Science.gov

Sample records for agu congressional science

  1. AGU Congressional Science Fellows Chosen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    AGU announces its two newest Congressional Science Fellows—Laura Sherman and Charles Podolak—who will work on science issues in a congressional office from September 2014 until August 2015. The program is run by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and trains scientists in the inner workings of congressional offices before helping them find a position. AGU has sponsored fellows in the program for 37 years, during which AGU fellows have worked on climate change, energy, water, security, and many more critical issues that rely on scientific understanding and affect the lives of the general public every day.

  2. AGU 2002-2003 Congressional Science Fellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illa Amerson, a Ph.D. candidate at the Oregon Health & Science University in Beaverton, was selected as AGU's 26th Congressional Science Fellow for 2002-2003. Starting in September, Amerson will serve a one-year assignment in the office of a senator or representative, or on a committee's staff as one of only a handful of scientists on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Once in an office, Amerson can expect to work as a regular member of the staff, serving as a legislative assistant. Her duties could include advising her boss how to vote on specific bills, writing speeches or press releases, crafting legislation, meeting with lobbyists and special interest groups, and even answering constituent mail.Amerson expects to receive her Ph.D. in environmental science and engineering this summer. Her dissertation focuses on the environmental impact of the gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). She completed a M.S. in civil and environmental engineering at Arizona State University and a S.B. in chemical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Amerson has also spent three years working in environmental regulation and consulting, dealing primarily with air and water quality issues.

  3. Reflections on an AGU Congressional Science Fellowship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellows, Jack D.

    In spring 1983, prior to my fellowship year, I was finishing my National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)—sponsored doctoral dissertation in hydrology at the University of Maryland. Currently, I am involved in the final budget deliberations for our nation's 1987 civilian space program in the Executive Office of the President (EOP). With this transformation in mind, I think it is fair to say that my 1983-1984 AGU Congressional Science Fellowship has had a tremendous influence on my career.During my fellowship in Congress, I worked with Rep. George E. Brown (D-Calif.) on water, remote sensing, space, and general science budgets and issues. I was involved in several pieces of legislation that are currently being implemented. It was through my responsibility for analysis of NASA programs and budget that I began to understand the complexity of the budget process and the development of our nation's civilian space policy. I found it very satisfying to learn about space programs beyond my own field of satellite-based hydrology.

  4. Maeve Boland selected as AGU Congressional Science Fellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chell, Kaitlin

    2009-10-01

    Maeve Boland, research assistant professor at the Colorado School of Mines, is AGU's 2009-2010 Congressional Science Fellow. Boland, who has a Ph.D. in geology from the Colorado School of Mines, is spending a year working in the office of U.S. Sen. Byron Dorgan (D-N. D.). She was selected in March by AGU's Committee on Public Affairs after a competitive interview process, and she is AGU's 32nd Congressional Science Fellow. In September, Boland and 31 other Congressional Science Fellows participated in a 2-week course in politics and the legislative process put on by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She then interviewed with a number of congressional offices and was offered a position in the office of Sen. Dorgan, who chairs the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development and is a member of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. Boland is working as a legislative fellow carrying out a range of duties such as organizing congressional hearings, crafting legislation, advising legislators on votes, meeting with lobbyists, and writing speeches. Fellows also are often asked to assist their senator or representative during committee hearings and on the U.S. House or Senate floors during legislative debates.

  5. Inside Politics with AGU's Congressional Science Fellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranes, Kevin

    2004-08-01

    One definition of pork is money, jobs, etc., received through pork-barrel Congressional appropriations and used for political patronage. However, pork is only pork if that swine farm is located in somebody else's Congressional district. If the project is in your district, rest assured that it is absolutely necessary for the safety and well-being of your constituents and the vitality of America as a whole. (That $650 million soil ion conductance lab at Southern State College is absolutely essential to the future of the American economy, right?)

  6. Learn about AGU's Congressional Science and Mass Media Fellowships at Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Erik

    2011-11-01

    Have you ever considered spending the summer as a science reporter in a mass media outlet or working for a member of Congress on Capitol Hill for a year? During a luncheon at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, learn about the AGU Congressional Science Fellowship and Mass Media Fellowship and how to apply for these opportunities. At the luncheon, this year's AGU Congressional Science Fellows, Rebecca French and Ian Lloyd, will discuss their experiences working in Congress. French, who received her Ph.D. in geosciences from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, is working for Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), while Lloyd, a recent Ph.D. graduate of Princeton, is working for Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Oreg.). Over the next year, French and Lloyd will advise and assist the senators on some Earth science issues and other matters.

  7. Share your expertise with Congress: Apply for an AGU Congressional Science Fellowship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnett, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    Scientists interested in using their skills to work on problems of public importance should consider applying for an AGU Congressional Science Fellowship. The fellowship is an opportunity to directly influence high-priority public policy issues such as natural hazards mitigation, mineral and energy resources, air and water quality, and federal support for basic research. Following an intensive 2-week course on politics and the legislative process run by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, congressional fellows work for a year as staff members in the offices of a senator, representative, or congressional committee. Their duties as staff members may include writing legislation, advising on votes, organizing congressional hearings, meeting with lobbyists and constituents, and conducting legislative research, among other tasks.

  8. AGU Congressional Fellow Outlines Challenges for Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, Maeve

    2010-11-01

    Science and technology were an essential part of all of the energy issues I worked on during my year as AGU Congressional Fellow in the office of U.S. senator Byron L. Dorgan (D-N. D.), chair of the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development and a senior member of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. During my fellowship year, which lasted from September 2009 through September 2010, I found that no one on Capitol Hill in Washington doubted the utility of science in addressing issues such as hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas production, the electrification of the transportation fleet, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and carbon capture and sequestration. However, during the year, two subjects were the focus of a broader questioning of science in Congress: “Climategate” and metrics to justify federal investment in research.

  9. AGU member running to fill congressional seat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Emily

    John F Mink, an AGU member (Hydrology) for 50 years, and husband of the late Representative Patsy T. Mink (D-Hawaii), will run in a special election on 30 November to fill the remainder of his wife's unexpired congressional term. Patsy Mink, who represented the 2nd Congressional District of Hawaii, passed away on 28 September after battling pneumonia.Her name will appear on the 5 November election ballot as a candidate for Hawaii's 2nd District in the 108th Congress. If she is elected posthumously, the state of Hawaii will hold a special election in January to select an official to serve the full two-year term.

  10. AGU scientists meet with legislators during Geosciences Congressional Visits Day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2011-10-01

    This year marks the fourth annual Geosciences Congressional Visits Day (Geo-CVD), in which scientists from across the nation join together in Washington, D. C., to meet with their legislators to discuss the importance of funding for Earth and space sciences. AGU partnered with seven other Earth and space science organizations to bring more than 50 scientists, representing 23 states, for 2 days of training and congressional visits on 20-21 September 2011. As budget negotiations envelop Congress, which must find ways to agree on fiscal year (FY) 2012 budgets and reduce the deficit by $1.5 trillion over the next 10 years, Geo-CVD scientists seized the occasion to emphasize the importance of federally funded scientific research as well as science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. Cuts to basic research and STEM education could adversely affect innovation, stifle future economic growth and competitiveness, and jeopardize national security.

  11. AGU Public Affairs: How to Get Involved in Science Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, E. A.; Hankin, E. R.; Uhlenbrock, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    AGU Public Affairs offers many ways for its members to get involved in science policy at different levels of participation, whether you would love to spend a year working as a resident science expert in a congressional office in Washington, D.C., or would rather simply receive email alerts about Earth and space science policy news. How you can get involved: Sign up for AGU Science Policy Alerts to receive the most relevant Earth and space science policy information delivered to your email inbox. Participate in one of AGU's Congressional Visits Days to speak with your legislators about important science issues. Attend the next AGU Science Policy Conference in spring 2013. Participate in events happening on Capitol Hill, and watch video of past events. Learn about AGU Embassy Lectures, where countries come together to discuss important Earth and space science topics. Learn how you can comment on AGU Position Statements. Apply to be an AGU Congressional Science Fellow, where you can work in a congressional office for one year and serve as a resident science expert, or to be an AGU Public Affairs Intern, where you can work in the field of science policy for three months. The AGU Public Affairs Team will highlight ways members can be involved as well as provide information on how the team is working to shape policy and inform society about the excitement of AGU science.

  12. AGU on hydrological science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hydrologists and other scientists expressed concern that progress in hydrology is impeded by a lack of programmatic focus within the National Science Foundation. In response to the concern, AGU president Don Anderson appointed a panel to assess the situation and to recommend an appropriate AGU position on this issue. The report of the panel was considered at the Fall meeting of the Council and approved as the formal Union position. Subsequently, it was transmitted to Robert Corell, head of the NSF Geosciences Directorate, for consideration. The position itself is given below.Hydrologic Science Within the NSF—A Position Statement: AGU recommends that NSF take steps to establish a unified program in hydrologic science that is commensurate with the importance of water in Earth processes at all scales.

  13. Congressional Science Fellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Riordan, Catherine

    2005-09-01

    Josh Trapani has been selected to serve as AGU's 2005-2006 Congressional Science Fellow. Trapani is a paleontologist who most recently studied the genetic basis of tooth development in fish as a postdoctoral fellow in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department at the University of Colorado, in Boulder. ``By studying the complexity of genetic differences between species of fish with different dentition patterns, we are able to begin to determine the evolutionary processes-chiefly selection and constraint-responsible for the evolution and maintenance of these differences over geologic time,'' He noted.

  14. 1989”1990 AGU Congressional Fellow report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Barbara J.

    Describing the last 3 months on the Subcommittee on International Scientific Cooperation of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology is no easy task. I have learned a great deal about many issues and about the workings of Congress; yet this knowledge has not been gained in a necessarily straightforward or logical manner.Although my status on the Subcommittee is that of a Fellow, in effect I am expected to function as a regular staff member. I immediately became involved in the preparation of two hearings, the first on science and technology initiatives for Poland and Hungary, and the second on the Human Genome Project. At these hearings, I learned firsthand about important aspects of science-related issues that concern Congress, namely, intellectual property rights, U.S. competitiveness in the science and technology arena with other countries, Japan, in particular; and big science versus small science funding.

  15. Inaugural AGU Science Policy Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2012-01-01

    AGU will present its inaugural Science Policy Conference, 30 April to 3 May 2012, at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, located in downtown Washington, D. C. This conference will bring together leading scientists, policy makers, industry professionals, press, and other stakeholders to discuss natural hazards, natural resources, oceans, and Arctic science and the role these sciences play in serving communities. To bridge the science and policy fields, AGU plans to host this conference every 2 years and focus on the applications of Earth and space sciences to serve local and national communities. "Our nation faces a myriad of challenges such as the sustainability of our natural resources, current and future energy needs, and the ability to mitigate and adapt to natural and manmade hazards," said Michael McPhaden, president of AGU. "It is essential that policies to address these challenges be built on a solid foundation of credible scientific knowledge."

  16. L. Jeff Lefkoff: Congressional Science Fellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    L. Jeff Lefkoff, a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS; Menlo Park, Calif.) and doctoral student at Stanford University (Stanford, Calif.), has been selected as the 1986-1987 AGU Congressional Science Fellow. A member of AGU's Hydrology Section, he will begin his 1-year tenure on Capitol Hill as AGU's 10th Congressional Science Fellow in January.At USGS and Stanford, Lefkoff has conducted research on the hydrologic and economic consequences of various options in water resources policy, especially the use of open markets for water rights. His work for USGS has included development of a computer model, intended for public distribution, for general groundwater management. He has used this model to design aquifer restoration systems and to analyze their hydrologic and economic performance.

  17. AGU Ocean Science Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Ocean Science Executive Committee has announced that nominations are needed for its Award given for outstanding service to the marine science community. Service may include leadership, management, sharing of data, analysis techniques or models, as well as facility or instrumentation development. In every case, the service must go well beyond the normal requirements of an individual's job specifications. The individual must be nationally recognized for such service.The executive committee will review nominations and designate awardee(s). Nominations should consist of a paragraph describing the individual's qualifications with respect to the award as well as a list of potential referees. While nominations can be considered at any time, it is customary for an annual assessment of potential awardee(s) to occur in early fall. The award is not given on any specific schedule, annual or otherwise. When the award is made, the awardee may select the meeting where he/she wishes to receive the award.

  18. Science policy events at the 2012 AGU Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Erik

    2012-10-01

    Are you interested in the intersection of science and policy, looking to make an impact on Capitol Hill, or concerned about the increasing number of attacks against scientists and their academic freedom? AGU Public Affairs offers many events at the 2012 Fall Meeting to assist member involvement in political processes and inform scientists of their rights and options should their research come under legal fire. Learn how you can share your science with policy makers to help inform policy at two luncheon events at the Fall Meeting. If you have ever considered working as a science expert for a member of Congress or reporting science in a mass media outlet, then you should attend the first luncheon, How to be a Congressional Science Fellow or Mass Media Fellow. The event will feature current AGU Congressional Science Fellows detailing their experiences working in Congress as well as past AGU Mass Media Fellows sharing their stories of reporting for a news organization. The luncheon will be held on Tuesday, 4 December, from 12:30 to 1:30 P.M. at the Marriott Hotel, in room Golden Gate B. In addition, current and former fellows will be available for one-on-one interactions at the AGU Marketplace from 3:30 to 4:30 P.M. on Tuesday, 4 December, through Thursday, 6 December.

  19. Congressional geohazards showcase presented by NSF and AGU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2011-10-01

    On Wednesday, 7 September 2011, two weeks after the magnitude 5.8 earthquake in Mineral, Va., and a week after Hurricane Irene struck the U.S. East Coast, AGU cosponsored a showcase of National Science Foundation (NSF)—funded hazards research in recognition of National Preparedness Month. This annual event highlights NSF—funded hazards research from all over the United States, with more than 30 exhibitors demonstrating the latest research and technology on hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, volcanoes, tsunamis, and oil spills, as well as emergency and social responses to these events. The event took place at the Hart Senate Office Building, where many members of Congress and their staff could attend and discuss the importance of hazards research with the researchers and NSF staff. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) kicked off with a panel of speakers, which included remarks by Mary Voytek, a member of the AGU Board of Directors, and Subra Suresh, director of NSF. Expert presentations were also given on hazard prediction, human safety, and social response. Following the event, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) hosted a small event to meet directly with a few of the exhibitors to discuss the importance of investment in scientific research and development.

  20. AGU hosts Leadership Summit on Climate Science Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, Ann

    2011-03-01

    Building on informal meetings among a small group of scientific societies and research institutions concerned with climate science, AGU hosted a Leadership Summit on Climate Science Communication, 7-8 March 2011, in Washington, D. C. Presidents, executive directors, and senior public policy staff from 17 science organizations engaged with experts in the social sciences regarding effective communication of climate science and with practitioners from agriculture, energy, and the military. The keynote speaker for the summit was Bob Inglis, former U.S. representative from South Carolina's 4th Congressional District.

  1. Congressional Science Fellow tackles science policy for U.K.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Julie J.

    After an AGU Congressional Science Fellowship in 1997-1998,I decided to pursue science policy further. I spied an ad in the Sunday Washington Post advertising for someone with a science degree, who also had knowledge of the United Kingdom, and science policy experience on Capitol Hill. In addition to my Ph.D. from the University of California at Los Angeles and the Congressional Science Fellowship, I had spent two years in the U.K. as a post-doc at Queen Mary and Westfield College in London.I applied for the job, which was at the British Embassy in Washington, D.C., and was hired. The UK Foreign Office has a tradition of hiring many of its embassy staff locally; they consider knowledge of local politics and issues very use ful for their interests. Now I cover hard science issues, including space and the Internet for Her Majesty's Government.

  2. Congressional Fellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eric L. Butler, AGU's 1984-1985 Congressional Science Fellow, has elected to spend his year on Capital Hill working for the Subcommittee on Commerce, Transportation, and Tourism of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.Butler, AGU's eighth Congressional Science Fellow, will be spending the period September 1984 to August 1985 on the Hill as part of the overall American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Congressional Science and Engineering Fellows program, which is aimed at involving scientists and engineers in public policy within Congress by means of work on members' or committee staffs.

  3. AGU Members Visit Capitol Hill to Promote Earth and Space Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chell, Kaitlin

    2010-10-01

    Climate change, earthquake preparedness, rare earth elements, hydraulic fracking, and America's global competitiveness in science are among the science topics in policy headlines today. For legislators to create good policy on these and other topics related to the Earth and space sciences, they need access to good science, which is why AGU encourages its members to participate in Congressional Visits Days. On 21-22 September, 55 Earth and space scientists from 24 states brought their expertise to the U.S. Congress, in Washington, D. C., for the third annual Geosciences Congressional Visits Day (Geo­CVD). AGU partnered with four other geosciences societies to bring a large scientific presence to Capitol Hill.

  4. Become an AGU Supporting Member

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You can extend your commitment to the continuing vitality of geophysics by helping AGU to build funds that will provide for new initiatives and assist in funding some of the nonrevenue programs of AGU, such as the congressional science fellowship, minority student scholarships, and student travel grants. The AGU Development Committee is seeking gifts a n d contributions toward building the endowment of the Union: The vitality of AGU and the vitality of geophysics march hand in hand.

  5. Become an AGU supporting member

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You can extend your commitment to the continuing vitality of geophysics by helping AGU to build funds that will provide for new initiatives and assist in funding some of the nonrevenue programs of AGU, such as the congressional science fellowship, minority student scholarships, and student travel grants. The AGU Development Committee is seeking gifts and contributions toward building the endowment of the Union: The vitality of AGU and the vitality of geophysics march hand in hand.

  6. Become an AGU Supporting Member

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You can extend your commitment to the continuing vitality of geophysics by helping AGU to build funds that will provide for new initiatives and assist in funding some of the nonrevenue programs of AGU, such as the congressional science fellowship, minority student scholarships, and student travel grants. The AGU Development Committee is seeking gifts and contributions toward building the endowment of the Union: The vitality of AGU and the vitality of geophysics march hand in hand.

  7. Williams to become new AGU director of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrogio, Olivia

    2012-06-01

    Billy Williams, who will join AGU as its new director of science on 15 June, will work to raise AGU's profile and impact and shape AGU's scientific activities and the development of scientific careers for AGU student members. As director of science, Williams will facilitate working relationships and communication of scientific information and resources between and among the AGU Board and Council, committees, sections and focus groups, AGU members (including students), staff, and external partners. In addition, he will facilitate and coordinate the development and implementation of memorandums of understanding and other collaborations with various scientific societies, and he will provide leadership for AGU's efforts to develop resources designed to assist students in preparing for scientific careers. Williams also will serve as senior staff member to the AGU Council.

  8. AGU scientists urge Congress to invest in research and science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothacker, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    With the "fiscal cliff" of sequestration drawing closer and threatening to hit basic science research funding with an 8.2% cut, according to an estimate by the Office of Management and Budget, congressional compromise on a budget plan is more urgent than ever. To discuss the value of scientific research and education with their senators and representatives, 55 Earth and space scientists from 17 states came to Washington, D. C., on 11-12 September to participate in the fifth annual Geosciences Congressional Visits Day sponsored by AGU and six other geoscience organizations. Although their specialties varied from space weather to soil science, the scientists engaged members of Congress and their staff in a total of 116 meetings to discuss a common goal: securing continued, steady investment in the basic scientific research that allows scientists to monitor natural hazards, manage water and energy resources, and develop technologies that spur economic growth and job creation. To make the most of these visits on 12 September, participants attended a training session the previous day, during which they learned about the details of the policy- making process and current legislative developments and practiced conducting a congressional meeting. Congressional Science Fellows, including past AGU fellow Rebecca French, described their experiences as scientists working on Capitol Hill, and White House policy analyst Bess Evans discussed the president's stance on sequestration and funding scientific research.

  9. AGU Members Visit Capitol Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Holle, Kate

    2007-06-01

    More than 200 scientists and engineers from around the United States convened in Washington, D.C., on 1-2 May 2007 to participate in the annual Science Engineering and Technology (SET) Congressional Visits Day (CVD). The AGU Office of Public Affairs frequently helps to arrange for members' visits to their congressional delegations, but CVD is a unique event during which AGU members can team up with a larger group of scientists and engineers to promote federal funding of scientific research.

  10. Bridging Science and Policy: The AGU Science Policy Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, E. R.; Uhlenbrock, K.; Landau, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, science has become inextricably linked to the political process. As such, it is more important now than ever for science to forge a better relationship with politics, for the health of both science and society. To help meet this need, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) strives to engage its members, shape policy, and inform society about the excitement of Earth and space science and its role in developing solutions for the sustainability of the planet. In June 2013, AGU held its second annual Science Policy Conference in Washington, D.C. The goal of the conference is to provide a new forum for diverse discussions and viewpoints on the challenges and opportunities of science policy, with a focus on applications of Earth and space science that serve local, national, and international communities. The meeting brought together more than 300 scientists, policy makers, industry professionals, members of the press, and other stakeholders to discuss the topics concerning the Arctic, climate change, oceans, energy, technology and infrastructure, and natural hazards science as they relate to challenges impacting society. Sessions such as 'The Water-Energy Nexus,' 'Potential for Megadisasters,' 'The Changing Ocean and Impacts on Human Health,' and 'Drowning and Drought: Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change' are examples of some of the intriguing and timely science policy issues addressed at the conference. The findings from the conference were used to develop a summary report. The report highlights key facts and figures to be used as a resource in discussions with policy makers and other stakeholders regarding the conference topics. This presentation will discuss the goals and outcomes of the conference and how the event represents one of the many ways AGU is approaching its 'Science and Society' priority objective as part of the Union's strategic plan; namely by increasing the effectiveness and recognition of AGU among policy makers as an authoritative

  11. Exploration Station Brings AGU Science to Children and Parents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Paul

    2008-08-01

    More than 20 families from the Fort Lauderdale, Fla., area attended AGU's pilot family science event, ``Exploration Station,'' held on 26 May as part of the 2008 Joint Assembly. During the event-which was organized by AGU's education staff, the Association for Astronomy Education, and the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Association-children and parents had the opportunity to discuss science with researchers and to get involved with many hands-on activities.

  12. AGU Members Learn Ways to Get Involved in Science Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2013-01-01

    Gasps filled the room as scientists listened to a talk about the looming U.S. "fiscal cliff" and sequestration impacts on the science community. This was but one example of efforts by AGU's Public Affairs team during this year's Fall Meeting to talk to members about the latest news on the federal budget and what was happening on Capitol Hill.

  13. AGU Science Policy Conference: 2012 Recap and 2013 Preview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, E. R.; Landau, E. A.; Uhlenbrock, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, science has become inextricably linked to the political process. As such, it is more important now than ever for science to forge a better relationship with politics, for the health of both science and society. To help meet this need, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) strives to engage its members, shape policy, and inform society about the excitement of Earth and space science and its role in developing solutions for the sustainability of the planet. In the spring of 2012, AGU held its inaugural Science Policy Conference in Washington, D.C. The goal of this new conference is to ensure diverse discussions and viewpoints on the challenges and opportunities of Earth and space science policy. The meeting brought together more than 300 scientists, policymakers, industry professionals, members of the press, and other stakeholders to discuss Arctic, oceans, natural resources, and natural hazards science as they relate to challenges impacting society. Sessions such as Hydraulic Fracturing, Mitigation and Resiliency to Severe Weather, Governance and Security in the Arctic, and Ocean Acidification are examples of some of the intriguing science policy issues addressed at the conference. The AGU Science Policy Conference will be an annual spring event in Washington, D.C.

  14. AGU Cinema: Festival of short science films at Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harned, Douglas A.

    2012-11-01

    New technologies have revolutionized the use of video as a means of science communication and have made it easier to create, distribute, and view. With video having become omnipresent in our culture, it sometime supplements or even replaces writing in many science and education applications. An inaugural science film festival sponsored by AGU at the 2012 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., in December will showcase short videos—30 minutes or less in length—developed to disseminate scientific results to various audiences and to enhance learning in the classroom. AGU Cinema will feature professionally produced, big budget films alongside low-budget videos aimed at niche audiences and made by amateurs. The latter category includes videos made by governmental agency scientists, educators, communications specialists within scientific organizations, and Fall Meeting oral and poster presenters.

  15. AGU Outreach: Earth and space science expertise for the public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifuentes, I. L.; Landau, E.; Weiss, P.

    2009-05-01

    AGU is an international Union of scientists, working together on a broad spectrum of scientific topics that span all of the Earth and space sciences. Our research encompasses everything from the exploration of the planets, to studies of the structure and chemical composition of the Earth's deep interior, to understanding the Earth's atmosphere and the causes of climate change. These are not only exciting scientific topics but many of the problems that we are working on are of great interest and relevance to people all over the world. The Outreach programs and activities at AGU inform and educate the public about the Earth and space sciences, foster a strong and diverse Earth and space science workforce, and provide expertise to serve as a basis for the development of public policy. AGU offers a variety of Outreach programs and activities associated with the meetings as well as in other venues. We will present examples of these; discuss what has worked and what presents difficulties; and propose concepts for future directions in education, public information and public affairs.

  16. A year as Congressional Science Fellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    I have carried out many different types of activities while working as an Earth scientist over the last 20 years, but the past year was extremely different from those that preceded it. During most of my career I have engaged in investigative activities mandated at one level or another by Congressional edict. Often during my work I have pondered how well we, as scientists, communicate with decision makers (let alone with each other). Two years ago it seemed likely that I would be moving to Washington, D.C., and this provided me with the long-desired opportunity to compete for the American Geophysical Union Congressional Science Fellowship in order to learn about such communication first hand, as well as to learn about the legislative application of Earth science information.

  17. AGU to Launch a New Open-Access Journal Spanning the Earth and Space Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Brooks

    2014-02-01

    AGU is pleased to announce a new, fully open-access journal, Earth and Space Science (ESS), that will reflect the expansive range of science represented by AGU's members. ESS will publish research papers spanning all of the Earth, planetary, and space sciences, including related fields in environmental science, geoengineering, space engineering, and biogeochemistry.

  18. AGU Opens Its Doors, Shares Science With the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamalavage, Annie; Adamec, Bethany Holm

    2014-02-01

    Imagine the United States without Los Angeles. That was the unnerving hypothetical posed by Lucile Jones to an audience of more than 100 people at AGU's annual public lecture on the opening day of the 2013 Fall Meeting. As the science advisor for risk reduction with the U.S. Geological Survey, Jones is a familiar face to many Californians—she is often interviewed in the wake of the state's frequent earthquakes. In her lecture, Jones explained that there is a high likelihood that a major quake will hit the Los Angeles region.

  19. Become an AGU Supporting Member

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You can extend your commitment to the continuing vitality .of geophysics by helping AGU to build funds that will provide for new initiatives and assist in funding some of the nonrevenue programs of AGU, such as the congressional science fellowship, minority student scholarships, and student travel grants. The AGU Development Committee is seeking gifts and contributions toward building the endowment of the Union: The vitality of AGU and the vitality of geophysics march hand in hand.Four categories of supporting membership are offered by the Union: Individual Supporting Member ($80 per year), Life Supporting Member ($1500), Sustaining Member ($5000), Benefactor ($10,000). Benefactors, Sustaining, and Life Supporting Members pay no further dues.

  20. Visiting Congress: Can AGU Members Make a Difference?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sunanda

    2006-03-01

    Having recently discovered the value of a Congressional Visit experience, I would like to invite other AGU members to participate in the 2006 Science Engineering and Technology Congressional Visits Day (CVD), 28-29 March 2006. My experience at an AGU CVD last fall taught me that participating in the policy process and visiting your Congressional delegation can make a difference. On 14 September 2005, I was part of a group of more than 70 scientists that fanned out to meet members of Congress and their staffs as part of a CVD organized by the Coalition for National Science Funding (CNSF). CNSF is an alliance of more than 100 organizations, including AGU, that supports the goal of increasing national investment in the U.S. National Science Foundation's (NSF) research and education programs.

  1. Fostering Diversity in the Earth and Space Sciences: The Role of AGU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, J. T.; Johnson, R. M.; Hall, F. R.

    2002-12-01

    In May 2002, AGU's Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR) approved a new Diversity Plan, developed in collaboration with the CEHR Subcommittee on Diversity. Efforts to develop a diversity plan for AGU were motivated by the recognition that the present Earth and space science community poorly represents the true diversity of our society. Failure to recruit a diverse scientific workforce in an era of rapidly shifting demographics could have severe impact on the health of our profession. The traditional base of Earth and space scientists in the US (white males) has been shrinking during the past two decades, but women, racial and ethnic minorities, and persons with disabilities are not compensating for this loss. The potential ramifications of this situation - for investigators seeking to fill classes and recruit graduate students, for institutions looking to replace faculty and researchers, and for the larger community seeking continued public support of research funding - could be crippling. AGU's new Diversity Plan proposes a long-term strategy for addressing the lack of diversity in the Earth and space sciences with the ultimate vision of reflecting diversity in all of AGU's activities and programs. Four key goals have been identified: 1) Educate and involve the AGU membership in diversity issues; 2) Enhance and foster the participation of Earth and space scientists, educators and students from underrepresented groups in AGU activities; 3) Increase the visibility of the Earth and space sciences and foster awareness of career opportunities in these fields for underrepresented populations; and 4) Promote changes in the academic culture that both remove barriers and disincentives for increasing diversity in the student and faculty populations and reward member faculty wishing to pursue these goals. A detailed implementation plan that utilizes all of AGU's resources is currently under development in CEHR. Supportive participation by AGU members and

  2. Institutional support for science and scientists: A perspective from the immediate past AGU President

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    There were a number of times during my term as AGU President (July 2008 - July 2010) when AGU scientists came under intense public scrutiny. During this presentation I will discuss these experiences as they relate to the topic of this session. The first event centered around the inquiry into the University of East Anglia Climatic Research Unit by the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee concerning the so-called Climategate emails. The second was when U.S. scientists came under fire under the guise of a tax fraud investigation by the Virginia State Attorney General. In the first event, climate change skeptics demanded that I take punitive action on the scientists involved in the scandal. In the second, I received requests from AGU members to speak out against the Virginia attorney general’s investigation. In both situations I felt poorly prepared and unable to act in a way that would place in AGU in a strong position and have a positive influence on the public debate. These experiences left me feeling that the interface between science and society is becoming increasingly complex. AGU must engage its membership to help shape policy, and inform society about solutions for sustainability, and we must allocate resources to support those functions. We think that a good policy strategy must be lean and targeted and that AGU needs to stick to its scientific messages. AGU is now grappling with those issues and we are partnering with policy makers and seeking input from our members.

  3. Growing and Supporting the Student and Early Career Pipeline in Earth and Space Sciences - A Spotlight on New AGU Initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, E. R.; Williams, B. M.; Asher, P. M.; Furukawa, H.; Holm Adamec, B.; Lee, M.; Cooper, P.

    2015-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) is home to more than 60,000 scientists from 139 countries. Included in this membership are approximately 20,000 (34%) student and early career members. Many well-established programs within AGU provide a dynamic forum for Earth and Space scientists to advance research, collaborate across disciplines, and communicate the importance and impact of science to society regardless of career stage—programs such as AGU publications, scientific meetings and conferences, honors and recognition, and other educational and scientific forums. Additionally, many AGU program initiatives focusing specifically on supporting student and early career scientists and the global talent pool pipeline ones are actively underway. These include both new and long-standing programs. This presentation will describe (1) the overall demographics and needs in Earth and Space sciences, and (2) AGU's coordinated series of programs designed to help attract, retain and support student and early career scientists—with an emphasis on new programmatic activities and initiatives targeting improved diversity. Included in this presentation are a description of the AGU BrightSTaRS Program, the AGU Berkner Program for international students, a newly established AGU Student & Early Career Conference, the AGU Virtual Poster Showcase initiative, the AGU Meeting Mentor program, and GeoLEAD—an umbrella program being jointly built by a coalition of societies to help address Earth and space sciences talent pool needs.

  4. Getting our hands wet: AGU participates in 2012 USA Science and Engineering Festival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamec, Bethany Holm; Asher, Pranoti

    2012-05-01

    At the 2nd USA Science & Engineering Festival, held in Washington, D. C., from 27 to 29 April, AGU's Education Division (http://education.agu.org/) joined the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE; http://www.cosee.net/) in presenting a series of hands-on activities for children. Titled "Get Your Hands Wet," these activities were developed by COSEE and focused on chemical oceanography, climate change, ocean exploration/measurement, contaminants, physical oceanography, and marine biology. AGU education staff helped to run events such as making sand cards to illustrate the various stages of weathering of rocks and teaching a carbon cycle game, which allowed students to "become" carbon molecules and travel throughout the Earth system. AGU videographer Derek Sollosi captured some of the action at the COSEE/AGU booth on film, along with images of the rest of the festival (seehttp://youtu.be/oX8wPxYZj48). Other popular exhibits included models of NASA rovers, a jet from the U.S. Air Force, and remotely operated vehicles from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Celebrities from Mythbusters, The Big Bang Theory, NCIS, and other popular television shows made appearances on stage. For more about these and other exhibits and festival events, see http://www.usasciencefestival.org/.

  5. AGU Council reaffirms position statement against the teaching of creationism as science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folger, Peter

    During this year's AGU Spring Meeting in Boston, held May 25-29, the AGU Council reaffirmed its opposition to the teaching of creationism as a scientific theory. By unanimous vote, the Council agreed with a recommendation from AGU's Committee on Public Affairs (COPA) to renew the statement that was first adopted in December 1981. The reaffirmed statement is as follows:"The Council of the American Geophysical Union notes with concern the continuing efforts by creationists for administrative, legislative, and juridical actions designed to require or promote the teaching of creationism as a scientific theory. "The American Geophysical Union is opposed to all efforts to require or promote the teaching of creationism or any other religious tenets as science.

  6. Congressional District Visits in August

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Fushcia

    2014-08-01

    In preparation for the U.S. congressional recess, AGU Public Affairs hosted an instructional webinar about meeting with legislators and their staff at their district offices. Congress is on recess, with most members back in their districts to reconnect with their constituents. The August recess is a great opportunity for AGU members to schedule meetings with their legislators to talk about the importance of their research and the value of science funding. In these meetings, members can initiate a connection with their senator or representative that will allow them to build a relationship as a valuable resource.

  7. AGU:Comments Requested on Natural Hazards Position Statement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    Biological oceanographer Jana Davis is AGU's Congressional Science Fellow for 2004-2005. She will spend the year in the office of U. S. Senator Frank Lautenberg (D-N. J.), working on ocean and other environment issues. Davis received her Ph.D. in 2000 from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, California, and most recently was with the Maritime Studies Program, Williams College-Mystic Seaport in Connecticut, and the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Maryland. She is AGU's 28th Congressional Science Fellow. Davis applied for the fellowship in order to focus on policy at this point in her career. She observed, ``I feel that cases in which policy might benefit from increased incorporation of science outnumber those in which science lags policy.'' Davis said that the fellowship will ``provide the ideal educational experience'' to learn how policy makers struggle to ``balance current human need with future human and ecological value.''

  8. Working together for AGU and you

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Mike; Finn, Carol; McEntee, Chris

    2011-11-01

    The AGU Board of Directors and Council continue to advance AGU's strategic plan and are working together to fulfill AGU's vision to "collaboratively advance and communicate science and its power to ensure a sustainable future." Both met recently. The key outcomes from both meetings are described below and posted on the AGU Web site ( http://www.agu.org/about/governance/).

  9. AGU and Climate Science Legal Defense Fund Support Scientists Facing Legal Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, Elizabeth

    2014-02-01

    A lawyer and a scientist walk into a room—but this is no joke. Scientists are facing subpoenas, Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests, and other legal issues regarding their scientific work. It is not part of a scientist's traditional training to learn how long to keep emails related to federally funded research or what to do if their research is subpoenaed. To assist members dealing with these matters AGU partnered, in 2013, with the Climate Science Legal Defense Fund (CSLDF) for a second year to put on the Legal Education for Scientists program, a series of events aimed at helping them navigate these often murky legal waters.

  10. Third Annual AGU Take Your Child to Work Day: Explorations in Earth and Space Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debeuneure, Jalin; Adamec, Bethany Holm

    2013-05-01

    The third annual Take Your Child to Work Day was held 25 April 2013 at AGU headquarters. Nearly 25 children, grandchildren, and nieces and nephews of AGU staff members participated in the daylong activities.

  11. Ocean Sciences Best Student Papers for 1988 Joint AGU/ASLO Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Ocean Sciences Section has selected four students to receive Best Student Paper Awards for the 1988 Joint AGU and American Society for Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) Meeting held last January in New Orleans.Brad M. Bebout received a Best Student Paper Award for his paper “The Use of Agricultural Waste (Corn Slash) to Support Microzone-Associated Nitrogen Fixation by Marine Microorganisms.” Bebout is an M.S. candidate in marine sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His thesis is on “The Role of Marine Fungi in Food Selection and Nutrition of the Salt Marsh Periwinkle Littorina irrorata Say (Gastropoda).” He received his B.A. in biology from the University of California, Santa Cruz.

  12. AGU Legislative Guide available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    A guide to help AGU members communicate with legislators and government agency officials is available free of charge from AGU headquarters. The guide is based on the premise that input from the scientific community assists government to make decisions based on the latest factual information available.AGU's Guide to Legislative Information and Contacts was developed by AGU's Committee on Public Affairs and is based largely on a publication of the American Institute of Biological Sciences. The guide briefly outlines the key steps in the legislative process and lists sources of information on legislation. The booklet also provides guidelines for corresponding with legislators a n d for providing scientific testimony to Congress. It also delineates some o f the constraints under which AGU must operate when undertaking legislative activities.

