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Sample records for ags rf system

  1. Commissioning the new high power rf system for the AGS with high intensity beam

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Ciardullo, D.J.; Deng, D.P; Hayes, T.; Onillon, E.; Otis, A.; Sanders, R.T.; Zaltsman, A.

    1994-08-01

    A new high power rf system has been installed in the AGS in order to raise the beam loading limit to beyond 6 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse. The old system was limited to 2.2 {times} 10{sup l3} ppp by: available real power, multi-loop instability, and transient beam loading during batch filling from the Booster. The key components of the new system are: new power amplifiers in the tunnel using the Thomson-CSF TH573 300kW tetrode, rf feedback around the power stage, and reduction of the 10 cavities` R/Q by 1.8 by additional gap capacitors. Commissioning of the new rf system with high intensity beam is described. The intensity goal for the 1994 running period is 4 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp. To date, 3.7 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp has been achieved.

  2. The upgrade project for the RF system for the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Ciardullo, D.J.; Hayes, T.; Meth, M.; McNerney, A.J.; Otis, A.; Pirkl, W.; Sanders, R.; Spitz, R.; Toldo, F.; Zaltsman, A.

    1993-06-01

    The AGS operates a varied program of proton, heavy ion, and polarized proton acceleration for fixed-target experiments and will soon serve as the injector of these beams into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC. The new Booster synchrotron extends the range of intensities and masses that can be accelerated. The 1.5 GeV injection energy increases the space charge limit by a factor of four to more than 6 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse. To accommodate the increased beam current the rf system will be upgraded to provide more power and lower impedance to the beam. The flexibility of the rf system will also be enhanced by virtue of a new rf beam control system and installation of individual tuning servos for the ten rf cavities. The fundamental necessity for upgrading the rf system is to deliver more power to the accelerating beam. Three key ingredients of the upgrade project addressing this problem is (1) new power amplifiers provide the necessary power, and are closely coupled to the cavities, (2) wideband rf feedback reduces the effective impedance by a factor of 10, and (3) the capacitors loading the acceleration gaps (four per cavity) are increased from 275 pF to 600 pF.

  3. The upgrade project for the RF system for the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Ciardullo, D.J.; Hayes, T.; Meth, M.; McNerney, A.J.; Otis, A.; Pirkl, W.; Sanders, R.; Spitz, R.; Toldo, F.; Zaltsman, A.

    1993-01-01

    The AGS operates a varied program of proton, heavy ion, and polarized proton acceleration for fixed-target experiments and will soon serve as the injector of these beams into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC. The new Booster synchrotron extends the range of intensities and masses that can be accelerated. The 1.5 GeV injection energy increases the space charge limit by a factor of four to more than 6 [times] 10[sup 13] protons per pulse. To accommodate the increased beam current the rf system will be upgraded to provide more power and lower impedance to the beam. The flexibility of the rf system will also be enhanced by virtue of a new rf beam control system and installation of individual tuning servos for the ten rf cavities. The fundamental necessity for upgrading the rf system is to deliver more power to the accelerating beam. Three key ingredients of the upgrade project addressing this problem is (1) new power amplifiers provide the necessary power, and are closely coupled to the cavities, (2) wideband rf feedback reduces the effective impedance by a factor of 10, and (3) the capacitors loading the acceleration gaps (four per cavity) are increased from 275 pF to 600 pF.

  4. Rf beam control for the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.

    1994-09-26

    RF beam control systems for hadron synchrotrons have evolved over the past three decades into an essentially standard design. The key difference between hadron and lepton machines is the absence of radiation damping and existence of significant frequency variation in the case of hadrons. Although the motion of the hadron in the potential well of the rf wave is inherently stable it is not strongly damped. Damping must be provided by electronic feedback through the accelerating system. This feedback is typically called the phase loop. The technology of the rf beam control system for the AGS Booster synchrotron is described. First, the overall philosophy of the design is explained in terms of a conventional servo system that regulates the beam horizontal position in the vacuum chamber. The concept of beam transfer functions is fundamental to the mathematics of the design process and is reviewed. The beam transfer functions required for this design are derived from first principles. An overview of the beam signal pick-ups and high level rf equipment is given. The major subsystems, the frequency program, the heterodyne system, and beam feedback loops, are described in detail. Beyond accelerating the beam, the rf system must also synchronize the bunches in the Booster to the buckets in the AGS before transfer. The technical challenge in this process is heightened by the need to accomplish synchronization while the frequency is still changing. Details of the synchronization system are given. This report is intended to serve two purposes. One is to document the hardware and performance of the systems that have been built. The other is to serve as a tutorial vehicle from which the non-expert can not only learn the details of this system but also learn the principles of beam control that have led to the particular design choices made.

  5. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  6. Simulation of proton RF capture in the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Khiari, F.Z.; Luccio, A.U.; Weng, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    RF capture of the proton beam in the AGS Booster has been simulated with the longitudinal phase-space tracking code ESME. Results show that a capture in excess of 95% can be achieved with multiturn injection of a chopped beam.

  7. Racetrack microtron rf system

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Keffeler, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The rf system for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS)/Los Alamos cw racetrack microtron is described. The low-power portion consists of five 75-W amplifers that drive two input ports in each of two chopper deflection cavities and one port in the prebuncher cavity. A single 500-kW klystron drives four separate 2380-MHz cavity sections: the two main accelerator sections, a capture section, and a preaccelerator section. The phases and amplitudes in all cavities are controlled by electronic or electromechanical controls. The 1-MW klystron power supply and crowbar system were purchased as a unit; several modifications are described that improve power-supply performance. The entire rf system has been tested and shipped to the NBS, and the chopper-buncher system has been operated with beam at the NBS. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  8. The TESLA RF System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choroba, S.

    2003-12-01

    The TESLA project proposed by the TESLA collaboration in 2001 is a 500 to 800GeV e+/e- linear collider with integrated free electron laser facility. The accelerator is based on superconducting cavity technology. Approximately 20000 superconducting cavities operated at 1.3GHz with a gradient of 23.4MV/m or 35MV/m will be required to achieve the energy of 500GeV or 800GeV respectively. For 500GeV ˜600 RF stations each generating 10MW of RF power at 1.3GHz at a pulse duration of 1.37ms and a repetition rate of 5 or 10Hz are required. The original TESLA design was modified in 2002 and now includes a dedicated 20GeV electron accelerator in a separate tunnel for free electron laser application. The TESLA XFEL will provide XFEL radiation of unprecedented peak brilliance and full transverse coherence in the wavelength range of 0.1 to 6.4nm at a pulse duration of 100fs. The technology of both accelerators, the TESLA linear collider and the XFEL, will be identical, however the number of superconducting cavities and RF stations for the XFEL will be reduced to 936 and 26 respectively. This paper describes the layout of the entire RF system of the TESLA linear collider and the TESLA XFEL and gives an overview of its various subsystems and components.

  9. Barrier rf systems in synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra M. Bhat

    2004-06-28

    Recently, many interesting applications of the barrier RF system in hadron synchrotrons have been realized. A remarkable example of this is the development of longitudinal momentum mining and implementation at the Fermilab Recycler for extraction of low emittance pbars for the Tevatron shots. At Fermilab, we have barrier RF systems in four different rings. In the case of Recycler Ring, all of the rf manipulations are carried out using a barrier RF system. Here, the author reviews various uses of barrier rf systems in particle accelerators including some new schemes for producing intense proton beam and possible new applications.

  10. NSLS-II RF SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Holub, B.; Kawashima, Y.; Ma, H.; Towne, N.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II is a new third generation light source being constructed at Brookhaven Lab. The storage ring is optimized for low emittance by use of damping wigglers to reduce the emittance to below 1 nm-rad. The RF systems are designed to provide stable beam through tight RF phase and amplitude stability requirements.

  11. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation.

  12. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation.

  13. Rf System for the NLCTA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Adolphsen, C.; Eichner, J.; Fuller, R.W.; Gold, S.L.; Hanna, S.M.; Hoag, H.A.; Holmes, S.G.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, Theodore L.; Loewen, R.J.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.D.; Pope, R.; Rifkin, J.; Ruth, R.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, Z.; Yeremian, A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-26

    This paper describes an X-Band RF system for the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator. The RF system consists of a 90 MeV injector and a 540 MeV linac. The main components of the injector are two low-Q single-cavity prebunchers and two 0.9-m-long detuned accelerator sections. The linac system consists of six 1.8-m-long detuned and damped detuned accelerator sections powered in pairs. The rf power generation, compression, delivery, distribution and measurement systems consist of klystrons, SLEDII energy compression systems, rectangular waveguides, magic-T's, and directional couplers. The phase and amplitude for each prebuncher is adjusted via a magic-T type phase shifter/attenuator. Correct phasing between the two 0.9 m accelerator sections is obtained by properly aligning the sections and adjusting two squeeze type phase shifters. Bunch phase and bunch length can be monitored with special microwave cavities and measurement systems. The design, fabrication, microwave measurement, calibration, and operation of the sub-systems and their components are briefly presented.

  14. NSLS RF system improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, J.; Thomas, M.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.; D'Alsace, R.; Ackerman, H.; Biscardi, R.; Langenbach, H.; Ramirez, G.

    1985-01-01

    It is required that the NSLS x-ray accelerator reach an energy of 2.5 GeV. An additional accelerating cavity and power amplifier system were installed to meet this goal. A new control system was designed to include phase and amplitude servos as well as computer interfacing. Commissioning and operating experience will be reported.

  15. Automatic calorimetry system monitors RF power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harness, B. W.; Heiberger, E. C.

    1969-01-01

    Calorimetry system monitors the average power dissipated in a high power RF transmitter. Sensors measure the change in temperature and the flow rate of the coolant, while a multiplier computes the power dissipated in the RF load.

  16. Low jitter RF distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Russell; Doolittle, Lawrence; Huang, Gang

    2012-09-18

    A timing signal distribution system includes an optical frequency stabilized laser signal amplitude modulated at an rf frequency. A transmitter box transmits a first portion of the laser signal and receive a modified optical signal, and outputs a second portion of the laser signal and a portion of the modified optical signal. A first optical fiber carries the first laser signal portion and the modified optical signal, and a second optical fiber carries the second portion of the laser signal and the returned modified optical signal. A receiver box receives the first laser signal portion, shifts the frequency of the first laser signal portion outputs the modified optical signal, and outputs an electrical signal on the basis of the laser signal. A detector at the end of the second optical fiber outputs a signal based on the modified optical signal. An optical delay sensing circuit outputs a data signal based on the detected modified optical signal. An rf phase detect and correct signal circuit outputs a signal corresponding to a phase stabilized rf signal based on the data signal and the frequency received from the receiver box.

  17. Double rf system for bunch shortening

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Yong Ho.

    1990-11-01

    It was suggested by Zisman that the combination of the two systems (double rf system) may be more effective to shorten a bunch, compromising between the desirable and the undesirable effects mentioned above. In this paper, we demonstrate that a double rf system is, in fact, quite effective in optimizing the rf performance. The parameters used are explained, and some handy formulae for bunch parameters are derived. We consider an example of bunch shortening by adding a higher-harmonic rf system to the main rf system. The parameters of the main rf system are unchanged. The double rf system, however, can be used for another purpose. Namely, the original bunch length can be obtained with a main rf voltage substantially lower than for a single rf system without necessitating a high-power source for the higher-harmonic cavities. Using a double rf system, the momentum acceptance remains large enough for ample beam lifetime. Moreover, the increase in nonlinearity of the rf waveform increases the synchrotron tune spread, which potentially helps a beam to be stabilized against longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities. We will show some examples of this application. We discuss the choice of the higher-harmonic frequency.

  18. OPERATION OF THE RHIC RF SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN,J.M.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; DELONG,J.; FISCHER,W.; HAYES,T.; SMITH,K.S.; ZALTSMAN,A.

    2003-05-12

    Operational aspects of the RHIC rf system are described. To date three different beam combinations have been collided for physics production: gold-gold, deuteron-gold, and proton-proton(polarized). To facilitate this flexibility the rf systems of the two rings are independent and self-sufficient. Techniques to cope with problems such as, injection/capture, beam loading, bunch shortening, and rf noise have evolved and are explained.

  19. Properties of nano structured Ag-TiO{sub 2} composite coating on stainless steel using RF sputtering method

    SciTech Connect

    Bakar, S. Abu; Jamuna-Thevi, K.; Abu, N.; Mohd Toff, M. R.

    2012-07-02

    RF Sputtering system is one of the Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) methods that have been widely used to produce hard coating. This technique is used to deposit thin layers of metallic substrates such as stainless steel (SS). From this process, a good adhesiveness and wear resistance coating can be produced for biomedical applications. In this study, RF sputtering method was used to deposit TiO{sub 2}-Ag composite coatings via various deposition parameters. The parameters are RF power of 350W, gas composition (Ar: O{sub 2}) 50:5 and deposition time at 1, 2, 4 and 6 hours. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize surface area of coated samples. The formation of nanocrystalline thin film and the surface morphology were examined using SEM. The crystallite size of TiO{sub 2}-Ag composite coatings were estimated between 20-60 nm based on XRD analysis using Scherer equation and SEM evaluation. The Raman and XRD results suggested that the structure of the TiO{sub 2}-Ag consist of anatase and rutile phases. It also showed that the intensity of anatase peaks increased after samples undergone annealing process at 500 Degree-Sign C.

  20. Properties of nano structured Ag-TiO2 composite coating on stainless steel using RF sputtering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakar, S. Abu; Jamuna-Thevi, K.; Abu, N.; Mohd Toff, M. R.

    2012-07-01

    RF Sputtering system is one of the Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) methods that have been widely used to produce hard coating. This technique is used to deposit thin layers of metallic substrates such as stainless steel (SS). From this process, a good adhesiveness and wear resistance coating can be produced for biomedical applications. In this study, RF sputtering method was used to deposit TiO2-Ag composite coatings via various deposition parameters. The parameters are RF power of 350W, gas composition (Ar: O2) 50:5 and deposition time at 1, 2, 4 and 6 hours. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize surface area of coated samples. The formation of nanocrystalline thin film and the surface morphology were examined using SEM. The crystallite size of TiO2-Ag composite coatings were estimated between 20-60 nm based on XRD analysis using Scherer equation and SEM evaluation. The Raman and XRD results suggested that the structure of the TiO2-Ag consist of anatase and rutile phases. It also showed that the intensity of anatase peaks increased after samples undergone annealing process at 500 °C.

  1. RF SYSTEM FOR THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRODOWSKI, J.; DELONG, J.; METH, M.; SMITH, K.; ZALTSMAN, A.

    2001-06-18

    During accumulation the RF beam current in the spallation neutron source ring rises from 0 to 50 amperes. A clean, 250 nanosecond gap is needed for the extraction kicker risetime. Large momentum spread and small peak current are needed to prevent instabilities and stopband related losses. A robust RF system meeting these requirements has been designed.

  2. Single frequency RF powered ECG telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. H.; Hynecek, J.; Homa, J.

    1979-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a radio frequency magnetic field can be used to power implanted electronic circuitry for short range telemetry to replace batteries. A substantial reduction in implanted volume can be achieved by using only one RF tank circuit for receiving the RF power and transmitting the telemetered information. A single channel telemetry system of this type, using time sharing techniques, was developed and employed to transmit the ECG signal from Rhesus monkeys in primate chairs. The signal from the implant is received during the period when the RF powering radiation is interrupted. The ECG signal is carried by 20-microsec pulse position modulated pulses, referred to the trailing edge of the RF powering pulse. Satisfactory results have been obtained with this single frequency system. The concept and the design presented may be useful for short-range long-term implant telemetry systems.

  3. Multi-level RF identification system

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Kerry D.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2004-07-20

    A radio frequency identification system having a radio frequency transceiver for generating a continuous wave RF interrogation signal that impinges upon an RF identification tag. An oscillation circuit in the RF identification tag modulates the interrogation signal with a subcarrier of a predetermined frequency and modulates the frequency-modulated signal back to the transmitting interrogator. The interrogator recovers and analyzes the subcarrier signal and determines its frequency. The interrogator generates an output indicative of the frequency of the subcarrier frequency, thereby identifying the responding RFID tag as one of a "class" of RFID tags configured to respond with a subcarrier signal of a predetermined frequency.

  4. The CEBAF RF Separator System Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hovater; Mark Augustine; Al Guerra; Richard Nelson; Robert Terrell; Mark Wissmann

    2004-08-01

    The CEBAF accelerator uses RF deflecting cavities operating at the third sub-harmonic (499 MHz) of the accelerating frequency (1497 MHz) to ''kick'' the electron beam to the experimental halls. The cavities operate in a TEM dipole mode incorporating mode enhancing rods to increase the cavity's transverse shunt impedance [1]. As the accelerators energy has increased from 4 GeV to 6 GeV the RF system, specifically the 1 kW solid-state amplifiers, have become problematic, operating in saturation because of the increased beam energy demands. Two years ago we began a study to look into replacement for the RF amplifiers and decided to use a commercial broadcast Inductive Output Tube (IOT) capable of 30 kW. The new RF system uses one IOT amplifier on multiple cavities as opposed to one amplifier per cavity as was originally used. In addition, the new RF system supports a proposed 12 GeV energy upgrade to CEBAF. We are currently halfway through the upgrade with three IOTs in operation and the remaining one nearly installed. This paper reports on the new RF system and the IOT performance.

  5. RF System High Power Amplifier Software Conversion at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    G. Lahti; H. Dong; T. Seegerger

    2006-10-31

    Jefferson Lab is in the process of converting the RF system from analog RF modules and non-smart high power amplifiers (HPAs) to digital RF modules and smart HPAs. The present analog RF module controls both the RF signal and the non-smart HPA hardware. The new digital RF module will only control the RF signal, so the new HPA must include embedded software. This paper will describe the conversion from a software perspective, including the initial testing, the intermediate mixed system of old and new units, and finally the totally new RF system.

  6. Iodization of rf sputter induced disordered Ag thin films reveals volume plasmon-exciton 'transition'

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathi Mohan, D.; Sunandana, C. S.

    2006-09-15

    Quasiamorphous Ag films of thicknesses ranging from 5 to 30 nm were prepared using rf magnetron sputtering technique and their controlled iodization was carried out for selected durations in the range of 15 min-60 h at room temperature. As deposited Ag and iodized films were characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM), and optical absorption techniques. From XRD, {gamma} and {beta}+{gamma} (mixed) phases of AgI nanoparticles have been observed for 5-10 and 20-30 nm thick films, respectively. Lattice parameters (a and c) and average strain ({epsilon}) were calculated versus iodization time for {gamma} and {beta}-AgI nanoparticles. Uniform and nonuniform spherically shaped AgI nanoparticles ({approx}20-130 nm) are realized through AFM for 5-10 and 20-30 nm thick films. Optical absorption shows volume plasmons (classified as PR1) for short duration iodization, which ''decay'' upon further iodization to convert to Z{sub 1,2} and Z{sub 3} excitons at 420 and 330 nm, respectively, in the manner of a metal-semiconductor/dielectric phase transition. Ag 'colloidal' particles (classified as PR2) are formed for 5-10 nm thick films and thereby control the {gamma} phase--a significant and applicable effect attributed to critical film thickness. With increasing thickness, a surface strain field lifting the degeneracy of the valence band results in Z{sub 1,2} and Z{sub 3} exciton formation at room temperature. Blueshift in the exciton absorption with decreasing film thickness implies the progressive quantum confinement due to decrease in the particle size. A thickness induced phase transition from {gamma}-AgI to {beta}-AgI is discussed by means of x-ray diffraction and optical absorption studies.

  7. The AGS Booster control system

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, R.; Auerbach, E.; Culwick, B.; Clifford, T.; Mandell, S.; Mariotti, R.; Salwen, C.; Schumburg, N.

    1988-01-01

    Although moderate in size, the Booster construction project requires a comprehensive control system. There are three operational modes: as a high intensity proton injector for the AGS, as a heavy ion accelerator and injector supporting a wide range of ions and as a polarized proton storage injector. These requirements are met using a workstation based extension of the existing AGS control system. Since the Booster is joining a complex of existing accelerators, the new system will be capable of supporting multiuser operational scenarios. A short discussion of this system is discussed in this paper.

  8. Airborne RF Measurement System and Analysis of Representative Flight RF Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Smith, Laura J.; Jones, Richard A.; Fleck, Vincent J.; Salud, Maria Theresa; Mielnik, John

    2007-01-01

    Environmental radio frequency (RF) data over a broad band of frequencies were needed to evaluate the airspace around several airports. An RF signal measurement system was designed using a spectrum analyzer connected to an aircraft VHF/UHF navigation antenna installed on a small aircraft. This paper presents an overview of the RF measurement system and provides analysis of a sample of RF signal measurement data over a frequency range of 30 MHz to 1000 MHz.

  9. Airborne RF Measurement System (ARMS) and Analysis of Representative Flight RF Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Smith, Laura J.; Jones, Richard A.; Fleck, Vincent J.; Salud, Maria Theresa; Mielnik, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Environmental radio frequency (RF) data over a broad band of frequencies (30 MHz to 1000 MHz) were obtained to evaluate the electromagnetic environment in airspace around several airports. An RF signal measurement system was designed utilizing a spectrum analyzer connected to the NASA Lancair Columbia 300 aircraft's VHF/UHF navigation antenna. This paper presents an overview of the RF measurement system and provides analysis of sample RF signal measurement data. This aircraft installation package and measurement system can be quickly returned to service if needed by future projects requiring measurement of an RF signal environment or exploration of suspected interference situations.

  10. Modular open RF architecture: extending VICTORY to RF systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melber, Adam; Dirner, Jason; Johnson, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Radio frequency products spanning multiple functions have become increasingly critical to the warfighter. Military use of the electromagnetic spectrum now includes communications, electronic warfare (EW), intelligence, and mission command systems. Due to the urgent needs of counterinsurgency operations, various quick reaction capabilities (QRCs) have been fielded to enhance warfighter capability. Although these QRCs were highly successfully in their respective missions, they were designed independently resulting in significant challenges when integrated on a common platform. This paper discusses how the Modular Open RF Architecture (MORA) addresses these challenges by defining an open architecture for multifunction missions that decomposes monolithic radio systems into high-level components with welldefined functions and interfaces. The functional decomposition maximizes hardware sharing while minimizing added complexity and cost due to modularization. MORA achieves significant size, weight and power (SWaP) savings by allowing hardware such as power amplifiers and antennas to be shared across systems. By separating signal conditioning from the processing that implements the actual radio application, MORA exposes previously inaccessible architecture points, providing system integrators with the flexibility to insert third-party capabilities to address technical challenges and emerging requirements. MORA leverages the Vehicular Integration for Command, Control, Communication, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR)/EW Interoperability (VICTORY) framework. This paper concludes by discussing how MORA, VICTORY and other standards such as OpenVPX are being leveraged by the U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command (RDECOM) Communications Electronics Research, Development, and Engineering Center (CERDEC) to define a converged architecture enabling rapid technology insertion, interoperability and reduced SWaP.

  11. Superconductor Digital-RF Receiver Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhanov, Oleg A.; Kirichenko, Dmitri; Vernik, Igor V.; Filippov, Timur V.; Kirichenko, Alexander; Webber, Robert; Dotsenko, Vladimir; Talalaevskii, Andrei; Tang, Jia Cao; Sahu, Anubhav; Shevchenko, Pavel; Miller, Robert; Kaplan, Steven B.; Sarwana, Saad; Gupta, Deepnarayan

    Digital superconductor electronics has been experiencing rapid maturation with the emergence of smaller-scale, lower-cost communications applications which became the major technology drivers. These applications are primarily in the area of wireless communications, radar, and surveillance as well as in imaging and sensor systems. In these areas, the fundamental advantages of superconductivity translate into system benefits through novel Digital-RF architectures with direct digitization of wide band, high frequency radio frequency (RF) signals. At the same time the availability of relatively small 4K cryocoolers has lowered the foremost market barrier for cryogenically-cooled digital electronic systems. Recently, we have achieved a major breakthrough in the development, demonstration, and successful delivery of the cryocooled superconductor digital-RF receivers directly digitizing signals in a broad range from kilohertz to gigahertz. These essentially hybrid-technology systems combine a variety of superconductor and semiconductor technologies packaged with two-stage commercial cryocoolers: cryogenic Nb mixed-signal and digital circuits based on Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) technology, room-temperature amplifiers, FPGA processing and control circuitry. The demonstrated cryocooled digital-RF systems are the world's first and fastest directly digitizing receivers operating with live satellite signals in X-band and performing signal acquisition in HF to L-band at ˜30GHz clock frequencies.

  12. ILC RF System R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The Linac Group at SLAC is actively pursuing a broad range of R&D to improve the reliability and reduce the cost of the L-band (1.3 GHz) rf system proposed for the ILC linacs. Current activities include the long-term evaluation of a 120 kV Marx Modulator driving a 10 MW Multi-Beam Klystron, design of a second-generation Marx Modulator, testing of a sheet-beam gun and beam transport system for a klystron, construction of an rf distribution system with remotely-adjustable power tapoffs, and development of a system to combine the power from many klystrons in low-loss circular waveguide where it would be tapped-off periodically to power groups of cavities. This paper surveys progress during the past few years.

  13. NSLS-II RF Cryogenic System

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Dilgen, T.; Gash, B.; Gosman, J.; Mortazavi, P.; Papu, J.; Ravindranath, V.; Sikora, R.; Sitnikov, A.; Wilhelm, H.; Jia, Y.; Monroe, C.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II is a 3 GeV X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. A new helium refrigerator system has been installed and commissioned to support the superconducting RF cavities in the storage ring. Special care was taken to provide very stable helium and LN2 pressures and flow rates to minimize microphonics and thermal effects at the cavities. Details of the system design along with commissioning and early operations data will be presented.

  14. Modulator considerations for the SNS RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Reass, W.A.

    1998-12-31

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an intense neutron source for neutron scattering experiments. The project is in the research stage, with construction funding beginning next year. The SNS is comprised of an ion source, a 1,000 MeV, H{sup {minus}} linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, a neutron producing target, and experimental area to utilize the scattering of the neutrons. The linear accelerator is RF driven, and the peak beam current is 27 mA and the beam duty factor is 5.84%. The peak RF power required is 104 MW, and the H{sup {minus}} beam pulse length is 0.97 ms at a 60 Hz repetition rate. The RF pulses must be about 0.1 ms longer than the beam pulses, due to the Q of the accelerating cavities, and the time required to establish control of the cavity fields. The modulators for the klystrons in this accelerator are discussed in this paper. The SNS is designed to be expandable, so the beam power can be doubled or even quadrupled in the future. One of the double-power options is to double the beam pulse length and duty factor. The authors are specifying the klystrons to operate in this twice-duty-factor mode, and the modulator also should be expandable to 2 ms pulses at 60 Hz. Due to the long pulse length and low RF frequency of 805 MHz, the klystron power is specified at 2.5 MW peak, and the RF system will have 56 klystrons at 805 MHz, and three 1.25 MW peak power klystrons at 402.5 MHz for the low energy portion of the accelerator. The low frequency modulators are conventional floating-deck modulation anode control systems.

  15. Superconducting RF systems for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Belomestnykh S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Hahn, H. et al

    2012-05-20

    The proposed electron-hadron collider eRHIC will consist of a six-pass 30-GeV electron Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and one of RHIC storage rings operating with energy up to 250 GeV. The collider design extensively utilizes superconducting RF (SRF) technology in both electron and hadron parts. This paper describes various SRF systems, their requirements and parameters.

  16. RF cavity vacuum interlock system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, K.; Crawford, K.; Bundy, R.; Dylla, H. F.; Heckman, J.; Marshall, J.; Nichols, R.; Osullivan, S.; Preble, J.; Robb, J.

    1992-03-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a continuous wave (CW) 4 GeV Electron Accelerator is undergoing construction in Newport News, Virginia. When completed in 1994, the accelerator will be the largest installation of radio-frequency superconductivity. Production of cryomodules, the fundamental building block of the machine, has started. A cryomodule consists of four sets of pairs of 1497 MHz, 5 cell niobium cavities contained in separate helium vessels and mounted in a cryostat with appropriate end caps for helium supply and return. Beam vacuum of the cavities, the connecting beam piping, the waveguides, and the cryostat insulating vacuum are crucial to the performance of the machine. The design and initial experience of the vacuum systems for the first 2 1/4 cryomodules that makeup the 45 MEV injector are discussed.

  17. New AGS fast extraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1980-09-01

    Both the high energy physics program and ISA injection require an improved fast extraction system from the AGS. The proposed new system consists of a fast kicker at H5 and an ejector magnet at H10. The H5 kicker is capable of producing 1.2 mrad deflection and rising up to 99% strength in 150 nsec with flat top ripple within +- 1%. It is found that the focusing strengths and positions of UQ3-UQ7 have to be modified to achieve an achromatic condition at the end of 8/sup 0/-bend. Also, the conceptual design of the H5 magnet and the pulser system are discussed.

  18. ACCELERATORS: RF system design and measurement of HIRF-CSRe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhe; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Wang, Chun-Xiao; Xia, Jia-Wen; Zhan, Wen-Long; Bian, Zhi-Bin

    2009-05-01

    An RF system for the CSRe (cooling storage experimental ring) is designed and manufactured domestically. The present paper mainly describes the RF system design in five main sections: ferrite ring, RF cavity, RF generator, low level system and cavity cooling. The cavity is based on a type of coaxial resonator which is shorted at the end with one gap and loaded with domestic ferrite rings. The RF generator is designed in the push-pull mode and the low level control system is based on a DSP+FGPA+DDS+USB interface and has three feedback loops. Finally we give the results of the measurement on our system.

  19. UNCERTAIN SYSTEM MODELING OF SNS RF CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    S. KWON; A. REGAN; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    This paper addresses the modeling problem of the linear accelerator RF system for SNS. The cascade of the klystron and the cavity is modeled as a nominal system. In the real world, high voltage power supply ripple, Lorentz Force Detuning, microphonics, cavity RF parameter perturbations, distortions in RF components, and loop time delay imperfection exist inevitably, which must be analyzed. The analysis is based on the accurate modeling of the disturbances and uncertainties. In this paper, a modern control theory is applied for modeling the disturbances, uncertainties, and for analyzing the closed loop system robust performance.

  20. The ALS Storage Ring RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B.; Lo, C.C.; Baptiste, K.; Guigli, J.; Julian, J.

    1993-05-01

    The ALS Storage Ring RF System is characterized by the use of the following features: (1) High power loading of two single cell cavities. (2) The use of a tubular ceramic input window employing aperture coupling. (3) The use of waveguide filters and matchers designed for HOM absorption. (4) A comprehensive HOM monitoring system. (5) The use of waveguide water-wedge loads for the magic tee and circulator loads. The results of cavity measurements and high power tests are reported together with the performance of the system during the commissioning and operation phases of the ALS project. Plans for future window development are discussed.

  1. Epitaxial growth of lead zirconium titanate thin films on Ag buffered Si substrates using rf sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chun; Laughlin, David E.; Kryder, Mark H.

    2007-04-23

    Epitaxial lead zirconium titanate (PZT) (001) thin films with a Pt bottom electrode were deposited by rf sputtering onto Si(001) single crystal substrates with a Ag buffer layer. Both PZT(20/80) and PZT(53/47) samples were shown to consist of a single perovskite phase and to have the (001) orientation. The orientation relationship was determined to be PZT(001)[110](parallel sign)Pt(001)[110](parallel sign)Ag(001)[110](parallel sign)Si(001)[110]. The microstructure of the multilayer was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electron diffraction pattern confirmed the epitaxial relationship between each layer. The measured remanent polarization P{sub r} and coercive field E{sub c} of the PZT(20/80) thin film were 26 {mu}C/cm{sup 2} and 110 kV/cm, respectively. For PZT(53/47), P{sub r} was 10 {mu}C/cm{sup 2} and E{sub c} was 80 kV/cm.

  2. Fermilab Tevatron high level rf accelerating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.; Kerns, C.; Miller, H.; Tawser, S.; Reid, J.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

    1985-06-01

    Eight tuned rf cavities have been installed and operated in the F0 straight section of the Tevatron. Their mechanical placement along the beam line enables them to be operated for colliding beams as two independent groups of four cavities, group 1-4 accelerating antiprotons and group 5-8 accelerating protons. The only difference is that the spacing between cavities 4 and 5 was increased to stay clear of the F0 colliding point. The cavities can easily be rephased by switching cables in a low-level distribution system (fan-out) so that the full accelerating capability of all eight cavities can be used during fixed target operations. Likewise, the cables from capacitive probes on each cavity gap can be switched to proper lengths and summed in a fan-back system to give an rf signal representing the amplitude and phase as ''seen by the beam,'' separately for protons and antiprotons. Such signals have been used to phase lock the Tevatron to the Main Ring for synchronous transfer.

  3. Whip antenna design for portable rf systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnapalli, Saila; Canora, Frank J.

    1995-12-01

    Whip type antennas are probably the most commonly used antennas in portable rf systems, such as cordless and cellular phones, rf enabled laptop computers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and handheld computers. Whip antennas are almost always mounted on the chassis which contains the radio and other electronics. The chassis is usually a molded plastic which is coated with a conducting paint for EMI purposes. The chassis which appears as a lossy conductor to the antenna, has several effects -- detuning, altering the gain of the antenna, and shadowing its radiation pattern. Extensive modeling and measurements must be performed in order to fully characterize the affects of the chassis on the whip antenna, and to optimize antenna type, orientation and position. In many instances, modeling plays a more important role in prediction of the performance of whip antennas, since measurements become difficult due to the presence of common mode current on feed cables. In this paper models and measurements are used to discuss the optimum choice of whip antennas and the impact of the chassis on radiation characteristics. A modeling tool which has been previously described and has been successfully used to predict radiated field patterns is used for simulations, and measured and modeled results are shown.

  4. LHC RF System Time-Domain Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    Non-linear time-domain simulations have been developed for the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These simulations capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction and are structured to reproduce the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They are also a valuable tool for the study of diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Results from these studies and related measurements from PEP-II and LHC have been presented in multiple places. This report presents an example of the time-domain simulation implementation for the LHC.

  5. Measurements for low level RF control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simrock, S. N.

    2007-08-01

    The low level RF control system for the European x-ray free electron laser, which is based on TESLA technology, requires information on a large number of signals and parameters which are either directly measurable as physical signals or must be derived from the physical signals. In most cases, calibrations are required to obtain the desired quantities. The measured signals are used in the real time feedback loops for field and resonance control, and for diagnostic purposes to support automation and exception handling. Good system models and powerful signal processors (including field programmable gate arrays and digital signal processors) combined with fast communication links allow for processing a large number of complex algorithms in real time. Several of these algorithms have been implemented at the free electron laser at Hamburg (FLASH) for evaluation and have increased the availability of the facility for user operation.

  6. The system of RF beam control for electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, A. M.; Chernousov, Yu. D.; Ivannikov, V. I.; Levichev, A. E.; Shebolaev, I. V.

    2015-06-01

    The system of RF control of three-electrode electron gun current is described. It consists of a source of microwave signal, coaxial line, coaxial RF switch and RF antenna lead. The system allows one to get the electron beam in the form of bunches with the frequency of the accelerating section to achieve the capture of particles in the acceleration mode close to 100%. The results of calculation and analysis of the elements of the system are presented. Characteristics of the devices are obtained experimentally. The results of using RF control in three-electrode electron gun at electron linear accelerator are described.

  7. Conceptual design of the 26. 7 MHz RF system for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Deng, D.P.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.; Pirkl, W.; Ratti, A.

    1993-01-01

    The 26.7 MHz (harmonic No. h=342) RF system will be used to capture the injected bunched beam from the AGS and accelerate it to a kinetic energy of up to 250 GeV for protons; 100 GeV/u for gold ions. All ions except protons cross transition, and are finally transferred to a storage RF system working at 196 MHz. Each RHIC ring will be provided with two single-ended capacitively loaded quarter-wave cavities; each of these can be dynamically tuned by 100 kHz to compensate for the change in speed of the beam, and can deliver at least 200 kV voltage. A 100 kW tetrode amplifier with local RF feedback is directly coupled to the cavity to minimize phase delay. Prototypes of cavity and amplifier have been built and first test results are presented.

  8. Conceptual design of the 26.7 MHz RF system for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Deng, D.P.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.; Pirkl, W.; Ratti, A.

    1993-06-01

    The 26.7 MHz (harmonic No. h=342) RF system will be used to capture the injected bunched beam from the AGS and accelerate it to a kinetic energy of up to 250 GeV for protons; 100 GeV/u for gold ions. All ions except protons cross transition, and are finally transferred to a storage RF system working at 196 MHz. Each RHIC ring will be provided with two single-ended capacitively loaded quarter-wave cavities; each of these can be dynamically tuned by 100 kHz to compensate for the change in speed of the beam, and can deliver at least 200 kV voltage. A 100 kW tetrode amplifier with local RF feedback is directly coupled to the cavity to minimize phase delay. Prototypes of cavity and amplifier have been built and first test results are presented.

  9. Superconducting Quantum Arrays for Broadband RF Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornev, V.; Sharafiev, A.; Soloviev, I.; Kolotinskiy, N.; Mukhanov, O.

    2014-05-01

    Superconducting Quantum Arrays (SQAs), homogenous arrays of Superconducting Quantum Cells, are developed for implementation of broadband radio frequency (RF) systems capable of providing highly linear magnetic signal to voltage transfer with high dynamic range, including active electrically small antennas (ESAs). Among the proposed quantum cells which are bi-SQUID and Differential Quantum Cell (DQC), the latter delivered better performance for SQAs. A prototype of the transformer-less active ESA based on a 2D SQA with nonsuperconducting electric connection of the DQCs was fabricated using HYPRES niobium process with critical current density 4.5 kA/cm2. The measured voltage response is characterized by a peak-to-peak swing of ~100 mV and steepness of ~6500 μV/μT.

  10. Fermilab tevatron high level RF accelerating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.; Kerns, C.; Miller, H.; Reid, J.; Tawzer, S.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

    1985-10-01

    Eight tuned rf cavities have been installed and operated in the F0 straight section of the Tevatron. Their mechanical placement along the beam line enables them to be operated for colliding beams as two independent groups of four cavities, group 1-4 accelerating antiprotons and group 5-8 accelerating protons. The only difference is that the spacing between cavities 4 and 5 was increased to stay clear of the F0 colliding point. The cavities can easily be rephased by switching cables in a low-level distribution system (fan-out) so that the full accelerating capability of all eight cavities can be used during fixed target operations. Likewise, the cables from capacitive probes on each cavity gap can be switched to proper lengths and summed in a fan-back system to give an rf signal representing the amplitude and phase as ''seen by the beam,'' separately for protons and antiprotons. Such signals have been used to phase lock the Tevatron to the Main Ring for synchronous transfer. A cavity consists of two quarter-wave resonators placed back to back with a coaxial drift tube separating the two accelerating gaps by ..pi.. radians. The cavities are very similar to the prototype which has been previously described/sup 3/ and is operating as Station 8 in the Tevatron. Only additional water cooling around the high current region of the drift tube supports and a double loop used to monitor the unbalance current through the Hipernom mode damping resistor have been added. Each cavity has a Q of about7100, a shunt impedance of 1.2 M..cap omega.., and is capable of running cw with a peak accelerating voltage of 360

  11. Rf system considerations for a large hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Raka, E.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, we shall discuss how we arrive at a particular choice of voltage and frequency; the type of acceleration structure that would be suitable for obtaining the required voltage and resonant impedance; static beam loading including a simplified beam stability criterion involving the beam current and total rf system shunt impedance; the basic principle of rf phase and frequency control loops; and the effect of rf noise and its interaction with these loops. Finally, we shall consider the need for and design of rf systems to damp independently coherent oscillations of individual bunches or groups of bunches. 30 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Ruth, Ronald D.; Zolotorev, Max

    1998-01-01

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  13. Booster Synchrotron RF System Upgrade for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sanghyun; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    Recent progress at the SPEAR3 includes the increase in stored current from 100 mA to 200 mA and top-off injection to allow beamlines to stay open during injection. Presently the booster injects 3.0 GeV beam to SPEAR3 three times a day. The stored beam decays to about 150 mA between the injections. The growing user demands are to increase the stored current to the design value of 500 mA, and to maintain it at a constant value within a percent or so. To achieve this goal the booster must inject once every few minutes. For improved injection efficiency, all RF systems at the linac, booster and SPEAR3 need to be phase-locked. The present booster RF system is basically a copy of the SPEAR2 RF system with 358.5 MHz and 40 kW peak RF power driving a 5-cell RF cavity for 1.0 MV gap voltage. These requirements entail a booster RF system upgrade to a scaled down version of the SPEAR3 RF system of 476.3 MHz with 1.2 MW cw klystron output power capabilities. We will analyze each subsystem option for their merits within budgetary and geometric space constraints. A substantial portion of the system will come from the decommissioned PEP-II RF stations.

  14. A FLYING WIRE SYSTEM IN THE AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG,H.; BUXTON,W.; MAHLER,G.; MARUSIC,A.; ROSER,T.; SMITH,G.; SYPHERS,M.; WILLIAMS,N.; WITKOVER,R.

    1999-03-29

    As the AGS prepares to serve as the injector for RHIC, monitoring and control of the beam transverse emittance become a major and important topic. Before the installation of the flying wire system, the emittance was measured with ionization profile monitors in the AGS, which require correction for space charge effects. It is desirable to have a second means of measuring profile that is less depend on intensity. A flying wire system has been installed in the AGS recently to perform this task. This paper discusses the hardware and software setup and the capabilities of the system.

  15. A self-adaptive feedforward rf control system for linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Renshan; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Xie, Jialin

    1993-01-01

    The design and performance of a self-adaptive feedforward rf control system are reported. The system was built for the linac of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Variables of time along the linac macropulse, such as field or phase are discretized and represented as vectors. Upon turn-on or after a large change in the operating-point, the control system acquires the response of the system to test signal vectors and generates a linearized system response matrix. During operation an error vector is generated by comparing the linac variable vectors and a target vector. The error vector is multiplied by the inverse of the system's matrix to generate a correction vector is added to an operating point vector. This control system can be used to control a klystron to produce flat rf amplitude and phase pulses, to control a rf cavity to reduce the rf field fluctuation, and to compensate the energy spread among bunches in a rf linac. Beam loading effects can be corrected and a programmed ramp can be produced. The performance of the control system has been evaluated on the control of a klystron's output as well as an rf cavity. Both amplitude and phase have been regulated simultaneously. In initial tests, the rf output from a klystron has been regulated to an amplitude fluctuation of less than ±0.3% and phase variation of less than ±0.6°. The rf field of the ATF's photo-cathode microwave gun cavity has been regulated to ±0.5% in amplitude and simultaneously to ±1° in phase. Regulating just the rf field amplitude in the rf gun cavity, we have achieved amplitude fluctuation of less than ±0.2%.

  16. RF modulated fiber optic sensing systems and their applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Eustace, John G.

    1992-01-01

    A fiber optic sensing system with an intensity sensor and a Radio Frequency (RF) modulated source was shown to have sensitivity and resolution much higher than a comparable system employing low modulating frequencies or DC mode of operation. Also the RF modulation with an appropriate configuration of the sensing system provides compensation for the unwanted intensity losses. The basic principles and applications of a fiber optic sensing system employing an RF modulated source are described. In addition the paper discusses various configurations of the system itself, its components, and modulation and detection schemes. Experimental data are also presented.

  17. Versatile Low Level RF System For Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, James M.

    2011-06-01

    The Low Level RF (LLRF) system is the source of all of the rf signals required for an rf linear accelerator. These signals are amplified to drive accelerator and buncher cavities. It can even provide the synchronizing signal for the rf power for a synchrotron. The use of Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS) techniques results in a versatile system that can provide multiple coherent signals at the same or different frequencies with adjustable amplitudes and phase relations. Pulsing the DDS allows rf switching with an essentially infinite on/off ratio. The LLRF system includes a versatile phase detector that allows phase-locking the rf frequency to a cavity at any phase angle over the full 360 deg. range. With the use of stepper motor driven slug tuners multiple cavity resonant frequencies can be phase locked to the rf source frequency. No external phase shifters are required and there is no feedback loop phase setup required. All that is needed is to turn the frequency feedback on. The use of Digital Signal Processing (DSP) allows amplitude and phase control over the entire rf pulse. This paper describes the basic principles of a LLRF system that has been used for both proton accelerators and electron accelerators, including multiple tank accelerators, sub-harmonic and fundamental bunchers, and synchrotrons.

  18. Traveling Wave RF Systems for Helical Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Lunin, A.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Romanov, G.; Neubauer, M.; Johnson, R.P.; Thorndahl, L.; /CERN

    2009-05-01

    The great advantage of the helical ionization cooling channel (HCC) is its compact structure that enables the fast cooling of muon beam 6-dimensional phase space. This compact aspect requires a high average RF gradient, with few places that do not have cavities. Also, the muon beam is diffuse and requires an RF system with large transverse and longitudinal acceptance. A traveling wave system can address these requirements. First, the number of RF power coupling ports can be significantly reduced compared with our previous pillbox concept. Secondly, by adding a nose on the cell iris, the presence of thin metal foils traversed by the muons can possibly be avoided. We show simulations of the cooling performance of a traveling wave RF system in a HCC, including cavity geometries with inter-cell RF power couplers needed for power propagation.

  19. A Design and Performance Analysis Tool for Superconducting RF Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilcher, Th.; Simrock, S. N.; Merminga, L.; Wang, D. X.

    1997-05-01

    Superconducting rf systems are usually operated with continuous rf power or with rf pulse lengths exceeding 1 ms to maximize the overall plug power efficiency. Typical examples are CEBAF at Jefferson Lab and the TESLA Test Facility at DESY. The long pulses allow for effective application of feedback to stabilize the accelerating field in presence of microphonics, Lorentz force detuning, and fluctuations of the beam current. In this paper we describe a set of tools to be used with MATLAB and SIMULINK, which allow to analyse the quality of field regulation for a given design. The tools include models for the cavities, the rf power source, the beam, sources of field perturbations, and the rf feedback system. The rf control relevant electrical and mechanical characteristics of the cavity are described in form of time-varying state space models. The power source is modeled as a current generator and includes saturation characteristics and noise. An arbitrary time structure can be imposed on the beam current to reflect a macro-pulse stucture and bunch charge fluctuations. For rf feedback several schemes can be selected: Traditional amplitude and phase control as well as I/Q control. The choices for the feedback controller include analog or digital approaches and various choices of frequency response. Feedforward can be added to further supress repetitive errors. The results of a performance analysis of the CEBAF and the TESLA Linac rf system using these tools are presented.

  20. A design and performance analysis tool for superconducting RF systems

    SciTech Connect

    T. Schilcher; S.N. Simrock; L. Merminga; D.X. Wang

    1997-05-01

    Superconducting rf systems are usually operated with continuous rf power or with rf pulse lengths exceeding 1 ms to maximize the overall wall plug power efficiency. Typical examples are CEBAF at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) and the TESLA Test Facility at DESY. The long pulses allow for effective application of feedback to stabilize the accelerating field in presence of microphonics, Lorentz force detuning, and fluctuations of the beam current. In this paper the authors describe a set of tools to be used with MATLAB and SIMULINK, which allow to analyze the quality of field regulation for a given design. The tools include models for the cavities, the rf power source, the beam, sources of field perturbations, and the rf feedback system. The rf control relevant electrical and mechanical characteristics of the cavity are described in form of time-varying state space models. The power source is modeled as a current generator and includes saturation characteristics and noise.An arbitrary time structure can be imposed on the beam current to reflect a macro-pulse structure and bunch charge fluctuations. For rf feedback several schemes can be selected: Traditional amplitude and phase control as well as I/Q control. The choices for the feedback controller include analog or digital approaches and various choices of frequency response. Feed forward can be added to further suppress repetitive errors. The results of a performance analysis of the CEBAF and the TESLA Linac rf system using these tools are presented.

  1. Simplified RF power system for Wideroe-type linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Fugitt, J.; Howard, D.; Crosby, F.; Johnson, R.; Nolan, M.; Yuen, G.

    1981-03-01

    The RF system for the SuperHILAC injector linac was designed and constructed for minimum system complexity, wide dynamic range, and ease of maintenance. The final amplifier is close coupled to the linac and operates in an efficient semilinear mode, eliminating troublesome transmission lines, modulators, and high level regulators. The system has been operated at over 250 kW, 23 MHz with good regulation. The low level RF electronics are contained in a single chassis adjacent to the RF control computer, which monitors all important operating parameters. A unique 360/sup 0/ phase and amplitude modular is used for precise control and regulation of the accelerating voltage.

  2. Control electronics of the PEP RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrin, J.L.; Schwarz, H.

    1981-01-01

    The operation of the major components used for controlling the phase and field level of the PEP RF cavities is described. The control electronics of one RF station is composed of several control loops: each cavity has a tuners' servo loop which maintains the frequency constant and also keeps the fields of each cavity balanced; the total gap voltage developed by a pair of cavities is regulated by a gap voltage controller; finally, the phase variation along the amplification chain, the klystron and the cavities are compensated by a phase lock loop. The design criteria of each loop are set forth and the circuit implementation and test results are presented.

  3. LEDA RF distribution system design and component test results

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, W.T.; Rees, D.E.; Borchert, H.L.; McCarthy, M.; Toole, L.

    1998-12-31

    The 350 MHz and 700 MHz RF distribution systems for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) have been designed and are currently being installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Since 350 MHz is a familiar frequency used at other accelerator facilities, most of the major high-power components were available. The 700 MHz, 1.0 MW, CW RF delivery system designed for LEDA is a new development. Therefore, high-power circulators, waterloads, phase shifters, switches, and harmonic filters had to be designed and built for this applications. The final Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) RF distribution systems design will be based on much of the same technology as the LEDA systems and will have many of the RF components tested for LEDA incorporated into the design. Low power and high-power tests performed on various components of these LEDA systems and their results are presented here.

  4. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF A CAPTURE RF SYSTEM FOR MUON COLLIDERS.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSE,J.

    2001-06-18

    A conceptual RF System design provides a basis for a more detailed engineering study to explore the technical issues involved in fabricating and testing a capture RF system in a proton-driver target experiment. A large-bore 71 MHz cavity design is detailed which is self-consistent with a proton-driver target experiment at BNL. Analysis of cell to cell coupling in a linac composed of a string of such cavitites is presented.

  5. RF system considerations for large high-duty-factor linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.T.; Ziomek, C.D.; Tallerico, P.J.; Regan, A.H.; Eaton, L.; Lawrence, G.

    1994-09-01

    RF systems are often a major cost item for linacs, but this is especially true for large high-duty-factor linacs (up to and including CW) such as the Accelerator for Production of Tritium (APT) or the Accelerator for Transmutation of nuclear Waste (ATW). In addition, the high energy and high average beam current of these machines (approximately 1 GeV, 100--200 mA) leads to a need for excellent control of the accelerating fields in order to minimize the possibility of beam loss in the accelerator and the resulting activation. This paper will address the key considerations and limitations in the design of the RF system. These considerations impact the design of both the high power RF components and the RF controls. As might be expected, the two concerns sometimes lead to conflicting design requirements. For example minimum RF operating costs lead to a desire for operation near saturation of the high power RF generators in order to maximize the operating efficiency. Optimal control of the RF fields leads to a desire for maximum overdrive capability in those same generators in order to respond quickly to disturbances of the accelerator fields.

  6. High power RF systems for the BNL ERL project

    SciTech Connect

    Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2011-03-28

    The Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) project, now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires two high power RF systems. The first RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting electron gun. The RF power from this system is used to drive nearly half an Ampere of beam current to 2 MeV. There is no provision to recover any of this energy so the minimum amplifier power is 1 MW. It consists of 1 MW CW klystron, transmitter and power supplies, 1 MW circulator, 1 MW dummy load and a two-way power splitter. The second RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting cavity. The system accelerates the beam to 54.7 MeV and recovers this energy. It will provide up to 50 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. It consists of 50 kW transmitter, circulator, and dummy load. This paper describes the two high power RF systems and presents the test data for both.

  7. R&D ERL: High power RF systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zaltsman, A.

    2010-01-15

    The Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) project, now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires two high power RF systems. The first RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting electron gun. The RF power from this system is used to drive nearly half an Ampere of beam current to 2.5 MeV. There is no provision to recover any of this energy so the minimum amplifier power is 1 MW. It consists of 1 MW CW klystron, transmitter and power supplies, 1 MW circulator, 1 MW dummy load and a two-way power splitter. The second RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting cavity. The system accelerates the beam to 54.7 MeV and recovers this energy. It will provide up to 50 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. It consists of 50 kW transmitter, circulator, and dummy load. This paper describes the two high power RF systems and presents the test data for both.

  8. Connect Global Positioning System RF Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Garth W.; Young, Lawrence E.; Ciminera, Michael A.; Tien, Jeffrey Y.; Gorelik, Jacob; Okihiro, Brian Bachman; Koelewyn, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    The CoNNeCT Global Positioning System RF Module (GPSM) slice is part of the JPL CoNNeCT Software Defined Radio (SDR). CoNNeCT is the Communications, Navigation, and Net working reconfigurable Testbed project that is part of NASA's Space Communication and Nav igation (SCaN) Program. The CoNNeCT project is an experimental dem onstration that will lead to the advancement of SDRs and provide a path for new space communication and navigation systems for future NASA exploration missions. The JPL CoNNeCT SDR will be flying on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2012 in support of the SCaN CoNNeCT program. The GPSM is a radio-frequency sampler module (see Figure 1) that directly sub-harmonically samples the filtered GPS L-band signals at L1 (1575.42 MHz), L2 (1227.6 MHz), and L5 (1176.45 MHz). The JPL SDR receives GPS signals through a Dorne & Margolin antenna mounted onto a choke ring. The GPS signal is filtered against interference, amplified, split, and fed into three channels: L1, L2, and L5. In each of the L-band channels, there is a chain of bandpass filters and amplifiers, and the signal is fed through each of these channels to where the GPSM performs a one-bit analog-to-digital conversion (see Figure 2). The GPSM uses a sub-harmonic, single-bit L1, L2, and L5 sampler that samples at a clock rate of 38.656 MHz. The new capability is the down-conversion and sampling of the L5 signal when previous hardware did not provide this capability. The first GPS IIF Satellite was launched in 2010, providing the new L5 signal. With the JPL SDR flying on the ISS, it will be possible to demonstrate navigation solutions with 10-meter 3-D accuracy at 10-second intervals using a field-program mable gate array (FPGA)-based feedback loop running at 50 Hz. The GPS data bits will be decoded and used in the SDR. The GPSM will also allow other waveforms that are installed in the SDR to demonstrate various GNSS tracking techniques.

  9. RF system at HIRFL-CSR main ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. Z.; Zhang, D. S.; Zhan, W. L.

    2001-12-01

    A heavy ion cooler-storage ring HIRFL-CSR[1] has been constructed at IMP. It consists of a main ring (CSRm) and an experimental ring (CSRe). Two RF cavities will be employed for CSRm. One is for beam acceleration, and another is for beam RF stacking. The accelerating cavity is designed to accelerate the beam from 10-50 MeV/u to 400-900 MeV/u with harmonic number h=1. The peak RF voltage is 8.0 kV and frequency range is from 0.25 MHz to 1.7 MHz. The RF stacking cavity with maximum voltage amplitude of 20 kV and tunable frequency range 6.0-14.0 MHz is used to capture the injected bunches from injector SSC (or SFC) and to accumulate the beam to high intensity by RF stacking method. In the present paper, the designed RF parameters and the details of hardware for the RF system are described.

  10. SIMULATION STUDY AND INITIAL TEST OF THESNS RING RF SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Hengjie; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Champion, Mark; Chu, Paul; Cousineau, Sarah M; Hardek, Thomas W; Plum, Michael A; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Piller, Chip

    2008-01-01

    The rfsimulator code was developed for the study of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) dual-harmonic ring RF control. It uses time-domain solvers to compute beam-cavity interactions and FFT methods to simulate the time responses of the linear RF system. The important elements of the system considered in the model include beam loading, dynamic cavity detuning, circuit bandwidth, loop delay, proportional-integral controller for feedback and adaptive feed forward, stochastic noise, width-in-turn loop parameter change, beam current fluctuation, and bunch leakage. As the beam power increases, beam loss in the ring goes up and thus precise control of the bunching RF phase and amplitude is required to limit beam loss. The code will help in the development of a functional RF control and in achieving the goal of minimizing beam loss in the accumulator ring.

  11. Rf system for the NSLS coherent infrared radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Broome, W.; Biscardi, R.; Keane, J.; Mortazavi, P.; Thomas, M.; Wang, J.M.

    1995-05-01

    The existing NSLS X-ray Lithography Source (XLS Phase I) is being considered for a coherent synchrotron radiation source. The existing 211 MHz warm cavity will be replaced with a 5-cell 2856 MHz superconducting RF cavity, driven by a series of 2 kW klystrons. The RF system will provide a total V{sub RF} of 1.5 MV to produce {sigma}{sub L} = 0.3 mm electron bunches at an energy of 150 MeV. Superconducting technology significantly reduces the required space and power needed to achieve the higher voltage. It is the purpose of this paper to describe the superconducting RF system and cavity, power requirements, and cavity design parameters such as input coupling, Quality Factor, and Higher Order Modes.

  12. Design of 250-MW CW RF system for APT

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.

