentiation grade, and potassium and bicarbonate ions; advanced malignancies were accompanied with higher pH compared with early ones (4.49 ± 1.31 vs 3.66 ± 1.61, P = 0.008). After operation, gastric pH in all groups was of weak-acidity and significantly higher than that pre-gastrectomy; on days 3-5, comparisons of gastric pH were similar between the 3 groups. Six months later, gastric pH was comparable to that on days 3-5; older patients were accompanied with higher total bilirubin level, indicating more serious

  20. Role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in gastric cancer: An in-depth literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chiurillo, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the most common cancers worldwide and one of the leading cause for cancer-related deaths. Gastric adenocarcinoma is a multifactorial disease that is genetically, cytologically and architecturally more heterogeneous than other gastrointestinal carcinomas. The aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is involved in the development and progression of a significant proportion of gastric cancer cases. This review focuses on the participation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in gastric cancer by offering an analysis of the relevant literature published in this field. Indeed, it is discussed the role of key factors in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and their downstream effectors regulating processes involved in tumor initiation, tumor growth, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Available data indicate that constitutive Wnt signalling resulting from Helicobacter pylori infection and inactivation of Wnt inhibitors (mainly by inactivating mutations and promoter hypermethylation) play an important role in gastric cancer. Moreover, a number of recent studies confirmed CTNNB1 and APC as driver genes in gastric cancer. The identification of specific membrane, intracellular, and extracellular components of the Wnt pathway has revealed potential targets for gastric cancer therapy. High-throughput “omics” approaches will help in the search for Wnt pathway antagonist in the near future. PMID:25992323

  1. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  2. Aggressive digital papillary adenoma-adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Evangelos G; Miller, Gavin; Revelos, Kyriakos; Kitsanta, Panagiota; Page, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma and aggressive digital papillary adenoma are rare tumours of the sweat glands. They are most common in the most distal part of the fingers and are locally aggressive with a 50% local recurrence rate; 14% of tumours metastasize. We present two cases.

  3. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  4. MicroRNA-29a inhibits cell migration and invasion via targeting Roundabout homolog 1 in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueting; Cai, Jun; Sun, Yanjun; Gong, Renhua; Sun, Dengqun; Zhong, Xingguo; Jiang, Shitao; He, Xinmiao; Bao, Enwu; Yang, Liusheng; Li, Yongxiang

    2015-09-01

    Deregulation of Roundabout homolog 1 (Robo1) has been demonstrated to be associated with several types of human cancer, including gastric cancer. However, the detailed role of Robo1 and its regulatory mechanism in gastric cancer remain largely unclear. In the current study, it was demonstrated that the expression of microRNA (miR)‑29a was frequently reduced in gastric cancer tissues, compared with their matched normal adjacent tissues. Similar results were additionally observed in AGS and SGC‑7901 human gastric cancer cells. Overexpression of miR‑29a led to reduced migration and invasion of AGS cells. To explore the targets of miR‑29a in gastric cancer, bioinformatics analysis was conducted and Robo1 was identified as a putative target of miR‑29a. Further western blotting and luciferase activity assay data confirmed that miR‑29a was able to negatively regulate the protein expression of Robo1, through directly binding to the 3'‑untranslated region of Robo1 mRNA in gastric cancer cells. In addition, it was demonstrated that Robo1 was frequently upregulated in gastric cancer tissues compared with their matched adjacent normal tissues, and a significant inverse correlation was identified between miR‑29a and Robo1 expression. In addition, knockdown of Robo1 by small interfering RNA markedly inhibited the migratory and invasive capabilities of AGS cells, which the results obtained with overexpression of miR‑29a. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge the current study suggested for the first time, that miR‑29a inhibits migration and invasion in part via direct inhibition of Robo1 in gastric cancer cells. Therefore, Robo1 and miR‑29a may serve as diagnostic or therapeutic targets for gastric cancer.

  5. Methylation-silencing RCC1 expression is associated with tumorigenesis and depth of invasion in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Ling; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Cheng, Shao-Bin; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Huang, Chu-Chun; P’eng, Fang-Ku; Tsai, Tung-Chou; Wu, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Regulator of chromosome condensation 1 (RCC1) is a critical cell cycle regulator. We firstly identified RCC1 gene hypermethylation in gastric tumor tissues using the differential methylation hybridization (DMH) microarray, but the role of RCC1 in the pathogenesis of gastric carcinoma is largely unknown. Methods: Three gastric cancer cell lines (AGS, MKN45, and TSGH9201) were used to analyze RCC1 gene methylation, mRNA and protein expressions. Furthermore, 85 pairs of matched human gastric carcinoma samples in a tissue microarray were used to analyze RCC1 expression by immunohistochemistry staining. Results: A differential methylation pattern was found in TSGH9201 (100%), MKN45 (87%), and AGS (62%) cell lines at the 9th CpG site of RCC1 exon 1. RCC1 mRNA and protein expressions in AGS cells were significantly higher than in TSGH9201 and MKN45 cell lines (P < 0.05). Tissue array data showed that RCC1 expression was detected in 21% (18/85) of gastric carcinoma tissues and in 80% (76/95) of adjacent non-tumor tissues. The expression of RCC1 in gastric carcinoma tissues was significantly lower than in adjacent non-tumor tissues (P < 0.001). Furthermore, an association between RCC1 expression and clinicopathological features showed that RCC1 expression was closely correlated with tumor differentiation and depth of invasion (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our data indicate that RCC1 expression is frequently lost in poorly differentiated gastric cell lines and gastric carcinoma tissues. Loss of RCC1 expression is correlated with tumor differentiation and depth of invasion. These findings suggest that RCC1 may play a tumor suppressor role in gastric carcinoma. PMID:26823742

  6. LKB1 inhibits the proliferation of gastric cancer cells by suppressing the nuclear translocation of Yap and β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lian-Gang; Bian, Shi-Bo; Cui, Jian-Xin; Xi, Hong-Qing; Zhang, Ke-Cheng; Qin, Hong-Zhen; Zhu, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is known to suppress the proliferation, energy metabolism and mesenchymal transition of various cancer cells, and is involved in the regulation of Hippo-Yes-associated protein (Yap) and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. However, the role of LKB1 in gastric cancer (GC) was not fully understood. Thus, in the present study, we studied LKB1 and found that protein expression (0.37±0.061 vs. 0.59±0.108, P=0.006) and the protein ratio of p-Yap/Yap (0.179±0.085 vs. 0.8±0.126, P=0.001) were reduced in 54 gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) tissues compared with the matched adjacent non-cancerous tissues, using western blotting and RT-qPCR assays. LKB1 expression was also observed decreased in 109 GAC tissues compared with 54 adjacent non-cancerous tissues (χ2=4.678, P=0.0306), and negatively correlated with the nuclear expression of Yap (r=-0.6997) and β-catenin (r=-0.3510), using immunohistochemical analysis. In GC patients, LKB1 expression was negatively associated with tumor size, tumor infiltration, lymph node metastasis and the TNM stage. LKB1 expression was determined to be positively correlated with longer overall survival of GC patients using Kaplan-Meier analysis (P=0.001). Subsequently, LKB1 expression in human GAC AGS cells was enhanced with a full‑length LKB1 transfection. In vitro and in vivo proliferation was inhibited in LKB1-overexpressing GC cells compared with the control cells. Yap and β-catenin expression were assessed by western blotting and RT-qPCR, and were found to be increased in the cytoplasm but decreased in the nucleus in LKB1-overexpressing GC cells compared with the control cells. The increase in cytoplasmic β-catenin was reversed by the silencing of LKB1 or Yap with shRNAs in LKB1-overexpressing GC cells. Moreover, Yap and β-catenin mRNA were barely altered by LKB1 overexpression. Thus, we concluded that LKB1 expression was reduced in GAC tissues but that it correlated positively with better prognosis for GC

  7. [TP53 codon 72 polymorphism and gastric cancer risk: a case-control study in individuals from the central-western region of Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Cañas, Miryan; Morán, Yeinmy; Camargo, María Eugenia; Rivero, María Belén; Bohórquez, Adolfo; Villegas, Venus; Ramírez, Eddy; Rendón, Yanet; Suárez, Alfredo; Morales, Luis; Useche, Emerson; Salazar, Sandra; Zambrano, Amado; Ramírez, Alvaro; Valderrama, Elvis; Briceño, Zuly; Chiurillo, Miguel Angel

    2009-06-01

    Codon 72 polymorphism of the tumor suppressor gene TP53 has been associated with a higher risk in the development of several types of cancer. The polymorphism results in a variant protein with either an arginine (CGC) or a proline residue (CCC). The aim of this study was to analyze the association of the TP53 codon 72 polymorphism with the risk of developing gastric cancer in a high-risk population from the central-western region of Venezuela. DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded gastric adenocarcinoma biopsies (n=65) and endoscopic biopsies from chronic gastritis patients (n=87). TP53 codon 72 polymorphism was determined by PCR-RFLP from all samples. Patients with gastric cancer had a significantly higher frequency (P = 0.037) of the Arg allele than those with chronic gastritis. A logistic regression analysis suggested that Arg carrier individuals had a 4.6-fold higher risk (95% CI 1.0-21.3) of developing gastric cancer. An increment of the Arg/Arg genotype was observed in poor-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma (OR: 3.1; 95% CI 1.0-9.2), and of the Arg/Pro genotype in well/moderate-differentiated adenocarcinoma samples (OR: 3.5; 95% CI 1.1-11.0), when comparing within the gastric cancer samples; and the last group also when contrasting it with chronic gastritis patients (OR: 2.4; 95% CI 1.1-5.2). The results of this study suggest that the carriage of the Arg allele could be associated with the development of gastric cancer in this Venezuelan population.