  13. AGU develops earthquake curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, Charles

    AGU, in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), announces the production of a new curriculum package for grades 7-12 on the engineering and geophysical aspects of earthquakes.According to Frank Ireton, AGU's precollege education manager, “Both AGU and FEMA are working to promote the understanding of earthquake processes and their impact on the built environment. We are designing a program that involves students in learning how science, mathematics, and social studies concepts can be applied to reduce earthquake hazards.”

  14. New AGU Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-02-01

    Fellows of AGU are members who have attained acknowledged eminence in the Earth and space sciences. The Fellows Committee on 15 January 2005 elected 43 members to join the ranks of AGU Fellows. Candidates for Fellow are nominated by colleagues and then vetted by the relevant Sections, who forward the top nominees to the Fellows Committee. The Fellows Committee, which consists of 11 Fellows, receives about twice the number of nominations as can be elected: no more than 0.1% of the AGU membership can be elected each year. The committee meets to review the forwarded nominations and decides who will be elected for the year.

  15. New AGU Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-02-01

    Fellows of AGU are members who have attained acknowledged eminence in the Earth and space sciences. The Fellows Committee on 14 January 2006 elected 45 members to join the ranks of AGU Fellows. Candidates for Fellow are nominated by colleagues and then vetted by the relevant Sections, who forward the top nominees to the Fellows Committee. The Fellows Committee, which consists of 11 Fellows, receives about twice the number of nominations as can be elected: no more than 0.1% of the AGU membership can be elected each year. The committee meets to review the forwarded nominations and decides who will be elected for the year.

  16. Science, Technology and Natural Resources Policy: Overcoming Congressional Gridlock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    The current status of Science, Technology and Natural Resources (STNR) policy in the United States provides an ideal context to examine the influence of committee seniority within the public policy process. Exemplars of the Policy Entrepreneur have been individuals in leadership positions, whether executive or legislative. The role of junior committee members in shaping policy innovation is less well understood, and is frequently masked either in cross-sectional research designs or in case studies. The House Natural Resources committee seniority patterns are compared to the House of Representatives Chamber data from 1975 to 2015. This expanse of congressional time captures both the policy innovation of the Class of 1974 who helped transform the public lands by pursuing a preservation agenda, along with the contemporaneous gridlock caused by disagreements about reducing the size of the federal government, a policy agenda championed and sustained by the Class of 1994. Several types of political actors have served as policy entrepreneurs, President Kennedy and Secretary of Interior Udall shepherding the Wilderness Act of 1964 from the Executive branch, or in the 111th Congress Committee chairmen Senator Christopher Dodd and Representative Barney Frank, having announced their retirements, spent their final Congress shaping the consensus that produced the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010. A less studied policy phenomenon relies on "packing the committee" to outvote the leadership. This tactic can be used by the party leadership to overcome recalcitrant senior committee members, as was the case for Democrats in the House Interior and Insular Affairs Committee shift to preservation in the 1970s, or the tactic can be employed from the grassroots, as may be happening in the case of the House Natural Resources Committee in the 114th Congress. A policy making process analog to rivers is more appropriate than a mechanistic model. As there are multiple

  17. AGU Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Administrative Committees are responsible for those functions required for the overall performance or well-being of AGU as an organization. These committees are Audit and Legal Affairs, Budget and Finance*, Development, Nominations*, Planning, Statutes and Bylaws*, Tellers.Operating Committees are responsible for the policy direction and operational oversight of AGU's primary programs. The Operating Committees are Education and Human Resources, Fellows*, Information Technology, International Participation*, Meetings, Public Affairs, Public Information, Publications*.

  18. The view from Capitol Hill: Congressional Science Fellow's midyear report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isherwood, Dana

    In a few short weeks, I will have reached the midpoint of my Fellowship year. Like others before me, this is a time for frustration, knowing there is so much left to accomplish and so little time. The past 5 months have been exhilarating. When I came to Washington, I knew very little about how Congress works and even less about the role of the Congressional staff. Imagine my surprise (and relief) when those “turkeys in Washington” turned out to be the most hardworking, capable, and dedicated group of people I know.

  19. AGU Fellows Elected for 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    AGU Fellows are members who have made exceptional contributions to Earth and space sciences as valued by their peer groups and vetted by a committee of Fellows. This year, 58 members have achieved this distinction (see http://www.agu.org/about/honors/fellows/ for more information and nomination details).

  20. New AGU Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    Fellows of AGU are members who have attained acknowledged eminence in the Earth and space sciences. On 13 December 2008, the Fellows Committee elected 55 members for the class of 2009. Candidates are nominated by colleagues and then vetted by relevant sections and focus groups, who forward the top nominees to the Fellows Committee.

  1. AGU hydrology publication outlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeze, R. Allan

    In recent months I have been approached on several occasions by members of the hydrology community who asked me which of the various AGU journals and publishing outlets would be most suitable for a particular paper or article that they have prepared.Water Resources Research (WRR) is the primary AGU outlet for research papers in hydrology. It is an interdisciplinary journal that integrates research in the social and natural sciences of water. The editors of WRR invite original contributions in the physical, chemical and biological sciences and also in the social and policy sciences, including economics, systems analysis, sociology, and law. The editor for the physical sciences side of the journal is Donald R. Nielson, LAWR Veihmeyer Hall, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616. The editor for the policy sciences side of the journal is Ronald G. Cummings, Department of Economics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131

  2. AGU members elected to Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six AGU members are among the sixty new members and fifteen foreign associates elected on April 27 to the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.AGU members elected were AGU Past-President G. Brent Dalrymple of USGS, Menlo Park, Calif.; Donald J . DePaolo, University of California, Berkeley; Ho-Kwang (David) Mao, Carnegie Institution, Washington, D.C.; Mario J . Molina, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge; and Alexandra Navrotsky, Princeton University, Princeton, N.J. Elected as foreign associates were Nikolai V. Sobolev, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, and Friedrich H. Busse, University of Bayreuth, Germany.

  3. First AGU Board of Directors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2010-08-01

    On 1 July 2010, the first AGU Board of Directors took office. The board is composed of the president, president-elect, immediate past president, general secretary, international secretary, development board chair, six members elected by the Union membership, vice chair of the AGU Council, and the executive director. Two additional members may be nominated by the AGU president and approved by the board. The creation of the board is a result of the new governance structure approved by the AGU membership in November 2009. The board is responsible for the business aspects of the Union, while an expanded AGU Council will focus on science issues. Council members will be introduced in a future issue of Eos.

  4. Two Students Win AGU Scholarships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Claire

    2014-10-01

    AGU is pleased to announce the winners of two student scholarships. Caterina Brighi is the recipient of the 2014 David S. Miller Young Scientist Scholarship, which recognizes a student of the Earth sciences whose academic work exhibits interest and promise.

  5. New AGU Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    With a new total membership high of just over 48,000, it was possible to elect 48 new Fellows for the 2007 class. Fellows of AGU are members who have attained acknowledged eminence in Earth and space sciences. They are nominated by colleagues, vetted by the relevant sections or in some cases focus groups, and then elected by the Union Fellows Committee, which comprises 11 Fellows. Only 0.1% of the membership can be elected each year.

  6. Funding Science And Technology Research; A Congressional Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Michael E.

    1981-03-01

    The growth in Federal funding of research and development that began during World War II has leveled off during the last decade, but the nation's need for continued expansion of effort in such areas as general technology development and industrial innovation has continued to grow. Foreign industries are increasingly able to compete in high technology areas previously dominated by domestic firms. As now constituted, research and support agencies such as the National Bureau of Standards are not able to respond to a call for new programs of greatly increased size and scope. For these reasons and others, a proposal is now before Congress to form a National Technology Foundation to include and expand the support missions of the National Bureau of Standards, the Patent and Trademark Office, the National Technical Information Service, and parts of the Engineering and Applied Science programs from the National Science Foundation. This proposal should be examined relative to the short term need for increasing the rate of industrial innovation and relative to a long term goal of integration of basic and applied interests in technology development.

  7. Why publish with AGU?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graedel, T. E.

    The most visible activity of the American Geophysical Union is its publication of scientific journals. There are eight of these: Journal of Geophysical Research—Space Physics (JGR I), Journal of Geophysical Research—Solid Earth (JGR II), Journal of Geophysical Research—Oceans and Atmospheres (JGR III), Radio Science (RS), Water Resources Research (WRR), Geophysical Research Letters (GRL), Reviews of Geophysics and Space Physics (RGSP), and the newest, Tectonics.AGU's journals have established solid reputations for scientific excellence over the years. Reputation is not sufficient to sustain a high quality journal, however, since other factors enter into an author's decision on where to publish his or her work. In this article the characteristics of AGU's journals are compared with those of its competitors, with the aim of furnishing guidance to prospective authors and a better understanding of the value of the products to purchasers.

  8. New AGU Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-02-01

    Fellows of AGU are members who have attained acknowledged eminence in the Earth and space sciences. On 8 December 2007, the Fellows Committee elected 51 members for the class of 2008. Candidates are nominated by colleagues and then vetted by relevant sections and focus groups, who forward the top nominees to the Fellows Committee, which comprises 11 Fellows. Members of the 2006-2008 Fellows Committee are Tuija Pulkkinen, chair, and Shaw Liu, Andrea Rinaldo, Roberta Rudnick, Barbara Romanowicz, Lawrence Mysak, Steve Running, Thomas Herring, Lisa Tauxe, Julian McCreary, and Maria Zuber.

  9. 2010-2012 AGU Council Takes Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Carol A.

    2010-08-01

    The AGU Council is the governing body responsible for science issues and is chaired by the Union president-elect (for more information, visit http://www.agu.org/about/governance/). The newly expanded Council includes the 24 focus group chairs and vice-chairs; 22 section presidents and presidents-elect; five committee chairs; four student/early-career scientists; and two ex officio members, the AGU president and the executive director. Council members elected their leadership team, which develops and oversees the work of the Council and defines issues of importance for Council deliberation. The Council will initially focus on how best to organize AGU science. This process will involve broad solicitation of insight into how Earth and space science is currently reconfiguring itself and how it is anticipated to change in the foreseeable future. That insight will be used to consider implications for how AGU structures itself, fulfills its purpose, and achieves its vision.

  10. Shop the AGU books clearance sale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscovitch, Mirelle

    2012-11-01

    For more than 85 years, AGU books have provided access to the work of scientists worldwide and covered exceptional research in the Earth and space sciences. Now more than 80 of our most popular titles are available at discounted prices. AGU members can save up to 75% off titles from the Geophysical Monograph Series, Water Resources Monograph Series, Special Publications, and more.

  11. The AGU Chapman Conference on Communicating Climate Science: A Historic Look to the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, J. M.; Rasch, P. J.; Andronova, N. G.

    2013-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union hosted a Chapman Conference on Communicating Climate Science at Snow Mountain Ranch, Granby, Colorado, June 8-13, 2013. The goal of the Chapman Conference was to bring together scholars, social scientists and journalists to discuss the history, and more importantly, the present and future of climate change communication. We met to evaluate our current and needed communication capacity, and to develop ways and means to convey advances in the understanding of climate science. Delegates discussed and presented methods and capacity to communicate to policymakers, the media, and society. Our focus was on the efficacy of scientific communication, on improving communication practices, and on building collaborations spawned at the conference, and beyond. The Chapman was a success. Close to 150 of us gathered high in the Colorado Rockies to share almost 100 presentations and nearly 10 hours of group discussions focused on ways and means to better bring the climate change message to society, to educators and policymakers in North America and around the world. This presentation will focus on the outcomes of the Chapman Climate Change Communication Conference; the conclusions of the delegate community; and directions forward.

  12. National Science Foundation Facilitation of AGU Scientists' K-14 Education and Outreach Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinen, M.; Prendeville, J.

    2002-12-01

    The National Science Foundation encourages the participation of geoscientists in K-14 education and outreach and provides support for that participation through a wide variety of programs. At the most general level, NSF requires that scientists describe the broader impacts of their research in their proposals. While broader impacts are not restricted to education and outreach, this requirement has encouraged many scientists to consider opportunities for K-14 education and outreach. Many NSF-wide programs provide financial support for K-14 education and outreach. Some are long-standing programs like Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU), which have been used effectively by the geoscience community to introduce undergraduates to our field. Other programs, like CAREER, encourage faculty to develop innovative teaching and curricular approaches and to relate them to their research program. The Education and Human Resources Directorate (EHR) of NSF provides funds for a variety of undergraduate education improvements, and for elementary and secondary education activities. EHR also provides opportunities for informal education that have been used by the geoscience community to develop museum exhibits, IMAX films, television programs, and other high visibility outreach activities. The Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) holds competitions in the Geoscience Education Program and Opportunities to Enhance Diversity in the Geosciences that provide funds focused on development in our own field. Other specialized competitions, like awards associated with the Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence, have targeted the specific K-14 education and outreach needs of portions of our community. Finally, GEO has facilitated the development of the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE) that has established a digital portal to age-appropriate, peer-reviewed curricular material for teachers.

  13. Advocacy and AGU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In May 1982, the AGU Council approved the following policy on the Union's role in advocacy on public issues.The American Geophysical Union is an association of scientists, scholars, and interested lay public for the purpose of advancing geophysical science. The Union shares a collateral sense of responsibility to assure that the results of geophysical research are made available to benefit all mankind. The Union encourages its members to exercise their individual sense of responsibility in addressing political and social issues. Should they choose to act collectively on such issues, other organizations exist for such purposes. The American Geophysical Union, as a society, should preserve its unique position as an objective source of analysis and commentary for the full spectrum of geophysical science. Accordingly, the following policies should guide the American Geophysical Union's role as an advocate:

  14. AGU Council Undertakes Mission:Alignment Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Carol

    2010-12-01

    Over the past 2 years, AGU has undertaken two critical initiatives designed to better position the organization for continued success. The first was a full membership vote to restructure governance to better address how both the science and the business of AGU are conducted. The second was to create a new long-term strategic plan based on broad input from a cross section of science perspectives. Now the newly configured AGU Council, which represents all constituent voices, is focusing on a key question: Given our strategic plan, stakeholder expectations of AGU, and what is being asked of science and our members, how does our science need to be organized, recognized and rewarded, disseminated, and promoted?

  15. AGU's 2010 annual report now available online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhrman, Joan

    2011-11-01

    AGU president Michael McPhaden, in a letter introducing the Union's recently released 2010 annual report, said that "2010 was a historic year for Earth and space science, and for AGU as an organization." He went on to say, "It is my honor to report on how our organization addressed challenges and created opportunities for growth and advancement throughout 2010, building on our core strengths of scientific excellence and groundbreaking research." The report tells the story of AGU's science and its commitment to promoting discovery in Earth and space science for the benefit of humanity through a series of profiles of individual members. The profiles focus on the impact these scientists' work is having on the world around them and how it relates to the goals outlined in AGU's new strategic plan.

  16. AGU Panel meets on career topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollister, Charles

    Graduate students and their career opportunities in ocean and earth sciences were the focus of the Education and Human Resources (E & HR) Committee meeting held at the 1982 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. A standing committee of AGU, the E & HR committee is responsible for matters concerning education in earth, ocean, and planetary sciences from precollege through graduate programs, including career guidance, academic preparation, student recruitment, and manpower supply and demand.At the meeting a draft of the AGU-sponsored Careers in Oceanography booklet by committee chairman C. Hollister was thoroughly discussed and a new draft will emerge soon for final approval. The booklet is designed to complement the Careers in Geophysics booklet recently published by AGU; the booklets contain information about planning a career, job opportunities, educational requirements, and a synopsis of where the prospective student might apply.

  17. Two Students Win AGU Scholarships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Claire

    2013-11-01

    AGU is pleased to announce the winners of two scholarships. Marc Neveu is the recipient of the 2013 David S. Miller Young Scientist Scholarship, which recognizes a student of the Earth sciences whose academic work exhibits interest and promise. Hima Hassenruck-Gudipati is the 2013 recipient of the David E. Lumley Scholarship, which recognizes a high-achieving student who is working on problems of global importance in the energy and environmental sectors of industry and academia.

  18. AGU election FAQs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Robert

    2012-08-01

    Many of you are aware that this is an election year, and I don't mean electing the next president of the United States! This is AGU's election year, and the polls are opening soon. Your vote matters. Eligible voters should vote, and now is the time to learn about the candidates. There are no TV ads, and the candidates won't be covered in the news. However, electing AGU leaders for the next term affects the future direction of the Union. Please take a few minutes to visit the election Web site (http://sites.agu.org/elections/) and review the candidate bios.

  19. Notification of upcoming AGU Council meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Billy

    2012-10-01

    The AGU Council will meet on Sunday, 2 December 2012, at the InterContinental Hotel in San Francisco, Calif. The meeting, which is open to all AGU members, will include discussions of AGU's new Grand Challenge Project (a project that will be introduced to members at the 2012 Fall Meeting), the proposed AGU scientific ethics policy, publishing strategies, future plans for honors and recognition, and leadership transition as new members join the Council. This year the Council experimented with a new approach to conducting business. By holding virtual meetings throughout the year, Council members have been able to act in a more timely manner and provide input on important membership and science issues on the Board of Directors' agenda. The Council Leadership Team—an elected subset of the Council—also experimented with a new approach, meeting every month to keep moving projects forward. This approach has increased communication and improved effectiveness in Council decision making.

  20. Leadership Gathering Marks Historic Transition at AGU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, Ann

    2010-06-01

    The 2008-2010 AGU Council adopted a strategic plan and voted to create a task force to facilitate AGU leadership in Earth and space sciences at its meeting on 7 June 2010. The meeting, at AGU headquarters in Washington, D. C., was the first part of a 4-day historic leadership conference that included 66 volunteer leaders and key staff as AGU prepares to transition to a new governance structure. The new Union officers (president, president-elect, general secretary, and international secretary), the newly established Board of Directors, and the new Council—which will consist of section presidents and presidents-elect, focus group chairs and vice chairs, committee chairs, and four appointed student/early-career scientists—take office on 1 July 2010.

  1. AGU lost members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mail to the following members has been returned, and we are unable to locate forwarding addresses. If you have information on any of them, please contact AGU by mail or call toll free at 800-424-2488.

  2. New AGU Climate Communication Prize: Call for nominations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2011-08-01

    AGU is pleased to announce the newly launched AGU Climate Communication Prize. This new Union prize, generously funded by Nature's Own, a purveyor of fossils, minerals, and handcrafted jewelry in Boulder, Colo., will honor an AGU member-scientist for the communication of climate science. The prize highlights the importance of promoting scientific literacy, clarity of message, and efforts to foster respect and understanding of science-based values as they relate to the implications of climate change. The prize will be awarded annually and will be presented at AGU's Fall Meeting. It will carry a cash award of $25,000.

  3. AGU elects 1986 Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eighteen distinguished scientists have been elected Fellows of AGU. The total number of Fellows elected each year may not exceed 0.1% of the total membership at the time of election.The newly elected Fellows are John D. Bossier, Office of Charting and Geodetic Services, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Rockville, Md.Ian S. Carmichael, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of California, Berkeley.Paul J. Crutzen, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Federal Republic of Germany.Dieter H. Ehhalt, Institute of Atmospheric Chemistry, Jülich, and Department of Geophysics, University of Cologne, Cologne, Federal Republic of Germany.Thomas C. Hanks, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, Calif.C. G. A. Harrison, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Fla.Stanley R. Hart, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.Charles W. Howe, Department of Economics, University of Colorado, Boulder.Charlotte E. Keen, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada.T. J. Kukkamäki, Finnish Geodetic Institute, Helsinki.Ronald T. Merrill, Geophysics Program, University of Washington, Seattle.Pearn P. Niiler, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif.Mervyn S. Paterson, Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra.Joseph Pedlosky, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Mass.W. R. Peltier, Department of Physics, University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada.Raymond G. Roble, Solar Variability Section, High-Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.David J. Stevenson, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.David A. Woolhiser, Southwest Watershed Research Center, Tucson, Ariz.

  4. AIP Congressional Fellowship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applications are now being accepted for the American Institute of Physics' Congressional Science Fellowship Program for 1990-1991. The fellow will serve as a special legislative assistant on either a congressional committee or on the staff of a member of Congress. The Congressional Science Fellowship Program was organized by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and includes 15 sponsoring societies.Qualifications for the AlP-sponsored, 1-year fellowship are a demonstrated Ph.D.-level competence in physics or a related field, membership in an AIP member society, U.S. citizenship or permanent U.S. resident status, and an interest in applying scientific knowledge within the legislative process.

  5. Keeping Pseudoscience Out of AGU Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, Robert A.

    2005-06-01

    I found the editorial, ``Speaking Up For Science'' (Eos, 86,(24), 14 June 2005, p. 225) disturbing, but not for the reasons you intended. The Smithsonian made a mistake, but nowhere do you discuss its efforts to correct that. More troublesome to me as a member of AGU is the blatant hypocrisy contained in the editorial. How many posters or presentations have been made at AGU meetings in the last 10-20 years that support creationism, intelligent design, or other forms of pseudo-science, such as the so-called ``face'' on Mars?

  6. AGU updating position statement on climate change: Call for comments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Erik

    2012-11-01

    Since 1982, AGU has developed and maintained position statements to provide scientific expertise on significant policy issues. All members are encouraged to help inform the policy-making process in their home and research locales with thoughtful presentation of scientific viewpoints. To aid in this task, AGU members may use an AGU position statement as an official statement of the Union in discussion with policy makers. Position statements are published on the AGU science policy Web page, where they can be viewed by scientists, policy makers, media, and the general public.

  7. The Congressional Science Fellow Program and Other Efforts to Help Congress and the Public Make Wiser Decisions on Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primack, Joel

    2004-05-01

    For thirty years the AAAS Congressional Science and Technology Fellow Program, with which the APS program is affiliated, has been bringing scientists and engineers to work on the staffs of Congress. During the same period, many independent technology policy groups at universities, professional societies including the APS, and non-profit organizations have prepared excellent reports. But despite these efforts, U.S. science and technology policy is often terrible! For example, the current Administration contends that there is not enough scientific evidence of global warming to actually begin to do something to slow the growth in fossil fuel use, but there is plenty of evidence to support deploying a missile defense system now, and we need to be ready to test new generations of nuclear weapons. We scientists must develop a bigger public constituency for good decisions. We need to present, not only sound recommendations backed up by convincing studies, but also wise moral leadership.

  8. AGU Fellows Elected for 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-04-01

    The Union Fellows Selection Committee met in Washington on 29 March 2011 to review candidates nominated in 2010 for the Class of 2011. The first class of AGU Fellows was elected in 1962 with the sole criteria defined as Eminence in Geophysics. AGU bylaws require that the size of the Fellows class be limited to no more than 0.1% of the total AGU membership. The following new Fellows will be recognized during the AGU Fall Meeting in December.

  9. New Look for AGU Website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treby, Jill

    2013-10-01

    You will notice some changes when you visit the AGU website this week. AGU.org has a modern look that is consistent with the Fall Meeting and other AGU meeting websites. Content is easier to find because of new features, including the following:

  10. Shaping AGU's contributions to policy debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, M. Granger; Patwardhan, Anand

    In their Forum piece in the April 9 issue of Eos, Kaula and Anderson paint an unrealistically stark choice for the roles AGU might play in policy debates that substantially involve geophysical science. On the one hand is the antiseptic model of AGU-above-the-policy-fray: the aloof provider of geophysical facts from the literature. On the other hand is the model of AGU-as-policy-advocate: blending geophysical knowledge with value judgements in order to argue for specific policy actions in the political trenches. The problem with the first model is that the form assumed by most geophysical facts in the literature is rather distant from the needs of policy makers. Thus, the facts are easily overlooked in the face of pressing short-term political agendas. The problem with the second model is that AGU is a professional society comprised of scientists who hold many different value orientations. Any particular set of values adopted in a piece of political advocacy is likely to be at odds with many AGU members.

  11. Fall 2008 Congressional Visits Day Focuses on Underfunding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Brian

    2009-03-01

    ``Can't you fill my recruiting schedule with more students?'' a company recruiter recently asked Andreas Kronenberg, professor and head of the Department of Geology and Geophysics at Texas A&M University. Kronenberg gave a simple, honest answer: ``No.'' He shared that anecdote with U.S. Representative Chet Edwards (D-Tex.) to underscore the fact that a number of college students are majoring in subjects other than geosciences due to the lack of secure funding and jobs in that field. Kronenberg had met with Edwards during AGU's fall 2008 Congressional Visits Day (CVD), a 2-day program when more than 60 scientists discussed with their legislators the importance of science funding.

  12. Free Workshop for Teachers at the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamalavage, Anne

    2013-10-01

    In keeping with its commitment to fostering the next generation of Earth and space scientists, AGU is partnering with the National Earth Science Teachers Association to hold the annual Geophysical Information for Teachers (GIFT) workshop at the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting. GIFT allows K-12 science educators (both classroom and informal) to hear from scientists about their latest Earth and space science research, explore new classroom resources for engaging students, and visit exhibits and technical sessions during the Fall Meeting.

  13. Influencing the future of AGU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael; Finn, Carol; McEntee, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Steve Jobs, visionary cofounder of Apple, Inc., once said, “Everyone here has the sense that right now is one of those moments when we are influencing the future.” This statement aptly describes AGU at this time as the Board of Directors and the Council continue to influence the future in exciting ways by advancing our strategic plan (http://www.agu.org/about/mission.shtml). Both governing bodies held meetings in San Francisco immediately preceding the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting. The agendas for both meetings, along with the key outcomes, are posted on AGU's Web site (http://www.agu.org/about/governance/).

  14. AGU members win Fulbrights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six AGU members have been awarded Fulbright grants to lecture or conduct research abroad during the current (1985-1986) academic year, according to the Council for International Exchange of Scholars, which helps to administer the Fulbright Scholar Program.James R. Barcus, a professor of physics at the University of Denver, is lecturing and doing research in thunderstorm coupling in global electricity at Catholic University in Lima, Peru, from January through June 1986.

  15. AGU and American Geosciences Institute Webinar Series to Strengthen Departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Pranoti M.; Keane, Christopher M.

    2013-02-01

    The AGU Education and Public Outreach department in collaboration with the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) are continuing their partnership to support Earth and space science departments through AGU's Heads and Chairs Program. Through this partnership, AGI's Workforce Program and AGU's education staff continue to host monthly, hour-long webinars and online discussions on various topics that hit at the heart of the health and success of Earth and space science departments. We invite department heads and chairs as well as faculty, administrators, and program directors to join in this unique free program.

  16. A Bit of History: The EGS, AGU, and EUG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1969-Waldo Smith (AGU Executive Director, 1944-1970) is invited to present an overview of the structure and function of AGU at a meeting convened by Keith Runcorn to discuss a proposal to form a European Geophysical Union (EGU). The EGU, as described in the notes of the meeting, is proposed ``principally in order to give more opportunity than presently exists, for young scientist in Europe to present their ideas and to benefit from interchanges with the scientists in the whole spectrum of disciplines embracing Earth and Planetary Sciences.'' 1971-The president of AGU, Homer Newell, and the new executive director, Fred Spilhaus, are invited by Runcorn to attend the Earth and Planetary Physics Colloquium and are asked to bring along the statutes and bylaws of AGU as an example to help in drafting the basis for the new European organization. The foundation is laid at that time for ongoing cooperation between AGU and what was soon to become EGS.

  17. AGU Board and Council Close Out Productive Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderlein, Cheryl

    2014-02-01

    The AGU Board of Directors and Council both held meetings in San Francisco the weekend before Fall Meeting, wrapping up a very busy and productive year. The Board and Council have a joint work plan (see http://sites.agu.org/leadership/bod/), and meetings are planned to provide a flow of information between the two groups, as well as to staff and other parts of the Union, including committees and task forces, editors, and sections and focus groups. Outcomes from the meetings are posted on AGU's website: Board outcomes can be found at http://sites.agu.org/leadership/bod/board-outcomes/ and Council outcomes at, http://sites.agu.org/leadership/science-council/council-outcomes/.

  18. Building a bridge between AGU and SEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, Louise; Bradford, John H.

    2012-05-01

    AGU and the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) complement each other in many ways. SEG is known for strength in applied geophysics and method development, while AGU is known for application of geophysics to broader scientific questions in Earth and atmospheric sciences. These boundaries are of course gray, and there is substantial and complementary overlap of interests, particularly among some disciplines; these include the study of passive and active source seismology, gravity and magnetic anomalies, and electrical and electromagnetic methodologies, as well as interest in the application of these methods to crustal structure, near- surface geophysics, geothermal exploration, and basin analysis. Facilitating communication between members of SEG and those of AGU has a significant impact on the geophysical sciences. The AGU-SEG Collaboration Committee (ASCC) was established as part of the AGUSEG Alliance Agreement, signed in 2010. In the agreement, ASCC was "charged with considering and making recommendations to the respective organizations regarding other areas of cooperation, such as joint workshops or programs and continuing- education courses." The first committee-wide meeting was held on 11 February 2011. Subsequent meetings are scheduled every 4-6 weeks.

  19. AGU Fall Meeting Mentors for Students Sought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsten, Jill

    2005-11-01

    Science mentors are sought for the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science Initiative (MS PHD's) Professional Development Program. MS PHD's, begun in 2004, is a joint NASA-U.S. National Science Foundation funded program that provides early career mentoring, professional development, and networking for minority undergraduate and graduate students pursuing degrees in the Earth and space sciences. AGU is one of several major sponsoring societies for this five-year effort to provide participating students with increased exposure to, interaction with, and engagement in the Earth system science community, in order to help them achieve their academic and professional goals.

  20. An Update on AGU Publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilst, Rob; Hanson, Brooks

    2013-07-01

    In the past year, AGU publishing has undergone substantial change, and we realize that this has caused some anxiety and concern among you, our members. As the start of a regular Eos series on issues in scientific publishing in general and AGU's content in particular, we provide here an overview and update of recent developments, with an emphasis on the partnership between AGU and Wiley. Topical entries, for instance on open access, will be published later.

  1. AGU Board and Council Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderlein, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    The AGU Board and Council held meetings in San Francisco the weekend before Fall Meeting. Both meetings kicked off with a "Then and Now" presentation by Mike McPhaden, outgoing president; Carol Finn, incoming president; and executive director/CEO Chris McEntee. The presentation highlighted AGU's accomplishments under its strategic plan and new governance model in the past 2.5 years. The AGU leaders' written State of the Union reports can be found at http://www.agu.org/about/strategic_plan.shtml.

  2. Newly established AGU awards and lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Beth; Kumar, Mohi

    2012-05-01

    The Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring (Biogeosciences section) recognizes AGU members who have sustained an active research career in a field related to biogeosciences while excelling as teachers and serving as role models for the next generation of female scientists. This new award acknowledges the importance of female mentors in enhancing gender balance in physical science career paths. The award is being endowed to honor Elizabeth Sulzman, an isotope biogeochemist and soil scientist, whose enthusiasm for teaching awed many undergraduates at Oregon State University. Current plans are to present the first Sulzman award at the 2013 Fall Meeting. Applicants must be women who are within 15 years of receiving their Ph.D., and nomination packages should include a cover letter, resumé, and three letters of recommendation. As they become available, more details will be posted on the Biogeosciences section Web site (http://www.agu.org/sections/biogeo/). The award will provide up to $1000 to one successful nominee each year, although the exact monetary amount is yet to be determined. AGU is currently accepting donations to endow this award; contact Victoria Thompson (vthompson@agu.org) to get involved.

  3. AGU Council to Meet in December

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderlein, Cheryl L.

    2010-11-01

    The AGU Council will hold a meeting on Sunday, 12 December 2010, in San Francisco in conjunction with the Fall Meeting. This is the first meeting of the reconfigured Council, chaired by President­elect Carol Finn. As an outcome of the membership vote a year ago, the composition and the focus of the Council changed. With the creation of the Board of Directors to handle the business and fiduciary responsibilities of the organization, the Council is free to focus on science policy and other science-related matters. There are currently 59 Council members, including section presidents and presidents-elect, focus group chairs and vice chairs, committee chairs, early-career scientists, and the AGU president, president-elect, and executive director.

  4. Diversity, Geosciences, and Societal Impact: Perspectives From a Geoscientist, Workforce Development Specialist, and Former Congressional Science Fellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    In order for the United States to remain competitive in the STEM fields, all available interested citizens must be engaged, prepared, and retained in the geoscience workforce. The misperception that the geosciences do little to support the local community and give back to fellow citizens contributes to the lack of diversity in the field. Another challenge is that the assumptions of career paths for someone trained in geosciences are often limited to field work, perpetuated by visuals found in media, popular culture and recruiting materials and university websites. In order to combat these views it is critical that geoscientists make visible both the diverse career opportunities for those trained in geoscience and the relevance of the field to societal issues. In order to make a substantive change in the number of underrepresented minorities pursuing and working in geosciences we must rethink how we describe our work, its impacts and its relevance to society. At UNAVCO, we have undertaken this charge to change they way the future generation of geoscientists views opportunities in our field. This presentation will include reflections of a trained geoscientist taking a non-field/research career path and the opportunities it has afforded as well as the challenges encountered. The presentation will also highlight how experience managing a STEM program for middle school girls, serving as a Congressional Science Fellow, and managing an undergraduate research internship program is aiding in shaping the Geoscience Workforce Initiative at UNAVCO.

  5. AGU Council adopts position statement on scientific expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, Elizabeth; Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2011-09-01

    On 17 August the AGU Council voted to adopt an American Meteorological Society (AMS) statement on free and open communication of scientific findings as an official position of AGU. The statement appears below. Recent attacks on scientists who present facts that are controversial or politically charged, such as in cases involving climate science, have sparked action by AGU and other scientific societies, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Open communication and collaboration are essential to the scientific process and must not be deterred by politics, media, or faith. In a recent letter to the New York Times, AGU president Michael McPhaden stated that “misguided attempts to suppress scientific research, particularly through political pressure, will not make climate change or the role human activity plays in it magically disappear. It will, however, make the objective knowledge needed to inform good policy decisions disappear.”

  6. AGU acts on NSF Page Charge Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast action by Headquarters alerted AGU members to a proposed change to the National Science Foundation's page charge policy that would weaken the ability of scientific societies to serve the scientific community.If adopted, NSF's new policy, announced in the Federal Register December 18, would remove the prohibition against allowing page charges to commercially produced journals. The proposal for the change was supposedly put forth to obtain a reaction from the scientific community.

  7. First AGU Climate Communication Prize awarded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Christine

    2012-02-01

    Gavin Schmidt, a climate scientist at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and cofounder of the RealClimate blog (http://www.realclimate.org/), received the first AGU Climate Communication Prize at the honors ceremony. The prize recognizes excellence in climate communication as well as the promotion of scientific literacy, clarity of messaging, and efforts to foster respect and understanding for science-based values related to climate change. Sponsored by Nature's Own—a Boulder, Colo.-based company specializing in the sale of minerals, fossils, and decorative stone specimens—the prize comes with a $25,000 cash award. "AGU created this award to raise the visibility of climate change as a critical issue facing the world today, to demonstrate our support for scientists who commit themselves to the effective communication of climate change science, and to encourage more scientists to engage with the public and policy makers on how climate research can contribute to the sustainability of our planet," said AGU president Michael Mc Phaden. "That's why we are so pleased to recognize Gavin for his dedicated leadership and outstanding scientific achievements. We hope that his work will serve as an inspiration for others."

  8. AGU'S Guide to Legislative Information and Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-04-01

    Based largely on a publication titled A Guide for Providing Scientific Testimony by Arthur Jack Grimes, Head, Department of Public Responsibilities, American Institute of Biological Sciences.NB. All price quotes for publications are 1983 prices.The purpose of this guide is to assist AGU members in communicating with legislators and government agency officials and to delineate some of the constraints under which AGU must operate when undertaking activities in this area.Before becoming law and having funds appropriated to carry it out, legislation at the federal level and at most state levels can go through more than 20 different steps. Certain steps offer opportunity for persons and groups to provide information with both written and inperson testimony. A few of the key steps in the legislative process are presented.

  9. Tomorrow's AGU: Building a Foundation for Good Governance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, Timothy L.

    2009-09-01

    In May, the AGU Council voted unanimously to create a 16-member board of directors to oversee the business of the Union, and to expand the Council beyond section leadership to include focus group and committee leaders concentrating on matters of science and related Union activities such as AGU publications, meetings, and awards and honors (see Eos, 90(25), 213, 23 June 2009). This fall, the AGU membership will be asked to vote on these important changes. The Council action followed careful deliberation and reflects the recommendations of the Future Focus Task Force, which was formed to answer the question, “How will AGU need to change the way it does business to achieve its strategic vision and mission and remain a preeminent scientific society?”

  10. Town Hall on AGU Publishing Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forlini, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Representatives from AGU's leadership and Wiley fielded questions at a town hall during Fall Meeting that ranged from the pricing of AGU's digital library to the fate of AGU books to the role of the governance structure in approving the AGU-Wiley publications partnership.

  11. Is AGU in your will?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitten, Charles A.

    We are approaching the time of year when the IRS requires that we review our ‘financial position.’ The new tax laws, we are told, have benefits for everyone. These ‘goodies’ may be hard to find. However, those laws that apply to estates have been changed significantly, and our lawyer urges that my wife and I update our wills.We hope you read the AGU-GIFT editorial on deferred giving in the September 15, 1981, Eos. John Reed mentioned different options. The Steering Committee for AGU-GIFT believes that the designation of a bequest to AGU in an updated will may be appealing to some of AGU's senior members who are well established, whose career-long commitments are largely fulfilled, and who may be better shielded from inflation than some other members.