    1997-09-01

    The design for the RF systems for the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) proton linac will be presented. The linac produces a continuous beam power of 130 MW at 1300 MeV with the installed capability to produce up to a 170 MW beam at 1700 MeV. The linac is comprised of a 350 MHz RFQ to 7 MeV followed in sequence by a 700 MHz coupled-cavity drift tube linac, coupled-cavity linac, and superconducting (SC) linac to 1700 MeV. At the 1700 MeV, 100 mA level the linac requires 213 MW of continuous-wave (CW) RF power. This power will be supplied by klystrons with a nominal output power of 1.0 MW. 237 kystrons are required with all but three of these klystrons operating at 700 MHz. The klystron count includes redundancy provisions that will be described which allow the RF systems to meet an operational availability in excess of 95 percent. The approach to achieve this redundancy will be presented for both the normal conducting (NC) and SC accelerators. Because of the large amount of CW RF power required for the APT linac, efficiency is very important to minimize operating cost. Operation and the RF system design, including in-progress advanced technology developments which improve efficiency, will be discussed. RF system performance will also be predicted. Because of the simultaneous pressures to increase RF system reliability, reduce tunnel envelope, and minimize RF system cost, the design of the RF vacuum windows has become an important issue. The power from a klystron will be divided into four equal parts to minimize the stress on the RF vacuum windows. Even with this reduction, the RF power level at the window is at the upper boundary of the power levels employed at other CW accelerator facilities. The design of a 350 MHz, coaxial vacuum window will be presented as well as test results and high power conditioning profiles. The transmission of 950 kW, CW, power through this window has been demonstrated with only minimal high power conditioning.

  13. Rf System Requirements for JLab’s MEIC Collider Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaoheng; Li, Rui; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Zhang, Yuhong

    2013-06-01

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC), proposed by Jefferson Lab, consists of a series of accelerators. At the top energy are the electron and ion collider rings. For the ion ring, it accelerates five long ion bunches to colliding energy and rebunches ions into a train of very short bunches before colliding. A set of low frequency RF system is needed for the long ion bunch energy ramping. Another set of high frequency RF cavities is needed to rebunch ions. For the electron ring, superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are needed to compensate the synchrotron radiation energy loss. The impedance of the SRF cavities must be low enough to keep the high current electron beam stable. The preliminary design requirements of these RF cavities are presented.

  14. STUDIES ON THE RCMS RF SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO,Y.

    2003-01-22

    This note addresses the various options for the Rapid Cycling Medical Synchrotron (RCMS) RF. The study was divided into three cases, namely non-tuning, tuning and filter. Each case also includes a few options. The primary study was focused on the non-tuning options. However, it was found that it requires too much driver power to cover the wide band and thus causes the cost being too high to be competitive. The proposal of RCMS is not yet clear if it can be approved or not. The results of this study might be useful to other similar machines.

  15. A New RF System for the CEBAF Normal Conducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Curt Hovater; Hai Dong; Alicia Hofler; George Lahti; John Musson; Tomasz Plawski

    2004-08-01

    The CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab is a 6 GeV five pass electron accelerator consisting of two superconducting linacs joined by independent magnetic transport arcs. CEBAF also has numerous normal conducting cavities for beam conditioning in the injector and for RF extraction to the experimental halls. The RF systems that presently control these cavities are becoming expensive to maintain, therefore a replacement RF control system is now being developed. For the new RF system, cavity field control is maintained digitally using an FPGA which contains the feedback algorithm. The system incorporates digital down conversion, using quadrature under-sampling at an IF frequency of 70 MHz. The VXI bus-crate was chosen as the operating platform because of its excellent RFI/EMI properties and its compatibility with the EPICS control system. The normal conducting cavities operate at both the 1497 MHz accelerating frequency and the sub-harmonic frequency of 499 MHz. To accommodate this, the ne w design will use different receiver-transmitter daughter cards for each frequency. This paper discusses the development of the new RF system and reports on initial results.

  16. Applications of barrier bucket RF systems at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, the barrier rf systems have become important tools in a variety of beam manipulation applications at synchrotrons. Four out of six proton synchrotrons at Fermilab are equipped with broad-band barrier rf systems. All of the beam manipulations pertaining to the longitudinal phase space in the Fermilab Recycler (synchrotron used for antiproton storage) are carried out using a barrier system. Recently, a number of new applications of barrier rf systems have been developed- the longitudinal momentum mining, longitudinal phase-space coating, antiproton stacking, fast bunch compression and more. Some of these techniques have been critical for the recent spectacular success of the collider performance at the Fermilab Tevatron. Barrier bunch coalescing to produce bright proton bunches has a high potential to increase proton antiproton luminosity significantly. In this paper, I will describe some of these techniques in detail. Finally, I make a few general remarks on issues related to barrier systems.

  17. New rf power system for SuperHILAC

    SciTech Connect

    Fugitt, J.; Lancaster, H.; Sorensen, R.

    1985-05-01

    The upgraded rf system for the SuperHILAC is now operational using 9 new tetrode amplifiers. Each amplifier can produce in excess of 1MW of 70 Mhz pulsed rf power. Ferrite is used to decouple the screen grid circuit and to absorb parasitic oscillations. This results in a very stable amplifier with reasonable gain. This system uses a common 8 MW anode power supply and crowbar system. Overall system efficiency has been increased significantly. We project a 3 year payback on the equipment cost, realized from the power savings alone. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Overview and status of RF systems for the SSC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Mynk, J.; Grippe, J.; Cutler, R.I.; Rodriguez, R.

    1993-05-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Linear Accelerator (Linac) produces a 600-MeV, 35-{mu}s, H-beam at a 10-Hz repetition rate. The beam is accelerated by a series of RF cavities. These consist of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), two bunchers, and four Drift Tube Linac (DTL) tanks at 427.617 MHz, and two bunchers, nine side-coupled Linac modules, and an energy compressor at 1282.851 MHz. The RFQ amplifier and the low-frequency buncher cavity amplifiers use gridded tubes, while the other cavities use klystron amplifier systems. The RF control system consists of a reference line and cavity feedback and feedforward loops for each amplifier. The RF amplifier system for each of these accelerator cavities is described, and the current status of each system is presented.

  19. Klystron 'efficiency loop' for the ALS storage ring RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Julian, Jim; Baptiste, Kenneth

    2002-05-20

    The recent energy crisis in California has led us to investigate the high power RF systems at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to decrease the energy consumption and power costs. We found the Storage Ring Klystron Power Amplifier system operating as designed but with significant power waste. A simple proportional-integrator (PI) analog loop, which controls the klystron collector beam current, as a function of the output RF power, has been designed and installed. The design considerations, besides efficiency improvement, were to interface to the existing system without major expense. They were to also avoid the klystron cathode power supply filter's resonance in the loop's dynamics, and prevent a conflict with the existing Cavity RF Amplitude Loop dynamics. This efficiency loop will allow us to save up to 700 MW-hours of electrical energy per year and increase the lifetime of the klystron.

  20. Low Level RF System for Jefferson Lab Cryomodule Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski; Trent Allison; Jean Delayen; J. Hovater; Thomas Powers

    2003-05-01

    The Jefferson Lab Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) has been upgraded to test and commission SNS and CEBAF Energy Upgrade cryomodules. Part of the upgrade was to modernize the superconducting cavity instrumentation and control. We have designed a VXI based RF control system exclusively for the production testing of superconducting cavities. The RF system can be configured to work either in Phase Locked Loop (PLL) or Self Excited Loop (SEL) mode. It can be used to drive either SNS 805 MHz or CEBAF Energy Upgrade 1497 MHz superconducting cavities and can be operated in pulsed or continuous wave (CW) mode. The base design consists of RF-analog and digital sections. The RF-analog section includes a Voltage Control Oscillator (VCO), phase detector, I&Q modulator and ''low phase shift'' limiter. The digital section controls the analog section and includes ADC, FPGA, and DAC . We will discuss the design of the RF system and how it relates to the support of cavity testing.

  1. PERFORMANCE OF THE AGS TRANSITION JUMP SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    AHRENS,L.A.; BRENNAN,J.M.; GLENN,J.W.; ROSER,T.; VAN ASSELT,W.K.

    1999-03-29

    The transition jump system has been indispensable to the high intensity proton operation of the AGS complex. Nevertheless, transition crossing remains one of the major hurdles as the accelerator complex intensity is pushed upward. To enhance the performance of the system ''quadrupole pumping'' in the Booster is used to minimize the necessary longitudinal dilution of the beam on the AGS injection porch. During the transition jump sextupole correctors at strategic locations are pulsed to minimize the effects of the chromatic non-linearity of the jump system. The available instrumentation for diagnosing the performance of the system will be described, along with installed hardware to counter the non-linear effects of the transition jump system.

  2. Klystron based high power rf system for proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, Manjiri; Shrotriya, Sandip; Sharma, Sonal; Patel, Niranjan; Handu, Verander E-mail: manjiri08@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    As a part of ADS program a proton accelerator (20 MeV, 30 mA) and its high power RF systems (HPRF) are being developed in BARC. This paper explains design details of this klystron based HPRF system. (author)

  3. An Orbiting Standards Platform for communication satellite system RF measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, R. G.; Woodruff, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Orbiting Standards Platform (OSP) is a proposed satellite dedicated to performing RF measurements on space communications systems. It would consist of a quasi-geostationary spacecraft containing an ensemble of calibrated RF sources and field strength meters operating in several microwave bands, and would be capable of accurately and conveniently measuring critical earth station and satellite RF performance parameters, such as EIRP, gain, figure of merit (G/T), crosspolarization, beamwidth, and sidelobe levels. The feasibility and utility of the OSP concept has been under joint study by NASA, NBS, Comsat and NTIA. A survey of potential OSP users was conducted by NTIA as part of this effort. The response to this survey, along with certain trends in satellite communications system design, indicates a growing need for such a measurement service.

  4. The RF power system for the SNS linac

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Reass, W.A.

    1998-12-31

    The initial goal of the SNS project is to produce a 1 MW average beam of protons with short pulse lengths onto a neutron-producing target. The objective of the SNS RF system is to generate 117 MW peak of pulsed 805 MHz microwave power with an accelerated beam pulse length of 1.04 ms at a 60 Hz repetition rate. The power system must be upgradeable in peak power to deliver 2 MW average power to the neutron target. The RF system also requires about 3 MW peak of RF power at 402.5 MHz, but that system is not discussed here. The design challenge is to produce an RF system at minimum cost, that is very reliable and economical to operate. The combination of long pulses and high repetition rates make conventional solutions, such as the pulse transformer and transmission line method, very expensive. The klystron, with a modulating anode, and 1.5 MW of peak output power is the baseline RF amplifier, an 56 are required in the baseline design. The authors discuss four power system configurations that are the candidates for the design. The baseline design is a floating-deck modulating anode system. A second power system being investigated is the fast-pulsed power supply, that can be turned on and off with a rise time of under 0.1 ms. This could eliminate the need for a modulator, and drastically reduce the energy storage requirements. A third idea is to use a pulse transformer with a series IGBT switch and a bouncer circuit on the primary side, as was done for the TESLA modulator. A fourth method is to use a series IGBT switch at high voltage, and not use a pulse transformer. The authors discuss the advantages and problems of these four types of power systems, but they emphasize the first two.

  5. Compact rf polarizer and its application to pulse compression systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzi, Matthew; Wang, Juwen; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel method of reducing the footprint and increasing the efficiency of the modern multi-MW rf pulse compressor. This system utilizes a high power rf polarizer to couple two circular waveguide modes in quadrature to a single resonant cavity in order to replicate the response of a traditional two cavity configuration using a 4-port hybrid. The 11.424 GHz, high-Q, spherical cavity has a 5.875 cm radius and is fed by the circularly polarized signal to simultaneously excite the degenerate T E114 modes. The overcoupled spherical cavity has a Q0 of 9.4 ×104 and coupling factor (β ) of 7.69 thus providing a loaded quality factor QL of 1.06 ×104 with a fill time of 150 ns. Cold tests of the polarizer demonstrated good agreement with the numerical design, showing transmission of -0.05 dB and reflection back to the input rectangular WR 90 waveguide less than -40 dB over a 100 MHz bandwidth. This novel rf pulse compressor was tested at SLAC using XL-4 Klystron that provided rf power up to 32 MW and generated peak output power of 205 MW and an average of 135 MW over the discharged signal. A general network analysis of the polarizer is discussed as well as the design and high power test of the rf pulse compressor.

  6. Superfluid helium cryogenic systems for superconducting RF cavities at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, H.; Hara, K.; Honma, T.; Hosoyama, K.; Kojima, Y.; Nakanishi, K.; Kanekiyo, T.; Morita, S.

    2014-01-29

    Recent accelerator projects at KEK, such as the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) for R and D of the International Linear Collider (ILC) project and the compact Energy Recovery Linac (cERL), employ superconducting RF cavities made of pure niobium, which can generate high gradient acceleration field. Since the operation temperature of these cavities is selected to be 2 K, we have developed two 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems for stable operation of superconducting RF cavities for each of STF and cERL. These two 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems are identical in principle. Since the operation mode of the cavities is different for STF and cERL, i.e. the pulse mode for STF and the continuous wave mode for cERL, the heat loads from the cavities are quite different. The 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems mainly consists of ordinary helium liquefiers/refrigerators, 2 K refrigerator cold boxes, helium gas pumping systems and high-performance transfer lines. The 2 K refrigerators and the high-performance transfer lines are designed by KEK. Some superconducting RF cavity cryomodules have been already connected to the 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems for STF and cERL respectively, and cooled down to 2 K successfully.

  7. Theory and Practice of Cavity RF Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Powers

    2006-08-28

    Over the years Jefferson Lab staff members have performed about 2500 cold cavity tests on about 500 different superconducting cavities. Most of these cavities were later installed in 73 different cryomodules, which were used in three different accelerators. All of the cavities were tested in our vertical test area. About 25% of the cryomodules were tested in our cryomodule test facility and later commissioned in an accelerator. The remainder of the cryomodules were tested and commissioned after they were installed in their respective accelerator. This paper is an overview which should provide a practical background in the RF systems used to test the cavities as well as provide the mathematics necessary to convert the raw pulsed or continuous wave RF signals into useful information such as gradient, quality factor, RF-heat loads and loaded Q?s. Additionally, I will provide the equations necessary for determining the measurement error associated with these values.

  8. Report of the workshop on rf heating in mirror systems

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.E.; Woo, J.T.

    1980-08-01

    This report is prepared from the proceedings of the Workshop on RF Heating in Magnetic Mirror Systems held at DOE Headquarters in Washington, DC, on March 10-12, 1980. The workshop was organized into four consecutive half-day sessions of prepared talks and one half-day discussion. The first session on tandem mirror concepts and program plans served to identify the opportunities for the application of rf power and the specific approaches that are being pursued. A summary of the ideas presented in this session is given. The following sessions of the workshop were devoted to an exposition of current theoretical and experimental knowledge on the interaction of rf power with magnetically confined, dense, high temperature plasmas at frequencies near the electron cyclotron resonance, lower hybrid resonance and ion cyclotron resonance (including magnetosonic) ranges. The conclusions from these proceedings are presented.

  9. The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan

    2008-12-01

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  10. THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE CRYOMODULE TEST STAND RF SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Crofford, Mark T; Ball, Jeffrey Allen; Davidson Jr, Taylor L; Hardek, Thomas W; Heidenreich, Dale A; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kang, Yoon

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has recently commissioned a cryomodule test facility for the repair and testing of the super-conducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. This facility utilizes the original 402.5/805 MHz Radio Frequency (RF) Klystron Test Stand as its power source along with dual Low Level RF (LLRF) control systems. One control system is based on the standard SNS Linac LLRF controls with a second system for open-loop only control. The system is designed to allow simultaneous testing of devices in the test cave and other devices which can be tested outside of the enclosure. Initial tests have shown good results; some improvements are yet to be implemented.

  11. Surface migration and volume diffusion in the AgGaSe2-Ag2Se system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, N.-H.; Feigelson, R. S.; Route, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    Surface migration and volume diffusion in the Ag2Se-AgGaSe2 system were investigated using reactive diffusion couples which were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. The surface diffusivities of all mobile species are found to be much larger than volume diffusivities. The results of the study suggest that Se moves together with Ag and Ga to maintain binary (Ag2Se and Ga2Se3) stoichiometry and electroneutrality. The dominance of surface migration kinetics can account for the uniform annihilation of second-phase precipitates during heat treatments.

  12. The AGS Booster beam loss monitor system

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, E.R.; Bennett, G.W.; Witkover, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    A beam loss monitor system has been developed for the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster accelerator, and is designed for use with intensities of up to 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} protons and carbon to gold ions at 50-3 {times} 10{sup 9} ions per pulse. This system is a significant advance over the present AGS system by improving the sensitivity, dynamic range, and data acquisition. In addition to the large dynamic range achievable, it is adaptively shifted when high losses are detected. The system uses up to 80 argon filled ion chambers as detectors, as well as newly designed electronics for processing and digitizing detector outputs. The hardware simultaneously integrates each detector output, interfaces to the beam interrupt systems, and digitizes all 80 channels to 21 bits at 170 KHz. This paper discuses the design, construction, and operation of the system. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Coordination Chemistry of Diiodine and Implications for the Oxidation Capacity of the Synergistic Ag(+) /X2 (X=Cl, Br, I) System.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Przemysław J; Himmel, Daniel; Krossing, Ingo

    2016-08-01

    The synergistic Ag(+) /X2 system (X=Cl, Br, I) is a very strong, but ill-defined oxidant-more powerful than X2 or Ag(+) alone. Intermediates for its action may include [Agm (X2 )n ](m+) complexes. Here, we report on an unexpectedly variable coordination chemistry of diiodine towards this direction: (A)Ag-I2 -Ag(A), [Ag2 (I2 )4 ](2+) (A(-) )2 and [Ag2 (I2 )6 ](2+) (A(-) )2 ⋅(I2 )x≈0.65 form by reaction of Ag(A) (A=Al(OR(F) )4 ; R(F) =C(CF3 )3 ) with diiodine (single crystal/powder XRD, Raman spectra and quantum-mechanical calculations). The molecular (A)Ag-I2 -Ag(A) is ideally set up to act as a 2 e(-) oxidant with stoichiometric formation of 2 AgI and 2 A(-) . Preliminary reactivity tests proved this (A)Ag-I2 -Ag(A) starting material to oxidize n-C5 H12 , C3 H8 , CH2 Cl2 , P4 or S8 at room temperature. A rough estimate of its electron affinity places it amongst very strong oxidizers like MF6 (M=4d metals). This suggests that (A)Ag-I2 -Ag(A) will serve as an easily in bulk accessible, well-defined, and very potent oxidant with multiple applications. PMID:27411163

  14. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mini RF System (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozette, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Miniature Radio Frequency (Mini-RF) system is manifested on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) as a technology demonstration and an extended mission science instrument. Mini-RF represents a significant step forward in space-borne RF technology and architecture. It combines synthetic aperture radar (SAR) at two wavelengths (S and X band) and two resolutions (150 m and 30 m) with interferometric and communications functionality in one lightweight (16kg) package. Previous radar observations (Earth-based, and one bistatic data set from Clementine) of the permanently shadowed regions of the lunar poles seem to indicate areas of high circular polarization ratio (CPR) consistent with volume scattering from volatile deposits (e.g. water ice) buried at shallow (0.1-1 m) depth, but only at unfavorable viewing geometries, and with inconclusive results (ref. 1-5). The LRO Mini-RF utilizes new wide band hybrid polarization architecture to measure the Stokes parameters of the reflected signal. These data will help to differentiate “true” volumetric ice reflections from ”false” returns due to angular surface regolith (ref. 6) . Additional lunar science investigations (e.g. pyroclastic deposit characterization) will also be attempted during the LRO extended mission. LRO’s lunar operations will be contemporaneous with India’s Chandrayaan-1, which carries the Forerunner Mini-SAR (S band wavelength and 150-m resolution). On orbit calibration procedures for LRO Mini RF have been validated using Chandrayaan 1 and ground based facilities (Arecibo and Greenbank Radio Observatories). References: 1) Nozette S. et al. (1996) Science 274, 1495. 2) Simpson R. and Tyler L. (1999) JGR 104, 3845. 3) Nozette S. et al. (2001) JGR 106, 23253. 4) Campbell D. et al., (2006) Nature 443, 835. 5) Feldman W. et al., (2001) JGR 106, 23231. 6) Raney R.K. (2007) IEEE Trans Geosci. Remote Sens. 45, 3397

  15. Controlling satellite communication system unwanted emissions in congested RF spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Donald; Heymann, Roger

    2007-09-01

    The International Telecommunication Union (ITU), a United Nations (UN) agency, is the agency that, under an international treaty, sets radio spectrum usage regulations among member nations. Within the United States of America (USA), the organization that sets regulations, coordinates an application for use, and provides authorization for federal government/agency use of the radio frequency (RF) spectrum is the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). In this regard, the NTIA defines which RF spectrum is available for federal government use in the USA, and how it is to be used. The NTIA is a component of the United States (U.S.) Department of Commerce of the federal government. The significance of ITU regulations is that ITU approval is required for U.S. federal government/agency permission to use the RF spectrum outside of U.S. boundaries. All member nations have signed a treaty to do so. U.S. federal regulations for federal use of the RF spectrum are found in the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management, and extracts of the manual are found in what is known as the Table of Frequency Allocations. Nonfederal government and private sector use of the RF spectrum within the U.S. is regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). There is a need to control "unwanted emissions" (defined to include out-of-band emissions, which are those immediately adjacent to the necessary and allocated bandwidth, plus spurious emissions) to preclude interference to all other authorized users. This paper discusses the causes, effects, and mitigation of unwanted RF emissions to systems in adjacent spectra. Digital modulations are widely used in today's satellite communications. Commercial communications sector standards are covered for the most part worldwide by Digital Video Broadcast - Satellite (DVB-S) and digital satellite news gathering (DSNG) evolutions and the second generation of DVB-S (DVB-S2) standard

  16. Rf power system for the chopper/buncher system on the NBS-Los Alamos RTM

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Keffeler, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The rf power system and its closed-loop feedback control for the racetrack microtron (RTM) chopper/buncher system are described. Measurements made on the response of the feedback system to external perturbations will also be reported.

  17. SRF and RF systems for LEReC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J. C.; Fedotov, A.; McIntyre, G.; Polizzo, S.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Tuozzolo, J.; Veshcherevich, V.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.

    2015-05-03

    The Low Energy RHIC electron Cooling (LEReC) is under development at BNL to improve RHIC luminosity at low energies. It will consist of a short electron linac and two cooling sections, one for blue and one for yellow rings. For the first stage of the project, LEReC-I, we will install a 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity and three normal conducting cavities operating at 9 MHz, 704 MHz and 2.1 GHz. The SRF cavity will boost the electron beam energy up to 2 MeV. The warm cavities will be used to correct the energy spread introduced in the SRF cavity. The paper describes layouts of the SRF and RF systems, their parameters and status.

  18. RF MEMS and Their Applications in NASA's Space Communication Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. Daniel; Ponchak, George E.; Simons, Rainee N.; Zaman, Afroz; Kory, Carol; Wintucky, Edwin; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Scardelletti, Maximilian; Lee, Richard; Nguyen, Hung

    2001-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) and microwave communication systems rely on frequency, amplitude, and phase control circuits to efficiently use the available spectrum. Phase control circuits are required for electronically scanning phase array antennas that enable radiation pattern shaping, scanning, and hopping. Two types of phase shifters, which are the phase control circuits, are most often used. The first is comprised of two circuits with different phase characteristics such as two transmission lines of different lengths or a high pass and low pass filter and a switch that directs the RF power through one of the two circuits. Alternatively, a variable capacitor, or varactor, is used to change the effective electrical path length of a transmission line, which changes the phase characteristics. Filter banks are required for the diplexer at the front end of wide band communication satellites. These filters greatly increase the size and mass of the RF/microwave systems, but smaller diplexers may be made with a low loss varactor or a group of capacitors, a switch and an inductor.

  19. The AGS Booster Beam Position Monitor system

    SciTech Connect

    Ciardullo, D.J.; Abola, A.; Beadle, E.R.; Smith, G.A.; Thomas, R.; Van Zwienen, W.; Warkentien, R.; Witkover, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    To accelerate both protons and heavy ions, the AGS Booster requires a broadband (multi-octave) beam position monitoring system with a dynamic range spanning several orders of magnitude (2 {times} 10{sup 10} to 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} particles per pulse). System requirements include the ability to acquire single turn trajectory and average orbit information with {plus minus} 0.1 mm resolution. The design goal of {plus minus} 0.5 mm corrected accuracy requires that the detectors have repeatable linear performance after periodic bakeout at 300 {degree}C. The system design and capabilities of the Booster Beam Position Monitor will be described, and initial results presented. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  20. RF heating systems evolution for the WEST project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magne, R.; Achard, J.; Armitano, A.; Argouarch, A.; Berger-By, G.; Bernard, J. M.; Bouquey, F.; Charabot, N.; Colas, L.; Corbel, E.; Delpech, L.; Durodié, F.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Guilhem, D.; Hillairet, J.; Jacquot, J.; Joffrin, E.; Litaudon, X.; Milanesio, D.; Lombard, G.; Moerel, J.; Mollard, P.; Prou, M.; van Helvoirt, J.; Volpe, R.; Vulliez, K.; Wittebol, E.

    2014-02-01

    Tore Supra is dedicated to long pulse operation at high power, with a record in injected energy of 1 GJ (2.8 MW × 380 s) and an achieved capability of 12 MW injected power delivered by 3 RF systems: Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD), Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH). The new WEST project (W [tungsten] Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) aims at fitting Tore Supra with an actively cooled tungsten coated wall and a bulk tungsten divertor. This new device will offer to ITER a test bed for validating the relevant technologies for actively cooled metallic components, with D-shaped H-mode plasmas. For WEST operation, different scenarii able to reproduce ITER relevant conditions in terms of steady state heat loads have been identified, ranging from a high RF power scenario (15 MW, 30 s) to a high fluence scenario (10 MW, 1000 s). This paper will focus on the evolution of the RF systems required for WEST. For the ICRH system, the main issues are its ELM resilience and its CW compatibility, three new actively cooled antennas are being designed, with the aim of reducing their sensitivity to the load variations induced by ELMs. The LH system has been recently upgraded with new klystrons and the PAM antenna, the possible reshaping of the antenna mouths is presently studied for matching with the magnetic field line in the WEST configuration. For the ECRH system, the device for the poloidal movement of the mirrors of the antenna is being changed for higher accuracy and speed.

  1. RF heating systems evolution for the WEST project

    SciTech Connect

    Magne, R.; Achard, J.; Armitano, A.; Argouarch, A.; Berger-By, G.; Bernard, J. M.; Bouquey, F.; Charabot, N.; Colas, L.; Corbel, E.; Delpech, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Guilhem, D.; Hillairet, J.; Jacquot, J.; Joffrin, E.; Litaudon, X.; Lombard, G.; Mollard, P.; and others

    2014-02-12

    Tore Supra is dedicated to long pulse operation at high power, with a record in injected energy of 1 GJ (2.8 MW × 380 s) and an achieved capability of 12 MW injected power delivered by 3 RF systems: Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD), Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH). The new WEST project (W [tungsten] Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) aims at fitting Tore Supra with an actively cooled tungsten coated wall and a bulk tungsten divertor. This new device will offer to ITER a test bed for validating the relevant technologies for actively cooled metallic components, with D-shaped H-mode plasmas. For WEST operation, different scenarii able to reproduce ITER relevant conditions in terms of steady state heat loads have been identified, ranging from a high RF power scenario (15 MW, 30 s) to a high fluence scenario (10 MW, 1000 s). This paper will focus on the evolution of the RF systems required for WEST. For the ICRH system, the main issues are its ELM resilience and its CW compatibility, three new actively cooled antennas are being designed, with the aim of reducing their sensitivity to the load variations induced by ELMs. The LH system has been recently upgraded with new klystrons and the PAM antenna, the possible reshaping of the antenna mouths is presently studied for matching with the magnetic field line in the WEST configuration. For the ECRH system, the device for the poloidal movement of the mirrors of the antenna is being changed for higher accuracy and speed.

  2. High Gradient Operation with the CEBAF Upgrade RF Control System

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hovater; G. Davis; Hai Dong; Alicia Hofler; Lawrence King; John Musson; Tomasz Plawski

    2006-08-16

    The CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab is presently a 6 GeV five pass electron accelerator consisting of two superconducting linacs joined by independent magnetic transport arcs. Energy will be upgraded to 12 GeV with the addition of 10 new high gradient cryomodules (17+ MV/m). The higher gradients pose significant challenges beyond what the present analog low level RF (LLRF) control systems can handle reliably; therefore, a new LLRF control system is needed. A prototype system has been developed incorporating a large FPGA and using digital down and up conversion to minimize the need for analog components. The new system is more flexible and less susceptible to drifts and component nonlinearities. Because resonance control is critical to reach high gradients quickly, the new cryomodules will include a piezoelectric tuner for each cavity, and the LLRF controls must incorporate both feedback and feed-forward methods to achieve optimal resonance control performance. This paper discusses development of the new RF system, system performance for phase and amplitude stability and resonance control under Lorentz detuning measured during recent tests on a prototype cryomodule.

  3. RF H and CD systems for DEMO - Challenges and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, T.; Wenninger, R.; Barbato, E.; Cardinali, A.; Cesario, R.; Mirizzi, F.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Eester, D. V.; Lerche, E.

    2014-02-12

    The aim of driving a sufficient amount of plasma current with an appropriate radial current density profile is considered as one of the key challenges for a tokamak fusion power plant in steady state operation. Furthermore, efficient heating to enable transition to regime of enhanced confinement and to achieve breakeven plasma temperatures as well as MHD control and plasma breakdown assistance are required. In the framework of the EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology (PPPT) activities, the ability of the Electron cyclotron (EC), Ion Cyclotron (IC) and Lower Hybrid (LH) systems to fulfil these requirements, was studied for a demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO). As boundary condition, a 1D description of the plasma for a pulsed DEMO based on system code studies combined with transport analysis was developed. The predicted 1D plasma parameters were used to calculate the current drive (CD) efficiency of each system and eventually optimised it. As an example, the EC current drive efficiency could be increased strongly by top launch compared to equatorial launch at least by a factor of two. For the IC system, two possible windows of operation for standard and higher frequencies were highlighted, whereby again top launch leads to higher CD-efficiencies. The efficiencies predicted for DEMO for the RF current drive systems will be presented. Finally, gaps in the feasibility of RF systems under DEMO relevant conditions will be identified.

  4. Design and test results of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) RF systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.; Bradley, J. III; Cummings, K.; Lynch, M.; Regan, A.; Rohlev, T.; Roybal, W.; Wang, Y.M.

    1998-12-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. The APT accelerator requires over 200 RF systems each with a continuous wave output power of 1 MW. The reliability and availability of these RF systems is critical to the successful operation of the APT plant and prototypes of these systems are being developed and demonstrated on LEDA. The RF system design for LEDA includes three, 1.2 MW, 350 MHz continuous wave (CW), RF systems driving a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and one, 1.0 MW, CW, RF system driving a coupled-cavity drift tube linac (CCDTL). This paper presents the design and test results for these RF systems including the klystrons, cathode power supply, circulators, RF vacuum windows, accelerator field and resonance control system, and RF transmission components. The three RF systems driving the RFQ use the accelerating structure as a power combiner, and this places some unique requirements on the RF system. These requirements and corresponding operational implications will be discussed.

  5. Barrier RF system and applications in Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Takagi, A.; Zheng, H.; /Caltech

    2005-05-01

    A novel broadband RF system--the barrier RF--has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector (MI). It uses nanocrystal magnetic alloy called Finemet and high voltage fast MOSFET switches. The system delivers {+-}10 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. It can stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity is increased. The high intensity beams have been successfully accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is under investigation. A second system will be installed during the fall shutdown and be tested for the so-called fast stacking scheme to continuously stack up to 12 Booster batches in the MI. This system is also used for cleaning up the leaking-out dc beams from slip stacking to reduce beam loss. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  6. Phase synchronization of multiple klystrons in RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, S.; Regan, A.; Wang, Y.M.; Rohlev, T.

    1998-12-31

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of the Acceleration Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. The first LEDA RF system includes three, 1.2 MW, 350 MHz, continuous wave, klystrons driving a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). A phase control loop is necessary for each individual klystron in order to guarantee the phase matching of these klystrons. To meet this objective, they propose adaptive PI controllers which are based on simple adaptive control. These controllers guarantee not only phase matching but also amplitude matching.

  7. rf power system for thrust measurements of a helicon plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Kieckhafer, Alexander W.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.

    2010-07-15

    A rf power system has been developed, which allows the use of rf plasma devices in an electric propulsion test facility without excessive noise pollution in thruster diagnostics. Of particular importance are thrust stand measurements, which were previously impossible due to noise. Three major changes were made to the rf power system: first, the cable connection was changed from a balanced transmission line to an unbalanced coaxial line. Second, the rf power cabinet was placed remotely in order to reduce vibration-induced noise in the thrust stand. Finally, a relationship between transmission line length and rf was developed, which allows good transmission of rf power from the matching network to the helicon antenna. The modified system was tested on a thrust measurement stand and showed that rf power has no statistically significant contribution to the thrust stand measurement.

  8. rf power system for thrust measurements of a helicon plasma source.

    PubMed

    Kieckhafer, Alexander W; Walker, Mitchell L R

    2010-07-01

    A rf power system has been developed, which allows the use of rf plasma devices in an electric propulsion test facility without excessive noise pollution in thruster diagnostics. Of particular importance are thrust stand measurements, which were previously impossible due to noise. Three major changes were made to the rf power system: first, the cable connection was changed from a balanced transmission line to an unbalanced coaxial line. Second, the rf power cabinet was placed remotely in order to reduce vibration-induced noise in the thrust stand. Finally, a relationship between transmission line length and rf was developed, which allows good transmission of rf power from the matching network to the helicon antenna. The modified system was tested on a thrust measurement stand and showed that rf power has no statistically significant contribution to the thrust stand measurement. PMID:20687758

  9. rf power system for thrust measurements of a helicon plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieckhafer, Alexander W.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.

    2010-07-01

    A rf power system has been developed, which allows the use of rf plasma devices in an electric propulsion test facility without excessive noise pollution in thruster diagnostics. Of particular importance are thrust stand measurements, which were previously impossible due to noise. Three major changes were made to the rf power system: first, the cable connection was changed from a balanced transmission line to an unbalanced coaxial line. Second, the rf power cabinet was placed remotely in order to reduce vibration-induced noise in the thrust stand. Finally, a relationship between transmission line length and rf was developed, which allows good transmission of rf power from the matching network to the helicon antenna. The modified system was tested on a thrust measurement stand and showed that rf power has no statistically significant contribution to the thrust stand measurement.

  10. RF System Modeling for the CEBAF Energy Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski, J. Hovater

    2009-05-01

    An RF system model, based on MATLAB/SIMULINK, has been developed for analyzing the basic characteristics of the low level RF (LLRF) control system being designed for the CEBAF 12 GeV Energy Upgrade. In our model, a typical passband cavity representation is simplified to in-phase and quadrature (I&Q) components. Lorentz Force and microphonic detuning are incorporated as a new quadrature carrier frequency (frequency modulation). Beam is also represented as in-phase and quadrature components and superpositioned with the cavity field vector. Signals pass through two low pass filters, where the cutoff frequency is equal to half of the cavity bandwidth, then they are demodulated using the same detuning frequency. Because only baseband I&Q signals are calculated, the simulation process is very fast when compared to other controller-cavity models. During the design process we successfully analyzed gain requirements vs. field stability for different superconducting cavity microphonic backgrounds and Lorentz Force coefficients. Moreover, we were able to evaluate different types of a LLRF system’s control algorithm: GDR (Generator Driven Resonator) and SEL (Self Excited Loop) [1] as well as klystron power requirements for different cavities and beam loads.

  11. Controlling satellite communication system unwanted emissions in congested RF spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Donald; Heymann, Roger

    2007-09-01

    The International Telecommunication Union (ITU), a United Nations (UN) agency, is the agency that, under an international treaty, sets radio spectrum usage regulations among member nations. Within the United States of America (USA), the organization that sets regulations, coordinates an application for use, and provides authorization for federal government/agency use of the radio frequency (RF) spectrum is the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). In this regard, the NTIA defines which RF spectrum is available for federal government use in the USA, and how it is to be used. The NTIA is a component of the United States (U.S.) Department of Commerce of the federal government. The significance of ITU regulations is that ITU approval is required for U.S. federal government/agency permission to use the RF spectrum outside of U.S. boundaries. All member nations have signed a treaty to do so. U.S. federal regulations for federal use of the RF spectrum are found in the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management, and extracts of the manual are found in what is known as the Table of Frequency Allocations. Nonfederal government and private sector use of the RF spectrum within the U.S. is regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). There is a need to control "unwanted emissions" (defined to include out-of-band emissions, which are those immediately adjacent to the necessary and allocated bandwidth, plus spurious emissions) to preclude interference to all other authorized users. This paper discusses the causes, effects, and mitigation of unwanted RF emissions to systems in adjacent spectra. Digital modulations are widely used in today's satellite communications. Commercial communications sector standards are covered for the most part worldwide by Digital Video Broadcast - Satellite (DVB-S) and digital satellite news gathering (DSNG) evolutions and the second generation of DVB-S (DVB-S2) standard

  12. A HIGH STABILITY, LOW NOISE RF DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Dorel

    2002-08-20

    Next generation linear colliders require high stability, low noise distribution of RF phase and timing signals. We describe a fiber-optics system that transmits phase at 357MHz, at a 1500nm wavelength, over a distance of 15 kilometers. Phase length errors in the transmission fiber are measured using the phase of the signal reflected from the fiber end. Corrections are performed by controlling the temperature of a 6-kilometer fiber spool placed in series with the main transmission fiber. This system has demonstrated a phase stability better than 10 femtoseconds per degree C, per kilometer, an improvement of a factor of >2000 relative to un-stabilized fiber. This system uses standard low cost telecom fiber and components.

  13. (Overview of RF systems for the advanced photon source)

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is being built by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Chicago. The APS is a 7-GeV positron storage ring from which x-ray beams of energies from a few keV to hundreds of keV are emitted as the positrons pass through ring bending magnets and also through special magnets called wigglers and undulators. The present schedule is to be operational in 1995. The energy emitted from the positron beam as x-rays is replaced through a radio-frequency accelerating system operating at 352 MHz at a maximum power level of 3 MW. The RF system will be described as well as several lower-power systems at frequencies of 0.8 MHz, 117 MHz and 2.8 GHz. The associated control electronics (phase shifters amplitude control, automatic tuning control, etc.) as well as the computer control architecture will also be described.

  14. The IPNS RCS RF-system third cavity upgrade.

    SciTech Connect

    Middendorf, M.E.; Brumwell, F. R.; Dooling, J.C.; Lein, M. K.; McMichael, G. E.; Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    2001-12-01

    The IPNS RCS is a rapid cycling synchrotron used to accelerate protons from 50 MeV to 450 MeV, 30 times per second. Currently, two single-gap, ferrite-loaded coaxial cavities, located 180 degrees apart, provide a total peak accelerating voltage of approximately 21 kV over the 2.2 MHz to 5.1 MHz revolution frequency band. An amplifier chain, which includes a 2 kW predriver, a 20 kW driver and a 100 kW final, drives each cavity. A third RF system, consisting of a cavity, cavity bias supply, and amplifier chain, is currently under construction. When complete, this upgrade will provide flexibility in operation that is expected to enhance reliability (i.e., three cavity operation at higher total accelerating voltage, three cavity operation at lower voltage per cavity, or two cavity operation with an on-line spare). In addition, the third cavity will provide an experimental station for second harmonic RF cavity studies. We report progress to date.

  15. A space-based classification system for RF transients

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Call, D.; Johnson, S.; Payne, T.; Ford, W.; Spencer, K.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Baumgart, C.

    1993-12-01

    The FORTE (Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events) small satellite is scheduled for launch in mid 1995. The mission is to measure and classify VHF (30--300 MHz) electromagnetic pulses, primarily due to lightning, within a high noise environment dominated by continuous wave carriers such as TV and FM stations. The FORTE Event Classifier will use specialized hardware to implement signal processing and neural network algorithms that perform onboard classification of RF transients and carriers. Lightning events will also be characterized with optical data telemetered to the ground. A primary mission science goal is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the correlation between the optical flash and the VHF emissions from lightning. By combining FORTE measurements with ground measurements and/or active transmitters, other science issues can be addressed. Examples include the correlation of global precipitation rates with lightning flash rates and location, the effects of large scale structures within the ionosphere (such as traveling ionospheric disturbances and horizontal gradients in the total electron content) on the propagation of broad bandwidth RF signals, and various areas of lightning physics. Event classification is a key feature of the FORTE mission. Neural networks are promising candidates for this application. The authors describe the proposed FORTE Event Classifier flight system, which consists of a commercially available digital signal processing board and a custom board, and discuss work on signal processing and neural network algorithms.

  16. LCLS-II high power RF system overview and progress

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, Anahid Dian

    2015-10-07

    A second X-ray free electron laser facility, LCLS-II, will be constructed at SLAC. LCLS-II is based on a 1.3 GHz, 4 GeV, continuous-wave (CW) superconducting linear accelerator, to be installed in the first kilometer of the SLAC tunnel. Multiple types of high power RF (HPRF) sources will be used to power different systems on LCLS-II. The main 1.3 GHz linac will be powered by 280 1.3 GHz, 3.8 kW solid state amplifier (SSA) sources. The normal conducting buncher in the injector will use four more SSAs identical to the linac SSAs but run at 2 kW. Two 185.7 MHz, 60 kW sources will power the photocathode dual-feed RF gun. A third harmonic linac section, included for linearizing the bunch energy spread before the first bunch compressor, will require sixteen 3.9 GHz sources at about 1 kW CW. A description and an update on all the HPRF sources of LCLS-II and their implementation is the subject of this paper.

  17. Precision stabilization system for MIS-structure rf capacitance

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, V.I.; Zhdan, A.G.

    1987-02-01

    A relatively simple resonant small-signal system is described for stabilization of the rf capacitance of MIS structures in the frequency range of 1-30 MHz that is based on a VM560 Q-meter. The relative sensitivity to capacitance variation ..delta..C/C is 2 x 10/sup -6/ at a level of C approx. 500 pF, the absolute sensitivity ..delta..C approx. 1 fF, and the response time is approx. 0.1 sec. The system is designed for relaxation spectroscopy of boundary states in MIS structures in the constant-capacitance mode by methods of unsteady capacitance and thermostimulated discharge of an MIS capacitor.

  18. Liquidus Projection and Isothermal Section of the Ag-In-Zn Ternary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jui-Shen; Chen, Sinn-wen

    2015-04-01

    This study experimentally determines the liquidus projection and phase equilibria isothermal section at 773.2 K (500°C) of the Ag-In-Zn ternary system. There are ten primary solidification phases of the Ag-In-Zn ternary system. In addition to the (Ag) (In) and (Zn) phases, there are seven binary compounds: β-(Ag3In), ζ-(Ag3In), γ-(Ag9In4), AgIn2, β-(AgZn), γ-(Ag5Zn8), and ɛ-(AgZn3). No ternary compounds were found. Among all these phases, the γ-(Ag9In4) primary solidification phase has the largest compositional regime. Five invariant reactions, two Class I reactions, two Class II reactions, and one Class III reaction, are determined by thermal analysis in this study. The reactions with the lowest and highest reaction temperatures are Liquid = (In) + AgIn2 + γ-(Ag5Zn8) at 413.5 K (140.3°C) and Liquid + (Ag) + β-(AgZn) = ζ-(Ag3In) at 964.9 K (691.7°C), respectively. In the isothermal section at 773.2 K, there are six tie-triangles: (Ag) + ζ-(Ag3In) + β-(AgZn), ζ-(Ag3In) + γ-(Ag9In4) + β-(AgZn), ζ-(Ag3In) + γ-(Ag9In4) + Liquid, γ-(Ag9In4) + β-(AgZn) + Liquid, β-(AgZn) + γ -(Ag5Zn8) + Liquid, and γ-(Ag5Zn8) + ɛ-(AgZn3) + Liquid.

  19. Design and construction of the advanced photon source 352-MHz rf system switching control

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, D.; Solita, L.; Reigle, D.; Dimonte, N.

    1997-08-01

    A switching control system has been designed and built to provide the capability of rapidly switching the waveguide and low-level cabling between different klystrons to operate the Advanced Photon Source storage ring in the event of a failure of a klystron system or to perform necessary repairs and preventative maintenance. The twelve possible modes of operation allow for complete redundancy of the booster synchrotron rf system and either a maximum of two storage ring rf systems to be completely off-line or one system to be used as a power source for an rf test stand. A programmable controller is used to send commands to intermediate control panels which interface to WR2300 waveguide switches and phase shifters, rf cavity interlock and low-level rf distribution systems, and klystron power supply controls for rapid reconfiguration of the rf systems in response to a mode-selection command. Mode selection is a local manual operation using a keyswitch arrangement which prevents more than one mode from being selected at a time. The programmable controller also monitors for hardware malfunction and guards against {open_quotes}hot-switching{close_quotes} of the rf systems. The rf switching controls system is monitored via the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) for remote system status check.

  20. Model based controls and the AGS booster controls system architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, R.A.

    1987-08-18

    The Heavy Ion Transfer Line used to inject heavy ions created at the Tandem Van de Graaff into the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) is briefly discussed, particularly as regards its control system. (LEW)

  1. RF system models for the CERN Large Hadron Collider with application to longitudinal dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; Winkle, D.Van; Baudrenghien, P.; /CERN

    2011-03-03

    The LHC RF station-beam interaction strongly influences the longitudinal beam dynamics, both single bunch and collective effects. Non-linearities and noise generated within the Radio Frequency (RF) accelerating system interact with the beam and contribute to beam motion and longitudinal emittance blowup. Thus, the noise power spectrum of the RF accelerating voltage strongly affects the longitudinal beam distribution. Furthermore, the coupled-bunch instabilities are also directly affected by the RF components and the configuration of the Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback loops. In this work we present a formalism relating the longitudinal beam dynamics with the RF system configurations, an estimation of collective effects stability margins, and an evaluation of longitudinal sensitivity to various LLRF parameters and configurations.

  2. Low-level RF control system issues for an ADTT accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek, C.D.; Regan, A.H.; Lynch, M.T.; Bowling, P.S.

    1994-09-01

    The RF control system for a charged-particle accelerator must maintain the correct amplitude and phase of RF field inside the accelerator cavity in the presence of perturbations, noises, and time varying system components. For an accelerator with heavy beam-loading, fluctuations in the beam current cause large perturbations to the RF field amplitude and phase that must be corrected by the RF control system. The ADTT applications require a high-current, heavily beam-loaded, continuous-wave (CW) accelerator. Additional concerns created by the CW operation include system start-up, beam interruption, and fault recovery. Also, the RF control system for an ADTT facility must include sophisticated automation to reduce the operator interaction and support. This paper describes an RF control system design that addresses these various issues by evaluation a combination of feedback and feed forward control techniques. Experience from the high-current Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is drawn upon for this RF control system design. Comprehensive computer modeling with the Matrix{sub x} software has been used to predict the performance of this RF control system.

  3. Low-level RF control system issues for an ADTT accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek, C. D.; Regan, A. H.; Lynch, M. T.; Bowling, P. S.

    1995-09-15

    The RF control system for a charged-particle accelerator must maintain the correct amplitude and phase of the RF field inside the accelerator cavity in the presence of perturbations, noises, and time varying system components. For an accelerator with heavy beam-loading, fluctuations in the beam current cause large perturbations to the RF field amplitude and phase that must be corrected by the RF control system. The ADTT applications require a high-current, heavily beam-loaded, continuous-wave (CW) accelerator. Additional concerns created by the CW operation include system start-up, beam interruption, and fault recovery. Also, the RF control system for an ADTT facility must include sophisticated automation to reduce the operator interaction and support. This paper describes an RF control system design that addresses these various issues by evaluation a combination of feedback and feedforward control techniques. Experience from the high-current Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is drawn upon for this RF control system design. Comprehensive computer modeling with the Matrixx software has been used to predict the performance of this RF control system.

  4. High current RF shield for PEP-II vacuum system expansion joint

    SciTech Connect

    Belser, F.C.; Berg, J.D.; Kerns, J.

    1996-05-01

    A novel RF shield was developed for the circular expansion joint used throughout the PEP-II vacuum system straight sections. Existing RF shield designs, used in accelerators/storage rings throughout the world, have been the source of many failures at beam currents much smaller than the 3 amps planned for PEP-II. This RF shield uses a unique spring-loaded finger mechanism to maintain proper electrical contact across the joint, accommodate 1.5 mm transverse and 32 mm longitudinal excursions, while minimizing geometry-driven trapped-mode RF heating at GHz frequencies. Alumina-dispersed, copper alloy fingers are used to maintain desired mechanical properties at higher temperatures instead of the more commonly used beryllium-copper alloys. A prototype expansion joint was assembled, mechanically tested, and subjected to 200% of the expected operational RF load. This RF shield design can be easily adapted to non-circular geometries.

  5. The Booster to AGS beam transfer fast kicker systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Bunicci, J.; Soukas, A.V.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1992-01-01

    The Brookhaven AGS Booster has a very successful commissioning period in June 1991. The third phase of that commissioning was a beam extraction test. The Booster extraction fast kicker (F3) deflected a 1.2 GeV proton beam from the Booster circulating orbit into the extraction septum aperture, partially down the extraction line to a temporary beam stop. Now, the Booster is committed to the AGS operations program for both heavy ion and proton beams. Thus, the Booster extraction and the corresponding AGS injection systems must operate routinely up to a pulse repetition frequency of 7.5 Hertz, and up to a beam energy of 1.5 Gev. The injection fast kicker is located in the A5 section of the AGS ring and is used to deflect the proton or heavy ion beam into its final AGS closed orbit. A distinctive feature of the AGS injection fast kicker modulators is the tail-bitting function required for proton beam injection. This enables the system to produce a fast current fall time to go along with the high current pulse amplitude with a fast rise time. The AGS injection fast kicker system has three pulse modulators, and each modulator consists of two thyratrons. The main PFN thyratrons switch on the current, and the tail bitting thyratrons are used to force the magnet current to decrease rapidly. Two digital pulse delay generators are used to align the main thyratrons and the tail bitting thyratrons respectively. The system has been tested and installed. The final commissioning of the Booster to AGS beam transfer line and injection is currently being undertaken. In this article, the system design, realization techniques and performance data will be presented.

  6. The Booster to AGS beam transfer fast kicker systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Bunicci, J.; Soukas, A.V.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1992-08-01

    The Brookhaven AGS Booster has a very successful commissioning period in June 1991. The third phase of that commissioning was a beam extraction test. The Booster extraction fast kicker (F3) deflected a 1.2 GeV proton beam from the Booster circulating orbit into the extraction septum aperture, partially down the extraction line to a temporary beam stop. Now, the Booster is committed to the AGS operations program for both heavy ion and proton beams. Thus, the Booster extraction and the corresponding AGS injection systems must operate routinely up to a pulse repetition frequency of 7.5 Hertz, and up to a beam energy of 1.5 Gev. The injection fast kicker is located in the A5 section of the AGS ring and is used to deflect the proton or heavy ion beam into its final AGS closed orbit. A distinctive feature of the AGS injection fast kicker modulators is the tail-bitting function required for proton beam injection. This enables the system to produce a fast current fall time to go along with the high current pulse amplitude with a fast rise time. The AGS injection fast kicker system has three pulse modulators, and each modulator consists of two thyratrons. The main PFN thyratrons switch on the current, and the tail bitting thyratrons are used to force the magnet current to decrease rapidly. Two digital pulse delay generators are used to align the main thyratrons and the tail bitting thyratrons respectively. The system has been tested and installed. The final commissioning of the Booster to AGS beam transfer line and injection is currently being undertaken. In this article, the system design, realization techniques and performance data will be presented.

  7. Using a double-frequency RF system to facilitate on-axis beam accumulation in a storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, B. C.; Zhao, Z. T.; Tian, S. Q.; Zhang, M. Z.; Zhang, Q. L.

    2016-04-01

    An on-axis injection scheme using a double-frequency RF system in a storage ring with small dynamic aperture is proposed. By altering RF voltages, empty RF buckets can be created which will be used for on-axis injection. After bunches are injected, a reverse RF voltage altering process is performed and the injected bunches can be longitudinally dumped to the main RF buckets. The scheme allows reaping the advantages of the on-axis injection while still performing accumulation.

  8. An offset tone based gain stabilization technique for mixed-signal RF measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Gopal; Motiwala, Paresh D.; Randale, G. D.; Singh, Pitamber; Agarwal, Vivek; Kumar, Girish

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes a gain stabilization technique for a RF signal measurement system. A sinusoidal signal of known amplitude, phase and close enough in frequency is added to the main, to be measured RF signal at the input of the analog section. The system stabilizes this offset tone in the digital domain, as it is sampled at the output of the analog section. This process generates a correction factor needed to stabilize the magnitude of the gain of the analog section for the main RF signal. With the help of a simple calibration procedure, the absolute amplitude of the main RF signal can be measured. The technique is especially suited for a system that processes signals around a single frequency, employs direct signal conversion into the digital domain, and processes subsequent steps in an FPGA. The inherent parallel signal processing in an FPGA-based implementation allows a real time stabilization of the gain. The effectiveness of the technique is derived from the fact, that the gain stabilization stamped to the main RF signal measurement branch requires only a few components in the system to be inherently stable. A test setup, along with experimental results is presented from the field of RF instrumentation for particle accelerators. Due to the availability of a phase synchronized RF reference signal in these systems, the measured phase difference between the main RF and the RF reference is also stabilized using this technique. A scheme of the signal processing is presented, where a moving average filter has been used to filter out not only the unwanted frequencies, but also to separate the main RF signal from the offset tone signal. This is achieved by a suitable choice of sampling and offset tone frequencies. The presented signal processing scheme is suitable to a variety of RF measurement applications.

  9. Communication methods, systems, apparatus, and devices involving RF tag registration

    DOEpatents

    Burghard, Brion J.; Skorpik, James R.

    2008-04-22

    One technique of the present invention includes a number of Radio Frequency (RF) tags that each have a different identifier. Information is broadcast to the tags from an RF tag interrogator. This information corresponds to a maximum quantity of tag response time slots that are available. This maximum quantity may be less than the total number of tags. The tags each select one of the time slots as a function of the information and a random number provided by each respective tag. The different identifiers are transmitted to the interrogator from at least a subset of the RF tags.

  10. Balanced-line rf electrode system for use in rf ground heating to recover oil from oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, W.A.; Vinegar, H.J.; Chiafu Hsu; Mueller, O.M.

    1993-08-17

    A system is described for extracting oil in-situ from a hydrocarbon bearing layer below a surface layer comprising: (a) a master oscillator for producing a fundamental frequency; (b) a plurality of heating sources, each comprising: radiofrequency (RF) producing means for providing a radiofrequency excitation signal based upon the fundamental frequency, a coaxial line coupled to the RF producing means for passing the radiofrequency signal through said surface layer without substantial loss of power; a conductive electrode located in the hydrocarbon bearing layer having a length related to the radiofrequency signal and adapted for radiating energy into said hydrocarbon bearing layer for causing shade oil to be extracted; a plurality of matching elements, each matching element coupled, respectively, between each respective electrode and a respective coaxial line for maximizing radiation emitted by the electrodes when they receive the radiofrequency signal; and (c) a plurality of producer wells adapted for collecting the extracted shale oil.

  11. RF Head Coil Design with Improved RF Magnetic Near-Fields Uniformity for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sung-Min; DelaBarre, Lance; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, John Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Higher magnetic field strength in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems offers higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, and spatial resolution in MR images. However, the wavelength in ultra-high fields (7 tesla and beyond) becomes shorter than the human body at the Larmor frequency with increasing static magnetic field (B0) of MRI system. At short wavelengths, interference effect appears resulting in non- uniformity of the RF magnetic near-field (B1) over the subject and MR images may have spatially anomalous contrast. The B1 near-field generated by the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) RF coil’s microstrip line element has a maximum near the center of its length and falls off towards both ends. In this study, a double trapezoidal shaped microstrip transmission line element is proposed to obtain uniform B1 field distribution by gradual impedance variation. Two multi-channel RF head coils with uniform and trapezoidal shape elements were built and tested with a phantom at 7T MRI scanner for comparison. The simulation and experimental results show stronger and more uniform B1+ near-field with the trapezoidal shape. PMID:25892746

  12. An analog RF gap voltage regulation system for the Advanced Photon Source storage ring.

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, D.

    1999-04-13

    An analog rf gap voltage regulation system has been designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory to maintain constant total storage ring rf gap voltage, independent of beam loading and cavity tuning effects. The design uses feedback control of the klystron mod-anode voltage to vary the amount of rf power fed to the storage ring cavities. The system consists of two independent feedback loops, each regulating the combined rf gap voltages of eight storage ring cavities by varying the output power of either one or two rf stations, depending on the mode of operation. It provides full operator control and permissive logic to permit feedback control of the rf system output power only if proper conditions are met. The feedback system uses envelope-detected cavity field probe outputs as the feedback signal. Two different methods of combining the individual field probe signals were used to generate a relative DC level representing one-half of the total storage ring rf voltage, an envelope-detected vector sum of the field probe rf signals, and the DC sum of individual field probe envelope detector outputs. The merits of both methods are discussed. The klystron high-voltage power supply (HVPS) units are fitted with an analog interface for external control of the mod-anode voltage level, using a four-quadrant analog multiplier to modulate the HVPS mod-anode voltage regulator set-point in response to feedback system commands.

  13. Superionic behavior in the xAgI-(1-x)CsAg2I3 polycrystalline system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, L. A.; Zapata, J.; Vargas, R. A.; Peña Lara, D.; Diosa, J. E.

    2016-06-01

    A superionic phase behavior (with DC ionic conductivities higher than 0.01 S/cm) has been observed in xAgI-(1-x)CsAg2I3 (x≈0.67) polycrystalline system grown by slow evaporation using AgI and CsI powders (molar ratio Cs/Ag=0.25) as starting salts and an aqueous solution of HI as solvent. The transition from the normal-to- the superionic state is first-order with a hysteretic behavior in temperature centered at about 116 °C as reflected by thermal (DSC) and electrical conductivity measurements. This mixture is composed of CsAg2I3 and AgI crystalline phases and an additional amorphous AgI phase that explains the glassy-type behavior observed in the superionic phase transition.