  8. Models of gastric emptying.

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, D F

    1977-01-01

    Some empirical and theoretical models of the emptying behaviour of the stomach are presented. The laws of Laplace, Hooke, and Poisseuille are used to derive a new model of gastric emptying. Published data on humans are used to test the model and evaluate empirical constants. It is shown that for meals with an initial volume of larger than or equal to 300 ml, the reciprocal of the cube root of the volume of meal remaining is proportional to the time the meal is in the stomach.For meals of initial volume of less than 300 ml the equation has to be corrected for the fact that the 'resting volume' of gastric contents is about 28 ml. The more exact formula is given in the text. As this model invokes no neural or hormonal factors, it is suggested that the gastric emptying response to the volume of a meal does not depend on these factors. The gastric emptying response to the composition of the meal does depend on such factors and a recent model of this process is used to evaluate an empirical constant. PMID:856678

  9. Melanoma with gastric metastases

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Katherine; Serafi, Sam W.; Bhatia, Abhijit S.; Ibarra, Irene; Allen, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman with a history of malignant melanoma who presented with dyspnea and fatigue was found to have metastases to the stomach detected on endoscopy. Primary cutaneous malignant melanoma with gastric metastases is a rare occurrence, and it is often not detected until autopsy because of its non-specific manifestations. PMID:27609722

  10. Histological and Pathological Assessment of miR-204 and SOX4 Levels in Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiao; Wang, Shuanhu; Liu, Mulin; Lu, Zhen; Zhan, Yanqing

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers and the efficient therapeutic methods are limited. Further study of the exact molecular mechanism of gastric cancer to develop novel targeted therapies is necessary and urgent. We herein systematically examined that miR-204 suppressed both proliferation and metastasis of gastric cancer AGS cells. miR-204 directly targeted SOX4. In clinical tissue research, we determined that miR-204 was expressed much lower and SOX4 expressed much higher in gastric cancer tissues compared with normal gastric tissues. Associated analysis with clinicopathological parameters in gastric cancer patients showed miR-204 was associated with no lymph node metastasis and early tumor stages whereas SOX4 was associated with lymph node metastasis and advanced tumor stages. In addition, miR-204 and SOX4 were negatively correlated in tissues from gastric cancer patients. Our findings examined the important role of miR-204 and SOX4 played in gastric cancer, and they could be used as candidate therapeutic targets for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:28133610

  11. Histological and Pathological Assessment of miR-204 and SOX4 Levels in Gastric Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao; Wang, Shuanhu; Liu, Mulin; Lu, Zhen; Zhan, Yanqing; Wang, Wenbin; Xu, A-Man

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers and the efficient therapeutic methods are limited. Further study of the exact molecular mechanism of gastric cancer to develop novel targeted therapies is necessary and urgent. We herein systematically examined that miR-204 suppressed both proliferation and metastasis of gastric cancer AGS cells. miR-204 directly targeted SOX4. In clinical tissue research, we determined that miR-204 was expressed much lower and SOX4 expressed much higher in gastric cancer tissues compared with normal gastric tissues. Associated analysis with clinicopathological parameters in gastric cancer patients showed miR-204 was associated with no lymph node metastasis and early tumor stages whereas SOX4 was associated with lymph node metastasis and advanced tumor stages. In addition, miR-204 and SOX4 were negatively correlated in tissues from gastric cancer patients. Our findings examined the important role of miR-204 and SOX4 played in gastric cancer, and they could be used as candidate therapeutic targets for gastric cancer therapy.

  12. Lymph node dissection for Siewert II esophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiao-Feng; Yue, Jie; Tang, Peng; Shang, Xiao-Bin; Jiang, Hong-Jing; Yu, Zhen-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The present study was aimed to investigate the application of right thansthoracic Ivor–Lewis (IL), left transthoracic (LTT), and left thoracoabdominal (LTA) approach in Siewert type II adenocarcinoma of esophagogastric junction (AEG). The data of 196 patients with Siewert type II AEG received surgical resection in our cancer center between January 2014 and April 2016 was retrospectively analyzed. Finally, 136 patients met the inclusion criteria were enrolled in the study and divided into the IL (47 cases), LTT (51 cases), and LTA group (38 cases). Clinical and short-term treatment effects were compared among the 3 groups. The patients with weight loss, diabetes, and heart disease increased in the LTT group (P = 0.054, P = 0.075, and P = 0.063, respectively). Operation time was significantly longest in the IL group (P < 0.001), but the amount of bleeding and tumor size did not significantly differ among the 3 groups (P = 0.176 and P = 0.228, respectively). The IL group had the significantly longest proximal surgical margin (P < 0.001) and most number of total (P < 0.001) and thoracic lymph nodes (P < 0.001) dissected. Both the IL and LTA groups had more abdominal lymph nodes dissected than the LTT group (P < 0.001). In general, the IL and LTT groups had the highest dissection rates of every station of thoracic (P < 0.05) and lower mediastinal lymph nodes (P < 0.05), respectively. The dissection rate of the paracardial, left gastric artery, and gastric lesser curvature lymph nodes did not differ significantly among the 3 groups (P > 0.05), but the dissection rate of the hepatic artery, splenic artery, and celiac trunk lymph nodes was significantly highest in the IL group (P < 0.05). Postoperative hospital stay, perioperative complications, and mortality did not differ significantly among the 3 groups (P > 0.05). Compared with the traditional left transthoracic approach, the Ivor–Lewis approach

  13. Suppression of CSN5 promotes the apoptosis of gastric cancer cells through regulating p53-related apoptotic pathways.

    PubMed

    Sang, Miao-Miao; Du, Wen-Qi; Zhang, Rui-Yan; Zheng, Jun-Nian; Pei, Dong-Sheng

    2015-08-01

    As one of the COP9 signalosome complex, CSN5 (also known as Jab1) has been confirmed overexpression in many human cancers and affected multiple pathways associating with cell proliferation and apoptosis. Correlation of CSN5 overexpression with poor prognosis for cancer provides evidence that it is involved in the tumorigenesis. However, little is known about the functional role and the underlying mechanism of CSN5 in gastric cancer progression. In the current study, the effect of CSN5 siRNA (small-interfering RNA) on the proliferation and apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells (AGS and MKN45) were examined. Our results showed that knockdown of CSN5 could inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. Additionally, suppression of CSN5 expression contributed to the increased expression levels of p53 and Bax. In conclusion, CSN5 overexpression is significantly correlated with gastric cancer progression, and CSN5 could be a novel target in gastric cancer therapy.

  14. Cytotoxic activities of naturally occurring oleanane-, ursane-, and lupane-type triterpenes on HepG2 and AGS cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Heejung; Kim, Hyun Woo; Kim, Young Choong; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Background: It is well known that the naturally occurring modified triterpenes in plants have a wide diversity of chemical structures and biological functions. The lupane-, oleanane-, and ursane-type triterpenes are the three major members of natural triterpenes with a wide range of biological properties. A systematic approach is necessary to review their structures and biological activities according to the backbones and the different substituents. Objective: Thirty lupane-(L1-7), oleanane-(O1-14), and ursane-type (U1-9) triterpenes with structural diversity were examined to evaluate their cytotoxic activities against two cancer cell lines, human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) and AGS cells. Materials and Methods: They were isolated from Hedera helix, Juglans sinensis, and Pulsatilla koreana using a series of column chromatography methods and were treated to evaluate their cytotoxic activities against HepG2 and AGS human gastric adenocarcinoma cell. Further, two triterpenes showing the most potent activities were subjected to the apoptotic screening assay using flow cytometry. Results: The polar groups, such as an oxo group at C-1, a free hydroxyl at C-2, C-3, or C-23, and a carboxylic moiety at C-28, as well as the type of backbone, explicitly increased the cytotoxic activity on two cancer cells. O5 and U5 showed significantly the potent cytotoxic activity in comparison to other glycosidic triterpenes. In annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) staining assay, the percentage of late apoptosis (annexin-V+/PI+) 12 and 24 h after treatment with O5 and U5 at 25 μM increased from 14.5% to 93.1% and from 46.4% to 49.1%, respectively, in AGS cells. The cytotoxicity induced by O5 showed a significant difference compared to U5 for 12 and 24 h. Conclusion: In the study, we can suggest the potent moieties which influence their cytotoxic activities against two cancer cells. The polar groups at C-1, C-2, C-3, C-23, and C-28 and the linkage of sugar moieties influenced the

  15. MicroRNA expression profiles associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and ampullary adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Nicolai A; Werner, Jens; Willenbrock, Hanni; Roslind, Anne; Giese, Nathalia; Horn, Thomas; Wøjdemann, Morten; Johansen, Julia S

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNAs have potential as diagnostic cancer biomarkers. The aim of this study was (1) to define microRNA expression patterns in formalin-fixed parafin-embedded tissue from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, ampullary adenocarcinoma, normal pancreas and chronic pancreatitis without using micro-dissection and (2) to discover new diagnostic microRNAs and combinations of microRNAs in cancer tissue. The expression of 664 microRNAs in tissue from 170 pancreatic adenocarcinomas and 107 ampullary adenocarcinomas were analyzed using a commercial microRNA assay. Results were compared with chronic pancreatitis, normal pancreas and duodenal adenocarcinoma. In all, 43 microRNAs had higher and 41 microRNAs reduced expression in pancreatic cancer compared with normal pancreas. In all, 32 microRNAs were differently expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared with chronic pancreatitis (17 higher; 15 reduced). Several of these microRNAs have not before been related to diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (eg, miR-492, miR-614, miR-622). MiR-614, miR-492, miR-622, miR-135b and miR-196 were most differently expressed. MicroRNA profiles of pancreatic and ampullary adenocarcinomas were correlated (0.990). MicroRNA expression profiles for pancreatic cancer described in the literature were consistent with our findings, and the microRNA profile for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (miR-196b-miR-217) was validated. We identified a more significant expression profile, the difference between miR-411 and miR-198 (P=2.06 × 10(-54)) and a diagnostic LASSO classifier using 19 microRNAs (sensitivity 98.5%; positive predictive value 97.8%; accuracy 97.0%). We also identified microRNA profiles to subclassify ampullary adenocarcinomas into pancreatobiliary or intestinal type. In conclusion, we found that combinations of two microRNAs could roughly separate neoplastic from non-neoplastic samples. A diagnostic 19 microRNA classifier was constructed which without micro-dissection could discriminate pancreatic

  16. Chk1 inhibition potentiates the therapeutic efficacy of PARP inhibitor BMN673 in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuping; Shen, Qian; Zhang, Peng; Tao, Ruikang; Chang, Weilong; Li, Ruidong; Xie, Gengchen; Liu, Weizhen; Zhang, Lihong; Kapoor, Prabodh; Song, Shumei; Ajani, Jaffer; Mills, Gordon B; Chen, Jianying; Tao, Kaixiong; Peng, Guang

    2017-01-01

    Globally, gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths because of the lack of effective treatments for patients with advanced tumors when curative surgery is not possible. Thus, there is an urgent need to identify molecular targets in gastric cancer that can be used for developing novel therapies and prolonging patient survival. Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is a crucial regulator of cell cycle transition in DNA damage response (DDR). In our study, we report that Chk1 plays an important role in promoting gastric cancer cell survival and growth, which serves as an effective therapeutic target in gastric cancer. First, Chk1 ablation by small interfering RNA could significantly inhibit cell proliferation and sensitize the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) treatment in both p53 wild type gastric cancer cell line AGS, and p53 mutant cell line MKN1. Secondly, we tested the anticancer effects of Chk1 chemical inhibitor LY2606368, which is a novel Chk1/2 targeted drug undergoing clinical trials in many malignant diseases. We found that LY2606368 can induce DNA damage, and remarkably suppress cancer proliferation and induce apoptosis in AGS and MKN1 cells. Moreover, we identified that LY2606368 can significantly inhibit homologous recombination (HR) mediated DNA repair and thus showed marked synergistic anticancer effect in combination with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitor BMN673 in both in vitro studies and in vivo experiments using a gastric cancer PDx model. The synergy between LY2606368 and PARP1 was likely caused by impaired the G2M checkpoint due to LY2606368 treatment, which forced mitotic entry and cell death in the presence of BMN673. In conclusion, we propose that Chk1 is a valued target for gastric cancer treatment, especially Chk1 inhibitor combined with PARP inhibitor may be a more effective therapeutic strategy in gastric cancer.