  12. Entering a New ERA: Education Resources and AGU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsten, J. L.; Johnson, R. M.

    2001-12-01

    Professional societies play a unique role in the on-going battle to improve public education in the Earth and space sciences. With guidance from its Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR), AGU has traditionally sponsored strong programs that provide mechanisms for linking its research membership with the formal/informal science education communities. Among the most successful of these are tutorials for K-12 teachers taught by AGU members during national meetings (e.g., GIFT - Geophysical Information For Teachers) and internships that allow teachers to experience geophysical science research first-hand (e.g., STaRS - Science Teacher and Research Scientist). AGU also co-sponsors major symposia to discuss and develop strategies for Earth science education reform (e.g., the NSF-sponsored Shaping the Future workshop) and provides an annual forum for the Heads and Chairs of undergraduate geoscience departments to discuss common problems and share solutions. In the fall of 2001, AGU expects to unveil a major new education and outreach website that will provide enhanced opportunities for communicating to students, teachers and the public about AGU members' research and new directions in geophysical science education. The most important contribution that AGU makes, however, is to validate and prominently endorse the education and outreach efforts of its members, both by sponsoring well-attended, education-related special sessions at AGU national meetings and by annually honoring individuals or groups with the Excellence in Geoscience Education award. Recent staff changes at AGU headquarters have brought new opportunities to expand upon these successful existing programs and move in other directions that capitalize on the strengths of the organization. Among new initiatives being considered are programs that partner education efforts with those being developed as part of several large research programs, curriculum modules that will promote teaching earth sciences

  13. Organization and role of AGU's section-based Education and Public Outreach committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, Cathryn A.; Asher, Pranoti

    2011-11-01

    Understanding Earth and space science is important not only to AGU members. It is also critical to citizens making decisions in their private lives, to voters, and to policy makers and government officials whose actions shape global societies. AGU's education and outreach activities aim to bring Earth and space science to the world beyond the scientific community (see AGU's strategic plan: http://www.agu.org/about/strategic_plan.shtml). To support these objectives, some AGU sections have formed a specific Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) committee or working group (http://www.agu.org/education/professionals.shtml). These groups engage in activities that range from interacting with teachers to supporting media releases.

  14. AGU Activities to Promote Undergraduate Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, K.; Johnson, R.; Giesler, J.

    2001-05-01

    A primary goal of the AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR) is to significantly increase the participation of undergraduate students at AGU meetings. Involving students in scientific meetings at this level of their education helps them to better prepare for graduate school and for a career in the geophysical sciences. Ongoing CEHR activities to promote undergraduate participation include: (1) sponsoring technical sessions to showcase undergraduate research; (2) sponsoring sessions about careers and other topics of special interest to students; (3) sponsoring workshops to inform faculty about doing research with undergraduates; (4) sponsoring meeting events to partner graduate student mentors with first-time undergraduate attendees; (5) working with sections to create situations where undergraduates and section scientists can interact; (6) creating a guide for first-time meeting attendees; (7) sponsoring an Academic Recruiting Forum at meetings to connect undergraduates with geophysical graduate programs; (8) running a Career Center at meetings to connect students and employers; (9) raising funds for more travel grants to provide more student support to attend meetings; (10) developing a listserve to inform AGU members about opportunities to do research with undergraduates and to involve more members in mentoring activities; and (11) collecting data, such as career outcomes and demographic characteristics of recent Ph.D. recipients, that are of interest to students.

  15. Eos Interviews Robert Van Hook, Former AGU Interim Executive Director

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-08-01

    Robert Van Hook, who served as AGU's interim executive director since January 2009, led the organization during a transition period that began with the retirement of long-serving executive director A. F. (“Fred”) Spilhaus Jr. Van Hook's tenure concluded on 30 August when Christine McEntee assumed her position as AGU's new executive director (see Eos, 91(17), 153, 156, 2010). During his tenure at AGU, which overlapped with a global economic recession, Van Hook helped to guide the organization through key structural governance changes, strategic planning, and upgrades in technology, human resources, and accounting. He also helped to revitalize public outreach and member services, among many other efforts. Van Hook, president of Transition Management Consulting, recently reflected upon his tenure, the transition period, and the future of AGU. Van Hook credits AGU's strong volunteer leadership—including past presidents Tim Killeen and Tim Grove, current president Mike McPhaden, and president-elect Carol Finn—for courage in moving the organization through a successful transition. “They were the ones who shoved the boat off from the shore. I was lucky enough to be invited into the boat,” he said. He also credits the staff for their resiliency and commitment to supporting AGU's science.

  16. AGU governance's decision-making process advances strategic plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael; Finn, Carol; McEntee, Chris

    2012-10-01

    A lot has happened in a little more than 2 years, and we want give AGU members an update on how things are working under AGU's strategic plan and governance model. AGU is an organization committed to its strategic plan (http://www.agu.org/about/strategic_plan.shtml), and if you have not read the plan lately, we encourage you to do so. AGU's vision is to be an organization that "galvanizes a community of Earth and space scientists that collaboratively advances and communicates science and its power to ensure a sustainable future." We are excited about the progress we have made under this plan and the future course we have set for the Union. Everything the Board of Directors, Council, and committees put on their agendas is intended to advance AGU's strategic goals and objectives. Together with headquarters staff, these bodies are working in an integrated, effective manner to carry out this plan. The best way to demonstrate the progress made and each group's role is to walk through a recent example: the creation of a new Union-level award (see Figure 1).

  17. AGU honors 79 geophysicists during 2011 awards cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Beth

    2012-02-01

    At the 2011 Fall Meeting, AGU honored 79 esteemed geophysicists for their landmark achievements and transformational discoveries, highlighting those who have pioneered new frontiers of scientific knowledge with dedication, commitment, and leadership. Sixty individuals widely recognized as experts in their fields of research were honored as the 2011 class of AGU Fellows. These scientists, who share a lifelong commitment to understanding how the world works and are dedicated to making it a better place, were nominated by their colleagues for spurring major paradigm shifts and innovating breakthrough discoveries in Earth and space sciences. Six Union awardees received recognition for their vision and leadership, for furthering education in the Earth and space sciences, and for outstanding and sustained achievements in science journalism. In addition, AGU presented its inaugural Climate Communication Prize, for outstanding contributions to scientific literacy and public awareness about the urgent problem of climate change.

  18. The AGU Data Management Maturity Model Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    In September 2014, the AGU Board of Directors approved two initiatives to help the Earth and space sciences community address the growing challenges accompanying the increasing size and complexity of data. These initiatives are: 1) Data Science Credentialing: development of a continuing education and professional certification program to help scientists in their careers and to meet growing responsibilities and requirements around data science; and 2) Data Management Maturity (DMM) Model: development and implementation of a data management maturity model to assess process maturity against best practices, and to identify opportunities in organizational data management processes. Each of these has been organized within AGU as an Editorial Board and both Boards have held kick off meetings. The DMM model Editorial Board will recommend strategies for adapting and deploying a DMM model to the Earth and space sciences create guidance documents to assist in its implementation, and provide input on a pilot appraisal process. This presentation will provide an overview of progress to date in the DMM model Editorial Board and plans for work to be done over the upcoming year.

  19. Science Is Important, but Politics Drives the Siting of Nuclear Waste Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, George H.

    2014-02-01

    In 1982, I worked on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act as an AGU Congressional Science Fellow tasked with assisting a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee. When I recently read the suggestion that clay-rich strata (shales) could be a viable medium for high-level nuclear waste (HLW) disposal [Neuzil, 2013], I could not help but remember the insights I gained more than 30 years ago from my time on the Hill.

  20. A Pressing Need for Gender Balance in AGU Honors Nominations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Jessica

    2014-03-01

    AGU thrives on the volunteer efforts of its scientists, which is how I found myself agreeing to be a member of AGU's Science for Solutions Award committee last year. The award is targeted specifically at students and postdoctoral scientists who use Earth and space science to solve societal problems, and it was an intriguing experience to go through the process of evaluating the nominees and selecting a winner. All across the Union, members of other honors committees were going through a similar process, and at the 2013 Fall Meeting, those award recipients selected by the committees were honored.

  1. 2011 AGU Workshop for Heads & Chairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Lydia K.; Asher, Pranoti

    2012-02-01

    The AGU Board of Heads & Chairs of Departments of Earth and Space Sciences (H&C) held its annual workshop on Sunday, 4 December, at the 2011 Fall Meeting. The workshop included presentations on successful strategies for various aspects of the role of department head or chair, as well as time for small group discussions and networking among the group. There were nearly 60 participants, representing all stages of the chair life cycle, from seasoned veterans to those about to assume the role. Participants also represented a variety of institution types, both public and private, from 2-year colleges to research universities.

  2. AGU Hosts Networking Event for Female Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Chris

    2013-01-01

    At Fall Meeting this year I had the pleasure of cohosting a new event, a Networking Reception for Early Career Female Scientists and Students, with Jane Lubchenco, under secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration administrator, and Marcia McNutt, director of the U.S. Geological Survey. AGU recognizes the importance of having a diverse pool of new researchers who can enrich Earth and space sciences with their skills and innovation. That's why one of our four strategic goals is to help build the global talent pool and provide early-career scientists with networking opportunities like this one.

  3. Common interests bind AGU and geophysical groups around the globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Christine

    2012-02-01

    In continuation of our work to strengthen alliances with key organizations in the Earth and space science community, AGU president Michael McPhaden, president-elect Carol Finn, and I held a series of meetings with leaders from other science societies during the 2011 Fall Meeting. Over the course of 2 days we met with leaders from the Geophysical Society of America, European Geosciences Union, Japan Geosciences Union, Ethiopian Geophysical Union, Asia Oceania Geosciences Society, Chinese Geophysical Society, and Asociación Latinoamericana de Geofísica Espacial. This gave us a valued opportunity to discuss the common interests and challenges we all face and to learn from each other's experience. The meetings allowed AGU to strengthen existing cooperative agreements and reach new levels of understanding between us and other societies. Additionally, we met with representatives from the Korean Ocean Research and Development Institute to discuss their intention to establish a geophysical union modeled after AGU.

  4. The 2008 AGU Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine

    2008-11-01

    The 2008 AGU Fall Meeting, to be held 15-19 December in San Francisco, is likely to be the largest AGU meeting to date. More than 15,800 presentations are scheduled, and more than 11,000 participants registered prior to the early-bird deadline of 14 November. This year, all oral sessions and the exhibit hall will be in Moscone West, and all poster sessions will be in Moscone North. (The American Society for Cell Biology will be holding its annual meeting in Moscone South.) Meeting attendees will receive general information including an author index, maps, and a list of sessions by discipline, cosponsors, day, time, and location.

  5. AGU climate scientists visit Capitol Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Erik

    2012-02-01

    On 1 February 2012, AGU teamed with 11 other scientific societies to bring 29 scientists researching various aspects of climate change to Washington, D. C., for the second annual Climate Science Day on Capitol Hill. The participants represented a wide range of expertise, from meteorology to agriculture, paleoclimatology to statistics, but all spoke to the reality of climate change as demonstrated in their scientific research. With Congress debating environmental regulations and energy policy amid tight fiscal pressures, it is critical that lawmakers have access to the best climate science to help guide policy decisions. The scientists met with legislators and their staff to discuss the importance of climate science for their districts and the nation and offered their expertise as an ongoing resource to the legislators.

  6. Bagla, Kwok Win 2010 AGU Journalism Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viñas, Maria-José

    2010-11-01

    A veteran Indian reporter and a rookie science writer have won AGU's 2010 journalism awards. Pallava Bagla will receive the David Perlman Award for Excellence in Science Journalism-News for two articles he wrote about the impact of climate change on Himalayan glaciers. The first of his articles, “No sign yet of Himalayan meltdown, Indian report finds,” published in Science, explores dissent among glaciologists regarding a passage in the Fourth Assessment Report of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The passage suggests that Himalayan glaciers are highly likely to disappear by 2035. His second article, “Himalayan glaciers melting deadline ‘a mistake,’” published by BBC News, discusses a possible typographical error in the disputed passage. In the article, Bagla indicates that this error appears to explain the panel's controversial acceleration of when Himalayan glaciers are expected to vanish.

  7. AGU's new task force on scientific ethics and integrity begins work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleick, Peter; Townsend, Randy

    2011-11-01

    In support of the new strategic plan, AGU has established a new task force to review, evaluate, and update the Union's policies on scientific misconduct and the process for investigating and responding to allegations of possible misconduct by AGU members. As noted by AGU president Michael McPhaden, "AGU can only realize its vision of `collaboratively advancing and communicating science and its power to ensure a sustainable future' if we have the trust of the public and policy makers. That trust is earned by maintaining the highest standards of scientific integrity in all that we do. The work of the Task Force on Scientific Ethics is essential for defining norms of professional conduct that all our members can aspire to and that demonstrate AGU's unwavering commitment to excellence in Earth and space science."

  8. Free workshop for teachers at AGU's 2012 Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm Adamec, Bethany

    2012-10-01

    AGU is committed to fostering the next generation of Earth and space scientists. We work on this commitment in many ways, one of which is partnering with the National Earth Science Teacher's Association (NESTA) to hold the annual Geophysical Information for Teachers (GIFT) workshop at the Fall Meeting. GIFT allows K-12 science educators (both classroom and informal) to hear from scientists about their latest Earth and space science research, explore new classroom resources for engaging students, and visit exhibits and technical sessions during the Fall Meeting. Six teams of leading scientists and education/public outreach professionals will give talks and lead teachers through interactive classroom activities over the course of 2 days at GIFT 2012. Becoming a GIFT presenter is a highly competitive process, with 29 applications evaluated through a peer review system this year. Science standards, prior classroom testing of materials, expertise of presenters, teacher interests, and AGU's science priorities are all taken into account during the selection process.

  9. Is AGU in your will?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consider whether or not you may wish to make a bequest to AGU in order that it may meet more adequately its growing responsibilities and opportunities. A bequest may be as simple or as complex as a donor's situation may require. And, regardless of whether a bequest is a small percentage of one's estate, a fixed amount of money, specified securities or other property, or the proceeds of a life insurance policy, it is likely to have tax advantages and will not deny you the continued use of your resources during your lifetime.On matters of this kind, you should consult your attorney. You should also feel free to bring your questions to Fred Spilhaus at AGU headquarters.

  10. Extend your commitment to AGU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voluntary contributions are essential for AGU to maintain and enhance its many innovative programs. In addition to unrestricted contributions to AGU, up to half of your Supporting Member contribution may be designated to one or more of the special funds. One such group of funds are the Section Funds. The Section Funds were established by the Council to support special Section activities. The Hydrology Section has used some of its funds to tape Langbein Lectures given by Wilfried Brutsaert, Shlomo Neuman,and Mark Meier, and to produce videotape interviews with John Philip, Terrence O'Donnell, James C. I. Dooge, David Dawdy Mark Meier, Gilbert White, Stanley Davis, and Peter Eagleson. Other Sections have used their funds to subsidize tickets for the Best Student Paper awardees to attend the Section luncheon at the Fall and Spring Meetings, give partial travel support to other Bowie lecturers, and give partial travel support to luncheon speakers. More information is available online at http://www.agu.org/inside/supportmember_top.html.

  11. Final slate for AGU elections this fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2012-07-01

    Your vote is important! This fall, AGU members will elect leaders for the next term (1 January 2013 to 31 December 2014). This issue of Eos provides details about the upcoming election and information on candidates for open AGU Board and Council positions as well as section and focus group secretary positions. All regular and student members who joined or renewed their membership by 1 July 2012 are eligible to vote in this year's election of AGU leaders. The election will be held electronically, and all members must have a valid e-mail address on file at AGU to receive login credentials from the company conducting the election.

  12. AGU's historical records move to the Niels Bohr Library and Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Kristine C.

    2012-11-01

    As scientists, AGU members understand the important role data play in finding the answers to their research questions: no data—no answers. The same holds true for the historians posing research questions concerning the development of the geophysical sciences, but their data are found in archival collections comprising the personal papers of geophysicists and scientific organizations. Now historians of geophysics—due to the efforts of the AGU History of Geophysics Committee, the American Institute of Physics (AIP), and the archivists of the Niels Bohr Library and Archives at AIP—have an extensive new data source: the AGU manuscript collection.

  13. AGU leadership reflects back, looks forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie; Buhrman, Joan

    2011-09-01

    AGU president Mike McPhaden, president-elect Carol Finn, and executive director Chris McEntee have served in their current capacities for approximately a year. In this interview, held 18 August after the AGU Council meeting, they reflect back on the year and discuss prospects for the future.

  14. Who Benefits From Your AGU Donation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Claire

    2014-09-01

    When you give to AGU, you are giving to programs and initiatives that affect you, your fellow scientists, and the entire world. From section and focus group newsletters to student scholarships to struggling communities, there is an opportunity for you to engage and make a difference. Visit http://giving.agu.org to make your impact.

  15. Another Milestone Day in AGU's History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderlein, Cheryl

    2010-09-01

    The AGU Board of Directors held its first board meeting on 20-21 September 2010 in Washington, D. C. The meeting, chaired by President Michael McPhaden, marked another step forward in implementing AGU's new governance structure and strategic direction. The agenda included ongoing organizational business, high-level strategic discussions, and opportunities for Board development. In the new governance structure, the Board is responsible for governing the business aspects of AGU, while the Council is responsible for governing scientific affairs. The strategic plan guides both governing groups, staff, and other membership groups by providing clear goals and objectives. Of the 28 objectives in the AGU strategic plan, the volunteer and staff leadership identified eight as priorities. The priority objectives are listed in the diagram to the right, which is also posted on the AGU Web site.

  16. G. N. Rassam Joins AGU Staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassan N. Rassam joined the AGU staff today, assuming the dual roles of Division Director for Public Information and Marketing and of Special Assistant for Nonprint Publications. He comes to AGU from the American Geological Institute, where he has been chief editor and assistant director of the GeoRef Information System.As Director of Public Information and Marketing, Rassam will head one of AGU's five divisions. He will have under his purview the Public Information Department and the Promotion and Sales Department. The Public Information Department produces Eos and also has the responsibility for press relations, including the preparation of news releases and the operation of press rooms at meetings. These activities are critical to the implementation of AGU's public education and public affairs initiatives, as well as to the central role of AGU in promoting the unity of geophysics.

  17. AGU Council looks to the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Precollege education was the focus of an important action taken by the AGU Council at its December 4, 1990, meeting in San Francisco. An expenditure of $50,000 was authorized to provide staff time to develop and implement programs in this area. The Union is looking forward to significant grant support for these education activities. With the funds the Education and Human Resources Committee hopes to improve the flow of students into the Earth and space sciences and generate an appreciation of science among all students and the general public.The Council also approved proceeding with plans for the construction of a new headquarters building. At current growth rates, the headquarters building will be full by 1994. After an extended study of a wide range of alternatives, the Ad Hoc Committee on Real Estate, chaired by Ned Ostenso, recommended that the current “obsolescent” building be demolished and a new and larger one built on the same site. While plans are being made for the next step in this process, a search will also be conducted for a suitable building in a good location in Washington that could be purchased at a reasonable price. The current state of the real estate market dictates keeping one's options open.

  18. AGU Publications: Improvements for Authors and Readers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Brooks

    2013-12-01

    AGU has introduced several new features aimed at simplifying and improving the submission of papers to AGU journals. Enhanced PDF and HTML formats and new journal home pages developed with our publishing partner, Wiley, will also provide improvements for readers. In previous issues of Eos, we provided broader overviews of AGU publications, including the transition to Wiley and open access (Eos, 94(30), 264-266, doi:10.1002/2013EO300009; Eos, 94(39), 345, doi:10.1002/2013EO390006).

  19. Tomorrow's AGU: Seeking a New Executive Director

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, Timothy L.; Finn, Carol

    2009-12-01

    AGU has begun the search for a new executive director to serve in partnership with AGU's elected leadership to build tomorrow's AGU—the contemporary scientific society envisioned by our members and needed for 2010 and beyond. This is a rare opportunity to take the helm of a highly respected, financially strong membership organization in a moment of transformation and help us achieve our goals to grow in impact. Reporting directly to the Board of Directors, the executive director is responsible for providing strategic vision, leadership, and overall management to the organization according to the direction set by AGU's elected leaders.

  20. Access to the Heads and Chairs Program expands beyond AGU Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Pranoti M.; Keane, Christopher M.

    2012-09-01

    The AGU Education and Public Outreach department is pleased to announce a new collaboration with the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) for AGU's existing Heads and Chairs Program. This collaboration developed from a mutual interest in supporting the higher education departments of Earth and space sciences, as well as a desire to combine activities and resources toward strengthening that support. Through this partnership, AGI's Workforce Program and AGU's education staff are hosting hour-long webinars on various topics each month to engage department heads and chairs in discussions that will help them share, learn, and apply new ideas to their own programs. The ultimate goal is to provide opportunities for open dialogue beyond the annual Heads and Chairs workshops held at the AGU Fall Meeting each year, as well as to support those heads and chairs who are unable to attend Fall Meeting.

  1. AGU candidates for office, 1998”2000, Union officers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcia K. McNutt. AGU member since 1976, Director of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. Major areas of interest are lithospheric tectonics and mantle geodynamics. B.A. in physics (Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude), 1973, Colorado College; Ph.D. in Earth science, 1978, Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Researcher at U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, 1979-1982semi Professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1982-1997. Member of American Association for the Advancement of Science. Authored 74 publications, 45 in AGU journals. Most important publications include The Superswell and mantle dynamics beneath the South Pacific, Science, 248, 969-975,1990semi Marine geodynamics: depth-age revisited, Rev. Geophys., U.S. National Report Supplement, 413-418,1995 Mapping the descent of Indian and Eurasian plates beneath the Tibetan plateau from gravity anomalies, J. Geophys. plume theory to explain multiple episodes of stress-triggered volcanism in the Austral Islands, Nature, in press, 1997. Awarded Macelwane Medal, 1988; Doctor of Science (honoris causa), Colorado College, 1988; NSF Visiting Professorship for Women, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, 1989-1990semi Griswold Professor of Geophysics, MIT, 1991-1997 Outstanding Alumni Award, The Blake Schools, Minneapolis, 1993; Capital Science Lecturer, Carnegie Institution, 1995; Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar, 1996-1997 MIT School of Science Graduate Teaching Prize, 1996. AGU service as Associate Editor and Guest Editor of Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth, member of Program, Budget and Finance, and Audit and Legal Affairs committeessemi; chair of Publications and Macelwane committees, and President of the Tectonophysics Section.

  2. A new building for AGU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVito, M. Catherine

    1992-03-01

    On March 4 at AGU headquarters, the Real Estate Committee reviewed plans for the construction of a new headquarters building, which is to be completed in early 1994 on the current 2000 Florida Avenue site. The committee discussed in detail the project's budget, scheduling, and design. This meeting marks the completion of the design and development phase. The project's architect, Shalom Baranes, will now begin construction drawings.Several years ago, projections of the Union's growth showed that by about 1995, the current building would be insufficient to house the staff required to serve the Union. A study was undertaken by a special committee with the help of consultants. This “Real Estate Committee,” chaired by Ned A. Ostenso, explored the advantages and disadvantages of six expansion options: to sell the current building and lease; to sell the current building and buy another; to “do nothing” to the existing building and expand by leasing; to keep the existing building and build a new, independent addition; to renovate the existing building and add a new addition; or to construct a new building at the current site.

  3. Thriving Earth Exchange: AGU's new grand challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Chris; Williams, Billy

    2012-11-01

    Imagine a world where scientists are acknowledged and celebrated for their good works. Imagine being able to make a powerful impact, applying your expertise and experience to create real solutions to ensure a sustainable future. Now imagine those two ideas linked: AGU scientists engaged in creating solutions that are recognized and celebrated for their positive impact on our world. The AGU Grand Challenge: Thriving Earth Exchange, a new idea from our member leaders, is about making this dream real.

  4. First Scholarship at AGU Established by David E. Lumley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahar, Joanna G.

    2009-09-01

    Shortly after AGU launched its annual voluntary contribution campaign last year—the theme was “Building Tomorrow's Talent Today”—the Union's development office received an e-mail message from David E. Lumley about establishing a scholarship for a high-school student or undergraduate. Many scientific societies and associations have quite a few named scholarships, but for AGU this was a new concept. Lumley was sure of what he wanted to do and even more excited when he learned that his scholarship would be a first for AGU. “I want to help inspire today's young minds to work on problems of global importance in both the energy and environment sectors of industry and academia,” Lumley said. Recipients of the David E. Lumley Young Scientist Scholarship for Energy and Environmental Science will be expected to present a paper and to participate in various student activities at Fall Meeting. “Meeting some of the ‘giants’ of geoscience and getting their feedback on research is a big deal for these young students. We sometimes lose sight of this,” he said.

  5. Improving Diversity and Educational Outreach at the K-14 level: A Call to Action for the AGU Membership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, F. R.; Johnson, R.

    2002-12-01

    In 2002, the Subcommittee on Diversity (SD) of the Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR) submitted a Diversity Plan to the leadership of AGU. This plan outlines specific programs and goals that AGU can follow to help improve diversity in the Earth and space sciences. Diversity issues are key components to improve the human resource potential in the geosciences. As women are the majority population, and racial and ethnic minorities are experiencing the largest growing segment of the United States population, it is within our best interest to actively recruit and retain these populations into our dynamic fields of study. The SD recognizes that the strength of the AGU lies within its membership. Composed of some of the brightest and talented scientists in the world, the AGU members are leaders and pioneers in our understanding of the Earth System. Yet, many, if not most, people within underrepresented communities are not aware of the relevance that the Earth and space sciences play in their lives. In this discussion, we will discuss the importance of the AGU membership in the Diversity Plan. In addition, we will outline specific things that AGU members can do to improve access of US students and citizenry to Earth and space science education. These steps require that AGU members become active advocates in the public, especially at the K-14 level.

  6. Congressional Election Forecasting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis-Beck, Michael S.; Rice, Tom W.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the growing literature on the forecasting of elections, providing an example in the form of 1988 congressional election predictions. Briefly discusses the history of election outcome prediction and outlines two scientific forecasting models which, the authors state, are appropriate for use in the classroom. (GEA)

  7. AGU launches new E-commerce Web site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaufuss, Karine S.

    During the week of 10 September 2007, AGU unveils a new e-commerce Web site (http://www.aip.org/AGU). The site is an upgraded version of the one that members and nonmembers have used to renew membership or join AGU, subscribe to journals, purchase books, or make a contribution. The new site, which is the result of collaboration between AGU and the American Institute of Physics, is another step in improving service to AGU constituents. Most of the changes being implemented stem from suggestions made by AGU members.

  8. A Presentation Bank for AGU-SPA Scientists Presenting to the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortfield, P. J.; Scherrer, D.

    2003-12-01

    The Stanford SOLAR Center in a coordinated effort with the AGU-SPA Education Committee is developing a Presentation Bank to provide AGU Space Physics and Aeronomy scientists with collected materials & imagery to present Sun-Earth related science in their field of expertise to the general public. The presentations can also be used for other audiences such as school groups, science museums, planetariums and the press. Working closely with the Education Committee and SPA scientists we are enhancing the existing SPA "slideset" into a prototype demonstration of the Presentation Bank. Our focus is to use up to date "best of" imagery and video to excite an audience about current research topics. By following a peer review process, the best and most useful collection of imagery will be produced to meet the needs of AGU scientists. We will share samples of slideset imagery and discuss details and infrastructure of the presentation bank and how scientists can best use this resource.

  9. 50 years of membership in AGU recognized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recently, 14 AGU members who joined the Union in 1937 received their recognition pins for 50 years of membership in the Union. They join the distinguished ranks of the 50- year AGU members, who are listed below by the year that they joined:1937 A.B. Bryan, Leonard B. Corwin, Tate Dalrymple, Richard H. Fleming, Harry L. Frauenthal, Konrad B. Krauskopf, J. Stuart Meyers, Brian O'Brien, Joseph F. Poland, Edward J. Rutter, Noel H. Stearn, John P. Tully, Victor Vacquier, G.H. Westby, and Harvey O. Westby.

  10. AGU Committee Volunteers for 2010-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2010-08-01

    The success of AGU as a scientific society depends on dedicated volunteers who reflect the diverse interests of our international membership. To function effectively, we need a strong core of volunteers who generously devote time, talent, and energy to Union committee work. To our members who have stepped up and unselfishly volunteered to serve for 2010-2012, I say thank you for your commitment to AGU's mission and programs. It is through your leadership and example that we will achieve our goals as an organization.

  11. Key Outcomes From the Inaugural AGU Board of Directors Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2010-10-01

    The engagement and enthusiasm of Board members and senior staff were evident as we met for the first Board of Directors meeting on 20-21 September 2010 at AGU headquarters, and much was accomplished over the 1.5 days. The meeting kicked off with a look to the future. Board members and staff had been asked to submit imagined headlines for 2019, the year that AGU will celebrate its 100th anniversary. This was a question raised by Executive Director Chris McEntee as she interacted with AGU leaders over the past several months. Board members and staff replied with a wide variety of headlines that inspired us to think about what is possible for AGU as we move forward as an organization. The headlines are posted on the AGU Web site (http://www.agu.org/about/presidents_msg/), and we encourage you to submit your own headline to agu_execdirector@agu.org.

  12. AGU: 89 Years of Dynamic Leadership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-10-01

    In its 89 years, AGU has matured and expanded through the dedicated administrative direction of three able leaders-John A. Fleming, Waldo E. Smith, and A. F. Spilhaus, Jr.-each with a vision of a strong scientific organization that serves individuals as they extend the knowledge and understanding of the Earth, the planets, and their space environments.

  13. AGU Board and Council Project Team Take Next Steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Mike; Finn, Carol

    2011-04-01

    AGU continues to actively implement its strategic plan. Both the AGU Board of Directors and the Council's Mission:Alignment Project (M:AP) team met during the last week of March at AGU headquarters in Washington, D. C. Significant progress was made at both meetings.

  14. Member Engagement Is Key to Our Success: A Note From AGU's New President, Carol Finn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Carol Finn has been a member of AGU since 1980. She currently serves as a senior research geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey, and her major research interests include geological interpretation of potential field data, volcano hazards, and tectonics. Finn received her B.A. in geology from Wellesley College, her M.S. in geophysics from the University of Colorado, and her Ph.D. in geophysics from the University of Colorado. She is a member of the Department of Geological Sciences Advisory Board for the University of Colorado and a fellow of the Geological Society of America, and she has written 54 referreed publications—half in AGU journals. Below are a few words from Finn as she starts her new position as AGU president.

  15. Second annual AGU Take Your Child to Work Day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Pranoti; Adamec, Bethany Holm; Panning, Jeannette

    2012-05-01

    The second annual Take Your Child to Work Day was held 26 April at AGU headquarters. Nearly 25 children, grandchildren, and nieces and nephews of AGU staff members participated in the daylong activities. Jill Treby, assistant director of member services, began the day by welcoming the children and telling them about what many AGU Earth and space scientists do. AGU blogger Callan Bentley and his Northern Virginia Community College colleagues provided mineral samples and an ultraviolet light; these allowed AGU staff to demonstrate fluorescence in minerals from Franklin, N. J., and other localities.

  16. AGU testifies on NASA Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    Witnesses from outside the U.S. government—including Frank Eden, representing AGU—testified about the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's budget on March 12 before the House Science Committee's subcommittee on space. One major topic of the hearing was familiar: what should NASA's top priority be, space science or human exploration of space.“Obviously this committee has a huge job of trying to set priorities—consistent with the budget restraints—that will end up giving the American taxpayer the most bang for his buck, as well as providing direction for our space program,” said F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. (R-Wis.), the subcommittee's ranking Republican. Another recurring topic, cited by the subcommittee's new chairman, Ralph M. Hall (D-Tex.), as well as by other committee members, was how to translate NASA-developed technologies into commercial gain for the U.S. in the global marketplace. Hall and others also posed a number of questions on a topic the chairman called a special concern of his: whether it would be economically and scientifically plausible for the U.S. to use the Soviet space station Mir for certain activities, such as medical applications.

  17. AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources Sub-Committee on Diversity Program for the term 2004-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. J.; Hiza, M.; Jenkins, G.; Karsten, J.; Molina, L.; Pyrtle, A.; Runyon, C.

    2004-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) founded the Diversity Subcommittee in 2000 to address what the AGU felt were important issues for the future of the geoscience community. A recent AGU statement of commitment and concern about issues of diversity reads, in part: It is essential that new strategies for educating, recruiting, and retaining geoscientists from currently under-represented populations be developed (a) for individual investigators seeking students to fill classes or work in their research programs; (b) for institutions looking to replace faculty and researchers; (c) for the larger community looking to the public for continued research funding, and (d) for the future US membership of AGU. In an effort to fulfill its charge, the majority of the 2004-2006 sub-committee's activities will be directed towards: (1) Education of the AGU Membership, including the sub-committee itself, on the salient issues of Diversity; (2) Mentoring and supporting minority students in the pipeline of Earth and Space Science education as well as minority faculty seeking to establish successful collaborations; (3) Establishing a mechanism for quantitative assessment of (a) the AGU demographics, (b) member knowledge, and (c) success of programs in the area of Diversity; (4) Conducting the first ever Chapman Conference on the needs of investigators with disabilities (July, 2005); (5) Partnering with other agencies and societies to build bridges; (6) Creating mechanisms for marketing the Earth and Space sciences to minority audiences; (7) Nurturing of minority members already in the AGU; promoting these members for honors and awards within AGU. Details, goals, and milestones of this program will be presented.

  18. New Format for AGU Print Journals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Bill

    2010-08-01

    AGU has adopted a new print format for Journal of Geophysical Research, Water Resources Research, Geophysical Research Letters, and Reviews of Geophysics starting with the July 2010 issues. In the new format, pages are condensed and rotated so that two pages of journal text fit side by side on one printed page. Why has AGU chosen to go this route? The rising costs of print, the decline of print subscriptions, and the need to conserve resources used in printing have led us to consider many options in delivering our journals to our customers. The most effective version, of course, is the electronic version, but many customers still require print copies for various purposes. As long as there is a demand for print, we will attempt to meet that demand and to explore all possibilities for reducing the costs of the format.

  19. AIP to Process AGU Renewals for 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilhaus, Fred

    2004-09-01

    AGU is collaborating with the American Institute of Physics (AIP) to provide improved online renewal of your membership and subscription starting with 2005 payments. The renewal process whether online or via mail will be easy for you. I would like to encourage each of you to renew early using the online form. You will be saving the Union money by cutting down on the cost of paper renewals. As a thank-you, members who renew within the first weeks will receive 2005 access without charge to the AGU Member Library of online back issues of all journals. At the same time you can help assure that your information has been correctly transferred to the new database. Great care has been taken in the transition; however, a check by you will assure your information is current.

  20. AGU Scientists Testify at Climate Change Hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folger, Peter

    2006-09-01

    AGU recently helped the U.S. House of RepresentativesCommittee on Government Reform to organize the hearing by suggestingpotential witnesses and outlining potentialtopics to explore, such as the global carboncycle, rapid climate change, climate feedbackprocesses, and satellite measurements. Climatechange falls within the committee'sbroader interest in the federal government'sprograms on energy and resources. Four AGUmembers testified at a 20 July hearing.

  1. AGU testifies on Space Station's cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    On May 1, before a standing-room-only House hearing, Representative Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) hammered hard questions at Richard Truly, administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, over the cost of the redesigned Space Station Freedom. AGU President G. Brent Dalrymple was also invited to testify about the station's cost and scientific merit as part of an expert panel before the House Government Operations subcommittee on government activities and transportation. Other witnesses included another AGU member, Louis J. Lanzerotti, chairman of the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council.The hearing, which ran three-and-a-half intense hours, dealt with new estimates of Freedom's cost that are well in excess of NASA's $30 billion figure for the revised design. Charles A. Bowsher, U.S. comptroller general, testified about a new study by the General Accounting Office that estimates a $118 billion cost for the station, more than triple NASA's figure. AGU's testimony and the subcommittee's staff both projected an even higher figure—$180 billion—although they used different assumptions to reach it.

  2. [Ultrasmall nanoparticles for radiotherapy: AGuIX].

    PubMed

    Lux, F; Detappe, A; Dufort, S; Sancey, L; Louis, C; Carme, S; Tillement, O

    2015-10-01

    Since twenty years, many nanoparticles based on high atomic number elements have been developed as radiosensitizers. The design of these nanoparticles is limited by the classical rules associated with the development of nanoparticles for oncology and by the specific ones associated to radiosensitizers, which aim to increase the effect of the dose in the tumor area and to spare the health tissues. For this application, systemic administration of nanodrugs is possible. This paper will discuss the development of AGuIX nanoparticles and will emphasize on this example the critical points for the development of a nanodrug for this application. AGuIX nanoparticles display hydrodynamic diameters of a few nanometers and are composed of polysiloxane and gadolinium chelates. This particle has been used in many preclinical studies and is evaluated for a further phase I clinical trial. Finally, in addition to its high radiosensitizing potential, AGuIX display MRI functionality and can be used as theranostic nanodrug for personalized medicine. PMID:26343033

  3. AGU Committee Update: Recent activities of NG Technical Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, John B.

    Beginning this year, the AGU has adopted a series of new policies designed to highlight the interdisciplinary aspects of the Union. As part of these new policies, members will soon be able to affiliate with the AGU Technical Committees, including the Nonlinear Geophysics (NG) Committee. In addition, the Technical Committees are now able to sponsor or co-sponsor technical sessions at both the Spring and Fall annual meetings, as well as make awards for best research and papers, and sponsor nominations for AGU Fellows and Union-wide awards.A website for the NG committee, with descriptions of the committee's activities and other functions, can be found via a link from the main AGU website, which is maintained by Jon Pelletier (University of Arizona). An AGU/NG listserver is maintained by the AGU staff liaison to NG, Dan Moore (DMoore@agu.org). AGU members wishing to be apprised of NG committee activities by inclusion in the listserv should either sign up through the NG web site, or send email to Dan Moore. As described, the NG committee can nominate an AGU member for election to AGU Fellow status. Don Turcotte (Cornell University) chairs the NG subcommittee on Fellow nominations.