  14. Commissioning of the LHC Low Level RF System Remote Configuration Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Van Winkle, Daniel; Fox, John; Mastorides, Themis; Rivetta, Claudio; Baudrenghien, Philippe; Butterworth, Andrew; Molendijk, John; /CERN

    2010-08-26

    The LHC Low Level RF system (LLRF) is a complex multi-loop system used to regulate the superconductive cavity gap voltage as well as to reduce the impedance presented by RF stations to the beam. The RF system can have a profound impact on the stability of the beam; a mis-configured RF system has the potential of causing longitudinal instabilities, beam diffusion and beam loss. To configure the RF station for operation, a set of parameters in the LLRF multi-loop system have to be defined. Initial system commissioning as well as ongoing operation requires a consistent method of computer based remote measurement and model-based design of each RF station feedback system. This paper describes the suite of Matlab tools used for configuring the LHC RF system during the start up in Nov2009-Feb2010. We present a brief overview of the tool, examples of commissioning results, and basics of the model-based design algorithms. This work complements our previous presentation, where the algorithms and methodology followed in the tools were described.

  15. Arc Detection and Interlock Module for the PEP II Low Level RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Tighe, R.; /SLAC

    2011-08-31

    A new arc detection and interlock generating module for the SLAC PEP-II low-level RF VXI-based system has been developed. The system is required to turn off the RF drive and high voltage power supply in the event of arcing in the cavity windows, klystron window, or circulator. Infrared photodiodes receive arc signals through radiation resistant optical fibers. Gain and bandwidth are selectable for each channel to allow tailoring response. The module also responds to interlock requests from other modules in the VXI system and communicates with the programmable logic controller (PLC) responsible for much of the low-level RF system's interlock functionality.

  16. Positron Injector Accelerator and RF System for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Adolphsen, C.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bowden, G.; Jongewaard, E.; Li, Z.; Miller, R.; Sheppard, J.C.; /SLAC

    2007-03-28

    Due to the extremely high energy deposition from positrons, electrons, photons and neutrons behind the positron target, and because a solenoid is required to focus the large emittance positron beam, the 1.3 GHz preaccelerator has to use normal conducting structures up to energy of 400 MeV. There are many challenges in the design of the normal-conducting portion of the ILC positron injector system such as obtaining high positron yield with required emittance, achieving adequate cooling with the high RF and particle loss heating, and sustaining high accelerator gradients during millisecond-long pulses in a strong magnetic field. Considering issues of feasibility, reliability and cost savings for the ILC, the proposed design for the positron injector contains both standing-wave (SW) and traveling-wave (TW) L-band accelerator structures. A short version of the new type of the SW section is under fabrication and testing. An updated status report is given. This paper also covers acceleration vs. deceleration for pre-accelerator sections, SW vs. TW structures, as well as longitudinal matching from target to linac and linac to damping ring.

  17. Accurate measurement of RF exposure from emerging wireless communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letertre, Thierry; Monebhurrun, Vikass; Toffano, Zeno

    2013-04-01

    Isotropic broadband probes or spectrum analyzers (SAs) may be used for the measurement of rapidly varying electromagnetic fields generated by emerging wireless communication systems. In this paper this problematic is investigated by comparing the responses measured by two different isotropic broadband probes typically used to perform electric field (E-field) evaluations. The broadband probes are submitted to signals with variable duty cycles (DC) and crest factors (CF) either with or without Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) modulation but with the same root-mean-square (RMS) power. The two probes do not provide accurate enough results for deterministic signals such as Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WIMAX) or Long Term Evolution (LTE) as well as for non-deterministic signals such as Wireless Fidelity (WiFi). The legacy measurement protocols should be adapted to cope for the emerging wireless communication technologies based on the OFDM modulation scheme. This is not easily achieved except when the statistics of the RF emission are well known. In this case the measurement errors are shown to be systematic and a correction factor or calibration can be applied to obtain a good approximation of the total RMS power.

  18. Results from commissioning the AGS Booster orbit system

    SciTech Connect

    Bleser, E.

    1993-06-01

    This note reports results from the commissioning of three systems in the AGS Booster. The beam position monitor system, which works to a relative accuracy of 0.36 millimeters; the uncorrected Booster orbit, which has quite large excursions; and the passive eddy current correction system, which eliminates all but a few percent of the eddy current dipole effect.

  19. Commissioning and Early Operation Experience of the NSLS-II Storage Ring RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Cupolo, J.; Dilgen, T.; Rose, B.; Gash, W.; Ravindranath, V.; Yeddulla, M.; Papu, J.; Davila, P.; Holub, B.; Tagger, J.; Sikora, R.; Ramirez, G.; Kulpin, J.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a 3 GeV electron X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The storage ring RF system, essential for replenishing energy loss per turn of the electrons, consists of digital low level RF controllers, 310 kW CW klystron transmitters, CESR-B type superconducting cavities, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system for beam current up to 200mA.

  20. High-Power Multimode X-Band RF Pulse Compression System for Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Pearson, C.; Nelson, J.; Jobe, K.; Chan, J.; Fant, K.; Frisch, J.; Atkinson, D.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2005-08-10

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  1. Reliability and availability considerations in the RF systems of ATW-class accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallerico, Paul J.; Lynch, Michael T.; Lawrence, George

    1995-09-01

    In an RF-driven, ion accelerator for waste transmutation or nuclear material production, the overall availability is perhaps the most important specification. The synchronism requirements in an ion accelerator, as contrasted to an electron accelerator, cause a failure of an RF source to have a greater consequence. These large machines also are major capital investments, so the availability determines the return on this capital. RF system design methods to insure a high availability without paying a serious cost penalty are the subject of this paper. The overall availability goal in our present designs is 75% for the entire ATW complex, and from 25 to 35% of the unavailability is allocated to the RF system, since it is one of the most complicated subsystems in the complex. The allowed down time for the RF system (including the linac and all other subsystems) is then only 7 to 9% of the operating time per year, or as little as 613 hours per year, for continuous operation. Since large accelerators consume large amounts of electrical power, excellent efficiency is also required with the excellent availability. The availability also influences the sizes of the RF components: smaller components may fail and yet the accelerator may still meet all specifications. Larger components are also attractive, since the cost of an RF system usually increases as the square root of the number of RF systems utilized. In some cases, there is a reliability penalty that accompanies the cost savings from using larger components. We discuss these factors, and present an availability model that allows one to examine these trade offs, and make rational choices in the RF and accelerator system designs.

  2. A new chemical analysis system using a photocathode RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yasushi; Yang, Jinfeng; Hirose, Masafumi; Sakai, Fumio; Tsunemi, Akira; Yorozu, Masafumi; Okada, Yasuhiro; Endo, Akira; Wang, Xijie; Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2000-11-01

    A compact chemical analysis (pulse radiolysis) apparatus using a BNL-type s-band photocathode RF gun (GUN-IV) is now under development at Sumitomo Heavy Industries (SHI). Using the apparatus, fast chemical reactions induced by 3.5 ps pulse of electron beam can be analyzed by means of time-resolved photo-absorption spectroscopy with 10 ps laser pulses in the wavelength range of 210-2000 nm. The high-precision control of RF phase makes 10 ps of time-resolution possible for the analysis.

  3. Design and optimization of an RF energy harvesting system from multiple sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mai; Albasha, Lutfi; Qaddoumi, Nasser

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the design and optimization of an RF energy harvesting system from multiple sources. The RF power is harvested from four frequency bands representing five wireless systems, namely GSM, UMTS, DTV, Wi-Fi, and road tolling system. A Schottky diode model was developed based on which an RF-DC rectifier joined with a voltage multiplier circuits were designed. The simulation results of the complete RF harvesting system showed superior performance to similar state of the art systems. To further optimize the design, and to eliminate use of a non-standard CMOS process associated with Schottky diodes, the Schottky diode based rectifier was replaced by diode connected transistor configuration based on self-threshold cancellation (SVC) technique.

  4. Precision 0.5 GW X-band rf system for advanced Compton scattering source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, T. S.; Anderson, G.; Gibson, D.; Hartemann, F. V.; Barty, C. P. J.; Vlieks, A.; Tantawi, S.; Jongewaard, E.; Anderson, S. G.

    2009-11-01

    A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. This will give us 500 MW (0.5 GW) at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to the LINAC with specific phase and amplitude control points to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

  5. RF Telemetry System for an Implantable Bio-MEMS Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Hall, David G.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a novel miniature inductor and a pick-up antenna for contact less powering and RF telemetry from implantable bio-MEMS sensors are presented. The design of the inductor and the pick-up antenna are discussed. In addition, the measured characteristics at the design frequency of 330 MHz have been shown.

  6. Gap Voltage Feed Forward Board for PEP II Low Level RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, William; Claus, Richard; Sapozhnikov, Leonid; /SLAC

    2011-08-31

    This paper describes the Gap Voltage Feed-Forward VXI module used in the PEP-II Low Level RF System. This module produces adaptively generated inphase (I) and quadrature (Q) reference signals for a single RF station based on measurements of periodic (1-turn) beam induced cavity transients caused by the presence of an ion clearing gap. In addition the module receives a fiber optically transmitted, bandlimited 'kic' signal from the longitudinal feedback system which is used to phase modulate the RF drive. This allows the RF system to act as a 'subwoofer' for the longitudinal feedback system for low order coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the fundamental mode of the accelerating cavities. The module includes hardware for remote measurement and adjustment of the 'kick' transfer function.

  7. Effects of flexibility on AGS performance. [Annular suspension pointing system Gimbal System aboard Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, H. L.; Cunningham, D. C.; Worley, H. E.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has had under development the Annular Suspension Pointing System Gimbal System (AGS) since early 1979. The AGS is an Orbiter cargo bay mounted subarcsecond 3 axis inertial pointer that can accommodate a wide range of payloads which require more stringent pointing than the Orbiter can provide. This paper will describe the AGS, state performance requirements and the control law configuration. Then an approach to investigating the flexible body effects on control system design will be discussed.

  8. Commissioning and Early Operation for the NSLS-II Booster RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, C.; Cupolo, J.; Davila, P.; Gao, F.; Goel, A.; Holub, B.; Kulpin, J.; McDonald, K.; Oliva, J.; Papu, J.; Ramirez, G.; Rose, J.; Sikora, R.; Sorrentino, C.; Towne, N.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a third generation 3GeV, 500mA synchrotron light source. We discuss the booster synchrotron RF system responsible for providing power to accelerate an electron beam from 200MeV to 3GeV. The RF system design and construction are complete and is currently in the operational phase of the NSLS-II project. Preliminary operational data is also discussed.

  9. Commissioning experience with the PEP-II low-level RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.; Allison, S.; Claus, R.; Ross, W.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Schwarz, H.D.; Tighe, R.; Yee, C.; Ziomek, C.

    1997-05-01

    The low-level RF system for PEP-II is a modular design housed in a VXI environment and supported by EPICS. All signal processing and control is done at baseband using in-phase and quadrature (IQ) techniques. Remotely configurable RF feedback loops are used to control coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the accelerating mode of the RF cavities. A programmable DSP based feedback loop is implemented to control phase variations across the klystron due to the required adjustment of the cathode voltage to limit cathode power dissipation. The DSP loop also adaptively cancels modulations caused by klystron power supply ripple at selected power line harmonics between 60 Hz and 10 kHz. The system contains a built-in baseband network analyzer which allows remote measurement of the RF feedback loop transfer functions and automated configuration of these loops. This paper presents observations and measured data from the system.

  10. Adsorbate-Induced Segregation in a PdAg Membrane Model System: Pd3Ag(1 1 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Svenum, I. H.; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Venvik, H. J.

    2012-10-15

    Thin PdAg alloy membranes with 20–25% Ag are being developed for hydrogen separation technology. Despite many investigations on such membranes as well as representative experimental and theoretical model systems, unresolved issues remain concerning the effect of the alloy surface structure and composition on adsorption and vice versa. Therefore, the interaction between hydrogen, carbon monoxide or oxygen with the surface of a PdAg model alloy was studied using periodic self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations. In particular, the adsorption structure, coverage dependence and possible adsorption-induced segregation phenomena were addressed using Pd3Ag(1 1 1) model surfaces with varying degrees of surface segregation. In agreement with previous experimental and theoretical investigations, we predict Ag surface termination to be energetically favorable in vacuum. The segregation of Ag is then reversed upon adsorption of H, CO or O. For these adsorbates, the binding is strongest on Pd three-fold hollow sites, and hence complete Pd termination is favored at high coverage of H or CO, while 25% Ag may remain under oxygen because of the lower O-saturation coverage. CO adsorption provides a somewhat stronger driving force for Pd segregation when compared to H, and this may have implications with respect to permeation properties of PdAg alloy surfaces. Our predictions for high coverage are particularly relevant in underlining the importance of segregation phenomena to the hydrogen transport properties of thin PdAg alloy membranes.

  11. Transformation of AgCl nanoparticles in a sewer system--A field study.

    PubMed

    Kaegi, Ralf; Voegelin, Andreas; Sinnet, Brian; Zuleeg, Steffen; Siegrist, Hansruedi; Burkhardt, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are increasingly used in consumer products and their release during the use phase may negatively affect aquatic ecosystems. Research efforts, so far, have mainly addressed the application and use of metallic Ag(0)-NP. However, as shown by recent studies on the release of Ag from textiles, other forms of Ag, especially silver chloride (AgCl), are released in much larger quantities than metallic Ag(0). In this field study, we report the release of AgCl-NP from a point source (industrial laundry that applied AgCl-NP during a piloting phase over a period of several months to protect textiles from bacterial regrowth) to the public sewer system and investigate the transformation of Ag during its transport in the sewer system and in the municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). During the study period, the laundry discharged ~85 g of Ag per day, which dominated the Ag loads in the sewer system from the respective catchment (72-95%) and the Ag in the digested WWTP sludge (67%). Combined results from electron microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the Ag discharged from the laundry to the sewer consisted of about one third AgCl and two thirds Ag2S, both forms primarily occurring as nanoparticles with diameters<100 nm. During the 800 m transport in the sewer channel to the nearby WWTP, corresponding to a travel time of ~30 min, the remaining AgCl was transformed into nanoparticulate Ag2S. Ag2S-NP also dominated the Ag speciation in the digested sludge. In line with results from earlier studies, the very low Ag concentrations measured in the effluent of the WWTP (<0.5 μg L(-1)) confirmed the very high removal efficiency of Ag from the wastewater stream (>95%). PMID:25582606

  12. Design of RF systems for the RTD mission VASIMR

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F. W.; Barber, G. C.; Carter, M. D.; Goulding, R. H.; Sparks, D. O.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; McCaskill, G. E.; Squire, J. P.

    1999-09-20

    The first flight test of the variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket (VASIMR) is tentatively scheduled for the Radiation and Technology Demonstration (RTD) in 2003. This mission to map the radiation environment out to several earth radii will employ both a Hall thruster and a VASIMR during its six months duration, beginning from low earth orbit. The mission will be powered by a solar array providing 12 kW of direct current electricity at 50 V. The VASIMR utilizes radiofrequency (RF) power both to generate a high-density plasma in a helicon source and to accelerate the plasma ions to high velocity by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). The VASIMR concept is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in collaboration with national laboratories and universities. Prototype plasma sources, RF amplifiers, and antennas are being developed in the experimental facilities of the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL). (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Design of RF Systems for the RTD Mission VASIMR

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.C.; Carter, M.D.; Chang-Diaz, F.R.; Goulding, R.H.; McCaskill, G.E.; Sparks, D.O.; Squire, J.P.

    1999-04-12

    The first flight test of the variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket (VASIMR) is tentatively scheduled for the Radiation and Technology Demonstration (RTD) in 2003. This mission to map the radiation environment out to several earth radii will employ both a Hall thruster and a VASIMR during its six months duration, beginning from low earth orbit. The mission will be powered by a solar array providing 12 kW of direct current electricity at 50 V. The VASIMR utilizes radiofrequency (RF) power both to generate a high-density plasma in a helicon source and to accelerate the plasma ions to high velocity by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). The VASIMR concept is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in collaboration with national laboratories and universities. Prototype plasma sources, RF amplifiers, and antennas are being developed in the experimental facilities of the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL).

  14. RF system concepts for a muon cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.; Corlett, J.N.; Li, D.; Moretti, A.; Kirk, H.G.; Palmer, R.B.; Zhao, Y.

    1998-06-01

    The feasibility of muon colliders for high energy physics experiments has been under intensive study for the past few years and recent activity has focused on defining an R and D program that would answer the critical issues. An especially critical issue is developing practical means of cooling the phase space of the muons once they have been produced and captured in a solenoidal magnetic transport channel. Concepts for the rf accelerating cavities of a muon cooling experiment are discussed.

  15. A divide-down RF source generation system for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, D.; Lenkszus, F.; Laird, R.

    1997-08-01

    A divide-down rf source system has been designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory to provide harmonically-related and phase-locked rf source signals between the APS 352-MHz storage ring and booster synchrotron rf systems and the 9.77-MHz and 117-MHz positron accumulator ring rf systems. The design provides rapid switching capability back to individual rf synthesizers for each one. The system also contains a digital bucket phase shifter for injection bucket selection. Input 352-MHz rf from a master synthesizer is supplied to a VXI-based ECL divider board which produces 117-MHz and 9.77-MHz square-wave outputs. These outputs are passed through low-pass filters to produce pure signals at the required fundamental frequencies. These signals, plus signals at the same frequencies from independent synthesizers, are fed to an interface chassis where source selection is made via local/remote control of coaxial relays. This chassis also produces buffered outputs at each frequency for monitoring and synchronization of ancillary equipment.

  16. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  17. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  18. Characteristics of Hydrogen Negative Ion Source with FET based RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, A.; Matsuno, T.; Funaoi, T.; Tanaka, N.; Tsumori, K.; Takeiri, Y.

    2011-09-26

    Characteristics of radio frequency (RF) plasma production were investigated using a FET inverter power supply as a RF generator. High density hydrogen plasma was obtained using an external coil wound a cylindrical ceramic tube (driver region) with RF frequency of lower than 0.5 MHz. When an axial magnetic field around 10 mT was applied to the driver region, an electron density increased drastically and attained to over 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in the driver region. Effect of the axial magnetic field in driver and expansion region was examined. Lower gas pressure operation below 0.5 Pa was possible with higher RF frequency. H{sup -} density in the expansion region was measured by using laser photo-detachment system. It decreased as the axial magnetic field applied, which was caused by the increase of energetic electron from the driver.

  19. The AGS New Fast Extracted Beam System orbit bump pulser

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.S.; Soukas, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    The AGS New Fast Extracted Beam System (New FEB) is designed for RHIC injection and the g-2 experiment, performing single bunch multiple extraction at the prf of 20 to 100 Hz up to 12 times per AGS cycle. Capacitor-discharge pulsers are required to produce local orbit bumps at the fast kicker and ejector magnet locations. These pulsers have to deliver half-sine current pulses at 1 KA peak with a base width of 5 msec. The discharge voltage will require approximately 800V with a [plus minus]0.1% accuracy. Direct charging will require a charger too costly and difficult to build because of the high prf. An alternative charging system is being developed to take advantage of the 1.5 sec idle time between each group of pulses. The charger power supply ratings and regulation requirements are thus greatly reduced. The system analysis and results from a prototype will be presented.

  20. The AGS New Fast Extracted Beam System orbit bump pulser

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.S.; Soukas, A.V.

    1993-06-01

    The AGS New Fast Extracted Beam System (New FEB) is designed for RHIC injection and the g-2 experiment, performing single bunch multiple extraction at the prf of 20 to 100 Hz up to 12 times per AGS cycle. Capacitor-discharge pulsers are required to produce local orbit bumps at the fast kicker and ejector magnet locations. These pulsers have to deliver half-sine current pulses at 1 KA peak with a base width of 5 msec. The discharge voltage will require approximately 800V with a {plus_minus}0.1% accuracy. Direct charging will require a charger too costly and difficult to build because of the high prf. An alternative charging system is being developed to take advantage of the 1.5 sec idle time between each group of pulses. The charger power supply ratings and regulation requirements are thus greatly reduced. The system analysis and results from a prototype will be presented.

  1. Compact Superconducting Radio-frequency Accelerators and Innovative RF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kephart, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Swaapan; Milton, Stephen

    2015-04-10

    We will present several new technical and design breakthroughs that enable the creation of a new class of compact linear electron accelerators for industrial purposes. Use of Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) cavities allow accelerators less than 1.5 M in length to create electron beams beyond 10 MeV and with average beam powers measured in 10’s of KW. These machines can have the capability to vary the output energy dynamically to produce brehmstrahlung x-rays of varying spectral coverage for applications such as rapid scanning of moving cargo for security purposes. Such compact accelerators will also be cost effective for many existing and new industrial applications. Examples include radiation crosslinking of plastics and rubbers, creation of pure materials with surface properties radically altered from the bulk, modification of bulk or surface optical properties of materials, sterilization of medical instruments animal solid or liquid waste, and destruction of organic compounds in industrial waste water effluents. Small enough to be located on a mobile platform, such accelerators will enable new remediation methods for chemical and biological spills and/or in-situ crosslinking of materials. We will describe one current design under development at Fermilab including plans for prototype and value-engineering to reduce costs. We will also describe development of new nano-structured field-emitter arrays as sources of electrons, new methods for fabricating and cooling superconducting RF cavities, and a new novel RF power source based on magnetrons with full phase and amplitude control.

  2. An Overview of the MaRIE X-FEL and Electron Radiography LINAC RF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Joseph Thomas III; Rees, Daniel Earl; Scheinker, Alexander; Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-05-04

    The purpose of the Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is to investigate the performance limits of materials in extreme environments. The MaRIE facility will utilize a 12 GeV linac to drive an X-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL). Most of the same linac will also be used to perform electron radiography. The main linac is driven by two shorter linacs; one short linac optimized for X-FEL pulses and one for electron radiography. The RF systems have historically been the one of the largest single component costs of a linac. We will describe the details of the different types of RF systems required by each part of the linacs. Starting with the High Power RF system, we will present our methodology for the choice of RF system peak power and pulselength with respect to klystron parameters, modulator parameters, performance requirements and relative costs. We will also present an overview of the Low Level RF systems that are proposed for MaRIE and briefly describe their use with some proposed control schemes.

  3. Shuttle STS-2 mission communication systems RF coverage and performance predictions. Volume 1: Ascent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, J. A.; Gibson, J. S.; Kroll, Q. D.; Loh, Y. C.

    1981-01-01

    The RF communications capabilities and nominally expected performance for the ascent phase of the second orbital flight of the shuttle are provided. Predicted performance is given mainly in the form of plots of signal strength versus elapsed mission time for the STDN (downlink) and shuttle orbiter (uplink) receivers for the S-band PM and FM, and UHF systems. Performance of the NAV and landing RF systems is treated for RTLS abort, since in this case the spacecraft will loop around and return to the launch site. NAV and landing RF systems include TACAN, MSBLS, and C-band altimeter. Signal strength plots were produced by a computer program which combines the spacecraft trajectory, antenna patterns, transmit and receive performance characteristics, and system mathematical models. When available, measured spacecraft parameters were used in the predictions; otherwise, specified values were used. Specified ground station parameter values were also used. Thresholds and other criteria on the graphs are explained.

  4. Shuttle STS-2 mission communication systems RF coverage and performance predictions. Volume 1: Ascent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, J. A.; Gibson, J. S.; Kroll, Q. D.; Loh, Y. C.

    1981-10-01

    The RF communications capabilities and nominally expected performance for the ascent phase of the second orbital flight of the shuttle are provided. Predicted performance is given mainly in the form of plots of signal strength versus elapsed mission time for the STDN (downlink) and shuttle orbiter (uplink) receivers for the S-band PM and FM, and UHF systems. Performance of the NAV and landing RF systems is treated for RTLS abort, since in this case the spacecraft will loop around and return to the launch site. NAV and landing RF systems include TACAN, MSBLS, and C-band altimeter. Signal strength plots were produced by a computer program which combines the spacecraft trajectory, antenna patterns, transmit and receive performance characteristics, and system mathematical models. When available, measured spacecraft parameters were used in the predictions; otherwise, specified values were used. Specified ground station parameter values were also used. Thresholds and other criteria on the graphs are explained.

  5. Update on RF System Studies and VCX Fast Tuner Work for the RIA Drive Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B; Shen, S

    2003-05-06

    The limited cavity beam loading conditions anticipated for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) create a situation where microphonic-induced cavity detuning dominates radio frequency (RF) coupling and RF system architecture choices in the linac design process. Where most superconducting electron and proton linacs have beam-loaded bandwidths that are comparable to or greater than typical microphonic detuning bandwidths on the cavities, the beam-loaded bandwidths for many heavy-ion species in the RIA driver linac can be as much as a factor of 10 less than the projected 80-150 Hz microphonic control window for the RF structures along the driver, making RF control problematic. While simply overcoupling the coupler to the cavity can mitigate this problem to some degree, system studies indicate that for the low-{beta} driver linac alone, this approach may cost 50% or more than an RF system employing a voltage controlled reactance (VCX) fast tuner. An update of these system cost studies, along with the status of the VCX work being done at Lawrence Livermore National Lab is presented here.

  6. The role of reduction extent of graphene oxide in the photocatalytic performance of Ag/AgX (X = Cl, Br)/rGO composites and the pseudo-second-order kinetics reaction nature of the Ag/AgBr system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiyin; Ran, Chenxin; Wang, Minqiang; Li, Le; Sun, Zhongwang; Yao, Xi

    2016-07-21

    Although reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-based photocatalyst composites have been intensively developed during the past few years, the influence of reduction extent of rGO on the photocatalytic performance of the rGO-based composite has virtually not been investigated due to some technical limitations, such as the poor water dispersibility of rGO and low reduction selectivity of the hydrothermal method, which make it difficult to control the reduction extent of rGO in these composites. Herein, we used a facile room-temperature method to synthesize Ag/AgX (X = Cl, Br)/rGO photocatalyst composites as a model to study the effect of reduction extent of rGO on the photocatalytic performance of the photocatalyst. It was found that the photocatalytic activities of both Ag/AgCl/PrGO and Ag/AgBr/PrGO systems had an optimized threshold of the reduction extent of photoreduced GO (PrGO). More importantly, due to the different conductive band values of AgCl and AgBr, the optimized thresholds in the two systems were at different PrGO reduction extents, based on which we proposed that the favorable energy band matching between AgX and PrGO in the two systems played a crucial role in obtaining high photocatalysis performance. Besides, the photocatalytic reaction of the Ag/AgBr based system was confirmed to be a pseudo-second-order kinetics reaction rather than pseudo-first-order kinetics reaction. The new insights presented in this work provided useful information on the design and development of a more sophisticated photocatalyst, and can also be applied to many other applications. PMID:27332751

  7. RF control system of a parabolic solar concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecpoyotl-Torres, M.; Campos-Alvarez, J.; Tellez-Alanis, F.; Escobedo-Alatorre, J.; Quiñones-Aguilar, J.; Sánchez-Mondragón, J.

    2007-09-01

    In this work we present the basic considerations of the solar concentrator design, operation and automatization. This concentrator is located at Temixco, Morelos, Mexico, where the geographic and climatic conditions are ideal for its operation because it accounts with the greatest constant illumination in Mexico. We have obtained up to 1000°C of temperature concentration with the corresponding setup (with an opening diameter plate of 332 cm). In order to optimize the operation of this concentrator we use a control circuit designed to track the apparent sun position, considering the variables corresponding to the specific place. The implementation of the remote control modules based on RF is necessary because of the computer, which controls all movements of the motors, must be isolated of the environment, making a suitable and practical arrange.

  8. A very high sensitivity RF pulse profile measurement system.

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulou, Christos George; Lai, Jesse B.

    2009-06-01

    A technique for characterizing the pulse profile of a radio-frequency (RF) amplifier over a very wide power range under fast-pulsing conditions is presented. A pulse-modulated transmitter is used to drive a device under test (DUT) with a phase-coded signal that allows for an increased measurement range beyond standard techniques. A measurement receiver that samples points on the output pulse power profile and performs the necessary signal processing and coherent pulse integration, improving the detectability of low-power signals, is described. The measurement technique is applied to two sample amplifiers under fast-pulsing conditions with a pulsewidth of 250 ns at 3-GHz carrier frequency. A full measurement range of greater than 160 dB is achieved, extending the current state of the art in pulse-profiling techniques.

  9. Temperature distributions from interstitial rf electrode hyperthermia systems: theoretical predictions.

    PubMed

    Strohbehn, J W

    1983-11-01

    In recent years, there has been increased interest in the use of hyperthermia as an adjuvant modality to radiation and chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer. One of the more promising techniques is the application of an rf voltage to an array of electrodes inserted directly into the tumor. The electrodes are usually small, hollow stainless steel needles that are inserted as the first step in a brachytherapy procedure. By applying a voltage between the needles, an rf current is induced in the tissue, resulting in joule heating. In this paper, we calculate numerically the temperature distributions for an array of such needles. In our model we assume a two-dimensional problem, i.e. infinitely long needles, and a homogeneous medium. Blood flow effects are included in the calculation. The results show that for low blood perfusion rates, e.g., on the order of 3 ml/100 gm X min, very smooth temperature distributions result, and the electrodes can be spaced fairly far apart. However, for blood flow rates on the order of 20 ml/100 gm X min the temperature distributions are not smooth, and there are hot spots around the electrodes and cool regions between them. However, if the electrodes are spaced about 1 cm apart and the voltages are adjusted to optimize the temperature distribution then reasonably good results should be achievable. The equation is solved using a finite difference technique. By applying the superpostion principle, we are able to introduce a procedure which substantially reduces the amount of core storage required and results in reasonably efficient run times on a moderate size mini-computer. PMID:6643161

  10. Spacecraft-level verification of the Van Allen Probes' RF communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowne, M. J.; Srinivasan, D.; Royster, D.; Weaver, G.; Matlin, D.; Mosavi, N.

    This paper presents the verification process, lessons learned, and selected test results of the radio frequency (RF) communication system of the Van Allen Probes, formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). The Van Allen Probes mission is investigating the doughnut-shaped regions of space known as the Van Allen radiation belts where the Sun interacts with charged particles trapped in Earth's magnetic field. Understanding this dynamic area that surrounds our planet is important to improving our ability to design spacecraft and missions for reliability and astronaut safety. The Van Allen Probes mission features two nearly identical spacecraft designed, built, and operated by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The RF communication system features the JHU/APL Frontier Radio. The Frontier Radio is a software-defined radio (SDR) designed for spaceborne communications, navigation, radio science, and sensor applications. This mission marks the first spaceflight usage of the Frontier Radio. RF ground support equipment (RF GSE) was developed using a ground station receiver similar to what will be used in flight and whose capabilities provided clarity into RF system performance that was previously not obtained until compatibility testing with the ground segments. The Van Allen Probes underwent EMC, acoustic, vibration, and thermal vacuum testing at the environmental test facilities at APL. During this time the RF communication system was rigorously tested to ensure optimal performance, including system-level testing down to threshold power levels. Compatibility tests were performed with the JHU/APL Satellite Communication Facility (SCF), the Universal Space Network (USN), and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Successful completion of this program as described in this paper validated the design of the system and demonstrated that it will be able to me

  11. Generalization of susceptibility of RF systems through far-field pattern superposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdin, B.; Debroux, P.

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to perform an analysis of RF (Radio Frequency) communication systems in a large electromagnetic environment to identify its susceptibility to jamming systems. We propose a new method that incorporates the use of reciprocity and superposition of the far-field radiation pattern of the RF system and the far-field radiation pattern of the jammer system. By using this method we can find the susceptibility pattern of RF systems with respect to the elevation and azimuth angles. A scenario was modeled with HFSS (High Frequency Structural Simulator) where the radiation pattern of the jammer was simulated as a cylindrical horn antenna. The RF jamming entry point used was a half-wave dipole inside a cavity with apertures that approximates a land-mobile vehicle, the dipole approximates a leaky coax cable. Because of the limitation of the simulation method, electrically large electromagnetic environments cannot be quickly simulated using HFSS's finite element method (FEM). Therefore, the combination of the transmit antenna radiation pattern (horn) superimposed onto the receive antenna pattern (dipole) was performed in MATLAB. A 2D or 3D susceptibility pattern is obtained with respect to the azimuth and elevation angles. In addition, by incorporating the jamming equation into this algorithm, the received jamming power as a function of distance at the RF receiver Pr(Φr, θr) can be calculated. The received power depends on antenna properties, propagation factor and system losses. Test cases include: a cavity with four apertures, a cavity above an infinite ground plane, and a land-mobile vehicle approximation. By using the proposed algorithm a susceptibility analysis of RF systems in electromagnetic environments can be performed.

  12. The rf system of the Synchrotron X-ray Source at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Kustom, R.L.; Mavrogenes, G.; Nicholls, G.

    1987-01-01

    A Positron Storage Ring for the Synchrotron X-ray Source at Argonne is under design. The rf system is described. The rf system is divided into four stations, each using a one-megawatt klystron to excite four single-cell spherical cavities to a gap voltage of 761 kV at the operating frequency of 350.8 MHz. The same klystron also provides the beam power for synchrotron radiation losses of the position beam of up to 300 mA, the higher-order-mode power losses, the power losses in the beam due to the insertion devices, and the rf power transmission losses. The transmission waveguide system includes magic tees for splitting the power of each klystron to four cavities, isolators to protect the klystrons, harmonic and higher-order-mode absorbers, and mechanical phase shifters for fine phase tuning.

  13. Aspects of operation of the Fermilab Booster RF System at very high intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, J.E.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this note is to examine the likelihood and problems associated with operation of the Fermilab Booster rf systems as it presently exists, or with only minor modifications, at beam intensity approaching 5x10{sup 13} protons per pulse. Beam loading of the rf system at such an intensity will be one order of magnitude larger than at the present operation level. It is assumed that the injection energy will be raised to 1 GeV with no major increase in the injected energy spread (longitudinal emittance). The beam will be bunched by adiabatic capture as is presently done although it may be necessary to remove one or two bunches prior to acceleration to allow clean extraction at 8 GeV. At very high intensity the charge in each bunch will interact with the vacuum chamber impedance (and with itself) in such a way as to reduce in some cases the bucket area generated by the rf voltage. Because this decrement must be made up by changes in the rf ring voltage if the required bucket area is to be maintained, these effects must be taken into consideration in any analysis of the capability of the rf system to accelerate very large intensity.

  14. APS injector synchrotron low-level RF system design and test

    SciTech Connect

    Stepp, J.D.; Bridges, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    We describe the control of the RF system for the injector synchrotron (booster) of the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source. The rf system consists of one klystron and four 5-cell cavities of the LEP type. A block diagram of the system is shown and the low power rf circuitry is described. Voltage and phase feedback are discussed, along with accelerating the beam to 7 GeV. The accelerating voltage is programmed with a waveform generator. Although the acceleration is constant, the power at injection is almost zero and at extraction it is near 600 kW. The power increases with beam energy to replace synchrotron radiation losses. Stability of the rf phase between the two sides of the ring are discussed. Control signals are described which synchronize the bunch during injection from an accumulator ring and for extraction to the 352-MHz bucket in the storage ring. Timing for injection into any bucket in the Storage Ring is accomplished in the rf controls interface located on the VM cards. There is only one bunch accelerated in the booster at a time, so the beam loading of the cavities is negligible. Operating experience during early commissioning efforts will also be outlined.

  15. Analysis Of Phase Transitions In Quasi-Two-Dimensional Dusty Systems In RF-Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Adamovich, X. G.; Vaulina, O. S.; Khrustalev, Yu. V.; Nekhaevsky, Yu. Yu.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    In this work, we investigate the phase transitions in quasi-two-dimensional systems of dusty plasma in RF discharge. The quasi-2D systems are considered, where the areas with different phase states (dusty liquid and dusty crystal) coexist. The parameters of these areas of dusty subsystem are estimated, the obtained results are analysed and compared with theoretical predictions.

  16. Development of system level integration of compact RF components on multilayer liquid crystal polymer (LCP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, David

    The objective of this research is to optimize compactness for reconfigurable wireless communication systems by integrating Radio Frequency (RF) components on a multilayer Liquid Crystal Polymer (LCP) package while minimizing the size and interconnection of each component. To achieve this goal, various RF/microwave components have been integrated on LCP with the design, fabrication, and testing results to explore the feasibility of the designs for RF applications. The first chapter of this research focuses on the characterization of via interconnects for 3D system designs. As a crucial component for achieving compact multilayer designs, various transition designs are explored from DC to 110 GHz. In particular, High Density Interconnects (HDI) are investigated to achieve low loss performance at mm-wave frequencies. An example of accessing the input and output of a LCP packaged device using via interconnects is included. In addition, a heat sink using via technology is presented for active cooling of heat generating embedded devices. Chapters 3, 4, and 5 demonstrate the results of RF Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) switches integrated on LCP to create compact reconfigurable devices. RF MEMS switches are essential for designing compact multi-functional devices. A pattern reconfigurable antenna with monolithically integrated RF MEMS switches is presented. In addition, a compact 3D phase shifter using RF MEMS switches for a 2 x 2 phased antenna array is also presented in this work. To create a phased antenna array that is more compatible with Integrated Circuits (IC), Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) RF MEMS switches are used to make a low voltage phase shifter. The actuation voltage is under 10 V, which is more easily achievable in a integrated system compared to commonly used electrostatic actuated RF MEMS switches that required at least 30 V. In Chapter 6, an expandable, low cost, and conformal multilayer phased antenna array is presented. Starting with a 4 x 8

  17. Innovative RF Design Unites Benefits of Multiplexed and Multi-Channel System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrič, Uroš

    2004-11-01

    The main advantages of the implemented innovative RF design are reproducibility, accuracy, low measurement uncertainty, and compact design. They were achieved by implementing the direct RF sampling and the completely new, patent pending technological approach of quasi-crossbar multiplexing and associated measurement method. The innovative quasi-crossbar switch matrix unites the benefits of both the multi-channel and the multiplexed system and at the same time compensates the disadvantages of the two. We achieve reproducibility and good "beam vs. current" dependence, which are multiplexed system characteristics and, using a multi-channel approach, we ensure a broader band of operation.

  18. A design study on high power RF system for the TARLA facility of TAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karslı, Özlem; Yavaş, Ömer

    2012-11-01

    The Turkish Accelerator and Radiation Laboratory in Ankara (TARLA) is a superconducting electron linac based IR FEL and Bremsstrahlung facility and it is under construction in Ankara as the first facility of the Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) Project. TARLA will compose of two optical cavity systems to produce oscillator FEL in infrared region (2-250 μm) and also Bremsstrahlung radiation to be used in basic and applied sciences. In this study, main parameters of TARLA's high power RF and power transmission line systems are defined and a 20 kW RF solid state power amplifier is optimized.

  19. Investigation of the Stability of the RF Gun of the SSRL Injector System

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J

    2004-02-05

    In the previous three years, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) has experienced electron beam instabilities in the injector system of the Stanford Positron Electron Asymmetric Ring (SPEAR). Currently, for approximately the past four months the radio frequency (RF) gun of the linear accelerator injector system of the SPEAR at SSRL has become increasingly unstable. The current of the RF gun has become progressively sluggish and the lifetime of the cathode within the RF gun has been much shorter than expected. The cathode also sustains many unexplained damages. The instability of the RF gun affects the entire operation of SPEAR, creating substantial inconvenience. Through mechanical, design, and procedural analysis of the RF gun and the cathode that emits the electron beam of the linear accelerator, a solution to prolong the life of the cathode and secure the stability of the gun can be found. The thorough analysis of the gun and cathode involves investigation into the history of cathode installation and removal through the years of SPEAR operation as well as interviews with SSRL personnel involved with the upkeep of the gun and cathode. From speaking with SSRL employees and reviewing several articles many possible causes for beam instability were presented. The most likely cause of the SSRL gun instability is excessive back bombardment that can be attributed to running the cathode at too high a temperature.

  20. Capture, acceleration and bunching rf systems for the MEIC booster and storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaoheng; Guo, Jiquan; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC), proposed by Jefferson Lab, consists of a series of accelerators. The electron collider ring accepts electrons from CEBAF at energies from 3 to 12 GeV. Protons and ions are delivered to a booster and captured in a long bunch before being ramped and transferred to the ion collider ring. The ion collider ring accelerates a small number of long ion bunches to colliding energy before they are re-bunched into a high frequency train of very short bunches for colliding. Two sets of low frequency RF systems are needed for the long ion bunch energy ramping in the booster and ion collider ring. Another two sets of high frequency RF cavities are needed for re-bunching in the ion collider ring and compensating synchrotron radiation energy loss in the electron collider ring. The requirements from energy ramping, ion beam bunching, electron beam energy compensation, collective effects, beam loading and feedback capability, RF power capability, etc. are presented. The preliminary designs of these RF systems are presented. Concepts for the baseline cavity and RF station configurations are described, as well as some options that may allow more flexible injection and acceleration schemes.

  1. Coherent THz Synchrotron Radiation from a Storage Ring with High-Frequency RF System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Cheever, D.; Farkhondeh, M.; Franklin, W.; Ihloff, E.; van der Laan, J.; McAllister, B.; Milner, R.; Tschalaer, C.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. F.; Zolfaghari, A.; Zwart, T.; Carr, G. L.; Podobedov, B.; Sannibale, F.

    2006-02-01

    The generation of brilliant, stable, and broadband coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in electron storage rings depends strongly on ring rf system properties such as frequency and gap voltage. We have observed intense coherent radiation at frequencies approaching the THz regime produced by the MIT-Bates South Hall Ring, which employs a high-frequency S-band rf system. The measured CSR spectral intensity enhancement with 2 mA stored current was up to 10 000 times above background for wave numbers near 3cm-1. The measurements also uncovered strong beam instabilities that must be suppressed if such a very high rf frequency electron storage ring is to become a viable coherent THz source.

  2. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  3. An optically coupled system for quantitative monitoring of MRI-induced RF currents into long conductors.

    PubMed

    Zanchi, Marta G; Venook, Ross; Pauly, John M; Scott, Greig C

    2010-01-01

    The currents induced in long conductors such as guidewires by the radio-frequency (RF) field in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are responsible for potentially dangerous heating of surrounding media, such as tissue. This paper presents an optically coupled system with the potential to quantitatively measure the RF currents induced on these conductors. The system uses a self shielded toroid transducer and active circuitry to modulate a high speed light-emitting-diode transmitter. Plastic fiber guides the light to a photodiode receiver and transimpedance amplifier. System validation included a series of experiments with bare wires that compared wire tip heating by fluoroptic thermometers with the RF current sensor response. Validations were performed on a custom whole body 64 MHz birdcage test platform and on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. With this system, a variety of phenomena were demonstrated including cable trap current attenuation, lossy dielectric Q-spoiling and even transverse electromagnetic wave node patterns. This system should find applications in studies of MRI RF safety for interventional devices such as pacemaker leads, and guidewires. In particular, variations of this device could potentially act as a realtime safety monitor during MRI guided interventions. PMID:19758855

  4. A method to localize RF B₁ field in high-field magnetic resonance imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J Thomas

    2012-12-01

    In high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, B₀ fields of 7 and 9.4 T, the RF field shows greater inhomogeneity compared to clinical MRI systems with B₀ fields of 1.5 and 3.0 T. In multichannel RF coils, the magnitude and phase of the input to each coil element can be controlled independently to reduce the nonuniformity of the RF field. The convex optimization technique has been used to obtain the optimum excitation parameters with iterative solutions for homogeneity in a selected region of interest. The pseudoinverse method has also been used to find a solution. The simulation results for 9.4- and 7-T MRI systems are discussed in detail for the head model. Variation of the simulation results in a 9.4-T system with the number of RF coil elements for different positions of the regions of interest in a spherical phantom are also discussed. Experimental results were obtained in a phantom in the 9.4-T system and are compared to the simulation results and the specific absorption rate has been evaluated. PMID:22929360

  5. Phase loop bandwidth measurements on the advanced photon source 352 MHz rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, D.; Nassiri, A.; Schwartz, C.

    1997-08-01

    Phase loop bandwidth tests were performed on the Advanced Photon Source storage ring 352-MHz rf systems. These measurements were made using the HP3563A Control Systems Analyzer, with the rf systems running at 30 kilowatts into each of the storage ring cavities, without stored beam. An electronic phase shifter was used to inject approximately 14 degrees of stimulated phase shift into the low-level rf system, which produced measureable response voltage in the feedback loops without upsetting normal rf system operation. With the PID (proportional-integral-differential) amplifier settings at the values used during accelerator operation, the measurement data revealed that the 3-dB response for the cavity sum and klystron power-phase loops is approximately 7 kHz and 45 kHz, respectively, with the cavities the primary bandwidth-limiting factor in the cavity-sum loop. Data were taken at various PID settings until the loops became unstable. Crosstalk between the two phase loops was measured.

  6. RF beam control system for the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Campbell, A.; DeLong, J.; Hayes, T.; Onillon, E.; Rose, J.; Vetter, K.

    1998-08-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency.

  7. RF BEAM CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE BROOKHAVEN RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER, RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN,J.M.; CAMPBELL,A.; DELONG,J.; HAYES,T.; ONILLON,E.; ROSE,J.; VETTER,K.

    1998-06-22

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency.

  8. Response of a coupled two-spin system to on-resonance amplitude modulated RF pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jinyuan; Ye, Chaohui; Sanctuary, B. C.

    A weakly scalar-coupled two-spin system subjected to two amplitude modulated RF pulses on exact resonance is treated by means of the rotation operator approach. The theory presented here enables coherence evolution to be evaluated by the routine procedure and to be expressed in analytical form. The evolution behaviour from the equilibrium state is discussed in some detail. It is shown that the application of rotation matrix and quaternion elements clarifies evolution expressions. The numerical calculation is performed by way of quaternions. Examples of BURP (band-selective, uniform response, purephase) and sinc-shaped RF pulses are given and the case of time-symmetrical RF pulses is analysed further.

  9. Concurrent System Engineering and Risk Reduction for Dual-Band (RF/optical) Spacecraft Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielhauer, Karl, B.; Boone, Bradley, G.; Raible, Daniel, E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a system engineering approach to examining the potential for combining elements of a deep-space RF and optical communications payload, for the purpose of reducing the size, weight and power burden on the spacecraft and the mission. Figures of merit and analytical methodologies are discussed to conduct trade studies, and several potential technology integration strategies are presented. Finally, the NASA Integrated Radio and Optical Communications (iROC) project is described, which directly addresses the combined RF and optical approach.

  10. Intelligent low-level RF system by non-destructive beam monitoring device for cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi Asadi Malafeh, M. S.; Ghergherehchi, M.; Afarideh, H.; Chai, J. S.; Yoon, Sang Kim

    2016-04-01

    The project of a 10 MeV PET cyclotron accelerator for medical diagnosis and treatment was started at Amirkabir University of Technology in 2012. The low-level RF system of the cyclotron accelerator is designed to stabilize acceleration voltage and control the resonance frequency of the cavity. In this work an Intelligent Low Level Radio Frequency Circuit or ILLRF, suitable for most AVF cyclotron accelerators, is designed using a beam monitoring device and narrow band tunable band-pass filter. In this design, the RF phase detection does not need signal processing by a microcontroller.

  11. Selecting RF Amplifiers for Impedance Controlled LLRF Systems - Nonlinear Effects and System Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, John D.; Mastorides, Themis; Rivetta, Claudio Hector; Van Winkle, Daniel; /SLAC

    2007-07-06

    Several high-current accelerators use feedback techniques in the accelerating RF systems to control the impedances seen by the circulating beam. These Direct and Comb Loop architectures put the high power klystron and LLRF signal processing components inside feedback loops, and the ultimate behavior of the systems depends on the individual sub-component properties. Imperfections and non-idealities in the signal processing leads to reduced effectiveness in the impedance control loops. In the PEP-II LLRF systems non-linear effects have been shown to reduce the achievable beam currents, increase low-mode longitudinal growth rates and reduce the margins and stability of the LLRF control loops. We present measurements of the driver amplifiers used in the PEP-II systems, and present measurement techniques needed to quantify the small-signal gain, linearity, transient response and image frequency generation of these amplifiers.

  12. Compact rf heating and levitation systems for the NASA modular electromagnetic levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The levitator demonstrates levitation of a 5 mm diam aluminum sphere at 1 G using a small, compact rf levitator operating from a small 12-V battery. This system is designed to levitate and melt niobium in space; however, the small battery unit limits the power for melting operations.

  13. New high power 200 MHz RF system for the LANSCE drift tube linac

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, J.; Friedrichs, C.; Lynch, M.

    1998-12-31

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linac provides an 800 MeV direct H{sup +} proton beam, and injects H{sup {minus}} to the upgraded proton storage ring for charge accumulation for the Short Pulse Spallation Source. Accelerating these interlaced beams requires high average power from the 201.25 MHz drift tube linac (DTL) RF system. Three power amplifiers have operated at up to three Megawatts with 12% duty factor. The total number of electron power tubes in the RF amplifiers and their modulators has been reduced from fifty-two to twenty-four. The plant continues to utilize the original design of a tetrode driving a super power triode. Further increases in the linac duty factor are limited, in part, by the maximum dissipation ratings of the triodes. A description of the system modifications proposed to overcome these limitations includes new power amplifiers using low-level RF modulation for tank field control. The first high power Diacrode{reg_sign} is being delivered and a new amplifier cavity is being designed. With only eight power tubes, the new system will deliver both peak power and high duty factor, with lower mains power and cooling requirements. The remaining components needed for the new RF system will be discussed.

  14. A new slip stacking RF system for a twofold power upgrade of Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Madrak, Robyn

    2014-09-11

    Fermilab@?s Accelerator Complex has been recently upgraded, in order to increase the 120GeV proton beam power on target from about 400kW to over 700kW for NO@nA and other future intensity frontier experiments. One of the key ingredients of the upgrade is the offloading of some Main Injector synchrotron operations - beam injection and RF manipulation called ''slip stacking'' - to the 8GeV Recycler Ring, which had until recently been used only for low-intensity antiproton storage and cooling. This required construction of two new 53MHz RF systems for the slip-stacking manipulations. The cavities operate simultaneously at V_p_e_a_k@?150kV, but at slightly different frequencies (@Df=1260Hz). Their installation was completed in September 2013. This paper describes the novel solutions used in the design of the new cavities, their tuning system, and the associated high power RF system. First results showing effective operation of the RF system, beam capture and successful slip-stacking in the Recycler Ring are presented.

  15. Space Station communications and tracking systems modeling and RF link simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Chit-Sang; Chie, Chak M.; Lindsey, William C.

    1986-01-01

    In this final report, the effort spent on Space Station Communications and Tracking System Modeling and RF Link Simulation is described in detail. The effort is mainly divided into three parts: frequency division multiple access (FDMA) system simulation modeling and software implementation; a study on design and evaluation of a functional computerized RF link simulation/analysis system for Space Station; and a study on design and evaluation of simulation system architecture. This report documents the results of these studies. In addition, a separate User's Manual on Space Communications Simulation System (SCSS) (Version 1) documents the software developed for the Space Station FDMA communications system simulation. The final report, SCSS user's manual, and the software located in the NASA JSC system analysis division's VAX 750 computer together serve as the deliverables from LinCom for this project effort.

  16. AGS tune jump system to cross horizontal depolarization resonances overview

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, J.W.; Ahrens, L.; Fu, W.; Mi, J.L.; Rosas, P.; Schoefer, V.; Theisen, C.; Altinbas, Z.

    2011-03-28

    Two partial snakes overcome the vertical depolarizing resonances in the AGS. But a new type of depolarizing intrinsic resonance from horizontal motion appeared. We reduce these using horizontal tune jumps timed to these resonances. We gain a factor of six in crossing rate with a tune jump of 0.05 in 100 {micro}s. Two quadrapoles, we described in 2009, pulse 42 times, the current matching beam energy. The power supplies for these quads are described in detail elsewhere in this conference. The controls for the Jump Quad system is based on a BNL designed Quad Function Generator. Two modules are used; one for timing, and one to supply reference voltages. Synchronization is provided by a proprietary serial bus, the Event Link. The AgsTuneJump application predicts the times of the resonances during the AGS cycle and calculates the power supply trigger times from externally collected tune and energy versus time data and the Low and High PS voltage functions from a voltage to current model of the power supply. The system was commissioned during runs 09 & 10 and is operational. Many beam effects are described elsewhere. The TuneJump system has worked well and has caused little trouble save for the perturbations in the lattice having such a large effect due to our need to run with the vertical tune within a few thousandths of the integer tune. As these problems were mostly sorted out by correcting the 6th harmonic orbit distortions which caused a large 18 theta beta wave. Also running with minimal chromaticity reduces emittance growth. There are still small beta waves which are being addressed. The timing of the pulses is still being investigated, but as each crossing causes minimal polarization loss, this is a lengthy process.

  17. Timing and low-level rf system for an x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Yuji; Maesaka, Hirokazu; Matsubara, Shinich; Hosoda, Naoyasu; Ohshima, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    An x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL), SACLA, designed to open up new science, was constructed for generating coherent x rays with a peak power of more than 10 GW and a very short pulse of below 30 fs. This feature demands a very highly short-term temporal stability of less than 50 fs to the acceleration rf field of SACLA. For this reason, we developed a timing and low-level rf (LLRF) system for SACLA based on that of the SPring8 compact SASE source (SCSS) test accelerator for verifying the feasibility of an XFEL. The performance of the system using the in-phase and quadrature rf manipulation method was improved from SCSS's system. Since the facility length of SACLA is 700 m, which is 10 times longer than that of the SCSS test accelerator, a phase-stabilized optical-fiber system designed to transmit time standard rf signals with low loss was also developed and deployed. This optical-fiber system equips fiber optical-length feedback control in order to mitigate environmental effects, such as temperature and humidity changes. On the other hand, the demanded maximum rf temporal stability is less than 50 fs, which is almost 10 times smaller than that of the SCSS test accelerator. Hence, reducing electric noise and increasing the temperature stability around timing and LLRF instruments were necessary and realized with a very low-noise power supply and a hemathermal 19-inch enclosure. The short-term temporal performance of the timing LLRF system finally attained a temporal stability of less than 13.6 fs in rms measured by a beam arrival-time measurement. This stability greatly helps to achieve the stable x-ray lasing of SACLA for routine operation during user experiments.

  18. Design and Implementation of RF Energy Harvesting System for Low-Power Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun, Yunus

    2016-08-01

    Radio frequency (RF) energy harvester systems are a good alternative for energizing of low-power electronics devices. In this work, an RF energy harvester is presented to obtain energy from Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) 900 MHz signals. The energy harvester, consisting of a two-stage Dickson voltage multiplier circuit and L-type impedance matching circuits, was designed, simulated, fabricated and tested experimentally in terms of its performance. Simulation and experimental works were carried out for various input power levels, load resistances and input frequencies. Both simulation and experimental works have been carried out for this frequency band. An efficiency of 45% is obtained from the system at 0 dBm input power level using the impedance matching circuit. This corresponds to the power of 450 μW and this value is sufficient for many low-power devices. The most important parameters affecting the efficiency of the RF energy harvester are the input power level, frequency band, impedance matching and voltage multiplier circuits, load resistance and the selection of diodes. RF energy harvester designs should be optimized in terms of these parameters.

  19. Design and Implementation of RF Energy Harvesting System for Low-Power Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun, Yunus

    2016-03-01

    Radio frequency (RF) energy harvester systems are a good alternative for energizing of low-power electronics devices. In this work, an RF energy harvester is presented to obtain energy from Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) 900 MHz signals. The energy harvester, consisting of a two-stage Dickson voltage multiplier circuit and L-type impedance matching circuits, was designed, simulated, fabricated and tested experimentally in terms of its performance. Simulation and experimental works were carried out for various input power levels, load resistances and input frequencies. Both simulation and experimental works have been carried out for this frequency band. An efficiency of 45% is obtained from the system at 0 dBm input power level using the impedance matching circuit. This corresponds to the power of 450 μW and this value is sufficient for many low-power devices. The most important parameters affecting the efficiency of the RF energy harvester are the input power level, frequency band, impedance matching and voltage multiplier circuits, load resistance and the selection of diodes. RF energy harvester designs should be optimized in terms of these parameters.

  20. System control and data acquisition of the two new FWCD RF systems at DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, T.E.; Allen, J.C.; Cary, W.P.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Ferguson, S.W.

    1995-12-31

    The Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) system at DIII-D has increased its available radio frequency (RF) power capabilities with the addition of two new high power transmitters along with their associated transmission line systems. A Sun Sparc-10 workstation, functioning as the FWCD operator console, is being used to control transmitter operating parameters and transmission line tuning parameters, along with acquiring data and making data available for integration into the DIII-D data acquisition system. Labview, a graphical user interface application, is used to manage and control the above processes. This paper will discuss the three primary branches of the FWCD computer control system: transmitter control, transmission line tuning control, and FWCD data acquisition. The main control program developed uses VXI, GPIB, CAMAC, Serial, and Ethernet protocols to blend the three branches together into one cohesive system. The control of the transmitters utilizes VXI technology to communicate with the transmitter`s digital interface. A GPIB network allows for communication with various instruments and CAMAC crate controllers. CAMAC crates are located at each phase-shifter/stub-tuner station and are used to digitize transmission line parameters along with transmission line fault detection during RF transmission. The phase-shifter/stub-tuner stations are located throughout the DIII-D facility and are controlled from the FWCD operator console via the workstation`s Serial port. The Sun workstation has an Ethernet connection allowing for the utilization of the DIII-D data acquisition Open System architecture and of course providing communication with the rest of the world.

  1. System control and data acquisition of the two new FWCD RF systems at DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, T.E.; Allen, J.C.; Cary, W.P. Petty, C.C.