  17. ECL-cell carcinoids and carcinoma in patients homozygous for an inactivating mutation in the gastric H(+) K(+) ATPase alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Fossmark, Reidar; Calvete, Oriol; Mjønes, Patricia; Benitez, Javier; Waldum, Helge L

    2016-07-01

    A family with a missense variant of the ATP4A gene encoding the alpha subunit of the gastric proton pump (H(+) K(+) ATPase) has recently been described. Homozygous siblings were hypergastrinemic (median gastrin 486 pM) and had gastric tumours diagnosed at a median age of 33 years. In the current histopathological study, we further characterized the tumours found in the gastric corpus. The tumours had the histological appearance of carcinoids (NET G1 or G2) and were immunoreactive for the general neuroendocrine markers chromogranin A (CgA) and synaptophysin as well as the ECL-cell markers vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and histidine decarbozylase (HDC). One of the tumours consisted of a NET G2 component, but also had a component with glandular growth, which morphologically was classified as an intestinal type adenocarcinoma. Many glands of the adenocarcinoma contained a large proportion of cells positive for neuroendocrine markers, especially the small vesicle marker synaptophysin and the cytoplasmic enzyme HDC. In conclusion, patients homozygous for an inactivating ATP4A mutation develop gastric ECL-cell carcinoids in their 3rd or 4th decade. The adenocarcinoma may be classified as neuroendocrine with ECL-cell differentiation.

  18. Gastric cancer and family history

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Identifying individuals at high risk is important for surveillance and prevention of gastric cancer. Having first-degree relatives diagnosed with gastric cancer is a strong and consistent risk factor for gastric cancer, but the pathogenic mechanisms behind this familial aggregation are unclear. Against this background, we reviewed the risk factors for gastric cancer in those with a first-degree relative with gastric cancer, and the possible causes for familial clustering of gastric cancer including bacterial factors, inherited genetic susceptibility, environmental factors or a combination thereof. Among individuals with a family history, current or past Helicobacter pylori infection, having two or more first-degree affected relatives or female gender was associated with an increased risk of developing gastric cancer. To date, no specific single nucleotide polymorphism has been shown to be associated with familial clustering of gastric cancer. H. pylori eradication is the most important strategy for preventing gastric cancer in first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients, particularly those in their 20s and 30s. Early H. pylori eradication could prevent the progression to intestinal metaplasia and reduce the synergistic effect on gastric carcinogenesis in individuals with both H. pylori infection and a family history. Endoscopic surveillance is also expected to benefit individuals with a family history. Further large-scale, prospective studies are warranted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and optimal time point for endoscopy in this population. Moreover, genome-wide association studies that incorporate environmental and dietary factors on a ‘big data’ basis will increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. PMID:27809451

  19. Inhibition of sphingosine-1-phosphate phosphatase 1 promotes cancer cells migration in gastric cancer: Clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang Y; Li, Lin; Wang, Xiao H; Wen, Xian Z; Ji, Ke; Ye, Lin; Cai, Jun; Jiang, Wen G; Ji, Jia F

    2015-10-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays an important role in regulating many biological processes. Sphingosine-1-phosphate phosphatase 1 (SGPP1) can dephosphorylate S1P into sphingosine and tip the balance of sphingosine-S1P. Increased levels of sphingosine leads to a decrease in the ability of cell invasion as well as an increase in the ability of cell apoptosis. However, little is known regarding the effects of SGPP1 in gastric cancer. The present study examined the function of SGPP1 on gastric cancer cell lines as well as its clinical relevance in gastric cancer progression. Using immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR techniques, the clinical significance of SGPP1 expression was analyzed in 288 paraffin-embedded gastric tissue specimens and 219 fresh gastric tissues, respectively. Transgenes encoding ribozymes to specifically target human SGPP1 (pEF-SGPP1) was constructed. Human gastric cancer cell lines (AGS and HGC27) were transfected with pEF-SGPP1 transgene and examined by functional analysis. SGPP1 was downregulated in gastric cancer tissues, compared with adjacent normal gastric tissues (p=0.034). SGPP1 mRNA levels in gastric cancer tissues were significantly decreased when compared with their adjacent non-cancerous tissues (p<0.001). Weakly expressed SGPP1 was positively correlated with the lymph node metastasis (p=0.005) and distant metastasis (p=0.031). Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that patients with SGPP1 positive expression had a significant increase in overall survival (OS) (p=0.034) and progression-free survival (PFS) (p=0.041). Multivariate analysis indicated the expression of SGPP1 was an independent prognostic factor in gastric cancer patients (p=0.041). In vitro experiments showed that knockdown of SGPP1 resulted in an increase in the invasion (2-fold) and migration (5-fold) of AGS and HGC27. The two gastric cancer cells transfected with pEF-SGPP1 exhibited a slower rate of growth with less adhesion. Thus, our findings provided evidence that

  20. Accumulation of hypericin in human gastric tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.; Rusina, Tatyana V.; Denisov, Nikolay A.; Braun, Evgeniy M.; Kikot, Vladimir O.; Chernyj, Vyacheslav A.

    1996-04-01

    Hypericin has been studied as a novel natural photosensitizer for PDT. It has been extracted from plants (St.-John's-wort). Oral administration (10% alcohol solution in a dose 2 mg/kg b.w.) was applied for 15 patients with gastric cancers 18 - 48 h before surgery. Normal and cancerous tissue samples were resected and underwent fluorescence analysis 1 - 2 h after resection. Tissue fluorescence was excited by He-Cd (20 mW, 442 nm) and Ar laser beams (100 mW, 488 nm) and registered from 510 to 725 nm. In tissue hypericin has maximum fluorescence peak at 603 nm for both excitation wavelengths. Fluorescence intensity ratio I603/I503 chosen as a criterion for tissue classification was varied from 1.6 to 3.2 (mean 2.5) for adenocarcinoma under He-Cd excitation whereas Ar laser excitation gave from 2.5 up to 4.2 (mean 3.5). Normal tissue had this ratio from 0.48 to 0.65 (mean 0.55) and from 0.53 to 0.75 (mean 3.5) for He-Cd and Ar laser excitation, respectively. No side effects were observed in patients during 6 month follow-up.

  1. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer using endoscopy with Fuji Intelligent Color Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shi-Jie; Shen, Lei; Luo, He-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Demarcation of early gastric cancers is sometimes unclear. Indigo carmine chromoendoscopy has usually been used as a diagnostic method for tumor margins as it enhances mucosal irregularities and differences in color. Fuji Intelligent Color Enhancement (FICE), a recently developed virtual chromoendoscopic system, can explore the entire mucosal surface (of structures and vessels). Here we report a case of a patient with early gastric cancer who underwent a successful endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) using endoscopy with FICE. A 58-year-old man with early gastric cancer underwent an ESD. Demarcation of the lesion was not clear through normal endoscopy. Therefore, an endoscopy was performed with FICE, which clearly revealed the demarcation. An ESD was carried out after spots were marked circumferentially. We identified the positional relationship between the demarcation and all markings on the magnifying model. A resection of the lesion was performed on the area outside the markings. Finally, the lesion was Histopathologically diagnosed as a well-differentiated adeno-carcinoma confined in the mucosal region, and the margins were free from carcinoma. FICE, especially combined with the magnifying model, is useful in the identification of the demarcation of early gastric cancer. This method may be useful in increasing the rate of complete resection by ESD for early gastric cancer.

  2. A case report of gastric cancer with brain metastasis: Rare peripheral nervous system symptoms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ge-Liang; Luo, Tian-Hang; Zhang, Hui-Qing; Ling, Chang-Quan; Li, Bai

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer with brain metastasis is rare. The present study reports a case of gastric cancer with isolated brain metastasis 1 year after gastrectomy. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no prior reports of solitary brain metastasis from gastric cancer with peripheral nervous system symptoms. A distal gastrectomy was performed on a 60-year-old male patient with gastric cancer in November 2012. Postoperative pathological analysis revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma with tumor invasion into the serosa and metastasis to one dissected lymph node. No abnormalities were found at follow-up examination. However, a tumor representing metastasis to the brain was recognized by a cranial enhanced magnetic resonance imaging examination 1 year after gastrectomy, which was performed when the patient exhibited numbness and thigmesthesia. The patient was administered 30 Gy of stereotactic radiotherapy, delivered in 5 fractions. The patient succumbed to disease 10 months subsequent to undergoing radiotherapy. This case report suggests that gastric cancer may re-present as brain metastasis with peripheral nervous system symptoms.

  3. Identification of CEACAM5 as a Biomarker for Prewarning and Prognosis in Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinfeng; Fan, Xing; Chen, Ning; Zhou, Fenli; Dong, Jiaqiang; Nie, Yongzhan; Fan, Daiming

    2015-12-01

    MGd1, a monoclonal antibody raised against gastric cancer cells, possesses a high degree of specificity for gastric cancer (GC). Here we identified that the antigen of MGd1 is CEACAM5, and used MGd1 to investigate the expression of CEACAM5 in non-GC and GC tissues (N=643), as a biomarker for prewarning and prognosis. The expression of CEACAM5 was detected by immunohistochemistry in numerous tissues; its clinicopathological correlation was statistically analyzed. CEACAM5 expression was increased progressively from normal gastric mucosa to chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and finally to GC (p<0.05). In gastric precancerous lesions (intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia), CEACAM5-positive patients had a higher risk of developing GC as compared with CEACAM5-negative patients (OR = 12.68, p<0.001). Besides, CEACAM5 was found positively correlated with invasion depth of gastric adenocarcinoma (p<0.001). In survival analysis, CEACAM5 was demonstrated to be an independent prognostic predictor for patients with GC of clinical stage IIIA/IV (p=0.033). Our results demonstrate that CEACAM5 is a promising biomarker for GC prewarning and prognostic evaluation.

  4. Indocyanine green fluorescence and three-dimensional imaging of right gastroepiploic artery in gastric tube cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toru; Sakurai, Tadashi; Maruyama, Shota; Ozawa, Yohei; Kamei, Takashi; Miyata, Go; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2015-01-07

    A 79-year-old male was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of cancer of the gastric tube. Gastrointestinal examination revealed a T1b Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) tumor at the pyloric region of the gastric tube. Laparotomy did not reveal infiltration into the serosa, peritoneal dissemination, regional lymph node swelling, or distant metastasis. We performed a distal gastrectomy preserving the right gastroepiploic artery by referencing the preoperative three-dimensional computed tomoangiography. We also evaluated the blood flow of the right gastroepiploic artery and in the proximal gastric tube by using indocyanine green fluorescence imaging intra-operatively and then followed with a gastrojejunal anastomosis with Roux-en-Y reconstruction. The definitive diagnosis was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the gastric tube, pT1bN0M0, pStage IA (UICC). His postoperative course was uneventful. Three-dimensional computed tomographic imaging is effective for assessing the course of blood vessels and the relationship with the surrounding structures. Intraoperative evaluation of blood flow of the right gastroepiploic artery and of the gastric tube in the anastomotic portion is very valuable information and could contribute to a safe gastrointestinal reconstruction.