  4. Why AGU is important in Eastern Europe and should increase its role even more?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocanu, V.

    2007-12-01

    After the fall of the ex-communist system about twenty years ago, the East European countries faced a significant, multilateral challenge in all aspects of their economical, financial, military, scientific and especially educational and professional life. They had a pretty robust tradition in classic education and research, but had to prepare their young generation and specialists for a hard competition for grad-, post grad- and professional level competing with colleagues from other parts of the world. They had to restructure their systems and re-discovered the professional societies. AGU represented a certain model of efficiency on handling various aspects of geoscientific activities: integration of geophysics with other related disciplines like atmospheric sciences, hydrology and hydrogeology, volcanism, geochemistry etc., from deep Earth to the intergalactic space. Close cooperation with other boundary sciences, regular and very well organized meetings dedicated more to Solid earth (AGU Fall Meeting) or Near-Surface Geophysics (AGU Spring Meetings), its very close cooperation with the sister societies from Europe, other North, Central and South American countries as well as the Far East and Australia, permanent opening towards a strong international cooperation with all countries and societies world- wide, very active interest in education and career orientation, strong publication policy represented a certain attraction and a very tempting model for the East European countries. Their very quick development has to be joined by transformation of their higher education and research system in such a way that they become more and more competitive with other countries worldwide. They have to develop their own system so that it attracts more and more youngsters to remain/return home and contribute to the advance of their home countries and, in close partnerships with other developed and developing countries, with the guidance of the professional societies like AGU

  5. Budget and Appropriations - Congressional Justification

    Cancer.gov

    The Congressional Justification is prepared when the President submits an annual budget to Congress, to justify the President's request by explaining NCI's mission, objectives for the coming fiscal year, and providing comparative budget data and analysis.

  6. AGU Journals Increase Speed and Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Mary

    2014-08-01

    Fast publication and high quality and impact are important for effective dissemination of geoscience research. With this in mind, AGU's journal editors and staff, along with staff at our publishing partner, Wiley, have been working to increase both the speed of publication and the impact of the research published in our 18 peer-reviewed journals while maintaining our commitment to quality. Significant progress continues to be made on both fronts, as evidenced by the most recent publication times and the 2013 release of the Journal Citation Reports®, which was issued by Thomson Reuters on 29 July.

  7. Pub Matters @ AGU: How is AGU doing? Very well in most areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilhaus, Fred

    There is some misinformation floating around, and the Council suggested I share some facts with you: Membership numbers are ahead of previous years. Member and institutional subscriptions are above 2001 levels at this time. Manuscript submissions for most journals are above last year's levels and overall are approximately 11% higher through June 2002 (see www.agu.org/pubs/stats).

  8. Congressional Response to Ensuring America's Competitiveness. BHEF Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business-Higher Education Forum (NJ1), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Congress is taking an active role in understanding and responding to the underlying problems that confront America's competitiveness in the global economy. During the 109th congressional session, legislation has been introduced addressing the importance of mathematics and science in the global economy. The Senate's Protecting America's Competitive…

  9. Proposed change in the AGU Bylaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    At its meeting on May 19, 1987, the AGU Council gave initial approval to an amendment to Bylaw 14, relating to election procedures, to clarify these procedures and bring them into conformity with Robert's Rules of Order. The changes are as follows: Add a new Article 14d to read: “Elections shall be accomplished by mail.”Add Article 14e to read: “If more than two candidates are nominated, voters shall be required to rank candidates in order of their preference. In tallying such votes, if no candidate has a majority of the first-place votes, then the candidate with the fewest first-place votes will be eliminated and the second-place votes on those ballots distributed among the other candidates and this process repeated until one candidate has a clear majority.”Change to Article 14f the old 14d, which reads: “Results of the general election shall be announced at the Annual Business Meeting.”Notice of this proposed change is given in accordance with Article 126 of the Statutes, which requires that proposed amendments to the Bylaws be published in an AGU publication of general circulation no less than 30 days prior to a second consideration by the Council. The Council will consider this proposal for final passage at its December 1987 meeting in San Francisco, Calif.

  10. Middle and high school students present posters at AGU Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltzman, Jennifer

    2011-06-01

    While science fairs may be one way for students to learn about science, AGU takes the science fair one step further by hosting middle and high school students from the San Francisco Bay Area so they can show off their research in the professional arena. The Bright Students Training as Research Scientists (Bright STaRS) program creates a special day at the AGU Fall Meeting for budding scientists. In addition to learning the ins and outs of geoscience research by participating in data collection and analysis for their research projects, they learn the importance of communication by presenting their results. Since 2004 the AGU Bright STaRS initiative has hosted students who have worked on research projects at universities, high schools, and science learning centers. The program enables them to spend a day at the Fall Meeting and to present their research in a poster session. Each year 10-15 abstracts are submitted by about 25-40 middle and high school students for this event; in 2010 this increased to 26 abstracts and 50 students. Since its inception, more than 250 students have participated in Bright STaRS.

  11. Exploration Station 2010 Brings Science to the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawro, Martha; Asher, Pranoti

    2011-04-01

    Exploration Station is a public outreach event held prior to the AGU Fall Meeting each year and is a joint venture between AGU and NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The event features hands-on science activities for the public. This year's event was held in conjunction with the AGU public lecture given by SDO lead project scientist, Dean Pesnell. Many members of the general public attended, including families with children. They were joined by many AGU members, who also enjoyed the exhibits and explored the possible education and outreach activities available within the AGU community. Educators from across AGU were involved, but space physics and planetary sciences were especially well represented.

  12. AGU Will Present Edmond M. Dewan Scholarship If Fund Reaches Goal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Claire

    2013-10-01

    AGU will present the Edmond M. Dewan Scholarship for the first time at the 2014 Fall Meeting if the scholarship fund reaches the goal of $25,000 by the end of 2013. The scholarship will provide financial assistance to deserving graduate students of atmospheric sciences or space physics and will serve as a tribute to Edmond Dewan, a distinguished scientist and dedicated member of the Union.

  13. New software system to improve AGU membership management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Almost 2 years ago, AGU began investigating how it could more efficiently manage member and customer records as well as support processes that currently run on multiple systems. I am pleased to announce that on 25 June, as the result of intense efforts, AGU will migrate to a new database software system that will house the majority of AGU operations. AGU staff will have more tools at their disposal to assist members, and members will have more intuitive and user-friendly options when using the online interface to update their profiles or make purchases. I am particularly excited about this major improvement to our infrastructure because it better positions AGU to achieve goals in its strategic plan.

  14. Lights, camera, action…critique? Submit videos to AGU communications workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viñas, Maria-José

    2011-08-01

    What does it take to create a science video that engages the audience and draws thousands of views on YouTube? Those interested in finding out should submit their research-related videos to AGU's Fall Meeting science film analysis workshop, led by oceanographer turned documentary director Randy Olson. Olson, writer-director of two films (Flock of Dodos: The Evolution-Intelligent Design Circus and Sizzle: A Global Warming Comedy) and author of the book Don't Be Such a Scientist: Talking Substance in an Age of Style, will provide constructive criticism on 10 selected video submissions, followed by moderated discussion with the audience. To submit your science video (5 minutes or shorter), post it on YouTube and send the link to the workshop coordinator, Maria-José Viñas (mjvinas@agu.org), with the following subject line: Video submission for Olson workshop. AGU will be accepting submissions from researchers and media officers of scientific institutions until 6:00 P.M. eastern time on Friday, 4 November. Those whose videos are selected to be screened will be notified by Friday, 18 November. All are welcome to attend the workshop at the Fall Meeting.

  15. CO2 Emissions from Air Travel by AGU and ESA Conference Attendees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, B.; Plug, L. J.

    2003-12-01

    Air travel by scientists is one contributor to rising concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. To assess the magnitude of this contribution in per-capita and overall terms, we calculated emissions derived from air travel for two major scientific conferences held in 2002: the western meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in San Francisco and the Ecological Society of America meeting in Tucson (ESA). Round trip travel distance for sampled attendees is 7971 +/- 6968 km (1 sigma range given, n=337) for AGU and 5452 +/- 5664 km for ESA (n=263), conservatively assuming great circle routes were followed. Using accepted CO2 production rates for commercial aircraft, mean AGU emissions are 1.3 tonnes per attendee and 12351 tonnes total and for ESA 0.9 tonnes per attendee and 3140 tonnes total. Although small compared to total anthropogenic emissions (2.275 x 1010 tonnes y-1 in 1999), per attendee emissions are significant compared to annual per-capita emissions; CO2 emission per AGU and ESA attendee exceeds the per capita annual emission of 42% and 19% of Earth's population, respectively. Per attendee AGU emissions are ≈6% of U.S. and ≈14% of British and Japanese per capita annual emission. Relocation of AGU and ESA to cities which minimize travel distances, Denver and Omaha respectively, would result in modest emission reductions of 8% and 14% (assuming 2002 attendee composition). To form a preliminary estimate of annual CO2 emissions for scientists in academia, we surveyed Earth Science faculty at our home institution. Mean annual air travel distance for professional activities was 38064 km y-1 (7 respondents). The consequent release of 6.1 tonnes y-1 of CO2 is 30% of annual per capita emissions in North America, and exceeds global per capita average of 4 tonnes y-1 by 150%. Society and the environment often benefit from scientific enquiry which is facilitated by travel. These benefits, however, might be balanced against the

  16. AGU and Wiley-Blackwell to partner on publication of journals and books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Chris

    2012-07-01

    AGU has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Wiley-Blackwell to partner in journal and book publishing. The agreement, effective 1 January 2013, is a significant step forward in transforming AGU publishing consistent with our strategic plan goal of scientific leadership and collaboration. Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Family-owned and publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange, the company is strong in every major academic and professional field and partners with many of the world's leading societies. Wiley-Blackwell, a leader in developing models for open access and providing developing nations with access to science, publishes nearly 1500 peer-reviewed journals and more than 1500 new books annually. The company publishes approximately 700 society titles.

  17. News media and new media: Strong coverage of AGU Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Peter

    2011-05-01

    As scientists at AGU's 2010 Fall Meeting engaged one another with talks, posters, and hallway chats last December, a steady stream of reporting and commentary about all things Fall Meeting spilled out from the Moscone Center in San Francisco, Calif., to audiences throughout the world. Some 150 journalists—representing print, online, and broadcast media outlets, plus freelancers—reported from the meeting. Other reporters not present at the meeting participated in press conferences and other press events via live webcasts. Writers for nearly 2 dozen Earth and space science blogs churned out Fall Meeting-related blog postings. Twitter users also busily commented from the meeting, generating more than 4500 tweets labeled with the meeting's #AGU10 hashtag (a Twitter identity code). The outpouring of meeting-related news and commentary added up to more than 3000 stories, of which many reached far-flung parts of the globe, according to an analysis made using Vocus, a media monitoring service.

  18. Christine McEntee Takes Office as AGU Executive Director

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2010-09-01

    In a historic transition event, AGU staff and volunteer leadership welcomed incoming executive director Christine W. McEntee and said farewell to outgoing interim executive director Robert Van Hook. The event, with the theme “A Bridge to the Future: From Strength to Strength,” took place at AGU headquarters in Washington, D. C., on 30 August. McEntee comes to AGU from the American Institute of Architects, where she served as executive vice president and chief executive officer since 2006. She is the Union's third executive director.

  19. AGU Career Center attracts hundreds of Fall Meeting attendees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Paul

    2012-02-01

    The poster hall of the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting was the venue not only for scientific discussion and exchange of ideas—Fall Meeting attendees also explored new career opportunities and received career advice at AGU's Career Center. For many years, recruiters and hiring managers have found ideal candidates for open positions during the AGU Fall Meeting through the Career Center. Last year was no exception: Recruiters browsed resumés, visited posters, and attended talks to find talented individuals to interview during the week. In addition, hundreds of meeting attendees looking for a new job or a postdoc position visited the Career Center and checked the online AGU Career Center job board to request interviews. Career counselor Alaina Levine of Quantum Success Solutions gave private one-on-one career advice to 47 meeting attendees, making sure that each individual she counseled left the session with clearer career objectives and tactics to bring these objectives to fruition.

  20. AGU Publications Volunteers Feted At Elegant Editors' Evening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    The 2012 Fall Meeting Editors' Evening, held at the City Club of San Francisco, was hosted by the Publications Committee and is the premier social event for editors and associate editors attending the Fall Meeting. The evening commenced with a welcome from Carol Finn, incoming AGU president, in which she expressed her thanks to the editors and associate editors for volunteering their time to benefit AGU.

  1. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education: Strategic Planning Needed to Better Manage Overlapping Programs across Multiple Agencies. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-12-108

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, George A.

    2012-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education programs help to enhance the nation's global competitiveness. Many federal agencies have been involved in administering these programs. Concerns have been raised about the overall effectiveness and efficiency of STEM education programs. GAO examined (1) the number of federal…

  2. Brown assails Congressional earmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Richard

    Since President Bush first submitted his budget to Congress it was clear that it would be difficult, if not impossible, to fully support all of the NASA activities contained in the budget. Now the appropriations bill containing NASA funding for fiscal year 1992 is sitting on the president's desk. Many space science programs were cut, ranging from the Earth Observing System (-$65 million) to the CRAF/Cassini program (-$117 million).Nevertheless, powerful members of Congress sitting on the appropriations committees managed to find money for many projects in their home districts and states via special earmarking of funds. During House consideration of the final version of H.R. 2519 on October 2, George E. Brown, Jr. (D-Calif.), chairman of the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee, spoke out against earmarking.

  3. The Gaia Controversy: AGU'S Chapman Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Eric G.

    The controversial Gaia Hypothesis of James Lovelock of Coombe Mill, Launceston, Cornwall, U.K., and his colleagues variously contends that throughout Earth history the global biosphere has influenced, even controlled, the physicochemical evolution of Earth's environments (especially oceans and climate) for its own benefit. Since the origin of life, the biosphere has influenced selective pressures on evolution, maintained the Earth in a kind of homeostasis, and thus created an environmental optimum through time, regulated by and for the biosphere. Rarely has a hypothesis immediately sparked such passionate response. There is something in it for everybody, from hard core scientists to philosophers, ultraconservationists, students of world religions, mystics, politicians, and space enthusiasts; they were all there in San Diego, March 7-11, 1988, for the AGU Chapman Conference on Gaia Hypotheses. For 4 days an impressive list of specialists presented and debated the pros and cons of Gaia Hypotheses from diverse perspectives: modern and ancient biology, ecology, biochemistry, the physicochemical systems of the Earth, oceans, and atmosphere, and the evolution of the solar system. Focus was on modern to Pleistocene atmosphere-ocean-Earth systems, case histories of their interaction with the biosphere, and relatively simple models drawn from these observations and projected back through time. Equivalent studies on the geological and paleobiological history of the Earth-life system over the past 3.5 b.y. were underrepresented. Extended debates that followed generally strong presentations were lively, argumentative, and remarkably civil despite widely held views. The grace with which Jim Lovelock moved between his strongest critics and supporters set high standards for the debates. Everybody acknowledged a high learning curve.

  4. Board Adds Two New Members With Expertise in Communication and Science Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Christine W.

    2010-11-01

    AGU's Board of Directors approved two new members during a special teleconference on 8 November. The appointments are related to AGU's strategic plan goal of addressing science and society. Specifically, they add to AGU's expertise in science communication and policy outreach. Author Chris Mooney and policy advisor Floyd DesChamps join AGU's Board of Directors immediately and will serve the remainder of the 2010-2012 term.

  5. The Relationship between Environmental Quality of School Facilities and Student Performance. Energy Smart Schools: Opportunities To Save Money, Save Energy and Improve Student Performance. A Congressional Briefing to the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lackney, Jeffery A.

    Congressional testimony is presented concerning school buildings and their connection to student health, behavior, and learning, including a review of selected empirical studies conducted over the past 30 years showing an explicit relationship between physical characteristics of school buildings and educational outcomes. The factors responsible…

  6. 44 CFR 5.6 - Congressional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Congressional information. 5... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION General Provisions § 5.6 Congressional information. Nothing in this part authorizes withholding information from the Congress except when...

  7. 44 CFR 5.6 - Congressional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Congressional information. 5... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION General Provisions § 5.6 Congressional information. Nothing in this part authorizes withholding information from the Congress except when...

  8. 42 CFR 137.2 - Congressional policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Congressional policy. 137.2 Section 137.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE General Provisions § 137.2 Congressional...

  9. 42 CFR 137.2 - Congressional policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Congressional policy. 137.2 Section 137.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE General Provisions § 137.2 Congressional...

  10. 42 CFR 137.2 - Congressional policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Congressional policy. 137.2 Section 137.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE General Provisions § 137.2 Congressional...

  11. 42 CFR 137.2 - Congressional policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Congressional policy. 137.2 Section 137.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE General Provisions § 137.2 Congressional...

  12. 42 CFR 137.2 - Congressional policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Congressional policy. 137.2 Section 137.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE General Provisions § 137.2 Congressional...

  13. Science Advocacy in a Shifting Policy Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickford, E. E.

    2013-12-01

    In the last 50 years, federal investment in research as a share of total spending has declined from a little more than 10% in 1963 to less than 4% in 2013 (AAAS, 2013). In an era of sequestration and shrinking budgets, more and more scientists are advocating directly to policymakers (and their staff) to gain support for research programs and funding. The best advocates understand the political and policy processes, and anticipate policy shifts that may affect them. While scientists are trained with the technical skills to conduct their science, teach it to others, and market their work in order to win grants and publish papers, the policy advocacy arena is unfamiliar territory to many. Acquiring yet another area of expertise mid-career can be daunting, but science advocacy need not require another academic degree. Connecting with policymakers is the first step, and then an understanding of each policymaker's issue history and top priorities will inform the sales pitch. Here, I present some experiences on both the pitching and receiving ends of science advocacy from my year in the US Senate as an AGU/AAAS Congressional Science Fellow, and some guidance for meeting with policymakers and successful science advocacy.

  14. Member Input Sought to Ensure AGU's Continued Success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, Timothy L.

    2008-11-01

    As an organization, AGU is indeed fortunate. Our Union has a growing membership worldwide with an average annual increase of 5.9% over the last 5 years. We are financially strong; we have planned carefully and managed our assets and our annual budgets so that we are able to navigate difficult times. Our Fall Meeting is ``the'' event for Earth and space scientists from more than 100 countries. Our publications continue to grow and evolve. Our outreach programs are gaining recognition in the communities we serve. Our development efforts are strengthening our ability to do more without taxing the revenues from meetings and publications. AGU is a preeminent scientific society.

  15. New AGU Journal on Earth Systems Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Bill

    2010-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union is pleased to announce that effective immediately, it is the new publisher of the Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems (JAMES). JAMES is a peer-reviewed, open-access, all-electronic journal that advances the science of Earth systems modeling by offering high-quality scientific research articles. JAMES was founded by the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a U.S. National Science Foundation-sponsored Science and Technology Center, and the journal began publishing peer-reviewed articles in the summer of 2009. Until now, the journal has been published by the Institute of Global Environment and Society.

  16. Young geologist trades neptunium for newspapers as 2012 AGU Mass Media Fellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Mary Catherine

    2012-05-01

    Though the lure of rocks, minerals, and radioactive elements took her away from her original studies, one geology Ph.D. candidate is returning to her journalism roots this summer as AGU's 2012 Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellow. Jessica Morrison is one of 12 young scientists nationwide who are trading in their lab coats for reporters' notebooks in mid-June as part of the program coordinated by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, which helps young scientists cultivate communication skills to help disseminate scientific information to general audiences. Morrison is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences at the University of Notre Dame. She spends her days in a laboratory investigating the geochemistry of actinides, the radioactive elements in the "no man's land" of the periodic table—the section that often gets left off or moved to the bottom. These are elements like uranium, neptunium, and plutonium.

  17. Technology Improvements for the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaux, Emily; Tomb, Jennifer

    2013-10-01

    AGU staff is dedicated to offering cutting-edge technology at Fall Meeting to improve meeting attendees' experience, provide state-of-the-art scientific content features, and continue developing features and elements of community building and social media. The overall goal is to implement technology that provides an accessible, manageable, and personal experience at Fall Meeting.

  18. AGU Ocean Sciences Award to John A. Knauss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauss, John A.

    John Knauss began his career in oceanography at the Naval Electronics Laboratory in 1947, after receiving his B.S. in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a M.S. in physics from the University of Michigan. He then became an oceanographer for the Office of Naval Research (ONR), both as a civilian and as a naval officer. John was one of a small group of physical oceanographers at ONR who convinced the Navy to increase its support of oceanographic research in the universities; this led to the Ten Year Program in Oceanography (TENOC) report. This was followed by an exceptional career as a graduate student and research oceanographer at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, where he had the rare experience of making the first full-scale measurements of a newly discovered current, the Cromwell Current, or Pacific Equatorial Under current; this study served as his Ph.D. dissertation. John's penchants for probing new areas and clarifying existing observations were further evidenced in his Gulf Stream transport work. The Pacific Under current had been discovered in 1952 by Cromwell, Montgomery, and Stroup; Knauss was able to show that it was a narrow coherent feature that spanned at least the entire eastern Pacific. The large transport of the under current measured by Knauss established it as a major component of the circulation in the Pacific. He then undertook an exploration of the Indian Ocean to determine whether or not the Under current was present in that ocean. The discovery of the Indian Ocean Under current in 1963 completed the reconnaissance of the three oceans; the under current had been shown to be a significant feature of the circulation in all three tropical oceans. Notably, all of his early work on descriptive oceanography remains theoretically topical at the present time.

  19. Communicating science: Reflections of an AGU public affairs intern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, Tyler

    2012-10-01

    This past summer, I read a biography of the geologist and anthropologist John Wesley Powell. Among his many important accomplishments, Powell was a legendary explorer of the then largely unknown American West, a leader in the founding of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its second director, and the founder of the Cosmos Club in Washington, D. C. He was a student of the Earth from an early age, fought and lost an arm for the Union during the Civil War, advanced to the rank of major, led the first successful expedition down the entirety of the Grand Canyon, and then spent the rest of his life coupling scientific knowledge with public policy.

  20. Congressional Report Waffles on Merit Pay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School Board Journal, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A skeptical review of recent congressional task force recommendations for public school teachers, which include only a limited endorsement of merit pay and strong encouragement for sabbatical leave for teachers to study and travel abroad. (JBM)

  1. Rotational Seismology: AGU Session, Working Group, and Website

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, William H.K.; Igel, Heiner; Todorovska, Maria I.; Evans, John R.

    2007-01-01

    . Igel, W.H.K. Lee, and M. Todorovska during the 2006 AGU Fall Meeting. The goal of this session was to discuss rotational sensors, observations, modeling, theoretical aspects, and potential applications of rotational ground motions. The session was accompanied by the inauguration of an International Working Group on Rotational Seismology (IWGoRS) which aims to promote investigations of all aspects of rotational motions in seismology and their implications for related fields such as earthquake engineering, geodesy, strong-motion seismology, and tectonics, as well as to share experience, data, software, and results in an open Web-based environment. The primary goal of this article is to make the Earth Science Community aware of the emergence of the field of rotational seismology.

  2. AGU Mass Media Fellow Discovers ``Wow'' Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Ben

    2008-04-01

    I clearly remember the first time I realized that something was amiss with my perception of science. It was the summer of 2001. I was a second-year graduate student studying hydrothermal chemistry at the University of Washington, in Seattle. At the moment of my realization, I was in New York exploring an exhibit about hydrothermal vents at the American Museum of Natural History. As I was inspecting an intricate diorama of a remotely operated vehicle diving on a vent field, my younger brother, fascinated by the setup, asked, ``How come when you talk about this stuff, it always sounds so complicated and boring?'' I didn't have a good answer.

  3. AGU Embassy Lecture Event Focuses on Carbon Capture and Storage Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, Gabriella

    2010-09-01

    A program entitled “Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)—Viable technology or risky gamble?” was the inaugural event of AGU's Embassy Lecture Series and part of the European Embassy Science Series. With many countries looking into ways to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, the 9 September event at the Germany Embassy in Washington, D. C., focused on the technological and commercial feasibility of CCS. Four speakers addressed questions including whether CCS can be implemented successfully on a commercial scale and if the technology is economically feasible with or without a cap and trade system, and whether the public will support CCS. They stressed the importance of good science, proper planning, and sound monitoring to ensure that the carbon captured will be stored permanently.

  4. Transcriptomic profile of aguR deletion mutant of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666

    PubMed Central

    del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M.; Redruello, Begoña; Martin, Maria Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly GE2-14) is a dairy strain that catabolizes agmatine (a decarboxylated derivative of arginine) into the biogenic amine putrescine by the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway [1]. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed by five genes aguR, aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC. The last four genes are responsible for the deamination of agmatine to putrescine and are co-transcribed as a single policistronic mRNA forming the catabolic operon aguBDAC[1]. aguR encodes a transmembrane protein that functions as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and accordingly regulates the transcription of aguBDAC[2], which is also transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose, but not by other sugars such as lactose and galactose [1], [3]. Here we report the transcriptional profiling of the aguR gene deletion mutant (L. lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 ∆aguR) [2] compared to the wild type strain, both grown in M17 medium with galactose as carbon source and supplemented with agmatine. The transcriptional profiling data of AguR-regulated genes were deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession no. GSE59514. PMID:26697381

  5. Transcriptomic profile of aguR deletion mutant of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M; Redruello, Begoña; Martin, Maria Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-12-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly GE2-14) is a dairy strain that catabolizes agmatine (a decarboxylated derivative of arginine) into the biogenic amine putrescine by the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway [1]. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed by five genes aguR, aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC. The last four genes are responsible for the deamination of agmatine to putrescine and are co-transcribed as a single policistronic mRNA forming the catabolic operon aguBDAC[1]. aguR encodes a transmembrane protein that functions as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and accordingly regulates the transcription of aguBDAC[2], which is also transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose, but not by other sugars such as lactose and galactose [1], [3]. Here we report the transcriptional profiling of the aguR gene deletion mutant (L. lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 ∆aguR) [2] compared to the wild type strain, both grown in M17 medium with galactose as carbon source and supplemented with agmatine. The transcriptional profiling data of AguR-regulated genes were deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession no. GSE59514. PMID:26697381

  6. Molecular Characterization and Regulation of the aguBA Operon, Responsible for Agmatine Utilization in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Nakada, Yuji; Jiang, Ying; Nishijyo, Takayuki; Itoh, Yoshifumi; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 utilizes agmatine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source via two reactions catalyzed successively by agmatine deiminase (encoded by aguA; also called agmatine iminohydrolase) and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (encoded by aguB). The aguBA and adjacent aguR genes were cloned and characterized. The predicted AguB protein (Mr 32,759; 292 amino acids) displayed sequence similarity (≤60% identity) to enzymes of the β-alanine synthase/nitrilase family. While the deduced AguA protein (Mr 41,190; 368 amino acids) showed no significant similarity to any protein of known function, assignment of agmatine deiminase to AguA in this report discovered a new family of carbon-nitrogen hydrolases widely distributed in organisms ranging from bacteria to Arabidopsis. The aguR gene encoded a putative regulatory protein (Mr 24,424; 221 amino acids) of the TetR protein family. Measurements of agmatine deiminase and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase activities indicated the induction effect of agmatine and N-carbamoylputrescine on expression of the aguBA operon. The presence of an inducible promoter for the aguBA operon in the aguR-aguB intergenic region was demonstrated by lacZ fusion experiments, and the transcription start of this promoter was localized 99 bp upstream from the initiation codon of aguB by S1 nuclease mapping. Experiments with knockout mutants of aguR established that expression of the aguBA operon became constitutive in the aguR background. Interaction of AguR overproduced in Escherichia coli with the aguBA regulatory region was demonstrated by gel retardation assays, supporting the hypothesis that AguR serves as the negative regulator of the aguBA operon, and binding of agmatine and N-carbamoylputrescine to AguR would antagonize its repressor function. PMID:11673419

  7. Molecular characterization and regulation of the aguBA operon, responsible for agmatine utilization in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Y; Jiang, Y; Nishijyo, T; Itoh, Y; Lu, C D

    2001-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 utilizes agmatine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source via two reactions catalyzed successively by agmatine deiminase (encoded by aguA; also called agmatine iminohydrolase) and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (encoded by aguB). The aguBA and adjacent aguR genes were cloned and characterized. The predicted AguB protein (M(r) 32,759; 292 amino acids) displayed sequence similarity (< or =60% identity) to enzymes of the beta-alanine synthase/nitrilase family. While the deduced AguA protein (M(r) 41,190; 368 amino acids) showed no significant similarity to any protein of known function, assignment of agmatine deiminase to AguA in this report discovered a new family of carbon-nitrogen hydrolases widely distributed in organisms ranging from bacteria to Arabidopsis. The aguR gene encoded a putative regulatory protein (M(r) 24,424; 221 amino acids) of the TetR protein family. Measurements of agmatine deiminase and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase activities indicated the induction effect of agmatine and N-carbamoylputrescine on expression of the aguBA operon. The presence of an inducible promoter for the aguBA operon in the aguR-aguB intergenic region was demonstrated by lacZ fusion experiments, and the transcription start of this promoter was localized 99 bp upstream from the initiation codon of aguB by S1 nuclease mapping. Experiments with knockout mutants of aguR established that expression of the aguBA operon became constitutive in the aguR background. Interaction of AguR overproduced in Escherichia coli with the aguBA regulatory region was demonstrated by gel retardation assays, supporting the hypothesis that AguR serves as the negative regulator of the aguBA operon, and binding of agmatine and N-carbamoylputrescine to AguR would antagonize its repressor function. PMID:11673419

  8. Implementing the peer review process in AGU publications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, P. J.

    1984-04-01

    Recently, Russell and Reiff [1984] presented a flow-diagram analysis of the AGU publication process indicating how publication delays naturally occur. Perhaps because o f space limitations, their diagram did not include some important control statements. For example, according to their diagram, all manuscripts are either published or enter an endless loop. In fact, many papers end up elsewhere: As fish wrappers, in filing cabinets, or in non-AGU publications. (Accepted papers can end up in the same places, but they have the advantage of having been published in an AGU journal.) Significantly, the number of times the paper passes through the submission-refereeing loop (NJ) is not just journal dependent. NJ also depends inversely on nD, the density of Dogma in the paper. We are concerned with the publication process also and are motivated by reports that NJ is unusually large in the case of certain distinguished colleagues, particularly when introducing new concepts or criticizing older approaches. Some suggestions are offered here to speed publication and consequently to assist in the smoother functioning of the scientific method in geophysics.

  9. Science meets public service in Washington, D.C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasavada, Ashwin R.

    Same planet, different worlds—that's how many scientists see the relationship between science and government. Yet science and technology have become so infused into society that those worlds are colliding. Today, a number of national issues share a strong connection to science, from stem cells to climate change and energy to bioterrorism. For scientists who can adapt to the culture of politics, working in the collision zone can be an exciting and rewarding way to spend a year or even a career.This past year, I was one of 35 scientists in Washington serving as Congressional Science and Technology Fellows, sponsored by a number of scientific societies, including AGU. The Fellows vary widely in age and carry resumes listing Ph.D.s in not only physics, biology, and chemistry but also in Earth science, food safety, psychology, and veterinary medicine. With a group like that, weekly lunches and happy hours become the kind of broadening experience that one rarely gets in focused academic departments. And then there's the politics.

  10. EPA - NEW ENGLAND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS - 108TH CONGRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set portrays the Congressional Districts of the United States for the 108th Congress. Lines coincident with Congressional District boundaries were extracted from the existing National Atlas County Boundaries layer. In areas lacking coincident geometry, lines from State ...

  11. The Value of Science Policy Internships to Interns and Employers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    My interns often look at me wide-eyed when I tell them to approach a Member of Congress at a congressional reception and introduce themselves. I understand their shock, as I once had the same experience. This presentation will look at the internship experience from the perspective of the intern and the employer, describing the value of the internship to each. I will detail my experience as an intern in the American Geosciences Institute Government Affairs Program, and my current position as the creator and hiring manager of the American Geophysical Union Public Affairs Department internship. This perspective will be augmented by information from recent AGU Public Affairs interns. Internships equate to experience, one critical and often underdeveloped component of a student or recent graduate's resume. Each of these internships offers the unique opportunity for students and recent graduates of geophysical science programs to immerse themselves in the science policy field, doing work alongside professionals and serving as an important part of their respective work environment. The networking opportunities and skills learned are highly valuable to those building their resumes and trying to break into the field - or simply figuring out what future career path to take. Scientific societies see value in investing in the next generation of scientific leaders and ensuring their perspective includes an understanding of science policy and the societal impacts of science. These internship experiences are often eye-opening and sometimes career-changing.

  12. 10 CFR 1.27 - Office of Congressional Affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Office of Congressional Affairs. 1.27 Section 1.27 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters Commission Staff § 1.27 Office of Congressional Affairs. The Office of Congressional Affairs— (a) Advises...

  13. 10 CFR 1.27 - Office of Congressional Affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Office of Congressional Affairs. 1.27 Section 1.27 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters Commission Staff § 1.27 Office of Congressional Affairs. The Office of Congressional Affairs— (a) Advises...

  14. 10 CFR 1.27 - Office of Congressional Affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Office of Congressional Affairs. 1.27 Section 1.27 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters Commission Staff § 1.27 Office of Congressional Affairs. The Office of Congressional Affairs— (a) Advises...

  15. 10 CFR 1.27 - Office of Congressional Affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Congressional Affairs. 1.27 Section 1.27 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters Commission Staff § 1.27 Office of Congressional Affairs. The Office of Congressional Affairs— (a) Advises...

  16. 10 CFR 1.27 - Office of Congressional Affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Office of Congressional Affairs. 1.27 Section 1.27 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters Commission Staff § 1.27 Office of Congressional Affairs. The Office of Congressional Affairs— (a) Advises...

  17. New AGU scientific integrity and professional ethics policy available for review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gundersen, Linda C.

    2012-01-01

    The AGU Task Force on Scientific Ethics welcomes your review and comments on AGU's new Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics Policy. The policy has at its heart a code of conduct adopted from the internationally accepted "Singapore Statement," originally created by the Second World Conference on Research Integrity (http://www.singaporestatement.org/), held in 2010. The new policy also encompasses professional and publishing ethics, providing a single source of guidance to AGU members, officers, authors, and editors

  18. New AGU scientific integrity and professional ethics policy available for review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundersen, Linda

    2012-09-01

    The AGU Task Force on Scientific Ethics welcomes your review and comments on AGU's new Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics Policy. The policy has at its heart a code of conduct adopted from the internationally accepted “Singapore Statement,” originally created by the Second World Conference on Research Integrity (http://www.singaporestatement.org/), held in 2010. The new policy also encompasses professional and publishing ethics, providing a single source of guidance to AGU members, officers, authors, and editors.

  19. Learn about AGU's scientific integrity policies during a Fall Meeting listening session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2011-11-01

    AGU members are invited to hear about the Union's new Scientific Integrity and Ethics Policy during a listening session at Fall Meeting. (See also the About AGU article by Peter Gleick and Randy Townsend on p. 433.) At this event, members of the Task Force on Scientific Ethics will discuss current efforts to update the Union's policies on scientific integrity. In addition, AGU members will have the opportunity to become involved in helping to shape the future of AGU by providing feedback, ideas, and insights.

  20. AGU awarded grant to establish program on engaging 2-year-college students in research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Pranoti; Adamec, Bethany Holm

    2012-03-01

    Students at 2-year colleges are a critical part of the future Earth and space science workforce, and undergraduate research experiences provide a hook to retain and ultimately to graduate students in the field. AGU was awarded a planning grant by the U.S. National Science Foundation Directorate for Geosciences (Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences award 1201578) to help launch a new initiative concerning these issues; education and public outreach staff are the principal investigators. This new initiative, titled Unique Research Experiences for Two-Year College Faculty and Students (URECAS), will begin with a planning workshop this summer (11-13 July). The workshop will bring together faculty from 2-year colleges, 4-year colleges and universities, and representatives from professional societies and federal organizations to learn more about how to support 2-year-college faculty and students engaged in Earth and space science research and to discuss the development of a program to strengthen the role of 2-year-college Earth and space science students in the future workforce

  1. The Impact of Immigration on Congressional Representation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouvier, Leon

    Explanation of shifts in U.S. Congressional representation among states have often overlooked the effects of international migration on the size and distribution of the U.S. population. Seventy percent of recent U.S. immigrants have settled in California, New York, Texas, Florida, New Jersey, and Illinois. Estimates of the distribution of…

  2. A New Method for Congressional Apportionment

    PubMed Central

    Balinski, M. L.; Young, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of Congressional apportionment is explained together with a brief history of the methods used or considered for its solution. Reasons are given for rejecting the presently used method of equal proportions and for accepting a new method, the quota method, which is the unique method satisfying three essential axioms. PMID:16592200

  3. [Comment on “AGU Authorship Policy” and “More on AGU Authorship Policy”] A response from the establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birmingham, Thomas J.