    1995-10-01

    The Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) system at DIII-D has increased its available radio frequency (RF) power capabilities with the addition of two new high power transmitters along with their associated transmission line systems. A Sun Sparc-10 workstation, functioning as the FWCD operator console, is being used to control transmitter operating parameters and transmission line tuning parameters, along with acquiring data and making data available for integration into the DIII-D data acquisition system. Labview, a graphical user interface application, is used to manage and control the above processes. This paper will discuss the three primary branches of the FWCD computer control system: transmitter control, transmission line tuning control, and FWCD data acquisition. The main control program developed uses VXI, GPIB, CAMAC, Serial, and Ethernet protocols to blend the three branches together into one cohesive system. The control of the transmitters utilizes VXI technology to communicate with the transmitter`s digital interface. A GPIB network allows for communication with various instruments and CAMAC crate controllers. CAMAC crates are located at each phase-shifter/stub-tuner station and are used to digitize transmission line parameters along with transmission line fault detection during RF transmission. The phase-shifter/stub-tuner stations are located through out the DIII-D facility and are controlled from the FWCD operator console via the workstation`s Serial port. The Sun workstation has an Ethernet connection allowing for the utilization of the DIII-D data acquisition {open_quotes}Open System{close_quotes} architecture and of course providing communication with the rest of the world.

  2. Integration of LHCD system with SST1 machine and its high power rf performance in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Ambulkar, K. K.; Dalakoti, S.; Parmar, P. R.; Virani, C. G.; Thakur, A. L.

    2014-02-01

    A 2.0 MW CW lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system based on 3.7 GHz klystron sources, is in advanced stage of commissioning, which would drive and sustain plasma current, non-inductively, in superconducting steadystate tokamak (SST1) for long pulse operation. Four klystrons, each rated for 0.5 MW CW rf power, delivers 2.0 MW of rf power to four layer of the LHCD system, which finally feeds the rf power to grill antenna. The antenna system along with vacuum window and vacuum transmission line is successfully integrated on the machine. Its vacuum and pressurization compatibility has been successfully established. To validate the high power performance of LHCD system for SST1 machine, stage-wise commissioning of LHCD system in staggered manner is planned. It has been envisaged that LHCD power may be gradually increased initially, since full power may not be required during the initial phases of SST1 plasma operation. Also if the system is integrated in steps or in phases, then integration issues, as well as high power operational issues, if any, can be addressed, attended and handled in a simpler way before integrating all the layers to the grill antenna. To begin with, one klystron is connected to one layer, out of four layers, which energizes a quarter of the grill antenna. Gradually, the rf power and its pulse length is increased to validate high power performance of the system. Arcing and reflections are observed as rf power is gradually increased. The problems are analysed and after taking appropriate remedial action the system performance is improved for operation up to 160kW. Several trains of short pulses are launched in SST1 vacuum vessel for rf conditioning of the LHCD system. Normally, reflections are high when power is launched in vacuum; therefore the pulse length is restricted up to 100 milliseconds. The high power performance of this layer, connected with grill antenna is validated by launching high power microwaves in vacuum vessel of SST1 machine

  3. RF system developments for CW and/or long pulse linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.

    1998-12-31

    High Power Proton Linacs are under development or proposed for development at Los Alamos and elsewhere. By current standards these linacs all require very large amounts of RF power. The Accelerator for Production of Tritium (APT) is a CW accelerator with an output current and energy of 100 mA and 1,700 MeV, respectively. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), in its ultimate configuration, is a pulsed accelerator with an average output power of 4 MW of beam. Other accelerators such as those that address transmutation and upgrades to LANSCE have similar requirements. For these high average power applications, the RF systems represent approximately half of the total cost of the linac and are thus key elements in the design and configuration of the accelerator. Los Alamos is fortunate to be actively working on both APT and SNS. For these programs the author is pursuing a number of component developments which are aimed at one or more of the key issues for large RF systems: technical performance, capital cost, reliability, and operating efficiency. This paper briefly describes some of the linac applications and then provides updates on the key RF developments being pursued.

  4. In Depth Diagnostics for RF System Operation in the PEP-II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Van Winkle, Daniel; Fox, John; Teytelman, Dmitry; /SLAC

    2005-05-27

    The PEP-II RF systems incorporate numerous feedback loops in the low-level processing for impedance control and operating point regulation. The interaction of the multiple loops with the beam is complicated, and the systems incorporate online diagnostic tools to configure the feedback loops as well as to record fault files in the case of an RF abort. Rapid and consistent analysis of the RF-related beam aborts and other failures is critical to the reliable operation of the B-Factory, especially at the recently achieved high beam currents. Procedures and algorithms used to extract diagnostic information from time domain fault files are presented and illustrated via example interpretations of PEP-II fault file data. Example faults presented will highlight the subtle interpretation required to determine the root cause. Some such examples are: abort kicker firing asynchronously, klystron and cavity arcs, beam loss leading to longitudinal instability, tuner read back jumps and poorly configured low-level RF feedback loop.

  5. Evolution of the symbiotic binary system AG Dranconis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikolajewska, Joanna; Kenyon, Scott J; Mikolajewski, Maciej; Garcia, Michael R.; Polidan, Ronald S.

    1995-01-01

    We present an analysis of new and archival photometric and spectroscopic observations of the symbiotic star AG Draconis. This binary has undergone several 1 - 3 mag optical and ultraviolet eruptions during the past 15 years. Our combination of optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic data allow a more complete analysis of this system than in previous papers. AG Dra is composed of a K-type bright giant M(sub g) approximately 1.5 solar mass) and a hot, compact star M(sub h approximatelly 0.4 - 0.6 solar mass) embedded in a dense, low metallicity nebula. The hot component undergoes occasional thermonuclear runaways that produce 2 - 3 mag optical/ultraviolet eruptions. During these eruptions, the hot component develops a low velocity wind that quenches x-ray emission from the underlying hot white dwarf. The photoionized nebula changes its volume by a factor of 5 throughout an eruptin cycle. The K bright giant occults low ionization emission lines during superior conjunctions at all outburst phases but does not occult high ionization lines in outburst (and perhaps quiescence). This geometry and the component masses suggest a system inclination of i approximately 30 deg - 45 deg.

  6. Operator interface for the PEP-II low level RF control system

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.; Claus, R.

    1997-05-01

    This paper focuses on the operational aspects of the low level RF control system being built for the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. Subsystems requiring major operational considerations include displays for monitor and control from UNIX workstations, slow feedback loops and control sequences residing on microprocessors, and various client applications in the existing SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) control system. Since commissioning of PEP-II RF is currently in-progress, only those parts of the control system used during this phase are discussed in detail. Based on past experience with the SLC control system, it is expected that effort expended during commissioning on a solid user interface will result in smoother transition to full reliable 24-hour-a-day operation.

  7. A low-level rf control system for a quarter-wave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwon; Hwang, Churlkew

    2012-06-01

    A low-level rf control system was designed and built for an rf deflector, which is a quarter wave resonator, and was designed to deflect a secondary electron beam to measure the bunch length of an ion beam. The deflector has a resonance frequency near 88 MHz, its required phase stability is approximately ±1° and its amplitude stability is less than ±1%. The control system consists of analog input and output components and a digital system based on a field-programmable gate array for signal processing. The system is cost effective, while meeting the stability requirements. Some basic properties of the control system were measured. Then, the capability of the rf control was tested using a mechanical vibrator made of a dielectric rod attached to an audio speaker system, which could induce regulated perturbations in the electric fields of the resonator. The control system was flexible so that its parameters could be easily configured to compensate for the disturbance induced in the resonator.

  8. RF Distribution System for High Power Test of the SNS Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Kang, Yoon W; Broyles, Michael R; Crofford, Mark T; Geng, Xiaosong; Kim, Sang-Ho; Phibbs, Curtis L; Strong, William Herb; Peglow, Robert C; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V

    2012-01-01

    A four-way waveguide RF power distribution system for testing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) multi-cavity cryomodule to investigate the collective behavior has been developed. A single klystron operating at 805MHz for 1.3 msec at 60Hz powers the 4-way waveguide splitter to deliver up to 400 kW to individual cavities. Each cavity is fed through a combination of waveguide splitters and vector modulators (VM) to provide independent magnitude and phase controls. The waveguide vector modulator consists of two quadrature hybrids and two motorized waveguide phase shifters. The phase shifters and the assembled waveguide vector modulators were individually tested and characterized for low power and high RF power in the SNS RF test facility. Precise calibrations of magnitude and phase were performed to generate the look up tables (LUTs) to provide operational references during the cryomodule test. An I-Q demodulator module was developed and utilized to measure relative phases in pulsed high RF power operation. PLC units were developed for mechanical control of the phase shifters. Initial low/high power measurements were made using LabVIEW. An operation algorithm has been implemented into EPICS control for the cryomodule test stand.

  9. An Overview of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA)= Project RF=20 Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Joseph T., III; Rees, Daniel E.; Lynch, Michael T.; Cummings, Karen A.; Roybal, William T.; Tallerico, Paul J.; Toole, Loren L.

    1997-05-01

    Successful operation of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) plant will require that accelerator downtime be kept to an absolute minimum. Over 200 separate 1 MW RF systems are expected to be used in the APT plant, making the efficiency and reliability of these systems two of the most critical factors in plant operation. The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will serve as the prototype for APT. The design of the RF systems used in LEDA has been driven by the need for high efficiency and extremely high system reliability. We present details of the High Voltage Power Supply and transmitter systems as well as detailed descriptions of the waveguide layout between the klystrons and the accelerating cavities. The first stage of LEDA operations will use as many as six 1 MW klystrons to test the RFQ and a single CCDTL section. Each accelerating cavity will serve as a power combiner for multiple RF systems. We present some of the unique challenges expected in the use of this concep t.

  10. Linac Coherent Light Source Undulator RF BPM System

    SciTech Connect

    Lill, R.M.; Morrison, L.H.; Waldschmidt, G.J.; Walters, D.R.; Johnson, R.; Li, Z.; Smith, S.; Straumann, T.; /SLAC

    2007-04-17

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) when it becomes operational in 2009. The LCLS is currently in the construction phase. The beam position monitor (BPM) system planned for the LCLS undulator will incorporate a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM system described in this paper. The BPM system will provide high-resolution measurements of the electron beam trajectory on a pulse-to-pulse basis and over many shots. The X-band cavity BPM size, simple fabrication, and high resolution make it an ideal choice for LCLS beam position detection. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results.

  11. Improved Controls for Fusion RF Systems. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Jeffrey A.

    2011-11-08

    We have addressed the specific requirements for the integrated systems controlling an array of klystrons used for Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). The immediate goal for our design was to modernize the transmitter protection system (TPS) for LHCD on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (MIT-PSFC). Working with the Alcator C-Mod team, we have upgraded the design of these controls to retrofit for improvements in performance and safety, as well as to facilitate the upcoming expansion from 12 to 16 klystrons. The longer range goals to generalize the designs in such a way that they will be of benefit to other programs within the international fusion effort was met by designing a system which was flexible enough to address all the MIT system requirements, and modular enough to adapt to a large variety of other requirements with minimal reconfiguration.

  12. RF System Modelling for the JLab 12 GeV Upgrade and RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Alicia Hofler; Jean Delayen; J. Hovater; Stefan Simrock

    2003-10-01

    Jefferson Lab is using the MATLAB/Simulink library for RF systems developed for TTF as a tool to develop a model of its 12 GeV upgrade and the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) to study the behavior and performance of the RF control system. The library includes elements describing a superconducting cavity with mechanical modes excited by Lorentz Force effects and a klystron including saturation characteristics. It can be applied to gradient and phase or in-phase and quadrature control for cavities operating in either a self-excited loop or generator driven mode. We will provide an overview of the theory behind the library components and present initial modeling results for Jefferson Lab's 12 GeV Upgrade and the RIA systems.

  13. Battery-Powered RF Pre-Ionization System for the Caltech Magnetohydrodynamically-Driven Jet Experiment: RF Discharge Properties and MHD-Driven Jet Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.

    This thesis describes investigations of two classes of laboratory plasmas with rather different properties: partially ionized low pressure radiofrequency (RF) discharges, and fully ionized high density magnetohydrodynamically (MHD)-driven jets. An RF pre-ionization system was developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and create hotter, faster jets in the Caltech MHD-Driven Jet Experiment. The RF plasma source used a custom pulsed 3 kW 13.56 MHz RF power amplifier that was powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 4-6 kV with the cathode of the jet experiment. The argon RF discharge equilibrium and transport properties were analyzed, and novel jet dynamics were observed. Although the RF plasma source was conceived as a wave-heated helicon source, scaling measurements and numerical modeling showed that inductive coupling was the dominant energy input mechanism. A one-dimensional time-dependent fluid model was developed to quantitatively explain the expansion of the pre-ionized plasma into the jet experiment chamber. The plasma transitioned from an ionizing phase with depressed neutral emission to a recombining phase with enhanced emission during the course of the experiment, causing fast camera images to be a poor indicator of the density distribution. Under certain conditions, the total visible and infrared brightness and the downstream ion density both increased after the RF power was turned off. The time-dependent emission patterns were used for an indirect measurement of the neutral gas pressure. The low-mass jets formed with the aid of the pre-ionization system were extremely narrow and collimated near the electrodes, with peak density exceeding that of jets created without pre-ionization. The initial neutral gas distribution prior to plasma breakdown was found to be critical in determining the ultimate jet structure. The visible radius of the dense central jet column was several times narrower than the axial current channel

  14. Use of Sensors and RF System Models to Control Inductively Coupled Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Lee A.

    1997-10-01

    Research for the development of plasma sources and processes for new generations of feature and wafer sizes must meet requirements in many dimensions including performance, cost, schedule, and yield. This last requirement is becoming increasingly difficult to meet because the process for submicron features frequently have narrow windows and it is difficult to have the needed tool to tool and wafer to wafer repeatability to consistently hit the window. Data from sensors, in particular post-match rf sensors, can be used to measure and control some of the critical process parameters. This work, in many respects, parallels previous work by Paul Miller on capacitively coupled tools. Three examples utilizing post-match rf sensor data will be presented. First, a common approach to auto-matching is to (separately) use the phase and magnitude of the reflected rf power signal to control two capacitors in the match box. At a minimum, presets must be changed for new processes and auto-matches sometimes fail. By utilizing error signals derived from both pre-and post-match rf sensors, we have developed and tested a new matching algorithm that accommodates a wide range of power and plasma conditions without the need for presets. Second, the same rf data can be used to infer power input to the plasma. Losses in match boxes range from 10-50%, depending on the both the rf system and desired plasma conditions. In addition, because of small, but significant differences in particular tool installation or rf components, there can be differences between the efficiencies of nominally the same tool under identical conditions. Thus machine control based on net power is needed for optimum control. Post-match sensors provide the data needed to separate the loses in the matchbox from power coupled to the plasma. The third use of rf system data is the measurement parameters that can be used to both characterize the tool and to indicate and help diagnose or even predict equipment failures. The

  15. Design of a new VHF RF power amplifier system for LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, John T M

    2010-01-01

    A major upgrade is replacing much of the 40 year-old proton drift tube linac RF system with new components at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). When installed, the new system will reduce the total number of electron power tubes from twenty-four to eight in the RF powerplant. A new 200 MHz high power cavity amplifier has being developed at LANSCE. This 3.2 MW final power amplifier (FPA) uses a Thales TH628 Diacrode{reg_sign}, a state-of-the-art tetrode that eliminates the large anode modulator of the triode-based FPA that has been in use for four decades. Drive power for the FPA is provided by a new tetrode intermediate power amplifier (and a solid-state driver stage). The new system has sufficient duty-factor capability to allow LANSCE to return to 1 MW beam operation. Prototype RF power amplifiers have been designed, fabricated, and assembled, and are being tested. High voltage DC power became available through innovative re-engineering of an installed system. Details of the electrical and mechanical design of the FPA and ancillary systems are discussed.

  16. Structural and Critical Behaviors of Ag Rough Films Deposited on Liquid Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Gao-xiang; Feng, Chun-mu; Zhang, Qi-rui; Ge, Hong-liang; Zhang, Xuan-jia

    1996-10-01

    A new Ag rough film system, deposited on silicone oil surfaces by rf-magnetron sputtering method, has been fabricated. The chrysanthemum-like surface morphology at micron length scale is observed. It is proposed that the anomalous critical behavior mainly results from the relative shift between the Ag atom clusters and the substrate. The discussion of the deposition mechanism is also presented.

  17. Switch over to the high frequency rf systems near transition

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Wei, J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to point out that since bunch narrowing naturally occurs in the acceleration process in the vicinity of transition, it should be possible to switch over to the high frequency system close to transition when the bunch has narrowed enough to fit directly into the high frequency bucket. The advantage of this approach is the simplicity, no extra components or gymnastics are required of the low frequency system. The disadvantage, of course, is for protons which do not go through transition. But on the other hand, there is no shortage of intensity for protons and so it should be possible to keep the phase space area low for protons, and then matching to the high frequency bucket should be easily accomplished by adiabatic compression. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Bandwidth utilization maximization of scientific RF communication systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, D.; Ryan, W.; Ross, M.

    1997-01-01

    A method for more efficiently utilizing the frequency bandwidth allocated for data transmission is presented. Current space and range communication systems use modulation and coding schemes that transmit 0.5 to 1.0 bits per second per Hertz of radio frequency bandwidth. The goal in this LDRD project is to increase the bandwidth utilization by employing advanced digital communications techniques. This is done with little or no increase in the transmit power which is usually very limited on airborne systems. Teaming with New Mexico State University, an implementation of trellis coded modulation (TCM), a coding and modulation scheme pioneered by Ungerboeck, was developed for this application and simulated on a computer. TCM provides a means for reliably transmitting data while simultaneously increasing bandwidth efficiency. The penalty is increased receiver complexity. In particular, the trellis decoder requires high-speed, application-specific digital signal processing (DSP) chips. A system solution based on the QualComm Viterbi decoder and the Graychip DSP receiver chips is presented.

  19. Efficient RF energy harvesting by using a fractal structured rectenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sechang; Ramasamy, Mouli; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2014-04-01

    A rectenna system delivers, collects, and converts RF energy into direct current to power the electronic devices or recharge batteries. It consists of an antenna for receiving RF power, an input filter for processing energy and impedance matching, a rectifier, an output filter, and a load resistor. However, the conventional rectenna systems have drawback in terms of power generation, as the single resonant frequency of an antenna can generate only low power compared to multiple resonant frequencies. A multi band rectenna system is an optimal solution to generate more power. This paper proposes the design of a novel rectenna system, which involves developing a multi band rectenna with a fractal structured antenna to facilitate an increase in energy harvesting from various sources like Wi-Fi, TV signals, mobile networks and other ambient sources, eliminating the limitation of a single band technique. The usage of fractal antennas effects certain prominent advantages in terms of size and multiple resonances. Even though, a fractal antenna incorporates multiple resonances, controlling the resonant frequencies is an important aspect to generate power from the various desired RF sources. Hence, this paper also describes the design parameters of the fractal antenna and the methods to control the multi band frequency.

  20. The linac and booster RF systems for a dedicated injector for SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J.N.; Baird, S., Baltay, M.; Borland, M.; Nuhn, H.D.; Safranek, J.; Chavis, C.; Emery, L.; Genin, R.D.; Hettel, R.; Morales, H.; Sebek, J.; Voss, J.; Wang, H.; Wiedemann, H.; Youngmann, B. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Miller, R.H. )

    1991-05-01

    A 120 MeV, 2856 MHz, TW linac, with a microwave gun, alpha magnet, and chopper, has been built at SSRL as a preinjector for and along with a 3 GeV booster synchrotron ring. The resulting injector will be available on demand to fill SPEAR, which is a storage ring now dedicated to synchrotron light production. The linac sections were purchased from China, the XK-5 klystrons were obtained surplus from SLAC, the modulators are a variation on those at SLAC and were built by SSRL, the alpha magnet and chopper were designed and built at SSRL and the microwave gun was designed and built in collaboration with Varian Associates. The rf system for the booster ring is similar to those at SPEAR and PEP and was built by SSRL. Some of the interesting mechanical and electrical details are discussed and the operating characteristics of the linac and ring rf system are highlighted. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Performance of the RF bunch coalescing system in the Fermilab main ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.; Meisner, K.; Miller, H.; Nicholls, G.; Wildman, D.

    1985-10-01

    Both the proton and antiproton bunches which will collide in the Tevatron have longitudinal emittance greater than can be accelerated by the Main Ring from 8 GeV without large loss and emittance growth. To circumvent this restriction, several bunches of smaller intensity are accelerated in the Main Ring to an energy of 150 GeV where these bunches are coalesced into a single high-intensity bunch. Coalescing has possible uses in other applications. Applications could be any time that a beam which has been accelerated by an rf system of one frequency must be captured by another rf frequency. The bunch coalescing system is described and some preliminary coalescing results are shown.

  2. High power RF solid state power amplifier system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high frequency, solid state power amplifier system includes a plurality of input multiple port splitters for receiving a high-frequency input and for dividing the input into a plurality of outputs and a plurality of solid state amplifier units. Each amplifier unit includes a plurality of amplifiers, and each amplifier is individually connected to one of the outputs of multiport splitters and produces a corresponding amplified output. A plurality of multiport combiners combine the amplified outputs of the amplifiers of each of the amplifier units to a combined output. Automatic level control protection circuitry protects the amplifiers and maintains a substantial constant amplifier power output.

  3. Use of Exotic Coordinate Systems in the Design of RF Resonators for High-Field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Edward

    2008-10-01

    High field human MRI (11.7 Tesla is FDC approved for human research) renders standard RF coil design inadequate because the resonant wavelength in human soft tissue (about 8 cm at 500 MHz) is significantly smaller than the physical size of the human body. I propose optimizing the design of such RF coils using coordinate systems appropriate to human body parts, as has been done with ellipticalootnotetextCrozier et al, Concepts Magn Reson 1997; 9:195-210. and Cassinian ovalootnotetextDe Zanche et al, Magn Reson Med 2005; 53:201-211. cross sections. I have computed analytically the magnetic fields produced by a device of toroidal cross section using a cascade of conformal transformations.ootnotetextButterworth & Gore, J Magn Reson 2005; 175:114-123. Building upon these efforts, I will use the eleven coordinate systems of Moon & Spencer,ootnotetextMoon & Spencer, Field Theory Handbook, Berlin: Springer-Verlag; 1971. along with other possible coordinate systems and conformal transformations, to identify a small number of configurations that have the highest probability of being useful as RF coil designs for ultrahigh-field MRI.

  4. Integrated design and analysis of rf heating and current drive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P.M.; Carter, M.D.; Goulding, R.H.

    1995-09-01

    The design, analysis, and performance evaluation of rf power systems ultimately requires accurate modeling of a chain of subsystems starting with the rf transmitter and ending with the power absorption in the plasma. A collection of computer codes is used at ORNL to calculate the plasma loading and wave spectrum for a three-dimensional rf antenna, the transmission/reflection properties of the Faraday shield and its effect on the electrical characteristics and phase velocity of the antenna, the internal coupling among antenna array components and the incorporation of the antenna array into a transmission line model of the phase control, tuning, matching, and power distribution system. Some codes and techniques are more suited for the rapid evaluation of system design progressions, while others are more applicable to the detailed analysis of final designs or existing hardware. The interaction of codes and the accuracy of calculations will be illustrated by the process of determining the plasma loading as a function of phasing and density profiles for the TFTR ICRH antennas and comparing the results to measurements. An example of modeling a complex antenna geometry will be the comparison of calculations with the measured electrical response of a four-strap mockup of the JET A2 antenna array which was loaned to ORNL by the JET ICRH team.

  5. 50 MW X-BAND RF SYSTEM FOR A PHOTOINJECTOR TEST STATION AT LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Barty, C J; Beer, G K; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Houck, T L; Adolphsen, C; Candel, A; Chu, T S; Jongewaard, E N; Li, Z; Raubenheimer, T; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A; Wang, F; Wang, J W; Zhou, F; Deis, G A

    2011-03-11

    In support of X-band photoinjector development efforts at LLNL, a 50 MW test station is being constructed to investigate structure and photocathode optimization for future upgrades. A SLAC XL-4 klystron capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 microsecond pulses will be the high power RF source for the system. Timing of the laser pulse on the photocathode with the applied RF field places very stringent requirements on phase jitter and drift. To achieve these requirements, the klystron will be powered by a state of the art, solid-state, high voltage modulator. The 50 MW will be divided between the photoinjector and a traveling wave accelerator section. A high power phase shifter is located between the photoinjector and accelerator section to adjust the phasing of the electron bunches with respect to the accelerating field. A variable attenuator is included on the input of the photoinjector. The distribution system including the various x-band components is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of the RF system.

  6. Beam Pipe HOM Absorber for 750 MHz RF Cavity Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Neubauer, Michael

    2014-10-29

    This joint project of Muons, Inc., Cornell University and SLAC was supported by a Phase I and Phase II grant monitored by the SBIR Office of Science of the DOE. Beam line HOM absorbers are a critical part of future linear colliders. The use of lossy materials at cryogenic temperatures has been incorporated in several systems. The design in beam pipes requires cylinders of lossy material mechanically confined in such a way as to absorb the microwave energy from the higher-order modes and remove the heat generated in the lossy material. Furthermore, the potential for charge build-up on the surface of the lossy material requires the conductivity of the material to remain consistent from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. In this program a mechanical design was developed that solved several design constraints: a) fitting into the existing Cornell load vacuum component, b) allowing the use of different material compositions, c) a thermal design that relied upon the compression of the lossy ceramic material without adding stress. Coating experiments were performed that indicated the design constraints needed to fully implement this approach for solving the charge build-up problem inherent in using lossy ceramics. In addition, the ACE3P program, used to calculate the performance of lossy cylinders in beam pipes in general, was supported by this project. Code development and documentation to allow for the more wide spread use of the program was a direct result of this project was well.

  7. Thin CVD-diamond RF Pill-Box vacuum windows for LHCD systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravera, G. L.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Cardinali, A.; Cesario, R.; Mirizzi, F.; Schettini, G.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    The preliminary assessment of a Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system for the DEMOnstration power plant (DEMO) is mainly focused on the R&D needs of the less conventional RF components of the Main Transmission Line (MTL) and of the launcher. 500 kW, CW klystrons will be used to deliver the RF power to independent Passive Active Multijunction (PAM) launcher modules at 5 GHz. This paper describes the criteria followed to investigate the optimum solution for the RF window used as vacuum barrier between the MTL and the launcher, an open issue in the LHCD system for ITER too. The best candidate, capable of withstanding a power level of, or above, 0.5 MW in CW operation and to satisfy the electrical and thermonuclear requirements, is a Pill-Box assembly, based on a thin single disk of CVD-diamond as dielectric, water cooled at the edge. A thickness of 3 mm, much shorter than half a wavelength of the TE°11 mode in the dielectric as in the conventional window (unfeasible and too expensive with CVD-diamond at these frequencies), is sufficient to limit the exerted stress at the edge under the fracture stress for a maximum pressure applied of 0.9 MPa. In this paper the simulation results of conventional and thin CVD-diamond vacuum windows are presented comparing S-parameters, losses and electric fields in both matching condition and with VSWR = 2, using WR284 and WR229 as input/output rectangular waveguide.

  8. Development of deflector cavity and RF amplifier for bunch length detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, H. K.; Bhattacharya, T. K.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2016-02-01

    A minimally-interceptive bunch length detector system is being developed for measurement of longitudinal dimension of the bunch beam from RFQ of the radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility at VECC. This detector system is based on secondary electrons emission produced by the primary ion beam hitting a thin tungsten wire placed in the beam path. In this paper we report the design, development and off line testing results of deflector cavity together with its RF sysytem. The deflector cavity is a capacitive loaded helical type λ/2 resonator driven by RF source of 500 W at 37.8 MHz solid state amplifier, realized by combining two amplifier modules of 300 W each. The measured RF characteristics of the resonator, such as frequency, Q value and shunt impedance have been found to be reasonably good and close to the analytical estimation and results of simulation. The design philosophy and test results of individual components of the amplifier are discussed. The test result upto full power shows a good harmonic separation at the individual module level and this is found to improve further when modules are combined together.The results of high power performance test of the deflector cavity together with amplifier are also reported.

  9. 3D ultrasound image guidance system used in RF uterine adenoma and uterine bleeding ablation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Mingyue; Luo, Xiaoan; Cai, Chao; Zhou, Chengping; Fenster, Aaron

    2006-03-01

    Uterine adenoma and uterine bleeding are the two most prevalent diseases in Chinese women. Many women lose their fertility from these diseases. Currently, a minimally invasive ablation system using an RF button electrode is being used in Chinese hospitals to destroy tumor cells or stop bleeding. In this paper, we report on a 3D US guidance system developed to avoid accidents or death of the patient by inaccurate localization of the tumor position during treatment. A 3D US imaging system using a rotational scanning approach of an abdominal probe was built. In order to reduce the distortion produced when the rotational axis is not collinear with the central beam of the probe, a new 3D reconstruction algorithm is used. Then, a fast 3D needle segmentation algorithm is used to find the electrode. Finally, the tip of electrode is determined along the segmented 3D needle and the whole electrode is displayed. Experiments with a water phantom demonstrated the feasibility of our approach.

  10. Low level rf system for the European Spallation Source's Bilbao linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadegan, Hooman; Garmendia, Nagore; Etxebarria, Victor; Bermejo, F. Javier

    2011-05-01

    Design and some performance results of the pulsed digital low level radio frequency (LLRF) for the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) systems of Rutherford Appleton Laboratory-front end test stand and the future European Spallation Source Bilbao linac are presented. For rf field regulation, the design is based on direct rf-to-baseband conversion using an analog in-phase quadrature (IQ) demodulator, high-speed sampling of the I/Q components, baseband signal processing in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), conversion to analog, and IQ modulation. This concept leads to a simple and versatile LLRF system which can be used for a large variety of rf frequencies and virtually any LLRF application including cw, ramping, and pulsed. In order to improve the accuracy of the probe voltage measurement, errors associated with the use of analog IQ demodulators have been identified and corrected by FPGA algorithms and proper setting of the feedback loop parameters. Furthermore, a baseband-equivalent model for the rf plant is developed in MATLAB-Simulink to study the RFQ transient response under beam loading in the presence of phase and delay errors. The effect of the unwanted resonant modes on the feedback loop stability and the LLRF considerations to avoid such instabilities are discussed and compared to some other machines such as the ILC and the European free electron laser . The practical results obtained from tests with a mock-up cavity and an RFQ cold model verify that amplitude and phase stabilities down to a fraction of one percent and one degree and phase margins larger than ±50° can be achieved with this method preserving the linearity and bandwidth of the feedback loops.

  11. RF and data acquisition systems for Fermilab's ILC SRF cavity vertical test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Ozelis, Joseph P.; Nehring, Roger; Grenoble, Christiana; Powers, Thomas J.; /Jefferson Lab

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities as part of its ILC program. The RF system for this facility is based on the proven production cavity test systems used at Jefferson Lab for CEBAF and SNS cavity testing. The design approach is modular in nature, using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. This yields a system that can be easily debugged and modified, and with ready availability of spares. Comprehensive data acquisition and control is provided by a PXI-based hardware platform in conjunction with software developed in the LabView programming environment.

  12. Cognitive Cellular Systems: A New Challenge on the RF Analog Frontend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Gabor; Schrey, Moritz; Subbiah, Iyappan; Ashok, Arun; Heinen, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive Cellular Systems are seen today as one of the most promising ways of moving forward solving or at least easing the still worsening situation of congested spectrum caused by the growing number of users and the expectation of higher data transfer rates. As the intelligence of a Cognitive Radio system is located in the digital domain - the Cognitive Engine and associated layers - extensive research has been ongoing in that domain since Mitola published his idea in 1999. Since, a big progress has been made in the domain of architectures and algorithms making systems more efficient and highly flexible. The pace of this progress, however, is going to be impeded by hard requirements on the received and transmitted signal quality, introducing ultimate challenges on the performance of the RF analog frontend, such as in-band local oscillator harmonics, ultra low sensitivity and ultra high linearity. The RF frontend is thus likely to become the limiting technical factor in the true realization of a Cognitive Cellular System. Based on short recapitulations of the most crucial issues in RF analog design for Cognitive Systems, this article will point out why those mechanisms become responsible for the limitation of the overall performance particularly in a broadband Cognitive Cellular System. Furthermore, as part of a possible solution to ease the situation, system design of a high intermediate frequency (IF) to UHF frequency converter for cognitive radios is discussed and the performance of such a converter analyzed as a proof of concept. In addition to successfully tackling some of the challenges, such a high-IF converter enables white space operation for existing commercial devices by acting as frequency converter. From detailed measurements, the capabilities in both physical layer and application layer performance of a high-IF frontend developed out of off-the-shelf components is explained and is shown to provide negligible degradation to the commercial device

  13. Energy-efficient operation of a booster RF system for Taiwan light source operated in top-up mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Meng-Shu; Wang, Chaoen; Chang, Lung-Hai; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Yu, Tsung-Chi; Lin, Ming-Chyuan; Chen, Ling-Jhen; Yang, Tz-Te; Chang, Mei-Hsia; Lin, Yu-Han; Tsai, Ming-Hsun; Lo, Chih-Hung; Liu, Zong-Kai

    2015-03-01

    Contemporary light sources operate in a top-up mode to maintain their photon intensity quasi-constant so as to improve significantly the thermal stability of the photon beam and to maximize ultimately the average photon flux at a designed maximum operational beam current. Operating in a top-up mode requires frequent beam injection from the synchrotron booster to the storage ring of the light source, but the injection intervals occupy only a tiny portion of the operational time of the integrated machine. To maintain a high operational reliability, the booster RF system practically operates necessarily under injection conditions around the clock and consumes full electric power whether during top-up injection or not. How to decrease the power consumption of the booster RF system during its stand-by time but not to sacrifice the reliability and availability of the RF system is obviously of fundamental interest for routine operation of the light source in a top-up mode. Here, an energy-efficient operation of a booster RF system adaptive to top-up operation of a light source is proposed that has been developed, realized and integrated into the booster RF system of the Taiwan Light Source (TLS), and routinely operated since the end of year 2008. The klystron cathode current and RF gap voltage of the booster's accelerating RF cavity are both periodically modulated to adapt the injection rhythm during top-up operation, which results in decreased consumption of electric power of the booster RF system by more than 78%. The impact on the reliability and availability of the booster RF system has been carefully monitored during the past five operational years, delivering more than 5000 h scheduled user beam time per year. The booster RF system retains its excellent reliability and availability as previously. Neither a decrease of the service time nor an induced reliability issue from the klystron or any high-power high-voltage component of the transmitter has been experienced

  14. RF Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Capacitive Switches Using Ultra Thin Hafnium Oxide Dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Onodera, Kazumasa; Maeda, Ryutaro

    2006-01-01

    A π-type RF capacitive switch using about 45-nm-thick HfO2 dielectric layer was fabricated. High isolation performance was obtained in wide-band range when the switch was down-state. The isolation was better than -40 dB at the frequency range of 4-35 GHz. Particularly, the isolation was better than -50 dB in the frequency range of 8-12 GHz, i.e., X band. HfO2 showed excellent process compatibility with conventional microfabrication procedure. The 45-nm-thick HfO2 film was prepared using sputtering at room temperature so that it was feasible to be integrated into RF switch and other microwave circuits. The results of constant bias stressing showed that the ultra thin HfO2 had excellent reliability. The electric breakdown of HfO2 was observed, which had no apparent negative effects on the reliability of the dielectric. HfO2 dielectrics were attractive in the application of RF micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) switch for new generation of low-loss high-linearity microwave circuits.

  15. Optimizing RF gun cavity geometry within an automated injector design system

    SciTech Connect

    Alicia Hofler ,Pavel Evtushenko

    2011-03-28

    RF guns play an integral role in the success of several light sources around the world, and properly designed and optimized cw superconducting RF (SRF) guns can provide a path to higher average brightness. As the need for these guns grows, it is important to have automated optimization software tools that vary the geometry of the gun cavity as part of the injector design process. This will allow designers to improve existing designs for present installations, extend the utility of these guns to other applications, and develop new designs. An evolutionary algorithm (EA) based system can provide this capability because EAs can search in parallel a large parameter space (often non-linear) and in a relatively short time identify promising regions of the space for more careful consideration. The injector designer can then evaluate more cavity design parameters during the injector optimization process against the beam performance requirements of the injector. This paper will describe an extension to the APISA software that allows the cavity geometry to be modified as part of the injector optimization and provide examples of its application to existing RF and SRF gun designs.

  16. THE MC AND A COUNCIL AT SSC RF - IPPE AS A COORDINATING BODY FOR SYSTEM SUSTAINABILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    FISHBONE,L.VALENTE,J.HANLEY,T.HIRSCHI,E.J.RUSS,P.SCHERER-KATZ,C.

    2004-07-18

    The State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation--Institute of Physics and Power Engineering's (SSC RF-IPPE) practice of nuclear material control and accounting (MC&A) has undergone significant changes during the period of cooperation with U.S. national laboratories from 1995 to the present. These changes corresponded with general changes of the Russian system of state control and accounting of nuclear materials resulting from the new Concept of the System for State Regulating and Control of Nuclear Materials (1996) and further regulatory documents, which were developed and implemented to take into account international experience in the MC&A [1]. During the upgrades phase of Russian-U.S. cooperation, an MC&A laboratory was specially created within the SSC RF IPPE for the purpose of guiding the creation of the upgraded MC&A system, coordinating the activities of all units involved in the creation of this system, and implementing a unified technical policy during the transition period. After five years of operation of the MC&A laboratory and the implementation of new components for the upgraded MC&A system, it was decided that a greater degree of attention must be paid to the MC&A system's operation in addition to the coordination activities carried out by the MC&A laboratory. To meet this need, an organization for operation of the nuclear material (NM) control and accounting system was created as part of the Division of NM Transportation and Storage. It was also recognized that a new mechanism was required for effective coordination of MC&A activities in IPPE, including the implementation of a unified MC&A policy in methodological, technical and practical areas. This mechanism should allow the IPPE management to gain an objective evaluation of the MC&A system status and provide leading specialists with objective recommendations on maintenance of MC&A system and on basic directions for further improvements. Preliminary discussions indicated that such a

  17. Characterization of Radiation Induced Current in RF coils of Linac-MR Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Benjamin Lester

    Real-time MR imaging of the cancer patients undergoing external beam radiation treatment represents the next generation in image guided radiotherapy. However, the radio frequency (RF) coil of the MRI is exposed to the pulsed radiation of the linear accelerator in the systems where a medical linear accelerator is integrated with the MRI. This thesis is primarily concerned with the instantaneous effect of pulsed radiation on the RF coils, in particular the Radiation Induced Current (RIC). The RIC results from the charge imbalance created by the ejection of Compton electrons from the thin conductors of the RF coils during the pulsed irradiation. This work spans the initial observations of the RIC in real coils, a detailed characterization of the RIC and finally its impact on the MR image. The first part presented the measurements of the instantaneous RIC in two different MRI RF coils. Some basic characterization of the RIC included the isolation of the RF coil component responsible for RIC, the dependence of RIC on linear accelerator dose rate, and the effect of placing wax buildup on the coil to reduce RIC. The copper windings of the RF coils were isolated as the main source of RIC. A linear dependence of the RIC amplitude on dose rate was observed. The RIC was decreased with wax buildup, suggesting an electronic disequilibrium as the cause of RIC. In the second part, a buildup method of RIC removal in planar conductors is tested, a Monte Carlo method of RIC calculation in metal conductors is presented and validated, and the Monte Carlo method is used to examine the effects of magnetic fields on both planar conductor and practical cylindrical coil geometries. The buildup method of RIC removal is effective in planar geometries and in cylindrical coil geometries when the coil conductor is in direct contact with the patient. The presence of air gap between the coil and patient makes this method of RIC removal less effective although placing buildup still reduces the RIC

  18. Application of system identification techniques to an rf cavity tuning loop

    SciTech Connect

    Mestha, L.K. ); Planner, C.W. )

    1990-11-01

    Modern system identification is applied to rf cavity tuning on the ISIS synchrotron. Four types of test signals are investigated to assess their suitability for real time measurement in an accelerator environment. The Pseudo Random Binary Signal (PRBS) appears to be the most advantageous. Measurements under normal operating conditions allow automatic identification for a self-adapting loop. The interactive software MATLAB is used to process the data and the identified model is represented in pole-zero form. The model shows good correlation with system performance. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Investigation of RF Emissions From Wireless Networks as a Threat to Avionic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salud, Maria Theresa P.; Williams, Reuben A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The paper focuses on understanding and obtaining preliminary measurements of radiated field (RF) emissions of laptop/wireless local area network (WLAN) systems. This work is part of a larger research project to measure radiated emissions of wireless devices to provide a better understanding for potential interference with crucial aircraft avionics systems. A reverberation chamber data collection process is included, as well as recommendations for additional tests. Analysis of measurements from devices under test (DUTs) proved inconclusive for addressing potential interference issues. Continued effort is expected to result in a complete easily reproducible test protocol. The data and protocol presented here are considered preliminary.

  20. Acceleration of heavy ions with a new RF system at HIMAC synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, T.; Kanazawa, M.; Shirai, T.; Iwata, Y.; Uchiyama, H.; Noda, K.

    2011-12-01

    A fast three-dimensional scanning irradiation method is under development at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) as the next stage of heavy ion cancer therapy. This method requires highly accurate control of the beam size, energy, and intensity. To improve the accelerated beam's quality, a new scheme for the synchrotron RF system has been developed. The new system adopts a periodic time clock system (T-clock) instead of an ordinary B-clock system. The new T-clock system is synchronized with a power line frequency of 50 Hz for synchronization with the synchrotron power supply. An ordinary B-clock system results in error pulses owing to the small analog signal of the magnetic field of the main dipole magnet, and the errors cause dipole oscillation of the beam in the RF bucket. Using the new T-clock generator at 192 kHz, we have observed an improvement in the acceleration efficiency and bunch shape compared to the B-clock generator.

  1. Nonstoichiometry in inorganic fluorides: I. Nonstoichiometry in MF m - RF n ( m < n ≤ 4) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, B. P.

    2012-05-01

    The manifestation of gross nonstoichiometry in MF m - RF n systems ( m < n ≤ 4) has been studied. Fluorides of 34 elements, in the systems of which phases of practical interest are formed, are chosen. To search for new phases of complex composition, a program for studying the phase diagrams of the condensed state (˜200 systems) has been carried out at the Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences. The main products of high-temperature interactions of the fluorides of elements with different valences ( m ≠ n) are grossly nonstoichiometric phases of two structural types: fluorite (CaF2) and tysonite (LaF3). Systems of fluorides of 27 elements ( M 1+ = Na, K; M 2+ = Ca, Sr, Ba, Cd, Pb; R 3+ = Sc, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu; R 4+ = Zr, Hf, Th, U) are selected; nonstoichiometric M 1 - x R x F m(1 - x) + nx phases, which are of greatest practical interest, are formed in these systems. The gross nonstoichiometry in inorganic fluorides is most pronounced in 80 MF2 - RF3 systems ( M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Cd, Pb; R are rare earth elements). The problems related to the growth of single crystals of nonstoichiometric phases and basic fields of their application as new fluoride multicomponent materials, the properties of which are controlled by the defect structure, are considered.

  2. DESIGN OF A RESONANT EXTRACTION SYSTEM FOR THE AGS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,K.; CULLEN,J.; GLENN,J.W.; LEE,Y.Y.; MCNERNEY,A.; NIEDERER,J.; ROSER,T,; SOUKAS,A.; TUOZZOLO,J.; TSOUPAS,N.

    1999-03-29

    The Booster Application Facility (BAF) will employ heavy ion beams of many different ion species and at beam energies ranging from 0.04 to 3.07 GeV/nucleon. Resonant extraction is required in order to deliver a continuous stream of particles. In this report we describe the beam requirements and the system design. The basic design is a third integer resonant extraction process which employs a single thin magnetic septum and a thick septum ejector magnet The expected extraction efficiency is about 85%, based on the thin septum thickness and the predicted step size of the resonant beam at the septum. This is more than sufficient for the low intensity low energy heavy ion beams needed for the BAF. In this report we will present a detailed discussion of the design of the various elements and a discussion of the detailed modeling of resonant extraction from the AGS Booster. The extraction process was modeled using a BNL version of MAD which allowed us to interactively observe detailed particle tracking of the process. This was a key tool to have in hand which permitted us to pose and answer various questions in a very short period of time.

  3. A Self-Powered Hybrid Energy Scavenging System Utilizing RF and Vibration Based Electromagnetic Harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uluşan, H.; Gharehbaghi, K.; Zorlu, Ö.; Muhtaroğlu, A.; Külah, H.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents a novel hybrid system that combines the power generated simultaneously by a vibration-based Electromagnetic (EM) harvester and a UHF band RF harvester. The novel hybrid scavenger interface uses a power management circuit in 180 nm CMOS technology to step-up and to regulate the combined output. At the first stage of the system, the RF harvester generates positive DC output with a 7-stage threshold compensated rectifier, while the EM harvester generates negative DC output with a self-powered AC/DC negative doubler circuit. At the second stage, the generated voltages are serially added, stepped-up with an on-chip charge pump circuit, and regulated to a typical battery voltage of 3 V. Test results indicate that the hybrid operation enables generation of 9 μW at 3 V output for a wide range of input stimulations, which could not be attained with either harvesting mode by itself. Moreover the hybrid system behaves as a typical battery, and keeps the output voltage stable at 3 V up to 18 μW of output power. The presented system is the first battery-like harvester to our knowledge that generates energy from two independent sources and regulates the output to a stable DC voltage.

  4. RF and Data Acquisition Systems for Fermilab's ILC SRF Cavity Vertical Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph P. Ozelis; Roger Nehring; Christiana Grenoble; Thomas J. Powers

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities as part of a program to improve cavity performance reproducibility for the ILC. The RF system for this facility, using the classic combination of oscillator, phase detector/mixer, and loop amplifier to detect the resonant cavity frequency and lock onto the cavity, is based on the proven production cavity test systems used at Jefferson Lab for CEBAF and SNS cavity testing. The design approach is modular in nature, using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. This yields a system that can be easily debugged and modified, and with ready availability of spares. Data acquisition and control is provided by a PXI-based hardware platform in conjunction with software developed in the LabView programming environment. This software provides for amplitude and phase adjustment of incident RF power, and measures all relevant cavity power levels, cavity thermal environment parameters, as well as field emission-produced radiation. It also calculates the various cavity performance parameters and their associated errors. Performance during system commissioning and initial cavity tests will be presented.

  5. A Multi-Moded RF Delay Line Distribution System (MDLDS) for the Next Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher D.

    2002-01-17

    The Delay Line Distribution System (DLDS) is an alternative to conventional pulse compression, which enhances the peak power of rf sources while matching the long pulse of those sources to the shorter filling time of accelerator structures. We present an implementation of this scheme that combines pairs of parallel delay lines of the system into single lines. The power of several sources is combined into a single waveguide delay line using a multi-mode launcher. The output mode of the launcher is determined by the phase coding of the input signals. The combined power is extracted from the delay line using mode-selective extractors, each of which extracts a single mode. Hence, the phase coding of the sources controls the output port of the combined power. The power is then fed to the local accelerator structures. We present a detailed design of such a system, including several implementation methods for the launchers, extractors, and ancillary high power rf components. The system is designed so that it can handle the 600 MW peak power required by the NLC design while maintaining high efficiency.

  6. Beam manipulation and compression using broadband rf systems in the Fermilab Main Injector and Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    G William Foster et al.

    2004-07-09

    A novel method for beam manipulation, compression, and stacking using a broad band RF system in circular accelerators is described. The method uses a series of linear voltage ramps in combination with moving barrier pulses to azimuthally compress, expand, or cog the beam. Beam manipulations can be accomplished rapidly and, in principle, without emittance growth. The general principle of the method is discussed using beam dynamics simulations. Beam experiments in the Fermilab Recycler Ring convincingly validate the concept. Preliminary experiments in the Fermilab Main Injector to investigate its potential for merging two ''booster batches'' to produce high intensity proton beams for neutrino and antiproton production are described.

  7. A new technique for making bright proton bunches using barrier RF systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    I describe here a very promising scheme for producing bright proton bunches for proton-antiproton and proton-proton colliders. The method is based on the use of wide-band barrier rf systems. First, I explain the principle of the method. The beam dynamics simulations applied to the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) suggest that the scheme allows a wide range of bunch intensities and emittances for ppbar collider. This method has the potential to increase the instantaneous luminosity by {ge}30% at the Tevatron.

  8. A COAXIAL TE011 CAVITY AND A SYSTEM TO MEASURE DC AND RF PROPERTIES OF SUPERCONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; Ganapati Rao Myneni; Larry Turlington; Gary Slack; Michael Morrone; William Clemens; Richard Bundy; Thomas Elliott; Jayanta Mondal

    2008-01-23

    A coaxial niobium cavity has been designed and built where the center conductor consists of a removable sample. In addition, a system to measure properties such as magnetization, penetration depth, critical temperature and thermal conductivity on the same cylindrical sample has been designed and built. The purpose of this effort is to investigate possible correlations between DC and RF properties of superconductors. In this contribution, the design of the various components is discussed and the test results on a niobium sample obtained so far are presented.

  9. RF Control System for the SC cavity of the Tesla Test Facility Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosnier, A.; Chel, S.; Phung Ngoc, B.; Tessier, J. M.

    1997-05-01

    The superconducting cavity of the TTF injector, which operates in pulsed mode, must accelerate the non relativistic electron beam to an energy of 10 to 15 MeV. Lorentz forces and microphonics detunings are the major sources of cavity field fluctuation. In order to achieve amplitude and phase stabilities much smaller than 10-3 and 1 degree, an analog feedback system, mainly based on a self excited loop and I/Q modulators, has been developed. After a description of the RF control module, various measurements without and with beam are reported and compared with numerical simulations.

  10. Installation of spectrally selective imaging system in RF negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, K.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.; Heinemann, B.; Kisaki, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Nakano, H.; Osakabe, M.; Tsumori, K.; Geng, S.; Kaneko, O.; Takeiri, Y.

    2016-02-01

    A spectrally selective imaging system has been installed in the RF negative ion source in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-relevant negative ion beam test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) to investigate distribution of hydrogen Balmer-α emission (Hα) close to the production surface of hydrogen negative ion. We selected a GigE vision camera coupled with an optical band-path filter, which can be controlled remotely using high speed network connection. A distribution of Hα emission near the bias plate has been clearly observed. The same time trend on Hα intensities measured by the imaging diagnostic and the optical emission spectroscopy is confirmed.

  11. A non-IQ sampling controller in low level RF system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Cheng-Ke; Dai, Zhi-Min; Liu, Jian-Fei; Zhao, Yu-Bin; Zhang, Tong-Xuan; Fu, Ze-Chuan; Liu, Wei-Qing

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes a non-IQ controller for digital Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback control. Based on this non-IQ sampling method, arbitrary frequency relationship between ADC/DAC sampling clocks and IF signals can be employed. The nonlinearity in digital conversion can be reduced and the system dynamic performance improved. This paper analyzes the nonlinearity in conventional IQ sampling, gives the state variable description of the non-IQ algorithm, presents an implementation and its synchronization, and compares its performances with IQ sampling. Supported by SSRF Project

  12. CONTROL OF THE INJECTED RF BEAM IN THE DIII-D ECH SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    K. KAJIWARA; C.B. BAXI; J.L. DOANE; R.E. ELLIS; M.E. FRIEND; M. GREEN; Y.A. GORELOV; J. LOHR; C.P. MOELLER; R.I. PINSKER; D. PONCE; R. PRATER

    2002-08-01

    The DIII-D ECH system includes three launcher assemblies each of which can accommodate the rf beams from two gyrotrons. The launchers use four different designs for the mirrors which focus and direct the beams into the tokamak. The designs use molybdenum brazed to graphite, thin Glidcop or variable thickness Glidcop. A fourth design with laminated Glidcop/stainless steel construction has been operated, but no thermal data are available. All the mirrors operate without active cooling. This paper presents preliminary analyses and measurements of the thermal performance of the three designs for which data have been obtained.

  13. HIGH ENERGY PULSED POWER SYSTEM FOR AGS SUPER NEUTRINO FOCUSING HORN.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; WENG, W.-T.

    2005-05-16

    This paper present a preliminary design of a 300 kA, 2.5 Hz pulsed power system. This system will drive the focusing horn of proposed Brookhaven AGS Neutrino Super Beam Facility for Very Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment. The peak output power of the horn pulsed power system will reach Giga-watts, and the upgraded AGS will be capable of delivering 1 MW in beam power.

  14. An automated measurement system for characterization of RF and gradient coil parameters.

    PubMed

    Boyer, J S; Wright, S M; Porter, J R

    1998-01-01

    A fully automated laboratory-based measurement system for characterization of coil system parameters is presented. This method uses an inexpensive personal computer (PC)-controlled stepper motor positioning system in conjunction with a network/spectrum analyzer and an analog-to-digital converter (A/D) board that allows high resolution data acquisition in an unattended manner. A graphical interface was created for complete control of stepper motor movement, measurement, and data acquisition. The system is capable of performing a wide range of measurements that can, either individually or combined, characterize radiofrequency (RF) and gradient coils used in MRI. Measurement methods, theory, and results for conductor and shield current distributions, mutual impedance, and magnetic fields are given. Comparisons with theoretical calculations are included to validate the accuracy and utility of the system. PMID:9626895

  15. Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, J.; Tantawi, S.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2012-05-25

    We are investigating a standing wave accelerator structure that uses a rf feed to each individual cell. This approach minimizes rf power flow and electromagnetic energy absorbed by an rf breakdown. The objective of this work is a robust high-gradient (above 100 MV/m) X-band accelerator structure.

  16. Radio Frequency (RF) Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) Switches for Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Ponchak, George E.; Scardelletti, Maximillian C.; Varaljay, Nicholas C.

    2000-01-01

    Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) is an emerging technology for radio frequency (RF) systems because it has the potential to dramatically decrease loss and improve efficiency. In this paper, we address the design and fabrication of novel MEMS switches being developed at NASA Glenn Research Center. Two types of switches are being developed: a microstrip series single pole single throw (SPST) switch and a coplanar waveguide (CPW) series SPST and single pole double throw (SPDT) switches. These are being fabricated as an integral part of 50 Ohm microstrip and CPW RF integrated circuits using microfabrication techniques. The construction of the switch relies on a cantilever beam that is partially supported by a dielectric post. The cantilever beam is electro-magnetically actuated. To decrease stiction, a Si3N4 thin film is deposited over the contact area. Thus, when the switch is closed, the ON-state insertion loss is governed by the parallel plate capacitance formed by the two contacts. The isolation in the OFF-state is governed by the parasitic capacitance when the cantilever is in the up position. RF MEMS switches have been demonstrated with 80% lower insertion loss than conventional solid state devices (GaAs Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MESFETs) and Silicon PIN diodes) based switches. For example, a conventional GaAs five-bit phase shifter which is required for beam steering in a phased array antenna has approximately 7 dB of insertion loss at 26.5 GHz where as a comparable MEMS based phase shifter is expected to have only 2 dB of insertion loss. This translates into 56% lower power dissipation and therefore decreases the thermal load on the spacecraft and also reduces the power amplifier requirements. These benefits will enable NASA to build the next generation of deep space science crafts and micro/nano satellites.

  17. Feedback analysis and design of RF power links for low-power bionic systems.

    PubMed

    Baker, M W; Sarpeshkar, R

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a feedback-loop technique for analyzing and designing RF power links for transcutaneous bionic systems, i.e., between an external RF coil and an internal RF coil implanted inside the body. The feedback techniques shed geometric insight into link design and minimize algebraic manipulations. We demonstrate that when the loop transmission of the link's feedback loop is -1, the link is critically coupled, i.e., the magnitude of the voltage transfer function across the link is maximal. We also derive an optimal loading condition that maximizes the energy efficiency of the link and use it as a basis for our link design. We present an example of a bionic implant system designed for load power consumptions in the 1-10-mW range, a low-power regime not significantly explored in prior designs. Such low power levels add to the challenge of link efficiency, because the overhead associated with switching losses in power amplifiers at the link input and with rectifiers at the link output significantly degrade link efficiency. We describe a novel integrated Class-E power amplifier design that uses a simple control strategy to minimize such losses. At 10-mW load power consumption, we measure overall link efficiencies of 74% and 54% at 1- and 10-mm coil separations, respectively, in good agreement with our theoretical predictions of the link's efficiency. At 1-mW load power consumption, we measure link efficiencies of 67% and 51% at 1- and 10-mm coil separations, respectively, also in good accord with our theoretical predictions. In both cases, the link's rectified output dc voltage varied by less than 16% over link distances that ranged from 2 to 10 mm. PMID:23851518

  18. The electromagnetic environment of Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems. Occupational exposure assessment reveals RF harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourzoulidis, G.; Karabetsos, E.; Skamnakis, N.; Kappas, C.; Theodorou, K.; Tsougos, I.; Maris, T. G.

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) systems played a crucial role in the postponement of the former occupational electromagnetic fields (EMF) European Directive (2004/40/EC) and in the formation of the latest exposure limits adopted in the new one (2013/35/EU). Moreover, the complex MRI environment will be finally excluded from the implementation of the new occupational limits, leading to an increased demand for Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) surveillance. The gradient function of MRI systems and the application of the RF excitation frequency result in low and high frequency exposures, respectively. This electromagnetic field exposure, in combination with the increased static magnetic field exposure, makes the MRI environment a unique case of combined EMF exposure. The electromagnetic field levels in close proximity of different MRI systems have been assessed at various frequencies. Quality Assurance (QA) & safety issues were also faced. Preliminary results show initial compliance with the forthcoming limits in each different frequency band, but also revealed peculiar RF harmonic components, of no safety concern, to the whole range detected (20-1000MHz). Further work is needed in order to clarify their origin and characteristics.

  19. System-in-package LTCC platform for 3D RF to millimeter wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vähä-Heikkilä, T.; Lahti, M.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation shows recent trends and results in 3D Low Temperature Co-Fired Ceramics (LTCC) modules in applications from RF to millimeter waves. The system-in-package LTCC platform is a true three dimensional module technology. LTCC is a lightweight multi-layer technology having typically 6-20 ceramic layers and metallizations between. The metallization levels i.e different metal layers can be patterned and connected together with metal vias. Passive devices can also be fabricated on LTCC while active devices and other chips are connected with flip-chip, wire bonding or soldering. In addition to passives directly fabricated to LTCC, several different technologies/ chips can be hybrid integrated to the same module. LTCC platform is also well suited for the realization of antenna arrays for microwave and millimeter wave applications. Potential applications are ranging from short range communications to space and radars. VTT has designed, fabricated and characterized microwave and millimeter wave packages for Radio Frequency (RF) Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) as well as active devices. Also, several types of system-in-package modules have been realized containing hybrid integrated CMOS and GaAs MMICs and antenna arrays.