  5. Rab14 Act as Oncogene and Induce Proliferation of Gastric Cancer Cells via AKT Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhenghao; Li, Qian; Zhou, Kaiyue; Zhao, Lingyu; Wang, Lumin; Yang, Juan; Huang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Rab14 is a member of RAS oncogene family, and its dysfunction has been reported to be involved in various types of human cancer. However, its expression and function were still unclear in gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the function and mechanism of Rab14 in gastric cancer cell lines. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed in 17 gastric adenocarcinoma tissues and 4 cell lines to detect the expression of Rab14. 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT), colony formation and flow cytometry assays were employed to determine the proliferative ability, cell cycle transition and apoptosis in vitro in BGC-823 or SGC-7901 cells. Western blot was performed to investigate the pathways and mechanism of Rab14 regulation. In this study, we show that Rab14 presents a significant up-regulated expression among the paired tissue samples and cell lines in gastric cancer. When we overexpressed Rab14 in SGC-7901 cells or silenced Rab14 in BGC-823 cells, we found that Rab14 could modify cell growth, cell cycle or apoptosis, which accompanied with an obvious regulation of CCND1, CDK2 and BAX involving in AKT signaling pathway. In conclusion, this study provides a new evidence on that Rab14 functions as a novel tumor oncogene and could be a potential therapeutic target in gastric cancer. PMID:28107526

  6. Effect of Native Gastric Mucus on in vivo Hybridization Therapies Directed at Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Rita S; Dakwar, George R; Xiong, Ranhua; Forier, Katrien; Remaut, Katrien; Stremersch, Stephan; Guimarães, Nuno; Fontenete, Sílvia; Wengel, Jesper; Leite, Marina; Figueiredo, Céu; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Braeckmans, Kevin; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects more than 50% of the worldwide population. It is mostly found deep in the gastric mucus lining of the stomach, being a major cause of peptic ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma. To face the increasing resistance of H. pylori to antibiotics, antimicrobial nucleic acid mimics are a promising alternative. In particular, locked nucleic acids (LNA)/2'-OMethyl RNA (2'OMe) have shown to specifically target H. pylori, as evidenced by in situ hybridization. The success of in vivo hybridization depends on the ability of these nucleic acids to penetrate the major physical barriers—the highly viscoelastic gastric mucus and the bacterial cell envelope. We found that LNA/2'OMe is capable of diffusing rapidly through native, undiluted, gastric mucus isolated from porcine stomachs, without degradation. Moreover, although LNA/2'OMe hybridization was still successful without permeabilization and fixation of the bacteria, which is normally part of in vitro studies, the ability of LNA/2'OMe to efficiently hybridize with H. pylori was hampered by the presence of mucus. Future research should focus on developing nanocarriers that shield LNA/2'OMe from components in the gastric mucus, while remaining capable of diffusing through the mucus and delivering these nucleic acid mimics directly into the bacteria. PMID:26645765

  7. HER2 diagnostics in gastric cancer-guideline validation and development of standardized immunohistochemical testing.

    PubMed

    Rüschoff, Josef; Dietel, Manfred; Baretton, Gustavo; Arbogast, Susanne; Walch, Axel; Monges, Geneviéve; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Nagelmeier, Iris; Schlake, Werner; Höfler, H; Kreipe, H H

    2010-09-01

    Trastuzumab-based therapy has been shown to confer overall survival benefit in HER2-positive patients with advanced gastric cancer in a large multicentric trial (ToGA study). Subgroup analysis identified adenocarcinomas of the stomach and gastroesophageal (GE) junction with overexpression of HER2 according to immunohistochemistry (IHC) as potential responders. Due to recent approval of trastuzumab for HER2 positive metastatic gastric and GE-junction cancer in Europe (EMEA) HER2 diagnostics is now mandatory with IHC being the primary test followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in IHC2+ cases. However, in order to not miss patients potentially responding to targeted therapy determination of a HER2-positive status for gastric cancer required modification of scoring as had been proposed in a pre-ToGA study. To validate this new HER2 status testing procedure in terms of inter-laboratory and inter-observer consensus for IHC scoring a series of 547 gastric cancer tissue samples on a tissue microarray (TMA) was used. In the first step, 30 representative cores were used to identify specific IHC HER2 scoring issues among eight French and German laboratories, while in the second step the full set of 547 cores was used to determine IHC HER2 intensity and area score concordance between six German pathologists. Specific issues relating to discordance were identified and recommendations formulated which proved to be effective to reliably determine HER2 status in a prospective test series of 447 diagnostic gastric cancer specimens.

  8. Ultrasound findings of diffuse metastasis of gastric signet-ring-cell carcinoma to the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Morita, Koji; Sakamoto, Takahiko; Ota, Shuji; Masugi, Hideo; Chikuta, Ikumi; Mashimo, Yamato; Edo, Naoki; Tokairin, Takuo; Seki, Nobuhiko; Ishikawa, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that metastases to the thyroid from extrathyroidal malignancies occur as solitary or multiple nodules, or may involve the whole thyroid gland diffusely. However, diffuse metastasis of gastric cancer to the thyroid is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of a 74-year-old woman with diffuse infiltration of gastric adenocarcinoma (signet-ring-cell carcinoma/poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma) cells in the thyroid. The pathological diagnosis was made based on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with biopsy and fine-needle aspiration cytology of the thyroid. An 18F-FDG PET/CT revealed multiple lesions with increased uptake, including the bilateral thyroid gland. On thyroid ultrasound examination, diffuse enlargement with internal heterogeneity and hypoechoic reticular lines was observed. On color Doppler imaging, a blood-flow signal was not detected in these hypoechoic lines. These findings were similar to those of diffuse metastases caused by other primary cancers, such as lung cancer, as reported earlier. Therefore, the presence of hypoechoic reticular lines without blood-flow signals is probably common to diffuse thyroid metastasis from any origin and an important diagnostic finding. This is the first report to show detailed ultrasound findings of diffuse gastric cancer metastasis to the thyroid gland using color Doppler.

  9. Familial colorectal adenocarcinoma and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: a nationwide epidemiological study from Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, K; Li, X

    2001-01-01

    Although estimates are available of the proportion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) among all colorectal cancer (CRC), its proportion among familial CRC is unclear. We estimated these proportions epidemiologically from the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database on 9.6 million individuals. Colorectal adenocarcinomas were retrieved from the Cancer Registry covering years 1958–1996. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for offspring (aged less than 62 years) when their parent had colorectal adenocarcinoma. In 9.82% of all families, an offspring and a parent were affected, giving a population attributable proportion of 4.91% and a familial SIR of 2.00. When offspring and parents shared the anatomic site, the SIR was 2.32 for proximal and 2.00 for distal CRC. When offspring were diagnosed before age 40 years and parents before age 50 years, the SIR was 25.72 for familial proximal CRC. In older age groups familial risks did not differ between proximal and distal CRC. Familial risks were increased also for endometrial, small intestinal and gastric cancers, manifestations in HNPCC. Depending on which assumptions were made, HNPCC was calculated to account for 20 to 50% of familial CRC, corresponding to 1 or 2.5% of all CRC among 0–61-year-old individuals. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11286479

  10. Deletion of IQGAP1 promotes Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric dysplasia in mice and acquisition of cancer stem cell properties in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bessède, Emilie; Molina, Silvia; Amador, Luis Acuña; Dubus, Pierre; Staedel, Cathy; Chambonnier, Lucie; Buissonnière, Alice; Sifré, Elodie; Giese, Alban; Bénéjat, Lucie; Rousseau, Benoît; Costet, Pierre; Sacks, David B.; Mégraud, Francis; Varon, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is responsible for gastric carcinogenesis but host factors are also implicated. IQGAP1, a scaffolding protein of the adherens junctions interacting with E-cadherin, regulates cellular plasticity and proliferation. In mice, IQGAP1 deficiency leads to gastric hyperplasia. The aim of this study was to elucidate the consequences of IQGAP1 deletion on H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis. Transgenic mice deleted for iqgap1 and WT littermates were infected with Helicobacter sp., and histopathological analyses of the gastric mucosa were performed. IQGAP1 and E-cadherin expression was evaluated in gastric tissues and in gastric epithelial cell lines in response to H. pylori infection. The consequences of IQGAP1 deletion on gastric epithelial cell behaviour and on the acquisition of cancer stem cell (CSC)-like properties were evaluated. After one year of infection, iqgap1+/- mice developed more preneoplastic lesions and up to 8 times more gastro-intestinal neoplasia (GIN) than WT littermates. H. pylori infection induced IQGAP1 and E-cadherin delocalization from cell-cell junctions. In vitro, knock-down of IQGAP1 favoured the acquisition of a mesenchymal phenotype and CSC-like properties induced by H. pylori infection. Our results indicate that alterations in IQGAP1 signalling promote the emergence of CSCs and gastric adenocarcinoma development in the context of an H. pylori infection. PMID:27729612

  11. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Vismodegib in Treating Patients With Advanced Stomach Cancer or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-16

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  12. Molecular biology of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, A; Rodríguez Braun, E; Pérez Fidalgo, A; Chirivella González, I

    2007-04-01

    Despite its decreasing incidence overall, gastric cancer is still a challenging disease. Therapy is based mainly upon surgical resection when the tumour remains localised in the stomach. Conventional chemotherapy may play a role in treating micrometastatic disease and is effective as palliative therapy for recurrent or advanced disease. However, the knowledge of molecular pathways implicated in gastric cancer pathogenesis is still in its infancy and the contribution of molecular biology to the development of new targeted therapies in gastric cancer is far behind other more common cancers such as breast, colon or lung. This review will focus first on the difference of two well defined types of gastric cancer: intestinal and diffuse. A discussion of the cell of origin of gastric cancer with some intriguing data implicating bone marrow derived cells will follow, and a comprehensive review of different genetic alterations detected in gastric cancer, underlining those that may have clinical, therapeutic or prognostic implications.