    Recent letters in Forum by Ron Zwickl (Eos, April 15, 1986, p. 186) and C. T. Russell (Eos, July 1, 1986, p. 545) have addressed the proliferation of authors on papers in AGU journals. I assume that the authors have at least the Journal of Geophysical Research-Space Physics in mind, as both are frequent contributors to our journal (and highly valued referees as well!).There is no doubt in my mind that marginal participants sometimes end up in the bylines of papers we publish. In a few instances, I do not believe that all authors even read the final manuscript: if they did, they would exercise better quality control over the submitted product. I do not agree, however, that AGU should be responsible for determining authorship, even in a tangential way: its concern, manifest through its editors, should be that each article published represents a significant new contribution to the discipline. To me as editor, it's what comes after the byline that matters!

  4. AGU leadership will involve new volunteers, new and continuing Board and Council members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, Tim

    2012-10-01

    The election is over, but AGU's leadership transition is just beginning! Newly elected leaders will take office on 1 January 2013, and about half of the current Board and Council members will rotate off. In addition, there will be changes to AGU committee structure, charges, and composition.

  5. Elections for AGU leadership positions: What you can expect in the months to come

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, Tim; Kavner, Abby; Fucugauchi, Jaime Urrutia; Farrington, John; Cashman, Kathy; Spohn, Tilman

    2012-02-01

    It's hard to believe that it is again time to consider elections for AGU leadership positions. Just over 18 months ago, AGU launched a new governance model and strategic plan. Since then, the AGU Board of Directors, the AGU Council, and staff leaders have partnered with us, the members of the Governance Committee, to move AGU forward in the positive direction set by members. Much has been accomplished in a short time, and much is left to do to achieve AGU's envisioned future (see http://www.agu.org/about/mission.shtml). We need to elect the next set of leaders who can carry on the direction and vision set in motion by the Future Focus Task Force and the first group of Board and Council members tasked with guiding this new plan. This year, AGU members will elect leaders for the next term (2013-2014). Below is a synopsis of what we've been doing, along with a timeline for nominations and elections.

  6. Use of energy policy research and/or analysis in congressional decision making

    SciTech Connect

    Ahiarah, S.C.O.

    1985-01-01

    Regardless of what anyone thinks about it, policy science, as conceived by Lasswell, has become a discipline that is breeding new professionals who are producing policy researches and/or analyses decision making. But are they so used - is the intended marriage between PRA information and public policy decision making taking place. Many think they are, although others are skeptical. This study goes beyond the question of whether or not PRAs are used in public policy decision making, to investigate the purposes for which they are used therein. The public-policy decision making context selected is the legislative (congressional) decision making occasions in energy issues between 1979 and 1982; the objects of use are the energy PRAs from three congressional support agencies - the General Accounting Office, the Office of Technology Assessment, and the Congressional Budget Office. The findings are that when use is defined as congressional admission of the PRAs, all support agency PRAs are used, but when use is defined in terms of Congress Considering or adapting the PRAs in its decision making contexts, only a portion of all the support agency PRAs get used. The PRAs that are consideratively or adaptively used are more likely to be used for enlightenment, position support, and/or symbolic-propagandistic purposes.

  7. Job Hunters' Workshop held at Spring AGU Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruder, Michal

    The Education and Human Resources Committee of AGU sponsored a Job Hunters' Workshop as a special afternoon session of this year's Baltimore meeting. Aimed primarily at graduate and postgraduate researchers, the workshop was designed to facilitate the transition from university into the job force. Six panel members provided advice and information on how to pursue research and employment: academia, government labs, consulting firms, and the petroleum industry.The panel included E. K. Graham (Pennsylvania State University, University Park), Richard Orville (State University of New York, Albany), Penny Hanshaw (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Reston, Va.), Anne Thompson (National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Goddard Space Flight Center), Joseph Bennett (S-Cubed, Reston, Va.,), and Michal Ruder (Exxon Production Research Company, Houston, Tex.,).

  8. Impact Factors Show Increased Use of AGU Journals in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Barbara Meyers

    2009-07-01

    The latest numbers released from Journal Citation Reports (JCR), published annually by Thomson Reuters, show large increases in the impact factor (IF) for several AGU journals. IFs are one way for publishers to know that readers have found their journals useful and of value in research. A journal's IF is calculated by taking the total number of citations to articles published by a given journal in the past 2 years and dividing it by the total number of papers published by the journal in the same time period. More generally, it can be seen as the frequency with which articles in a journal have been cited over the past year. The numbers speak for themselves (see Table 1).

  9. CO2 Emissions Generated by a Fall AGU Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    osborn, G.; Malowany, K. S.; Samolczyk, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The process of reporting on and discussing geophysical phenomena, including emissions of greenhouse gases, generates more greenhouse gases. At the 2010 fall meeting of the AGU, 19,175 delegates from 81 countries, including, for example, Eritrea, Nepal, and Tanzania, traveled a total of 156,000,000 km to congregate in San Francisco for five days. With data on home bases of participants provided by AGU, we estimated the CO2 emissions generated by travel and hotel stays of those participants. The majority of the emissions from the meeting resulted from air travel . In order to estimate the footprint of such travel, (a) distances from the largest airport in each country and American state (except Canada and California) to San Francisco were tabulated , (b) basic distances were converted to emissions using the TerraPass (TRX Travel Analytics) carbon calculator, (c) it was assumed that half the California participants would fly and half would drive, (d) it was assumed that half of Canadians would fly out of Toronto and half out of Vancouver, and (e) a fudge factor of 10% was added to air travel emissions to account for connecting flights made by some participants to the main airports in the respective countries (connecting flights are disproportionately significant because of high output during takeoff acceleration). Driving impacts were estimated with a Transport Direct/RAC Motoring Services calculator using a 2006 Toyota Corolla as a standard car. An average driving distance of 50 km to the departure airport, and from the airport upon return, was assumed. Train impacts were estimated using the assumption that all flying participants would take BART from SFO. Accomodation impacts were estimated using an Environmental Protection Agency calculator, an assumed average stay of 3 nights, and the assumption that 500 participants commuted from local residences or stayed with friends. The above assumptions lead to an estimate, which we consider conservative, of 19 million kg of

  10. AGU Launches Web Site for New Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Randy

    2013-03-01

    AGU's Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics policy, approved by the AGU Board of Directors and Council in December 2012, is now available online on a new Web site, http://ethics.agu.org. As the Web site states, the policy embodies a "set of guidelines for scientific integrity and professional ethics for the actions of the members and the governance of the Union in its internal activities; in its public persona; and most importantly, in the research and peer review processes of its scientific publications, its communications and outreach, and its scientific meetings."

  11. AGU continues 2003 journal access for libraries affected by RoweCom bankruptcy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifland, Jonathan

    Following the default of one of its major journal subscription agents, AGU has committed itself to providing campus-wide electronic access for 2003 to libraries whose journal orders are affected by the bankruptcy. The company, RoweCom Inc. of Westwood, Massachusetts, filed for Chapter 11 protection on 27 January 2003.RoweCom folded in December with nearly $80 million in unfulfilled orders which were destined to thousands of publishers. Subscription agents consolidate orders from libraries and transmit payments to publishers for journal subscriptions. The bankruptcy could cost AGU up to $700,000 in lost revenue in 2003, approximately 7% of AGU's gross institutional subscriptions.

  12. Gender Issues: Women's Participation in the Sciences Has Increased, but Agencies Need to Do More to Ensure Compliance with Title IX. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-04-639

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Cornelia M.

    2004-01-01

    Because of concerns about women's access to opportunities in the sciences, this report addresses: how the Department of Education (Education), Department of Energy (Energy), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and National Science Foundation (NSF) ensure that federal grant recipient institutions comply with Title IX in math,…

  13. Remarks from Congressional Leaders: Congressman Daniel Lipinski (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema

    Lipinski, Daniel (Congressman, Illinois)

    2012-03-14

    Congressman Daniel Lipinski (D-Illinois) spoke during the opening session of the EFRC Summit. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  14. Remarks from Congressional Leaders: Senator Jeff Bingaman (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema

    Bingaman, Jeff (Senator, New Mexico)

    2012-03-14

    During the opening session of the EFRC Summit, Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM) explained how the EFRCs play an important role in the U.S. energy innovation ecosystem. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  15. Remarks from Congressional Leaders: Senator Jeff Bingaman (2011 EFRC Summit)

    SciTech Connect

    Bingaman, Jeff

    2011-05-25

    During the opening session of the EFRC Summit, Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM) explained how the EFRCs play an important role in the U.S. energy innovation ecosystem. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  16. Remarks from Congressional Leaders: Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema

    Lofgren, Zoe (Congresswoman, California)

    2012-03-14

    Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren (D-California) spoke during the opening session of the EFRC Summit. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  17. 46 CFR 9.13 - Congressional appropriations necessary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Congressional appropriations necessary. 9.13 Section 9... COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.13 Congressional appropriations necessary. Payment of extra compensation for overtime services shall be subject to appropriations being made therefor by Congress....

  18. EGS Richardson AGU Chapman NVAG3 Conference: Nonlinear Variability in Geophysics: scaling and multifractal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, D.; Lovejoy, S.

    was followed by five days with 8 oral sessions and one poster session. Overall, there were 65 papers involving 74 authors. In general, the main topics covered are reflected in this special issue: geophysical turbulence, clouds and climate, hydrology and solid earth geophysics. In addition to AGU and EGS, the conference was supported by the International Science Foundation, the Centre Nationale de Recherche Scientifique, Meteo-France, the Department of Energy (US), the Commission of European Communities (DG XII), the Comite National Francais pour le Programme Hydrologique International, the Ministere de l'Enseignement Superieur et de la Recherche (France). We thank P. Hubert, Y. Kagan, Ph. Ladoy, A. Lazarev, S.S. Moiseev, R. Pierrehumbert, F. Schmitt and Y. Tessier, for help with the organization of the conference. However special thanks goes to A. Richter and the EGS office, B. Weaver and the AGU without whom this would have been impossible. We also thank the Institut d' Etudes Scientifiques de Cargese whose beautiful site was much appreciated, as well as the Bar des Amis whose ambiance stimulated so many discussions. 2. Tribute to L.F. Richardson With NVAG3, the European geophysical community paid tribute to Lewis Fry Richardson (1881-1953) on the 40th anniversary of his death. Richardson was one of the founding fathers of the idea of scaling and fractality, and his life reflects the European geophysical community and its history in many ways. Although many of Richardson's numerous, outstanding scientific contributions to geophysics have been recognized, perhaps his main contribution concerning the importance of scaling and cascades has still not received the attention it deserves. Richardson was the first not only to suggest numerical integration of the equations of motion of the atmosphere, but also to attempt to do so by hand, during the First World War. This work, as well as a presentation of a broad vision of future developments in the field, appeared in his

  19. Congressional hearing reviews NSF major research and facilities projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-03-01

    An 8 March congressional hearing about the U.S. National Science Foundation's Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction (NSF MREFC) account focused on fiscal management and accountability of projects in that account and reviewed concerns raised by NSF's Office of Inspector General (OIG). NSF established the MREFC account in 1995 to better plan and manage investments in major equipment and facilities projects, which can cost from tens of millions to hundreds of millions of dollars, and the foundation has funded 17 MREFC projects since then. The Obama administration's proposed fiscal year (FY) 2013 budget includes funding for four MREFC projects: Advanced Laser Gravitational-Wave Observatory (AdvLIGO), Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), National Ecological Observatory (NEON), and Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI). The hearing, held by a subcommittee of the House of Representatives' Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, reviewed management oversight throughout the life cycles of MREFC projects and concerns raised in recent OIG reports about the use of budget contingency funds. NSF's February 2012 manual called "Risk management guide for large facilities" states that cost contingency is "that portion of the project budget required to cover `known unknowns,'" such as planning and estimating errors and omissions, minor labor or material price fluctuations, and design developments and changes within the project scope. Committee members acknowledged measures that NSF has made to improve the MREFC oversight process, but they also urged the agency to continue to take steps to ensure better project management.

  20. Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics at AGU - The Establishment and Evolution of an Ethics Program at a Large Scientific Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael; Leinen, Margaret; McEntee, Christine; Townsend, Randy; Williams, Billy

    2016-04-01

    The American Geophysical Union, a scientific society of 62,000 members worldwide, has established a set of scientific integrity and professional ethics guidelines for the actions of its members, for the governance of the union in its internal activities, and for the operations and participation in its publications and scientific meetings. This presentation will provide an overview of the Ethics program at AGU, highlighting the reasons for its establishment, the process of dealing ethical breaches, the number and types of cases considered, how AGU helps educate its members on Ethics issues, and the rapidly evolving efforts at AGU to address issues related to the emerging field of GeoEthics. The presentation will also cover the most recent AGU Ethics program focus on the role for AGU and other scientific societies in addressing sexual harassment, and AGU's work to provide additional program strength in this area.

  1. Speaking Up For Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilhaus, Fred

    2005-06-01

    The Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C. is planning to show a film, "A Privileged Planet" that promotes creationism in the form of "intelligent design." The film is based on the book by Guillermo Gonzalez and Jay Wesley Richards, both affiliated with the Discovery Institute, which advocates teaching "intelligent design" as science in U.S. public schools. By associating with the Discovery Institute, the Smithsonian Institution will associate science with creationism and damage their credibility. The film is slated for airing on 23 June, unless the Smithsonian comes to its senses.Why is this important? Because the film promotes a long term strategy of the Discovery Institute (//www.discovery.org/csc/) to replace "materialistic science" with "intelligent design." The film fosters the idea that science should include the supernatural. This is unacceptable. AGU's position is clear, creationism is not science and AGU opposes all efforts to promote creationism as science, (The full text of the AGU position statement can be found at: //www.agu.org/sci_soc/policy/positions/evolution.shtml).

  2. Cancer death rates in US congressional districts.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Rebecca L; Sahar, Liora; Portier, Kenneth M; Ward, Elizabeth M; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the cancer burden is important for informing and advocating cancer prevention and control. Mortality data are readily available for states and counties, but not for congressional districts, from which representatives are elected and which may be more influential in compelling legislation and policy. The authors calculated average annual cancer death rates during 2002 to 2011 for each of the 435 congressional districts using mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics and population estimates from the US Census Bureau. Age-standardized death rates were mapped for all sites combined and separately for cancers of the lung and bronchus, colorectum, breast, and prostate by race/ethnicity and sex. Overall cancer death rates vary by almost 2-fold and are generally lowest in Mountain states and highest in Appalachia and areas of the South. The distribution is similar for lung and colorectal cancers, with the lowest rates consistently noted in districts in Utah. However, for breast and prostate cancers, while the highest rates are again scattered throughout the South, the geographic pattern is less clear and the lowest rates are in Hawaii and southern Texas and Florida. Within-state heterogeneity is limited, particularly for men, with the exceptions of Texas, Georgia, and Florida. Patterns also vary by race/ethnicity. For example, the highest prostate cancer death rates are in the West and north central United States among non-Hispanic whites, but in the deep South among African Americans. Hispanics have the lowest rates except for colorectal cancer in Wyoming, eastern Colorado, and northern New Mexico. These data can facilitate cancer control and stimulate conversation about the relationship between cancer and policies that influence access to health care and the prevalence of behavioral and environmental risk factors. PMID:26208318

  3. Executive Director Fred Spilhaus Steps Down; Interim Leader Takes AGU Reins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Peter

    2009-02-01

    After 39 years as AGU executive director, Fred Spilhaus has stepped down from his post; he will become executive director emeritus. At a 27 January 2009 staff meeting at AGU headquarters, in Washington, D. C., three of the Union officers introduced Robert T. Van Hook, who will serve as interim executive director while AGU conducts a worldwide search for a new executive director. The search is expected to start in the summer of 2009 and to take from 6 to 18 months. ``AGU is a growing, vibrant organization that wishes to thoughtfully chart its course for the coming decades,'' Van Hook said. ``I am a professional interim executive, here to build on Fred Spilhaus's legacy. I want to help this extraordinary Union of researchers, teachers, and students take careful stock of where it is today, where it wants to go tomorrow, and what kind of staff leader it needs to help it get there,'' he said. ``My job is to get you ready for the next executive director,'' Van Hook told AGU staff, noting that he is not a candidate for the position himself.

  4. Science Speaks: AGU's New Way to Share Science and Its Value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrogio, Olivia V.

    2013-12-01

    On the count of three, as the camera shutter clicked, Julia Galkiewicz jumped up, her expression gleeful as she gripped a whiteboard. Emblazoned on it was a message: "This is what a scientist looks like."

  5. Setting the rural health services research agenda: the congressional perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Patton, L

    1989-01-01

    This series of key research questions is based on the underlying congressional assumption that the rural health research agenda must be developed as an instrument equally relevant to policymakers, practitioners, and the public. PMID:2492981

  6. U.S. Science and Engineering Education and Manpower: Background; Supply and Demand; and Comparison with Japan, the Soviet Union, and West Germany. Report Prepared by the Congressional Research Service Library of Congress for the Subcommittee on Science, Research and Technology, Transmitted to the Committee on Science and Technology. U.S. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Edith Fairman

    This five-part report examines several aspects of science/engineering (S/E) education as it relates to S/E manpower. Part I discusses: pre-college science/mathematics curricula that have a bearing on future career decisions of students and that will subsequently affect the supply of scientific/technical manpower; the importance of…

  7. National Medal of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nineteen scientists and engineers were awarded the nation's highest scientific honor, the National Medal of Science, by President Ronald Reagan in late February in a ceremony held in the East Room of the White House. Among the recipients were two AGU members.

  8. Ailing Voters Advance Attractive Congressional Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Robert G.; Palumbo, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    Among many benefits of facial attractiveness, there is evidence that more attractive politicians are more likely to be elected. Recent research found this effect to be most pronounced in congressional districts with high disease threat—a result attributed to an adaptive disease avoidance mechanism, whereby the association of low attractiveness with poor health is particularly worrisome to voters who feel vulnerable to disease. We provided a more direct test of this explanation by examining the effects of individuals’ own health and age. Supporting a disease avoidance mechanism, less healthy participants showed a stronger preference for more attractive contenders in U.S. Senate races than their healthier peers, and this effect was stronger for older participants, who were generally less healthy than younger participants. Stronger effects of health for older participants partly reflected the absence of positive bias toward attractive candidates among the healthiest, suggesting that healthy older adults may be unconcerned about disease threat or sufficiently wise to ignore attractiveness. PMID:25562113

  9. Funding to Support the Participation of Scientists Engaged in DOE Research in the 2008 AGU Chapman Conference on Biogeophysics. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Lee D.

    2009-05-11

    This project provided travel awards for scientists engaged in research relevant to the DOE mission to participate in the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Chapman Conference on Biogeophysics held October 13-16, 2008, in Portland, Maine (http://www.agu.org/meetings/chapman/2008/fcall/). The objective of this Chapman Conference was to bring together geophysicists, biophysicists, geochemists, geomicrobiologists, and environmental microbiologists that are leaders in their field and have a personal interest in exploring this new interdisciplinary field or are conducting multidisciplinary research with potential impact on biogeophysics in order to define the current state of the science, identify the critical questions facing the community and to generate a roadmap for establishing biogeophysics as a critical subdiscipline of earth science research. The sixty participants were an international group of academics, graduate students and scientists at government laboratories engaged in biogeophysics related research. Scientists from Europe, Israel and China traveled to engage North American colleagues in this highly focused 3.5 day meeting. The group included an approximately equal mix of microbiologists, biogeochemists and near surface geophysicists. The recipients of the DOE travel awards were [1] Dennis Bazylinski (University of Nevada, Las Vegas), [2] Yuri Gorby (Craig Venter Institute), [3] Carlos Santamarina (Georgia Tech), [4] Susan Hubbard (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), [5] Roelof Versteeg (Idaho National Laboratory), [6] Eric Roden (University of Wisconsin), [7] George Luther (University of Delaware), and [8] Jinsong Chen (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory)

  10. AguR, a Transmembrane Transcription Activator of the Putrescine Biosynthesis Operon in Lactococcus lactis, Acts in Response to the Agmatine Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Daniel M.; del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begoña; Ladero, Victor; Martin, M. Cruz; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Fernandez, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Dairy industry fermentative processes mostly use Lactococcus lactis as a starter. However, some dairy L. lactis strains produce putrescine, a biogenic amine that raises food safety and spoilage concerns, via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The enzymatic activities responsible for putrescine biosynthesis in this bacterium are encoded by the AGDI gene cluster. The role of the catabolic genes aguB, aguD, aguA, and aguC has been studied, but knowledge regarding the role of aguR (the first gene in the cluster) remains limited. In the present work, aguR was found to be a very low level constitutively expressed gene that is essential for putrescine biosynthesis and is transcribed independently of the polycistronic mRNA encoding the catabolic genes (aguBDAC). In response to agmatine, AguR acts as a transcriptional activator of the aguB promoter (PaguB), which drives the transcription of the aguBDAC operon. Inverted sequences required for PaguB activity were identified by deletion analysis. Further work indicated that AguR is a transmembrane protein which might function as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and, accordingly, regulates the transcription of the aguBDAC operon through a C-terminal cytoplasmic DNA-binding domain typically found in LuxR-like proteins. PMID:26116671

  11. AguR, a Transmembrane Transcription Activator of the Putrescine Biosynthesis Operon in Lactococcus lactis, Acts in Response to the Agmatine Concentration.

    PubMed

    Linares, Daniel M; Del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begoña; Ladero, Victor; Martin, M Cruz; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Fernandez, Maria; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-09-01

    Dairy industry fermentative processes mostly use Lactococcus lactis as a starter. However, some dairy L. lactis strains produce putrescine, a biogenic amine that raises food safety and spoilage concerns, via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The enzymatic activities responsible for putrescine biosynthesis in this bacterium are encoded by the AGDI gene cluster. The role of the catabolic genes aguB, aguD, aguA, and aguC has been studied, but knowledge regarding the role of aguR (the first gene in the cluster) remains limited. In the present work, aguR was found to be a very low level constitutively expressed gene that is essential for putrescine biosynthesis and is transcribed independently of the polycistronic mRNA encoding the catabolic genes (aguBDAC). In response to agmatine, AguR acts as a transcriptional activator of the aguB promoter (PaguB), which drives the transcription of the aguBDAC operon. Inverted sequences required for PaguB activity were identified by deletion analysis. Further work indicated that AguR is a transmembrane protein which might function as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and, accordingly, regulates the transcription of the aguBDAC operon through a C-terminal cytoplasmic DNA-binding domain typically found in LuxR-like proteins. PMID:26116671

  12. The Politics of Research Misconduct: Congressional Oversight, Universities, and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafollette, Marcel C.

    1994-01-01

    In the U.S. Congress, attention to scientific fraud and misconduct has involved extensive use of oversight authority. Because scientists and universities have failed to respond promptly to calls for self-regulation, Congress has imposed formal regulations and favors increased scrutiny of research and a reassessment of university-government-science…

  13. AGU supports free and open communication of scientific findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-09-01

    Scientists, policy makers, and supporting institutions should guard and promote unfettered communication of scientific data, debates, and findings as a component of scientific expression. Advances in science and the benefits of science to policy, technological progress, and society as a whole depend upon the free exchange of scientific data and information as well as on open debate. The ability of scientists to present their findings to the scientific community, policy makers, the media, and the public without censorship, intimidation, or political interference is imperative. With the specific limited exception of proprietary information or constraints arising from national security, scientists must be permitted unfettered communication of scientific results. In return, it is incumbent upon scientists to communicate their findings in ways that portray their results and the results of others, objectively, professionally, and without sensationalizing or politicizing the associated impacts.

  14. AGU President's Message: Obama Administration's Commitment to Scientific Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    In March 2009, President Barack Obama issued a memorandum on the subject of scientific integrity in which he stated emphatically, 'Science and the scientific process must inform and guide decisions of my Administration on a wide range of issues, including improvement of public health, protection of the environment, increased efficiency in the use of energy and other resources, mitigation of the threat of climate change, and protection of national security.” The president charged John Holdren, director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), with developing specific recommendations “for ensuring the highest level of integrity in all aspects of the executive branch's involvement with scientific and technological processes.” On Friday, 17 December, OSTP released federal department and agency guidelines for implementing the administration’s policies on scientific integrity.

  15. [Congressional amendments to the Brazilian Federal health budget].

    PubMed

    Baptista, Tatiana Wargas de Faria; Machado, Cristiani Vieira; Lima, Luciana Dias de; Garcia, Marcia; Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares de; Gerassi, Camila Duarte

    2012-12-01

    The public budget in Brazil has undergone significant changes since enactment of the 1988 Federal Constitution. Mechanisms for integration of planning activities and budget execution have been created, and Legislative participation in budgeting has increased. Congressional amendments appeared in this context. The article discusses the participation of Congressional amendments in the Federal health budget from 1997 to 2006, combining elements for discussion of funding mechanisms and health planning. Such amendments played a significant role in the budget process, accounting for over half of health funds in some years. The North was the region of Brazil that received most resources resulting from Congressional amendments, suggesting the need for further studies on the relationship between the amendments' enforcement and political party coalitions. The article concludes that the amendments cannot be understood solely as a funding mechanism, but mainly as a political instrument, and that they are not necessarily subject to health planning logic. PMID:23288060

  16. Presidential Citation for Science and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-07-01

    AGU presented its Presidential Citation for Science and Society to three recipients at a reception on 1 May 2012 in the Rayburn House Office Building as part of the inaugural AGU Science Policy Conference. Google Earth, Jane Lubchenco, who is the under secretary of Commerce for oceans and atmosphere and administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) were recognized for their leadership and vision in shaping policy and heightening public awareness of the value of Earth and space science. “This is an important award because with it AGU brings to light the importance of cutting-edge use-inspired science that helps people, communities, and businesses adapt to climate change and sustainably manage our oceans and coasts,” Lubchenco said.

  17. U.S. congressional district cancer death rates

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yongping; Ward, Elizabeth M; Jemal, Ahmedin; Pickle, Linda W; Thun, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Background Geographic patterns of cancer death rates in the U.S. have customarily been presented by county or aggregated into state economic or health service areas. Herein, we present the geographic patterns of cancer death rates in the U.S. by congressional district. Many congressional districts do not follow state or county boundaries. However, counties are the smallest geographical units for which death rates are available. Thus, a method based on the hierarchical relationship of census geographic units was developed to estimate age-adjusted death rates for congressional districts using data obtained at county level. These rates may be useful in communicating to legislators and policy makers about the cancer burden and potential impact of cancer control in their jurisdictions. Results Mortality data were obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) for 1990–2001 for 50 states, the District of Columbia, and all counties. We computed annual average age-adjusted death rates for all cancer sites combined, the four major cancers (lung and bronchus, prostate, female breast, and colorectal cancer) and cervical cancer. Cancer death rates varied widely across congressional districts for all cancer sites combined, for the four major cancers, and for cervical cancer. When examined at the national level, broad patterns of mortality by sex, race and region were generally similar with those previously observed based on county and state economic area. Conclusion We developed a method to generate cancer death rates by congressional district using county-level mortality data. Characterizing the cancer burden by congressional district may be useful in promoting cancer control and prevention programs, and persuading legislators to enact new cancer control programs and/or strengthening existing ones. The method can be applied to state legislative districts and other analyses that involve data aggregation from different geographic units. PMID:16796732

  18. Volunteers: A Critical Element in the New AGU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael

    2010-02-01

    We are in the midst of unprecedented change at the American Geophysical Union. Members have recently approved new bylaws to create a governance structure that better reflects the Union's diverse range of scientific interests and enables more efficient and transparent functioning of the organization. We have also embarked on a new strategic planning process to develop far-reaching organizational goals that will ensure continued global leadership in the Earth and space sciences. Finally, we are in the midst of hiring a new permanent executive director to lead our organization in the years ahead.

  19. 2006 Ocean Sciences Meeting Travel Grant opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travel support for students participating in the 2006 Ocean Sciences Meeting (20-24 February, Honolulu, Hawaii) is being offered through two programs. The 2006 Ocean Sciences Meeting is jointly sponsored by AGU, the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO), and The Oceanography Society (TOS).Student Travel Grant Program: Students presenting first-author papers at the Ocean Sciences Meeting are eligible to apply for partial travel support through the Student Travel Grant program. Support for this program has been made available by a grant from the U.S. National Oceanographic Partnership Program (www.nopp.org), with additional contributions from AGU and ASLO.

  20. Congressional liaison task force - a briefing of the October 1994 meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    As the US Senate overturned roadblocks attempting-unsuccessfully-to halt passage of the elementary and secondary education reauthorization legislation representatives from several federal agencies and laboratories addressed Congressional Liaison Task Force (CLTF) participants October 12th. They spoke about their commitment, programs, and accomplishments toward the nation`s science knowledge, particularly at the precollege level. Marjorie S. Steinberg legislative assistant to bill cosponsor Sen. Jeff Bingaman (DNM), and Gary Allen, Triangle Coalition director of Governmental affairs, spoke about education legislation and specifically about the Technology for Education Act that was on the Senate floor for a vote in October and now is law. Bruce A. Fuchs talked about the National Institute of Health`s (NIH) work in science literacy and education. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s (NASA) Frank C. Owens and Eddie Anderson contributed to this report.

  1. [comment t[Comment on] “What is AGU's proper role in society?”] AGU's role in society: Duty to the public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilshire, Howard

    Bravo to William Kaula and Don Anderson for their forthright opinion, “What Is AGU's Proper Role in Society?” (Eos, April 9, 1991). In hearing preliminaries about Mission to Planet Earth at the Geological Society of America's meeting in Phoenix in 1987, I was turned off by what seemed to me to be endless self-serving proposals to probe the Earth “with our steely knives,” but with hardly a mention of how we could use the information to assist the nation in making rational decisions about the future human occupancy of Earth. I concur with Kaula and Anderson that it is not only the duty of individual scientists to speak out on controversial issues of public concern, but also the duty of professional societies to influence the public policy decision-making process in areas where our special expertise is relevant.It does not matter that opinions within the professional societies differ. Opinions within the nation differ, too. But to take no position at all because of these differences of opinion is dereliction of our duty to the public that supports us. AGU already has a mechanism for presenting a Union-endorsed position on public issues (which could serve as a model for other professional societies whose best effort is to hide under the bed). This mechanism needs to be used more aggressively so that our expert knowledge (both of facts and hypotheses) is brought to bear on matters of critical human concern.

  2. President's message: Dues increase will help build the foundation for AGU's future success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2012-09-01

    The world is a very different place than it was 43 years ago. In 1969, Jimi Hendrix rocked the legendary Woodstock music festival, Neil Armstrong took the first steps on the Moon, and U.S. drivers paid an average of 35 cents a gallon for gas. Today, digital music files have replaced vinyl records, NASA's Curiosity rover is transmitting data and imagery from the surface of Mars, and a growing number of cars run on alternative fuels. In the same way, 43 years ago AGU was a very different organization. Membership hovered around 10,000, and the Fall Meeting was still in its infancy. Today, AGU's membership has increased to more than 61,000, Fall Meeting attendance has topped 20,000, and an entire generation of geoscientists who weren't even born in 1969 now comprises 28% of our current membership.

  3. Organizing a Congressional Candidate Debate as Experiential Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeckelman, Keith; Deitz, Janna L.; Hardy, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a political debate among congressional candidates that the authors organized in 2006. The debate was structured to maximize student involvement both in the planning stages and during the event itself. After discussing relevant literature on experiential learning, the article describes the debate format and details the issues…

  4. Management, Security, and Congressional Oversight. Federal Government Information Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report considers the management, use, and congressional oversight of information technology in the Federal Government as rapid advances in technology--e.g., microcomputers, computer networking, computer modeling, videoconferencing, and electronic information exchange--are generating many new applications, opportunities, and issues which are…

  5. 48 CFR 225.871-7 - Congressional notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Congressional notification. 225.871-7 Section 225.871-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Other International Agreements and Coordination 225.871-7...

  6. 7 CFR 2.23 - Assistant Secretary for Congressional Relations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Assistant Secretary for Congressional Relations. 2.23 Section 2.23 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY BY THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE AND GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE DEPARTMENT Delegations of Authority to the Deputy Secretary, the Under Secretaries, and...

  7. Review of Congressional Issues. News from Capitol Hill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, Ann Simeo

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on U.S. congressional issues in two categories: (1) enacted legislation, and (2) proposed legislation. Addresses topics such as the resolution related to Iraq, the Department of Homeland Security, Pledge of Allegiance, social security protection, elder justice, and women's rights. Includes learning activities. (CMK)

  8. Congressional Politics in the Gilded Age: A Classroom Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghere, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a classroom simulation that employs active learning to introduce students to congressional politics using the national issues of the Gilded Age. Explains that the students are divided into groups in order to simulate the U.S. Senate and then discuss, amend, and vote on legislation. Provides four detailed simulation options. (CMK)

  9. The congressional viewpoint: Deficit reduction and risk legislation

    SciTech Connect

    Chakoff, H.E.

    1995-12-31

    This presentation will provide a current congressional status of legislation related to low-level waste and DOE cleanup. Key legislation discussed will include S. 755 for Privatization of the Uranium Enrichment Corporation and the markup of H.R. 1020, the Nuclear Waste Legislation. In addition, the session will include a discussion of legislation related to the approval of the Texas compact.

  10. Encouraging students during Science and Tech Week

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    On 30 April, Robert Ballard, head of the Jason Project science education program, delivered a pep talk to students and teachers about environmental stewardship, ocean exploration, and science education, as part of Global Science and Technology Week.Addressing students in a Congressional hearing room, Ballard urged them to investigate the vast, undiscovered regions of the Earth.

  11. 7 years of MacGyver sessions at EGU and AGU: what happened?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hut, Rolf; Selker, John; Weijs, Steven; Luxemburg, Wim; Wickert, Andy; Blume, Theresa; Bamburger, Jan; Stoof, Cathelijne; Tauro, Flavia

    2016-04-01

    The session that this poster is in, the: "Self-made sensors and unintended use of measurement equipment", also known as the "MacGyver-session" has had 7 years of scientists contributing their self made devices, hacks and solutions with the hydrological community. In 2009, the first session was held at the AGU fall meeting and since 2011 a session is also organised at the EGU General Assembly. On this poster, and in the accompanying review paper, we will present an overview of the work presented in the last 7 years, cataloging the work of the inventive scientists who have contributed to these successful, and above all: fun, sessions.

  12. The Psychological and Social Sciences Research Support Programs of the National Science Foundation: A Background Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science and Technology.

    Offered in response to a request for background information from the Congressional Subcommittee on Science, Research, and Technology, the document presents a report of the National Science Foundation's (NSF) support for social and psychological sciences research. Major objectives of the report are to review the origins of NSF support programs;…

  13. Congressional committee scrutinizes Environmental Protection Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a favored target of criticism by those claiming the agency's regulatory actions hurt the economy, faced further scrutiny during a 17 November House of Representatives hearing to review the agency's research and development activities and discuss the Environmental Research, Development and Demonstration Act (ERDDA), which authorizes research and development activities at EPA. Although the act has not been reauthorized since 1980, EPA also derives authority from a number of other specific environmental laws such as the Clean Air Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, and Clean Water Act. The House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology's Subcommittee on Energy and Environment, which held the hearing, is undertaking the process for reauthorizing ERDDA, according to Rep. Andrew Harris (R-Md.), subcommittee chair.

  14. FY 1997 congressional budget request: Budget highlights

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This is an overview of the 1997 budget request for the US DOE. The topics of the overview include a policy overview, the budget by business line, business lines by organization, crosswalk from business line to appropriation, summary by appropriation, energy supply research and development, uranium supply and enrichment activities, uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund, general science and research, weapons activities, defense environmental restoration and waste management, defense nuclear waste disposal, departmental administration, Office of the Inspector General, power marketing administrations, Federal Energy Regulatory commission, nuclear waste disposal fund, fossil energy research and development, naval petroleum and oil shale reserves, energy conservation, economic regulation, strategic petroleum reserve, energy information administration, clean coal technology and a Department of Energy Field Facilities map.

  15. Moving AGU Meetings sites [Comment to “Fall Meeting site”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Maclennan, C. C.

    1984-04-01

    A recent letter to Eos by AGU member Dan Baker (March 13, 1984, p. 98) suggested that a method of reducing the attendance at the Fall AGU meeting would be to move it from San Francisco to his namesake, namely Bakersfield. He cited as a precedent the probably reduced attendance at the (at that time) upcoming Spring Meeting to be held in Cincinnati. While neither of us is promoting cities with names similar to ours, nevertheless we both believe that the recent meeting held in Cincinnati was a great success, even with the reduced number of registrants. The arrangements in the Convention Center, as well as the proximity of the hotels to the convention center and the amenities in the hotels were all excellent, and easily matched or surpassed the facilities in any of the cities in which the major meetings have been held to this time. Furthermore, we would like to make a qualitative judgment that the number of attendees at the individual sessions were perhaps as large as in a Baltimore or Washington meeting. In those meetings the number of registrants may have been larger, but the number of attendees at the given session may have been smaller; a significant proportion of the attendees at any given time would likely be visiting the offices of their contract monitors. Admittedly, the Spring Meeting has been an ideal opportunity to both attend scientific sessions and to lobby for additional research support. However, such lobbying does not necessarily make for increased attendance at the scientific sessions.