  20. Transparent Conductive AGZO/Ag/AGZO Multilayers on PET Substrate by Roll-to-Roll Sputtering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehoon; Park, Kwangwon; Kim, Jongsu

    2016-02-01

    Indium-free Al and Ga-codoped ZnO (AGZO) multilayer films with nanoscale Ag interlayer were deposited by dual target roll-to-roll RF for AGZO and DC sputtering systems for Ag at room temperature for a large scale. The thicknesses of AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer were optimized by changing the roll speed: 0.15/1.1/0.15 m/min for AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayers, respectively. The optimum thicknesses of AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer are 9.21, 8.32 and 8.04 nm, respectively. Optimized AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer films showed an excellent transparency (84% at 550 nm) and a low sheet resistance (9.2 omega/sq.) on PET substrates for opto-electronic applications. The effects of nanoscale Ag interlayer on optical and electrical properties of AGZO/Ag/AGZO multilayer films were discussed. PMID:27433648

  1. Chemical and phase distributions in a multilayered organic matter-Ag nanoparticle thin film system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, F. M.; Levard, C.; Wang, Y.; Choi, Y.; Eng, P.; Brown, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    Rapid development of nanotechnologies raises concern regarding the environmental impact of nanoparticles on ecosystems. Among the types of nanoparticles currently in production, metallic silver is the most widely used in nanotechnology (1). Synthetic Ag nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are most often used for their antimicrobial and antifungal properties that are, in part, explained by the release of highly toxic Ag+ species (2). While such properties are desirable in certain applied cases, the release of Ag-NPs and soluble Ag+ species to the environment is expected to impact biota as well as soil and water quality (3). With the production of Ag-NPs projected to increase (1), the amount of Ag-NPs that will be released to the environment through waste streams is also likely to increase. As such, a deeper understanding of the fundamental processes associated with Ag-NPs toxicity and reactivity is needed to evaluate their impact on the environment. We have studied the interaction during aging of poly-acrylic acid (PAA) and Ag-NPs with average particle sizes of 20 ±5 nm. The sample studied was composed of thin films of PAA and Ag-NPs deposited on a Si-wafer support. PAA served as a model compound and a simplified surrogate for exopolysaccharide, an organic substance produced through metabolic activity by most microorganisms. We applied a novel combination of long-period x-ray standing wave fluorescence yield (XSW-FY) spectroscopy, grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), and XRD-based standing wave profiles (XSW-XRD) to obtain chemical- and phase-specific information on this sample. After 24 hours, we observed the formation of AgCl(s) in the PAA film of the sample, which suggests oxidation and dissolution of a portion of the Ag-NPs during aging, resulting in the release of Ag+. In addition, we see partitioning of Cl and Br, both present initially in the PAA, to the intact Ag-NPs thin film. To our knowledge, this is the first application of this suite of techniques to this

  2. RF characteristics of the hoop column antenna for the land mobile satellite system mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foldes, P.

    1984-01-01

    A communication system using a satellite with a 118 meter diameter quad aperture antenna to provide telephone service to mobile users remotely located from the large metropolitan areas where the telephone companies are presently implementing their cellular system is described. In this system, which is compatible with the cellular system, the mobile user communicates with the satellite at UHF frequencies. The satellite connects him at S-Band, to the existing telephone network via a base station. The results of the RF definition work for the quad aperture antenna are presented. The elements of the study requirements for the LMSS are summarized, followed by a beam topology plan which satisfies the mission requirements with a practical and realiable configuration. The geometry of the UHF antenna and its radiation characteristics are defined. The various feed alternatives, and the S-band aperture are described.

  3. R.F. plasma discharge polymerization. Mass balance in static and flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, P.; Castello, G.; Nicchia, M.; Munari, S.

    The results of static radiofrequency plasma discharges and of flowing plasmas were compared in order to ascertain if the study of closed system experiments can be used to foresee the behaviour of flow plasma polymerization, etching or surface modifications. The experiments, carried up with pure ethane at a R.F. frequency of 13.5 MHz and with an initial gas pressure of 0.5 torr, showed that the values of the parameter γ, that represents the variation of the number of molecules in the gas phase during the plasma discharge, obtained from the ratio between the input and output flows in a flow system and from the ratio of initial and final pressures in a static system, are nearly coincident when systems subjected to the same specific energy input are considered.

  4. An RF Waveguide Distribution System for the ILC Test Accelerator at Fermilab's NML

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; Bowden, Gordon; Swent, Richard; McKee, Bobby; /SLAC

    2007-06-27

    An ILC R&D facility is being constructed in the NML building at Fermilab which, in addition to an injector and beam dump with spectrometer, will contain up to three cryomodules of ILC-type superconducting 9-cell cavities. This linac will be powered by a single klystron. As part of SLAC's contribution to this project, we will provide a distribution network in WR650 waveguide to the various cavity couplers. In addition to commercial waveguide components and circulators and loads, this system will include adjustable tap-offs, and customized hybrids. In one configuration, the circulators will be removed to test pair-wise cancellation of cavity reflections through hybrids. The system will be pressurized with nitrogen to 3 bar absolute to avoid the need for SF{sub 6}. The full distribution system for the first cryomodule will be delivered and installed later this year. We describe the design of the system and completed RF testing.

  5. Improvements of Low Level RF Control Systems for J-PARC LINAC 400-MeV Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Futatsukawa, K.; Fukui, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Michizono, S.; Sato, F.; Shinozaki, S.; Chishiro, E.

    The low level RF (LLRF) control systems have been successfully improved for the J-PARC LINAC upgrade. After the installation of 972-MHz high-β acceleration section behind the 324-MHz low-β section beginning in the summer of 2013, the proton beam was successfully accelerated to 400 MeV in January 2014. Many improvements in the LLRF control systems have been carried out to facilitate the operation of the J-PARC LINAC at 400 MeV. The reference 12-MHz signal delay settings for the feedback control systems have been optimized using 12-MHz delay modules. The stability performances of the 972-MHz RF&CLK (Clock) and Mixer&IQ (Mixer & IQ-modulator) boards have been improved using temperature-compensation techniques. By improving the hardware of the feedback control systems, very good stability of the RF systems has been achieved.

  6. Investigations on electrical and electrochemical properties of Ag+ ion conducting quaternary solid electrolyte systems: x[0.75 AgI : 0.25 AgCl] : (1-x)RbI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, R. C.; Chandra, Angesh; Bhatt, Alok; Mahipal, Y. K.

    2007-08-01

    Investigations on ion transport behaviour of new Ag+ ion conducting quaternary solid electrolyte systems: x[0.75AgI : 0.25AgCl] : (1 - x)RbI, where 0.1 <= x <= 1 mol.wt fractions, are reported. The solid electrolyte systems were synthesized adopting different routes of solid solution reactions. An alternative host salt, 'a quenched [0.75AgI : 0.25AgCl] mixed system solid solution', discovered at the present laboratory, has been used in place of AgI. The compositional dependent conductivity studies at room temperature revealed the quaternary systems 0.7[0.75AgI : 0.25AgCl] : 0.3RbI as the optimum conducting composition (OCC). AgI has been traditionally and most widely used as host salt in the past to prepare the majority of well-known fast Ag+ ion conductors including the ternary superionic solids MAg4I5 (M = Rb, K, NH4). Also, RbAg4I5 has been recognized as one of the highest conducting superionic solids with conductivity σrt ~ 10-1 S cm-1 at room temperature. However, it has been observed that RbAg4I5 is thermodynamically unstable, particularly in the open ambient conditions, while the newly synthesized quaternary solid electrolyte, having OCC 0.7[0.75AgI : 0.25AgCl] : 0.3RbI, has been observed to be much more stable than RbAg4I5. For direct comparison of the ion conduction behaviour of the newly synthesized OCC, the ternary superionic solid RbAg4I5 (0.8AgI : 0.2RbI) has also been synthesized in an identical manner. The room temperature conductivity (σrt) of the newly synthesized quaternary OCC was slightly lower than that of RbAg4I5. However, σrt remained practically stable for a fairly long time in the open ambient conditions as compared with that of RbAg4I5. The mechanism of ion transport in OCC has been characterized on the basis of experimental studies on various ionic parameters namely conductivity (σ), ionic mobility (μ), mobile ion concentration (n), ionic drift velocity (vd), ionic transference number (tion) etc. The temperature dependent studies on

  7. Portable RF-Sensor System for the Monitoring of Air Pollution and Water Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joonhee; Kim, Jin Young

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring air pollution including the contents of VOC, O3, NO2, and dusts has attracted a lot of interest in addition to the monitoring of water contamination because it affects directly to the quality of living conditions. Most of the current air pollution monitoring stations use the expensive and bulky instruments and are only installed in the very limited area. To bring the information of the air and water quality to the public in real time, it is important to construct portable monitoring systems and distribute them close to our everyday living places. In this work, we have constructed a low-cost portable RF sensor system by using 400 MHz transceiver to achieve this goal. Accuracy of the measurement was comparable to the ones used in the expensive and bulky commercial air pollution forecast systems. PMID:22928151

  8. Development of Simple Designs of Multitip Probe Diagnostic Systems for RF Plasma Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Naz, M. Y.; Shukrullah, S.; Ghaffar, A.; Rehman, N. U.

    2014-01-01

    Multitip probes are very useful diagnostics for analyzing and controlling the physical phenomena occurring in low temperature discharge plasmas. However, DC biased probes often fail to perform well in processing plasmas. The objective of the work was to deduce simple designs of DC biased multitip probes for parametric study of radio frequency plasmas. For this purpose, symmetric double probe, asymmetric double probe, and symmetric triple probe diagnostic systems and their driving circuits were designed and tested in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) generated by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) source. Using I-V characteristics of these probes, electron temperature, electron number density, and ion saturation current was measured as a function of input power and filling gas pressure. An increasing trend was noticed in electron temperature and electron number density for increasing input RF power whilst a decreasing trend was evident in these parameters when measured against filling gas pressure. In addition, the electron energy probability function (EEPF) was also studied by using an asymmetric double probe. These studies confirmed the non-Maxwellian nature of the EEPF and the presence of two groups of the energetic electrons at low filling gas pressures. PMID:24683326

  9. Development of simple designs of multitip probe diagnostic systems for RF plasma characterization.

    PubMed

    Naz, M Y; Shukrullah, S; Ghaffar, A; Rehman, N U

    2014-01-01

    Multitip probes are very useful diagnostics for analyzing and controlling the physical phenomena occurring in low temperature discharge plasmas. However, DC biased probes often fail to perform well in processing plasmas. The objective of the work was to deduce simple designs of DC biased multitip probes for parametric study of radio frequency plasmas. For this purpose, symmetric double probe, asymmetric double probe, and symmetric triple probe diagnostic systems and their driving circuits were designed and tested in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) generated by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) source. Using I-V characteristics of these probes, electron temperature, electron number density, and ion saturation current was measured as a function of input power and filling gas pressure. An increasing trend was noticed in electron temperature and electron number density for increasing input RF power whilst a decreasing trend was evident in these parameters when measured against filling gas pressure. In addition, the electron energy probability function (EEPF) was also studied by using an asymmetric double probe. These studies confirmed the non-Maxwellian nature of the EEPF and the presence of two groups of the energetic electrons at low filling gas pressures. PMID:24683326

  10. Functional and expression analysis of the metal-inducible dmeRF system from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Sanz, L; Prieto, R I; Imperial, J; Palacios, J M; Brito, B

    2013-10-01

    A gene encoding a homolog to the cation diffusion facilitator protein DmeF from Cupriavidus metallidurans has been identified in the genome of Rhizobium leguminosarum UPM791. The R. leguminosarum dmeF gene is located downstream of an open reading frame (designated dmeR) encoding a protein homologous to the nickel- and cobalt-responsive transcriptional regulator RcnR from Escherichia coli. Analysis of gene expression showed that the R. leguminosarum dmeRF genes are organized as a transcriptional unit whose expression is strongly induced by nickel and cobalt ions, likely by alleviating the repressor activity of DmeR on dmeRF transcription. An R. leguminosarum dmeRF mutant strain displayed increased sensitivity to Co(II) and Ni(II), whereas no alterations of its resistance to Cd(II), Cu(II), or Zn(II) were observed. A decrease of symbiotic performance was observed when pea plants inoculated with an R. leguminosarum dmeRF deletion mutant strain were grown in the presence of high concentrations of nickel and cobalt. The same mutant induced significantly lower activity levels of NiFe hydrogenase in microaerobic cultures. These results indicate that the R. leguminosarum DmeRF system is a metal-responsive efflux mechanism acting as a key element for metal homeostasis in R. leguminosarum under free-living and symbiotic conditions. The presence of similar dmeRF gene clusters in other Rhizobiaceae suggests that the dmeRF system is a conserved mechanism for metal tolerance in legume endosymbiotic bacteria. PMID:23934501

  11. MEMS high-speed angular-position sensing system with rf wireless transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Winston; Li, Wen J.

    2001-08-01

    A novel surface-micromachined non-contact high-speed angular-position sensor with total surface area under 4mm2 was developed using the Multi-User MEMS Processes (MUMPs) and integrated with a commercial RF transmitter at 433MHz carrier frequency for wireless signal detection. Currently, a 2.3 MHz internal clock of our data acquisition system and a sensor design with a 13mg seismic mass is sufficient to provide visual observation of a clear sinusoidal response wirelessly generated by the piezoresistive angular-position sensing system within speed range of 180 rpm to around 1000 rpm. Experimental results showed that the oscillation frequency and amplitude are related to the input angular frequency of the rotation disk and the tilt angle of the rotation axis, respectively. These important results could provide groundwork for MEMS researchers to estimate how gravity influences structural properties of MEMS devices under different circumstances.

  12. RF System Requirements for a Medium-Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, Robert A; Hannon, Fay E; Guo, Jiquan; Huang, Shichun; Huang, Yulu; Wang, Haipeng; Wang, S

    2015-09-01

    JLab is studying options for a medium energy electron-ion collider that could fit on the JLab site and use CEBAF as a full-energy electron injector. A new ion source, linac and booster would be required, together with collider storage rings for the ions and electrons. In order to achieve the maximum luminosity these will be high-current storage rings with many bunches. We present the high-level RF system requirements for the storage rings, ion booster ring and high-energy ion beam cooling system, and describe the technology options under consideration to meet them. We also present options for staging that might reduce the initial capital cost while providing a smooth upgrade path to a higher final energy. The technologies under consideration may also be useful for other proposed storage ring colliders or ultimate light sources.

  13. New bulk glassy alloys in Cu-Zr-Ag ternary system prepared by casting and milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janovszky, D.; Tomolya, K.; Sveda, M.; Solyom, J.; Roosz, A.

    2009-01-01

    The thermal stability, crystallization behaviour and glass forming ability of Cu-Zr-Ag system have been investigated on the basis of a ternary phase diagram. We altered the concentration of the alloys from the Cu58Zr42 to the concentration of the deep eutectic point of the Cu-Zr-Ag ternary system and we calculated the glass forming ability parameters. This paper summerises the results of the procedure during which Cu-Zr-Ag amorphous alloys with different Ag content (0-25%) were prepared by casting and ball-milling. Wedge-shaped samples were prepared from the ingots by centrifugal casting into copper mold. The supercooled liquid region (ΔTx) exceeded 75K. Following the characterization of the cast alloys, master alloys of identical composition were milled in a Fritsch Pulverisette 2 ball-mill. The powders, milled for various periods of time were analysed by XRD in order to define the amorphous fraction.

  14. High temperature phase equilibria studies in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O-Ag system

    SciTech Connect

    Margulies, Lawrence

    1999-11-08

    A variety of experimental techniques were utilized to examine the high temperature phase equilibria in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O-Ag system. Quenching studies were used to determine the liquid solubility of Ag in the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (Bi2212) melt and the details of the peritectic decomposition pathway of Bi2212 as a function on Ag content and oxygen partial pressure (PO{sub 2}). A liquid immiscibility region between oxide and Ag liquids in the 8--98 at% range was found above 900 C. Two eutectics were found in the Bi2212-Ag pseudobinary. On the oxide rich side, a eutectic exists at approximately 4 at% Ag. On the Ag rich side, a eutectic exists at approximately 98 at% Ag at a temperature of 15 C below the melting point of pure Ag. Six distinct solid phases were found to be in equilibrium with the partial melt within the Ag content and PO{sub 2} range studied. The stability of these solid phases were found to be highly sensitive to PO{sub 2}, and to a much lesser extent Ag content. High temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD) studies of this system are in conflict with these results. It is suggested that these discrepancies are due to experimental artifacts caused by the significant thermal gradients and lack of full bulk sampling which is inherent in conventional HTXRD designs. In part 2, a new furnace design compatible with synchrotron radiation sources is introduced to address these problems. This design allows for full bulk sampling in a low thermal gradient environment using Debye-Scherrer transmission geometry. Sample spinning is also introduced in the design to eliminate preferred orientation and incomplete powder averaging and allow for quantitative phase analysis and structural refinement. Studies on model systems are presented to demonstrate the capabilities for high resolution structural studies (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and time resolved phase transformation studies (SrCO{sub 3}). Finally, the Bi2212 system is examined to confirm the quenching results

  15. Installation of spectrally selective imaging system in RF negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, K; Wünderlich, D; Fantz, U; Heinemann, B; Kisaki, M; Nagaoka, K; Nakano, H; Osakabe, M; Tsumori, K; Geng, S; Kaneko, O; Takeiri, Y

    2016-02-01

    A spectrally selective imaging system has been installed in the RF negative ion source in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-relevant negative ion beam test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) to investigate distribution of hydrogen Balmer-α emission (Hα) close to the production surface of hydrogen negative ion. We selected a GigE vision camera coupled with an optical band-path filter, which can be controlled remotely using high speed network connection. A distribution of Hα emission near the bias plate has been clearly observed. The same time trend on Hα intensities measured by the imaging diagnostic and the optical emission spectroscopy is confirmed. PMID:26931995

  16. Measurement of the thermodynamic properties of saturated solid solutions of compounds in the Ag-Sn-Se system by the EMF method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, M. V.; Prokhorenko, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    The dependence of the EMF ( E) of galvanic cells Ag|AgI|Ag2GeS3 glass| D on temperature (where Ag, D denotes the electrodes of an electrochemical cell; D represents equilibrium two- and three-phase alloys of the Ag-Sn-Se system; and AgI|Ag2GeS3 glass is a bilayer membrane with purely ionic (Ag+) conductivity) is studied in the range of 480-580 K. Analytical equations of E( T) are used to calculate the values of the thermodynamic functions of saturated solid solutions of the SnSe, β-Ag2Se, AgSnSe2, and Ag8SnSe6 phases of the Ag-Sn-Se system in the standard state.

  17. An Optically-Coupled System for Quantitative Monitoring of MRI-Induced RF Currents into Long Conductors

    PubMed Central

    Zanchi, Marta G.; Venook, Ross; Pauly, John M.; Scott, Greig C.

    2010-01-01

    The currents induced in long conductors such as guidewires by the radio frequency (RF) field in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are responsible for potentially dangerous heating of surrounding media, such as tissue. This paper presents an optically-coupled system with the potential to quantitatively measure the RF currents induced on these conductors. The system uses a self shielded toroid transducer and active circuitry to modulate a high speed LED transmitter. Plastic fiber guides the light to a photodiode receiver and transimpedance amplifier. System validation included a series of experiments with bare wires that compared wire tip heating by fluoroptic thermometers with the RF current sensor response. Validations were performed on a custom whole body 64 MHz birdcage test platform and on a 1.5T MRI scanner. With this system, a variety of phenomena were demonstrated including cable trap current attenuation, lossy dielectric Q-spoiling and even transverse electromagnetic wave node patterns. This system should find applications in studies of MRI RF safety for interventional devices such as pacemaker leads, and guidewires. In particular, variations of this device could potentially act as a realtime safety monitor during MRI guided interventions. PMID:19758855

  18. Design and RF measurements of a 5 GHz 500 kW window for the ITER LHCD system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillairet, J.; Achard, J.; Bae, Y. S.; Bernard, J. M.; Dechambre, N.; Delpech, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Faure, N.; Goniche, M.; Kim, J.; Larroque, S.; Magne, R.; Marfisi, L.; Namkung, W.; Park, H.; Park, S.; Poli, S.; Vulliez, K.

    2014-02-01

    CEA/IRFM is conducting R&D efforts in order to validate the critical RF components of the 5 GHz ITER LHCD system, which is expected to transmit 20 MW of RF power to the plasma. Two 5 GHz 500 kW BeO pill-box type window prototypes have been manufactured in 2012 by the PMB Company, in close collaboration with CEA/IRFM. Both windows have been validated at low power, showing good agreement between measured and modeling, with a return loss better than 32 dB and an insertion loss below 0.05 dB. This paper reports on the window RF design and the low power measurements. The high power tests up to 500kW have been carried out in March 2013 in collaboration with NFRI. Results of these tests are also reported.

  19. The AGS new fast extraction system for the g-2 experiment and RHIC injection

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, M.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The AGS requires a new fast extraction beam (NewFEB) system for the muon g-2 experiment and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The proposed NewFEB system will consist of a new fast multi-pulsing kicker placed at straight section G10 and an ejector septum magnet at H10, together will local orbit bumps generated by powering backleg windings on the AGS main magnets. The new system is capable of performing single bunch multiple extraction as often as every 8 ms up to 12 times per AGS cycle, in addition to the standard single turn fast extraction. The conceptual design of the NewFEB system will be discussed. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. A PLANAR, RECTANGULAR WAVEGUIDE LAUNCHER AND EXTRACTOR FOR A DUAL-MODED RF POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher D.

    2000-11-21

    The desire to reduce the amount of low-loss, circular-waveguide delay line required in a pulse-compressing power distribution system for the Next Linear Collider has led to the pursuit of multi-moded schemes [1]. In such a system, power is delivered to different destinations through the same waveguide via different propagating modes. Current plans [2] utilize two modes, with manipulations done primarily in overmoded rectangular guide. We describe two key components of the system, a four-input/four-output, dual-mode launcher and an extractor for diverting one mode from the delay line to an accelerator feed while allowing the other to pass on to an upstream feed. These novel passive waveguide devices utilize the rectangular TE10 and TE20 modes. Because they must carry up to 600 MW pulsed rf power, H-planar symmetry is maintained in their designs to allow the use of overheight waveguide, and features that invite breakdown, such as coupling slots, irises, and septa, are avoided. Special rectangular-to-circular tapers [3] will be used to convert between the above modes and the circular TE11{sup o} (TE12{sup o}) and TE01{sup o} delay line modes, respectively. Rectangular waveguide for relative ease of handling. Mode converters, including special cross-section tapers [3] will be used to transform between the above circular waveguide modes and the TE20 and TE10 rectangular waveguide modes, respectively.

  1. An amplitude and phase control system for the TFTR rf heating sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cutsogeorge, G.

    1989-04-01

    Feedback loops that control the amplitude and phase of the rf heating sources on TFTR are described. The method for providing arc protection is also discussed. Block diagrams and Bode plots are included. 6 figs.

  2. A short report on voltage-to-frequency conversion for HISTRAP RF system tuning control loops

    SciTech Connect

    Hasanul Basher, A.M.

    1991-09-01

    One of the requirements of the HISTRAP RF accelerating system is that the frequency of the accelerating voltage for the cavity must keep in step with the change in the magnetic field. As the energy of the particle increases, the magnetic field is increased to keep the radius of the particle orbit constant. At the same time, the frequency of the electric field must be changed to insure that it is synchronized with the angular movement of the particle. So we need to generate the frequency of the accelerating voltage in relation to the magnetic field. The frequency generation can be accomplished in two stages. The first stage of frequency generation consists of measuring the magnetic field in terms of voltage which is already developed. The second stage is to convert this voltage into frequency. Final frequency precision can be achieved by deriving a frequency-correcting signal from the beam position. This project is concerned with generating the frequency from the analog voltage. The speed of response required will place very stringent requirements on both hardware and software. Technology is available to carry out this task. A hardware configuration has been established and software has been developed. In the following section, we describe the implementation strategy, the hardware configuration, and the desired specifications. Next, we present the software developed, results obtained, along with capabilities and limitations of the system. Finally, we suggest alternate solutions to overcome some of the limitations toward meeting our goal. In the appendices, we include program listings.

  3. RF systems in space. Volume 1: Space antennas frequency (SARF) simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, A. C.; Freeman, J. R.; Capp, J. D.

    1983-04-01

    The main objective of this effort was to develop a computer based analytical capability for simulating the RF performance of large space-based radar (SBR) systems. The model is capable of simulating corporate and space fed aperture. The model also can simulate multibeam feeds, cluster/point feeds, corporate feed and various aperture distributions. The simulation is capable of accepting Draper Labs structural data and antenna current data from Atlantic Research Corporation's (ARC) First Approximation Methods (FAM) and Higher Approximation Methods (HAM) models. In addition there is a routine to input various apertures surface distortions which causes the elements in the array to be displaced from the ideal location on a planar lattice. These were analyses looking at calibration/compensation techniques for large aperture space radars. Passive, space fed lens SBR designs were investigated. The survivability of an SBR system was analyzed. The design of ground based SBR validation experiments for large aperture SBR concepts were investigated. SBR designs were investigated for ground target detection.

  4. Design and evaluation of a low-level RF control system analog/digital receiver for the ILC main Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Mavric, Uros; Vidmar, Matjaz; Chase, Brian; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    The proposed RF distribution scheme for the two 15 km long ILC LINACs, uses one klystron to feed 26 superconducting RF cavities operating at 1.3 GHz. For a precise control of the vector sum of the signals coming from the SC cavities, the control system needs a high performance, low cost, reliable and modular multichannel receiver. At Fermilab we developed a 96 channel, 1.3 GHz analog/digital receiver for the ILC LINAC LLRF control system. In the paper we present a balanced design approach to the specifications of each receiver section, the design choices made to fulfill the goals and a description of the prototyped system. The design is tested by measuring standard performance parameters, such as noise figure, linearity and temperature sensitivity. Measurements show that the design meets the specifications and it is comparable to other similar systems developed at other laboratories, in terms of performance.

  5. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  6. Modeling closure of the Pd-Ag system in iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Orman, J.; Matthes, M.; Fischer-Gödde, M.; Krawczynski, M. J.; Kleine, T.

    2015-12-01

    J.A. Van Orman1, M. Matthes2, M. Fischer-Godde2, M.J. Krawczynski3, T. Kleine21 Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (james.vanorman@case.edu) 2 Westfalische Wilhelms-Universitat Muenster, 48149 Muenster, Germany 3 Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 The short-lived Pd-107/Ag-107 system can provide constraints on the timing of assembly and cooling of iron meteorite parent bodies, but to interpret the dates derived from this system it is necessary to understand the closure conditions. Palladium is strongly enriched in the metal phases, and sulphide (troilite) is the primary sink for radiogenic silver. Closure of the system hence depends primarily on the transfer of Ag-107 from metal to troilite. Because cation diffusion in troilite is extremely rapid, Ag-107 transfer is likely to be controlled by diffusion through the metal. Sugiura and Hoshino (2003) estimated a closure temperature of ~1100 K for the Pd/Ag system in iron meteorites under the assumption that the diffusion rate of Ag in the metal is similar to that of Ni diffusion in taenite. Here we consider the problem in more detail, utilizing constraints on Ag diffusion in taenite and kamacite from the metallurgical literature to numerically model diffusive exchange between metal and troilite with simultaneous radiogenic ingrowth. The process is complicated by exsolution of the metal into bcc kamacite and fcc taenite phases during cooling. We will discuss approaches to the treatment of this issue and their influence on the derived closure temperatures. Sugiura N., Hoshino H. (2003) Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 38, 117-143.

  7. High temperature metal purification using a compact portable rf heating and levitation system on the wake shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahs, C. A.

    1990-01-01

    The Wake Shield Facility (WSF) can provide an ideal vacuum environment for the purification of high temperature metals in space. The Modular Electromagnetic Levitator (MEL), will provide the opportunity to study undercooling of metals in space and allow to determine material properties in space. The battery powered rf levitation and heating system developed for the MEL demonstrated efficiency of 36 percent. This system is being considered to purify metals at temperatures below 3000 C.

  8. 500 MW X-Band RF System of a 0.25 GeV Electron LINAC for Advanced Compton Scattering Source Application

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Tak Sum; Anderson, Scott; Barty, Christopher; Gibson, David; Hartemann, Fred; Marsh, Roark; Siders, Craig; Adolphsen, Chris; Jongewaard, Erik; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tantawi, Sami; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL in collaboration with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. For compactness consideration, we are looking at a folded waveguide setup. This will give us 500 MW at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to six traveling wave accelerator sections. Phase and amplitude control are located at the RF gun input and additional control points along the LINAC to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

  9. 500 MW X-BAND RF SYSTEM OF A 0.25 GEV ELECTRON LINAC FOR ADVANCED COMPTON SCATTERING SOURCE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T S; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Marsh, R A; Siders, C; Barty, C P; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E; Tantawi, S; Vlieks, A; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T

    2010-05-12

    A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL in collaboration with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. For compactness consideration, we are looking at a folded waveguide setup. This will give us 500 MW at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to six traveling wave accelerator sections. Phase and amplitude control are located at the RF gun input and additional control points along the LINAC to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

  10. Fiber-optic link for the RF phase reference distribution system for the XFEL and TESLA projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuba, Krzysztof; Eints, Frank; Felber, Matthias; Simrock, Stefan

    2005-02-01

    The UV Free-Electron Laser (UVFEL) and The TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) projects will require phase synchronization of 0.1 ps short term (millisecond), 1 ps short term (minutes) and 10 ps long term (days). The stringent synchronization requirement of 10fs was given for the X-Ray Free- Electron Laser (XFEL). To fufill this requirement the XFEL may use a fiber laser as reference generator. But this requirement applies for a special location only, therefore the RF phase reference distribution system developed UVFEL and TESLA will also be used in the XFEL. The RF phase reference distribution system must deliver phase stable signals to hundreds of stations over a length of 33 km. Long, optical fiber based links are planned to be an important part of the entire distribution system. This paper describes the concept of a long optical link, with a feedback system suppressing long term drifts of the RF signal phase. Stability requirements are given and most important design issues affecting system performance are discussed. Finally, an experimental setup and measurement results demonstrating system performance is shown.

  11. RF Sources for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Brunkhorst, C.; Fredd, E.; Goulding, R. H.; Goulding, R. H.; Greenough, N.; Kung, C.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Swain, D. W.; Wilson, J. R.

    2005-10-04

    The RF source requirements for the ITER ion cyclotron (IC) heating and current drive system are very challenging ? 20 MW CW power into an antenna load with a VSWR of up to 2 over the frequency range of 35-65 MHz. For the two present antenna designs under consideration, 8 sources providing 2.5 MW each are to be employed. For these sources, the outputs of two final power amplifiers (FPAs), using the high power CPI 4CM2500KG tube, are combined with a 180? hybrid combiner to easily meet the ITER IC source requirements ? 2.5 MW is supplied at a VSWR of 2 at ? 70% of the maximum tube power available in class B operation. The cylindrical cavity configuration for the FPAs is quite compact so that the 8 combined sources fit into the space allocated at the ITER site with room to spare. The source configuration is described in detail and its projected operating power curves are presented. Although the CPI tube has been shown to be stable under high power operating conditions on many facilities, a test of the combined FPA source arrangement is in preparation using existing high power 30 MHz amplifiers to assure that this configuration can be made robustly stable for all phases at a VSWR up to 2. The possibility of using 12 sources to feed a suitably modified antenna design is also discussed in the context of providing flexibility for specifying the final IC antenna design.

  12. New RF control system for the 12 GeV energy upgrade of the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plawski, T.; Allison, T.; Bachimanchi, R.; Dong, H.; Hovater, C.; Musson, J.

    2008-11-01

    The CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab presently consists of 50 MeV injector, two anti-parallel superconducting linacs and two arcs for transporting beam between the linacs. By the mid-1990s, the accelerator was providing electrons up to 5.75 GeV. The 12 GeV Upgrade is a major accelerator project aimed at doubling the energy by adding 10 (five per linac) new high gradient cryomodules, each providing 100 MV of field. The new cryomodule will consist of eight 7-cell superconducting cavities operating at an average accelerating gradient of 19.5 mv/m and with an external Q = 3.2 x 107 The high gradient, very high quality factor and large Lorentz detuning coefficient (KL up to 4) pose significant challenges beyond what the present analog low level RF (LLRF) control systems can handle reliably; therefore, a new digital LLRF control system has been developed. The main highlights of the new RF Control system include: a RF frontend with low temperature drift and good linearity, a large FPGA platform for digital signal processing, an EPICS Input Output Computer (IOC) using a PC-104 and a digital Self Exciting Loop (SEL) based algorithm. This paper provides an overview of the 6 GeV and 12 GeV Upgrade CEBAF machines, a summary of sources of cavity field variation that drive LLRF system performance, and discusses recent developments and progress in Jefferson Lab's new LLRF system design.

  13. Failure analysis of radio frequency (rf) micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walraven, Jeremy A.; Cole, Edward I., Jr.; Sloan, Lynn R.; Hietala, Susan L.; Tigges, Chris P.; Dyck, Christopher W.

    2001-10-01

    MEMS are rapidly emerging as critical components in the telecommunications industry. This enabling technology is currently being implemented in a variety of product and engineering applications. MEMS are currently being used as optical switches to reroute light, tunable filters, and mechanical resonators. Radio frequency (RF) MEMS must be compatible with current Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) processing technologies for maximum integration levels. The RF MEMS switch discussed in this paper was fabricated using various layers of polyimide, silicon oxynitride (SiON), gold, and aluminum monolithically fabricated on a GaAs substrate. Fig. 1 shows a metal contacting series switch. This switch consists of gold signal lines (transmission lines), and contact metallization. SiON was deposited to form the fixed-fixed beam, and aluminum was deposited to form the top actuation electrode. To ensure product performance and reliability, RF MEMS switches are tested at both the wafer and package levels. Various processing irregularities may pass the visual inspection but fail electrical testing. This paper will focus on the failure mechanisms found in the first generation of RF MEMS developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Various tools and techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), resistive contrast imaging (RCI), focused ion beam (FIB), and thermally-induced voltage alteration (TIVA) have been employed to diagnose the failure mechanisms. The analysis performed using these tools and techniques led to corrective actions implemented in the next generation of RF MEMS metal contacting series switches.

  14. Mini RF-driven ion source for focused ion beam system

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Ji, Q.; Chang, A.; Leung, K.N.

    2002-08-02

    Mini RF-driven ion sources with 1.2 cm and 1.5 cm inner chamber diameter have been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Several gas species have been tested including argon, krypton and hydrogen. These mini ion sources operate in inductively coupled mode and are capable of generating high current density ion beams at tens of watts. Since the plasma potential is relatively low in the plasma chamber, these mini ion sources can function reliably without any perceptible sputtering damage. The mini RF-driven ion sources will be combined with electrostatic focusing columns, and are capable of producing nano focused ion beams for micro machining and semiconductor fabrications.

  15. RF interference suppression in a cardiac synchronization system operating in a high magnetic field NMR imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Damji, A.A.; Snyder, R.E.; Ellinger, D.C.; Witkowski, F.X.; Allen, P.S.

    1988-11-01

    An electrocardiographic (ECG) unit suitable for cardiac-synchronized nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in high magnetic fields is presented. The unit includes lossy transmission lines as ECG leads in order to suppress radio frequency (RF) interference in the electrocardiogram. The unit's immunity to RF interference is demonstrated.

  16. An RF driven H{sup {minus}} source and a low energy beam injection system for RFQ operation

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.; Bachman, D.A.; Chan, C.F.; McDonald, D.S.

    1992-12-31

    An RF driven H{sup {minus}} source has been developed at LBL for use in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). To date, an H{sup {minus}} current of {approx}40 mA can be obtained from a 5.6-cm-diam aperture with the source operated at a pressure of about 12 m Torr and 50 kW of RF power. In order to match the accelerated H{sup {minus}} beam into the SSC RFQ, a low-energy H{sup {minus}} injection system has been designed. This injector produces an outgoing H{sup {minus}} beam free of electron contamination, with small radius, large convergent angle and small projectional emittance.

  17. RF Beam Characterization Measurements on the DIII-D ECH System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, Y.; Cengher, M.; Lohr, J.; Ponce, D.; Torrezan, A.

    2015-11-01

    Optimum coupling of electron microwave radiation in a tokamak plasma requires polarization control of a high quality Gaussian rf beam. In the DIII_D installation, the polarization of the rf beam from each gyrotron is controlled by pairs of grooved mirrors located in transmission line miter bends, The polarizer mirror rotation angles are determined by using a computer model that takes into account the specifics of the transmission line geometry, tokamak magnetic field and equilibrium, the launcher mirror angles and the plasma density. The final polarization of each beam is checked with a polarization measurement at the last miter bend position using an rf power monitor with a rotatable rectangular horn or an orthomode transducer in a newly developed diagnostic miter bend. The Gaussian beam quality is determined by propagating the rf beam into free space and performing a phase retrieval analysis or by measurements using a mode sensitive directional coupler integrated into the diagnostic miter. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  18. Electron bunch energy and phase feed-forward stabilization system for the Mark V RF-linac free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadmack, M. R.; Jacobson, B. T.; Kowalczyk, J. M. D.; Lienert, B. R.; Madey, J. M. J.; Szarmes, E. B.

    2013-06-01

    An amplitude and phase compensation system has been developed and tested at the University of Hawai`i for the optimization of the RF drive system to the Mark V free-electron laser. Temporal uniformity of the RF drive is essential to the generation of an electron beam suitable for optimal free-electron laser performance and the operation of an inverse Compton scattering x-ray source. The design of the RF measurement and compensation system is described in detail and the results of RF phase compensation are presented. Performance of the free-electron laser was evaluated by comparing the measured effects of phase compensation with the results of a computer simulation. Finally, preliminary results are presented for the effects of amplitude compensation on the performance of the complete system.

  19. Nanofabrication using home-made RF plasma coupled chemical vapour deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Si Ci; Ilyas, Usman; Rawat, Rajdeep Singh

    2014-08-01

    Zinc oxide, ZnO, a popular semiconductor material with a wide band gap (3.37 eV) and high binding energy of the exciton (60 meV), has numerous applications such as in optoelectronics, chemical/biological sensors, and drug delivery. This project aims to (i) optimize the operating conditions for growth of ZnO nanostructures using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, and (ii) investigate the effects of coupling radiofrequency (RF) plasma to the CVD method on the quality of ZnO nanostructures. First, ZnO nanowires were synthesized using a home-made reaction setup on gold-coated and non-coated Si (100) substrates at 950 °C. XRD, SEM, EDX, and PL measurements were used for characterizations and it was found that a deposition duration of 10 minutes produced the most well-defined ZnO nanowires. SEM analysis revealed that the nanowires had diameters ranging from 30-100 mm and lengths ranging from 1-4 µm. In addition, PL analysis showed strong UV emission at 380 nm, making it suitable for UV lasing. Next, RF plasma was introduced for 30 minutes. Both remote and in situ RF plasma produced less satisfactory ZnO nanostructures with poorer crystalline structure, surface morphology, and optical properties due to etching effect of energetic ions produced from plasma. However, a reduction in plasma discharge duration to 10 minutes produced thicker and shorter ZnO nanostructures. Based on experimentation conducted, it is insufficient to conclude that RF plasma cannot aid in producing well-defined ZnO nanostructures. It can be deduced that the etching effect of energetic ions outweighed the increased oxygen radical production in RF plasma nanofabrication.

  20. Theory of the electronic states and absorption spectrum of the LiCl:Ag+ impurity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Koblar A.; Lin, Chun C.

    1990-01-01

    The impurity absorption spectra of Ag+ and Cu+ impurities in alkali halide hosts show characteristically different features, despite the similar nature of the corresponding free ions. We use the self-interaction-corrected local-spin-density (SIC-LSD) theory to calculate the electronic structure of the ground state (4d) and the 5s and 5p excited states of the LiCl:Ag+ impurity ion. The method of linear combinations of atomic orbitals is used to determine the wave functions and energy levels. By comparing with previous calculations for LiCl:Cu+, we are able to attribute the differences in the d-->s and d-->p transitions in the ultraviolet spectra of these systems to the increased bonding between host crystal and impurity orbitals in LiCl:Ag+, due to the more extensive nature of the Ag+ 4d orbitals. A modification of the earlier SIC-LSD impurity-crystal procedure is introduced to treat the strongly mixed impurity states.

  1. RF potentials analysis using TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, Daniele; Sorba, Marco; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2008-11-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) heating is fully dependent on edge plasma conditions and particularly on the acceleration of charged particles which can damage the antennas and surroundings. Rectified RF field induces drifts on ions that can hit the first wall, causing hot spots, sputtering, impurities, fuel dilution and, eventually, disruption. These phenomena mainly depend on the antenna geometry and materials, on the plasma density profile at the edge and on the connection patterns. The heat flux attributed to accelerated ions is somehow proportional to the RF potential in front of the antenna. Because of this, the understanding of the RF potential generation in front of the antenna is crucial for every high RF power systems, in order to predict the deleterious particle flux and therefore mitigate its effect by means of a proper design. The TOPICA code, an innovative tool realized for the analysis and design of ICRH and LH antennas, has been upgraded to evaluate the RF potential in front of the antenna. The solution of the Maxwell's equations in plasma combined with the RF field map at the plasma edge (standard outputs of TOPICA calculation) allow for the computation of the RF fields also in the plasma region. A new TOPICA module has been developed to account for a rigorous procedure to obtain the RF potentials and RF potential mitigation techniques through antenna geometrical modifications have been studied and will be presented.

  2. Klystron Linearizer for Use with 1.2 MW 476 MHz Klystrons in PEP-II RF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.; Mastorides, T.; Teytelman, D.; Van Winkle, D.; Zhou, Y.; Gallo, A.; /Frascati

    2005-06-15

    The direct and comb loop feedback around the RF cavities in PEP-II is critical in reducing longitudinal instabilities driven by the cavity impedance. The non-linear 1.2 MW klystron is in the signal path for these feedback loops. As a result, the effective small-signal gain of the klystron at 85% saturation reduces the impedance control by factors of 5 to 20 as compared to a linear power amplifier. A klystron linearizer circuit has been developed which operates in series with the power amplifier and acts to equalize the small and large signal gains through the combination. The technique must implement a 1 MHz linear control bandwidth over roughly 15 dB of RF signal level variation. The dynamics of this system is operating point dependent, and the channel must have dynamic gain compensation to keep the linearity compensation loop stable over changes in operating point. The design of this non-linear signal processing channel (incorporating RF and DSP techniques) and measured results from full-power klystron testing are presented.

  3. RESULTS FROM A DEMONSTRATION OF RF-BASED UF6 CYLINDER ACCOUNTING AND TRACKING SYSTEM INSTALLED AT A USEC FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, Chris A; Kovacic, Donald N; Morgan, Jim; Younkin, James R; Carrick, Bernie; Ken, Whittle; Johns, R E

    2008-09-01

    Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally for storing and transporting uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at uranium enrichment plants and processing facilities. To verify that no diversion or undeclared production of nuclear material involving UF{sub 6} cylinders at the facility has occurred, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts periodic, labor-intensive physical inspections to validate facility records, cylinder identities, and cylinder weights. A reliable cylinder monitoring system that would improve overall inspector effectiveness would be a significant improvement to the current international safeguards inspection regime. Such a system could include real-time unattended monitoring of cylinder movements, situation-specific rules-based event detection algorithms, and the capability to integrate with other types of safeguards technologies. This type of system could provide timely detection of abnormal operational activities that may be used to ensure more appropriate and efficient responses by the IAEA. A system of this type can reduce the reliance on paper records and have the additional benefit of facilitating domestic safeguards at the facilities at which it is installed. A radio-frequency (RF)-based system designed to track uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders during processing operations was designed, assembled, and tested at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) facility in Portsmouth, Ohio, to determine the operational feasibility and durability of RF technology. The overall objective of the effort was to validate the robustness of RF technology for potential use as a future international safeguards tool for tracking UF6 cylinders at uranium-processing facilities. The results to date indicate that RF tags represent a feasible technique for tracking UF{sub 6} cylinders in operating facilities. Additional work will be needed to improve the operational robustness of the tags for repeated autoclave processing and to

  4. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2004-12-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  5. Barrier RF Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-08

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  6. Barrier RF Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver ±7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  7. ICH rf system data acquisition and real time control using a microcomputer system

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, W.P.; Allen, J.A.; Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.

    1993-10-01

    On the basis of the rapidly increasing power, speed, and decreasing cost of the personal computer (microcomputer) it was felt that a real time data acquisition and control system could be configured quickly and very cost effectively. It was further felt that by using a high level or object-oriented programming language that considerable time and expense could be saved and at the same time increase system flexibility. This paper will attempt to address the desired system requirements and performance for both the control of the high power transmitters and for the data acquisition and presentation of the information.

  8. WETTING AND SPREADING IN THE Cu-Ag SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Sharps, Paul R.; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Pask, Joseph A.

    1980-11-01

    Sessile drop experiments were made in the copper-silver system at the eutectic temperature and 900°C. Wetting, or acute contact angles, were observed for specimens in chemical thermodynamic equilibrium. Spreading occured when the substrate was not in chemical equilibrium with the liquid. The interface does not remain aligned with the free surface of the substrate only in the presence of reactions,

  9. SLC Arc transport system: AG-magnet measurement and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.; Anderson, M.; Byers, R.; Cobb, J.; Fischer, G.; Hamilton, V.

    1985-03-01

    This paper describes the design, construction, and operation of devices used to rapidly measure the mechanical and magnetic properties of some 950 Alternate gradient magnets used in the arc system of the Stanford Linear Collider. The problems of dealing with the measurement of the transverse dimensions to within minute (0.0001 in.) resolution of objects that are 8 ft long are discussed. Early results from the production runs of these magnets are presented. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Status of RF system for the JAERI energy-recovery linac FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawamura, Masaru; Nagai, Ryoji

    2006-02-01

    The two types of the RF sources are used for the JAERI ERL-FEL. One is an all-solid state amplifier and the other is an inductive output tube (IOT). There are advantages of little failure and wide bandwidth for the all-solid state amplifier, low cost and high efficiency for IOT. The property of low cost with the IOT is suitable for a large machine like an energy recovery linac (ERL).

  11. Ag/ZnO hybrid systems studied with scanning tunnelling microscopy-based luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascua, Leandro; Stavale, Fernando; Nilius, Niklas; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-03-01

    Coupled metal/oxide systems are prepared by depositing and embedding Ag nanoparticles into crystalline ZnO films grown on Au(111) supports. The morphology and optical properties of the compounds are investigated by topographic imaging and luminescence spectroscopy performed in a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). The luminescence of bare ZnO is governed by the band-recombination and a Zn-vacancy related peak. After Ag deposition, two additional maxima are detected that are assigned to the in-plane and out-of-plane plasmon in Ag nanoparticles and have energies below and slightly above the oxide band-gap, respectively. Upon coating the particles with additional ZnO, the out-of-plane plasmon redshifts and loses intensity, indicating strong coupling to the oxide electronic system, while the in-plane mode broadens but remains detectable. The original situation can be restored by gently heating the sample, which drives the silver back to the surface. However, the optical response of pristine ZnO is not recovered even after silver evaporation at high temperature. Small discrepancies are explained with changes in the ZnO defect landscape, e.g., due to silver incorporation. Our experiments demonstrate how energy-transfer processes can be investigated in well-defined metal/oxide systems by means of STM-based spectroscopic techniques.

  12. Adhesion of human gingival fibroblasts/Streptococcus mitis co-culture on the nanocomposite system Chitlac-nAg.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Amelia; Gallorini, Marialucia; Di Giulio, Mara; Guarnieri, Simone; Mariggiò, Maria Addolorata; Traini, Tonino; Di Pietro, Roberta; Cellini, Luigina; Marsich, Eleonora; Sancilio, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    Composite materials are increasingly used as dental restoration. In the field of biomaterials, infections remain the main reason of dental devices failure. Silver, in the form of nanoparticles (AgNPs), ions and salt, well known for its antimicrobial properties, is used in several medical applications in order to avoid bacterial infection. To reduce both bacterial adhesion to dental devices and cytotoxicity against eukaryotic cells, we coated BisGMA/TEGDMA methacrylic thermosets with a new material, Chitlac-nAg, formed by stabilized AgNPs with a polyelectrolyte solution containing Chitlac. Here we analyzed the proliferative and adhesive ability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) on BisGMA/TEGDMA thermosets uncoated and coated with AgNPs in a coculture model system with Streptococcus mitis. After 48 h, HGFs well adhered onto both surfaces, while S. mitis cytotoxic response was higher in the presence of AgNPs coated thermosets. After 24 h thermosets coated with Chitlac as well as those coated with Chitlac-nAg exerted a minimal cytotoxic effect on HGFs, while after 48 h LDH release raised up to 20 %. Moreover the presence of S. mitis reduced this release mainly when HGFs adhered to Chitlac-nAg coated thermosets. The reduced secretion of collagen type I was significant in the presence of both surfaces with the co-culture system even more when saliva is added. Integrin β1 localized closely to cell membranes onto Chitlac-nAg thermosets and PKCα translocated into nuclei. These data confirm that Chitlac-nAg have a promising utilization in the field of restorative dentistry exerting their antimicrobial activity due to AgNPs without cytotoxicity for eukaryotic cells. PMID:26970770

  13. A worldwide population study of the Ag-system haplotypes, a genetic polymorphism of human low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Breguet, G; Bütler, R; Bütler-Brunner, E; Sanchez-Mazas, A

    1990-03-01

    The aim of this investigation is to examine the distribution of the Ag immunological polymorphism in human populations on a worldwide scale and to look for possible explanations of this distribution in the field of modern human peopling history and Ag-system evolution. Extensive Ag-antigene typings were carried out on 13 human population samples, including sub-Saharan African, European, west and east Asiatic, Melanesian, Australian aborigine, and Amerindian groups. Complete Ag-haplotype frequencies were estimated by maximum-likelihood-score procedures, and the data were analyzed by genetic distance computations and principal coordinate projections. With the exception of the Amerindian sample, the Ag polymorphism is shown to be highly polymorphic in all the populations tested. Their genetic relationships appear to be closely correlated to their geographical distribution. This suggests that the Ag system has evolved as a neutral or nearly neutral polymorphism and that it is highly informative for modern human peopling history studies. From the worldwide Ag haplotypic distributions, a model for the Ag molecular structure is derived. According to this model and to the most recent results obtained from molecular data, the establishment of the Ag polymorphism could be explained by several mutations and recombination events between the haplotypes most frequently found in human populations today. As a conclusion, genetic and paleontological data suggest that the genetic structure of caucasoid populations (located from North Africa to India) may be the least differentiated from an ancestral genetic stock. Worldwide genetic differentiations are properly explained as the results of westward and eastward human migrations from a Near East-centered but undefined geographical area where modern humans may have originated. The importance of Ag polymorphism analyses for the reconstruction of human settlement history and origins is discussed in the light of the main conclusions of

  14. A worldwide population study of the Ag-system haplotypes, a genetic polymorphism of human low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Breguet, G; Bütler, R; Bütler-Brunner, E; Sanchez-Mazas, A

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to examine the distribution of the Ag immunological polymorphism in human populations on a worldwide scale and to look for possible explanations of this distribution in the field of modern human peopling history and Ag-system evolution. Extensive Ag-antigene typings were carried out on 13 human population samples, including sub-Saharan African, European, west and east Asiatic, Melanesian, Australian aborigine, and Amerindian groups. Complete Ag-haplotype frequencies were estimated by maximum-likelihood-score procedures, and the data were analyzed by genetic distance computations and principal coordinate projections. With the exception of the Amerindian sample, the Ag polymorphism is shown to be highly polymorphic in all the populations tested. Their genetic relationships appear to be closely correlated to their geographical distribution. This suggests that the Ag system has evolved as a neutral or nearly neutral polymorphism and that it is highly informative for modern human peopling history studies. From the worldwide Ag haplotypic distributions, a model for the Ag molecular structure is derived. According to this model and to the most recent results obtained from molecular data, the establishment of the Ag polymorphism could be explained by several mutations and recombination events between the haplotypes most frequently found in human populations today. As a conclusion, genetic and paleontological data suggest that the genetic structure of caucasoid populations (located from North Africa to India) may be the least differentiated from an ancestral genetic stock. Worldwide genetic differentiations are properly explained as the results of westward and eastward human migrations from a Near East-centered but undefined geographical area where modern humans may have originated. The importance of Ag polymorphism analyses for the reconstruction of human settlement history and origins is discussed in the light of the main conclusions of

  15. Design of an rf separation system for a proton-rich radioisotope beam produced by using an in-flight fragment separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myeongjin; Yun, Chong-Cheol; Kim, Jong-Won; Lee, Jaeyu

    2013-03-01

    An in-flight fragment separator is a device to separate a radioisotope (RI) beam of interest produced by bombarding a thin target with a primary heavy-beam usually of high intensity. The isotope beam separation is done by momentum dispersion of dipole magnets and energy loss in a wedge-shaped degrader. However, this separation method is not sufficient for proton-rich isotope beams because their momenta tend to overlap with the low-momentum tails of more abundant fragments produced with larger cross sections. An additional separation technique, which relies on the velocity difference in the isotope beams, can be used to enhance the purity of the desired isotope beam. A separation system based on an rf-kicker was considered, and its beam line was designed using the TRANSPORT and the COSY INFINITY codes. Trajectories and vertical separations of the RI beams were calculated using the LISE++ code. The background isotope beam can be greatly reduced with the use of the rf separator system, but transmission of the isotope beam may be reduced by the aperture of the rf kicker. The lower rf frequency of the primary beam is an important factor in adopting the rf separator system. The electromagnetic design of the rf-kicker was studied.

  16. RF-CLASS: A Remote-sensing-based Interoperable Web service system for Flood Crop Loss Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, L.; Yu, G.; Kang, L.

    2014-12-01

    Flood is one of the worst natural disasters in the world. Flooding often causes significant crop loss over large agricultural areas in the United States. Two USDA agencies, the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) and Risk Management Agency (RMA), make decisions on flood statistics, crop insurance policy, and recovery management by collecting, analyzing, reporting, and utilizing flooded crop acreage and crop loss information. NASS has the mandate to report crop loss after all flood events. RMA manages crop insurance policy and uses crop loss information to guide the creation of the crop insurance policy and the aftermath compensation. Many studies have been conducted in the recent years on monitoring floods and assessing the crop loss due to floods with remote sensing and geographic information technologies. The Remote-sensing-based Flood Crop Loss Assessment Service System (RF-CLASS), being developed with NASA and USDA support, aims to significantly improve the post-flood agricultural decision-making supports in USDA by integrating and advancing the recently developed technologies. RF-CLASS will operationally provide information to support USDA decision making activities on collecting and archiving flood acreage and duration, recording annual crop loss due to flood, assessing the crop insurance rating areas, investigating crop policy compliance, and spot checking of crop loss claims. This presentation will discuss the remote sensing and GIS based methods for deriving the needed information to support the decision making, the RF-CLASS cybersystem architecture, the standards and interoperability arrangements in the system, and the current and planned capabilities of the system.

  17. MICRO-BUNCHING OF THE AGS SLOW EXTRACTED BEAM FOR A RARE KAON DECAY SEARCH.

    SciTech Connect

    GLENN,J.; SIVERTZ,M.; CHIANG,I.; LAZARUS,D.; KOSCIELNIAK,S.

    2001-06-18

    The AGS Slow Extracted Beam (SEB) must be chopped with 250 ps bursts every 40 ns to permit time-of-flight (ToF) measurement of the secondary K{sup 0} beam. Standard techniques to produce this level of bunching would require excessive rf voltage, thus we have developed a ''Micro-Bunching'' technique of extracting the beam as it is forced between empty rf buckets. A specification of the required rf system will be given. Four-dimensional model simulations of particle dynamics for the planned rf and extraction systems will be shown. Simulations of previous tests along with the test measurements are also presented. Measurement of tight bunching requires dedicated instrumentation. The design of a detector system to measure bunch widths and the extinction factor between bunches will be given; considerations include the various particles produced and transported, timing precision and background.

  18. Review of pulsed rf power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    I am going to talk about pulsed high-power rf generation for normal-conducting electron and positron linacs suitable for applications to high-energy physics in the Next Linear Collider, or NLC. The talk will cover some basic rf system design issues, klystrons and other microwave power sources, rf pulse-compression devices, and test facilities for system-integration studies.

  19. High-temperature metal purification using a compact, portable rf heating and levitation system on the wake shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahs, C. A.

    1990-01-01

    The potential use of a compact, battery-operated rf levitator and heating system to purify high-temperature melting materials in space is described. The wake shield now being fabricated for the Space Vacuum Epitaxy Center will provide an Ultra-high vacuum (10(exp -14) Torr hydrogen, 10(exp -14) Torr helium, 10(exp -30) Torr oxygen). The use of the wake shield to purify Nb, Ti, W, Ir, and other metals to a purity level not achievable on earth is described.

  20. RF plugging of mirror plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kotelnikov, I.A.; Kuzmin, S.G.

    1996-12-01

    Discovery of superconducting materials that operate at high temperatures revives interest in the use of rf field for plasma confinement. This paper discusses feasibility of a scheme where resonant rf cavities are attached to the mirror ends of an open system for plasma confinement. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  1. RF transformer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  2. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou and Akira Takagi

    2003-02-24

    This paper introduces a new method for stacking beams in the longitudinal phase space. It uses RF barriers to confine and compress beams in an accelerator, provided that the machine momentum acceptance is a few times larger than the momentum spread of the injected beam. This is the case for the Fermilab Main Injector. A barrier RF system employing Finemet cores and high-voltage solid-state switches is under construction. The goal is to double the number of protons per cycle on the production target for Run2 and NuMI experiments.