  13. Clinical epidemiology of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Tiing Leong; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and the fourth most common cancer globally. There are, however, distinct differences in incidence rates in different geographic regions. While the incidence rate of gastric cancer has been falling, that of gastric cardia cancers is reportedly on the rise in some regions. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor of non-cardia gastric cancer, and data has emerged concerning the role of H. pylori eradication for primary prevention of gastric cancer. Dietary, lifestyle and metabolic factors have also been implicated. Although addressing these other factors may contribute to health, the actual impact in terms of cancer prevention is unclear. Once irreversible histological changes have occurred, endoscopic surveillance would be necessary. A molecular classification system offers hope for molecularly tailored, personalised therapies for gastric cancer, which may improve the prognosis for patients. PMID:25630323

  14. Current State of Gastric Stump Carcinoma in Japan: Based on the Results of a Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Eiji; Lee, Sang-Woong; Kaminishi, Michio; Sugiyama, Mitsugu; Aikou, Takashi; Kitajima, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Background Carcinoma of the gastric remnant after partial gastrectomy for benign disease or cancer is unusual but an important cancer model. The Japanese Society for the Study of Postoperative Morbidity after Gastrectomy (JSSPMG) performed a nationwide questionnaire survey to understand the current state of gastric stump carcinoma in Japan. Methods In the questionnaire survey of November 2008, gastric stump carcinoma was defined as an adenocarcinoma of the stomach occurring 10 years or more after Billroth I or Billroth II gastrectomy for benign condition or cancer disease. The survey was conducted at the request of reports on five or more patients with gastric stump carcinoma for each institution. Items for the survey included gender, age, methods of reconstruction in an original gastrectomy, original diseases, time interval between original gastrectomy and first detection of stump carcinomas, locations of stump carcinomas, tumor histology, tumor depth, and extent of lymph node metastasis. The questionnaire was sent to 163 surgical institutions in the JSSPMG. Results Ninety-five institutions (58.3%) responded to the survey, and the data of 887 patients satisfied the required conditions for the survey. A total of 887 patients were composed of 368 patients who received Billroth I distal gastrectomy and 519 who received Billroth II. The Billroth II group has a significantly higher number of original benign lesions than the Billroth I group (P < 0.001). This study confirmed the following issues: (1) The remnant stomach after gastrectomy for cancer disease had a higher prevalence to develop stump carcinomas occurring in a shorter time interval since original gastrectomy; (2) Patients with Billroth II gastrectomy had stump carcinomas most frequently in the anastomotic area, but not in the non-stump area as in Billroth I gastrectomy; (3) Tumor histology of 72.4% of 304 stump carcinomas at an early stage was intestinal type adenocarcinoma, i.e., well or moderately

  15. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, Version 2.2012

    PubMed Central

    Tempero, Margaret A.; Arnoletti, J. Pablo; Behrman, Stephen W.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Benson, Al B.; Casper, Ephraim S.; Cohen, Steven J.; Czito, Brian; Ellenhorn, Joshua D. I.; Hawkins, William G.; Herman, Joseph; Hoffman, John P.; Ko, Andrew; Komanduri, Srinadh; Koong, Albert; Ma, Wen Wee; Malafa, Mokenge P.; Merchant, Nipun B.; Mulvihill, Sean J.; Muscarella, Peter; Nakakura, Eric K.; Obando, Jorge; Pitman, Martha B.; Sasson, Aaron R.; Tally, Anitra; Thayer, Sarah P.; Whiting, Samuel; Wolff, Robert A.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A.; Shead, Dorothy A.

    2013-01-01

    The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma discuss the workup and management of tumors of the exocrine pancreas. These NCCN Guidelines Insights provide a summary and explanation of major changes to the 2012 NCCN Guidelines for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma. The panel made 3 significant updates to the guidelines: 1) more detail was added regarding multiphase CT techniques for diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer, and pancreas protocol MRI was added as an emerging alternative to CT; 2) the use of a fluoropyrimidine plus oxaliplatin (e.g., 5-FU/leucovorin/oxaliplatin or capecitabine/oxaliplatin) was added as an acceptable chemotherapy combination for patients with advanced or metastatic disease and good performance status as a category 2B recommendation; and 3) the panel developed new recommendations concerning surgical technique and pathologic analysis and reporting. PMID:22679115

  16. The bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5) is expressed in human gastric cancers and promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition in gastric cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Sabrina; Marchianò, Silvia; Marino, Elisabetta; Zampella, Angela; Rende, Mario; Mosci, Paolo; Distrutti, Eleonora; Donini, Annibale; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    GPBAR1 (also known as TGR5) is a bile acid activated receptor expressed in several adenocarcinomas and its activation by secondary bile acids increases intestinal cell proliferation. Here, we have examined the expression of GPBAR1 in human gastric adenocarcinomas and investigated whether its activation promotes the acquisition of a pro-metastatic phenotype. By immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR analysis we found that expression of GPBAR1 associates with advanced gastric cancers (Stage III-IV). GPBAR1 expression in tumors correlates with the expression of N-cadherin, a markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) (r=0.52; P<0.01). Expression of GPBAR1, mRNA and protein, was detected in cancer cell lines, with MKN 45 having the higher expression. Exposure of MKN45 cells to GPBAR1 ligands, TLCA, oleanolic acid or 6-ECDCA (a dual FXR and GPBAR1 ligand) increased the expression of genes associated with EMT including KDKN2A, HRAS, IGB3, MMP10 and MMP13 and downregulated the expression of CD44 and FAT1 (P<0.01 versus control cells). GPBAR1 activation in MKN45 cells associated with EGF-R and ERK1 phosphorylation. These effects were inhibited by DFN406, a GPBAR1 antagonist, and cetuximab. GPBAR1 ligands increase MKN45 migration, adhesion to peritoneum and wound healing. Pretreating MKN45 cells with TLCA increased propensity toward peritoneal dissemination in vivo. These effects were abrogated by cetuximab. In summary, we report that GPBAR1 is expressed in advanced gastric cancers and its expression correlates with markers of EMT. GPBAR1 activation in MKN45 cells promotes EMT. These data suggest that GPBAR1 antagonist might have utility in the treatment of gastric cancers. PMID:27409173

  17. Synchronous gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and other primary neoplasms of gastrointestinal tract: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ramneet; Bhalla, Sunita; Nundy, Samiran; Jain, Sunila

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract with a malignant potential. However, uncommonly they can be associated with synchronous tumors of different histogenesis. We herein report two cases of gastric GIST with synchronous tumors. The first case is of a 50-year-old male patient who was suspected with GIST of stomach and was incidentally found to have an associated duodenal neuroendo-crine neoplasm. The second case is of a 62-year-old male who, while undergoing surgery for a primary colon adenocarcinoma, was incidentally detected to have a coexistent gastric GIST initially suspected to be a metastatic nodule. Coexistence of gastric GIST with neuroendocrine tumor is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge this is the second case of gastric GIST coexisting with duodenal neuroendocrine tumor to be reported in the literature. Similarly, association of GIST with adenocarcinoma is uncommon. We herein analyze the pathological findings of two such cases, and we review the malignant potential of these synchronous tumors.

  18. A gastric acid secretion model.

    PubMed Central

    de Beus, A M; Fabry, T L; Lacker, H M

    1993-01-01

    A theory of gastric acid production and self-protection is formulated mathematically and examined for clinical and experimental correlations, implications, and predictions using analytic and numerical techniques. In our model, gastric acid secretion in the stomach, as represented by an archetypal gastron, consists of two chambers, circulatory and luminal, connected by two different regions of ion exchange. The capillary circulation of the gastric mucosa is arranged in arterial-venous arcades which pass from the gastric glands up to the surface epithelial lining of the lumen; therefore the upstream region of the capillary chamber communicates with oxyntic cells, while the downstream region communicates with epithelial cells. Both cell types abut the gastric lumen. Ion currents across the upstream region are calculated from a steady-state oxyntic cell model with active ion transport, while the downstream ion fluxes are (facilitated) diffusion driven or secondarily active. Water transport is considered iso-osmotic. The steady-state model is solved in closed form for low gastric lumen pH. A wide variety of previously performed static and dynamic experiments on ion and CO2 transport in the gastric lumen and gastric blood supply are for the first time correlated with each other for an (at least) semiquantitative test of current concepts of gastric acid secretion and for the purpose of model verification. Agreement with the data is reported with a few outstanding and instructive exceptions. Model predictions and implications are also discussed. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8396457

  19. Rett syndrome and gastric perforation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Malay B; Bittner, James G; Edwards, Michael A

    2008-04-01

    Rett Syndrome is associated with decreased peristaltic esophageal waves and gastric dysmotility, resulting in swallowing difficulties and gastric dilation. Rarely, gastric necrosis and perforation occur. Our case represents the third reported case of gastric necrosis and perforation associated with Rett Syndrome. A 31-year-old female after 11 hours of intermittent emesis and constant, sharp abdominal pain presented with evidence of multiorgan system failure including hypovolemic shock, metabolic acidosis, coagulopathy, and hepatorenal failure. A chest radiograph revealed intra-abdominal free air necessitating emergent laparotomy. During exploration, a severely dilated, thin-walled stomach with an area of necrosis and gross perforation was noted. Wedge resection of the necrotic tissue and primary closure were performed. Despite aggressive perioperative resuscitation and ventilation support, the patient died 3 hours postoperatively secondary to refractory shock and hypoxemia. Severe gastric dilation can occur with Rett Syndrome and may cause gastric necrosis and perforation. Prolonged elevated gastric pressures can decrease perfusion and may contribute to perforation. Timely decompression via percutaneous endoscopic or surgical gastrostomy could decrease the risk of perforation particularly when significant gastric distention is present. Consideration of gastric necrosis and perforation in patients with Rett Syndrome may lead to earlier intervention and decreased mortality.

  20. CT and ultrasound of gastric and duodenal duplications

    SciTech Connect

    Guibaud, L.; Genin, G.; Fouque, P.

    1996-05-01

    We present the radiological findings of gastric and duodenal duplications in four adults, in whom abdominal ultrasound, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and CT were primarily used for diagnosis. The diagnosis was surgically confirmed in all cases. Preoperative diagnosis of duplications was possible with ultrasound in three patients, in whom CT showed a nonspecific cystic structure. Ultrasound demonstrated a pathognomonic multilayered wall appearance suggestive of a digestive origin, including an echogenic inner mucosal layer and a hypoechoic muscular layer, better appreciated using EUS in one patient. In one case, digestive origin was confirmed by direct visualization of a peristaltic activity within the cystic wall after water ingestion. In the last patient, a non-specific heterogeneous mainly solid mass of the esophagogastric junction was found to be an adenocarcinoma arising from a duplication on the histological analysis of the surgical specimen. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Increased Helicobacter pylori-associated Gastric Cancer Risk in the Andean Region of Colombia Is Mediated by Spermine Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Rupesh; de Sablet, Thibaut; Asim, Mohammad; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Barry, Daniel P.; Verriere, Thomas G.; Sierra, J. Carolina; Hardbower, Dana M.; Delgado, Alberto G.; Schneider, Barbara G.; Israel, Dawn A.; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Nagy, Toni A.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Bravo, Luis E.; Peek, Richard M.; Fox, James G.; Woster, Patrick M.; Casero, Robert A.; Correa, Pelayo; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes gastric cancer, the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. More than half of the world’s population is infected, making universal eradication impractical. Clinical trials suggest that antibiotic treatment only reduces gastric cancer risk in patients with non-atrophic gastritis (NAG), and is ineffective once preneoplastic lesions of multifocal atrophic gastritis (MAG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) have occurred. Therefore, additional strategies for risk stratification and chemoprevention of gastric cancer are needed. We have implicated polyamines, generated by the rate limiting enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), in gastric carcinogenesis. During H. pylori infection, the enzyme spermine oxidase (SMOX) is induced, which generates hydrogen peroxide from the catabolism of the polyamine spermine. Herein, we assessed the role of SMOX in the increased gastric cancer risk in Colombia associated with the Andean mountain region when compared to the low risk region on the Pacific coast. When co-cultured with gastric epithelial cells, clinical strains of H. pylori from the high risk region induced more SMOX expression and oxidative DNA damage, and less apoptosis than low risk strains. These findings were not attributable to differences in the CagA oncoprotein. Gastric tissues from subjects from the high risk region exhibited greater levels of SMOX and oxidative DNA damage by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, and this occurred in NAG, MAG, and IM. In Mongolian gerbils, a prototype colonizing strain from the high risk region induced more SMOX, DNA damage, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma than a colonizing strain from the low risk region. Treatment of gerbils with either α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an inhibitor of ODC, or MDL 72527, an inhibitor of SMOX, reduced gastric dysplasia and carcinoma, as well as apoptosis-resistant cells with DNA damage. These data indicate that aberrant activation of polyamine-driven oxidative