  16. Earth and space scientists Visit Capitol Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Riordan, Catherine

    AGU's Office of Public Affairs organizes frequent opportunities for members to meet with Congress. Recently AGU members participated in two events: an annual Congressional Visits Day and the Coalition for National Science Funding congressional reception.Over 200 scientists and engineers met with key legislators and their staffs on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. as part of the 10th annual Science, Engineering, and Technology Congressional Visits Day (CVD) held on 10-11 May. In their meetings, participants advocated this year's CVD theme: Federally funded research secures our nation's future.

  17. Conference focuses on challenges, opportunities in key Earth science and policy topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, Elizabeth; Hankin, Erik; Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2012-07-01

    In our rapidly changing world, integrating Earth and space science into policy is vital to supporting our economy, public safety, and national security. One way in which AGU is striving to bridge the science and policy fields is through discussions and collaborations at the AGU Science Policy Conference. This inaugural conference, held in May 2012 in Washington, D. C., featured experts from government, industry, academia, and nonprofits. The goal of this new conference is to ensure diverse discussions and viewpoints on the challenges and opportunities of science policy, with a focus on applications of Earth and space science that serve local, national, and international communities.

  18. DC State of Mind; A Congressional update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Kristopher

    2010-10-01

    Every day the headlines are dominated by news of a slow economic recovery, high unemployment, and a Congress focused on the next election. Deficit hawks, Tea Partiers, partisanship, and mid-term elections are all topics typically outside the ken of physics but are critically important to our ability to continue to pursue cutting edge innovative research. For example, during the last six months Congress has, among other things, worked on passing the 2011 federal budget and reauthorization of America COMPETES. Both of these major pieces of legislation are fundamental to how our country will fund physics research for the next few years. For the past two years, science has done very well thanks to the support of Congress and the administration. The coming years are going to be far more difficult and every physicist needs to commit themselves to defending the gains we have made. This talk will provide an overview of what has happened on Capitol Hill in the past few months and what, to the best of our knowledge, the physics community can expect for the coming years. The legislative successes of the last few months were, in part, made possibly with the aid of physicists who got involved. Around the country, physicists wrote opinion pieces for their local papers, wrote letters-to-the-editor, called their representatives, made their voices heard and helped shape policy.

  19. DC State of Mind; A Congressional update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Kristopher

    2010-10-01

    Every day the headlines are dominated by news of a slow economic recovery, high unemployment, and a Congress focused on the next election. Deficit hawks, Tea Partiers, partisanship, and mid-term elections are all topics typically outside the ken of physics but are critically important to our ability to continue to pursue cutting edge innovative research. For example, during the last six months Congress has, among other things, worked on passing the 2011 federal budget and reauthorization of America COMPETES. Both of these major pieces of legislation are fundamental to how our country will fund physics research for the next few years. For the past two years, science has done very well thanks to the support of Congress and the administration. The coming years are going to be far more difficult and every physicist needs to commit themselves to defending the gains we have made. This poster will provide an overview of what has happened on Capitol Hill in the past few months and what, to the best of our knowledge, the physics community can expect for the coming years. The legislative successes of the last few months couldn't of happened without the aid of physicists who got involved. Around the country, physicists wrote opinion pieces for their local papers, wrote letters-to-the-editor, called their representatives, made their voices heard and helped shape policy.

  20. DC State of Mind: A Congressional update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Kristopher

    2010-10-01

    Every day the headlines are dominated by news of a slow economic recovery, high unemployment, and a Congress focused on the next election. Deficit hawks, Tea Partiers, partisanship, and mid-term elections are all topics typically outside the ken of physics but are critically important to our ability to continue to pursue cutting edge innovative research. For example, during the last six months Congress has, among other things, worked on passing the 2011 federal budget and reauthorization of America COMPETES. Both of these major pieces of legislation are fundamental to how our country will fund physics research for the next few years. For the past two years, science has done very well thanks to the support of Congress and the administration. The coming years are going to be far more difficult and every physicist needs to commit themselves to defending the gains we have made. This talk will provide an overview of what has happened on Capitol Hill in the past few months and what, to the best of our knowledge, the physics community can expect for the coming years. Also included will be a discussion of how physicists can get involved, educate Congress, and assure that the United States retains a strong commitment to basic research.

  1. Lindstrom Receives 2013 Ocean Sciences Award: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrom, Eric J.

    2014-09-01

    My sincere thanks go to the AGU Ocean Sciences section for this award. Is there any higher honor than recognition by one's peers? To join the illustrious list of prior recipients is deeply moving. Thanks so much to Arnold and Gary for their abundant praise and support over many years.

  2. Congressional voting behavior on firearm control legislation: 1993-2000.

    PubMed

    Price, James H; Dake, Joseph A; Thompson, Amy J

    2002-12-01

    Firearm morbidity and mortality place an enormous burden on the health care enterprise and society at large. Recent research has shown strong public support for strategies to regulate firearms yet effective federal legislation to control the types of firearms sold, conditions of sale and purchase, limitation in transportation and storage, and responsibility for use of personally owned firearms has been limited. Thus the purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between Congressional voting on firearm control legislation and the following: political affiliation, military service, geographic location of representation, education level, sex, and gun rights and gun control contributions. This was accomplished using a retrospective assessment of Congressional voting records from the 103rd-106th Congresses (1993-2000) regarding firearm control legislation. The study found that $6,270,553 was donated to members of Congress, $5,394,049 to members of the House and $876,504 to members of the Senate by groups concerned with firearm legislation. In the House, males (Odds Ratio [OR], 3.87), Republicans (OR, 13), those from the South (OR, 5), and those who received gun rights funds (OR, 13 to 203, depending on level of donations) were more likely to vote pro gun rights. In the Senate, support for gun rights occurred more often for those from the West (OR, 3.56), Republicans (OR, 130.50), or those who had received gun rights donations (OR, 28.00). This study has found a strong and consistent relationship between a Congressional member's position on firearm legislation and the amount of money received, political affiliation, and geographic location of representation. PMID:12458784

  3. 7 CFR 2.83 - Deputy Assistant Secretary for Congressional Relations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Deputy Assistant Secretary for Congressional Relations. 2.83 Section 2.83 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY BY THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE AND GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE DEPARTMENT Delegations of Authority by the Assistant Secretary for Congressional Relations §...

  4. 76 FR 62594 - Order of Succession for the Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Relations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Order of Succession for the Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Relations...: Notice of order of succession. SUMMARY: In this notice, the Assistant Secretary for Congressional and Intergovernmental Relations designates the Order of Succession for the Office of the Assistant Secretary...

  5. 32 CFR 901.8 - Congressional and U.S. Possessions categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Congressional and U.S. Possessions categories. 901.8 Section 901.8 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY TRAINING AND SCHOOLS APPOINTMENT TO THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ACADEMY Nomination Procedures and Requirements § 901.8 Congressional and...

  6. 32 CFR 901.8 - Congressional and U.S. Possessions categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Congressional and U.S. Possessions categories. 901.8 Section 901.8 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY TRAINING AND SCHOOLS APPOINTMENT TO THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ACADEMY Nomination Procedures and Requirements § 901.8 Congressional and...

  7. Life Sciences in NASA's Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1999-01-01

    The topics of agency and enterprise goals, OLMSA organization, life sciences relationship to NASA/HEDS strategic plans, budget allocated by the HEDS strategic plan goals, 1998 successes, exploration and the International Space Station, congressional budgets, OLMSA grants, biomedical research and countermeasures, medical care, biologically inspired technologies, and publication, education and outreach are all presented in viewgraph form.

  8. Further Comment on “AGU Statement: Investigation of Scientists and Officials in L'Aquila, Italy, Is Unfounded”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobran, Flavio

    2010-10-01

    The AGU statement on the investigation of Italian scientists and officials in regard to the L'Aquila earthquake (Eos, 91(28), 248, 13 July 2010) appears to be a noble attempt to protect not only these individuals but also those AGU members who are involved in similar hazard and risk assessments. But in the long run this statement not only damages AGU by misleading its membership as to the responsibilities of the indicted individuals but also sends the wrong message to the Italian scientific communities about their social responsibilities. The AGU statement assumes that the indicted individuals are innocent because it is not possible for scientists to predict earthquakes, but it neglects to explain what their scientific responsibilities are and why these individuals may be also guilty of failing to properly exercise their social responsibility. If one accepts public funds, has the responsibility of deciding how to manage those funds, and is playing the double role of a scientist and a politician, one is also responsible for both the scientific and social consequences of one's actions. Because some of the indicted individuals are also responsible for drafting and promoting the unreliable Vesuvius Evacuation Plan (http://www.westnet.com/˜dobran), they should also be accountable for the consequences in the Vesuvius area.

  9. EGS Richardson AGU Chapman NVAG3 Conference: Nonlinear Variability in Geophysics: scaling and multifractal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, D.; Lovejoy, S.

    was followed by five days with 8 oral sessions and one poster session. Overall, there were 65 papers involving 74 authors. In general, the main topics covered are reflected in this special issue: geophysical turbulence, clouds and climate, hydrology and solid earth geophysics. In addition to AGU and EGS, the conference was supported by the International Science Foundation, the Centre Nationale de Recherche Scientifique, Meteo-France, the Department of Energy (US), the Commission of European Communities (DG XII), the Comite National Francais pour le Programme Hydrologique International, the Ministere de l'Enseignement Superieur et de la Recherche (France). We thank P. Hubert, Y. Kagan, Ph. Ladoy, A. Lazarev, S.S. Moiseev, R. Pierrehumbert, F. Schmitt and Y. Tessier, for help with the organization of the conference. However special thanks goes to A. Richter and the EGS office, B. Weaver and the AGU without whom this would have been impossible. We also thank the Institut d' Etudes Scientifiques de Cargese whose beautiful site was much appreciated, as well as the Bar des Amis whose ambiance stimulated so many discussions. 2. Tribute to L.F. Richardson With NVAG3, the European geophysical community paid tribute to Lewis Fry Richardson (1881-1953) on the 40th anniversary of his death. Richardson was one of the founding fathers of the idea of scaling and fractality, and his life reflects the European geophysical community and its history in many ways. Although many of Richardson's numerous, outstanding scientific contributions to geophysics have been recognized, perhaps his main contribution concerning the importance of scaling and cascades has still not received the attention it deserves. Richardson was the first not only to suggest numerical integration of the equations of motion of the atmosphere, but also to attempt to do so by hand, during the First World War. This work, as well as a presentation of a broad vision of future developments in the field, appeared in his

  10. Geological science needs studied

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Geological Sciences Board of the National Academy of Science is conducting a study of the trends, needs, and priorities of the geological sciences for the 1980s. Many organizations and individuals already have been contacted regarding this task; however, in order to ensure that the forthcoming report is based broadly on ideas from the scientific community, the Geological Sciences Board solicits the thoughts of AGU members about the substance of the study. Please send your questions and comments by early this fall to William Dickinson, chairman of the Geological Sciences Board, National Academy of Sciences, Room 69, 2101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20418. A draft report is expected in January 1983.

  11. 75 FR 10483 - Filing Dates for the Pennsylvania Special Election in the 12th Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Pennsylvania Special Election in the 12th Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Pennsylvania...

  12. Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Linda E., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on science instruction and technology: "A 3-D Journey in Space: A New Visual Cognitive Adventure" (Yoav Yair, Rachel Mintz, and Shai Litvak); "Using Collaborative Inquiry and Interactive Technologies in an Environmental Science Project for Middle School Teachers: A Description and Analysis" (Patricia…

  13. The Process of Science Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, K. B.

    2001-12-01

    This panel session will focus on the actual role of scientists in all aspects of science policy, from the appropriations process, to authorization, to grassroots efforts to regulatory issues. Special attention will be given to the current policy situation and outlook and how scientists can play a positive role. Ample time will be available for questions from the audience. Panel members will be: Nadine Lymn, Director for Public Affairs, Ecological Society of America Peter Folger, Public Affairs Manager, American Geological Union Sam Rankin, Associate Executive Director and Director of the Washington Office of the American Mathematical Society Francis Slakey, Associate Director of Public Affairs, American Physical Society Sherri Stephan, Professional Staff Senate Governmental Affairs Committee Subcommittee on International Security, Proliferation and Federal Services and former Congressional Science Fellow Jennifer Wiseman, Congressional Science Fellow

  14. Support Your Science: Donate to Sections and Focus Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Claire

    2014-02-01

    AGU's 23 sections and focus groups allow scientists in the same disciplines to engage and collaborate. They are essential to the Union—they help identify emerging issues central to their field of science, provide member input, and nominate scientists for honors and recognition.

  15. Hayes Receives 2012 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshin, Laurie A.

    2013-10-01

    Alexander G. Hayes Jr. received the 2012 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science at the 2012 AGU Fall Meeting, held 3-7 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes significant early-career contributions to planetary science.

  16. Recent Developments Bearing Upon National Policy in the Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamburg, David A.

    1977-01-01

    Several recent, substantial reports are examined that, taken together, point the way toward a constructive reformulation of health sciences policy. Private, public, and Congressional reports suggest the high quality of the bioscience effort as well as the need to broaden traditional concepts to include centrally the sciences associated with public…

  17. House Committee Sets Agenda for Huge Science Policy Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lepkowski, Wil

    1984-01-01

    Discusss studies (commissioned with the Office of Technology Assessment, Congressional Research Service, and General Accounting Office) which will inform the House Science and Technology Committee members and Congress of various issues related to science policy. Includes a list of questions which indicate the range of issues under consideration.…

  18. Science Policy: A Working Glossary. Fourth Edition. Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives, Ninety-Fifth Congress, Second Session. Committee Print.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddle, Franklin P., Ed.; Carlson, Elaine, Ed.

    Presented is the fourth edition of the Working Glossary on Science Policy, prepared by the Congressional Research Service for the Subcommittee on Science, Research and Technology in the House of Representatives. The purpose of the glossary is to facilitate communication between Congress and persons engaged in the study of science policy. This…

  19. FY 2005 Congressional Earmark: The Environmental Institute Fellowship Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sharon Tracey, Co-PI and Richard Taupier, Co-PI

    2007-02-06

    Congressional Earmark Funding was used to create a Postdoctoral Environmental Fellowship Program, interdisciplinary Environmental Working Groups, and special initiatives to create a dialogue around the environment at the University of Massachusetts Amherst to mobilize faculty to work together to respond to emerging environmental needs and to build institutional capacity to launch programmatic environmental activities across campus over time. Developing these networks of expertise will enable the University to more effectively and swiftly respond to emerging environmental needs and assume a leadership role in varied environmental fields. Over the course of the project 20 proposals were submitted to a variety of funding agencies involving faculty teams from 19 academic departments; 4 projects were awarded totaling $950,000; special events were organized including the Environmental Lecture Series which attracted more than 1,000 attendees over the course of the project; 75 University faculty became involved in one or more Working Groups (original three Working Groups plus Phase 2 Working Groups); an expertise database was developed with approximately 275 faculty involved in environmental research and education as part of a campus-wide network of environmental expertise; 12 University centers and partners participated; and the three Environmental Fellows produced 3 publications as well as a number of presentations and papers in progress.

  20. Highlights of the 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Jonathan; Briscoe, Melbourne; Itsweire, Eric

    2014-07-01

    The 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting was the 17th biennial gathering since the inception of ocean sciences meetings in 1982. A joint venture of the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO), The Oceanography Society (TOS), and the Ocean Sciences section of AGU, the meeting was by far the largest ever: More than 5600 attendees made this meeting more than 30% larger than any previous one. Forty percent of attendees live outside the United States, hailing from 55 countries, showing the importance of this meeting as an international gathering of ocean scientists.

  1. Expression of the agmatine deiminase pathway in Enterococcus faecalis is activated by the AguR regulator and repressed by CcpA and PTS(Man) systems.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Cristian; Espariz, Martín; Blancato, Víctor S; Magni, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Although the agmatine deiminase system (AgDI) has been investigated in Enterococcus faecalis, little information is available with respect to its gene regulation. In this study we demonstrate that the presence of exogenous agmatine induces the expression of agu genes in this bacterium. In contrast to the homologous and extensively characterized AgDI system of S. mutants, the aguBDAC operon in E. faecalis is not induced in response to low pH. In spite of this, agmatine catabolism in this bacterium contributes by neutralizing the external medium while enhancing bacterial growth. Our results indicate that carbon catabolic repression (CCR) operates on the AgDI system via a mechanism that involves interaction of CcpA and P-Ser-HPr with a cre site found in an unusual position considering the aguB promoter (55 nt upstream the +1 position). In addition, we found that components of the mannose phosphotransferase (PTS(Man)) system also contributed to CCR in E. faecalis since a complete relief of the PTS-sugars repressive effect was observed only in a PTS(Man) and CcpA double defective strain. Our gene context analysis revealed that aguR is present in oral and gastrointestinal microorganisms. Thus, regulation of the aguBDAC operon in E. faecalis seems to have evolved to obtain energy and resist low pH conditions in order to persist and colonize gastrointestinal niches. PMID:24155893

  2. Expression of the Agmatine Deiminase Pathway in Enterococcus faecalis Is Activated by the AguR Regulator and Repressed by CcpA and PTSMan Systems

    PubMed Central

    Blancato, Víctor S.; Magni, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Although the agmatine deiminase system (AgDI) has been investigated in Enterococcus faecalis, little information is available with respect to its gene regulation. In this study we demonstrate that the presence of exogenous agmatine induces the expression of agu genes in this bacterium. In contrast to the homologous and extensively characterized AgDI system of S. mutants, the aguBDAC operon in E. faecalis is not induced in response to low pH. In spite of this, agmatine catabolism in this bacterium contributes by neutralizing the external medium while enhancing bacterial growth. Our results indicate that carbon catabolic repression (CCR) operates on the AgDI system via a mechanism that involves interaction of CcpA and P-Ser-HPr with a cre site found in an unusual position considering the aguB promoter (55 nt upstream the +1 position). In addition, we found that components of the mannose phosphotransferase (PTSMan) system also contributed to CCR in E. faecalis since a complete relief of the PTS-sugars repressive effect was observed only in a PTSMan and CcpA double defective strain. Our gene context analysis revealed that aguR is present in oral and gastrointestinal microorganisms. Thus, regulation of the aguBDAC operon in E. faecalis seems to have evolved to obtain energy and resist low pH conditions in order to persist and colonize gastrointestinal niches. PMID:24155893

  3. 22 CFR 123.15 - Congressional certification pursuant to Section 36(c) of the Arms Export Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Congressional certification pursuant to Section 36(c) of the Arms Export Control Act. 123.15 Section 123.15 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.15 Congressional certification pursuant to Section 36(c)...

  4. 22 CFR 123.15 - Congressional certification pursuant to Section 36(c) of the Arms Export Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Congressional certification pursuant to Section 36(c) of the Arms Export Control Act. 123.15 Section 123.15 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT AND TEMPORARY IMPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.15 Congressional...

  5. Understanding Public Policy Making through the Work of Committees: Utilizing a Student-Led Congressional Hearing Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinfret, Sara R.; Pautz, Michelle C.

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to help students better understand the complexity of making environmental policy and the role of policy actors in this process, we developed a mock congressional hearing simulation. In this congressional hearing, students in two environmental policy courses take on the roles of members of Congress and various interest groups to…

  6. Sharpen your science communication skills at a Fall Meeting workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Mary Catherine

    2012-10-01

    Are you eager to share your research and want to help reporters get it right? Do you yearn to enter the climate science debate but are wary of saying the wrong thing? AGU is offering two separate communications skill-building events on Sunday, 2 December 2012, for Fall Meeting attendees wishing to sharpen their communications skills. For scientists interested in talking about climate science, AGU and the Union of Concerned Scientists, an organization that combines scientific research with citizen action to create practical solutions for a healthy environment and a safer world, will offer the Communicating Climate Science Workshop on Sunday morning. A panel of experienced communicators will share their success stories and offer advice on how to avoid common missteps. Then, in an interactive workshop setting, attendees will practice identifying and effectively responding to misinformation about climate science in front of a variety of audiences.

  7. Earth Science Week evolves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earth Science Week, October 7-13, is an annual grassroots effort sponsored by the American Geological Institute (AGI) and its member societies, of which AGU is the largest. This year, for the first time, Earth Science Week has a general theme, evolution in Earth history. The Earth Science Week information kit for 2001, available from AGI, includes a variety of posters, bookmarks, and other materials that illustrate this concept. The kit contains a new 32-page “Ideas and Activities” booklet that emphasizes evolution in Earth history through an array of activities about rocks, fossils, and geologic time. It also has information on the upcoming Public Broadcasting Service series, “Evolution,” which is to be aired in late September.

  8. Petit receives Robert C. Cowen Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademacher, Horst

    2012-01-01

    Charles W. Petit, a veteran science writer, received the 2011 Robert C. Cowan Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. Petit covered earthquakes for the San Francisco Chronicle during the 1980s and 1990s and has recently served as "head tracker" for the Knight Science Journalism Tracker, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology-based daily blog that compiles and critiques science reporting worldwide. Petit was previously honored by AGU in 2003 when he received the David Perlman Award for an article about a new finding in oceanography. The Cowan Award, named for a former science editor of the Christian Science Monitor, is given no more than every 2 years and recognizes a journalist who has made "significant, lasting, and consistent contributions to accurate reporting or writing" on the Earth and space sciences for the general public.

  9. Petit receives Robert C. Cowen Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Charles W. Petit, a veteran science writer, received the 2011 Robert C. Cowan Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. Petit covered earthquakes for the San Francisco Chronicle during the 1980s and 1990s and has recently served as "head tracker" for the Knight Science Journalism Tracker, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology-based daily blog that compiles and critiques science reporting worldwide. Petit was previously honored by AGU in 2003 when he received the David Perlman Award for an article about a new finding in oceanography. The Cowan Award, named for a former science editor of the Christian Science Monitor, is given no more than every 2 years and recognizes a journalist who has made "significant, lasting, and consistent contributions to accurate reporting or writing" on the Earth and space sciences for the general public.

  10. [Comment on “Looking at gender distribution among AGU Fellows”] An open letter to Ellen Druffel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.

    I would like to congratulate you on your excellent study of the gender distribution of AGU Fellows [Eos, Sept. 13, 1994]. However, I must take issue with your interpretation of some of the data. First of all you concentrate on the inequity in the awarding of AGU Fellowships. I, on the other hand, look at Figure 3 with amazement that, considering the obstacles in women's careers, the ratios are as good as they are. If you added only one 80-year-old woman, two 70-year-old women, two 60-year-olds and four 50-year-olds, the curves would look almost identical. Surely, it would be possible this year to elect 9 women to Fellowship out of the 30 Fellows to be elected. This change seems possible especially in sections like GP and Hydrology that clearly have a surplus of good female candidates, since none have been elected for some time. I think that the deficit can quickly be eliminated with just a modicum of attention to identifying the previously overlooked candidates and securing nominations for them. The following is some advice on the process, based on my nomination of two female candidate Fellows, one of whom was successful and one of whom thus far has not been successful.

  11. House vote on Hyde changes dynamic of Congressional abortion debate.

    PubMed

    1993-07-27

    US Congressional action is summarized for actions taken on abortion amendments and abortion funding amendments during the month of July 1993. The Hyde Amendment was passed in the House on July 1, 1993; by a margin of 255 to 178; the Senate version will be voted on in August. The amendment was a victory for anti-abortion supporters, because it limited coverage of abortions under Medicaid to cases involving only life endangerment, rape, or incest. Both sides of the abortion debate were energized by the vote. The national Campaign for Abortion and Reproductive Equity (CARE) was launched on July 13 through support from a coalition of 130 organizations and Representatives Maxine Waters, Cynthia McKinney, and Nita Lowey. CARE aims to restore federal funding of abortion services for poor women and others using federally funded health care. The Freedom of Choice Act (FOCA) leaves abortion funding and parental involvement to the discretion of individual states. FOCA was characterized by Senator Carol Moseley-Braun, who withdrew her sponsorship of the bill, as not meeting the needs of the "marginalized, disrespected, and ignored population." 4 other Democratic women senators followed suit and promised to very strongly oppose all efforts to restrict abortions through amendments to appropriations bills. Senate appropriations bills were also considered during July. On July 15 the Senate Veterans Affairs (VA) Committee defeated an amendment that would have barred the use of federal funds for abortion services at VA hospitals, except in cases of rape, incest, or the saving of maternal life. Senate Committee members John Rockefeller and Tom Daschle contributed to the bill's defeat. Federal employee health insurance plans will continue to ban the coverage of abortion services due to passage by the Subcommittee on Treasury, Postal Service, and General Government. An amendment introduced by Senator Bond to allow abortions in cases of rape, incest, or risk to maternal life was adopted

  12. The American Math and Science Student Support Act. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Science of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

    This document presents the transcript of a congressional hearing to consider the American Math and Science Student Support Act, H.R. 4595. The legislation is designed to address the issue of attracting a greater proportion of U.S. citizens to graduate study in science, mathematics, and engineering. The hearings include testimony and prepared…

  13. Space Science: Past, Present and Future. Report Prepared by the Subcommittee on Space Science and Applications. Transmitted to the Committee on Science and Technology, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, Serial O.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science and Technology.

    Congressional hearings held on October 8-10, 1985, were meant to characterize the attributes of past successes of the United States' efforts in the space sciences, and to project the direction of future research in that area. This report prepared by the subcommittee on space science and application includes recommendations of expert panels on…

  14. Excellence in Science Teaching. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Science of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

    A Congressional hearing was held at the New River Community College in Dublin, Virginia, to address the challenges of achieving quality science education in southwest Virginia. Speakers representing the subcommittee included Rick Boucher, Chairman, Subcommittee on Science; and Dr. Luther S. Williams, Assistant Director for Education and Human…

  15. Moderated discussion about forwarding science and science communication through video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachon, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    The pathways of using video to forward science aren't always transparent. Just like a reader of an exceptional peer-review paper, the strategies for connecting with a specific reader are not apparent. As such, there are fundamental tenants to making videos designed to forward science, and equally as important aspects that are changing as rapidly as many of the sciences we wish to enhance. Flushing out valuable uses for video could greatly stand to gain from an open forum discussion between those who wish to or are applying video towards these ends. This session will break the mold of an ordinary AGU talk. Instead, presenters of posters and talks, and curious members of our audience will be invited to engage in a moderated discussion about varying aspects of using video to enhance and expand science and science communication.

  16. Communicating Science: Translation and Tangibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Brian

    2009-02-01

    Until last summer, I thought communicating science was just a matter of translation. When my friends' eyes glazed over as I explained, for example, how a productivity crisis and planktrophism could have caused the Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction, I thought they simply needed these terms translated. While cutting through potentially difficult terminology is a key part of communicating science to the public, I now know that it is only the first of two parts. The second part is making one's subject matter tangible. Finding that out was my most important lesson last summer as an AGU-sponsored fellow in the Mass Media Fellowship program run by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Understanding this journalistic two-step has helped me become a better science communicator and comprehend more fully why the Earth sciences fascinate me in the first place.

  17. 76 FR 62593 - Delegation of Authority for the Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Relations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... October 7, 2011 Part IV Department of Housing and Urban Development Delegation of Authority for the Office... 7, 2011 / Notices#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Delegation of Authority for.... Rodriguez, Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Relations, Department of Housing and...

  18. Simulations Build Efficacy: Empirical Results from a Four-Week Congressional Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariani, Mack; Glenn, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a four-week congressional committee simulation implemented in upper level courses on Congress and the Legislative process at two liberal arts colleges. We find that the students participating in the simulation possessed high levels of political knowledge and confidence in their political skills prior to the simulation. An…

  19. Pesticides: Improvements Needed To Ensure the Safety of Farmworkers and Their Children. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerrero, Peter F.

    In response to a Congressional request, the General Accounting Office examined issues related to pesticide safety for children in agricultural settings. Pesticides can cause acute, chronic, or delayed-onset illnesses. Children may be exposed to pesticides through farm work; eating pesticide-treated foods; or contact with drift from pesticide…

  20. Prospects: The Congressionally Mandated Study of Educational Growth and Opportunity. The Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael J.; And Others

    This publication is the first interim report from the Congressionally Mandated Study of Educational Growth and Opportunity (Prospects), and describes students' characteristics and the schools they attend. Prospects is designed to evaluate the short- and long-term consequences of Chapter 1 program participation by following for 5 years large…

  1. Grant Formulas. A Catalog of Federal Aid to States and Localities. Report to Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    This report is a resource document which includes a catalog that explains how formulas for federal programs are used to allocate assistance to state and local governments. In addition, it provides information on the agencies and congressional committees that have jurisdiction over these programs, the amount of money allocated through these…

  2. 76 FR 72210 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request Congressional Earmark Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND... sent to: Reports Liaison Officer, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Frank McNally, Director, Congressional Grants Division, Department of...

  3. 77 FR 22574 - Filing Dates for the Washington Special Election In the 1st Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Washington Special Election In the 1st Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Washington has...

  4. 75 FR 34450 - Filing Dates for the Indiana Special Election in the 3rd Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Indiana Special Election in the 3rd Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Indiana has scheduled a...

  5. 77 FR 43823 - Filing Dates for the Michigan Special Election in the 11th Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Michigan Special Election in the 11th Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Michigan has...

  6. 77 FR 9927 - Filing Dates for the Arizona Special Election in the 8th Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Arizona Special Election in the 8th Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Arizona has scheduled elections...

  7. 78 FR 53454 - Filing Dates for the Louisiana Special Elections in the 5th Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Louisiana Special Elections in the 5th Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Louisiana has...

  8. 77 FR 56208 - Filing Dates for the Kentucky Special Election in the 4th Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Kentucky Special Election in the 4th Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Kentucky has scheduled a...

  9. Defense Health Care. Collaboration and Criteria Needed for Sizing Graduate Medical Education. Report to Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Health, Education, and Human Services Div.

    This report responds to a Congressional requirement to examine the Navy's advisory council recommendations for restructuring graduate medical education (GME) and to compare these with Army and Air Force GME closure activities. The report focuses on the specific recommendation of the Navy advisory council to drop GME at the Bethesda (Maryland)…

  10. 76 FR 51366 - Filing Dates for the Oregon Special Election in the 1st Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... information on these requirements, see Federal Register Notice 2009-03, 74 FR 7285 (February 17, 2009... November 8, 2011, and January 31, 2012, to fill the U.S. House seat in the 1st Congressional District... forms: One form to cover 2011 activity, labeled as the Year-End Report; and the other form to cover...

  11. Health and Nutrition: Collection of Vital Statistical Data on Hispanics. Briefing Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    In response to Congressional requests, this report describes the extent of Hispanic American health and nutrition data available from federal sources. Oversampling of a minority group by a national survey is necessary for valid analysis of group characteristics. Among the four national health and nutrition surveys conducted by the Department of…

  12. 78 FR 60653 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Members of Congress and Congressional Staff

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... Abortion Services OPM received over 59,000 comments regarding coverage of abortion services for Members of... Congress and congressional staff include abortion services. Current law prohibits the use of Federal funds to pay for abortions, except in the case of rape, incest, or when the life of the woman is...

  13. New Congressional Climate Change Task Force Calls on President to Use Administrative Authority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-02-01

    Spurred by U.S. congressional inaction on climate change and by President Barack Obama's comments on the topic in his 21 January inaugural address, several Democratic members of Congress announced at a Capitol Hill briefing the formation of a bicameral task force on climate change. In addition, they have called on the president to use his administrative authority to deal with the issue.

  14. Congressional Budget Action for Fiscal Year 2012 and Its Impact on Education Funding. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delisle, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The fiscal year 2012 budget process has been anything but typical or predictable. While fiscal year 2012 starts in just a few weeks on October 1, 2011, the annual appropriations process is far from complete, and funding for federal education programs has not yet been finalized. Nevertheless, congressional action in the months that have led up to…

  15. 78 FR 23778 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request: Congressional Earmark Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... subject proposal. HUD's Congressional Grants Division and its Environmental Officers in the field use this..., semi-annual reports and close-out reports to track grantee performance in the implementation of... Environmental Officers in the field use this information to make funds available to entities directed to...

  16. 18 CFR 16.17 - Procedures upon Congressional authorization of takeover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures upon Congressional authorization of takeover. 16.17 Section 16.17 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT...

  17. 18 CFR 16.17 - Procedures upon Congressional authorization of takeover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedures upon Congressional authorization of takeover. 16.17 Section 16.17 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT...

  18. 18 CFR 16.17 - Procedures upon Congressional authorization of takeover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedures upon Congressional authorization of takeover. 16.17 Section 16.17 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT...

  19. 18 CFR 16.17 - Procedures upon Congressional authorization of takeover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedures upon Congressional authorization of takeover. 16.17 Section 16.17 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT...

  20. 18 CFR 16.17 - Procedures upon Congressional authorization of takeover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Procedures upon Congressional authorization of takeover. 16.17 Section 16.17 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT...

  1. Technology Transfer. Administration of the Bayh-Dole Act by Research Universities. Report to Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Resources, Community, and Economic Development Div.

    In 1980, Congress passed the Bayh-Dole Act (BDA) to allow universities, not-for-profit corporations, and small businesses to retain title to and market federally funded inventions, and to allow federal agencies to grant exclusive licenses for federally owned technology. This report to congressional committees addresses the manner in which the BDA…

  2. Congressional Panel Seeks To Curb Access of Foreign Students to U.S. Supercomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiernan, Vincent

    1999-01-01

    Fearing security problems, a congressional committee on Chinese espionage recommends that foreign students and other foreign nationals be barred from using supercomputers at national laboratories unless they first obtain export licenses from the federal government. University officials dispute the data on which the report is based and find the…

  3. 43 CFR 10005.9 - Relationship of the plan to congressional appropriations and Commission expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Relationship of the plan to congressional appropriations and Commission expenditures. 10005.9 Section 10005.9 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) UTAH RECLAMATION MITIGATION AND CONSERVATION COMMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR DEVELOPING...

  4. 75 FR 52318 - Presidential Academies for American History and Civics Education; Congressional Academies for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... period in the Federal Register on June 30, 2010, (75 FR 37780). That notice contained background... Presidential Academies for American History and Civics Education; Congressional Academies for Students of American History and Civics Education AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement, Department of...

  5. School Finance: State and Federal Efforts To Target Poor Students. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Health, Education, and Human Services Div.

    State and federal governments provided $146 billion for public elementary and secondary schools in the 1994-95 school year. In response to a Congressional directive to: (1) determine the extent to which state and federal funding is targeted to districts on the basis of the number of poor students; and (2) the effect of state and federal funding on…

  6. College Completion: Additional Efforts Could Help Education with Its Completion Goals. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Cornelia M.

    Because of concerns that not enough students who start college are completing a bachelor's degree, and in response to a Congressional request, the General Accounting Office (GAO) examined the extent to which students who enroll in a 4-year college complete a bachelor's degree and the factors that affect completion. The study also investigated what…

  7. Beyond the Chalkboard: Multimedia Sources for Instruction in Political Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luna, Carl J.; McKenzie, Joe Mac

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the wealth of opportunity provided by electronic media applicable to political science instruction. Reviews CD-ROM text supplements, tutorial packages, and databases. Briefly summarizes online sources and websites including the CIA World Factbook, Congressional Quarterly, United Nations gopher, and Supreme Court rulings. (MJP)

  8. Water Science, Management and Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifland, Jonathan

    2004-02-01

    A new AGU book, Water:Science, Management and Policy, edited by Richard Lawford, Denise Fort, Holly Hartmann, and Susanna Eden, explores the scientific and political issues behind water use and sustainability worldwide. The book investigates critical issues facing water managers, policy makers, and scientists in the 21st century, examining specific examples of water planning and decision-making. Among the topics discussed by the authors are the current state of water engineering, sharing resources across state and international borders, and the best methods for managing the resource with the future impact of climate change and additional pollution.

  9. Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education. Joint Hearing before the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology and the Committee on Education and Labor. U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This joint congressional committee hearing focuses on attaining the educational goal of making the United States children first in mathematics and science by the year 2000 as proposed by the President's "America 2000" plan. Witnesses representing the Office of Science and Technology Policy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the…

  10. Greenspan promotes science and math education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Saying that the need to improve scientific reasoning skills among U.S. students “is crucial for the future of our nation,” Federal Reserve System Chairman Alan Greenspan, on September 21, testified in support of federal legislation to improve teacher training in science, mathematics, and related subjects.The National Science Education Enhancement Act (House Resolution 4272) includes provisions to provide mentoring, summer institutes, and other professional development programs for teachers. The legislation follows on a 1999 Congressional report, “Unlocking Our Future Toward a New National Science Policy.”

  11. The Role of the Research Museums. Science Policy Study-Hearings Volume 2. Hearing before the Task Force on Science Policy of the Committee on Science and Technology, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session. April 17, 1985. No. 56.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science and Technology.