  3. An RF Therapy System for Breast Cancer Using Dual Deformable Mirrors — Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Udpa, Satish S.; Udpa, Lalita

    2007-03-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths amongst women in the United States. In the past two decades, the potential of non-ionizing high power RF waves to destroy cancerous biological tissues is actively investigated for cancer therapy. This paper presents the computational feasibility study of an alternative mode of electromagnetic radiation therapy that employs dual source and deformable mirror. The adaptive focusing capability of the deformable mirror is exploited for preferential energy deposition at the tumor site in the breast irradiated by electromagnetic radiation. The outcome of the computational study for the proposed deformable mirror-based thermal therapy for breast cancer is presented in this paper.

  4. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    SciTech Connect

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also

  5. TOPOLOGY FOR A DSP BASED BEAM CONTROL SYSTEM IN THE AGS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    DELONG,J.BRENNAN,J.M.HAYES,T.LE,T.N.SMITH,K.

    2003-05-12

    The AGS Booster supports beams of ions and protons with a wide range of energies on a pulse-by-pulse modulation basis. This requires an agile beam control system highly integrated with its controls. To implement this system digital techniques in the form of Digital Signal Processors, Direct Digital Synthesizers, digital receivers and high speed Analog to Digital Converters are used. Signals from the beam and cavity pick-ups, as well as measurements of magnetic field strength in the ring dipoles are processed in real time. To facilitate this a multi-processor topology with high bandwidth data links is being designed.

  6. Improved RF Isolation Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, G. L.; Macconnell, J.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit has high reverse isolation and wide bandwidth. Wideband isolation amplifier has low intermodulation distortion and high reverse isolation. Circuit does not require selected or matched components or directional coupling device. Circuit used in applications requiring high reverse isolation such as receiver intermediate-frequency (IF) strips and frequency distribution systems. Also applicable in RF and video signaling.

  7. Analysis of longitudinal beam dynamics behavior and rf system operative limits at high-beam currents in storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J. D.; van Winkle, D.; Teytelman, D.

    2008-06-01

    A dynamics simulation model is used to estimate limits of performance of the positron-electron project (PEP-II). The simulation captures the dynamics and technical limitations of the low level radio frequency (LLRF) system, the high-power rf components, and the low-order mode coupled-bunch longitudinal beam dynamics. Simulation results showing the effect of nonlinearities on the LLRF loops, and studies of the effectiveness of technical component upgrades are reported, as well as a comparison of these results with PEP-II measurements. These studies have led to the estimation of limits and determining factors in the maximum stored current that the low energy ring/high energy ring (LER/HER) can achieve, based on system stability for different rf station configurations and upgrades. In particular, the feasibility of the PEP-II plans to achieve the final goal in luminosity, which required an increase of the beam currents to 4 A for LER and 2.2 A for HER, is studied. These currents are challenging in part because they would push the longitudinal low-order beam mode stability to the limit, and the klystron forward power past a level of satisfactory margin. An acceptable margin is defined in this paper, which in turn determines the corresponding klystron forward power limitation.

  8. High-temperature phase equilibria studies in the Bi-Sr- Ca-Cu-O-Ag system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulies, Lawrence

    A variety of experimental techniques were utilized to examine the high temperature phase equilibria in the Bi- Sr-Ca-Cu-O-Ag system. Quenching studies were used to determine the liquid solubility of Ag in the Bi2Sr 2CaCu2O8 (Bi2212) melt and the details of the peritectic decomposition pathway of Bi2212 as a function on Ag content and oxygen partial pressure (PO2). A liquid immiscibility region between oxide and Ag liquids in the 8-98 at% range was found above 900°C. Two eutectics were found in the Bi2212-Ag pseudo-binary. On the oxide rich side, a eutectic exists at approximately 4 at% Ag. On the Ag rich side, a eutectic exists at approximately 98 at% Ag at a temperature of 15°C below the melting point of pure Ag. Six distinct solid phases were found to be in equilibrium with the partial melt within the Ag content and PO2 range studied. The stability of these solid phases were found to be highly sensitive to PO2, and to a much lesser extent Ag content. High temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD) studies of this system are in conflict with these results. It is suggested that these discrepancies are due to experimental artifacts caused by the significant thermal gradients and lack of full bulk sampling which is inherent in conventional HTXRD designs. In part II, a new furnace design compatible with synchrotron radiation sources is introduced to address these problems. This design allows for full bulk sampling in a low thermal gradient environment using Debye- Scherrer transmission geometry. Sample spinning is also introduced in the design to eliminate preferred orientation and incomplete powder averaging and allow for quantitative phase analysis and structural refinement. Studies on model systems are presented to demonstrate the capabilities for high resolution structural studies (Al 2O3) and time resolved phase transformation studies (SrCO 3). Finally, the Bi2212 system is examined to confirm the quenching results of part I, and to demonstrate the degree to which

  9. Nonstoichiometry in inorganic fluorides: I. Nonstoichiometry in MF{sub m}-RF{sub n} (m < n {<=} 4) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, B. P.

    2012-05-15

    The manifestation of gross nonstoichiometry in MF{sub m}-RF{sub n} systems (m < n {<=} 4) has been studied. Fluorides of 34 elements, in the systems of which phases of practical interest are formed, are chosen. To search for new phases of complex composition, a program for studying the phase diagrams of the condensed state ({approx}200 systems) has been carried out at the Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences. The main products of high-temperature interactions of the fluorides of elements with different valences (m {ne} n) are grossly nonstoichiometric phases of two structural types: fluorite (CaF{sub 2}) and tysonite (LaF{sub 3}). Systems of fluorides of 27 elements (M{sup 1+} = Na, K; M{sup 2+} = Ca, Sr, Ba, Cd, Pb; R{sup 3+} = Sc, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu; R{sup 4+} = Zr, Hf, Th, U) are selected; nonstoichiometric M{sub 1-x}R{sub x}F{sub m(1-x)+nx} phases, which are of greatest practical interest, are formed in these systems. The gross nonstoichiometry in inorganic fluorides is most pronounced in 80 MF{sub 2} - RF{sub 3} systems (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Cd, Pb; R are rare earth elements). The problems related to the growth of single crystals of nonstoichiometric phases and basic fields of their application as new fluoride multicomponent materials, the properties of which are controlled by the defect structure, are considered.

  10. Diffusion Dynamics of Charged Dust Particles in Capacitively Coupled RF Discharge System

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, W. X.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.; Yap, S. L.; Tan, K. S.

    2011-03-30

    Dusty plasma is loosely defined as electron-ion plasma with additional charged components of micron-sized dust particles. In this study, we developed a particle diagnostic technique based on light scattering and particle tracking velocimetry to investigate the dynamics of micron-sized titanium oxide particles in Argon gas capacitively coupled rf-discharge. The particle trajectories are constructed from sequence of image frames and treated as sample paths of charged Brownian motion. At specific sets of plasma parameters, disordered liquid-like dust particle configuration are observed. Mean-square-displacement of the particle trajectories are determined to characterize the transport dynamics. We showed that the dust particles in disordered liquid phase exhibit anomalous diffusion with different scaling exponents for short and large time scales, indicating the presence of slow and fast modes which can be related to caging effect and dispersive transport, respectively.

  11. An RF Energy Harvester System Using UHF Micropower CMOS Rectifier Based on a Diode Connected CMOS Transistor

    PubMed Central

    Shokrani, Mohammad Reza; Hamidon, Mohd Nizar B.; Rokhani, Fakhrul Zaman; Shafie, Suhaidi Bin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new type diode connected MOS transistor to improve CMOS conventional rectifier's performance in RF energy harvester systems for wireless sensor networks in which the circuits are designed in 0.18 μm TSMC CMOS technology. The proposed diode connected MOS transistor uses a new bulk connection which leads to reduction in the threshold voltage and leakage current; therefore, it contributes to increment of the rectifier's output voltage, output current, and efficiency when it is well important in the conventional CMOS rectifiers. The design technique for the rectifiers is explained and a matching network has been proposed to increase the sensitivity of the proposed rectifier. Five-stage rectifier with a matching network is proposed based on the optimization. The simulation results shows 18.2% improvement in the efficiency of the rectifier circuit and increase in sensitivity of RF energy harvester circuit. All circuits are designed in 0.18 μm TSMC CMOS technology. PMID:24782680

  12. An RF energy harvester system using UHF micropower CMOS rectifier based on a diode connected CMOS transistor.

    PubMed

    Shokrani, Mohammad Reza; Khoddam, Mojtaba; Hamidon, Mohd Nizar B; Kamsani, Noor Ain; Rokhani, Fakhrul Zaman; Shafie, Suhaidi Bin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new type diode connected MOS transistor to improve CMOS conventional rectifier's performance in RF energy harvester systems for wireless sensor networks in which the circuits are designed in 0.18  μm TSMC CMOS technology. The proposed diode connected MOS transistor uses a new bulk connection which leads to reduction in the threshold voltage and leakage current; therefore, it contributes to increment of the rectifier's output voltage, output current, and efficiency when it is well important in the conventional CMOS rectifiers. The design technique for the rectifiers is explained and a matching network has been proposed to increase the sensitivity of the proposed rectifier. Five-stage rectifier with a matching network is proposed based on the optimization. The simulation results shows 18.2% improvement in the efficiency of the rectifier circuit and increase in sensitivity of RF energy harvester circuit. All circuits are designed in 0.18 μm TSMC CMOS technology. PMID:24782680

  13. Potent Antigen-Adjuvant Delivery System by Conjugation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ag85B-HspX Fusion Protein with Arabinogalactan-Poly(I:C) Conjugate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qingrui; Yu, Weili; Hu, Tao

    2016-04-20

    Protein-based vaccine is promising to improve or replace Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine for its specificity, safety, and easy production. However, protein-based vaccine calls for potent adjuvants and improved delivery systems to protect against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Poly(I:C) is one of the most potent pathogen-associated molecular patterns that signals primarily via TLR3. Arabinogalactan (AG) is a biocompatible polysaccharide that can increase splenocyte proliferation and stimulate macrophages. The AG-poly(I:C) conjugate (AG-P) showed an adjuvant potency through a synergistic interaction of AG and poly(I:C). Ag85B and HspX are two important virulent protein antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Ag85B-HspX fusion protein (AH) was prepared. An antigen-adjuvant delivery system (AH-AG-P) was developed by conjugation of AH with AG-P to ensure that both AH and AG-P reach the APCs simultaneously. AH-AG-P elicited high AH-specific IgG titers and stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. AH-AG-P provoked the secretion of Th1-type cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-2) and Th2-type cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Pharmacokinetics revealed that conjugation with AG-P could prolong the serum exposure of AH to the immune system. Pharmacodynamics suggested that conjugation with AG-P led to a rapid and intense production of AH-specific IgG. Accordingly, conjugation with AG-P could promote a robust cellular and humoral immune response to AH. Thus, conjugation of AH with a potent adjuvant AG-P is an effective strategy to develop an efficacious protein-based vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:27002920

  14. Signal Processing for Wireless Communication MIMO System with Nano- Scaled CSDG MOSFET based DP4T RF Switch.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Viranjay M

    2015-01-01

    In the present technological expansion, the radio frequency integrated circuits in the wireless communication technologies became useful because of the replacement of increasing number of functions, traditional hardware components by modern digital signal processing. The carrier frequencies used for communication systems, now a day, shifted toward the microwave regime. The signal processing for the multiple inputs multiple output wireless communication system using the Metal- Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect-Transistor (MOSFET) has been done a lot. In this research the signal processing with help of nano-scaled Cylindrical Surrounding Double Gate (CSDG) MOSFET by means of Double- Pole Four-Throw Radio-Frequency (DP4T RF) switch, in terms of Insertion loss, Isolation, Reverse isolation and Inter modulation have been analyzed. In addition to this a channel model has been presented. Here, we also discussed some patents relevant to the topic. PMID:25986227

  15. New chalcogenide glasses in the CdTe-AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} system

    SciTech Connect

    Kassem, M.; Le Coq, D.; Boidin, R.; Bychkov, E.

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the glass-forming region in the pseudo-ternary CdTe-AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of macroscopic properties of the new CdTe-AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the total conductivity of CdTe-AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison between the selenide and telluride equivalent systems. -- Abstract: Chalcogenide glasses in the pseudo-ternary CdTe-AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} system were synthesized and the glass-forming range was determined. The maximum content of CdTe in this glass system was found to be equal to 15 mol.%. The macroscopic characterizations of samples have consisted in Differential Scanning Calorimetry, density, and X-ray diffraction measurements. The cadmium telluride addition does not generate any significant change in the glass transition temperature but the resistance of binary AgI-As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} glasses towards crystallisation is estimated to be decreasing on the base of {Delta}T = T{sub x} - T{sub g} parameter. The total electrical conductivity {sigma} was measured by complex impedance spectroscopy. First, the CdTe additions in the (AgI){sub 0.5}(As{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub 0.5} host glass, (CdTe){sub x}(AgI){sub 0.5-x/2}(As{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub 0.5-x/2} lead to a conductivity decrease at x {<=} 0.05. Then, the behaviour is reversed at 0.05 {<=} x {<=} 0.15. The obtained results are discussed by comparison with the equivalent selenide system.

  16. RF-Medisys: a radio frequency identification-based electronic medical record system for improving medical information accessibility and services at point of care.

    PubMed

    Ting, Jacky S L; Tsang, Albert H C; Ip, Andrew W H; Ho, George T S

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative electronic medical records (EMR) system, RF-MediSys, which can perform medical information sharing and retrieval effectively and which is accessible via a 'smart' medical card. With such a system, medical diagnoses and treatment decisions can be significantly improved when compared with the conventional practice of using paper medical records systems. Furthermore, the entire healthcare delivery process, from registration to the dispensing or administration of medicines, can be visualised holistically to facilitate performance review. To examine the feasibility of implementing RF-MediSys and to determine its usefulness to users of the system, a survey was conducted within a multi-disciplinary medical service organisation that operates a network of medical clinics and paramedical service centres throughout Hong Kong Island, the Kowloon Peninsula and the New Territories. Questionnaires were distributed to 300 system users, including nurses, physicians and patients, to collect feedback on the operation and performance of RF-MediSys in comparison with conventional paper-based medical record systems. The response rate to the survey was 67%. Results showed a medium to high level of user satisfaction with the radiofrequency identification (RFID)-based EMR system. In particular, respondents provided high ratings on both 'user-friendliness' and 'system performance'. Findings of the survey highlight the potential of RF-MediSys as a tool to enhance quality of medical services and patient safety. PMID:21430306

  17. Attitude Ground System (AGS) For The Magnetospheric Multi-Scale (MMS) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, Juan C.; Sedlak, Joseph E.; Vint, Babak

    2015-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is a Solar-Terrestrial Probe mission consisting of four identically instrumented spin-stabilized spacecraft flying in an adjustable pyramid-like formation around the Earth. The formation of the MMS spacecraft allows for three-dimensional study of the phenomenon of magnetic reconnection, which is the primary objective of the mission. The MMS spacecraft were launched early on March 13, 2015 GMT. Due to the challenging and very constricted attitude and orbit requirements for performing the science, as well as the need to maintain the spacecraft formation, multiple ground functionalities were designed to support the mission. These functionalities were incorporated into a ground system known as the Attitude Ground System (AGS). Various AGS configurations have been used widely to support a variety of three-axis-stabilized and spin-stabilized spacecraft missions within the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The original MMS operational concept required the AGS to perform highly accurate predictions of the effects of environmental disturbances on the spacecraft orientation and to plan the attitude maneuvers necessary to stay within the science attitude tolerance. The orbit adjustment requirements for formation control drove the need also to perform calibrations that have never been done before in support of NASA GSFC missions. The MMS mission required support analysts to provide fast and accurately calibrated values of the inertia tensor, center of mass, and accelerometer bias for each MMS spacecraft. During early design of the AGS functionalities, a Kalman filter for estimating the attitude, body rates, center of mass, and accelerometer bias, using only star tracker and accelerometer measurements, was heavily analyzed. A set of six distinct filters was evaluated and considered for estimating the spacecraft attitude and body rates using star tracker data only. Four of the six filters are closely related and were compared

  18. Impact of environmental conditions on the contact physics of gold contact RF microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Christopher John

    RF MEMS switch technology is poised to create a new generation of devices capable of vastly outperforming current mechanical and semiconductor switching technology. Despite the efforts of top industrial, academic, and government labs, commercialization of RF MEMS switches has lagged expectations. This dissertation focuses on issues associated with switch contact physics. Understanding the failure mechanisms for metal contact switches is a complex challenge. There is strong interplay between variables such as mechanical creep, deformation, contact heating, contact asperity size, real contact area, and current flow leading to the eventual failure of the switch. Stiction failures moreover are highly sensitive to ambient conditions and absorbed film layers at the switch contact. The experiments in this thesis seek to isolate individual failure mechanisms and tie them to the physics driving that behavior through correlation of experimental data and theoretical modeling. Four experiments in controlled environments were performed: (1) the impact of cryogenic temperatures on RF MEMS contacts, (2) a correlation between experimental data and theoretical modeling for gold asperity creep at room and cryogenic temperatures, (3) a power law relationship between contact resistance and time dependent creep, and (4) the pressure dependence of switch closure. Cryogenic temperatures were used to isolate contaminant film effects. Contaminant films were found to have less mobility at 77 K, and contact resistance measurements showed that the film could be reduced on the contact surface through mechanical cycling and high temperatures at the gold asperities. It was also noted at cryogenic temperatures that the choice of atmosphere was important. A nitrogen atmosphere at liquid nitrogen temperature produced variable contact resistance as the condensed liquid boiled off the switch contacts. Data was correlated with a single asperity creep model to show that change in contact resistance as

  19. Rheumatoid factor (RF)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid factor (RF) is a blood test that measures the amount of the RF antibody in the blood. ... these conditions still have a "normal" or low RF. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different ...

  20. Phase Evolution in the Pd-Ag-CuO Air Braze Filler Metal Alloy System

    SciTech Connect

    Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott

    2006-08-01

    Palladium was added as a ternary component to a series of copper oxide-silver alloys in an effort to increase the use temperature of these materials for potential ceramic air brazing applications. Phase equilibria in the ternary Pd-Ag-CuO system were investigated via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and a series of quenching experiments. Presented here are the latest findings on this system and a construction of the corresponding ternary phase diagram for low-to-moderate additions of palladium. The analysis included samples with higher palladium additions than were studied in the past, as well as an analysis of the composition-temperature trends in the Ag-CuO miscibility gap with palladium addition. It was found that the addition of palladium increases the solidus and liquidus and caused three phase zones to appear as expected by the phase rule. Furthermore, the palladium additions cause the miscibility gap boundary extending from the former binary eutectic to shift to lower silver-to-copper ratios.

  1. Freeze-dried PVP-Ag+ precursors to novel AgBr/AgCl-Ag hybrid nanocrystals for visible-light-driven photodegradation of organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Deliang; Chen, Qianqian; Zhang, Wenjie; Ge, Lianfang; Shao, Gang; Fan, Bingbing; Lu, Hongxia; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Daoyuan; Shao, Guosheng

    2015-04-01

    AgBr/AgCl-Ag nanocrystals with various molar Br-to-Ag ratios (RBr/Ag = 0, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, 1) and different photoreduction times (0-20 min) were synthesized via stepwise liquid-solid reactions using the freeze-dried PVP-Ag+ hybrid as the Ag source, followed by a photoreduction reaction. The AgBr/AgCl-Ag7.5(1:2) nanocrystals obtained take on a spherical morphology with a particle-size range of 58 ± 15 nm. The photocatalytic performance of AgBr/AgCl-Ag nanocrystals was evaluated by photodegrading organic dyes, 4-chlorophenol and isopropanol under artificial visible light (λ ⩾ 420 nm, 100 mW cm-2). For the decomposition of rhodamine B, the AgBr/AgCl-Ag7.5(1:2) nanocrystals has a photodegradation rate of ∼0.87 min-1, ∼159 times higher than that (∼0.0054 min-1) of TiO2 (P25), whereas the AgCl-Ag and AgBr-Ag nanocrystals have photodegradation rates of 0.35 min-1 and 0.45 min-1, respectively. The efficient separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs in the ternary system consisting of AgBr, AgCl and Ag species plays a key role in the enhancement of photocatalytic performance.

  2. Liquidus projection of the Ag-Ba-Ge system and melting points of clathrate type-I compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Zeiringer, I.; Grytsiv, A.; Broz, P.

    2012-12-15

    The liquidus and solidus projection has been constructed for the Ag-Ba-Ge system up to 33.3 at% Ba, using electron micro probe analysis (EPMA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DSC/DTA). Eight different primary crystallization regions were found: (Ge), Ba{sub 8}Ag{sub x}Ge{sub 46-x-y}{open_square}{sub y} ({kappa}{sub I}) ({open_square} is a vacancy), Ba{sub 6}Ag{sub x}Ge{sub 25-x} ({kappa}{sub Ix}), BaGe{sub 2}, Ba(Ag{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}){sub 2} ({tau}{sub 1}), BaAg{sub 2-x}Ge{sub 2+x} ({tau}{sub 2}) BaAg{sub 5} and (Ag). The ternary invariant reactions have been determined for the region investigated and are the basis for a Schulz-Scheil diagram. The second part of this work provides a comprehensive compilation of melting points of ternary A{sub 8}T{sub x}M{sub 46-x} and quaternary (A=Sr, Ba, Eu; T=Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, B, Al, Ga; M=Si, Ge, Sn) clathrate type-I compounds and decomposition temperatures of inverse clathrate type-I Ge{sub 38}{l_brace}P,As,Sb{r_brace}{sub 8}{l_brace}Cl,Br,I{r_brace}{sub 8}, Si{sub 46-x}P{sub x}Te{sub y} and tin based compounds. - Graphical Abstract: Partial liquidus projection of the Ag-Ba-Ge system. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The liquidus and solidus projection has been constructed for the Ag-Ba-Ge system up to 33.33 at% Ba. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight different primary crystallization fields have been found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the ternary compounds form congruently from the melt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ternary invariant reactions have been determined and are the basis for a Schulz-Scheil diagram.

  3. Theoretical and experimental study of metastable solid solutions and phase stability within the immiscible Ag-Mo binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarakinos, K.; Greczynski, G.; Elofsson, V.; Magnfält, D.; Högberg, H.; Alling, B.

    2016-03-01

    Metastable solid solutions are phases that are synthesized far from thermodynamic equilibrium and offer a versatile route to design materials with tailor-made functionalities. One of the most investigated classes of metastable solid solutions with widespread technological implications is vapor deposited ternary transition metal ceramic thin films (i.e., nitrides, carbides, and borides). The vapor-based synthesis of these ceramic phases involves complex and difficult to control chemical interactions of the vapor species with the growing film surface, which often makes the fundamental understanding of the composition-properties relations a challenging task. Hence, in the present study, we investigate the phase stability within an immiscible binary thin film system that offers a simpler synthesis chemistry, i.e., the Ag-Mo system. We employ magnetron co-sputtering to grow Ag1-xMox thin films over the entire composition range along with x-ray probes to investigate the films structure and bonding properties. Concurrently, we use density functional theory calculations to predict phase stability and determine the effect of chemical composition on the lattice volume and the electronic properties of Ag-Mo solid solutions. Our combined theoretical and experimental data show that Mo-rich films (x ≥ ˜0.54) form bcc Mo-Ag metastable solid solutions. Furthermore, for Ag-rich compositions (x ≤ ˜0.21), our data can be interpreted as Mo not being dissolved in the Ag fcc lattice. All in all, our data show an asymmetry with regards to the mutual solubility of Ag and Mo in the two crystal structures, i.e., Ag has a larger propensity for dissolving in the bcc-Mo lattice as compared to Mo in the fcc-Ag lattice. We explain these findings in light of isostructural short-range clustering that induces energy difference between the two (fcc and bcc) metastable phases. We also suggest that the phase stability can be explained by the larger atomic mobility of Ag atoms as compared to that

  4. Spiral Chip Implantable Radiator and Printed Loop External Receptor for RF Telemetry in Bio-Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Hall, David G.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the operation of a patented wireless RF telemetry system, consisting of a bio-MEMS implantable sensor and an external hand held unit, operating over the frequency range of few hundreds of MHz. A MEMS capacitive pressure sensor integrated with a miniature inductor/antenna together constitute the implantable sensor. Signal processing circuits collocated with a printed loop antenna together form the hand held unit, capable of inductively powering and also receiving the telemetry signals from the sensor. The paper in addition, demonstrates a technique to enhance the quality factor and inductance of the inductor in the presence of a lower ground plane and also presents the radiation characteristics of the loop antenna.

  5. SiC formation for a solar cell passivation layer using an RF magnetron co-sputtering system.

    PubMed

    Joung, Yeun-Ho; Kang, Hyun Il; Kim, Jung Hyun; Lee, Hae-Seok; Lee, Jaehyung; Choi, Won Seok

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a method of amorphous silicon carbide film formation for a solar cell passivation layer. The film was deposited on p-type silicon (100) and glass substrates by an RF magnetron co-sputtering system using a Si target and a C target at a room-temperature condition. Several different SiC [Si1-xCx] film compositions were achieved by controlling the Si target power with a fixed C target power at 150 W. Then, structural, optical, and electrical properties of the Si1-xCx films were studied. The structural properties were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The optical properties were achieved by UV-visible spectroscopy and ellipsometry. The performance of Si1-xCx passivation was explored by carrier lifetime measurement. PMID:22221730

  6. An Ag based brazing system with a tunable thermal expansion for the use as sealant for solid oxide cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiebach, Ragnar; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Grahl-Madsen, Laila; Sieborg, Bertil; Chen, Ming; Hjelm, Johan; Norrman, Kion; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2016-05-01

    An Ag-Al2TiO5 composite braze was developed and successfully tested as seal for solid oxide cells. The thermo-mechanical properties of the Ag-Al2TiO5 system and the chemical compatibility between this composite braze and relevant materials used in stacks were characterized and the leak rates as a function of the operation temperature were measured. The thermal expansion coefficient in the Ag-Al2TiO5 system can be tailored by varying the amount of the ceramic filler. The brazing process can be carried out in air, the joining partners showed a good chemical stability and sufficient low leak rates were demonstrated. Furthermore, the long-term stability of the Ag-Al2TiO5 composite braze was studied under relevant SOFC and SOEC conditions. The stability of brazed Crofer/Ag-Al2TiO5/NiO-YSZ assemblies in reducing atmosphere and in pure oxygen was investigated over 500 h at 850 °C. Additionally, a cell component test was performed to investigate the durability of the Ag-Al2TiO5 seal when exposed to dual atmosphere. The seals performed well over 900 h under electrolysis operation conditions (-0.5 A cm2, 850 °C), and no cell degradation related to the Ag-Al2TiO5 sealing was found, indicating that the developed braze system is applicable for the use in SOFC/SOEC stacks.

  7. IgM rheumatoid factor (RF), IgA RF, IgE RF, and IgG RF detected by ELISA in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Gioud-Paquet, M; Auvinet, M; Raffin, T; Girard, P; Bouvier, M; Lejeune, E; Monier, J C

    1987-01-01

    One hundred patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), of whom 73 were seropositive by latex or Waaler-Rose (WR) assays, or both, 100 healthy subjects, and 102 diseased controls (22 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 80 with bronchial asthma) were evaluated for the presence of IgM rheumatoid factor (RF), IgA RF, IgE RF, and IgG RF by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ninety two per cent, 65%, 68%, and 66% of the patients with RA were found to be positive for IgM, IgA, IgE, and IgG respectively. A positive correlation existed between the levels of IgM RF and IgA RF on the one hand and disease activity on the other, and the levels of IgM RF and IgA RF correlated with the levels of circulating immune complexes as measured by a C1q binding assay. The presence of extra-articular features also correlated positively with the levels of IgA RF and IgE RF. Five out of six patients with Sjögren's syndrome had very high levels of IgA RF. Of 47 patients typed for HLA-DR, DR1 and DR2 were significantly more frequent in those with the highest levels of IgM RF. Conversely, DR3 was associated with low levels or absence of IgA RF and IgE RF. These results suggest that immune response genes may regulate the level of different RF isotypes. The frequencies of IgM, IgA, IgE, and IgG RF were 59%, 36%, 9%, and 27% respectively in SLE and 25%, 2.5%, 70%, and 59% in bronchial asthma. PMID:3813676

  8. Evolution of the symbiotic binary system AG Pegasi - The slowest classical nova eruption ever recorded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Mikolajewski, Maciej; Polidan, Ronald S.; Slovak, Mark H.

    1993-01-01

    We present an analysis of new and existing photometric and spectroscopic observations of the ongoing eruption in the symbiotic star AG Pegasi, showing that this binary has evolved considerably since the turn of the century. Recent dramatic changes in both the UV continuum and the wind from the hot component allow a more detailed analysis than in previous papers. AG Peg is composed of a normal M3 giant and a hot, compact star embedded in a dense, ionized nebula. The hot component powers the activity observed in this system, including a dense wind and a photoionized region within the outer atmosphere of the red giant. The hot component contracted in radius at roughly constant luminosity from 1850 to 1985. Its bolometric luminosity declined by a factor of about 4 during the past 5 yr. Both the mass loss rate from the hot component and the emission activity decreased in step with the hot component's total luminosity, while photospheric radiation from the red giant companion remained essentially constant.

  9. Selective oxidation of ethane using the Au|YSZ|Ag electrochemical membrane system

    SciTech Connect

    Hamakawa, Satoshi; Sato, Koichi; Hayakawa, Takashi; York, A.P.E.; Tsunoda, Tatsuo; Suzuki, Kunio; Shimizu, Masao; Takehira, Katsuomi

    1997-01-01

    The catalytic conversion of ethane to acetaldehyde on an inert gold electrode has been studied using the electrochemical membrane reactor with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) solid electrolyte at 475 C. On applying a direct current to the reaction cell, 5% ethane in N{sub 2}, Au|YSZ|Ag, 100% O{sub 2}, acetaldehyde was formed and the formation rate increased linearly with increasing current. Selectivities to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide were 45 and 55%, respectively. The addition of oxygen to the ethane-mixed gas in the anode space did not affect the acetaldehyde formation. The use of YSZ powder as a fixed bed catalyst under the mixed gas flow of ethane and oxygen at 450 to 600 C resulted in the formation of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and ethene. Even the use of N{sub 2}O instead of oxygen resulted in no formation of acetaldehyde. Hence, it is likely that partial oxidation of ethane to acetaldehyde was carried out by the oxygen species transferred electrochemically through the YSZ which appeared at the gold-YSZ-gas triple-phase boundary. From the results of ethanol oxidation over the Au|YSZ|Ag system, the following mechanism was proposed: ethane is dehydrogenated to an ethyl radical, then converted to ethoxide, and finally to acetaldehyde by the oxygen species transferred through the YSZ.

  10. An ELM-resilient rf arc detection system for DIII-D based on electromagnetic and sound emissions from the arc

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    Two detection methods based solely on sound and electromagnetic emissions form the arc are presented. Detection of arc induced sound signals 40 to 50 dB above background noise are observed. Detection of arc induced low radio frequency (HF) electromagnetic noise levels 20 to 60 dB above background are observed. The arc noise is randomly strongest on side A and/or B of the DIII-D rf system. The sum of these sensors correlates with tripping due to an increase in the rf reflection coefficient. The sensors are resilient to ELMs and other plasma noise.

  11. Deposition of adherent Ag-Ti duplex films on ceramics in a multiple-cathode sputter deposition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honecy, Frank S.

    1992-01-01

    The adhesion of Ag films deposited on oxide ceramics can be increased by first depositing intermediate films of active metals such as Ti. Such duplex coatings can be fabricated in a widely used three target sputter deposition system. It is shown here that the beneficial effect of the intermediate Ti film can be defeated by commonly used in situ target and substrate sputter cleaning procedures which result in Ag under the Ti. Auger electron spectroscopy and wear testing of the coatings are used to develop a cleaning strategy resulting in an adherent film system.

  12. Nano-crystalline Ag-PbTe thermoelectric thin films by a multi-target PLD system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, E.; Bellucci, A.; Medici, L.; Mezzi, A.; Kaciulis, S.; Fumagalli, F.; Di Fonzo, F.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2015-05-01

    It has been evaluated the ability of ArF pulsed laser ablation to grow nano-crystalline thin films of high temperature PbTe thermoelectric material, and to obtain a uniform and controlled Ag blending, through the entire thickness of the film, using a multi-target system in vacuum. The substrate used was a mirror polished technical alumina slab. The increasing atomic percentage of Ag effect on physical-chemical and electronic properties was evaluated in the range 300-575 K. The stoichiometry and the distribution of the Ag component, over the whole thickness of the samples deposited, have been studied by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and corresponding depth profiles. The crystallographic structure of the film was analyzed by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD) system. Scherrer analysis for crystallite size shows the presence of nano-structures, of the order of 30-35 nm. Electrical resistivity of the samples, studied by the four point probe method, as a function of increasing Ag content, shows a typical semi-conductor behavior. From conductivity values, carrier concentration and Seebeck parameter determination, the power factor of deposited films was calculated. Both XPS, Hall mobility and Seebeck analysis seem to indicate a limit value to the Ag solubility of the order of 5%, for thin films of ∼200 nm thickness, deposited at 350 °C. These data resulted to be comparable to theoretical evaluation for thin films but order of magnitude lower than the corresponding bulk materials.

  13. AgDscam, a Hypervariable Immunoglobulin Domain-Containing Receptor of the Anopheles gambiae Innate Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuemei; Taylor, Harry E

    2006-01-01

    Activation of the insect innate immune system is dependent on a limited number of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) capable of interacting with pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Here we report a novel role of an alternatively spliced hypervariable immunoglobulin domain-encoding gene, Dscam, in generating a broad range of PRRs implicated in immune defense in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. The mosquito Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule gene, AgDscam, has a complex genome organization with 101 exons that can produce over 31,000 potential alternative splice forms with different combinations of adhesive domains and interaction specificities. AgDscam responds to infection by producing pathogen challenge-specific splice form repertoires. Transient silencing of AgDscam compromises the mosquito's resistance to infections with bacteria and the malaria parasite Plasmodium. AgDscam is mediating phagocytosis of bacteria with which it can associate and defend against in a splice form–specific manner. AgDscam is a hypervariable PRR of the A. gambiae innate immune system. PMID:16774454

  14. AgMIP's Transdisciplinary Agricultural Systems Approach to Regional Integrated Assessment of Climate Impacts, Vulnerability, and Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antle, John M.; Valdivia, Roberto O.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Janssen, Sander; Jones, James W.; Porter, Cheryl H.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Ruane, Alexander C.; Thorburn, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes methods developed by the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) to implement a transdisciplinary, systems-based approach for regional-scale (local to national) integrated assessment of agricultural systems under future climate, biophysical, and socio-economic conditions. These methods were used by the AgMIP regional research teams in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia to implement the analyses reported in their respective chapters of this book. Additional technical details are provided in Appendix 1.The principal goal that motivates AgMIP's regional integrated assessment (RIA) methodology is to provide scientifically rigorous information needed to support improved decision-making by various stakeholders, ranging from local to national and international non-governmental and governmental organizations.

  15. RF/optical shared aperture for high availability wideband communication RF/FSO links

    DOEpatents

    Ruggiero, Anthony J; Pao, Hsueh-yuan; Sargis, Paul

    2015-03-24

    An RF/Optical shared aperture is capable of transmitting and receiving optical signals and RF signals simultaneously. This technology enables compact wide bandwidth communications systems with 100% availability in clear air turbulence, rain and fog. The functions of an optical telescope and an RF reflector antenna are combined into a single compact package by installing an RF feed at either of the focal points of a modified Gregorian telescope.

  16. RF/optical shared aperture for high availability wideband communication RF/FSO links

    DOEpatents

    Ruggiero, Anthony J; Pao, Hsueh-yuan; Sargis, Paul

    2014-04-29

    An RF/Optical shared aperture is capable of transmitting and receiving optical signals and RF signals simultaneously. This technology enables compact wide bandwidth communications systems with 100% availability in clear air turbulence, rain and fog. The functions of an optical telescope and an RF reflector antenna are combined into a single compact package by installing an RF feed at either of the focal points of a modified Gregorian telescope.

  17. RF/microwave system high-fidelity modeling and simulation: application to airborne multi-channel receiver system for angle of arrival estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen; Rajan, Sreeraman; Young, Anne; O'Regan, Christina

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a high-fidelity RF modeling and simulation framework is demonstrated to model an airborne multi-channel receiver system that is used to estimate the angle of arrival (AoA) of received signals from a stationary emitter. The framework is based on System Tool Kit (STK®), Matlab and SystemVue®. The SystemVue-based multi-channel receiver estimates the AoA of incoming signals using adjacent channel amplitude and phase comparisons, and it estimates the Doppler frequency shift of the aircraft by processing the transmitted and received signals. The estimated AoA and Doppler frequency are compared with the ground-truth data provided by STK to validate the efficacy of the modeling process. Unlike other current RF electronic warfare simulation frameworks, the received signal described herein is formed using the received power, the propagation delay and the transmitted waveform, and does not require information such as Doppler frequency shift or radial velocity of the moving platform from the scenario; hence, the simulation is more computationally efficient. In addition, to further reduce the overall modeling and simulation time, since the high-fidelity model computation is costly, the high-fidelity electronic system model is evoked only when the received power is higher than a predetermined threshold.

  18. AgRP Neurons Control Systemic Insulin Sensitivity via Myostatin Expression in Brown Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Steculorum, Sophie M; Ruud, Johan; Karakasilioti, Ismene; Backes, Heiko; Engström Ruud, Linda; Timper, Katharina; Hess, Martin E; Tsaousidou, Eva; Mauer, Jan; Vogt, Merly C; Paeger, Lars; Bremser, Stephan; Klein, Andreas C; Morgan, Donald A; Frommolt, Peter; Brinkkötter, Paul T; Hammerschmidt, Philipp; Benzing, Thomas; Rahmouni, Kamal; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Kloppenburg, Peter; Brüning, Jens C

    2016-03-24

    Activation of Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons potently promotes feeding, and chronically altering their activity also affects peripheral glucose homeostasis. We demonstrate that acute activation of AgRP neurons causes insulin resistance through impairment of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into brown adipose tissue (BAT). AgRP neuron activation acutely reprograms gene expression in BAT toward a myogenic signature, including increased expression of myostatin. Interference with myostatin activity improves insulin sensitivity that was impaired by AgRP neurons activation. Optogenetic circuitry mapping reveals that feeding and insulin sensitivity are controlled by both distinct and overlapping projections. Stimulation of AgRP → LHA projections impairs insulin sensitivity and promotes feeding while activation of AgRP → anterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (aBNST)vl projections, distinct from AgRP → aBNSTdm projections controlling feeding, mediate the effect of AgRP neuron activation on BAT-myostatin expression and insulin sensitivity. Collectively, our results suggest that AgRP neurons in mice induce not only eating, but also insulin resistance by stimulating expression of muscle-related genes in BAT, revealing a mechanism by which these neurons rapidly coordinate hunger states with glucose homeostasis. PMID:27015310

  19. The Structure and Electrical Properties of the Ag2Se + Ga2Se3 + GeSe2 Glass System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marple, Maxwell Adam Thomas

    Silver containing homogeneous chalcogenide glasses in the ternary system Ag2Se-Ga2Se3-GeSe2 (AGGS) are synthesized and their atomic structure-property relationships are investigated. Structural studies are carried out using Raman, 77Se, 71Ga, 69Ga, and 109Ag nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The structure of these glasses consists primarily of a network of corner sharing (Ga/Ge)Se4/2 tetrahedra with a small fraction of homopolar Se-Se bonds. Compositional modification of the atomic structure follows the charge compensated network model developed in the literature for aluminosilicate glasses. Ag2Se acts as a network modifier, forming non-bridging Se in glasses with Ag/Ga >1, while Ga 2Se3 plays the role of a network intermediate similar to Al2O3 in oxide glasses. The network favors the formation of homopolar Ge-Ge bonding in glasses with Ag/Ga <1, to accommodate the Se deficiency brought by the incorporation of Ga2Se3 with Ga being tetrahedrally coordinated to Se. This structural model is consistent with the variation in the glass transition temperatures and molar volume. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) reveals the ionic conductivity of the AGGS glasses to be quite high at ambient temperature, reaching up to 10 --4 S/cm for glasses with the highest Ag content. Increasing Se deficiency with respect to stoichiometry can enhance the conductivity further to ˜3x10--4 S/cm . Transference number measurements using the electromotive force (EMF) method as well as variable temperature 109Ag NMR line shape studies indicate that the conductivity is predominantly ionic in nature and results from fast hopping dynamics of Ag ions. The high ionic conductivity can be related to a heavily modified structural network that results in a potential energy landscape with many suitable hopping sites for the Ag ions. These structural characteristics and electrical properties of the glasses in the AGGS system may guide in the development of next generation fast ion

  20. Mechanical contact in system-level models of electrostatically actuated RF-MEMS switches: experimental analysis and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niessner, Martin; Iannacci, Jacopo; Schrag, Gabriele

    2011-06-01

    Three different multi-energy domain coupled system-level models are used to simulate the closing and opening transients of a respective ohmic contact type RF-MEMS switch. The comparison of simulated and measured data shows that, due to the presence of multiple structural modes, none of the system-level models is able to capture exactly the initial closing and contact phase whilst dynamic pull-in. The system-level model, that uses a mechanical submodel based on modal superposition, produces the result closest to the real situation. Notably, the effective residual air gap, assumed whilst contact between the membrane with high surface roughness and the contact pads of the switch, is the most influential parameter in the simulation of the closing transient, as this parameter strongly affects the air damping on the device during pull-in. This finding demonstrates that a reliable model of air damping is a vital prerequisite for the predictive simulation of pull-in and pull-out transients.

  1. ArgoEcoSystem-watershed (AgES-W) model evaluation for streamflow and nitrogen/sediment dynamics on a midwest agricultural watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AgroEcoSystem-Watershed (AgES-W) is a modular, Java-based spatially distributed model which implements hydrologic/water quality simulation components under the Object Modeling System Version 3 (OMS3). The AgES-W model was previously evaluated for streamflow and recently has been enhanced with the ad...

  2. Rf power sources for 1990 and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper will discuss the types of devices and system architectures that show promise in providing rf power sources for future space requirements. It will extrapolate these solutions to accelerators that are now being planned for construction and commissioning in the 1990s and will suggest technological advantages of using SDI-developed rf systems. Finally, the present state of the various SDI-sponsored high-powered rf-development programs will be reviewed.

  3. A LOW NOISE RF SOURCE FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    HAYES,T.

    2004-07-05

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) requires a low noise rf source to ensure that beam lifetime during a store is not limited by the rf system. The beam is particularly sensitive to noise from power line harmonics. Additionally, the rf source must be flexible enough to handle the frequency jump required for rebucketing (transferring bunches from the acceleration to the storage rf systems). This paper will describe the design of a Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) based system that provides both the noise performance and the flexibility required.

  4. Using AGNESS (A Generalized Network-based Expert System Shell) for matching images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pong, Ting-Chuen; Lee, Chung-Mong; Slagle, James

    1988-01-01

    The image correspondence problem is considered the most difficult step in both stereo and motion analysis. Stereo vision is useful in determining the 3-D positions of points on visible surface in a scene. Motion analysis is useful in determining the spatial and temporal relationships of objects in an environment. Besides stereo and motion analysis, there is the image correspondence problem. Most of this work is based on point or local area properties of the observed gray level values in 2-D images. A global and general approach to this problem is described by using a knowledge-based system. The knowledge it uses consists of both physical properties and spatial relationships of the edges and regions extracted from the given images. The physical component depends on features of the edge or region) in isolation. The spatial component involves the set of edges and regions adjacent to a given edge (or region) of the first image and the set of edges and regions adjacent to each potentially matching edge (or region) of the second image; thus the spatial context of each edge or region is considered. A computational network is used to represent this knowledge, it allows the computation of the likelihood of matching two edges or regions with logical and heuristic operators. An expert system shell called AGNESS (A Generalized Network-based Expert System Shell) is used to build a prototype system.

  5. Overview of High Power Vacuum Dry RF Load Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2015-08-27

    A specific feature of RF linacs based on the pulsed traveling wave (TW) mode of operation is that only a portion of the RF energy is used for the beam acceleration. The residual RF energy has to be terminated into an RF load. Higher accelerating gradients require higher RF sources and RF loads, which can stably terminate the residual RF power. RF feeders (from the RF source though the accelerating section to the load) are vacuumed to transmit multi-megawatt high power RF. This overview will outline vacuumed RF loads only. A common method to terminate multi-MW RF power is to use circulated water (or other liquid) as an absorbing medium. A solid dielectric interface (a high quality ceramic) is required to separate vacuum and liquid RF absorber mediums. Using such RF load approaches in TW linacs is troubling because there is a fragile ceramic window barrier and a failure could become catastrophic for linac vacuum and RF systems. Traditional loads comprising of a ceramic disk have limited peak and average power handling capability and are therefore not suitable for high gradient TW linacs. This overview will focus on ''vacuum dry'' or ''all-metal'' loads that do not employ any dielectric interface between vacuum and absorber. The first prototype is an original design of RF loads for the Stanford Two-Mile Accelerator.

  6. The TLR7 7926A>G polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Ma, Yan; Li, Jing; Cen, Han; Wang, De-Guang; Feng, Chen-Chen; Li, Ruo-Jie; Leng, Rui-Xue; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2012-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disorder that predominantly affects women of childbearing age, with a female-to-male ratio of approximately 9:1. Previous findings indicated that male cases of SLE were associated with Klinefelter's syndrome (47, XXY), whereas females with Turner's syndrome (45, X0) did not contract SLE. Additionally, duplicated Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) was found to promote lupus-like disease. Consequently, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether the TLR7 gene served as a genetic marker for the development of SLE. A case-control study was performed on one tag single nucleotide polymorphism TLR7 rs1634323 in a population with 507 SLE patients and 513 healthy controls. Genotyping was determined by the TaqMan genotyping assay using the ABI 7300 real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction system. The results showed a significantly elevated risk of SLE with the rs1634323 AG genotype in females (P = 0.040, OR = 1.897, 95% CI 1.031-3.491), whereas a similar association was not replicated in males (P = 0.303, OR = 0.338, 95% CI 0.043-2.656). In a subgroup analysis by clinical manifestation of lupus nephritis, no significant differences were found. These findings indicate that the TLR7 gene rs1634323 polymorphism may contribute to SLE susceptibility in females. PMID:22505023

  7. Parametric analysis of RF communications and tracking systems for manned space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    System performance, system interface compatibility, and system management and operations are analyzed for external and internal communications provided by the modular space station. Mathematical models are utilized to evaluate performances of the various communication links between the MSS and the tracking and data relay satellites, the shuttle, and the ground stations. Communication control design requirements are determined from overall MSS control design and checkout requirements are developed in a related systems study. Parallel design efforts consider equipment configurations for the external communication assembly baseband and the internal communication assembly to accommodate signal transfer and control. The recommended baseline design considers also interfaces between equipment groups and the critical functional and signal characteristics of these interfaces. The data processing assembly has direct communication circuits to the external communication assembly and the control interface is provided via a digital data bus and a remote acquisition and control unit.

  8. The Two-Component System GrvRS (EtaRS) Regulates ace Expression in Enterococcus faecalis OG1RF

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kavindra V.; La Rosa, Sabina Leanti; Cohen, Ana Luisa V.; Murray, Barbara E.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of ace (adhesin to collagen of Enterococcus faecalis), encoding a virulence factor in endocarditis and urinary tract infection models, has been shown to increase under certain conditions, such as in the presence of serum, bile salts, urine, and collagen and at 46°C. However, the mechanism of ace/Ace regulation under different conditions is still unknown. In this study, we identified a two-component regulatory system GrvRS as the main regulator of ace expression under these stress conditions. Using Northern hybridization and β-galactosidase assays of an ace promoter-lacZ fusion, we found transcription of ace to be virtually absent in a grvR deletion mutant under the conditions that increase ace expression in wild-type OG1RF and in the complemented strain. Moreover, a grvR mutant revealed decreased collagen binding and biofilm formation as well as attenuation in a murine urinary tract infection model. Here we show that GrvR plays a major role in control of ace expression and E. faecalis virulence. PMID:25385790

  9. Ultra-fast pulse radiolysis system combined with a laser photocathode RF gun and a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muroya, Y.; Lin, M.; Watanabe, T.; Wu, G.; Kobayashi, T.; Yoshii, K.; Ueda, T.; Uesaka, M.; Katsumura, Y.

    2002-08-01

    In order to study the early events in radiation physics and chemistry, two kinds of new pulse radiolysis systems with higher time resolution based on pump-and-probe method have been developed at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, the University of Tokyo. The first one, a few picosecond (2 ps at FWHM) electron beam (pump) from an 18 MeV S-band Linac using a laser photocathode RF gun (BNL/KEK/SHI type: GUN IV) was operated with a femtosecond laser pulse (100 fs at FWHM), which also acted as the analyzing light (probe). The synchronization precision between the pump and the probe was 1.7 ps (rms). In a 1.0 cm sample cell, a time resolution of 12 ps was achieved. The second one, a picosecond (4 ps at FWHM) electron pulse from a 35 MeV S-band Linac employing a conventional thermionic gun with a sub-harmonic buncher, was synchronized with the femtosecond laser pulse, with a synchronization jitter of 2.8 ps (rms). A time resolution of 22 ps was obtained with 2 cm cell. This makes it possible to do the pulse radiolysis experiments in the time range from picosecond to sub-microsecond.

  10. Investigation of techniques for improving Saturn 5 RF tracking and ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, J. R., Jr.; Wetherington, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Results of theoretical analyses of 12 problems are presented and comparisons of theoretical and experimental results are given. The investigations covered were: (1) techniques for improving the Saturn radar altimeter, (2) performance of the phase lock loop of the offset Doppler transponder, (3) signal processing equipment design for an orbital altitude radar return experiment, (4) spectral studies of signals present in the command and communication system (CCS) up-link transmitter, (5) intermodulation in the CCS down-link data demodulators, (6) error rate performance of the CCS transponder command demodulator, (7) flame attenuation effects on telemetry transmissions during Saturn launches, (8) design of a digital television system which converts a standard monochrome picture to a slow-scan picture, (9) methods of obtaining an additional CCS 72-kilobit/sec telemetry channel, (10) computation of the CCS S-band down-link spectra, (11) modeling of portions of the communications systems, and (12) modeling of a telemetry transmitter.

  11. The AgroEcoSystem (AgES) response-function model simulates layered soil water dynamics in semi-arid Colorado: sensitivity and calibration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation of vertical soil hydrology is a critical component of simulating even more complex soil water dynamics in space and time, including land-atmosphere and subsurface interactions. The AgroEcoSystem (AgES) model is defined here as a single land unit implementation of the full AgES-W (Watershe...

  12. A component-based, integrated spatially distributed hydrologic/water quality model: AgroEcoSystem-Watershed (AgES-W) overview and application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AgroEcoSystem-Watershed (AgES-W) is a modular, Java-based spatially distributed model which implements hydrologic/water quality simulation components. The AgES-W model was previously evaluated for streamflow and recently has been enhanced with the addition of nitrogen (N) and sediment modeling compo...

  13. Dual Water Systems: Characterization and Performance for Distribution of Reclaimed Water (WaterRF Report 4333)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research tasks included: an inventory of cases where dual systems have been implemented; formulation of a protocol to identify claimed benefits, costs, and risks; collection of data (quantitative and anecdotal) to assess performance; display of data in the form of performance...

  14. AGS RESONANT EXTRACTION WITH HIGH INTENSITY BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    AHRENS,L.; BROWN,K.; GLENN,J.W.; ROSER,T.; TSOUPAS,N.; VANASSELT,W.

    1999-03-29

    The Brookhaven AGS third integer resonant extraction system allows the AGS to provide high quality, high intensity 25.5 GeV/c proton beams simultaneously to four target stations and as many as 8 experiments. With the increasing intensities (over 7 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse) and associated longer spill periods (2.4 to 3 seconds long), we continue to run with low losses and high quality low modulation continuous current beams.[1] Learning to extract and transport these higher intensity beams has required a process of careful modeling and experimentation. We have had to learn how to correct for various instabilities and how to better match extraction and the transport lines to the higher emittance beams being accelerated in the AGS. Techniques employed include ''RF'' methods to smooth out momentum distributions and fine structure. We will present results of detailed multi-particle tracking modeling studies which enabled us to develop a clear understanding of beam loss mechanisms in the transport and extraction process. We will report on our status, experiences, and the present understanding of the intensity limitations imposed by resonant extraction and transport to fixed target stations.

  15. Development of the rf-SQUID Based Multiplexing System for the HOLMES Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puiu, A.; Becker, D.; Bennett, D.; Faverzani, M.; Ferri, E.; Fowler, J.; Gard, J.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Hilton, G.; Giachero, A.; Maino, M.; Mates, J.; Nucciotti, A.; Schmidt, D.; Swetz, D.; Ullom, J.; Vale, L.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring the neutrino mass is one of the most compelling issues in particle physics. The European Research Council has funded HOLMES, a new experiment for a direct measurement of neutrino mass that started in 2014. HOLMES will perform a precise measurement of the end point of the Electron Capture decay spectrum of ^{163} Ho in order to extract information on neutrino mass with a sensitivity as low as 0.4 eV. HOLMES, in its final configuration, will deploy a 1000 pixel array of low-temperature microcalorimeters: each calorimeter consists of an absorber, where the Ho atoms will be implanted, coupled to a transition edge sensor thermometer. The read out for an array of 1000 cryogenic detectors is a crucial matter: for HOLMES, a special radio-frequency-based multiplexing system is being developed. In this contribution, we outline the performance and special features of the multiplexing system and readout methods chosen for HOLMES.

  16. Development of the rf-SQUID Based Multiplexing System for the HOLMES Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puiu, A.; Becker, D.; Bennett, D.; Faverzani, M.; Ferri, E.; Fowler, J.; Gard, J.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Hilton, G.; Giachero, A.; Maino, M.; Mates, J.; Nucciotti, A.; Schmidt, D.; Swetz, D.; Ullom, J.; Vale, L.

    2016-07-01

    Measuring the neutrino mass is one of the most compelling issues in particle physics. The European Research Council has funded HOLMES, a new experiment for a direct measurement of neutrino mass that started in 2014. HOLMES will perform a precise measurement of the end point of the Electron Capture decay spectrum of ^{163}Ho in order to extract information on neutrino mass with a sensitivity as low as 0.4 eV. HOLMES, in its final configuration, will deploy a 1000 pixel array of low-temperature microcalorimeters: each calorimeter consists of an absorber, where the Ho atoms will be implanted, coupled to a transition edge sensor thermometer. The read out for an array of 1000 cryogenic detectors is a crucial matter: for HOLMES, a special radio-frequency-based multiplexing system is being developed. In this contribution, we outline the performance and special features of the multiplexing system and readout methods chosen for HOLMES.

  17. RF model of the distribution system as a communication channel, phase 2. Volume 2: Task reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rustay, R. C.; Gajjar, J. T.; Rankin, R. W.; Wentz, R. C.; Wooding, R.

    1982-01-01

    Based on the established feasibility of predicting, via a model, the propagation of Power Line Frequency on radial type distribution feeders, verification studies comparing model predictions against measurements were undertaken using more complicated feeder circuits and situations. Detailed accounts of the major tasks are presented. These include: (1) verification of model; (2) extension, implementation, and verification of perturbation theory; (3) parameter sensitivity; (4) transformer modeling; and (5) compensation of power distribution systems for enhancement of power line carrier communication reliability.

  18. Design and performance of high voltage power supply with crowbar protection for 3-Φ  high power rf amplifier system of cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    The superconducting cyclotron at VECC consists of three rf cavities separated at 120° and each cavity is fed power from an individual rf amplifier, based on a tetrode tube, in the frequency range of 9–27 MHz. All the three tetrode tubes are powered by individual power supplies for their biasing which are fabricated and commissioned with the rf system of the cyclotron. The dc power to the anodes of all three tubes is fed from a high voltage power supply rated at 20 kV dc, 22 A along with suitable interlocks and crowbar protection. The tubes are protected by a single ignitron based crowbar system against an internal arc fault by diverting the stored energy very fast, minimizing the deposited amount of energy at load and allowing the fault to clear. The performance and protective capability of the crowbar system is demonstrated by using wire survivability test. The design criteria of anode power supply along with the crowbar protection system, in-house development, testing and performance is presented in this paper.

  19. Characterization of the (Ag,Cu)(In,Ga)Se2 thin film alloy system for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Jonathan

    Energy is the underlying factor to human economic activity, and more energy is projected to be needed in the near future and photovoltaics provide a means to supply that energy. Results presented in this dissertation detail material properties of the (Ag,Cu)(In,Ga)Se2 thin film alloy system for use as a solar cell material. Structural and optical properties were determined via X-ray diffraction and UV/Vis/NIR spectrophotometry, respectively. Structural data was analyzed using JADE 2010 software and optical data was analyzed via two different methods. Results of Ag substitution into Cu(In,Ga)Se2 alloy were reconciled with the Jaffe-Wei-Zunger (JWZ) theoretical model, which relates structural and chemical properties of Cu-based ternary chalcopyrite alloys to their optical properties. Dominant phase of the alloy system was identified as chalcopyrite I-42d, Space group 122, with minor secondary phases and order defect phases. No chalcopyrite-chalcopyrite miscibility gap was present in the alloy compositional space, counter to prior literature on bulk polycrystalline materials and thermodynamic calculations performed here, indicating that Ag was successfully substituted into the chalcopyrite lattice. Lattice constant results were consistent with JWZ model, where a O lattice constant closely follows Vegard's rule, cO lattice constant changes at different rates than aO does with composition, and anion displacement is affected by cation radii. Optical results showed bandgap widening with Ag and Ga substitution across the full compositional space, with bowing parameters shown overall to be invariant with cation substitution, counter to expectations. (Ag+Cu)/(In+Ga) ratio effect on bandgap for a limited set of samples is consistent with p-d hybridization effects from JWZ model.