  2. ZnRF3 Induces Apoptosis of Gastric Cancer Cells by Antagonizing Wnt and Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hongzhen; Cai, Aizhen; Xi, Hongqing; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Lin

    2015-11-01

    A large proportion of malignant cancers of the stomach are gastric adenocarcinoma type. In spite of many studies, the molecular basis for this cancer is still unclear. Deregulated cell proliferative signaling via Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog pathways is considered important in the pathogenesis of many cancers including the gastric cancer. Recent studies identified ZnRF3 protein, which is a E3-ubiquitin ligase and which is either deleted or mutated in cancers, to inhibit Wnt signaling. However, the significance of ZnRF3 in the control of gastric cancer and whether it also regulates Hedgehog signaling pathway, is not known. In the present study, we assessed the expression of ZnRF3 in gastric tumors and paracancerous tissues from 58 patients (44 male and 14 female) of different ages and related this to patient survival. We observed a clear relationship between ZnRF3 expression in paracancerous tissue and tumor size. Also, ZnRF3 expression was much higher in tumors from aged patients. Male patients showed higher mortality than the females. Mechanistic studies using normal gastric cells (GES1) and gastric cancer cells (MGC-803) infected with either AdZnRF3 or AdGFP viral vectors, revealed that ZnRF3 overexpression causes significantly more apoptosis and lowered proliferation of cancer cells. ZnRF3 overexpression led to greatly reduced levels of Lgr5, a component of Wnt signaling and also Gli1, a component of Hedgehog signaling. Thus, ZnRF3 negatively influences both the Wnt and Hedgehog proliferative pathways, and probably this way it negatively regulates cancer progression. These results suggest the importance of normal ZnRF3 function in checking the progression of cancer cell growth and indicate that a lack of this protein can lead to poorer clinical outcomes for gastric cancer patients.

  3. Increased expression of argininosuccinate synthetase protein predicts poor prognosis in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yan-Shen; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Lai, Ming-Derg; Yen, Meng-Chi; Luo, Yi-Pey; Chen, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1, also known as ASS) has been found in cancer cells and is involved in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the level of ASS expression in human gastric cancer and to determine the possible correlations between ASS expression and clinicopathological findings. Immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin‑embedded tissues to determine whether ASS was expressed in 11 of 11 specimens from patients with gastric cancer. The protein was localized primarily to the cytoplasm of cancer cells and normal epithelium. In the Oncomine cancer microarray database, expression of the ASS gene was significantly increased in gastric cancer tissues. To investigate the clinicopathological and prognostic roles of ASS expression, we performed western blot analysis of 35 matched specimens of gastric adenocarcinomas and normal tissue obtained from patients treated at the National Cheng Kung University Hospital. The ratio of relative ASS expression (expressed as the ASS/β-actin ratio) in tumor tissues to that in normal tissues was correlated with large tumor size (P=0.007) and with the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system (P=0.031). Patients whose cancer had increased the relative expression of ASS were positive for perineural invasion and had poor recurrence-free survival. In summary, ASS expression in gastric cancer was associated with a poor prognosis. Further study of mechanisms to silence the ASS gene or decrease the enzymatic activity of ASS protein has the potential to provide new treatments for patients with gastric cancer.

  4. [Atypical metastatic site of lung adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Sakhri, L; Mennecier, B; Jacqmin, D; Di Marco, A; Schumacher, C; Chenard, M-P; Bergmann, E; Quoix, E

    2011-12-01

    The case concerns a 40 years old smoker male, treated for an adenocarcinoma of the left upper lobe, metastatic in muscle extended to the right femur cortex. The patient had first a surgical excision of the mass of the thigh, an intramedullary femoral nailing, and six courses of chemotherapy (cisplatin-vinorelbine) with concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. This treatment led to disease stability. One year later, hematuria revealed a bladder tumor. Cystoscopy with biopsy concluded to an adenocarcinoma pulmonary origin. The PET-scanner showed an uptake of the bladder mass, a hypermetabolic right adrenal gland and subcutaneous left shoulder nodule. The patient had a partial cystectomy associated with enterocystoplasty and left ureteral reimplantation, plus excision of the subcutaneous nodule located in the left shoulder and a right adrenalectomy during the same time. All of the sites were metastasis from adenocarcinoma of pulmonary origin. A salvage chemotherapy was initiated. In the vast majority of cases, bladder metastasis as primary bladder tumours is revealed by hematuria, cystitis or sometimes vague pelvic pain. Our case is a very unusual bladder metastatic site from lung cancer. We will discuss the different procedures and the therapeutic strategies on the basis of the published data.

  5. Carcinogenesis of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Precursor Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gnoni, Antonio; Licchetta, Antonella; Scarpa, Aldo; Azzariti, Amalia; Brunetti, Anna Elisabetta; Simone, Gianni; Nardulli, Patrizia; Santini, Daniele; Aieta, Michele; Delcuratolo, Sabina; Silvestris, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma displays a variety of molecular changes that evolve exponentially with time and lead cancer cells not only to survive, but also to invade the surrounding tissues and metastasise to distant sites. These changes include: genetic alterations in oncogenes and cancer suppressor genes; changes in the cell cycle and pathways leading to apoptosis; and also changes in epithelial to mesenchymal transition. The most common alterations involve the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, the HER2 gene, and the K-ras gene. In particular, the loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes has been documented in this tumor, especially in CDKN2a, p53, DPC4 and BRCA2 genes. However, other molecular events involved in pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathogenesis contribute to its development and maintenance, specifically epigenetic events. In fact, key tumor suppressors that are well established to play a role in pancreatic adenocarcinoma may be altered through hypermethylation, and oncogenes can be upregulated secondary to permissive histone modifications. Indeed, factors involved in tumor invasiveness can be aberrantly expressed through dysregulated microRNAs. This review summarizes current knowledge of pancreatic carcinogenesis from its initiation within a normal cell until the time that it has disseminated to distant organs. In this scenario, highlighting these molecular alterations could provide new clinical tools for early diagnosis and new effective therapies for this malignancy. PMID:24084722

  6. Intraoperative molecular imaging to identify lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Andrew D.; Kennedy, Gregory T.; Predina, Jarrod D.; Low, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative molecular imaging is a promising new technology with numerous applications in lung cancer surgery. Accurate identification of small nodules and assessment of tumor margins are two challenges in pulmonary resections for cancer, particularly with increasing use of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). One potential solution to these problems is intraoperative use of a fluorescent contrast agent to improve detection of cancer cells. This technology requires both a targeted fluorescent dye that will selectively accumulate in cancer cells and a specialized imaging system to detect the cells. In several studies, we have shown that intraoperative imaging with indocyanine green (ICG) can be used to accurately identify indeterminate pulmonary nodules. The use of a folate-tagged fluorescent molecule targeted to the folate receptor-α (FRα) further improves the sensitivity and specificity of detecting lung adenocarcinomas. We have demonstrated this technology can be used as an “optical biopsy” to differentiate adenocarcinoma versus other histological subtypes of pulmonary nodules. This strategy has potential applications in assessing bronchial stump margins, identifying synchronous or metachronous lesions, and rapidly assessing lymph nodes for lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:28066672

  7. Comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the lung is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Here we report molecular profiling of 230 resected lung adenocarcinomas using messenger RNA, microRNA and DNA sequencing integrated with copy number, methylation and proteomic analyses. High rates of somatic mutation were seen (mean 8.9 mutations per megabase). Eighteen genes were statistically significantly mutated, including RIT1 activating mutations and newly described loss-of-function MGA mutations which are mutually exclusive with focal MYC amplification. EGFR mutations were more frequent in female patients, whereas mutations in RBM10 were more common in males. Aberrations in NF1, MET, ERBB2 and RIT1 occurred in 13% of cases and were enriched in samples otherwise lacking an activated oncogene, suggesting a driver role for these events in certain tumours. DNA and mRNA sequence from the same tumour highlighted splicing alterations driven by somatic genomic changes, including exon 14 skipping in MET mRNA in 4% of cases. MAPK and PI(3)K pathway activity, when measured at the protein level, was explained by known mutations in only a fraction of cases, suggesting additional, unexplained mechanisms of pathway activation. These data establish a foundation for classification and further investigations of lung adenocarcinoma molecular pathogenesis. PMID:25079552

  8. Comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    2014-07-31

    Adenocarcinoma of the lung is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Here we report molecular profiling of 230 resected lung adenocarcinomas using messenger RNA, microRNA and DNA sequencing integrated with copy number, methylation and proteomic analyses. High rates of somatic mutation were seen (mean 8.9 mutations per megabase). Eighteen genes were statistically significantly mutated, including RIT1 activating mutations and newly described loss-of-function MGA mutations which are mutually exclusive with focal MYC amplification. EGFR mutations were more frequent in female patients, whereas mutations in RBM10 were more common in males. Aberrations in NF1, MET, ERBB2 and RIT1 occurred in 13% of cases and were enriched in samples otherwise lacking an activated oncogene, suggesting a driver role for these events in certain tumours. DNA and mRNA sequence from the same tumour highlighted splicing alterations driven by somatic genomic changes, including exon 14 skipping in MET mRNA in 4% of cases. MAPK and PI(3)K pathway activity, when measured at the protein level, was explained by known mutations in only a fraction of cases, suggesting additional, unexplained mechanisms of pathway activation. These data establish a foundation for classification and further investigations of lung adenocarcinoma molecular pathogenesis.