    American science policy as related to the role and operation of museum research is examined in this report of the hearings of the Congressional Committee on Science and Technology. Focus is given to how museums fit into the overall picture of United States research activity and to the composition of and future requirements for financial support.…

  12. Dessler, Jimenez, Klein, and Nenes Receive 2012 Atmospheric Sciences Ascent Awards: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, Athanasios

    2013-11-01

    It is a rare privilege and a deeply fulfilling experience to pursue science while helping shape future generations of scientists and engineers. To be awarded on top of it is humbling to say the least. I am deeply grateful to my nominator and supporters and thank the AGU Atmospheric Sciences Section Awards Committee for this honor. What makes the Ascent Award even more special is its strong vote of confidence for the future, which is both energizing and inspiring.

  13. Science and Technology Education in Two-Year Colleges. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Science of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session (November 19, 1991). [No. 92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

    This report on a House congressional hearing on proposed legislation regarding the improvement of science and technology education and advanced technical training in two-year colleges presents testimony, along with prepared letters, statements, and supplemental materials. The report opens with an introductory statement by Rick Boucher, the House…

  14. In Brief: Rita Colwell receives National Medal of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2007-07-01

    Rita Colwell, director of the U.S. National Science Foundation from 1998 to 2004, was awarded a U.S. National Medal of Science in a White House ceremony on 27 July 2007. Colwell, currently a professor of microbiology and biotechnology at the University of Maryland at College Park and a professor at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, received the award for her research on global infectious diseases and marine microbes, specifically the bacterium that causes pandemic cholera. The National Medal of Science is the United States' highest honor for scientific achievement. Colwell currently serves on AGU's development board.

  15. Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository prompts heated congressional hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-11-01

    Although the final report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future is not expected until January 2012, the tentative conclusions of the commission's draft report were dissected during a recent joint hearing by two subcommittees of the House of Representatives' Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. Among the more heated issues debated at the hearing was the fate of the stalled Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository in Nevada. The Blue Ribbon Commission's (BRC) draft report includes recommendations for managing nuclear waste and for developing one or more permanent deep geological repositories and interim storage facilities, but the report does not address the future of Yucca Mountain. The BRC charter indicates that the commission is to "conduct a comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle." However, the draft report states that the commission was not asked to consider, and therefore did not address, several key issues. "We have not rendered an opinion on the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site or on the request to withdraw the license application for Yucca Mountain," the draft report states.

  16. Earth and space science funding at risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhrman, Joan

    2011-07-01

    With debt ceiling deadlines quickly approaching, U.S. lawmakers are still markedly divided over how to address the nation's economic and budgetary troubles. AGU is closely monitoring these debates and any cuts directed at funding for scientific research and development. Cuts beyond the already reduced levels from the current fiscal year 2011 continuing resolution have the potential to be devastating not only for the scientific community but also for the health, safety, and welfare of the public and America's economic competitiveness. It is not clear how the current proposals would apply to cutting scientific research and development, but it is very likely that federal funding levels for fiscal year 2012 will be even lower than those seen in 2011, a trend that could continue for a number of years. The Obama administration and congressional leadership are reported to be negotiating up to $4 trillion in reduced expenditures, with cuts of at least $1.1 trillion being made in discretionary appropriations over the next 10 years, starting in fiscal year 2012. While it is possible that a smaller, interim deal could pass, which would bring another debt ceiling vote before November 2012, there is significant opposition to such a stopgap measure.

  17. How Science and Hollywood Can Work Together Is Focus of Fall Meeting Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-01-01

    Jon Amiel, director of the 2003 science fiction blockbuster movie The Core, told a room packed with geophysicists at the recent AGU Fall Meeting that he had a confession to make. The confession had nothing to do with what he called the “preposterous premises” of the movie, including that humans could start or stop the spinning of Earth's core. Rather, he told the crowd at the Tuesday evening presentation “Science and the Cinema: AGU Sciences Meet Hollywood” about his recurring dream of being on stage wearing nothing but a skimpy T-shirt. “This dream now has come true. Here I am, I'm talking to a whole room of geophysicists about The Core. I've never felt like the T-shirt was this short,” he said.

  18. How Big Science Gets Funded — An Introduction for Students to the Politics of Space Science Funding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Richard, Jr.

    A collaborative group project for non-science majors is described, which introduces students to the processes and politics involved in securing funding for big ticket space science missions. In this project, student groups represent research teams that have to make pleas for funding before a "congressional committee" composed of non-science faculty. Students are assigned actual projects (such as the Terrestrial Planet Finder or the Mission to Pluto) and are placed in direct competition for funds with other projects of similar goals. An additional student group plays the role of congressional staffers with responsibility for briefing their faculty congressperson on all of the competing projects that will be presented. The project will be discussed in terms of its benefits for student learning and the areas that tended to limit the overall success of the project.

  19. To the Ocean Sciences section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Barbara

    To maximize our ability to obtain recognition of Ocean Sciences Section members as Fellows of AGU while minimizing the associated workload, I have, in consultation with our executive committee, established an Ocean Sciences Fellows Committee chaired by the President-Elect to oversee and assist in the nomination process.The committee asks that anyone wanting to sponsor a nomination send a one-page proposal telling why an individual should be made a Fellow. Proposals will be reviewed by the commitee, and a number equal to 1 ½ to 2 times our nomination quota will be chosen for full presentation. Committee members will then work with nominators to select and contact seconders, while the nominator provides the required curriculum vitae and publication list. The committee will assist in any manner possible to insure that the files that go forward are both timely and well documented.

  20. Federal Information Policies: The Congressional Initiative. A Summary of Proceedings of the Annual Forum on Federal Information Policies (6th, Washington, D.C., March 22, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Douglas

    This booklet summarizes the proceedings of a forum--whose audience consisted of over 200 library and information managers, congressional staff members, and persons from the information industry and academic community--on the condition of federal information policies as they relate to the Congressional initiative. Among issues discussed are: (1)…

  1. Excellence in Mathematics and Science. Conference Report To Accompany H.R. 996. House of Representatives, 101st Congress, 2d Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House.

    The recommended Senate amendment to the bill (H.R. 996) to establish the Congressional Scholarships for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering, and the joint explanatory statement of the committee of conference are presented. The sections to be amended include the following: (1) Mathematics, Science and Technology Improvements; (2) Higher…

  2. Science, Technology, and Diplomacy in the Age of Interdependence: Committee on International Relations, U.S. House of Representatives. [Committee Print].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on International Relations.

    Provided is a congressional study which analyzes the interactions between contemporary practice of science, technology, and the formulation and conduct of U.S. foreign policy. Six cases illustrating the interaction of science, technology, and diplomacy are reviewed and six general issues, including topics such as nuclear power, seabed resources,…

  3. Science education crisis: Problems, solutions discussed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolcott, John

    Public concern about the state of science education in America at the pre-college and college levels is widespread, triggered largely by the perception that we are losing ground in the global economy. Science, and particularly technology, are seen as our most likely sources of recovery. For those who recall the public reaction to the launching of Sputnik by Russia in 1957, the present mood is similar, if somewhat less intense.AGU members are in a unique position to influence debate about the science education crisis. Many of us, either as experts in some subset of physical science issues, as teachers at the college level, or even as parents observing our children's experiences in elementary or secondary school classrooms, may offer insight to this debate.

  4. Wishart AGU 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Wishart, J. R.; Neumann, K.; Edenborn, H. M.; Hakala, J. A.; Yang, J.; Torres, M. E.; Colwell, F. S.

    2013-01-01

    Shales are a component of the terrestrial subsurface biosphere and may be colonized by microorganisms when temperature and fluid flow are permitting. Assessing microbial community activity will be aided by the use of in situ sampling devices such as the osmosampler, an osmotically driven sampling device. Community analysis of shale samples remains a challenge and requires further methods development. The objectives of the work reported are: 1. to review geochemical and microbiological evidence for the possible microbial inhabitation of shale 2. to compare conditions among U.S. shale formations 3. to develop analytical techniques to evaluate microbial communities present in hydraulic fracturing fluid.

  5. AGU membership applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applications for membership have been received from the following individuals. The letter after the name denotes the proposed primary section affiliation.Raffi Aroian (P), David Baker (P), D. Craig Barilotti (O), Stephen J. Barnes (V), Thomas O. Barnwell (H), Robert P. Bessette (G), Brian Bicknell (H), William Blumberg (A), Michele A. Boccadoro (G), Richard Boylan (T), Robert C. Bucknam (T), Roman J. Budzianowski (H), Bruce M. Crowe (V), Charles G. Cunningham (V).

  6. AGU membership applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applications for membership have been received from the following individuals. The letter after the name denotes the proposed primary section affiliation.Aubrey L. Anderson (O), Lennart A. Anderson (V), Kathleen W. Baird (V), William R. Bergmann (A), E. N. Bernard (O), Joyce R. Blueford (O), Wayne M. Brewer (T), Nancy Ann Brewster (O), Philip S. Callahan (O), Jack G. Calvert (A), Drew A. Carey (O), Benjamin Chen (O), J. W. Cole (V), George Courtney (T), Charles G. Crawford (H).

  7. AGU membership applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applications for membership have been received from the following individuals. The letter after the name denotes the proposed primary section affiliation. Donald K. Balmer (H), Mark Bushnell (O), Charles J . Garcia (SS), Enzo Mantovani (S), Vicky Pease (T), James E. Quick (V), Gerard Schuster (S), Endre Skaar, Michael Underwood (T), J o hn J . Whipple (H).

  8. AGU elects 1989 Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twenty-two distinguished scientists have been elected Fellows of the Union. Fellows are scientists who are judged by their peers as having attained ackowledged eminence in a branch of geophysics. The number of Fellows elected each year is limited to 0.1 % of the total membership at the time of election. The newly elected Fellows are Walter Alvarez, University of California, Berkeley; John R. Booker, University of Washington, Seattle; Peter G. Brewer, Woods Hole Oceanographie Institution, Woods Hole, Mass.; Michael H. Carr, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, Calif.; Gedeon Dagan, Tel Aviv University, Israel; James H. Dieterich, USGS, Menlo Park; Thomas Dunne, University of Washington, Seattle; Jack Fooed Evernden, USGS, Menlo Park; Edward A. Flinn, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C.; Arnold L. Gordon, Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Palisades, N.Y.; Gerhard Haerendel, Max Planck Institut, Garching, Federal Republic of Germany; David L. Kohlstedt, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.; Robert A. Langel, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD; James G. Moore, USGS, Menlo Park; Marcia Neugebauer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Robert C. Newton, University of Chicago, Illinois; John A. Orcutt, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif.; Robert B. Smith, University of Utah, Salt Lake City; Bengt U. Sonnerup, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H.; Martin A. Uman, University of Florida, Gainesville; Joe Veverka, Cornell University; and James C.G. Walker, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

  9. AGU membership applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applications for membership have been received from the following individuals. The letter after the name denotes the proposed primary section affiliation.Henry D. I. Abarbanel (O), Julia C. Allen (H), Gwendolyn L. Anson (GP), Andrew Bakun (O), C. A. Bengtson (T), Patricia A. Berge (S), Peter R. Betzer (O), Pierre Boivin (V), Michael V. Capobianco (P), Martin C. Chapman (S), Chu-Yung Chen (V), Timothy J. Clarke (S), Steven C. Constable (GP), Michele Dermer (H), G. M. Dow (T), Carl E. Draper (G), Dean A. Dunn (O), I. B. Everingham (S).

  10. Would You Like To Swing on a Star? Opportunities To Improve Education in Kentucky's Fifth Congressional District. A Report to the Shakertown Roundtable Conference on Economic Development and Education in Kentucky's Fifth Congressional District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamm, Carol; And Others

    Interviews conducted in Kentucky's Fifth Congressional District sought answers for improving educational quality in the district, which has the highest dropout rate, the lowest holding power, and the lowest standardized test scores in Kentucky. Members of the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development interviewed 155 people from 15 of…

  11. Science, Society and Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, K. S.; Teich, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    Apart from the journals they produce, scientific societies play an important role in communicating scientific findings and norms to the broader society. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) includes among its goals to promote and defend the integrity of science and its use; provide a voice for science on societal issues; promote the responsible use of science in public policy; and increase public engagement with science and technology. AAAS websites and programs, including Communicating Science (www.aaas.org/communicatingscience), Working with Congress (http://www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/wwc/book.htm) and ScienceCareers.org (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org), provide tools for scientists to become more directly engaged in effectively communicating their findings and involved in the policy process. Education programs work to build the next generation of scientists and a science-literate public. To bridge the current communication gap between scientists, the public and policymakers, AAAS, like other scientific societies, maintains policy and outreach programs with limited budgets and staff. AAAS works to engage policymakers and provide scientific underpinning to key issues through congressional briefings, meetings, policy briefs, and media outreach. AAAS responds to challenges to accepted scientific findings and processes through op-eds, letters to government officials, resolutions, and Board statements. Some of these initiatives occur on a local level in partnership with local civic leaders, whose endorsement makes them more powerful. On a national scale, they assure that the voice of science is included in the debate. The changing media landscape presents opportunities and challenges for future AAAS endeavors.

  12. Child Labor in Agriculture: Changes Needed To Better Protect Health and Educational Opportunities. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    In a response to a Congressional request, this report presents information and statistics on child labor in agriculture. Specifically, the report examines: (1) the extent and prevalence of child labor in agriculture, (2) the legislative protections available to children working in agriculture, (3) the enforcement of these protections as they apply…

  13. 78 FR 7781 - Filing Dates for the South Carolina Special Elections in the 1st Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the South Carolina Special Elections in the 1st Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special elections. SUMMARY: South Carolina...

  14. Home Sweet Home: Congressional Black Caucus Initiative Leads HBCU, Community College Students down the Road to Homeownership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chew, Cassie

    2004-01-01

    When students graduate from college, the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation (CBCF) wants to make sure they hold the keys to economic success. And one of those keys, the CBCF says, should unlock the door to their own home. Toward this end, the foundation has embarked upon an initiative to help young people graduate from renters to homeowners.…

  15. Education Financial Management: Weak Internal Controls Led to Instances of Fraud and Other Improper Payments. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calbom, Linda M.

    This report to Congressional Requesters is concerned with internal control problems found in the U.S. Department of Education. Significant internal control weaknesses in the U.S. Department of Education's payment processes and poor physical control over its computer assets made the department vulnerable to (and in some cases resulted in) fraud,…

  16. Program Evaluation: A Variety of Rigorous Methods Can Help Identify Effective Interventions. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-10-30

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Recent congressional initiatives seek to focus funds for certain federal social programs on interventions for which randomized experiments show sizable, sustained benefits to participants or society. The private, nonprofit Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy undertook the Top Tier Evidence initiative to help federal programs identify interventions…

  17. 22 CFR 124.11 - Congressional certification pursuant to Section 36(d) of the Arms Export Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 36(d) of the Arms Export Control Act. 124.11 Section 124.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS AGREEMENTS, OFF-SHORE PROCUREMENT AND OTHER DEFENSE SERVICES § 124.11 Congressional certification pursuant to Section 36(d) of the Arms Export Control Act. (a) The Arms...

  18. 22 CFR 124.11 - Congressional certification pursuant to Section 36(d) of the Arms Export Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 36(d) of the Arms Export Control Act. 124.11 Section 124.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS AGREEMENTS, OFF-SHORE PROCUREMENT, AND OTHER DEFENSE SERVICES § 124.11 Congressional certification pursuant to Section 36(d) of the Arms Export Control Act. (a) The Arms...

  19. 22 CFR 124.11 - Congressional certification pursuant to Section 36(d) of the Arms Export Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 36(d) of the Arms Export Control Act. 124.11 Section 124.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS AGREEMENTS, OFF-SHORE PROCUREMENT AND OTHER DEFENSE SERVICES § 124.11 Congressional certification pursuant to Section 36(d) of the Arms Export Control Act. (a) The Arms...

  20. Head Start and Even Start: Greater Collaboration Needed on Measures of Adult Education and Literacy. Report to the Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderlinde, Virginia; Doughty, Sherri; Boiman, Tiffany; Rebbe, James; Stenersen, Stan; Peterson, Jill

    This report examines whether Head Start and Even Start are substantially similar in key areas. At the request of a congressional subcommittee, the Government Accounting Office determined: (1) how similar the programs are in legal requirements and administration and the extent to which they have similar purposes, performance goals, and indicators;…

  1. Food Assistance: Financial Information on WIC Nutrition Services and Administrative Costs. United States General Accounting Office Report to Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Robert E.

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) is a federally funded nutrition assistance program administered by the Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service (FNS). Responding to Congressional requests for information regarding program costs, this report provides information on: (1) funding…

  2. 22 CFR 123.15 - Congressional certification pursuant to Section 36(c) of the Arms Export Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 36(c) of the Arms Export Control Act. 123.15 Section 123.15 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.15 Congressional.... § 123.15, Nt. Effective Date Note: At 77 FR 16598, Mar. 21, 2012, § 123.15 was amended by...

  3. Congressional capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    1984-04-01

    Several geophysics-related bills were passed as the House of Representatives and the Senate each scrambled to complete as much business as possible before the recess for the Independence Day holiday and the Democratic National Convention. The House and Senate will reconvene July 23.The Senate ratified the compromise version of the Land Remote-Sensing Commercialization Act (H.R. 5155) (Eos, July 3, 1984, p. 425) in the final hours before recessing. The bill was expected to be sent to President Ronald Reagan for his signature as Eos went to press.

  4. Science Policy Conference Speakers Examine Megadisasters and Call for Risk Reduction Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-07-01

    How well is the United States prepared for a megadisaster, such as a solar storm that knocks out the power grid for months, a large asteroid impact, a giant tsunami, or a rainstorm that lasts for weeks and leads to widespread flooding? Moreover, how can risk reduction efforts be made more effective? These were two topics addressed during two of the hazards sessions at the 2013 AGU Science Policy Conference on 25 and 26 June.

  5. Information Literacy in the Study of American Politics: Using New Media to Teach Information Literacy in the Political Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Jonathan; Flanagan, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Students have access to a vast amount of information about American politics through new media outlets (e.g., the Internet). We survey the perils and promise of this new landscape through a case study of a political science class at the College of Staten Island, City University of New York (CUNY), that examined congressional races in the 2010…

  6. Friends of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten members of Congress have been presented with the Friends of Science Award by the National Coalition for Science and Technology (NCST). The awards, honoring significant contributions to science, engineering, and science education, are made every 2 years at the end of the congressional session. The recipients this year are Sen. Pete V. Domenici (R-N.M.), Rep. Joseph D. Early (D-Mass.), Rep. Bill Frenzel (R-Minn.), Rep. Albert Gore, Jr. (D-Tenn.), Rep. Judd Gregg (R-N.H.), Sen. Daniel K. Inouye (D-Hawaii), Rep. Stan Lundine (D-N.Y.), Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.), Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Calif.), and Rep. Ed Zschau (R-Calif).Except for Sen. Inouye, whose term expires in 1986, all of this year's recipients were up for reelection in the national elections held November 6. All were successful in securing another term in Congress. In addition, Albert Gore was successful in his bid for a Senate seat, filling the vacancy left by the retiring Senate Majority Leader Howard H. Baker (R-Tenn.)

  7. Science Under Sequestration: How will a decade of science funding cuts affect you?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, E. A.; Hankin, E. R.; Uhlenbrock, K.

    2013-12-01

    Budget sequestration is now a reality for the United States. From 2013-2021, $1.2 trillion in funding will be cut indiscriminately from most federal spending programs. These funding cuts impact scientific research and development, STEM education programs, federal grants, and many other aspects of science. Although the cuts are just beginning, impacts are already being felt by the scientific community. The reach and degree of impacts will likely worsen with time. To better understand how recent U.S government budget policy is impacting Earth and space science, AGU has collected data from its members in two surveys, sent in March and July of 2013. Over 1,600 scientists responded to the July survey. Specifically, the surveys were designed to determine how sequestration and/or government travel restrictions affect scientists' ability to conduct research, attend scientific conferences, and identify any other impacts. This discussion will reveal what impacts scientists are seeing across sectors, look at early trends, and provide insight on the next eight years and what impacts may lay ahead. We are providing this information at the AGU Fall Meeting venue in order to help prepare the Earth and space science community for impacts, and to engage the community on this important policy issue.

  8. The potential for congressional use of emergent telecommunications: An exploratory assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, F. B.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the use of newly emerging communications technology for improving the understanding between members of Congress and their constituents was conducted. The study employed a number of specific methodologies such as interdisciplinary systems model building, technology analysis, a sample survey, and semi-structured interviews using sketches of the emergent channels. The following configurations were identified as representative of emergent channel characteristics: (1) the teleconference, (2) the videoconference, (3) the videophone, (4) cable television, (5) cable television polling, and (6) information retrieval. Analysis of the interview data resulted in an overview of the current congressional-constituent communication system and an assessment of the potential for emergent telecommunications, as perceived by congressmen and senior staff from 40 offices in the stratified judgement sample.

  9. Creationism and science: An impossible union?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mims, Forrest M., III

    Eos reported on June 28, 1994, that the AGU Council has reaffirmed for the second time a statement on “Creationism” first adopted in December 1981. The brief statement opposes “…all efforts to require or promote the teaching of creationism or any other religious tenets as science.” The statement offers no definition of creationism.The AGU Council's rejection of “creationism” and “religious tenets as science” may be fashionable by today's standards but the rejection of any role for God in science is a comparatively recent development. Many great scientists of the past believed in and even wrote about their faith in a creator God. I know many scientists today who believe in God. Several years ago I lost an assignment to write a column for Scientific American after the editor learned that I am an evangelical Christian who rejects abortion and much of Darwinism. After my dismissal received widespread publicity in the national media, I received calls and letters of support from scientists in many fields, including medicine, biology, and paleontology, who believe as I do.

  10. Climate Scientists Build Relationships With Legislators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Erik

    2014-02-01

    Forty climate scientists ventured to Washington, D. C., on 29 January 2014 for the fourth annual Climate Science Day on Capitol Hill. AGU, along with 13 other scientific societies, including the Geological Society of America and the American Chemical Society, invited members at the forefront of climate science, with communications expertise, to meet with their legislators. Through this event, the organizers facilitated more than 100 congressional meetings over the course of the day.

  11. U.S EPA science and technology efforts come under scrutiny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Two US. Congressional hearings in mid-March put the heat on some science and technology efforts of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). First, a March 22 House of Representatives Science Committee hearing focused on EPAs management of a ruling about sludge treatment and disposal. The hearing examined whether the agency has failed to foster sound science, while also allegedly harassing agency whistleblowers and some private citizens. Then, a March 23 House Science Subcommittee hearing scrutinized the fiscal year 2001 budget authorization request for EPAs science and technology budget.

  12. Young Member Places Seventh in Noted U.S. Student Science Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A student member of AGU is one of the top 10 winners of a science contest for pre-college age students which is sponsored annually by Intel Corporation. The contest results were announced on March 11 at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. Carolyn Tewksbury, 17, was a finalist in the 2003 Intel Science Talent Search competition. She took seventh place in the contest for her project, titled ``Collapse of the Pasom-mana Tessera Region, Venus: Implications for the Evolution of Crustal Plateaus.''

  13. Biological Evolution and the History of the Earth Are Foundations of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    AGU affirms the central importance of including scientific theories of Earth history and biological evolution in science education. Within the scientific community, the theory of biological evolution is not controversial, nor have ``alternative explanations'' been found. This is why no competing theories are required by the U.S. National Science Education Standards. Explanations of natural phenomena that appeal to the supernatural or are based on religious doctrine-and therefore cannot be tested through scientific inquiry-are not scientific, and have no place in the science classroom.

  14. From plant extract to molecular panacea: a commentary on Stone (1763) 'An account of the success of the bark of the willow in the cure of the agues'.

    PubMed

    Wood, John N

    2015-04-19

    The application of aspirin-like drugs in modern medicine is very broad, encompassing the treatment of inflammation, pain and a variety of cardiovascular conditions. Although anecdotal accounts of willow bark extract as an anti-inflammatory drug have occurred since written records began (for example by Hippocrates), the first convincing demonstration of a potent anti-pyretic effect of willow bark containing salicylates was made by the English cleric Edward Stone in the late eighteenth century. Here, we discuss the route to optimizing and understanding the mechanism of action of anti-inflammatory drugs that have their origins in Stone's seminal study, 'An account of the success of the bark of the willow in the cure of agues'. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750237

  15. "Discoveries in Planetary Sciences": Turning Press Release Science into Teachable Moments in Higher Ed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N. M.; Brain, D.; Sada, P. V.

    2011-12-01

    AGU disciplines are all fields that evolve rapidly, and it can take several years for new advances to work their way into college textbooks. Yet it is important for students to have exposure to these new advances for a number of reasons. In some cases, new work renders older textbook knowledge incorrect or incomplete. In some cases, new discoveries make it possible to emphasize older textbook knowledge in a new way. In all cases, new advances provide exciting and accessible examples of the scientific process in action. But press releases rarely provide these "teachable moments" in either content or format. To bridge the gap between textbooks and new advances in planetary sciences, we have developed content on new discoveries for use by undergraduate instructors. Called 'Discoveries in Planetary Sciences', each new discovery is summarized in a 3-slide PowerPoint presentation. The first slide describes the discovery, the second slide discusses the underlying planetary science concepts, and the third presents the big picture implications of the discovery. A fourth slide includes links to associated press releases, images, and primary sources. This effort is generously sponsored by the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society, and the slide sets are available at http://dps.aas.org/education/dpsdisc/. More than twenty slide sets have been released so far covering topics spanning all sub-disciplines of planetary science, with a fall release planned for Spanish translations In this presentation we will discuss our motivation for this project, our implementation approach (from choosing topics to creating the slide sets, to getting them reviewed and released), and give examples of slide sets. We will present information in the form of web statistics on how many educators are using the slide sets, and which topics are most popular. We will also present feedback from educators who have used them in the classroom. The value and popularity of these

  16. Ocean sciences section starts new committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Barbara

    To maximize our ability to obtain recognition of Ocean Sciences Section members as Fellows of AGU while minimizing the associated workload, I have, in consultation with our executive committee, established an Ocean Sciences Fellows Committee chaired by the President-Elect to oversee and assist in the nomination process.The committee asks that anyone wanting to make a nomination send a one-page proposal telling why an individual should be a Fellow. Proposals will be reviewed by the commitee, and a number equal to 1½ to 2 times our nomination quota will be chosen for full presentation. Committee members will then work with nominators to select and contact seconders, while the nominator provides the required curriculum vitae and publication list. The committee will assist in any manner possible to insure that the files that go forward are both timely and well documented.

  17. Science, Society, and Social Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, K. S.; Lohwater, T.

    2009-12-01

    The increased use of social networking is changing the way that scientific societies interact with their members and others. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) uses a variety of online networks to engage its members and the broader scientific community. AAAS members and non-members can interact with AAAS staff and each other on AAAS sites on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter, as well as blogs and forums on the AAAS website (www.aaas.org). These tools allow scientists to more readily become engaged in policy by providing information on current science policy topics as well as methods of involvement. For example, members and the public can comment on policy-relevant stories from Science magazine’s ScienceInsider blog, download a weekly policy podcast, receive a weekly email update of policy issues affecting the scientific community, or watch a congressional hearing from their computer. AAAS resource websites and outreach programs, including Communicating Science (www.aaas.org/communicatingscience), Working with Congress (www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/) and Science Careers (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org) also provide tools for scientists to become more personally engaged in communicating their findings and involved in the policy process.

  18. Atmospheric sciences students present papers, get career tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Doren, Jane M.

    At AGU's Spring Meeting the Atmospheric Sciences Section hosted a series of special sessions to highlight student research and provide advice and information about securing successful careers in the geosciences. Eighteen graduate students presented papers and posters covering field, laboratory, and modeling efforts. Subject areas included aerosol chemistry, morphology, physics, sources and transport of atmospheric species, and issues relating to regional and global climate. The panel discussion on successfulcareers drew a wide audience, from students to accomplished researchers. Topics discussed included postdoctoral positions job applications, research funding proposals, and time management.

  19. Games and Simulations for Climate, Weather and Earth Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    We will demonstrate several interactive, computer-based simulations, games, and other interactive multimedia. These resources were developed for weather, climate, atmospheric science, and related Earth system science education. The materials were created by the UCAR Center for Science Education. These materials have been disseminated via our web site (SciEd.ucar.edu), webinars, online courses, teacher workshops, and large touchscreen displays in weather and Sun-Earth connections exhibits in NCAR's Mesa Lab facility in Boulder, Colorado. Our group has also assembled a web-based list of similar resources, especially simulations and games, from other sources that touch upon weather, climate, and atmospheric science topics. We'll briefly demonstrate this directory. More info available at: scied.ucar.edu/events/agu-2014-games-simulations-sessions

  20. Revised congressional budget request, FY 1982. Conservation and renewable energy program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Programs dealing with conservation and renewable energy are reprinted from the Revised Congressional Budget Request FY 1982. From Volume 7, Energy Conservation, information is presented on: buildings and community systems; industrial programs; transportation programs; state and local programs; inventor's program energy conversion technology; energy impact assistance; and residential/commercial retrofit. From Volume 2, Energy Supply Research and Development, information and data are presented on: solar building applications; solar industrial applications; solar power applications; solar information systems; SERI facility; solar international activities; alcohol fuels; geothermal; and hydropower. From Volume 6, Energy Production, Demonstration, and Distribution, information and data on solar energy production, demonstration, and distribution are presented. From Volume 3, Energy Supply and R and D Appropriation, information and data on electric energy systems and energy storage systems are included. From Volume 4, information and data are included on geothermal resources development fund. In Volume 5, Power Marketing Administrations, information and data are presented on estimates by appropriations, positions and staff years by appropriation, staffing distribution, and power marketing administrations. Recissions and deferrals for FY 1981 are given. (MCW)

  1. a Comparison of δ13C & pMC Values for Ten Cretaceous-Jurassic Dinosaur Bones from Texas to Alaska USA, China and Europe with that of Coal and Diamonds Presented in the 2003 Agu Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, H. R.; Dennett, R.; de Pontcharra, J.; Giertych, M.; Kline, O.; van Oosterwych, M. C.; Owen, H.; Taylor, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    There is convincing evidence that soft tissue and other biomolecules can survive long periods of fossilization by their interaction with blood iron and/or carbonate absorption. Here are presented the results of investigations showing that ancient biomolecules and their decay products contain significantly more pMC's (% modern 14C) than diamond and coal presented during a poster session held at the AGU 2003 SF convention. The title was: The Enigma of the Ubiquity of 14C in organic samples older than 100,000 K. The given range for five diamonds from Botswana and South Africa ranged from 0.096 to 0.146 pMC. Ten coal specimens from the United States from the Eocene to Pennsylvanian geologic interval yielded 0.1 to 0.46 pMC's. In our extensive field and lab study ten dinosaurs from Texas to Alaska, and China yielded much higher pMC's of 0.76 to 5.59 after pretreatment to remove modern contaminants. When 2g of a Belgium Mosasaur from Europe was pretreated to remove contaminants the pMC was 4.68 or 24,600 RC years on Lund Un AMS in Sweden (Lindgren et al. 2011, PloS ONE, page 9). The endogenous sources of dinosaur pMC's were further enhanced by the δ13C range of -20.1 to -23.8 for collagen, 16.6-28.4 for bulk organic and -3.1 to -9.1 for CO3 fractions. The δ13C values compare favorably to δ13C values of -23 to -27 in a similar study of dinosaur δ13C values from the Judith River formation in Alberta, Canada that (Ostrom et al. 1993, Geology, v. 21). . Diamonds from South America (Taylor-Southon, Nuclear Instruments 2007 ) yielded ages of 66,000 to 80,000 years leaving little doubt that at least the dinosaur ages of 22,020 ± 50 to 39,230 ± 140 were not machine error or a result of contamination anymore than the coal samples. This data explains more clearly why such biomolecules have persisted and therefore should not be ignored as the implications are of utmost importance to science and humanity. Thus the experimental results presented here demonstrate the need for

  2. Dessler, Jimenez, Klein, and Nenes Receive 2012 Atmospheric Sciences Ascent Awards: Citation for Athanasios Nenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Peter J.

    2013-11-01

    The Atmospheric Sciences section of AGU awards one of the four Ascent Awards to Professor Athanasios Nenes, of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering of the Georgia Institute of Technology, for the creation of thermodynamical models for tropospheric aerosols and the development of physically based aerosol-cloud parameterizations. In addition, he is recognized for the design of instrumentation and techniques to characterize the hygroscopicity and activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and also for contributions to the understanding of the role of aerosols in climate and air quality.

  3. Hayes Receives 2012 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Alexander G.

    2013-10-01

    I am deeply honored to be the inaugural recipient of the Ronald Greeley Early Career Award. Ron was an icon in the field of planetary science, and the establishment of this award is a fitting way to pay tribute to his legacy. I applaud Laurie Leshin, Bill McKinnon, and the rest of the AGU Planetary Science section officers and selection committee for taking the time to organize this memorial. Ron is remembered not only for his fundamental scientific contributions but also for his mentorship and support of early-career scientists, both his own students and postdocs and those of his colleagues.

  4. Youth Drug Abuse in New York. Hearing before the Subcommitte of the Committee on Appropriations. United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session. Special Hearing: Congressional Witnesses, Nondepartmental Witnesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Appropriations.

    This document contains Congressional and nondepartmental witness testimony from the Congressional hearing on youth drug abuse in New York. Opening statements are presented on the incidence of drug use in America, the role of the federal government, the impact of drugs on youth, foreign country production of illegal drugs, funding to fight illegal…

  5. Thank you to 2015 reviewers of Radio Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Phil; Salous, Sana

    2016-04-01

    On behalf of Radio Science, AGU, and the scientific community, the editors and associate editors would like to thank everybody who reviewed manuscripts for Radio Science in 2015. Peer review is widely accepted as an indispensable part of science. The hours spent reading and commenting on manuscripts not only improve the manuscripts themselves, but also ensure the scientific rigor of future research in our field. These contributions are vital. Many of those listed below went further and reviewed three or more manuscripts for our journal, and they are indicated in italics. Overall, reviewers contributed 591 individual reviews of 282 manuscripts. Thank you once again to all our reviewers for contributing your valuable time to this essential task. We look forward to a 2016 of exciting advances in our field and communicating those advances to our community and to the broader public.

  6. How to cite an Earth science data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Creating a great data set can be a life's work (consider Charles Keeling). Yet, scientists do not receive much recognition for creating rigorous, useful data. At the same time, in a post "climategate" world there is increased scrutiny on science and a greater need than ever to adhere to scientific principles of transparency and repeatability. The Council of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) asserts that the scientific community should recognize the value of data collection, preparation, and description and that data "publications" should "be credited and cited like the products of any other scientific activity." Currently, however, authors rarely cite data formally in journal articles, and they often lack guidance on how data should be cited. The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) Preservation and Stewardship Cluster has been working this issue for some time now and has begun to address some of the challenges. Overall, scientists and data managers have a professional and ethical responsibility to do their best to meet the data publication goals asserted by AGU. This talk outlines a data citation approach to increase the credit and credibility of data producers.

  7. Leo Szilard Lecturship Award: How can physicists help the public make better decisions about science and technology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primack, Joel

    2016-03-01

    For more than 40 years the APS has worked to improve governmental decision-making, mainly through the Congressional Science and Technology Fellowship program and through occasional studies of important science and technology issues. How productive have these been? How can the APS and other professional societies more effectively combat anti-science propaganda and help the public develop better-informed views about science and technology? How can individual scientists communicate scientific concepts in a more understandable and engaging way? How can we encourage young scientists and students to participate in creating a scientifically responsible future?

  8. Fostering science communication via direct outreach by scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viñas, M.; Weiss, P. L.; O'Neil, K.; Richardson, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    While the bread-and-butter of the press operation at the American Geophysical Union remains issuing press releases and organizing press conferences for mainstream media, the implosion of specialized science coverage in print media, TV, and radio, and the heated public debates on science issues require us to find other ways to get science and scientists into the public eye. This means getting volunteers--small armies of scientists interested in and able to communicate with the public. At AGU, we have three programs to foster direct communication between scientists and the public: (1) A suite of blogs launched in Fall 2010, written by external Earth and space science bloggers for an audience of scientists and lay public. We will report on whom the bloggers are, their motivations, who makes up their audiences, what incentives AGU uses to encourage them to participate in this project, blog network traffic, and resources needed to support them. (2) "The Plainspoken Scientist", a science communication-oriented blog for an audience of scientists, was launched in spring 2010 and is a mixture of guest posts and in-house articles. We will report on the response to and effects of the science communication blog, how we obtain and use guest posts from volunteers, and traffic. (3) We began professional development workshops at scientific meetings in spring 2009 to help scientists brush up on how to communicate with the media and the public. We will report on the motivations and interests of the participants in the professional development workshops, impacts, and the lessons we have learned about how to provide useful workshops.

  9. Comment on ``Communicating Government Science''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lins, Harry F.

    2006-05-01

    Soroosh Sorooshian's editorial in the 18 April issue of Eos (87(16) 2005) is a timely reminder of the need for unambiguous guidelines governing the interactions between government scientists and the media. His comments implicitly recognize the central role that science plays in a modern democratic society, which includes informing policy at the highest levels of government and educating the general public about the world we inhabit. Federal research scientists, who constitute approximately 15 percent of the AGU's U.S. membership, have a unique public responsibility. They would welcome a consistent policy for the review and approval of publications, oral presentations, and media communications. An example of the value and success that such a policy can have to both science and the nation is evident in the operations of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). For more than a century, the USGS has had clear policies and procedures for ensuring the communication of accurate, high-quality, and impartial scientific information. These policies and procedures are set forth in the USGS Manual under sections entitled ``Approval by the director for outside publication and oral presentation,'' ``Review of USGS publications and abstracts of oral presentations for policy-sensitive issues,'' and ``News release and media relations policy.'' These policies are available online at http:// www.usgs.gov/usgs-manual/500/500-9.html (.../500-8.html and .../500 5.html).