  20. Tomcat-Projects_RF

    SciTech Connect

    Warrant, Marilyn M.; Garcia, Rudy J.; Zhang, Pengchu; Arms, Robert M.; Herzer, John A.; Conrad, Gregory N.; Brabson, John M.

    2004-09-15

    Tomcat-Projects_RF is a software package for analyzing sensor data obtained from a database and displaying the results with Java Servlet Pages (JSP). SQL Views into the dataset are tailored for personnel having different roles in monitoring the items in a storage facility. For example, an inspector, a host treaty compliance officer, a system engineer and software developers were the users identified that would need to access data at different levels of detail, The analysis provides a high level status of the storage facility and allows the user to go deeper into the data details if the user desires.

  1. Tomcat-Projects_RF

    2004-09-15

    Tomcat-Projects_RF is a software package for analyzing sensor data obtained from a database and displaying the results with Java Servlet Pages (JSP). SQL Views into the dataset are tailored for personnel having different roles in monitoring the items in a storage facility. For example, an inspector, a host treaty compliance officer, a system engineer and software developers were the users identified that would need to access data at different levels of detail, The analysis providesmore » a high level status of the storage facility and allows the user to go deeper into the data details if the user desires.« less

  2. CRFR1 in AgRP Neurons Modulates Sympathetic Nervous System Activity to Adapt to Cold Stress and Fasting.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, Yael; Weiss, Meira; Dine, Julien; Staikin, Katy; Golani, Ofra; Ramot, Assaf; Nahum, Tali; Kühne, Claudia; Shemesh, Yair; Wurst, Wolfgang; Harmelin, Alon; Deussing, Jan M; Eder, Matthias; Chen, Alon

    2016-06-14

    Signaling by the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 (CRFR1) plays an important role in mediating the autonomic response to stressful challenges. Multiple hypothalamic nuclei regulate sympathetic outflow. Although CRFR1 is highly expressed in the arcuate nucleus (Arc) of the hypothalamus, the identity of these neurons and the role of CRFR1 here are presently unknown. Our studies show that nearly half of Arc-CRFR1 neurons coexpress agouti-related peptide (AgRP), half of which originate from POMC precursors. Arc-CRFR1 neurons are innervated by CRF neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, and CRF application decreases AgRP(+)CRFR1(+) neurons' excitability. Despite similar anatomy in both sexes, only female mice selectively lacking CRFR1 in AgRP neurons showed a maladaptive thermogenic response to cold and reduced hepatic glucose production during fasting. Thus, CRFR1, in a subset of AgRP neurons, plays a regulatory role that enables appropriate sympathetic nervous system activation and consequently protects the organism from hypothermia and hypoglycemia. PMID:27211900

  3. X-BAND TRAVELING WAVE RF DEFLECTOR STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Tantawi, S.; /SLAC

    2008-12-18

    Design studies on the X-Band transverse RF deflectors operating at HEM{sub ll} mode have been made for two different applications. One is for beam measurement of time-sliced emittance and slice energy spread for the upgraded LCLS project, its optimization in RF efficiency and system design are carefully considered. Another is to design an ultra-fast RF kicker in order to pick up single bunches from the bunch-train of the B-factory storage ring. The challenges are to obtain very short structure filling time with high RF group velocity and good RF efficiency with reasonable transverse shunt impedance. Its RF system will be discussed.

  4. Inhibition of metal induced crystallization in the system Ag/ZnO/a-Si:H

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, F.; Brener, R.; Cytermann, C.; Weil, R.; Beneking, C.; Beyer, W.

    1996-12-31

    A systematic investigation has been made on the barrier properties of ZnO layer between n-doped a-Si:H and Ag metallization films in the structures (001)Si/SiO{sub 2}/Ag/ZnO/a-Si:H:P and (001)Si/SiO{sub 2}/a-Si:H:P/ZnO/Ag. Plasma assisted CVD deposition was used to produce a Si:H (2,500 {angstrom} thick) highly P-doped films over thermally oxidized Si-wafers at 190 and 270 C. Transparent conductive ZnO:Al layers, 1,000{angstrom} and 1 {micro}m thickness, and Ag films (1,000{angstrom} thick) were deposited by sputtering. The polycrystalline ZnO layers were textured along the <0001> axis in the as-deposited state. The structures were annealed in vacuum in the temperature range from 300 to 700 C for 1/4 to 16h. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies demonstrated the a-Si:H:P stability against crystallization under ZnO buffer protection up to 700 C (when free a-Si crystallizes itself). The (111) peak position of the Ag reflection was used to show that while the Ag was always strained, the strain was partially relaxed when in contact with the 0.1{micro}m ZnO film, it developed additional strain when in contact with the 1{micro}m ZnO film.

  5. RF methods for adaptive cancellation of cross polarisation in microwave satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwan, N. J.; Gunes, M.; Mahmoud, M. S.

    The expected capabilities and limitations of unitary cancellers are summarized on the basis of existing knowledge of microwave propagation in ice and rain, and the construction of a new prototype X-band device is described. Two new results, concerning a two-parameter canceller which yields large improvements in isolation and the case of an ice medium in which the principal plane angle and the differential phase shift are correlated, are briefly discussed. The new prototype uses a four-vane differential phase shifter which simultaneously moves the four vanes by means of a system of four metal links in a diamond formation. The gearing and screw can change the differential phase shift at a maximum of 30 deg per second. The absolute insertion loss of the shifter was measured as less than 0.25 dB under all conditions and for either rexolite or perspex untampered vanes between 9.4 and 12.4 GHz.

  6. Design of RF chopper system for improving beam quality in FEL injector with thermionic gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Qin, B.; Tan, P.; Hu, T.; Pei, Y.; Zhang, F.

    2014-08-01

    For a linac-based Free Electron Laser (FEL), good beam quality largely contributes to the success of the final radiation. An imperfection confronted with the HUST THz-FEL facility is the long beam tail that emerges in the electron gun and exists through the whole beam line. This paper proposes to deploy a chopper system after the electron gun to truncate the beam tails before they enter into the linac. Physical dimensions of the chopper cavity are discussed in detail and we have developed and derived new analytical expressions applying to all frequencies for the optimal design. Also, technical issues of the cavity are considered. Beam dynamic simulation is performed to examine the truncation effect and the results show that more than 78% of the beam tail can be removed effectively, while preserving the emittance and energy spread in acceptable level.

  7. Multiharmonic rf feedforward system for compensation of beam loading and periodic transient effects in magnetic-alloy cavities of a proton synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Fumihiko; Ohmori, Chihiro; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Yoshii, Masahito; Schnase, Alexander; Nomura, Masahiro; Toda, Makoto; Shimada, Taihei; Hasegawa, Katsushi; Hara, Keigo

    2013-05-01

    Beam loading compensation is a key for acceleration of a high intensity proton beam in the main ring (MR) of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Magnetic alloy loaded rf cavities with a Q value of 22 are used to achieve high accelerating voltages without a tuning bias loop. The cavity is driven by a single harmonic (h=9) rf signal while the cavity frequency response also covers the neighbor harmonics (h=8,10). Therefore the wake voltage induced by the high intensity beam consists of the three harmonics, h=8,9,10. The beam loading of neighbor harmonics is the source of periodic transient effects and a possible source of coupled bunch instabilities. In the article, we analyze the wake voltage induced by the high intensity beam. We employ the rf feedforward method to compensate the beam loading of these three harmonics (h=8,9,10). The full-digital multiharmonic feedforward system was developed for the MR. We describe the system architecture and the commissioning methodology of the feedforward patterns. The commissioning of the feedforward system has been performed by using high intensity beams with 1.0×1014 proteins per pulse. The impedance seen by the beam is successfully reduced and the longitudinal oscillations due to the beam loading are reduced. By the beam loading compensation, stable high power beam operation is achieved. We also report the reduction of the momentum loss during the debunching process for the slow extraction by the feedforward.

  8. Processing and evaluation of the AGS Booster ultra-high vaccum system

    SciTech Connect

    Hseuh, H.C.; Mapes, M.; Schnitzenbaumer, P.; Shen, B.; Sikora, R.; Stattel, P.

    1991-01-01

    The AGS Booster is a synchrotron for the acceleration of both protons and heavy ions. To minimize the beam loss due to charge exchange of the partially stripped, low {Beta} very heavy ions with the residual gas molecules, pressure of low 10{sup {minus}11} Torr is required for the 200 m booster ring. To achieve this ultra high vacuum, chemical cleaning, vacuum furnace degassing and insitu bake were employed for all chambers and beam components. Using these procedures, vacuums of low 10{sup {minus}11} Torr have been routinely achieved during the testing of individual half cells and beam components, and during the commissioning of the vacuum sectors. In this paper, the design and layout of chambers, flanges and bakeout hardware is briefly described. The vacuum processing of different components and the results of bakeout and evaluation are summarized. The experience gained during the construction and commissioning of this ultra-high vacuum system is also given. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. RF hyperthermia using conductive nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gach, H. Michael; Balachandrasekaran, Arvind; Nair, Tejas

    2010-02-01

    Specific absorption rate (SAR) heating using radiofrequency (RF) waves is affected by the RF frequency and amplitude, and the conductivity of the tissue. Recently, conductive nanoparticles were demonstrated to induce hyperthermia in vitro and in vivo upon irradiation with an external 13.56 MHz RF field. The addition of conductive nanoparticles was assumed to increase the tissue conductivity and SAR. However, no quantitative studies have been performed that characterize the conductivities of biocompatible colloids or tissues containing nanoparticles, and relate the conductivity to SAR. The complex permittivities were measured for colloids containing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in normal saline with 0.32% w/v Pluronic F108 nonionic surfactant. The carbon concentrations of the colloids ranged from 0 to 88 mM. The permittivities were measured using a dielectric probe and RF network analyzer for RF frequencies from 200 MHz to 3 GHz. The nonionic surfactant was added to the colloids to minimize flocculation of the nanotubes during the RF heating experiments. The results were compared with prior measurements of colloids containing 0.02% Pluronic F108. The dielectric and conductivity of the 0.02% Pluronic colloids rose linearly with carbon concentration but the 0.32% Pluronic colloids varied from linearity. Based on the permittivity results, selected colloid samples were placed inside a Bruker 7T/20 magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) system and irradiated at 300 MHz using a high duty cycle RF pulse sequence. The temperature changes were measured directly using fiber-optic thermometers and indirectly using MR thermometry and spectroscopy. Temperature changes were consistent with the colloid conductivities.

  10. Implementing New Methods of Laser Marking of Items in the Nuclear Material Control and Accountability System at SSC RF-IPPE: An Automated Laser Marking System

    SciTech Connect

    Regoushevsky, V I; Tambovtsev, S D; Dvukhsherstnov, V G; Efimenko, V F; Ilyantsev, A I; Russ III, G P

    2009-05-18

    For over ten years SSC RF-IPPE, together with the US DOE National Laboratories, has been working on implementing automated control and accountability methods for nuclear materials and other items. Initial efforts to use adhesive bar codes or ones printed (painted) onto metal revealed that these methods were inconvenient and lacked durability under operational conditions. For NM disk applications in critical stands, there is the additional requirement that labels not affect the neutron characteristics of the critical assembly. This is particularly true for the many stainless-steel clad disks containing highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium that are used at SSC RF-IPPE for modeling nuclear power reactors. In search of an alternate method for labeling these disks, we tested several technological options, including laser marking and two-dimensional codes. As a result, the method of laser coloring was chosen in combination with Data Matrix ECC200 symbology. To implement laser marking procedures for the HEU disks and meet all the nuclear material (NM) handling standards and rules, IPPE staff, with U.S. technical and financial support, implemented an automated laser marking system; there are also specially developed procedures for NM movements during laser marking. For the laser marking station, a Zenith 10F system by Telesis Technologies (10 watt Ytterbium Fiber Laser and Merlin software) is used. The presentation includes a flowchart for the automated system and a list of specially developed procedures with comments. Among other things, approaches are discussed for human-factor considerations. To date, markings have been applied to numerous steel-clad HEU disks, and the work continues. In the future this method is expected to be applied to other MC&A items.

  11. R&D ERL: Low level RF

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.

    2010-01-15

    A superconducting RF (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is currently under development at the Collider-Accelerator Department (C-AD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The major components from an RF perspective are (a) a 5-cell SRF ERL cavity, (b) an SRF photocathode electron gun, and (c) a drive laser for the photocathode gun. Each of these RF subsystems has its own set of RF performance requirements, as well as common requirements for ensuring correct synchronism between them. A low level RF (LLRF) control system is currently under development, which seeks to leverage both technology and experience gained from the recently commissioned RHIC LLRF system upgrade. This note will review the LLRF system requirements and describe the system to be installed at the ERL.

  12. A colorimetric nitrite detection system with excellent selectivity and high sensitivity based on Ag@Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianhua; Li, Yonglong; Zhang, Yujie; Dong, Chen; Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-02-21

    Excessive uptake of NO2(-) is detrimental to human health, but the currently available methods used to sensitively detect this ion in the environment are cumbersome and expensive. In this study, we developed an improved NO2(-) detection system based on a redox etching strategy of CTAB-stabilized Ag-Au core-shell nanoparticles (Ag@AuNPs). The detection mechanism was verified by UV-Vis spectroscopy, TEM and XPS. The detection system produces a color change from purple to colorless in response to an increase of NO2(-) concentration. The selectivity of detection of NO2(-), both with the unaided eye and by measurement of UV-Vis spectra, is excellent in relation to other ions, including Cu(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cr(3+), Al(3+), Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(3+), Hg(2+), Ag(+), K(+), F(-), PO4(3-), C2O4(2-), SO3(2-), CO3(2-), SO4(2-), NO3(-) and CH3-COO(-) (Ac(-)). The limit of detection (LOD) for NO2(-) is 1.0 μM by eye and 0.1 μM by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The LOD by eye is lower than the lowest previously reported value (4.0 μM). There is a good linear relationship between A/A0 and the concentration of NO2(-) from 1.0 to 20.0 μM NO2(-), which permits a quantitative assay. The applicability of our detection system was also verified by analysis of NO2(-) in tap water and lake water. The results demonstrate that our Ag@AuNP-based detection system can be used for the rapid colorimetric detection of NO2(-) in complex environmental samples, with excellent selectivity and high sensitivity. PMID:25564225

  13. Phase modulation in RF tag

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2007-02-20

    A radio frequency (RF) communication system employs phase-modulated backscatter signals for RF communication from an RF tag to an interrogator. The interrogator transmits a continuous wave interrogation signal to the RF tag, which based on an information code stored in a memory, phase-modulates the interrogation signal to produce a backscatter response signal that is transmitted back to the interrogator. A phase modulator structure in the RF tag may include a switch coupled between an antenna and a quarter-wavelength stub; and a driver coupled between the memory and a control terminal of the switch. The driver is structured to produce a modulating signal corresponding to the information code, the modulating signal alternately opening and closing the switch to respectively decrease and increase the transmission path taken by the interrogation signal and thereby modulate the phase of the response signal. Alternatively, the phase modulator may include a diode coupled between the antenna and driver. The modulating signal from the driver modulates the capacitance of the diode, which modulates the phase of the response signal reflected by the diode and antenna.

  14. Analysis of periodic transient beam loading of the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.; Weng, W.T.

    1992-07-13

    In this note, we discuss the multi-batch bunched ;beam loading during the injection from the Booster to the AGS. The full intensity beam injection to the upgraded AGS RF system with beam phase and radial feedbacks will be studied. It is shown that a beam phase feed-back is necessary in order to guarantee a predictable beam behavior after the first batch injection, otherwise the initial phase deviation for the following batch injections cannot be controlled. However, the effectiveness of the phase feedback control of the transient beam loading is limited by the associated emittance blow-up in the process. It is shown that a fast power amplifier feedback with a moderate gain can significantly reduce the transient effect of the bunched beam injection.

  15. Design, construction and operational results of the IGBT controlled solid state modulator high voltage power supply used in the high power RF systems of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator of the accelerator production of tritium (APT) project

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J.T. III; Rees, D.; Przeklasa, R.S.; Scott, M.C.

    1998-12-31

    The 1700 MeV, 100 mA Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Proton Linac will require 244 1 MW, continuous wave RF systems. 1 MW continuous wave klystrons are used as the RF source and each klystron requires 95 kV, 17 A of beam voltage and current. The cost of the DC power supplies is the single largest percentage of the total RF system cost. Power supply reliability is crucial to overall RF system availability and AC to DC conversion efficiency affects the operating cost. The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) will serve as the prototype and test bed for APT. The design of the RF systems used in LEDA is driven by the need to field test high efficiency systems with extremely high reliability before APT is built. The authors present a detailed description and test results of one type of advanced high voltage power supply system using Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) that has been used with the LEDA High Power RF systems. The authors also present some of the distinctive features offered by this power supply topology, including crowbarless tube protection and modular construction which allows graceful degradation of power supply operation.

  16. RF-to-DC Characteristics of Direct Irradiated On-Chip Gallium Arsenide Schottky Diode and Antenna for Application in Proximity Communication System

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Farahiyah; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2014-01-01

    We report the RF-to-DC characteristics of the integrated AlGaAs/GaAs Schottky diode and antenna under the direct injection and irradiation condition. The conversion efficiency up to 80% under direct injection of 1 GHz signal to the diode was achieved. It was found that the reduction of series resistance and parallel connection of diode and load tend to lead to the improvement of RF-to-DC conversion efficiency. Under direct irradiation from antenna-to-antenna method, the output voltage of 35 mV was still obtainable for the distance of 8 cm between both antennas in spite of large mismatch in the resonant frequency between the diode and the connected antenna. Higher output voltage in volt range is expected to be achievable for the well-matching condition. The proposed on-chip AlGaAs/GaAs HEMT Schottky diode and antenna seems to be a promising candidate to be used for application in proximity communication system as a wireless low power source as well as a highly sensitive RF detector. PMID:24561400

  17. Direct visualization of surface phase of oxygen molecules physisorbed on Ag(111) surface: A two-dimensional quantum spin system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shunji; Yoshida, Yasuo; Imada, Hiroshi; Kim, Yousoo; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2016-02-01

    We report on the real-space observation of the two-dimensional distorted triangular lattice of physisorbed oxygen (O2) molecules on an Ag(111) surface by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The physisorbed state of the O2 monolayers was confirmed by measuring their thermal stability, which showed good agreement with previous thermal desorption spectroscopy. The distortion of the observed lattice was reproduced quantitatively by considering the intermolecular exchange interaction in Monte Carlo calculations, indicating a critical role of antiferromagnetic ordering of O2 spins. In tunneling spectra, the Kondo resonance was not observed on the O2 layer at 4.7 K unlike the case of physisorbed O2 on Ag(110). These results indicate that an intrinsic S =1 spin of the O2 molecules was preserved to form a two-dimensional antiferromagnetic quantum spin system on the surface.

  18. A novel surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrate based on a large area of MoS2 and Ag nanoparticles hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. X.; Qiu, H. W.; Xu, S. C.; Liu, X. Y.; Li, Z.; Hu, L. T.; Li, C. H.; Guo, J.; Jiang, S. Z.; Huo, Y. Y.

    2016-07-01

    Few layers MoS2 were directly synthesized on Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) by thermal decomposion method to fabricate a MoS2/AgNPs hybrid system for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The MoS2/AgNPs hybrid system shows high performance in terms of sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio, reproducibility and stability. The minimum detected concentration from MoS2/AgNPs hybrid system for R6 G can reach 10-9 M, which is one order of magnitude lower than that from AgNPs system. The hybrid system shows the reasonable linear response between the Raman intensity and concentration that R2 is reached to 0.988. The maximum deviations of SERS intensities from 20 positions of the SERS substrate are less than 13%. Besides, the hybrid system has a good stability, the Raman intensity only drop by 20% in a month. This work can provide a basis for the fabrication of novel SERS substrates.

  19. Transparent conductive ZnInSnO-Ag-ZnInSnO multilayer films for polymer dispersed liquid-crystal based smart windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun Mi; Choi, In-Seok; Oh, Jeong-Pyo; Kim, Young-Baek; Lee, Jong-Ho; Choi, Yong-Sung; Cho, Jung-Dae; Kim, Yang-Bae; Heo, Gi-Seok

    2014-09-01

    Multilayer transparent films with electrical resistances lower than those in conventionally used transparent conductive electrodes were prepared at room temperature on glass substrates in an RF/DC magnetron sputtering system. The multilayer structure of the films consisted of three layers, ZnInSnO (ZITO)-Ag-ZITO. The optical and electrical properties of the multilayer structures were investigated with respect to the thickness of each ZITO-Ag-ZITO layer. Transparent conductive films with a sheet resistance of 9.4 Ω/square and an average transmittance of 92% at 550 nm were obtained at the following thicknesses of the glass substrate: ZITO (100 nm)-Ag (8 nm)-ZITO (42 nm). The surface roughness (RRMS) of the obtained ZITO-Ag-ZITO multilayer films was below 0.8 nm. Overall, the properties of the ZITO-Ag-ZITO multilayer films were comparable or superior to those of other multilayers such as InSnO (ITO)-Ag-ITO and InZnO (IZO)-Ag-IZO. The deposited ZITO single layer and ZITO-Ag-ZITO multilayer films were used in the fabrication of polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal (PDLC)-based smart windows. The ZITO-Ag-ZITO multilayer-based smart windows exhibited a lower operating voltage (16 V) and a higher cutoff rate of infrared light than ITO or ZITO-based smart windows 20-26 V. However, they showed a lower PDLC-ON transmittance than ITO-based smart windows.

  20. 60kV, 10Amp DC power supply multiple input control and monitoring provision for the operation of various high power RF generation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Kirit M.; Srinivas, Y. S. S.; Kulkarni, S. V.; ICRH-RF Group

    2010-02-01

    A 60 kV, 10 A DC power supply is used for testing of high power RF and microwave tubes e.g. Klystron, Gyrotron. Two 500 kW, 3.7 GHz klystrons, and one 82.6 GHz Gyrotron are located in SST1 Hall where as 200 kW; 28 GHz Gyrotron is located in Aditya Hall. The same power supply is required to operate, control and monitor various systems at different locations with easy change over from one system to other as per experimental requirements. An off line, control change over system, is designed to accomplish the above requirements, with control panels installed at desired different locations. The input (0 to 11 kV) A.C. voltage to power supply is given from a motorized voltage variation system (VVS). The control panels provide indication of A.C. input voltage to power supply from 11 kV potential transformers of VVS. In addition, the control panel is provided with 11 kV circuit breaker status indication and control i.e. Emergency OFF switch. The control panels are designed and developed indigenously which are successfully installed and are in continuous use for the safe and easy operation of different high power rf systems from the same DC power supply. The paper presents the design of the controls, monitoring and indications. Safety aspects of the system are also highlighted.

  1. Positron emission mammography using Pr:LuAG scintillator - Fusion of optical material study and systems engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Akira; Yanagida, Takayuki; Kamada, Kei; Yokota, Yuui; Pejchal, Jan; Yamaji, Akihiro; Usuki, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Miyake, Masayasu; Kumagai, Kazuaki; Sasaki, Katsuhisa; dos Santos, T. R.; Baba, Mamoru; Ito, Masatoshi; Takeda, Motohiro; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Nikl, Martin

    2010-08-01

    The breast cancer is one of the most frequent cause of death among female cancer patients. However, when discovered at the early stage, the probability of recovery is very high. Therefore, the development of positron emission mammography (PEM) to detect the breast cancer at the early stage with high efficiency is demanding. As the diameter of the scanner part is small, a scintillator with faster response is required. As the recently developed Pr:LuAG has almost twice as short scintillation decay time than that of Ce:LSO, the Pr:LuAG scintillator was employed in our recently developed PEM system. One camera unit consisted of 20 × 64 scintillator pixels optically coupled with three H8500-03 multi anode photomultipliers. The Pr:LuAG pixel size is 2.1 × 2.1 × 15 mm 3 and the BaSO 4 was used as a reflector. Four planar cameras are placed at both sides. Therefore, eight cameras were installed at both sides of the instrument. The spatial resolution was evaluated to be 1.1 mm using the 22Na point source. Fluorodeoxyglucose with 18F hotspot image was also detected using the breast phantom.

  2. Technology, science, and environtmental impact of a novel Cu-Ag core-shell solderless interconnect system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, Milea Joy

    processing of the final flux/particle paste combination was optimized at a commercial test facility for printing on test boards containing a wide variety of pad shapes, sizes, and pitches and thus, validated the ability of the Cu-Ag core-shell paste to be a drop-in replacement for traditional solder paste using conventional manufacturing techniques. The second study addresses the fundamental mechanisms behind interconnect formation. An assessment of the kinetics and microstructure evolution during silver thin film dewetting and defect formation provides essential materials science knowledge to understand and control the functionality of the Cu-Ag core-shell system. From an interrupted annealing study used to quantify dewetting kinetics, a range of surface diffusion coefficients were calculated from the experimental results, assuming that surface diffusion controlled dewetting. The two order of magnitude range in calculated diffusion coefficient demonstrates that the diffusion-limited kinetic models traditionally used to quantify hillock and hole growth kinetics during thin film relaxation and dewetting do not apply to the dewetting of Ag films. The presence of interface-limited kinetics was then validated through the non-uniform growth of individual hillocks over time. Lastly, an environmental assessment compares the impacts associated with the manufacturing and materials for the Cu-Ag core-shell particle system and SAC 305, the most commonly used lead-free solder alloy that contains 96.5% tin, 3% silver, and 0.5% copper. By comparing the impacts on global warming, acidification, eutrophication, ozone depletion, ecotoxicity, smog, carcinogenics, non-carcinogenics, and respiratory effects associated with each technology, the environmental advantages and disadvantages of each system are clearly communicated. By utilizing this information and the versatility of the core-shell system, possible methods for reducing impacts of the Cu-Ag core-shell system are addressed in order to

  3. Ag island film-enhanced rare earth co-luminescence effect of Tb-Gd-protein-sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate system and sensitive detection of protein.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chang Xia; Wu, Xia; Zhou, Hai Ping; Wang, Fei; Ding, Hong Hong; Zhao, Liang Liang; Yang, Jing He

    2008-09-15

    This paper reported the coupling technique of Ag island film-enhanced fluorescence with rare earth co-luminescence effect of Tb-Gd-sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS)-protein system. While the collagen is used as the separator between Ag island film and the fluorophore because it not only can decrease the fluorescence of the blank, but also can promote the adsorption of other proteins and change the conformation of the protein. The effects of Ag island film on both the fluorescence and resonance energy transfer process of Tb-Gd-SDBS-protein system are studied, finding that Ag island film can enhance the energy transfer efficiency of this system, resulting in fluorescence enhancement about tenfold compared with this system without Ag island film. Therefore, this technique is used for the detection of proteins as low as 0.72 ng/mL for BSA and 1.3 ng/mL for HSA. In addition, Ag island film can also change the energy transfer process of Tb-SDBS-protein system. PMID:18761153

  4. Silver(I) complexes in coordination supramolecular system with bulky acridine-based ligands: syntheses, crystal structures, and theoretical investigations on C-H...Ag close interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Sen; Chen, Pei-Quan; Yang, En-Cui; Tian, Jin-Lei; Bu, Xian-He; Li, Zheng-Ming; Sun, Hong-Wei; Lin, Zhenyang

    2006-07-24

    to Ag(I) ions. Also, these results strongly support the existence of C-H...Ag close interactions and allow us to have a better understanding of the nature of such interactions in the coordination supramolecular systems. PMID:16841986

  5. RF power generation for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fowkes, W.R.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Miller, R.H.; Pearson, C.; Spalek, G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    The next linear collider will require 200 MW of rf power per meter of linac structure at relatively high frequency to produce an accelerating gradient of about 100 MV/m. The higher frequencies result in a higher breakdown threshold in the accelerating structure hence permit higher accelerating gradients per meter of linac. The lower frequencies have the advantage that high peak power rf sources can be realized. 11.42 GHz appears to be a good compromise and the effort at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is being concentrated on rf sources operating at this frequency. The filling time of the accelerating structure for each rf feed is expected to be about 80 ns. Under serious consideration at SLAC is a conventional klystron followed by a multistage rf pulse compression system, and the Crossed-Field Amplifier. These are discussed in this paper.

  6. Conceptual design of data acquisition and control system for two Rf driver based negative ion source for fusion R&D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Jigensh; Yadav, R. K.; Patel, A.; Gahlaut, A.; Mistry, H.; Parmar, K. G.; Mahesh, V.; Parmar, D.; Prajapati, B.; Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Bansal, G.; Pandya, K.; Chakraborty, A.

    2013-02-01

    Twin Source - An Inductively coupled two RF driver based 180 kW, 1 MHz negative ion source experimental setup is initiated at IPR, Gandhinagar, under Indian program, with the objective of understanding the physics and technology of multi-driver coupling. Twin Source [1] (TS) also provides an intermediate platform between operational ROBIN [2] [5] and eight RF drivers based Indian test facility -INTF [3]. A twin source experiment requires a central system to provide control, data acquisition and communication interface, referred as TS-CODAC, for which a software architecture similar to ITER CODAC core system has been decided for implementation. The Core System is a software suite for ITER plant system manufacturers to use as a template for the development of their interface with CODAC. The ITER approach, in terms of technology, has been adopted for the TS-CODAC so as to develop necessary expertise for developing and operating a control system based on the ITER guidelines as similar configuration needs to be implemented for the INTF. This cost effective approach will provide an opportunity to evaluate and learn ITER CODAC technology, documentation, information technology and control system processes, on an operational machine. Conceptual design of the TS-CODAC system has been completed. For complete control of the system, approximately 200 Nos. control signals and 152 acquisition signals are needed. In TS-CODAC, control loop time required is within the range of 5ms - 10 ms, therefore for the control system, PLC (Siemens S-7 400) has been chosen as suggested in the ITER slow controller catalog. For the data acquisition, the maximum sampling interval required is 100 micro second, and therefore National Instruments (NI) PXIe system and NI 6259 digitizer cards have been selected as suggested in the ITER fast controller catalog. This paper will present conceptual design of TS -CODAC system based on ITER CODAC Core software and applicable plant system integration processes.

  7. Novel step-tunable wavelength-swept optical system based on a SSB modulator driven by a RF generator for fiber sensing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tianxin; Qiu, Changren; Wang, Changle; Wang, Zhaoying; Ge, Chunfeng; Sang, Mei

    2012-03-01

    High resolution wavelength-tunable lasers are essential to sensing applications. For sensing applications, high resolution is needed to improve the spatial resolution and/or measurement accuracy, and fast tuning (sweeping) is required to enhance the measurement speed for dynamic sensing. However the demand of high resolution conflicts with the requirement of fast continuous wavelength tuning. The solution to this issue is tuning the wavelength of the output in a quasi-continuous way in which the length of each step is dependent on the frequency of a RF generator which is used to drive a single-sideband (SSB) modulator in the wavelength-swept optical system. In this paper, a principle of the step-tunable wavelength-swept optical system is proposed and demonstrated. The two optical features of narrow bandwidth and fairly high optical output power make the system unique for improving the accuracy of the measurement of the center-wavelength of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. In addition, changing the tuning-step by adjusting the frequency of a RF generator electrically is user-friendly compared to the conventional wavelength swept systems by tuning optical elements mechanically.

  8. ASME AG-1 REQUIREMENT EXEMPTION JUSTIFICATIONS FOR VENTILATION SYSTEMS AT NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    GUSTAVSON, R.D.

    2004-09-03

    Washington State Department of Health regulations require compliance with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) AG-1, ''Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment,'' for all new radioactive air emission units. As a result, these requirements have been applied to systems that ventilate the radioactive waste storage tanks in the tank farm facilities on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. ASME AG-1 is applied as a regulatory constraint to waste tank ventilation systems at the Hanford Site, even though the code was not intended for these systems. An assessment was performed to identify which requirements should be exempted for waste tank ventilation systems. The technical justifications for requirement exemptions were prepared and presented to the regulator. The technical justifications were documented so that select requirement exemptions for specific projects and systems can be sought through the regulator's permitting process. This paper presents the rationale for attempting to receive requirement exemption and presents examples of the technical justifications that form the basis for these exemptions.

  9. Synthesis of ultrafine Si3N4 powder in RF-RF plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Michitaka; Nishio, Hiroaki

    1991-10-01

    A newly designed plasma-CVD apparatus mounted with the RF-RF type plasma torch was introduced to synthesize ultrafine powders of silicon nitride (Si3N4). The RF-RF plasma system (the combination of a main (lower) and controlling (upper) RF plasma) improved the stability of simple RF plasma and solved the impurity problem of dc-RF hybrid plasma. The reaction of SiCl4 and NH3, which were radially injected into the tail flames of the upper and lower plasmas, respectively, yielded near-stoichiometric amorphous powders of Si3N4. The nitrogen content in the products largely depended on the flow rate of the quenching gas, a mixture of NH3 (reactant) and H2. The oxygen content and metal impurities are 2-3 wt pct and less than 200 ppm, respectively. The powder particles had an average diameter of about 15 nm with a narrow size distribution, and showed extreme air sensitivity. Conspicuous crystallazation and particle growth occurred when heated at temperatures above 1400 C. These results suggested that the RF-RF system was a potential reactor for the synthesis of ultrafine powders with excellent sinterability at relatively low temperatures. 9 refs.

  10. Development of a micro-step voltage-fed actuator with a novel stepper motor for automobile AGS systems.

    PubMed

    Rhyu, Se-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Jong; Gu, Bon-Gwan; Choi, Byung-Dae; Lim, Jung-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an improved micro-step voltage-fed actuator for an automobile active grill shutter (AGS) system. A novel structured stepper motor, which contains both the main and auxiliary teeth in the stator, is proposed for the actuator. In a normal permanent magnet (PM) motor coils are generally wound on all the stator teeth, however, in the proposed motor, the winding is only on the main teeth. Because of the absence of coils in the auxiliary teeth, the proposed stepper motor possesses the following advantages: simple structure, lighter weight, smaller volume, and less time consumption. The unique auxiliary poles in the stepper motor supply the flux path to increase the step resolution even without any coils. The characteristics of the proposed stepper motor were investigated using finite element analysis. In particular, the effect of the magnetization distribution of the PM on the motor performance was investigated during the analysis. Cogging torque, which causes noise and vibration issues, was minimized by the tooth-shape optimization. In addition, a micro-step voltage-fed algorithm was implemented for a high-resolution position control. By employing a current close to a sine wave using space vector pulse-width modulation, a high-quality current waveform with a high resolution was obtained. Finally, the proposed prototype was fabricated, and the cogging torque, back-electromotive force, and current characteristics were measured by mounting the prototype on the AGS system. Both the analysis and experimental results validate the performance improvement from the proposed motor and its possible application for the flap control of the AGS system. PMID:24803193

  11. Beam position monitoring in the AGS Linac to Booster transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.; Brodowski, J.; Witkover, R.

    1991-12-31

    A beam position monitor system has been developed and used in the commissioning of Brookhaven`s Linac to Booster transfer line. This line transports a chopped, RF modulated H- beam from the 200 MeV Linac to the AGS Booster. Over a 15dB dynamic range in beam current, the position monitor system provides a real-time, normalized position signal with an analog bandwidth of about 20 MHz. Seven directional coupler style pickups are installed in the line with each pickup sensing both horizontal and vertical position. Analog processing electronics are located in the tunnel and incorporate the amplitude modulation to phase modulation normalization technique. To avoid interference from the 200 MHz linac RF system, processing is performed at 400 MHz. This paper will provide a system overview and report results from the commissioning experience.

  12. Beam position monitoring in the AGS Linac to Booster transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.; Brodowski, J.; Witkover, R.

    1991-01-01

    A beam position monitor system has been developed and used in the commissioning of Brookhaven's Linac to Booster transfer line. This line transports a chopped, RF modulated H- beam from the 200 MeV Linac to the AGS Booster. Over a 15dB dynamic range in beam current, the position monitor system provides a real-time, normalized position signal with an analog bandwidth of about 20 MHz. Seven directional coupler style pickups are installed in the line with each pickup sensing both horizontal and vertical position. Analog processing electronics are located in the tunnel and incorporate the amplitude modulation to phase modulation normalization technique. To avoid interference from the 200 MHz linac RF system, processing is performed at 400 MHz. This paper will provide a system overview and report results from the commissioning experience.

  13. Substrate-Linked Conformational Change in the Periplasmic Component of a Cu(I)/Ag(I) Efflux System

    SciTech Connect

    Bagai, I.; Liu, W.; Rensing, C.; Blackburn, N.J.; McEvoy, M.M.

    2009-06-02

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize dual membrane resistance nodulation division-type efflux systems to export a variety of substrates. These systems contain an essential periplasmic component that is important for assembly of the protein complex. We show here that the periplasmic protein CusB from the Cus copper/silver efflux system has a critical role in Cu(I) and Ag(I) binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments demonstrate that one Ag(I) ion is bound per CusB molecule with high affinity. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data indicate that the metal environment is an all-sulfur 3-coordinate environment. Candidates for the metal-coordinating residues were identified from sequence analysis, which showed four conserved methionine residues. Mutations of three of these methionine residues to isoleucine resulted in significant effects on CusB metal binding in vitro. Cells containing these CusB variants also show a decrease in their ability to grow on copper-containing plates, indicating an important functional role for metal binding by CusB. Gel filtration chromatography demonstrates that upon binding metal, CusB undergoes a conformational change to a more compact structure. Based on these structural and functional effects of metal binding, we propose that the periplasmic component of resistance nodulation division-type efflux systems plays an active role in export through substrate-linked conformational changes.

  14. Enhanced formation of silver nanoparticles in Ag+-NOM-iron(II, III) systems and antibacterial activity studies.

    PubMed

    Adegboyega, Nathaniel F; Sharma, Virender K; Siskova, Karolina M; Vecerova, Renata; Kolar, Milan; Zbořil, Radek; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2014-03-18

    This work reports the role of iron redox pair (Fe(3+)/Fe(2+)) in the formation of naturally occurring silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the aquatic environment. The results showed that Fe(3+) or Fe(2+) ions in the mixtures of Ag(+) and natural organic matter enhanced the formation of AgNPs. The formation of AgNPs depended on pH and types of organic matter. Increase in pH enhanced the formation of AgNPs, and humic acids as ligands showed higher formation of AgNPs compared to fulvic acids. The observed results were described by considering the potentials of redox pairs of silver and iron species and the possible species involved in reducing silver ions to AgNPs. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy measurements of AgNPs revealed mostly bimodal size distribution with decrease in size of AgNPs due to iron species in the reaction mixture. Minimum inhibitory concentration of AgNPs needed to inhibit the growth of various bacterial species suggested the role of surfaces of tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Stability study of AgNPs, formed in Ag(+)-humic acid/fulvic acids-Fe(3+) mixtures over a period of several months showed high stability of the particles with significant increase in surface plasmon resonance peak. The environmental implications of the results in terms of fate, transport, and ecotoxicity of organic-coated AgNPs are briefly presented. PMID:24524189

  15. High-Power Rf Load

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Vlieks, Arnold E.

    1998-09-01

    A compact high-power RF load comprises a series of very low Q resonators, or chokes [16], in a circular waveguide [10]. The sequence of chokes absorb the RF power gradually in a short distance while keeping the bandwidth relatively wide. A polarizer [12] at the input end of the load is provided to convert incoming TE.sub.10 mode signals to circularly polarized TE.sub.11 mode signals. Because the load operates in the circularly polarized mode, the energy is uniformly and efficiently absorbed and the load is more compact than a rectangular load. Using these techniques, a load having a bandwidth of 500 MHz can be produced with an average power dissipation level of 1.5 kW at X-band, and a peak power dissipation of 100 MW. The load can be made from common lossy materials, such as stainless steel, and is less than 15 cm in length. These techniques can also produce loads for use as an alternative to ordinary waveguide loads in small and medium RF accelerators, in radar systems, and in other microwave applications. The design is easily scalable to other RF frequencies and adaptable to the use of other lossy materials.

  16. Electrical characterization of rf plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.A.

    1991-08-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) electrical sources are commonly used to generate plasmas for processing of industrial materials and for related experimental work. Published descriptions of such plasmas usually include generator-power measurements, and occasionally include plasma dc-bias measurements. One or both of these quantitites are also used in industrial feedback ccontrol systems for setpoint regulation. Recent work at Sandia an elsewhere with an experimental rf discharge device (the GEC RF Reference Cell'') has shown that power and dc-bias levels are often insufficient information for specifying the state of the plasma. The plasma can have nonlinear electrical characteristics that cause harmonic generation, and the harmonic levels can depend sensitively on the impedance of the external circuitry at harmonic frequencies. Even though the harmonics may be low in amplitude, they can be directly related to large changes in plasma power and to changes in optical emission from the plasma. Consequently, in order for a worker to truly master the plasma-generation process, it is necessary to understand, measure, and control electrical characteristics of the plamsa. In this paper we describe technique that have been developed from work with the Reference Cell for making electrical measurements on rf plasmas, and we describe surprising observations of harmonic behavior. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Destabilization of Ag nanoislands on Ag(100) by adsorbed sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Mingmin; Russell, Selena M.; Liu, Da-Jiang; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2011-10-17

    Sulfur accelerates coarsening of Ag nanoislands on Ag(100) at 300 K, and this effect is enhanced with increasing sulfur coverage over a range spanning a few hundredths of a monolayer, to nearly 0.25 monolayers. We propose that acceleration of coarsening in this system is tied to the formation of AgS{sub 2} clusters primarily at step edges. These clusters can transport Ag more efficiently than can Ag adatoms (due to a lower diffusion barrier and comparable formation energy). The mobility of isolated sulfur on Ag(100) is very low so that formation of the complex is kinetically limited at low sulfur coverages, and thus enhancement is minimal. However, higher sulfur coverages force the population of sites adjacent to step edges, so that formation of the cluster is no longer limited by diffusion of sulfur across terraces. Sulfur exerts a much weaker effect on the rate of coarsening on Ag(100) than it does on Ag(111). This is consistent with theory, which shows that the difference between the total energy barrier for coarsening with and without sulfur is also much smaller on Ag(100) than on Ag(111).

  18. AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrids with highly efficient visible-light driven photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumata, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Masanao; Suzuki, Tohru; Kaneco, Satoshi

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrid was prepared via an in situ anion-exchange method. • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} displays the excellent photocatalytic activity under visible light. • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} readily transforms to be Ag@AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} system. • h{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup ·−} play the major role in the AO 7 decolorization over AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. • The activity enhancement is ascribed to a Z-scheme system composed of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, Ag and AgI. - Abstract: Highly efficient visible-light-driven AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrid photocatalysts with different mole ratios of AgI were prepared via an in situ anion-exchange method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) technique. Under visible light irradiation (>420 nm), the AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} photocatalysts displayed the higher photocatalytic activity than pure Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and AgI for the decolorization of acid orange 7 (AO 7). Among the hybrid photocatalysts, AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with 80% of AgI exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity for the decolorization of AO 7. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} readily transformed to be Ag@AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} system while the photocatalytic activity of AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} remained after 5 recycling runs. In addition, the quenching effects of different scavengers displayed that the reactive h{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup ·−} play the major role in the AO 7 decolorization. The photocatalytic activity enhancement of AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrids can be ascribed to the efficient separation of electron–hole pairs through a Z-scheme system composed of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, Ag and AgI, in which Ag nanoparticles act as the charge separation center.

  19. Spherical LDH-Ag°-montmorillonite heterocoagulated system with a pH-dependent sol-gel structure for controlled accessibility of AgNPs immobilized on the clay lamellae.

    PubMed

    Deák, Ágota; Janovák, László; Tallósy, Szabolcs Péter; Bitó, Tamás; Sebők, Dániel; Buzás, Norbert; Pálinkó, István; Dékány, Imre

    2015-02-17

    Aqueous suspensions of spherical ZnMgAl-layered double hydroxides [LDH(sph)] and antibacterial silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) deposited on the lamellae of montmorillonite were used for the synthesis of composites, which behave like coherent gels at low pH (≲4.5) and incoherent sols at higher pH (≳4.5). The composition of the composite was chosen as LDH(sph)/Ag°-montm. = 25:75 wt % in order to ensure a sol-gel transition that can also be characterized by viscometry. This pH-sensitive heterocoagulated system consisting of oppositely charged colloid particles was suitable for the release of antimicrobial AgNPs immobilized on the clay lamellae via a pH-controlled gel-sol transition. The heterocoagulation process was also characterized by surface charge titration measurements. Spherical LDH/Ag°-montmorillonite composite samples were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The morphological properties of the composites were studied, and the presence of the heterocoagulated structure was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The nanoscale structure of the LDH(sph)-Ag°-montmorillonite composite obtained was also verified by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and the rheological characteristics were studied at various pH values. The viscosity and yield value of the composite decreased by an order of magnitude upon increasing the pH from 3.0 to 5.5. The sol-gel transition of the composite suspension was reversible in the previously mentioned pH range. PMID:25619227

  20. Matching network for RF plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Pickard, Daniel S.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2007-11-20

    A compact matching network couples an RF power supply to an RF antenna in a plasma generator. The simple and compact impedance matching network matches the plasma load to the impedance of a coaxial transmission line and the output impedance of an RF amplifier at radio frequencies. The matching network is formed of a resonantly tuned circuit formed of a variable capacitor and an inductor in a series resonance configuration, and a ferrite core transformer coupled to the resonantly tuned circuit. This matching network is compact enough to fit in existing compact focused ion beam systems.

  1. rf coupler technology for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Radio frequency (rf) oscillations at critical frequencies have successfully provided a means to convey power to fusion plasmas due to the electrical-magnetic properties of the plasma. While large rf systems to couple power to the plasma have been designed, built, and tested, the main link to the plasma, the coupler, is still in an evolutionary stage of development. Design and fabrication of optimal antennas for fusion applications are complicated by incomplete characterizations of the harsh plasma environment and of coupling mechanisms. A brief description of rf coupler technology required for plasma conditions is presented along with an assessment of the status and goals of coupler development.

  2. High power solid state rf amplifier for proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Akhilesh; Sharma, Deepak Kumar; Gupta, Alok Kumar; Hannurkar, P. R.

    2008-01-15

    A 1.5 kW solid state rf amplifier at 352 MHz has been developed and tested at RRCAT. This rf source for cw operation will be used as a part of rf system of 100 MeV proton linear accelerator. A rf power of 1.5 kW has been achieved by combining output power from eight 220 W rf amplifier modules. Amplifier modules, eight-way power combiner and divider, and directional coupler were designed indigenously for this development. High efficiency, ease of fabrication, and low cost are the main features of this design.

  3. TiInZnO/Ag/TiInZnO multilayer films for transparent conducting electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho-Hyeong; Kim, Eun-Mi; Lee, Kyung-Ju; Park, Jae-Young; Lee, Yu-Ri; Shin, Dong-Chan; Hwang, Tae-Jin; Heo, Gi-Seok

    2014-03-01

    Ti-In-Zn-O (TIZO) and TIZO/Ag/TIZO multilayer transparent films were prepared at room temperature on glass substrates using an RF/DC magnetron sputtering system. The optical and electrical properties of the multilayer structures were examined according to the thickness of each TIZO/Ag/TIZO layer. A transparent and conductive film with a sheet resistance of 11.1 Ω/□ and a transmittance of 86.9% at 550 nm (94.2%, normalized to the glass substrate) was obtained at a TIZO/Ag/TIZO thickness of 100/8/42 nm. The TIZO and TIZO/Ag/TIZO multilayer films exhibited higher mechanical resistances against an increasing load of external scratches than the indium tin oxide (ITO) film. Overall, the properties of the TIZO/Ag/TIZO multilayer films were comparable or superior to those of the ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer. The deposited TIZO/Ag/TIZO multilayer films were used in the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) as the transparent electrode. The TIZO/Ag/TIZO multilayer-based DSSCs exhibited a short circuit photocurrent density of 9.4 mA/cm2, a photocurrent of 613 mV, and an overall cell efficiency of 3.1% at a light intensity of one sun.

  4. Colliding Winds in Symbiotic Binary Systems. II. Colliding Winds Geometries and Orbital Motion in the Symbiotic Nova AG Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, H. T.; Taylor, A. R.

    2007-06-01

    AG Pegasi has been observed at high angular resolution and sensitivity at the Very Large Array (VLA) at 5 GHz in four epochs between 1984 and 1991. Analysis of the radio visibilities indicate that a mass of 4.0+/-0.5×10-5 Msolar is concentrated in the inner nebula and is moving outward at a velocity of 53+/-4 km s-1 (D=600 pc assumed). In order to explain the observed morphology of the inner nebula, a new colliding winds model is derived, which includes the effects of orbital motion (CWo model). Orbital effects cannot be ignored in AG Pegasi since the orbital timescale (2.25 yr; Meinunger 1981) is short compared to the likely timescale of wind collision (symbiotic nova eruption beginning ~1850 Merrill 1959). When these effects are considered, the interaction front between binary stellar winds is wrapped into spiral walls whose density decreases outward with 1/r2. Distinctive geometries are found to arise depending on which wind dominates the interaction, the late-type wind from the symbiotic ``cool component,'' or the high-velocity wind from the ``hot component.'' Application of the CWo model to AG Peg suggests that the observed transient lobe enhancements of the inner nebula arise due to changes in the mass-loss rate from the hot component. Hot component mass-loss rates ranging between 2.1 and 6.0×10-8 Msolar yr-1 are derived. The model is also successful in reproducing the radio spectrum of the central unresolved object of the system. A position angle of -15deg+/-10deg is inferred for the orbital pole as projected on the plane of the sky.

  5. CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M.; Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E.; Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U.; Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.; Pereira, P. L.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

  6. Transparent SiON/Ag/SiON multilayer passivation grown on a flexible polyethersulfone substrate using a continuous roll-to-roll sputtering system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of a silicon oxynitride/silver/silicon oxynitride [SiON/Ag/SiON] multilayer passivation grown using a specially designed roll-to-roll [R2R] sputtering system on a flexible polyethersulfone substrate. Optical, structural, and surface properties of the R2R grown SiON/Ag/SiON multilayer were investigated as a function of the SiON thickness at a constant Ag thickness of 12 nm. The flexible SiON/Ag/SiON multilayer has a high optical transmittance of 87.7% at optimized conditions due to the antireflection and surface plasmon effects in the oxide-metal-oxide structure. The water vapor transmission rate of the SiON/Ag/SiON multilayer is 0.031 g/m2 day at an optimized SiON thickness of 110 nm. This indicates that R2R grown SiON/Ag/SiON is a promising thin-film passivation for flexible organic light-emitting diodes and flexible organic photovoltaics due to its simple and low-temperature process. PMID:22221400

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGH-TEMPERATURE CERAMIC BRAZE: ANALYSIS OF PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN THE Pd-Ag-CuOx SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Darsell, Jens T.

    2006-01-18

    This paper describes the effects of small palladium additions on the phase equilibria in the Ag-CuOx system. Below a concentration of 5 mol%, palladium was found to increase the temperature of the eutectic reaction present in the pseudobinary system, but have little effect on a higher temperature monotectic reaction. However once enough palladium was added to increase the pseudoternary solidus temperature to that of the lower boundary for this three-phase field (~970°C), the lower boundary begins to increase in temperature as well. The addition of palladium also causes the original eutectic point to move to lower silver concentrations, which also causes a convergence of the two new three-phase fields, CuOx + L1 + L2 and CuOx + α + L1. This suggests that with higher palladium concentrations, a peritectic reaction, α + L1 + L2 → CuOx, may eventually be observed in the system.

  8. RF beam transmission of x-band PAA system utilizing large-area, polymer-based true-time-delay module developed using imprinting and inkjet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zeyu; Subbaraman, Harish; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiaochu; Xu, Xiaochuan; Chen, Xiangning; Zhang, Xingyu; Zou, Yi; Panday, Ashwin; Guo, L. Jay; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-02-01

    Phased-array antenna (PAA) technology plays a significant role in modern day radar and communication networks. Truetime- delay (TTD) enabled beam steering networks provide several advantages over their electronic counterparts, including squint-free beam steering, low RF loss, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), and large bandwidth control of PAAs. Chip-scale and integrated TTD modules promise a miniaturized, light-weight system; however, the modules are still rigid and they require complex packaging solutions. Moreover, the total achievable time delay is still restricted by the wafer size. In this work, we propose a light-weight and large-area, true-time-delay beamforming network that can be fabricated on light-weight and flexible/rigid surfaces utilizing low-cost "printing" techniques. In order to prove the feasibility of the approach, a 2-bit thermo-optic polymer TTD network is developed using a combination of imprinting and ink-jet printing. RF beam steering of a 1×4 X-band PAA up to 60° is demonstrated. The development of such active components on large area, light-weight, and low-cost substrates promises significant improvement in size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements over the state-of-the-art.

  9. Si-based RF MEMS components.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, James E.; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Baker, Michael Sean; Fleming, James Grant; Stewart, Harold D.; Dyck, Christopher William

    2005-01-01

    Radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMS) are an enabling technology for next-generation communications and radar systems in both military and commercial sectors. RF MEMS-based reconfigurable circuits outperform solid-state circuits in terms of insertion loss, linearity, and static power consumption and are advantageous in applications where high signal power and nanosecond switching speeds are not required. We have demonstrated a number of RF MEMS switches on high-resistivity silicon (high-R Si) that were fabricated by leveraging the volume manufacturing processes available in the Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL), a Class-1, radiation-hardened CMOS manufacturing facility. We describe novel tungsten and aluminum-based processes, and present results of switches developed in each of these processes. Series and shunt ohmic switches and shunt capacitive switches were successfully demonstrated. The implications of fabricating on high-R Si and suggested future directions for developing low-loss RF MEMS-based circuits are also discussed.

  10. Technology, science, and environtmental impact of a novel Cu-Ag core-shell solderless interconnect system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, Milea Joy

    processing of the final flux/particle paste combination was optimized at a commercial test facility for printing on test boards containing a wide variety of pad shapes, sizes, and pitches and thus, validated the ability of the Cu-Ag core-shell paste to be a drop-in replacement for traditional solder paste using conventional manufacturing techniques. The second study addresses the fundamental mechanisms behind interconnect formation. An assessment of the kinetics and microstructure evolution during silver thin film dewetting and defect formation provides essential materials science knowledge to understand and control the functionality of the Cu-Ag core-shell system. From an interrupted annealing study used to quantify dewetting kinetics, a range of surface diffusion coefficients were calculated from the experimental results, assuming that surface diffusion controlled dewetting. The two order of magnitude range in calculated diffusion coefficient demonstrates that the diffusion-limited kinetic models traditionally used to quantify hillock and hole growth kinetics during thin film relaxation and dewetting do not apply to the dewetting of Ag films. The presence of interface-limited kinetics was then validated through the non-uniform growth of individual hillocks over time. Lastly, an environmental assessment compares the impacts associated with the manufacturing and materials for the Cu-Ag core-shell particle system and SAC 305, the most commonly used lead-free solder alloy that contains 96.5% tin, 3% silver, and 0.5% copper. By comparing the impacts on global warming, acidification, eutrophication, ozone depletion, ecotoxicity, smog, carcinogenics, non-carcinogenics, and respiratory effects associated with each technology, the environmental advantages and disadvantages of each system are clearly communicated. By utilizing this information and the versatility of the core-shell system, possible methods for reducing impacts of the Cu-Ag core-shell system are addressed in order to

  11. Fast beam stacking using rf barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Capista, D.; Griffin, J.; Ng, K.-Y.; Wildman, D.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Two barrier RF systems were fabricated, tested and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. Each can provide 8 kV rectangular pulses (the RF barriers) at 90 kHz. When a stationary barrier is combined with a moving barrier, injected beams from the Booster can be continuously deflected, folded and stacked in the Main Injector, which leads to doubling of the beam intensity. This paper gives a report on the beam experiment using this novel technology.

  12. A no-load RF calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    The described device can be used to measure the output of any dc powered RF source. No dummy load is required for the measurements. The device is, therefore, called the 'no-load calorimeter' (NLC). The NLC measures the power actually fed to the antenna or another useful load. It is believed that the NLC can compete successfully with directional coupler type systems in measuring the output of high-power RF sources.

  13. Rf power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-05-01

    This paper covers RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach has been with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. This paper is confined to electron-positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  14. Microbunching and RF Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  15. Hydrogen FBG sensor using Pd/Ag film with application in propulsion system fuel tank model of aerospace vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Said; Hassine, Lotfi; Elfahem, Wassim

    2014-09-01

    The high efficiency hydrogen fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor is presented. The sensitive film was a new alliance of palladium-silver (Pd-Ag). In addition, the titanium (Ti) layer was used as the adhesive layer. The presented sensor showed the resolution of more than 60 pm/1% H2, and a fast response time of 4 s-5 s was guaranteed in the 0.1% H2-4% H2 range. Moreover, the life time of the sensor was investigated. The obtained results showed that the sensor had an enhanced life time. Furthermore, the sensor was applied in the propulsion system fuel tank model of the aerospace vehicle. The obtained results indicated that it is a prevention system against the disaster aerospace due to hydrogen leakage.

  16. Design, construction, system integration, and test results of the 1 MW CW RF system for the e-gun cavity in the energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lenci,S.J.; Eisen, E. L.; Dickey, D. L.; Sainz, J. E.; Utay, P. F.; Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2009-05-04

    Brookhaven's ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) requires a 1 MW CW RF system for the superconducting electron gun cavity. The system consists primarily of a klystron tube, transmitter, and High-Voltage Power Supply (HVPS). The 703.75 MHz klystron made by CPl, Inc. provides RF power of 1MW CW with efficiency of 65%. It has a single output window, diode-type electron gun, and collector capable of dissipating the entire beam power. It was fully factory tested including 24-hour heat run at 1.1 MW CWo The solid state HVPS designed by Continental Electronics provides up to 100 kV at low ripple and 2.1 MW CW with over 95% efficiency. With minimal stored energy and a fast shut-down mode no crowbar circuit is needed. Continental 's transmitter includes PLC based user interface and monitoring, RF pre-amplifier, magnet and Vac-Ion pump supplies, cooling water instrumentation, and integral safety interlock system. BNL installed the klystron, HVPS, and transmitter along with other items, such as circulator, water load, and waveguide components. The collaboration of BNL, CPI, and Continental in the design, installation, and testing was essential to the successful operation of the 1MW system.