  9. Solitary Psoas Muscle Metastasis of Gastroesphageal Junction Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Azadeh, Payam; Yaghobi Joybari, Ali; Sarbaz, Samaneh; Ghiasi, Hosein Ali; Farasatinasab, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis of gastroesphageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma in skeletal muscle is rare and primary sites for skeletal muscle metastases are usually lung, renal and colorectal cancer. We have encountered with the first case report of solitary psoas muscle metastasis of GEJ adenocarcinoma. Here we describe a 65 years old man was diagnosed with GEJ adenocarcinoma in Gastroenterology Department, Imam Hussein Hospital, Tehran, Iran in February 2014. We were not able to use PET techniques due to lack of access. Staging CT scans demonstrated a small mass lateral to right psoas muscle. A CT-guided core needle biopsy of right psoas muscle was performed that supported a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma consistent with primary adenocarcinoma of the GEJ. Distant metastasis to skeletal muscle rarely occurs in patients with GEJ adenocarcinoma, but heightened awareness to these soft tissue lesions is warranted. CT or MR imaging could show findings suggestive of metastatic disease, although PET is preferable modality. PMID:26870148

  10. Downregulation of Sp1 by Minnelide leads to decrease in HSP70 and decrease in tumor burden of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Nivedita; Alsaied, Osama; Dauer, Patricia; Majumder, Kaustav; Modi, Shrey; Giri, Bhuwan; Dudeja, Vikas; Banerjee, Sulagna; Von Hoff, Daniel; Saluja, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer related mortality worldwide with poor survival rates. Even though a number of chemotherapeutic compounds have been used against this disease, stomach cancer has not been particularly sensitive to these drugs. In this study we have evaluated the effect of triptolide, a naturally derived diterpene triepoxide and its water soluble pro-drug Minnelide on several gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines both as monotherapy and in combination with CPT-11. Methods Gastric cancer cell lines MKN28 and MKN45 were treated with varying doses of triptolide in vitro. Cell viability was measured using MTT based assay kit. Apoptotic cell death was assayed by measuring caspase activity. Effect of the triptolide pro-drug, Minnelide, was evaluated by implanting the gastric cancer cells subcutaneously in athymic nude mice. Results Gastric cancer cell lines MKN28 and MKN45 cells exhibited decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis when treated with varying doses of triptolide in vitro. When implanted in athymic nude mice, treatment with Minnelide reduced tumor burden in both MKN28 derived tumors as well as MKN45 derived tumors. Additionally, we also evaluated Minnelide as a single agent and in combination with CPT-11 in the NCI-N87 human gastric tumor xenograft model. Conclusion Our results indicated that the combination of Minnelide with CPT-11 resulted in significantly smaller tumors compared to control. These studies are extremely encouraging as Minnelide is currently undergoing phase 1 clinical trials for gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:28192510

  11. Doxorubicin delivery enhanced by electroporation to gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma cells with P-gp overexpression.

    PubMed

    Kulbacka, Julita; Daczewska, Małgorzata; Dubińska-Magiera, Magda; Choromańska, Anna; Rembiałkowska, Nina; Surowiak, Paweł; Kulbacki, Marek; Kotulska, Małgorzata; Saczko, Jolanta

    2014-12-01

    Electroporation (EP) can effectively support the penetration of macromolecules from the extracellular space into cells. Electropores induced by the influence of electromagnetic field generate additional paths of transport for macromolecules. The aim of this study was evaluation of the electroporation effect on doxorubicin transport efficiency to human colon (LoVo and LoVo/DX) and gastric (EPG85-257/P and EPG85-257/RDB) adenocarcinoma cells with overexpression of P-glycoprotein and murine macrophage cell line (P388/D1). In our EP experiments cells were placed into a cuvette with aluminum electrodes and pulsed with five square electric pulses of 1300 V/cm and duration of 50 μs each. Cells were also treated with low doxorubicin concentration ([DOX]=1.7 μM). The ultrastructure (TEM) and changes of P-glycoprotein expression of tumor cells subjected to electric field were monitored. The mitochondrial cell function and trypan blue staining were evaluated after 24h. Our results indicate the most pronounced effect of EP with DOX and disturbed ultrastructure in resistant gastric and colon cells with decrease of P-gp expression. Electroporation may be an attractive delivery method of cytostatic drugs in chemotherapy, enabling reduction of drug dose, exposure time and side effects.

  12. Serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 is a biomarker of poor prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, C H; Park, H J; Lee, J R; Kim, H K; Jeon, T Y; Jo, H-J; Kim, D H; Kim, G H; Park, D Y

    2014-01-01

    Background: In a previous study, we reported that serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 (serpinA1) is upregulated in Snail-overexpressing gastric cancer. Although serpinA1 has been studied in several types of cancer, little is known about its roles and mechanisms of action. In this study, we examined the role of serpinA1 in the migration and invasion of gastric cancers and determined its underlying mechanism. Methods: Expression levels were assessed by western blot analyses and real-time PCR. Snail binding to serpinA1 promoter was analysed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. The roles of serpinA1 were studied using cell invasion and migration assays. In addition, the clinicopathologic and prognostic significance of serpinA1 expression were validated in 400 gastric cancer patients using immunohistochemical analysis. Results: Overexpression of Snail resulted in upregulation of serpinA1 in gastric cancer cell lines, AGS and MKN45, whereas knockdown of Snail inhibited serpinA1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that overexpression of Snail increased Snail recruitment to the serpinA1 promoter. Overexpression of serpinA1 increased the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, whereas knockdown of serpinA1 decreased invasion and migration. Moreover, serpinA1 increased mRNA levels and release of metalloproteinase-8 in gastric cancer cells. Serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 was observed in the cytoplasm of tumour cells and the stroma by immunohistochemistry. Enhanced serpinA1 expression was significantly associated with increased tumour size, advanced T stage, perineural invasion, lymphovascular invasion, lymph node metastases, and shorter overall survival. Conclusions: Serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 induces the invasion and migration of gastric cancer cells and its expression is associated with the progression of gastric cancer. These results may provide a potential target to prevent invasion and

  13. Association between polymorphisms in segregation genes BUB1B and TTK and gastric cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Hudler, Petra; Britovsek, Nina Kocevar; Grazio, Snjezana Frkovic; Komel, Radovan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant transformation of normal gastric cells is a complex and multistep process, resulting in development of heterogeneous tumours. Susceptible genetic background, accumulation of genetic changes, and environmental factors play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in mitotic segregation genes could be responsible for inducing the slow process of accumulation of genetic changes, leading to genome instability. Patients and methods We performed a case-control study of polymorphisms in mitotic kinases TTK rs151658 and BUB1B rs1031963 and rs1801376 to assess their effects on gastric cancer risk. We examined the TTK abundance in gastric cancer tissues using immunoblot analysis. Results C/G genotype of rs151658 was more frequent in patients with diffuse type of gastric cancer and G/G genotype was more common in intestinal types of gastric cancers (p = 0.049). Polymorphic genotype A/A of rs1801376 was associated with higher risk for developing diffuse type of gastric cancer in female population (p = 0.007), whereas A/A frequencies were increased in male patients with subserosa tumour cell infiltration (p = 0.009). T/T genotype of rs1031963 was associated with well differentiated tumours (p = 0.035). TT+CT genotypes of rs1031963 and GG+AG genotypes of rs1801376 were significantly associated with gastric cancer risk (dominant model; OR = 2,929, 95% CI: 1.281-6.700; p = 0.017 and dominant model; OR = 0,364, 95% CI: 0.192-0.691; p = 0.003 respectively). Conclusions Our results suggest that polymorphisms in mitotic kinases TTK and BUB1B may contribute to gastric tumorigenesis and risk of tumour development. Further investigations on large populations and populations of different ethnicity are needed to determine their clinical utility. PMID:27679546

  14. ETS2 and Twist1 promote invasiveness of Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric cancer cells by inducing Siah2

    PubMed Central

    Das, Lopamudra; Kokate, Shrikant Babanrao; Rath, Suvasmita; Rout, Niranjan; Singh, Shivaram Prasad; Crowe, Sheila Eileen; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Bhattacharyya, Asima

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most potent factors leading to gastric carcinogenesis. The seven in absentia homologue (Siah2) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase which has been implicated in various cancers but its role in H. pylori-mediated gastric carcinogenesis has not been established. We investigated the involvement of Siah2 in gastric cancer metastasis which was assessed by invasiveness and migration of H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cancer cells. Cultured gastric cancer cells (GCCs) MKN45, AGS and Kato III showed significantly induced expression of Siah2, increased invasiveness and migration after being challenged with the pathogen. Siah2-expressing stable cells showed increased invasiveness and migration after H. pylori infection. Siah2 was transcriptionally activated by E26 transformation-specific sequence 2 (ETS2)- and Twist-related protein 1 (Twist1) induced in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. These transcription factors dose-dependently enhanced the aggressiveness of infected GCCs. Our data suggested that H. pylori-infected GCCs gained cell motility and invasiveness through Siah2 induction. As gastric cancer biopsy samples also showed highly induced expression of ETS2, Twist1 and Siah2 compared with noncancerous gastric tissue, we surmise that ETS2- and Twist1-mediated Siah2 up-regulation has potential diagnostic and prognostic significance and could be targeted for therapeutic purpose. PMID:27048589

  15. Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yutaro; Kawahara, Takashi; Iwashita, Hiromichi; Shimokihara, Kota; Tsutsumi, Sohgo; Takamoto, Daiji; Mochizuki, Taku; Hattori, Yusuke; Teranishi, Jun-ichi; Miyoshi, Yasuhide; Yumura, Yasushi; Yao, Masahiro; Inayama, Yoshiaki; Uemura, Hiroji

    2016-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is an unusual variant of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. A 73-year-old male was referred to our hospital for the further examination of an elevated prostate-specific antigen level of 23.4 ng/mL. Radical prostatectomy (RP) was performed based on the diagnosis obtained by a prostate needle biopsy. The RP specimen revealed ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate with positive capsular penetration. We herein report a rare case of ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate. PMID:28101029

  16. Occupational asbestos exposure and risk of esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer in the prospective Netherlands Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Offermans, Nadine S M; Vermeulen, Roel; Burdorf, Alex; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; Keszei, András P; Peters, Susan; Kauppinen, Timo; Kromhout, Hans; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2014-10-15

    The evidence for an association between occupational asbestos exposure and esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer is limited. We studied this association specifically addressing risk differences between relatively low and high exposure, risk associated with cancer subtypes, the influence of potential confounders and the interaction between asbestos and smoking in relation to cancer risk. Using the Netherlands Cohort Study (n = 58,279 men, aged 55-69 years at baseline), asbestos exposure was estimated by linkage to a job-exposure matrix. After 17.3 years of follow-up, 187 esophageal, 486 gastric and 1,724 colorectal cancer cases were available for analysis. The models adjusted for age and family history of cancer showed that mainly (prolonged) exposure to high levels of asbestos was statistically significantly associated with risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), total and distal colon cancer and rectal cancer. For overall gastric cancer and gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA), also exposure to lower levels of asbestos was associated. Additional adjustment for lifestyle confounders, especially smoking status, yielded non-significant associations with overall gastric cancer and GNCA in the multivariable-adjusted model, except for the prolonged highly exposed subjects (tertile 3 vs. never: HR 2.67, 95% CI: 1.11-6.44 and HR 3.35, 95% CI: 1.33-8.44, respectively). No statistically significant additive or multiplicative interaction between asbestos and smoking was observed for any of the studied cancers. This prospective population-based study showed that (prolonged) high asbestos exposure was associated with overall gastric cancer, EAC, GNCA, total and distal colon cancer and rectal cancer.

  17. Gastric and enterohepatic helicobacters other than Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Armelle; Péré-Védrenne, Christelle; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2014-09-01

    During the past year, research on non-Helicobacter pylori species has intensified. H. valdiviensis was isolated from wild birds, and putative novel species have been isolated from Bengal tigers and Australian marsupials. Various genomes have been sequenced: H. bilis, H. canis, H. macacae, H. fennelliae, H. cetorum, and H. suis. Several studies highlighted the virulence of non-H. pylori species including H. cinaedi in humans and hyperlipidemic mice or H. macacae in geriatric rhesus monkeys with intestinal adenocarcinoma. Not surprisingly, increased attention has been paid to the position of Helicobacter species in the microbiota of children and animal species (mice, chickens, penguins, and migrating birds). A large number of experimental studies have been performed in animal models of Helicobacter induced typhlocolitis, showing that the gastrointestinal microbial community is involved in modulation of host pathways leading to chronic inflammation. Animal models of H. suis, H. heilmannii, and H. felis infection have been used to study the development of severe inflammation-related pathologies, including gastric MALT lymphoma and adenocarcinoma.

  18. Polymorphisms in metabolic genes related to tobacco smoke and the risk of gastric cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Antonio; Sala, Núria; Pera, Guillem; Capellá, Gabriel; Berenguer, Antonio; García, Nadia; Palli, Domenico; Boeing, Heiner; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Saieva, Calogero; Carneiro, Fatima; Berrino, Franco; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Berglund, Göran; Simán, Henrik; Stenling, Roger; Hallmans, Göran; Martínez, Carmen; Bilbao, Roberto; Barricarte, Aurelio; Navarro, Carmen; Quirós, José R; Allen, Naomi; Key, Tim; Bingham, Sheila; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Linseisen, Jakob; Nagel, Gabriele; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; Peeters, Petra H; Numans, Mattijs E; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lund, Eiliv; Offerhaus, Johan; Jenab, Mazda; Ferrari, Pietro; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio; González, Carlos A

    2006-12-01

    Metabolizing enzymes, which often display genetic polymorphisms, are involved in the activation of compounds present in tobacco smoke that may be relevant to gastric carcinogenesis. We report the results of a study looking at the association between risk of gastric adenocarcinoma and polymorphisms in genes CYP1A1, CYP1A2, EPHX1, and GSTT1. A nested case-control study was carried out within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, developed in 10 European countries. The study includes 243 newly diagnosed cases of histologically confirmed gastric adenocarcinoma and 946 controls matched by center, age, sex, and date of blood collection. Genotypes were determined in nuclear DNA from WBCs. We found an increased risk of gastric cancer for homozygotes for C (histidine) variant in Y113H of EPHX1 (odds ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-3.07) compared with subjects with TC/TT. There was also a significant increased risk for smokers carrying at least one variant allele A in Ex7+129C>A (m4) of CYP1A1 and never smokers with null GSTT1 and allele A in the locus -3859G>A of CYP1A2. Most of these genes are involved in the activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, suggesting a potential role of these compounds in gastric carcinogenesis.

  19. AGS experiments - 1994, 1995, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the following information on the Brookhaven AGS Accelerator complex: FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; FY 1997 AGS schedule (working copy); AGS beams 1997; AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program (in progress); a listing of experiments by number; two-phage summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and listing of AGS experimenters begins here.

  20. Phase II trial of 4'-epi-doxorubicin in locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cazap, E; Estevez, R; Bruno, M; Levy, D; Algamiz, C; Chacon, R; Badano, C; Romero, A; Desimone, G; Roca, E

    1988-06-30

    Patients with locally advanced or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma received an i.v. bolus of 4'-epi-doxorubicin, 75/mg/m2/cycle, every 21 days. Partial responses were observed in 5 of 23 evaluable patients (21.7%). Treatment was generally well tolerated and toxicity was mild. The response rate to epirubicin appears to be very similar to that reported for doxorubicin. Larger doses of epirubicin could be safely used in future studies, and further evaluation of epirubicin in phase III trials is indicated.

  1. Differential expression of CCN family members CYR611, CTGF and NOV in gastric cancer and their association with disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Gao, Xiangyu; Ji, Ke; Sanders, Andrew J.; Zhang, Zhongtao; Jiang, Wen G.; Ji, Jiafu; Ye, Lin

    2016-01-01

    CCN is an acronym for cysteine-rich protein 61 (CYR61), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and nephroblastoma overexpressed (NOV). Aberrations of certain CCN members including CYR61, CTGF, Wnt1-inducible signalling pathway protein (WISP)-1 and -3 have been reported in gastric cancer. The present study aimed to examine the clinical relevance of NOV along with CYR61 and CTGF in gastric cancer by analysing their transcript levels. CYR61, CTGF and NOV transcript expression in 324 gastric cancer samples with paired adjacent normal gastric tissues were determined using real-time quantitative PCR and the results were statistically analysed against patient clinicopathological data using SPSS software. NOV mRNA levels in gastric cancer tissues were significantly elevated when compared with levels in their paired adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Local advanced tumours with invasive expansion (T3 and T4) expressed higher levels of NOV (p=0.013) compared with the less invasive tumours (T1 and T2). CYR61 transcript levels were also significantly increased in gastric cancers compared with levels in the adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that patients with CYR61-low transcript levels had longer overall survival (OS) (p=0.018) and disease-free survival (DFS) (p=0.015). NOV overexpression promoted the in vitro proliferation of AGS cells while the knockdown resulted in a reduced proliferation of HGC27 cells. A similar effect was observed for the invasion of these two gastric cancer cell lines. NOV expression was increased in gastric cancer which was associated with local invasion and distant metastases. Taken together, the expression of NOV and CYR61 was increased in gastric cancer. The elevated expression of CYR61 was associated with poorer survival. NOV promoted proliferation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Further investigations may highlight their predictive and therapeutic potential in gastric cancer. PMID:27633176

  2. Gut microbiota and gastric disease.

    PubMed

    Sgambato, Dolores; Miranda, Agnese; Romano, Lorenzo; Romano, Marco

    2017-02-15

    The gut microbiota may be considered a crucial "organ" of human body because of its role in the maintenance of the balance between health as well as disease. It is mainly located in the small bowel and colon, while, the stomach was long thought to be sterile in particular for its high acid production. In particular, stomach was considered "an hostile place" for bacterial growth until the identification of Helicobacter pylori (HP). Now, the stomach and its microbiota can be considered as two different "organs" that share the same place and they have an impact on each other. In fact microscopic structures of gastric mucosa (mucus layer and luminal contents) influence local microflora and vice versa. In this article our attention is directed specifically to explain the effects of this "cross-talk" on gastric homeostais. The gastric microbiota grossly consists of two macrogroups: HP and non-HP bacteria. Here, we review the relationship between these two populations and their role in the development of the different gastric disorders: functional dyspepsia, gastric premalignant lesions (chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia of the gastric mucosa) and gastric cancer. Moreover we focus on the effects on the gastric microbiota of exogenous interference as diet and use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs).

  3. Augmented gp130-mediated cytokine signalling accompanies human gastric cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Jackson, C B; Judd, L M; Menheniott, T R; Kronborg, I; Dow, C; Yeomans, N D; Boussioutas, A; Robb, L; Giraud, A S

    2007-10-01

    H. pylori infection accounts for most cases of gastric cancer, but the initiating events remain unclear. The principal H. pylori pathogenicity-associated CagA protein disrupts intracellular SHP-2 signalling pathways including those used by the IL-6 family cytokines, IL-6 and IL-11. Imbalanced IL-6 family cytokine signalling in the gp130(757FF) mouse model of gastric cancer arising from hyperactivation of oncogenic STAT3 after altered SHP-2 : ERK1/2 signalling produces dysplastic antral tumours preceded by gastritis and metaplasia. In a cohort of patient gastric biopsies with known H. pylori and CagA status, we investigated whether (i) STAT3 and ERK1/2 activation is altered in H. pylori-dependent gastritis; (ii) these profiles are more pronounced in CagA+ H. pylori infection; and (iii) the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines that activate STAT3 and ERK 1/2 pathways is associated with progression to gastric cancer. IL-6, IL-11, and activated STAT3 and ERK1/2 were quantified in antral biopsies from gastritic stomach, metaplastic tissue, and resected gastric cancer tissues. We observed significantly increased STAT3 and ERK1/2 activation (p = 0.001) in H. pylori-dependent gastritis, which was further enhanced in the presence of CagA+ H. pylori strains. Of known gastric ligands that drive STAT3 activation, IL-6 expression was increased after H. pylori infection and both IL-6 and IL-11 were strongly up-regulated in the gastric cancer biopsies. This suggests a mechanism by which IL-11 drives STAT3 activation and proliferation during gastric cancer progression. We addressed this using an in vitro approach, demonstrating that recombinant human IL-11 activates STAT3 and concomitantly increases proliferation of MKN28 gastric epithelial cells. In summary, we show increased STAT3 and ERK1/2 activation in H. pylori-dependent gastritis that is likely driven in an IL-6-dependent fashion. IL-11 expression is associated with adenocarcinoma development, but not gastritic lesions

  4. MYC, FBXW7 and TP53 copy number variation and expression in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MYC deregulation is a common event in gastric carcinogenesis, usually as a consequence of gene amplification, chromosomal translocations, or posttranslational mechanisms. FBXW7 is a p53-controlled tumor-suppressor that plays a role in the regulation of cell cycle exit and reentry via MYC degradation. Methods We evaluated MYC, FBXW7, and TP53 copy number, mRNA levels, and protein expression in gastric cancer and paired non-neoplastic specimens from 33 patients and also in gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines. We also determined the invasion potential of the gastric cancer cell lines. Results MYC amplification was observed in 51.5% of gastric tumor samples. Deletion of one copy of FBXW7 and TP53 was observed in 45.5% and 21.2% of gastric tumors, respectively. MYC mRNA expression was significantly higher in tumors than in non-neoplastic samples. FBXW7 and TP53 mRNA expression was markedly lower in tumors than in paired non-neoplastic specimens. Moreover, deregulated MYC and FBXW7 mRNA expression was associated with the presence of lymph node metastasis and tumor stage III-IV. Additionally, MYC immunostaining was more frequently observed in intestinal-type than diffuse-type gastric cancers and was associated with MYC mRNA expression. In vitro studies showed that increased MYC and reduced FBXW7 expression is associated with a more invasive phenotype i