  17. Pulsed power supply system for the fast quadrupoles in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocky, R.J.; Lambiase, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    In the acceleration of polarized protons in the AGS, a number of depolarizing resonances will be encountered. Depolarization due to the so-called intrinsic resonances will be minimized by crossing each resonance in less than one beam revolution period (approx. 2 ..mu..s). This will be accomplished with a set of twelve fast tune-shifting quadrupoles distributed symmetrically around the ring. During a typical acceleration cycle, the fast quads will be energized with a burst of alternating polarity, fast rise/slow fall triangular current pulses. The amplitude of these pulses will vary from 160 A to about 2700 A peak. This paper describes the development of the pulsed power supply for the fast quads, the construction of a prototype modulator, and some of the initial test results obtained with the prototype.

  18. Stable High-Brightness Electron Beam System with a Photocathode RF Gun for Short Pulse X-Ray Generation by Thomson Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Fumio; Yang, Jinfeng; Yorozu, Masafumi; Okada, Yasuhiro; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Endo, Akira

    2002-03-01

    A high-brightness electron accelerator system with a photocathode RF gun and an all-solid stable laser for the photocathode was installed, and a commissioning test was performed to generate short-pulse X-ray beams by the Thomson scattering method. Electron energy was boosted by a linear accelerator (linac) up to 14 MeV. Energy dispersion of the electron beams was measured to be 0.7% (rms). The normalized emittance of the electron beam was 4 πmm-mrad with a 0.4 nC bunch charge. The electron beam size at the interaction point, where the electron beams and high peak power laser light interacted, was measured to be 100 μm (rms). Good stability in the spatial and temporal domains was also obtained.

  19. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1995-05-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0--1.5 TeV, 5 TeV and 25 TeV. In order keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0--1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150--200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30--40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-11 system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternately, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0--1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  20. Fabrication of porous silicon nanowires by MACE method in HF/H2O2/AgNO3 system at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoyuan; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Xiuhua; Xiao, Yongyin; Ma, Mingyu; Zhu, Wenjie; Wei, Feng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the moderately and lightly doped porous silicon nanowires (PSiNWs) were fabricated by the 'one-pot procedure' metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) method in the HF/H2O2/AgNO3 system at room temperature. The effects of H2O2 concentration on the nanostructure of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were investigated. The experimental results indicate that porous structure can be introduced by the addition of H2O2 and the pore structure could be controlled by adjusting the concentration of H2O2. The H2O2 species replaces Ag(+) as the oxidant and the Ag nanoparticles work as catalyst during the etching. And the concentration of H2O2 influences the nucleation and motility of Ag particles, which leads to formation of different porous structure within the nanowires. A mechanism based on the lateral etching which is catalyzed by Ag particles under the motivation by H2O2 reduction is proposed to explain the PSiNWs formation. PMID:24910568

  1. Fabrication of porous silicon nanowires by MACE method in HF/H2O2/AgNO3 system at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the moderately and lightly doped porous silicon nanowires (PSiNWs) were fabricated by the ‘one-pot procedure’ metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) method in the HF/H2O2/AgNO3 system at room temperature. The effects of H2O2 concentration on the nanostructure of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were investigated. The experimental results indicate that porous structure can be introduced by the addition of H2O2 and the pore structure could be controlled by adjusting the concentration of H2O2. The H2O2 species replaces Ag+ as the oxidant and the Ag nanoparticles work as catalyst during the etching. And the concentration of H2O2 influences the nucleation and motility of Ag particles, which leads to formation of different porous structure within the nanowires. A mechanism based on the lateral etching which is catalyzed by Ag particles under the motivation by H2O2 reduction is proposed to explain the PSiNWs formation. PMID:24910568

  2. RF Sheath Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2007-11-01

    RF sheath formation on the antennas and walls in ICRF-heated experiments can reduce the heating efficiency, limit the coupled power, and cause damage to plasma-facing structures. The sheaths are driven by a slow wave component of the rf field due to a mismatch between the magnetic field and the boundary (antenna or wall). Quantitative modeling of the highly nonlinear sheaths may now be feasible for the first time in massively-parallel-processing (MPP) codes developed in the RF SciDAC project. Recently, a new approach to sheath modeling was proposed,ootnotetextD.A. D'Ippolito and J.R. Myra, Phys. Plasmas 13, 102508 (2006). in which the sheath physics is incorporated into the RF wave computation by using a modified boundary condition (BC) on the RF fields in both wave propagation and antenna codes. Here, we illustrate the use of the sheath BC for near-field sheaths by a model calculation that includes electromagnetic effects and a simple antenna coupling model. Properties of the model (such as the role of sheath-plasma waves) and implications for antenna codes such as TOPICAootnotetextV. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion 46, S476 (2006). will be discussed.

  3. Attitude Ground System (AGS) for the Magnetospheric Multi-Scale (MMS) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, Juan C.; Sedlak, Joseph E.; Vint, Babak

    2015-01-01

    MMS Overview Recall from Conrads presentation earlier today MMS launch: March 13, 2015 on an Atlas V from Space Launch Complex 40, Cape Canaveral, Florida MMS Observatory Separation: five minute intervals spinning at 3 rpm approximately 1.5 hours after launch MMS Science Goals: study magnetospheric plasma physics and understand the processes that cause power grids, communication disruptions and Aurora formation Mission: 4 identical spacecraft in tetrahedral formation with variable size1.2 x 12 RE in Phase 1, with apogee on dayside to observe bow shock1.2 x 25 RE in Phase 2, with apogee on night side to observe magneto tail Challenges Tight attitude control box, orbit and formation maintenance requirements Maneuvers on thrusters every two weeks Delta-H Spin axis direction and spin rate maintenance Delta-V Orbit and Formation maintenance Mission phase transitions AGS support Smart targeting prediction of Spin-Axis attitude in the presence of environmental torques to stay within the science attitude Determination of the spacecraft attitude and spin rate (sensitive to knowledge of inertia tensor)Calibrations to improve attitude determination results and improve orbit maneuvers Mass properties (Center of Mass, and inertia tensor for nutation and coning) Accelerometer bias (sensitive to the accuracy of the rate estimates) Sensor alignments.

  4. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of a Ag/oligo(phenyleneethynylene)/Ag sandwich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Melissa; Alexson, D. M.; Prokes, Sharka; Glembocki, Orest; Vivoni, Alberto; Hosten, Charles

    2011-02-01

    α,ω-Dithiols are a useful class of compounds in molecular electronics because of their ability to easily adsorb to two metal surfaces, producing a molecular junction. We have prepared Ag nanosphere/oligo(phenyleneethynylene)/Ag sol (AgNS/OPE/Ag sol) and Ag nanowire/oligo(phenyleneethynylene)/Ag sol (AgNW/OPE/Ag sol) sandwiches to simulate the architecture of a molecular electronic device. This was achieved by self-assembly of OPE on the silver nanosurface, deprotection of the terminal sulfur, and deposition of Ag sol atop the monolayer. These sandwiches were then characterized by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. The resulting spectra were compared to the bulk spectrum of the dimer and to the Ag nanosurface/OPE SERS spectra. The intensities of the SERS spectra in both systems exhibit a strong dependence on Ag deposition time and the results are also suggestive of intense interparticle coupling of the electromagnetic fields in both the AgNW/OPE/Ag and the AgNS/OPE/Ag systems. Three previously unobserved bands (1219, 1234, 2037 cm -1) arose in the SER spectra of the sandwiches and their presence is attributed to the strong enhancement of the electromagnetic field which is predicted from the COSMOL computational package. The 544 cm -1 disulfide bond which is observed in the spectrum of solid OPE but is absent in the AgNS/OPE/Ag and AgNW/OPE/Ag spectra is indicative of chemisorption of OPE to the nanoparticles through oxidative dissociation of the disulfide bond.

  5. Schottky or Ohmic metal-semiconductor contact: influence on photocatalytic efficiency of Ag/ZnO and Pt/ZnO model systems.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fengpo; Wang, Yonghao; Zhang, Jiye; Lin, Zhang; Zheng, Jinsheng; Huang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the contact type in metal-semiconductor junctions and their photocatalytic efficiencies is investigated. Two metal-semiconductor junctions, silver on zinc oxide (Ag/ZnO) and platinum on zinc oxide (Pt/ZnO) serve as model system for Ohmic and Schottky metal-semiconductor contact, respectively. Ag/ZnO, with Ohmic contact, exhibits a higher photocatalytic efficiency than Pt/ZnO, with Schottky contact. The direction of electric fields within the semiconductor is found to play a crucial role in the separation of photogenerated charges, and thus strongly influences the photocatalytic efficiency. PMID:24458735

  6. AGS II

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Interest in rare K decays, neutrino oscillations and other fields have generated an increasing demand for running, and improved intensity and duty cycle, at the AGS. Current projects include acceleration of polarized protons and light ions (up to mass 32). Future plans are for a booster to increase intensity and allow heavy ions (up to mass 200), and a stretcher to give 100% duty cycle. A later upgrade could yield an average current of 32 ..mu.. amps. 6 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Determination of standard thermodynamic properties of daubreelite (FeCr2S4) in the system Ag-Cr-Fe-S by the solid state galvanic cells method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osadchii, Evgeniy; Voronin, Mikhail; Osadchii, Valentin

    2014-05-01

    Daubreelite is a common mineral in enstatite chondrites, but its thermodynamic properties have not been studied. This greatly complicates the study of the physico - chemical parameters of enstatite chondrites formation in their parent bodies. Analysis of the quaternary system Ag-Cr-Fe-S showed that at temperatures below 423 K can be stable phase association Ag2S + Cr2S3 + FeS2 + FeCr2S4, potential silver which can be defined in a completely solid state galvanic cell: (-) Pt | Ag | RbAg4I5 | Ag2S, Cr2S3, FeS2, FeCr2S4 | Pt (+), with a RbAg4I5 as a solid electrolyte with a specific conductivity of Ag+ ion. The overall potential forming process in the cell corresponds to a chemical reaction: 2Ag + Cr2S3 + FeS2 = Ag2S + FeCr2S4 Gibbs energy of this reaction is associated with the electromotive force of galvanic cells by fundamental equation of thermodynamics ΔrG =-nFE, where n = 2 - the number of electrons in the electrochemical process, F = 96485 C•mol-1 - Faraday constant, and E-electromotive force (emf) of galvanic cell in volts. Temperature dependence of the emf was determined in an electrochemical cell, a device which is described in detail in the works Osadchii and Chareev (2006), and Osadchii and Echmaeva (2007). The results were approximated by a linear dependence of E(T), which corresponds to the condition ΔrCp constant and equal to zero: E(mV)=76.32+0.2296•T, 339

  8. RF Gun Optimization Study

    SciTech Connect

    A. S. Hofler; P. Evtushenko; M. Krasilnikov

    2007-08-01

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. RF and SRF gun design is further complicated because the bunches are space charge dominated and require additional emittance compensation. A genetic algorithm has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs for Cornell* and Jefferson Lab**, and we propose studying how the genetic algorithm techniques can be applied to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize gun designs that have been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation.

  9. FLASH Beam-Off RF Measurements and Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Shilun; Adolphsen, Chris; Carwardine, John; /Argonne

    2009-03-31

    The FLASH L-band (1.3 GHz) superconducting accelerator facility at DESY has a Low Level RF (LLRF) system that is similar to that envisioned for ILC. This system has extensive monitoring capability and was used to gather performance data relevant to ILC. In particular, waveform data were recorded with beam off for three, 8-cavity cryomodules to evaluate the input rf stability, perturbations to the SC cavity frequencies and the rf overhead required to achieve constant gradient during the 800-s pulses. In this paper, we discuss the measurements and data analysis procedures and present key findings on the pulse-to-pulse input rf and cavity field stability.

  10. Rf2a and rf2b transcription factors

    DOEpatents

    Beachy, Roger N.; Petruccelli, Silvana; Dai, Shunhong

    2007-10-02

    A method of activating the rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) promoter in vivo is disclosed. The RTBV promoter is activated by exposure to at least one protein selected from the group consisting of Rf2a and Rf2b.

  11. RF interference at ground stations located in populated areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, N.; Bitman, J.; Copeland, D.; Srinivasan, D.; Garcia, A.

    Ground stations located in populated areas must contend with RF interference (RFI). While RF interference may disrupt occasional satellite contacts, disruption statistics in many cases are manageable. Thus the RF environment must be statistically characterized in order to predict availability and detect changes in the environment. An RF monitoring and recording system is essential to both characterize the RF environment and send alarms when interference appears. This paper presents a study of RF interference at the Satellite Communications Facility (SCF) located at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, and describes the impact of RF interference on the NASA Van Allen Probes mission. The area surrounding the SCF, located in Laurel, Maryland, was rural farmland when the SCF was commissioned in 1963. Since then the area has experienced tremendous commercial and residential development. Concurrent with this development RF activity has increased. In particular, increased RF interference is evident within the Van Allen Probes' S-band downlink allocation. The interference is due to other licensed parties, out-of-band commercial emissions, as well as natural phenomena. Some RFI sources have been identified, whereas others remain unknown. In this paper we describe the RF environment, and present a statistical characterization that shows that RFI has only a small impact on ground station availability. We also discuss operational considerations, including hand-shaking protocols and coordination with spectrum management.

  12. Direct Visualization of Surface Phase of Oxygen Molecules Physisorbed on the Ag(111) Surface: A Two-dimensional Quantum Spin System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shunji; Yoshida, Yasuo; Imada, Hiroshi; Kim, Yousoo; Hasegawa, Yukio

    Oxygen molecule (O2) is one of the smallest molecular magnets with an S = 1 quantum spin. This makes O2 attractive as a building block of low-dimensional (LD) quantum spin systems. Recently, the existence of a spin in physisorbed O2 on Ag(111) was confirmed by the ortho-para conversion of molecular hydrogen. Therefore, there is a strong need for STM-based techniques with single-molecule resolution in order to verify the potential of the O2/Ag(111) for LD quantum spin systems. Here we report the real-space observation of oxygen molecules physisorbed on an Ag(111) surface by using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. A well-ordered O2 structure was observed, and the lattice was distorted from an isosceles triangular lattice. The distortion can be explained by the competition between the magnetic and elastic instabilities of the O2 lattice. In differential tunneling conductance spectra, we found no feature of the Kondo resonance at 4.7 K; in contrast, the physisorbed O2 on Ag(110) showed a clear Kondo resonance at 18 K. Based on these observations, we discuss the realization of an S = 1 two-dimensional antiferromagnetic quantum spin system.

  13. Strongly visible-light responsive plasmonic shaped AgX:Ag (X = Cl, Br) nanoparticles for reduction of CO2 to methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Changhua; Wang, Jizhuang; Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Meiyu; Ming, Xijuan; Wang, Shutao; Zhang, Qinhui

    2012-08-01

    into useful organic compounds. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Schematic diagram of a home-made photocatalytic reduction system. UV-vis absorption spectra and band gap calculation of AgCl and AgBr nanoparticles. Water oxidation using AgCl:Ag as catalyst, and XRD patterns of AgCl:Ag and AgBr:Ag after three repeated reactions of reduction of CO2. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31213a

  14. The RF Design of an HOM Polarized RF Gun for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Clendenin, J.E.; Colby, E.R.; Miller, R.A.; Lewellen, J.W.; /Argonne

    2006-11-15

    The ILC requires a polarized electron beam. While a highly polarized beam can be produced by a GaAs-type cathode in a DC gun of the type currently in use at SLAC, JLAB and elsewhere, the ILC injector system can be simplified and made more efficient if a GaAs-type cathode can be combined with a low emittance RF gun. Since this type of cathode is known to be extremely sensitive to vacuum contamination including back bombardment by electrons and ions, any successful polarized RF gun must have a significantly improved operating vacuum compared to existing RF guns. We present a new RF design for an L-Band normal conducting (NC) RF gun for the ILC polarized electron source. This design incorporates a higher order mode (HOM) structure, whose chief virtue in this application is an improved conductance for vacuum pumping on the cathode. Computer simulation models have been used to optimize the RF parameters with two principal goals: first to minimize the required RF power; second to reduce the peak surface field relative to the field at the cathode in order to suppress field emitted electron bombardment. The beam properties have been simulated initially using PARMELA. Vacuum and other practical issues for implementing this design are discussed.

  15. RF cavity using liquid dielectric for tuning and cooling

    DOEpatents

    Popovic, Milorad; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2012-04-17

    A system for accelerating particles includes an RF cavity that contains a ferrite core and a liquid dielectric. Characteristics of the ferrite core and the liquid dielectric, among other factors, determine the resonant frequency of the RF cavity. The liquid dielectric is circulated to cool the ferrite core during the operation of the system.

  16. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  17. High pulse power rf sources for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1983-09-01

    RF sources with high peak power output and relatively short pulse lengths will be required for future high gradient e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear colliders. The required peak power and pulse length depend on the operating frequency, energy gradient and geometry of the collider linac structure. The frequency and gradient are in turn constrained by various parameters which depend on the beam-beam collision dynamics, and on the total ac wall-plug power that has been committed to the linac rf system. Various rf sources which might meet these requirements are reviewed. Existing source types (e.g., klystrons, gyrotrons) and sources which show future promise based on experimental prototypes are first considered. Finally, several proposals for high peak power rf sources based on unconventional concepts are discussed. These are an FEL source (two beam accelerator), rf energy storage cavities with switching, and a photocathode device which produces an rf current by direct emission modulation of the cathode.

  18. An Inexpensive and Programmable RF Transmitter Setup for Two-coil CASL

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qin; Glielmi, Christopher; Zhou, Lei; Choi, Kisueng; Hu, Xiaoping

    2009-01-01

    An inexpensive and programmable RF transmitter for two-coil continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) system is presented in this paper. While previous implementations of two-coil CASL require the expensive MR RF instruments, the present design utilizes a low-cost system on chip direct digital synthesizer and a mini-size communication RF power amplifier to generate the labeling RF waveform without sacrificing RF performance. Compared with a single RF channel two-coil CASL approach, this design requires minimal scanner hardware modifications. Moreover, this design offers a programmable interface for easy sequence setup and debugging. Performance and ease of use are validated experimentally. PMID:19830266

  19. TiO2 nanotube composite layers as delivery system for ZnO and Ag nanoparticles - an unexpected overdose effect decreasing their antibacterial efficacy.

    PubMed

    Roguska, A; Belcarz, A; Pisarek, M; Ginalska, G; Lewandowska, M

    2015-06-01

    Enhancement of biocompatibility and antibacterial properties of implant materials is potentially beneficial for their practical value. Therefore, the use of metallic and metallic oxide nanoparticles as antimicrobial coatings components which induce minimized antibacterial resistance receives currently particular attention. In this work, TiO2 nanotubes layers loaded with ZnO and Ag nanoparticles were designed for biomedical coatings and delivery systems and evaluated for antimicrobial activity. TiO2 nanotubes themselves exhibited considerable and diameter-dependent antibacterial activity against planktonic Staphylococcus epidermidis cells but favored bacterial adhesion. Loading of nanotubes with moderate amount of ZnO nanoparticles significantly diminished S. epidermidis cell adhesion and viability just after 1.5h contact with modified surfaces. However, an increase of loaded ZnO amount unexpectedly altered the structure of nanoparticle-nanolayer, caused partial closure of nanotube interior and significantly reduced ZnO solubility and antibacterial efficacy. Co-deposition of Ag nanoparticles enhanced the antibacterial properties of synthesized coatings. However, the increase of ZnO quantity on Ag nanoparticles co-deposited surfaces favored the adhesion of bacterial cells. Thus, ZnO/Ag/TiO2 nanotube composite layers may be promising delivery systems for combating post-operative infections in hard tissue replacement procedures. However, the amount of loaded antibacterial agents must be carefully balanced to avoid the overdose and reduced efficacy. PMID:25842121

  20. Photocathodes for RF photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelato, P.

    1997-02-01

    Over the past ten years photocathodes have been extensively used as high-brightness electron sources in RF guns. In this paper, I present a general review of the alkali-based high quantum efficiency (QE) photoemitters (e.g. Cs 3Sb, K 2CsSb and Cs 2Te), together with a comparative analysis of the different preparation procedures and the results obtained, both in the preparation chambers and in RF guns. The need to increase the photocathode reliability has provided the impetus to get an R&D activity to go over the alchemy of photocathode preparation procedure. In this paper, I will discuss the results so far obtained in different laboratories, both by using traditional investigation strategy (e.g. QE and RF behavior) and by means of surface science techniques as Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Alkali antimonides have been used at first in the RF gun due to the high QE response to the green light of the Nd:YLF second-harmonic radiation. Measurements have confirmed the high reactivity of the alkali antimonide photocathodes to the residual gases: this fact makes their use in RF guns not practical, mainly for short lifetimes. Further investigations have shown that the choice of the substratum preparation procedure and chemical composition plays a fundamental role in the photocathode performance, both from the point of view of the QE and the operative lifetime and ruggedness to gas exposition. Cesium telluride (Cs 2Te) prepared on a molybdenum substratum seems to be, nowadays, the best compromise, in terms of preparation procedure reliability and ruggedness, that now the characteristics and drawbacks of this material are well understood (e.g. the need of an UV laser source). Future possible developments will be discussed. In particular, the measurement and the control of the thermal emittance and the time response could be an important task.

  1. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF HIGH POWER RF VECTOR MODULATORS*

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W; Wilson, Joshua L; Champion, Mark; Hardek, Thomas W; Kim, Sang-Ho; McCarthy, Mike; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V

    2007-01-01

    A fan-out RF power distribution system can allow many accelerating cavities to be powered by a single high-power klystron amplifier. High-power vector modulators can perform independent control of amplitudes and phases of RF voltages at the cavities without changing the klystron signal. A prototype highpower RF vector modulator employing a quadrature hybrid and two ferrite phase shifters in coaxial TEM transmission lines has been built and tested for 402.5 MHz. RF properties of the design and results of high power testing are presented.

  2. A High-performance Hybrid RF Isolation Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    A high-performance hybrid RF Isolation Amplifier (Iso-Amp) has been developed at JPL. The circuit exhibits a unique combination of RF characteristics at performance levels exceeding those of any commercially available device. Recent improvments in the design have resulted in significantly higher reverse isolation, a four-fold increase in bandwidth and improve reliability. These devices are very useful in RF and IF signal conditioners, instrumentation, and signal generation and distribution equipment. These Iso-Amps should find wide application in future DSN and R&D RF systems.

  3. RF power recovery feedback circulator

    DOEpatents

    Sharamentov, Sergey I.

    2011-03-29

    A device and method for improving the efficiency of RF systems having a Reflective Load. In the preferred embodiment, Reflected Energy from a superconducting resonator of a particle accelerator is reintroduced to the resonator after the phase of the Reflected Energy is aligned with the phase of the Supply Energy from a RF Energy Source. In one embodiment, a Circulator is used to transfer Reflected Energy from the Reflective Load into a Phase Adjuster which aligns the phase of the Reflected Energy with that of the Supply Energy. The phase-aligned energy is then combined with the Supply Energy, and reintroduced into the Reflective Load. In systems having a constant phase shift, the Phase Adjuster may be designed to shift the phase of the Reflected Energy by a constant amount using a Phase Shifter. In systems having a variety (variable) phase shifts, a Phase Shifter controlled by a phase feedback loop comprising a Phase Detector and a Feedback Controller to account for the various phase shifts is preferable.

  4. Plasmonic excitations in ZnO/Ag/ZnO multilayer systems: Insight into interface and bulk electronic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Philipp, Martin; Knupfer, Martin; Buechner, Bernd; Gerardin, Hadia

    2011-03-15

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy experiments in transmission were carried out on silver-based multi-layer systems, consisting of a silver layer of various thicknesses (8, 10 and 50 nm) sandwiched between two Al-doped ZnO layers. The films were produced by magnetron sputtering using potassium bromide single crystals as substrates. The electronic structure of these systems was probed and analyzed with respect to their plasmonic excitations, which can be basically split up into excitations of the electrons in the bulk silver and excitations at the ZnO:Al/Ag interface. A detailed examination of the momentum dependence of the plasmon peaks revealed a positive dispersion for both, the volume and the interface plasmon, where only for the first one a quadratic behavior (as expected for a free electron gas) could be observed. Furthermore, the peak width was analyzed and set into relation to electrical conductivity measurements by calculating the plasmon lifetime and the electron scattering rate. Here, a good agreement between these different methods was obtained.

  5. Copper-based alloys, crystallographic and crystallochemical parameters of alloys in binary systems Cu-Me (Me=Co, Rh, Ir, Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, Pt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porobova, Svetlana; Markova, Tat'jana; Klopotov, Vladimir; Klopotov, Anatoliy; Loskutov, Oleg; Vlasov, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of the analysis of phase equilibrium of ordered phases in binary systems based on copper Cu- Me (where Me - Co, Rh, Ir, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, Pt) to find correlations of crystallochemical and crystallographic factors. It is established that the packing index in disordered solid solutions in binary systems based on copper is close to the value of 0.74 against the background of an insignificant deviation of atomic volumes from the Zen's law.

  6. RF TECHNIQUES FOR IMPROVED LUMINOSITY IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN,J.M.BLASKIEWICZ,J.BUTLER,J.DELONG,J.FISCHER,W.HAYES,T.

    2004-07-05

    The luminosity of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has improved significantly [1] over the first three physics runs. A number of special rf techniques have been developed to facilitate higher luminosity. The techniques described herein include: an ultra low-noise rf source for the 197 MHz storage rf system, a frequency shift switch-on technique for transferring bunches from the acceleration to the storage system, synchronizing the rings during the energy ramp (including crossing the transition energy) to avoid incidental collisions, installation of dedicated 200 MHZ cavities to provide longitudinal Landau damping on the ramp, and the development of a bunch merging scheme in the Booster to increase the available bunch intensity from the injectors.

  7. Preparation of Carbon-Doped TiO2 Nanopowder Synthesized by Droplet Injection of Solution Precursor in a DC-RF Hybrid Plasma Flow System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Juyong; Takana, Hidemasa; Ando, Yasutaka; Solonenko, Oleg P.; Nishiyama, Hideya

    2013-08-01

    Carbon-doped titanium dioxide nanopowder has received much attention because of its higher photocatalytic performance, which is practically activated not only by UV, but also by visible light irradiation. In the present study, C-TiO2 nanopowder was synthesized by droplet injection of solution precursor in a DC-RF hybrid plasma flow system, resulting in higher photocatalytic performance even under visible light irradiation. In-flight C-TiO2 nanoparticles reacted with the high concentration of carbon in plasma flow and were then deposited on the surfaces of two quartz tubes in the upstream and downstream regions of this system. The collected C-TiO2 nanopowder contained anatase-rutile mixed-phase TiO2 and TiC, the contents of which depended on the location of the powder collection, the temperature, and the duration of plasma treatment. Highly functional C-TiO2 nanopowder collected in the downstream region exhibited a higher degradation rate of methylene blue than that of single-phase anatase TiO2, even under visible light irradiation, in spite of being TiC.

  8. RF Performance of Membrane Aperture Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flint, Eirc M.; Lindler, Jason E.; Thomas, David L.; Romanofsky, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of recent results establishing the suitability of Membrane Aperture Shell Technology (MAST) for Radio Frequency (RF) applications. These single surface shells are capable of maintaining their figure with no preload or pressurization and minimal boundary support, yet can be compactly roll stowed and passively self deploy. As such, they are a promising technology for enabling a future generation of RF apertures. In this paper, we review recent experimental and numerical results quantifying suitable RF performance. It is shown that candidate materials possess metallic coatings with sufficiently low surface roughness and that these materials can be efficiently fabricated into RF relevant doubly curved shapes. A numerical justification for using a reflectivity metric, as opposed to the more standard RF designer metric of skin depth, is presented and the resulting ability to use relatively thin coating thickness is experimentally validated with material sample tests. The validity of these independent film sample measurements are then confirmed through experimental results measuring RF performance for reasonable sized doubly curved apertures. Currently available best results are 22 dBi gain at 3 GHz (S-Band) for a 0.5m aperture tested in prime focus mode, 28dBi gain for the same antenna in the C-Band (4 to 6 GHz), and 36.8dBi for a smaller 0.25m antenna tested at 32 GHz in the Ka-Band. RF range test results for a segmented aperture (one possible scaling approach) are shown as well. Measured antenna system actual efficiencies (relative to the unachievable) ideal for these on axis tests are generally quite good, typically ranging from 50 to 90%.

  9. Low-level RF control for the AFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek, C.; Kinross-Wright, J.; Plato, J.

    1994-09-01

    A limiting factor in the performance of the Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser (AFEL) is the stability of the RF accelerating field. A high-performance low-level RF control system has been implemented that uses analog feedback and digital feed forward to regulate the RF field. This low-level RF control system has achieved long-term amplitude and phase stabilities better than {+-}0.25% and {+-}0.33{degree} respectively. In order to improve the RF field stability further, a detailed system analysis and design is proceeding. Subsystem measurements are being used to model the system performance, predict the performance-limiting components, and determine possible improvements. Results to-date, modeling analyses, and suggested future improvements are presented.

  10. TRAK_RF - Electromagnetic Field and Charged Particle Simulations in RF Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, Stanley; Rees, Daniel

    1997-05-01

    An integrated software system has been developed to model electromagnetic fields and charged particle orbits in high-power RF devices. The primary application is simulation of electron multipactoring in linac vacuum windows for Accelerator Production of Tritium(G. Lawrence, et.al., Conventional and Superconducting RF Linac Design for the APT Project, in Proc. 1996 Int'l. Linear Acc. Conf. (Geneva, 1996), to be published.). The finite-element frequency-domain field solver can determine resonant fields such as cutoff and propagating modes of waveguides and TE(mnp) and TM(mnp) modes of cylindrical structures. In contrast to codes like Superfish, TRAK_RF makes direct determinations of power dissipation and phase shifts resulting ffrom lossy materials and walls. Furthermore, the program can handle scattering solutions, simulating free-space conditions with resistive termination boundary layers. TRAK_RF has advanced particle tracking capabilities to investigate a variety of innovative window designs. The program can simutaneously apply three numerical solutions for electrostatic, magnetostatic and electromagnetic fields on independent conformal triangular meshes. The finite-element method allows an unambiguous determination of particle collisions with material surfaces. It is possible to define up to 32 material types with energy-dependent secondary emission coefficients. TRAK_RF has a versatile automatic mesh generator with an interactive drafting utility for boundary input. Other applications include cavity design, radar and communications, microwave systems, and beam optics in RF accelerators.

  11. Station to instrumented aircraft L-band telemetry system and RF signal controller for spacecraft simulations and station calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scaffidi, C. A.; Stocklin, F. J.; Feldman, M. B.

    1971-01-01

    An L-band telemetry system designed to provide the capability of near-real-time processing of calibration data is described. The system also provides the capability of performing computerized spacecraft simulations, with the aircraft as a data source, and evaluating the network response. The salient characteristics of a telemetry analysis and simulation program (TASP) are discussed, together with the results of TASP testing. The results of the L-band system testing have successfully demonstrated the capability of near-real-time processing of telemetry test data, the control of the ground-received signal to within + or - 0.5 db, and the computer generation of test signals.

  12. Design studies for the LCLS 120 Hz RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.Y.; Pjerov, S.; Woodle, M.

    2000-11-01

    A preliminary design studies were carried out at Brookhaven National Laboratory for a photocathode RF gun injection system for LCLS 120 Hz operation. The starting point for the design is 50 Hz BNL Gun IV developed by a BNL/KEK/SHI collaboration. The basic parameters of the 120 Hz gun is discussed in this report. The complete photocathode RF gun injection system is described for a 120 Hz operation. The injector system includes photocathode RF gun, emittance compensation solenoid magnet, laser system and laser beam delivery system, and electron beam diagnostics. The basic design parameters, mechanical modification and the performance will be presented in this report.

  13. The AgESGUI geospatial simulation system for environmental model application and evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Practical decision making in spatially-distributed environmental assessment and management is increasingly being based on environmental process-based models linked to geographical information systems (GIS). Furthermore, powerful computers and Internet-accessible assessment tools are providing much g...

  14. Hierarchically plasmonic photocatalysts of Ag/AgCl nanocrystals coupled with single-crystalline WO3 nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Deliang; Li, Tao; Chen, Qianqian; Gao, Jiabing; Fan, Bingbing; Li, Jian; Li, Xinjian; Zhang, Rui; Sun, Jing; Gao, Lian

    2012-08-01

    The hierarchical photocatalysts of Ag/AgCl@plate-WO3 have been synthesized by anchoring Ag/AgCl nanocrystals on the surfaces of single-crystalline WO3 nanoplates that were obtained via an intercalation and topochemical approach. The heterogeneous precipitation process of the PVP-Ag+-WO3 suspensions with a Cl- solution added drop-wise was developed to synthesize AgCl@WO3 composites, which were then photoreduced to form Ag/AgCl@WO3 nanostructures in situ. WO3 nanocrystals with various shapes (i.e., nanoplates, nanorods, and nanoparticles) were used as the substrates to synthesize Ag/AgCl@WO3 photocatalysts, and the effects of the WO3 contents and photoreduction times on their visible-light-driven photocatalytic performance were investigated. The techniques of TEM, SEM, XPS, EDS, XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption and UV-vis DR spectra were used to characterize the compositions, phases and microstructures of the samples. The RhB aqueous solutions were used as the model system to estimate the photocatalytic performance of the as-obtained Ag/AgCl@WO3 nanostructures under visible light (λ >= 420 nm) and sunlight. The results indicated that the hierarchical Ag/AgCl@plate-WO3 photocatalyst has a higher photodegradation rate than Ag/AgCl, AgCl, AgCl@WO3 and TiO2 (P25). The contents and morphologies of the WO3 substrates in the Ag/AgCl@plate-WO3 photocatalysts have important effects on their photocatalytic performance. The related mechanisms for the enhancement in visible-light-driven photodegradation of RhB molecules were analyzed.The hierarchical photocatalysts of Ag/AgCl@plate-WO3 have been synthesized by anchoring Ag/AgCl nanocrystals on the surfaces of single-crystalline WO3 nanoplates that were obtained via an intercalation and topochemical approach. The heterogeneous precipitation process of the PVP-Ag+-WO3 suspensions with a Cl- solution added drop-wise was developed to synthesize AgCl@WO3 composites, which were then photoreduced to form Ag/AgCl@WO3 nanostructures in

  15. The chemiluminescence determination of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide using luminol-AgNO3-silver nanoparticles system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddah, Bozorgmehr; Shamsi, Javad; Barsang, Mehran Jam; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi

    2015-05-01

    A highly sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) method for the determination of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2-CEES) was presented. It was found that 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2-CEES) could inhibit the CL of the luminol-AgNO3 system in the presence of silver nanoparticles in alkaline solution, which made it applicable for determination of 2-CEES. The presented method is simple, convenient, rapid and sensitive. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.0001-1 ng mL-1, with the correlation coefficient of 0.992; while the limit of detection (LOD), based on signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3, was 6 × 10-6 ng mL-1. Also, the relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 5) for determination of 2-CEES (0.50 ng mL-1) was 3.1%. The method was successfully applied for the determination of 2-CEES in environmental aqueous samples.

  16. The chemiluminescence determination of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide using luminol-AgNO3-silver nanoparticles system.

    PubMed

    Maddah, Bozorgmehr; Shamsi, Javad; Barsang, Mehran Jam; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi

    2015-05-01

    A highly sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) method for the determination of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2-CEES) was presented. It was found that 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2-CEES) could inhibit the CL of the luminol-AgNO3 system in the presence of silver nanoparticles in alkaline solution, which made it applicable for determination of 2-CEES. The presented method is simple, convenient, rapid and sensitive. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.0001-1ngmL(-1), with the correlation coefficient of 0.992; while the limit of detection (LOD), based on signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3, was 6×10(-6)ngmL(-1). Also, the relative standard deviation (RSD, n=5) for determination of 2-CEES (0.50ngmL(-1)) was 3.1%. The method was successfully applied for the determination of 2-CEES in environmental aqueous samples. PMID:25703367

  17. Directions for rf-controlled intelligent microvalve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderling, Stefan; Varadan, Vijay K.; Abbott, Derek

    2001-03-01

    In this paper, we consider the novel concept of a Radio Frequency (RF) controllable microvalve for different medical applications. Wireless communication via a Surface Acoustic Wave Identification-mark (SAW ID-tag) is used to control, drive and locate the microvalve inside the human body. The energy required for these functions is provided by RF pulses, which are transmitted to the valve and back by a reader/transmitter system outside of the body. These RF bursts are converted into Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs), which propagate along the piezoelectric actuator material of the microvalve. These waves cause deflections, which are employed to open and close the microvalve. We identified five important areas of application of the microvalve in biomedicine: 1) fertility control; 2) artificial venous valves; 3) flow cytometry; 4) drug delivery and 5) DNA mapping.

  18. RF Spectroscopy on a Homogeneous Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenjie; Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Patel, Parth; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Over the last two decades RF spectroscopy has been established as an indispensable tool to probe a large variety of fundamental properties of strongly interacting Fermi gases. This ranges from measurement of the pairing gap over tan's contact to the quasi-particle weight of Fermi polarons. So far, most RF spectroscopy experiments have been performed in harmonic traps, resulting in an averaged response over different densities. We have realized an optical uniform potential for ultracold Fermi gases of 6 Li atoms, which allows us to avoid the usual problems connected to inhomogeneous systems. Here we present recent results on RF spectroscopy of these homogeneous samples with a high signal to noise ratio. In addition, we report progress on measuring the contact of a unitary Fermi gas across the normal to superfluid transition.

  19. The cardiovascular response to the AGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardus, David; Mctaggart, Wesley G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results of experiments on human subjects conducted to study the cardiovascular response to various g-levels and exposure times using an artificial gravity simulator (AGS). The AGS is a short arm centrifuge consisting of a turntable, a traction system, a platform and four beds. Data collection hardware is part of the communication system. The AGS provides a steep acceleration gradient in subjects in the supine position.

  20. Development of a dual-pulse RF driver for an S-band (= 2856 MHz) RF electron linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Sungsu; Kim, Yujong; Lee, Byeong-No; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Hyungki; Ha, Jang Ho; Park, Hyung Dal; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Hui Su; Buaphad, Pikad

    2016-04-01

    The radiation equipment research division of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has developed a Container Inspection System (CIS) using a Radio Frequency (RF) electron linear accelerator for port security. The primary purpose of the CIS is to detect nuclear materials and explosives, as well country-specific prohibited substances, e.g., smuggled. The CIS consists of a 9/6 MeV dualenergy electron linear accelerator for distinguishing between organic and inorganic materials. The accelerator consists of an electron gun, an RF accelerating structure, an RF driver, a modulator, electromagnets, a cooling system, a X-ray generating target, X-ray collimator, a detector, and a container moving system. The RF driver is an important part of the configuration because it is the RF power source: it supplies the RF power to the accelerating structure. A unique aspect of the RF driver is that it generates dual RF power to generate dual energy (9/6 MeV). The advantage of this RF driver is that it can allow the pulse width to vary and can be used to obtain a wide range of energy output, and pulse repetition rates up to 300 Hz. For this reason, 140 W (5 MW - 9 MeV) and 37 W (3.4 MW - 6 MeV) power outputs are available independently. A high power test for 20 minutes demonstrate that stable dual output powers can be generated. Moreover, the dual power can be applied to the accelerator which has stable accelerator operation. In this paper, the design, fabrication and high power test of the RF driver for the RF electron linear accelerator (linac) are presented.

  1. Applying an intelligent and automated emissions measurement system to characterize the RF environment for supporting wireless technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Keebler, P. F.; Phipps, K. O.

    2006-07-01

    The use of wireless technologies in commercial and industrial facilities has grown significantly in the past several years. New applications of wireless technologies with increasing frequency and varying radiated power are being developed everyday. Wireless application specialists and end users have already identified several sources of electromagnetic interference (EMI) in these facilities. Interference has been reported between wireless devices and between these devices and other types of electronic equipment either using frequencies in the unlicensed wireless spectrum or equipment that may generate undesired man-made noise in this spectrum. Facilities that are not using the wireless band should verify the spectral quality of that band and the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) integrity of safety-related power and signal cables before installing wireless technologies. With the introduction of new wireless devices in the same electromagnetic space where analog and digital I and C systems and cables must co-exist, the ability of facility managers to manage their spectra will dictate the degree of interference between wireless devices and other electronic equipment. Because of the unknowns associated with interference with analog and digital I and C systems in the wireless band, nuclear power plants have been slow to introduce wireless technologies in plant areas. With the application of newly developed advanced radiated emissions measurement systems that can record, process, and analyze radiated and conducted emissions in a cost-effective manner, facility managers can more reliably characterize potential locations for wireless technologies, including potential coupling effects with safety-related power and signal cables, with increased confidence that the risks associated with creating an interference can be significantly reduced. This paper will present an effective philosophy already being used in other mission-critical applications for managing EMC, an

  2. RF Field Visualization of RF Ablation at the Larmor Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Pascal; Kerr, Adam; Pauly, John; Scott, Greig

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is an effective minimally invasive treatment for tumors. One primary source of difficulty is monitoring and controlling the ablation region. Currently, RF ablation is performed at 460 kHz, for which MRI could play a role given its capability for temperature monitoring and tumor visualization. If instead the ablation were to be performed at the MRI Larmor frequency, then the MR capability for B1 field mapping could be used to directly visualize the RF fields created by the ablation currents. Visualizing the RF fields may enable better control of the ablation currents, enabling better control of lesion shape and size and improving repeatability. We demonstrate the feasibility of performing RF ablations at 64 MHz and show preliminary results from imaging the RF fields from the ablation. The post-ablation RF fields show an increase in current density in the ablated region, consistent with an increase in conductivity of the ablated tissue. PMID:21775256

  3. Recent developments in superconducting cavity RF control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simrock, Stefan

    2005-02-01

    Presently a large number of superconducting accelerators under construction or proposed impose stringent requirements on the rf control of the accelerating fields, operability, and reliability. The accelerator application range from linear colliders, UV-FELs and X-FELs, ERL based light sources, high power proton accelerators to heavy ion accelerators. Examples are TESLA and NLC, the European XFEL and Lux, the Cornell ERL based light source, the high power ERL based IR-FEL at JLAB, the neutron spallation source SNS, the heavy ion accelerator RIA, and the energy upgrade of the CEBAF accelerator at JLAB. The requirements on the rf systems range from low to high current, medium to high gradient, and relativistic to non-relativistics beam. With the technology in analog and digital electronics developing rapidly, the technology for rf feedback system is changing more and more from analog or hybrid systems towards fully digital systems. Todays DSPs and FPGAs can process sophisticated feedback algorithms on a time scale of some 100 ns to a few us with ADCs and DACs with about 100 MHz bandwidth at 14 bit and latencies less than 100 ns available to inter-face to the field detectors and field control actuators. Also fast analog multiplier technology allows for field detection and actuators for rf control with high linearity, measurement and control bandwidth while maintaining low noise levels.

  4. Locking-to-unlocking system is an efficient strategy to design DNA/silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) probe for human miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pratik; Choi, Suk Won; Kim, Ho-jin; Cho, Seok Keun; Bhang, Yong-Joo; Ryu, Moon Young; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Bjerrum, Morten Jannik; Yang, Seong Wook

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNA molecules, are important biomarkers for research and medical purposes. Here, we describe the development of a fast and simple method using highly fluorescent oligonucleotide-silver nanocluster probes (DNA/AgNCs) to efficiently detect specific miRNAs. Due to the great sequence diversity of miRNAs in humans and other organisms, a uniform strategy for miRNA detection is attractive. The concept presented is an oligonucleotide-based locking-to-unlocking system that can be endowed with miRNA complementarity while maintaining the same secondary structure. The locking-to-unlocking system is based on fold-back anchored DNA templates that consist of a cytosine-rich loop for AgNCs stabilization, an miRNA recognition site and an overlap region for hairpin stabilization. When an miRNA is recognized, fluorescence in the visible region is specifically extinguished in a concentration-dependent manner. Here, the exact composition of the fold-back anchor for the locking-to-unlocking system has been systematically optimized, balancing propensity for loop-structure formation, encapsulation of emissive AgNCs and target sensitivity. It is demonstrated that the applied strategy successfully can detect a number of cancer related miRNAs in RNA extracts from human cancer cell lines. PMID:26681688

  5. Locking-to-unlocking system is an efficient strategy to design DNA/silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) probe for human miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pratik; Choi, Suk Won; Kim, Ho-Jin; Cho, Seok Keun; Bhang, Yong-Joo; Ryu, Moon Young; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Bjerrum, Morten Jannik; Yang, Seong Wook

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNA molecules, are important biomarkers for research and medical purposes. Here, we describe the development of a fast and simple method using highly fluorescent oligonucleotide-silver nanocluster probes (DNA/AgNCs) to efficiently detect specific miRNAs. Due to the great sequence diversity of miRNAs in humans and other organisms, a uniform strategy for miRNA detection is attractive. The concept presented is an oligonucleotide-based locking-to-unlocking system that can be endowed with miRNA complementarity while maintaining the same secondary structure. The locking-to-unlocking system is based on fold-back anchored DNA templates that consist of a cytosine-rich loop for AgNCs stabilization, an miRNA recognition site and an overlap region for hairpin stabilization. When an miRNA is recognized, fluorescence in the visible region is specifically extinguished in a concentration-dependent manner. Here, the exact composition of the fold-back anchor for the locking-to-unlocking system has been systematically optimized, balancing propensity for loop-structure formation, encapsulation of emissive AgNCs and target sensitivity. It is demonstrated that the applied strategy successfully can detect a number of cancer related miRNAs in RNA extracts from human cancer cell lines. PMID:26681688

  6. Two Liquid Phases Separation of Fe-Cu-B and Fe-Cu-Ag-B systems at 1873 and 1523 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono-Nakazato, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiro; Agawa, Shingo; Taguchi, Kenji; Usui, Tateo

    In recycling of steel scraps, the accumulation of tramp element in steel has been one of serious problems. Because copper in steel causes hot-shortness, the copper content of steel scraps is strictly adjusted under the upper limiting value in steelmaking process. In addition, recycling of steel scrap is necessary for energy savings and to realize a recycling-oriented society. In the present study,it was found that addition of boron could separate a single liquid in Fe-Cu system into Fe-rich and Cu-rich phases. Equilibrium experiments in Fe-Cu-B ternary system at 1873 and 1523 K showed that the copper content in Fe-rich phase decreased to 4.3 mass%. Subsequently, equilibrium experiments in Fe-Cu-Ag-B system were carried out and the copper was observed to be distributed between Fe-B and Ag phases. The distribution ratio of [mass%Cu](in Ag) / [mass%Cu](in Fe) was about 6 at 1873 K, regardless of copper content. It was found that the copper content of iron could be decreased by using silver as the solvent.

  7. Ag on Si(111) from basic science to application

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    In our work we revisit Ag and Au adsorbates on Si(111)-7x7, as well as experiment with a ternary system of Pentacene, Ag and Si(111). Of particular interest to us is the Si(111)-(√3x√3)R30°}–Ag (Ag-Si-√3 hereafter). In this thesis I systematically explore effects of Ag deposition on the Ag-Si-√3 at different temperatures, film thicknesses and deposition fluxes. The generated insight of the Ag system on the Si(111) is then applied to generate novel methods of nanostructuring and nanowire growth. I then extend our expertise to the Au system on the Ag-Si(111) to gain insight into Au-Si eutectic silicide formation. Finally we explore behavior and growth modes of an organic molecule on the Ag-Si interface.

  8. Towards athermal optically-interconnected computing system using slotted silicon microring resonators and RF-photonic comb generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Linjie; Kashiwagi, Ken; Okamoto, Katsunari; Scott, R. P.; Fontaine, N. K.; Ding, Dan; Akella, Venkatesh; Yoo, S. J. B.

    2009-06-01

    We report that completely athermal design of a slotted silicon waveguide is possible by combining the negative thermo-optic (TO) coefficient of, for example, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) with the positive TO coefficient of silicon. When used in a microring resonator structure, the filled overcladding slotted waveguide and the unfilled (air-filled) overcladding slotted waveguide can both achieve athermal characteristics. Simulations indicate a wide range of realizations with proper design parameters of the slotted waveguides, namely, the silicon strip and slot widths. Preliminary experimental results on fabricated devices demonstrate that the temperature dependence is reduced from 91 pm/°C for a regular microring resonator to 52 pm/°C for the PMMA-clad microring resonator. Completely athermal realization is expectable in similar devices with improved fabrication techniques. For the external optical source, we demonstrate a stable 3.5 THz wide (175 modes×20 GHz) optical comb source with nearly flat spectral phase. Adjustable mode spacing and wavelength tunability across the C-band are maintained so that comb lines can be matched to the specified wavelength grid of the computing system. With such schemes, temperature controls of individual optical components in the optically interconnected computing chips become unnecessary, greatly reducing the complexity of the computing system.

  9. The IPNS second harmonic RF upgrade.

    SciTech Connect

    Middendorf, M. E.; Brumwell, F. R.; Dooling, J. C.; Horan, D.; Kustom, R. L.; Lien, M. K.; McMichael, G. E.; Moser, M. R.; Nassiri, A.; Wang, S.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2008-01-01

    The intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) is used to accelerate protons from 50 MeV to 450 MeV, at a repetition rate of 30 Hz. The original ring design included two identical rf systems, each consisting of an accelerating cavity, cavity bias supply, power amplifiers and low-level analog electronics. The original cavities are located 180 degrees apart in the ring and provide a total peak accelerating voltage of {approx}21 kV over the 2.21-MHz to 5.14-MHz revolution frequency sweep. A third rf system has been constructed and installed in the RCS. The third rf system is capable of operating at the fundamental revolution frequency for the entire acceleration cycle, providing an additional peak accelerating voltage of up to {approx}11 kV, or at the second harmonic of the revolution frequency for the first {approx}4 ms of the acceleration cycle, providing an additional peak voltage of up to {approx}11 kV for bunch shape control. We describe here the hardware implementation and operation to date of the third rf cavity in the second harmonic mode.

  10. Preparation, characterization, and photocatalytic activity of porous AgBr@Ag and AgBrI@Ag plasmonic photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Tian, Baozhu; Zhang, Jinlong; Xiong, Tianqing; Wang, Tingting

    2014-02-01

    Porous AgBr@Ag and AgBrI@Ag plasmonic photocatalysts were synthesized by a multistep route, including a dealloying method to prepare porous Ag, a transformation from Ag to AgBr and AgBrI, and a photo-reduction process to form Ag nanoparticles on the surface of AgBr and AgBrI. It was found that the porous structure kept unchanged during Ag was transferred into AgBr, AgBrI, AgBr@Ag, and AgBrI@Ag. Both porous AgBr@Ag and porous AgBrI@Ag showed much higher visible-light photocatalytic activity than cubic AgBr@Ag for the degradation of methyl orange, which is because the interconnected pore channels not only provide more reactive sites but also favor the transportation of photo-generated electrons and holes. For AgBrI@Ag, AgBrI solid solution formed at the interface of AgBr and AgI, and the phase junction can effectively separate the photo-generated electrons and holes, favorable to the improvement of photocatalytic activity. The optimal I content for obtaining the highest activity is ∼10 at.%.

  11. Observation of largely enhanced hardness in nanomultilayers of the Ag-Nb system with positive enthalpy of formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, W. S.; Yang, M. J.

    2007-04-30

    Ag/Nb nanomultilayers with different modulation wavelengths {lambda} were prepared on silicon wafers by electron beam evaporation. Nanoindenter measurements show that with decreasing {lambda} of the multilayers, the nanohardness increases up to {approx}80% for {lambda}=4 nm, whereas the modulus is almost unchanged. This unusual behavior originates from a unique microstructure where amorphous Ag-Nb alloys form at the interfaces and grain boundaries of silver nanoparticles, as observed by cross-section high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The amorphous phases favor hardness enhancement by preventing dislocation emission and movement, whereas they have a negative contribution to the modulus because of their free volume.

  12. RF current sensor

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James A.; Sparks, Dennis O.

    1998-11-10

    An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

  13. RF modal quantity gaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanleuven, K.

    1989-05-01

    The primary objective is to provide a concept of a radio frequency (RF) modal resonance technique which is being investigated as a method for gaging the quantities of subcritical cryogenic propellants in metallic tanks. Of special interest are the potential applications of the technique to microgravity propellant gaging situations. The results of concept testing using cryogenic oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen, as well as paraffin simulations of microgravity fluid orientations, are reported. These test results were positive and showed that the gaging concept was viable.

  14. Perfectly matched pulsed 2MHz RF network and CW 30MHz RF matching network for the J-PARC RF-driven H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, A.; Namekawa, Y.; Yamazaki, S.; Ohkoshi, K.; Koizumi, I.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Oguri, H.

    2013-02-01

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of an H- ion beam current of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmmṡmrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of more than 50days, a cesiated RF-driven H- ion source using a internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was developed. As similar as the SNS ion source, the 60kW pulsed 2MHz-RF and 200W CW 30MHz-RF systems are used in order to produce pulsed high-temperature 2MHz-RF plasma and CW low-temperature 30MHz-RF plasma. Each matching network for each system is composed of two vacuum variable condensers (VVCs). In order to supply pulsed 60kW-2MHz-RF power from the power supply (PS) on the ground level, a one-turn isolation transformer using FINEMET cores is installed between the PS and the J-PARC ion source. By comprehending the matching networks with the LTspice IV simulations and high- and low- power experiments and setting the parameters properly, the pulsed 2MHz-RF power up to 46 kW is successfully input to the hydrogen plasma without any misfire and with almost no reflected power.

  15. Chemically twinned phases in the Ag 2S-PbS-Bi 2S 3 system.Part I. Electron microscope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, A.; Tilley, R. J. D.

    1990-04-01

    Phases in the PbS-rich region of the Ag 2S-PbS-Bi 2S 3 system have been studied by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. In samples quenched from the melt or melted and annealed at 773 or 973 K a number of new chemically twinned phases have been found. Their structures contain galena-like slabs four-, five-, seven-, and eight-octahedra wide, joined along twin planes. Ordered phases predominate in the PbS-rich region of the phase diagram, while both ordered and disordered intergrowths occur in the PbS-poor region. The role of Ag in stabilizing slabs of galena-like material five- and eight-octahedra wide and its function in the formation of these twinned phases is discussed.

  16. High-power RF testing of a 352-MHZ fast-ferrite RF cavity tuner at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, D.; Cherbak, E.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2006-01-01

    A 352-MHz fast-ferrite rf cavity tuner, manufactured by Advanced Ferrite Technology, was high-power tested on a single-cell copper rf cavity at the Advanced Photon Source. These tests measured the fast-ferrite tuner performance in terms of power handling capability, tuning bandwidth, tuning speed, stability, and rf losses. The test system comprises a single-cell copper rf cavity fitted with two identical coupling loops, one for input rf power and the other for coupling the fast-ferrite tuner to the cavity fields. The fast-ferrite tuner rf circuit consists of a cavity coupling loop, a 6-1/8-inch EIA coaxial line system with directional couplers, and an adjustable 360{sup o} mechanical phase shifter in series with the fast-ferrite tuner. A bipolar DC bias supply, controlled by a low-level rf cavity tuning loop consisting of an rf phase detector and a PID amplifier, is used to provide a variable bias current to the tuner ferrite material to maintain the test cavity at resonance. Losses in the fast-ferrite tuner are calculated from cooling water calorimetry. Test data will be presented.

  17. Ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ji, Qing; Wilde, Stephen

    2005-12-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source.

  18. An Efficient RF Source for Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Dudas, A.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng

    2013-12-01

    We propose the development of a highly reliable high efficiency RF source for JLAB with a lower lifetime cost operating at 80% efficiency with system operating costs of about 0.7M$/year for the 6 GeV machine. The design of the RF source will be based upon two injection locked magnetrons in a novel combining architecture for amplitude modulation and a cross field amplifier (CFA) as an output tube for the 12 GeV upgrade. A cost analysis including efficiency and reliability will be performed to determine the optimum system architecture. Several different system architectures will be designed and evaluated for a dual injection locked magnetron source using novel combining techniques and possibly a CFA as the output tube. A paper design for the 1497 MHz magnetron system will be completed. The optimum system architecture with all relevant specifications will be completed so that a prototype can be built.

  19. THE AGS-BASED SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    WENG,W.T.; DIWAN,M.; RAPARIA,D.

    2004-10-08

    be upgraded to 0.2 s to reach the required repetition rate of 2.5 Hz. The required upgrade of the AGS power supply, the rf system, and other rate dependent accelerator issues is discussed. The design of the target/horn configuration is shown. The material selected for the proton target is a Carbon-Carbon composite. It is a 3-dimensional woven material that exhibits extremely low thermal expansion for temperatures up to 1000 C; for higher temperatures it responds like graphite. This property is important for greatly reducing the thermo-elastic stresses induced by the beam, thereby extending the life of the target. The target consists of a 80 cm long cylindrical rod of 12 mm diameter. The target intercepts a 2 mm rms proton beam of 10{sup 14} protons/pulse. The total energy deposited as heat in the target is 7.3 kJ with peak temperature rise of about 280 C. Heat will be removed from the target through forced convection of helium gas across its outside surface. The extracted proton beam uses an existing beamline at the AGS, but is then directed to a target station atop a constructed earthen hill. The target is followed by a downward slopping pion decay channel. This vertical arrangement keeps the target and decay pipe well above the water table in this area. The 11.3 degrees slope aims the neutrino beam at a water Cerenkov neutrino detector to be located in the Homestake mine at Lead, South Dakota. A 3-dimensional view of the beam transport line, target station, and decay tunnel is provided.

  20. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W. Michoski, C.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-10

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.