  10. Persistent Identifiers, Discoverability and Open Science (Communication)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Fiona; Lehnert, Kerstin; Hanson, Brooks

    2016-04-01

    Early in 2016, the American Geophysical Union announced it was incorporating ORCIDs into its submission workflows. This was accompanied by a strong statement supporting the use of other persistent identifiers - such as IGSNs, and the CrossRef open registry 'funding data'. This was partly in response to funders' desire to track and manage their outputs. However the more compelling argument, and the reason why the AGU has also signed up to the Center for Open Science's Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines (http://cos.io/top), is that ultimately science and scientists will be the richer for these initiatives due to increased opportunities for interoperability, reproduceability and accreditation. The AGU has appealed to the wider community to engage with these initiatives, recognising that - unlike the introduction of Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) for articles by CrossRef - full, enriched use of persistent identifiers throughout the scientific process requires buy-in from a range of scholarly communications stakeholders. At the same time, across the general research landscape, initiatives such as Project CRediT (contributor roles taxonomy), Publons (reviewer acknowledgements) and the forthcoming CrossRef DOI Event Tracker are contributing to our understanding and accreditation of contributions and impact. More specifically for earth science and scientists, the cross-functional Coalition for Publishing Data in the Earth and Space Sciences (COPDESS) was formed in October 2014 and is working to 'provide an organizational framework for Earth and space science publishers and data facilities to jointly implement and promote common policies and procedures for the publication and citation of data across Earth Science journals'. Clearly, the judicious integration of standards, registries and persistent identifiers such as ORCIDs and International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSNs) to the research and research output processes is key to the success of this venture

  11. Rodinia, She Do Spin: A (prequal) tribute to the legendary 2001 AGU poster, "Pangaea, She No Spin"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegman, D.; Knight, K.

    2004-12-01

    On one side of the poster: actual science, real equations, a burning question many scientists are researching by employing the best resources governments can provide; on the other side of the poster: a shameless and ill-fated attempt to conceptualize the problem using rudimentary and commonly available crafts. Unbenownst to passers-by, meticulous, covert record keepers will busily tabulate which of the two presentation styles draws more attention and for what length. Late night television the world over asks such simple questions: Will it float? (David Letterman); What was weak? (Australian Broadcasting Corporation's "Double the Fist" show); etc. Borrowing a page from popular culture we adopt a simple and interesting question: Does it spin? This question has been posed previously in rigorously mathematical terms in relation to true polar wander (TPW) (Ricard et al, 1993), in descriptive terms in relation to paleomagnetic data sets (Evans, 2003), and also in more interesting terms (McDowell, 2001). This poster draws on the success of the latter presentation which described the 2001 experiment thusly, "I wondered what would happen if the configuration were put in high relief on a globe and spun on axis. Then I wondered if the present configuration of land masses would itself balance as a spinning top. So I got two Replogle globes, two boxes of colored modeling clay sticks, and two fat knitting needles, to fit through the capped holes at the poles of the globes. The clay sticks I cut up into 3 mm. (1/8") slices, using a different color for each continent, and applied to the first globe, assuming the extreme exaggeration above the geoid, no matter how crude, would tell the story. Inserting one needle through the globe and securing it, I balanced the globe on the point of the needle and twirled it like a top. Result: Wobbly! Top end of needle gyrated unevenly, and here it was supposed to make a smooth precessional cone. Oh boy. For the second globe, I used a Scotese

  12. Communicating Science in the Capitol: The Graduate Student Voice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glembo, Tyler

    2015-03-01

    Fundamental scientific research, as a majority federally funded initiative, is becoming more deeply embedded in politics. Since the end of the Space Race, funding of basic physical sciences research as a percent GDP has continuously declined, indicating that policy makers see funding scientific research as less of a priority than they once did. A lack of understanding about both science and how science is done amongst members of Congress has led to both reduced prioritization and also to misguided attempts at regulation, such as making peer review a public process and considering Congressional oversight for specific grants. Here we will examine a few current issues in science policy, the effect on graduate students, and why the student voice is effective. We will also consider the positive or negative effects such public engagement may have on our scientific careers and ways in which you can get involved.

  13. Summary of Changes Related to the Individualized Education Program (IEP): Current Law and 1997 IDEA Amendments, Including Congressional Committee Comments. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrag, Judy; Ahearn, Eileen M.

    This report summarizes provisions and highlights changes for the Individualized Education Program (IEP) within the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Amendments of 1997. Also included are references from the two Congressional Committee Reports--those of the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee and the House Committee on…

  14. Plans of Mice and Men: From Bench Science to Science Policy

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ian D.

    2011-01-01

    The transition from bench science to science policy is not always a smooth one, and my journey stretched as far as the unemployment line to the hallowed halls of the U.S. Capitol. While earning my doctorate in microbiology, I found myself more interested in my political activities than my experiments. Thus, my science policy career aspirations were born from merging my love of science with my interest in policy and politics. After receiving my doctorate, I accepted the Henry Luce Scholarship, which allowed me to live in South Korea for 1 year and delve into the field of science policy research. This introduction into science policy occurred at the South Korean think tank called the Science and Technology Policy Institute (STEPI). During that year, I used textbooks, colleagues, and hands-on research projects as my educational introduction into the social science of science and technology decision-making. However, upon returning to the United States during one of the worst job markets in nearly 80 years, securing a position in science policy proved to be very difficult, and I was unemployed for five months. Ultimately, it took more than a year from the end of the Luce Scholarship to obtain my next science policy position with the American Society for Microbiology Congressional Fellowship. This fellowship gave me the opportunity to work as the science and public health advisor to U.S. Senator Harry Reid. While there were significant challenges during my transition from the laboratory to science policy, those challenges made me tougher, more appreciative, and more prepared to move from working at the bench to working in the field of science policy. PMID:21966041

  15. What are megaprojects doing to science?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    A House panel recently explored the effect of big projects such as Space Station Freedom and the Superconducting Super Collider on “small science,” as it grappled with the definition of small vs. big science. Much of the discussion zeroed in on the particulars of this year's most controversial megaproject, the space station. Among the witnesses at the July 11 hearing of the House Budget Committee Task Force on Defense, Foreign Policy, and Space was Thomas Donahue, chair of AGU's Committee on Public Affairs.George E. Brown, Jr. (D-Calif.), temporarily stepping down from his presiding chair over the House Science Committee to testify at the task force's witness table, justified his support for Freedom while acknowledging that “many features [of the space station] that would be good for science have been deferred.” But, he added, “The reasons for the manned space program and for the station have to do with international leadership and technological competitiveness.”

  16. Covering Science as a Mass Media Fellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMeeking, Gavin R.

    2006-03-01

    I remember my first unpleasant biology lab dissection in high school. I am not sure if the experience was worse for me or for the unfortunate fetal pig we dissected that day. The sights and smells of that fateful morning forever put me on a path toward the physical sciences, and probably have a lot to do with my ending up as a graduate student in atmospheric chemistry instead of at some medical school cutting up dead bodies. So imagine my horror after encountering the leg of a dead horse as I walked into a bioengineering laboratory to report on a story about artificial joint research. Subjecting myself to such biological horrors, though, was part of my duties as an AGU-sponsored American Association for the Advancement of Science Mass Media Fellow. The program places graduate students and recent graduates from scientific fields in major media outlets throughout the country. The aim of the program is to give science-trained individuals a taste of a career in science journalism as well as to help scientists develop better communication skills.

  17. Wiesner Confirmed To Head New Science Office.

    PubMed

    1962-07-27

    The Senate last week unanimously approved the nomination of Jerome B. Wiesner as director of the newly established Office of Science and Technology. Wiesner's nomination occasioned his first formal appearance before a Congressional committee since he joined the administration as K,ennedy's special assistant for science and technology. He retains that post while serving as director of the new office and will also continue as chairman of the President's Science Advisory Committee (PSAC), an 18-member group of nongovernmental consultants drawn from science, industry, and education. He will also continue as chairman of the Federal Council on Science and Technology, which is the intra-governmental counterpart of the PSAC. In relations between science and government Wiesner probably occupies the most influential position in the country. Following are excerpts from his testimony before the Senate Labor and Public Welfare Committee. (A limited number of complete transcripts may be obtained without charge from the committee at Room 4230, New Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C.). PMID:17744438

  18. Science in Science Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allday, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Offers some suggestions as to how science fiction, especially television science fiction programs such as "Star Trek" and "Star Wars", can be drawn into physics lessons to illuminate some interesting issues. (Author/KHR)

  19. Changing legal standards for proof of causation in hazardous waste tort cases. Plaintiffs' problems and congressional responses.

    PubMed

    Learner, L G; Hartman, K L; Berry, D S

    1983-12-01

    Increasing public awareness and concern over the possible dangers of exposure to toxic chemicals and hazardous wastes has resulted in a variety of lawsuits brought by plaintiffs claiming injury resulting from chemical exposure. The legal system and its traditional approach to tort cases demands that a plaintiff demonstrate that a particular chemical substance was the "cause in fact" of his injury. However, a plaintiff's inability to present credible scientific evidence sufficient to pinpoint conclusively the specific cause of his injury or disease, particularly in cancer cases, leads to defeat in courts of law. This article discusses the existing barriers to plaintiffs' recovery in toxic tort cases and reviews congressional proposals designed to ease plaintiffs' evidentiary burden and increase their chances of prevailing. PMID:6666765

  20. Congressional Hearing on Near-Earth Objects Brings Reassurances and "What If" Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-04-01

    Despite repeated reassurances from Obama administration officials that it is unlikely that a near-Earth object (NEO) could cause catastrophic damage on Earth anytime over the next several hundred years, members of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology kept raising "what if" questions at a 19 March hearing about threats from space.

  1. Earth and Space Science Ph.D. Class of 2003 Report released

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keelor, Brad

    AGU and the American Geological Institute (AGI) released on 26 July an employment study of 180 Earth and space science Ph.D. recipients who received degrees from U.S. universities in 2003. The AGU/AGI survey asked graduates about their education and employment, efforts to find their first job after graduation, and experiences in graduate school. Key results from the study include: The vast majority (87%) of 2003 graduates found work in the Earth and space sciences, earning salaries commensurate with or slightly higher than 2001 and 2002 salary averages. Most (64%) graduates were employed within academia (including postdoctoral appointments), with the remainder in government (19%), industry (10%), and other (7%) sectors. Most graduates were positive about their employment situation and found that their work was challenging, relevant, and appropriate for someone with a Ph.D. The percentage of Ph.D. recipients accepting postdoctoral positions (58%) increased slightly from 2002. In contrast, the fields of physics and chemistry showed significant increases in postdoctoral appointments for Ph.D.s during the same time period. As in previous years, recipients of Ph.D.s in the Earth, atmospheric, and ocean sciences (median age of 32.7 years) are slightly older than Ph.D. recipients in most other natural sciences (except computer sciences), which is attributed to time taken off between undergraduate and graduate studies. Women in the Earth, atmospheric,and ocean sciences earned 33% of Ph.D.s in the class of 2003, surpassing the percentage of Ph.D.s earned by women in chemistry (32%) and well ahead of the percentage in computer sciences (20%), physics (19%), and engineering (17%). Participation of other underrepresented groups in the Earth, atmospheric, and ocean sciences remained extremely low.

  2. Enhancing the Communication of Climate Change Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, R. C.; Hassol, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Climate scientists have an important role to play in the critical task of informing the public, media and policymakers. Scientists can help in publicizing and illuminating climate science. However, this task requires combining climate science expertise with advanced communication skills. For example, it is entirely possible to convey scientific information accurately without using jargon or technical concepts unfamiliar to non-scientists. However, making this translation into everyday language is a job that few scientists have been trained to do. In this talk, we give examples from our recent experience working with scientists to enhance their ability to communicate well. Our work includes providing training, technical assistance, and communications tools to climate scientists and universities, government agencies, and research centers. Our experience ranges from preparing Congressional testimony to writing major climate science reports to appearing on television. We have also aided journalists in gathering reliable scientific information and identifying trustworthy experts. Additionally, we are involved in developing resources freely available online at climatecommunication.org. These include a feature on the links between climate change and extreme weather, a climate science primer, and graphics and video explaining key developments in climate change science.

  3. Science and Science Fiction

    ScienceCinema

    Scherrer, Robert [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States

    2009-09-01

    I will explore the similarities and differences between the process of writing science fiction and the process of 'producing' science, specifically theoretical physics. What are the ground rules for introducing unproven new ideas in science fiction, and how do they differ from the corresponding rules in physics? How predictive is science fiction? (For that matter, how predictive is theoretical physics?) I will also contrast the way in which information is presented in science fiction, as opposed to its presentation in scientific papers, and I will examine the relative importance of ideas (as opposed to the importance of the way in which these ideas are presented). Finally, I will discuss whether a background as a research scientist provides any advantage in writing science fiction.

  4. Highlighting Your Science to NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, C.

    2003-12-01

    An effort is underway to provide greater visibility within NASA headquarters, and to those who provide funding to NASA, of the outstanding work that is being performed by scientists involved in the Solar System Exploration Research and Analysis Programs, most of whom are DPS members. In support of this effort, a new feature has been developed for the NASA Headquarters Solar System Exploration Division web site whereby researchers can provide a synopsis of their current research results. The site (http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/spotlight/ - Username: your email address Password: sse) is an online submission area where NASA-funded scientists can upload the results of their research. There they provide their contact information, briefly describe their research, and upload any associated images or graphics. The information is available to a limited number of reviewers and writers at JPL. Each month, one researcher's work will be chosen as a science spotlight. After a writer interviews the scientist, a brief Power Point presentation that encapsulates their work will be given to Dr. Colleen Hartman at NASA headquarters. She will then present the exciting findings to Associate Administrator for Space Science, Dr. Ed Weiler. The information from some of these highlights can serve as a basis to bring Principal Investigators to NASA Headquarters for exposure to media through Space Science Updates on NASA television. In addition, the science results may also be incorporated into briefing material for the Office of Management and Budget and congressional staffers. Some spotlights will also be converted into feature stories for the Solar System Exploration website so the public, too, can learn about exciting new research. The site, http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/, is one of NASA's most visited. Over the past decade, there has been a trend of flat budgets for Research and Analysis activities. By giving more visibility to results of Solar System research, our goal is to encourage

  5. The Climate Science Rapid Response Team - A Model for Science Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandia, S. A.; Abraham, J. A.; Weymann, R.; Ashley, M.

    2011-12-01

    interactions with the media sources has been overwhelmingly affirmative. The CSRRT has become recognized as a high-quality service that provides accurate science information in a very rapid manner. The CSRRT encourages AGU climate scientists who wish to participate in CSRRT to contact us, and AGU members to inform their contacts in the media about our service.

  6. Science in science fiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allday, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Science fiction, from Star Trek to Star Wars, is hugely popular and pupils will surely have encountered good and bad physics there, but do they really notice? Discussing the science implied in books and movies, such as in the use of transporters, can be a good way of getting students interested in physics.

  7. Stephen Hall Receives 2012 Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism-Features: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Hall, a freelance science writer and science-communication teacher, received the Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism-Features at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. Hall was honored for the article "At Fault?" published 15 September 2011 in Nature. The article examines the legal, personal, and political repercussions from a 2009 earthquake in L'Aquila, Italy for seismologists who had attempted to convey seismic risk assessments to the public. The 6.3 magnitude quake devastated the medieval town and caused more than 300 deaths. Six scientists and one government official were subsequently convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to prison for inadequately assessing and mischaracterizing the risks to city residents, despite the inexact nature of seismic risk assessment. The Sullivan award is for work published with a deadline pressure of more than 1 week.

  8. James Cameron discusses record dive and science concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy; Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-12-01

    James Cameron, the explorer and filmmaker, led a 4 December panel at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco to discuss his daring dive on 26 March to the bottom of the ocean in a one-person vertical "torpedo" submarine, the Deepsea Challenger, and to present some initial science findings from expedition samples and data. The dive touched the bottom of the Challenger Deep, a valley in the floor of the nearly 11-kilometer-deep Mariana Trench in the western Pacific Ocean. The vessel landed close to the same depth and at a location similar to where Don Walsh and Jacques Piccard descended in the Trieste bathyscaphe on 23 January 1960 at a then record-setting depth of 10,911 meters.

  9. Political conservatism, authoritarianism, and societal threat: voting for Republican representatives in U.S. Congressional elections from 1946 to 1992.

    PubMed

    McCann, Stewart J H

    2009-07-01

    The author found that the degree of national societal threat preceding congressional elections from 1946 to 1992 was positively associated with the mean state percentage of people voting for Republican representatives, supporting a conventional threat-authoritarianism hypothesis. However, threat was positively associated with the mean state percentage of people voting for Republican representatives in conservative states but not in liberal states, and the conventional threat-authoritarianism link was entirely driven by the relation in conservative states. The author classified states with a composite measure (alpha = .92) on the basis of state ideological identification, religious fundamentalism, composite policy liberalism, Republican Party elite ideology, and Democratic Party elite ideology. These results offer support to an interactive threat-authoritarianism hypothesis derived from the authoritarian dynamic theory of K. Stenner (2005), which postulates that only authoritarian persons are activated to manifest authoritarian behavior in times of normative threat. Also, the author discusses potential alternative explanations on the basis of system justification, need for closure, and terror-management theories. PMID:19606642

  10. Scientists must listen to be heard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefkoff, Jeff

    My experience as an AGU Congressional Fellow began in earnest when I was told “Legislation is a bit like sausage—Once you find out how it's really made, you feel completely different about it.” Being a vegetarian, I knew then that I was in for an interesting year.The sausage analogy was cited during a 2-week orientation to Capitol Hill that was planned by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). I was one of 25 AAAS Congressional Science Fellows, each sponsored by different scientific society. Though our backgrounds varied widely, two shared feelings quickly brought us together: an interest in the interface between science and policy and a desire to steer our career paths toward that interface.

  11. Science Anxiety and Science Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallow, Jeffrey V.; Greenburg, Sharon L.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses origins and nature of science anxiety and describes the Science Anxiety Clinic, outlining techniques used at the clinic. Techniques include science skills training and psychological interventions. Comments on the connection between science anxiety and cognitive processes in science learning. (Author/JN)

  12. Soapy Science. Teaching Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a science and math activity that involves bubbles, shapes, colors, and solid geometry. Students build geometric shapes with soda straws and submerge the shapes in soapy water, allowing them to review basic geometry concepts, test hypotheses, and learn about other concepts such as diffraction, interference colors, and evaporation. (TJQ)

  13. Communicating Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Nicholas

    2009-10-01

    Introduction: what this book is about and why you might want to read it; Prologue: three orphans share a common paternity: professional science communication, popular journalism, and literary fiction are not as separate as they seem; Part I. Professional Science Communication: 1. Spreading the word: the endless struggle to publish professional science; 2. Walk like an Egyptian: the alien feeling of professional science writing; 3. The future's bright? Professional science communication in the age of the internet; 4. Counting the horse's teeth: professional standards in science's barter economy; 5. Separating the wheat from the chaff: peer review on trial; Part II. Science for the Public: What Science Do People Need and How Might They Get It?: 6. The Public Understanding of Science (PUS) movement and its problems; 7. Public engagement with science and technology (PEST): fine principle, difficult practice; 8. Citizen scientists? Democratic input into science policy; 9. Teaching and learning science in schools: implications for popular science communication; Part III. Popular Science Communication: The Press and Broadcasting: 10. What every scientist should know about mass media; 11. What every scientist should know about journalists; 12. The influence of new media; 13. How the media represents science; 14. How should science journalists behave?; Part IV. The Origins of Science in Cultural Context: Five Historic Dramas: 15. A terrible storm in Wittenberg: natural knowledge through sorcery and evil; 16. A terrible storm in the Mediterranean: controlling nature with white magic and religion; 17. Thieving magpies: the subtle art of false projecting; 18. Foolish virtuosi: natural philosophy emerges as a distinct discipline but many cannot take it seriously; 19. Is scientific knowledge 'true' or should it just be 'truthfully' deployed?; Part V. Science in Literature: 20. Science and the Gothic: the three big nineteenth-century monster stories; 21. Science fiction: serious

  14. ``Political'' Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, Laura

    2013-03-01

    Politics and policy affect all of us, both as scientists and as citizens, and issues ranging from laboratory budgets to arms control treaties clearly require research problem-solving skills and technical expertise. There is a critical role for scientists in each aspect of the political system, and in fact, we as a society need more scientists to take part in politics. Furthermore, the research we pursue has important societal applications and is fascinating! We have a right and a responsibility to share our scientific knowledge not only with each other, but with the general public as well. So, why are we as a community of scientists reticent in the public arena, hesitant to enter politics, and even at times unsupportive of our peers who transition into governmental roles? In this time of fiscal constraint, when difficult research funding (and de-funding) choices are regularly being made, we as scientists must step up to the plate, reach across the aisle, and explain why what we do is fascinating, inspiring, and important, not just to us, but to society as a whole. A range of policy-relevant roles exists inside and outside the laboratory, such as Congressional Fellowships. Each year the Congressional Fellowships program brings together approximately thirty scientists at all stages of their careers to serve as scientific advisors in a variety of offices in the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives. Although the jump from lab to lobbying meetings can be frustrating, the transition can also be intriguing. Firsthand experience with the ``how'' and ``why'' (or lack thereof) of politics and policy is invaluable and provides a unique opportunity to expand and broaden one's background. The opportunity to work on Capitol Hill is unparalleled, particularly because our nation has a definite need for scientists with the inclination and interest to inform and develop policy. But, whatever role you decide to take, from contributing scientific news to local publications to

  15. Global Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Approaches taken by a school science department to implement a global science curriculum using a range of available resources are outlined. Problems with current curriculum approaches, alternatives to an ethnocentric curriculum, advantages of global science, and possible strategies for implementing a global science policy are discussed. (27…

  16. Food Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkman, Susan J.

    1996-01-01

    Presents food science experiments designed for high school science classes that aim at getting students excited about science and providing them with real-life applications. Enables students to see the application of chemistry, microbiology, engineering, and other basic and applied sciences to the production, processing, preservation, evaluation,…

  17. Science Sacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenberg, Kimberlee

    2012-01-01

    With the emphasis placed on standardized testing, science education has been squeezed out. As a physics teacher, the author knows the importance of building children's interest in science early in their school career and of providing practice in basic science skills and inquiry. In order to make more time for science at her sons' elementary…

  18. Science Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odell, Bill

    2005-01-01

    The spaces and structures used for undergraduate science often work against new teaching methods and fail to provide environments that attract the brightest students to science. The undergraduate science building often offers little to inspire the imaginations of young minds. The typical undergraduate science building also tends to work against…

  19. Fall Meeting abstract submission inspires science poetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-08-01

    When the 4 August deadline for submitting Fall Meeting abstracts passed, AGU had received more than 20,000 abstracts, a record-breaking number. The submission process had an unexpected by-product: It inspired some scientists to write haiku on Twitter. (Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry typically having three lines, the first with five syllables, the second with seven, and the third with five.) The following are examples of the haiku tweets, with the hashtag #AGU11AbstractHaiku. (For those who want to keep updated about the Fall Meeting on Twitter, the hashtag is #AGU11.) For more information about the meeting, including registration and housing, visit http://sites.agu.org/fallmeeting/.

  20. Biopolitical science.

    PubMed

    Arnhart, Larry

    2010-03-01

    This article develops a theoretical framework for biopolitical science as a science of political animals. This science moves through three levels of deep political history: the universal political history of the species, the cultural political history of the group, and the individual political history of animals in the group. To illustrate the particular application of biopolitical science, this essay shows how this science would help us to understand Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863. PMID:20812796

  1. Science Fiction and Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Terence

    2002-01-01

    Uses science fiction films such as "Jurassic Park" or "Anaconda" to teach science concepts while fostering student interest. Advocates science fiction as a teaching tool to improve learning and motivation. Describes how to use science fiction in the classroom with the sample activity Twister. (YDS)

  2. Beautiful Earth: Inspiring Native American students in Earth Science through Music, Art and Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casasanto, V.; Rock, J.; Hallowell, R.; Williams, K.; Angell, D.; Beautiful Earth

    2011-12-01

    Spaceship Earth Scientist (SES) Module, featuring an Earth Scientist expert discussing the science seen in the presentation. Hands-on activities such as sea ice melting simulations will be held with participants. Results from these first pilot education experiences will be presented at the 2011 AGU.

  3. Preparing Teachers to Teach Earth Science: Resources for Geoscience Faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. L.; Bezanson, C.; Moosavi, S. C.; Reynolds, D.; Manduca, C. A.

    2005-12-01

    Currently in the United States, there is a major push toward improving science education throughout all levels of education. While physics, biology, and chemistry are the three common sciences taught in high school, how, when and if Earth science is taught in our nation's schools varies greatly from region to region. Earth science topics are commonly incorporated into physics, chemistry, and biology classrooms and taught by teachers who may have never taken more than an introductory geoscience course. These teachers are often highly motivated to increase their understanding of the Earth sciences and need appropriate professional development opportunities in order to do so. In addition, many future elementary and middle school Earth science teachers take introductory geoscience courses in college. For these reasons, geoscience faculty play an active role in helping to educate future Earth science teachers. As part of the Digital Library for Earth System Education, the Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College has developed a "Preparing Teachers to Teach Earth Science" website (http://serc.carleton.edu/teacherprep/). At this site geoscience faculty can learn more about supporting Earth science teachers both during their pre-service training in college, and as their careers progress through professional development opportunities. The website contains background materials and information about the necessity for geoscience faculty to get involved in supporting Earth science teachers, as well as recent science education reform initiatives. In addition, the site contains examples of geoscience courses serving pre-service teachers and Earth science professional development programs throughout the country linked to descriptions of their design and implementation. The website content draws heavily on material presented at the 2003 AGU/NAGT workshop "Developing the Earth Science Teacher Workforce: The Role of Geoscience Departments and Introductory Courses

  4. High-Performance Computing: Industry Uses of Supercomputers and High-Speed Networks. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Information Management and Technology Div.

    This report was prepared in response to a request for information on supercomputers and high-speed networks from the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, and the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. The following information was requested: (1) examples of how various industries are using supercomputers to…

  5. National Earth Science Teachers Association Achievements in Earth Science Education Leadership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passow, M. J.; Johnson, R. M.; Pennington, P.; Herrold, A.; Holzer, M.; Ervin, T.; Hall, B.

    2008-12-01

    on AGU committees, especially CEHR and the AIP's outstanding children's book award committee. Many NESTA members are leaders in state science education and other organizations. In addition to describing our past successes, NESTA will also present results of a member-needs survey to identify the concerns of Earth Science educators from across the nation.

  6. Earth and Space Science PhDs: Class of 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesler, J.

    2001-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the American Geological Institute (AGI) have been collecting data on recent PhDs in the geosciences for 5 years (1996-2000). Over these years continual improvement has been recorded in the job market through indicators such as time to find employment and starting salaries. As these indicators continue to improve, so too does the perception of the job market in general. There are several characteristics that are unique to PhDs in the geosciences. Unlike physical science graduates, there is a significant number who have been working full-time at least one year prior to earning their PhD. Recent graduates employed prior to graduation are heavily concentrated in Solid Earth Geology (41%) followed by Atmospheric Sciences (19%) and Oceanography (12%). A second distinguishable feature of Earth & space science PhDs is their age. Each year there is a higher percentage of recent graduates over the age of 40: 16% in 1998, 20% in 1999, and 23% in 2000. In 2000, the average time between earning a B.S. and starting a graduate program was 4.6 years. Both 1999 and 2000 show a drop in the overall numbers of postdoctoral appointments. This suggests that greater than 50% of the recent graduates are finding full-time permanent employment. Of the geoscience subfields, oceanography has greatest number of people obtaining employment outside the field.

  7. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 29 science activities for secondary school science instruction. Topic areas include botany, genetics, biochemistry, anatomy, entomology, molecular structure, spreadsheets, chemistry, mechanics, astronomy, relativity, aeronautics, instrumentation, electrostatics, quantum mechanics, and laboratory interfacing. (CW)

  8. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 27 science activities for secondary school science instruction. Topic areas include microbiology, botany, biochemistry, genetics, safety, earthquakes, problem solving, electricity, heat, solutions, mechanics, quantum mechanics, flame tests, and molecular structure. (CW)

  9. Science Scope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Richard, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses an education project launched by the National Academy of Sciences and the Pentagon to turn laid-off aerospace engineers into science teachers at Los Angeles middle schools and high schools. (MKR)

  10. Science Sleuths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilly, Sherril L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a two-day forensic science course that is offered to eighth grade students enrolled in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Magnet Schools. Provides sample student activity sheets for the course. (Author/RT)

  11. Forensic Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Keith O.; Nigh, W. G.

    1973-01-01

    A course is described, which was given during an interim, with an enrollment of 41 students. The course involved an in-depth study of forensic science, involving students with the methodology of science. (DF)

  12. Dramatic Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Debbie; Precious, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The setting: the science classroom. The characters: you and your students. The scene: Your students acting out scientific discoveries, modeling a frog's life cycle, mimicking the transition from liquid to solid. This is "dramatic science", a teaching approach that uses acting techniques to explore and develop young children's ideas about science.…

  13. Sublime Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girod, Mark

    2007-01-01

    One of the shortcomings in most efforts to integrate art and science is that many people have a shallow understanding of art, which inevitably leads to shallow connections between art and science. Coloring drawings of planets, building sculptures of volcanoes, and decorating scientific diagrams are fine activities, but they do not link science and…

  14. Science First.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strycker, Jan Adkins

    1995-01-01

    Describes a teacher's efforts to put science first in the classroom. Discusses changing the place of science on the schedule and presents an activity to engage student interest. Concludes that a difference in teacher attitude towards science motivates students to learn. (NB)

  15. Safer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This column provides best safety practices for the science classroom and laboratory. In this month's issue, pregnancy policy in the laboratory is discussed. One can't ignore the fact that student and faculty pregnancies--and the resulting potential hazards in the science laboratory--exist at the high school level. Science teachers need to be…

  16. Science Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan W.; Biehle, James T.; Motz, LaMoine L.; West, Sandra S.

    2009-01-01

    The National Research Council's "National Science Education Standards" call for science education to be "developmentally appropriate, interesting, and relevant to students' lives, emphasize student understanding through inquiry, and be connected with other school subjects." This description captures the three major trends in science education…

  17. Congressional Methodology: How It Affects Federal Student Financial Aid Eligibility. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Postsecondary Education of the Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives. 100th Congress, Second Session. Hearing held in Teaneck, New Jersey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    A transcript is provided of the subcommittee hearing on the effect of Congressional Methodology (the system established to determine eligibility for federal student aid) on federal student financial aid eligibility. The statements of the following persons are provided: Francine Andrea, New Jersey Association of Student Financial Aid…

  18. Congressional Oversight Hearing on Local Gang Diversion Programs. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Human Resources of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, 103rd Congress, First Session (El Monte, California).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This congressional hearing report highlights some of the steps people are taking to divert and prevent youth from becoming involved in gang activities. Testimony and prepared statements include those from Joseph Gonzales, Field Organizer of the Youth Volunteer Corps from Kansas City; Kathy Masera, President of the California Job Journal; Ron…

  19. Child Care: Current System Could Undermine Goals of Welfare Reform. United States General Accounting Office Testimony before the Subcommittee on Human Resources, Committee on Education and Labor, and Congressional Caucus for Women's Issues. House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Jane L.

    This statement by the associate director of Income Security Issues of the Department of Health, Education and Human Services Division addresses the Congressional welfare reform goal of self-sufficiency for welfare mothers through employment. It analyzes the problems of the current welfare subsidy system by examining the effect of child care…

  20. How to interact with Congress about Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbach, Raymond

    The role of Congress is critical to the succes of the scientific enterprise, both in terms of authorization and appropriation. As a consequence, it is very important to make the case for science directly with Congress. Every scientist has a representative in the House of Representatives in whose district he/she lives, and in the Senate. Constituents are especially welcomed in their offices. A personal visit is the most effective means for transmitting the importance of science in general, and physics in particular. The AAAS website lists the ``Top Ten Rules for Working With Congress.'' They are: (1) Know your goal; (2) Understand how Congress works; (3) Conduct detailed background research; (4) Determine the timing of your course of action; (5) Be clear and succinct; (6) Understand Congressional staff and their influence; (7) Provide concrete suggestions; (8) Present support of science as a means to meet national and local goals, not as an entitlement; (9)Be willing to say ``I don't know'' and (10) Follow up appropriately. Each of these will be described in more detail during the presentation. The March Meeting is an example of a particularly important time period for meeting with representatives (Rule #4). The President's Budget Request has been submitted to Congress, and the individual appropriation subcommittees are in the process of developing their respective ``mark ups.'' Appointments with members or their staff is now timely, and urgent. Authorization bills are also in play, and can have significant impact on the scientific community. Paying attention to their development in key committees (e.g. the Science, Space, and Technology Committee of the House of Representatives), and providing appropriate and timely input, is the responsibility of every scientist.

  1. Climate Communication from a Science Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Today, the world faces crucial choices in deciding what to do about climate change. Wise policy can be usefully informed by sound science. Scientists who are both climate experts and skilled communicators can provide valuable input into this policy process. They can help the public, media and policymakers learn what science has discovered about climate change. Scientists as a group are widely admired throughout the world. They can often use their prestige as well as their technical knowledge to advantage in publicizing and illuminating the findings of climate science. However, most scientists are unaware of the main obstacles to effective communication, such as the distrust that arises when the scientist and the audience do not have a shared worldview and shared cultural values. Many climate scientists also fail to realize that the jargon they use in their work is a significant barrier to communication, and that their messages requires skilled translation into the everyday language that people understand. Scientists need to recognize that lecturing is almost always poor communication. Speaking in a television interview or a Congressional hearing is completely unlike teaching a class of graduate students. The people whom one is trying to reach are rarely hungry for pure scientific information. Instead, they want to know how climate change will affect them and what can be done about it. Communicating climate science resembles skiing or speaking a foreign language: it is a skill that can be learned, but beginners are well advised to take lessons from expert instructors. Becoming adept at climate communication requires study and practice. Effective professional training in climate communication is available for those scientists who have the time and the willingness to improve as communicators.

  2. Congressional Pay Cut Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Giffords, Gabrielle [D-AZ-8

    2011-01-06

    02/08/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Federal Workforce, U.S. Postal Service, and Labor Policy . (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Congressional Accountability Pay Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Forbes, J. Randy [R-VA-4

    2011-10-06

    11/02/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Federal Workforce, U.S. Postal Service, and Labor Policy . (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Experiences in the New York Academy of Sciences STEM Mentoring Program (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomposi, C.; Thompson, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    In the Fall of 2010, The New York Academy of Sciences (NYAS) established an after school STEM Mentoring Program. The program recruits both current graduate students and postdocs to teach an after school curriculum to 4th-8th graders in any of the following areas: genetics, human body systems, space science, earth science, robotics, or math. Since its inception, the program has grown and now has branches in New York City, Newark (NJ), and other locations. My talk will focus on my experiences within the NYAS STEM Mentoring program during both the Fall of 2012 and the Fall of 2013 (expected teaching fellow). As a teaching fellow, I not only developed a unique curriculum in Earth Science Education, along with my teaching partner, but also delivered the lectures and executed various laboratory exercises to maintain a hands-on learning environment for the students. I will discuss the development of a coherent earth science curriculum, focused around the theme of ';Natural Disasters' and culminating in our semester-end project in which the students completed an AGU-style presentation for community members. I plan to describe how the students' perception of earth science changed from the program's beginning to its end 10 weeks later. Best practices of the inquiry-based, student-centered curriculum will be discussed, with the hope that they can be applied across similar educational and outreach opportunities.

  5. Science Squared: Teaching Science Visually.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paradis, Olga; Savage, Karen; Judice, Michelle

    This paper describes a collection of novel ideas for bulletin board displays that would be useful in supplementing science classroom instruction. Information on women and minorities in science; science concepts in everyday activities such as nutrition, baseball, and ice cream-making; and various holidays and celebratory events is included. Each…

  6. Science Teaching in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Brendan E.; Dopico, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Reading the interesting article "Discerning selective traditions in science education" by Per Sund, which is published in this issue of "CSSE," allows us to open the discussion on procedures for teaching science today. Clearly there is overlap between the teaching of science and other areas of knowledge. However, we must…

  7. What's a Nice Hummingbird Like You Doing at an AGU Meeting Like This? (or, Operation RubyThroat Meets The GLOBE Program)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, B.

    2003-12-01

    "Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" is an international cross-disciplinary initiative that uses Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris) as a hook to excite K-12 students (and adults) about science learning. In 2002, Operation RubyThroat affiliated with The GLOBE Program as the first GLOBE protocol that involves animal behavior. Through Operation RubyThroat, students make observations about hummingbird phenology, behavior, and ecology and correlate their data against traditional GLOBE observations of atmosphere, climate, land cover, soils, hydrology, and phenology. Although Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (RTHUs) breed throughout the eastern half of the United States and southern Canada and may be the most common and most widely distributed of all 338 hummingbird species, little is known about how abiotic environmental factors affect their migration, nesting activities, and everyday behavior. Operation RubyThroat participants in the U.S. and Canada log early arrival dates of RTHUs during spring migration, note their presence throughout the breeding season, and report the last date RTHUs are seen in autumn. Conversely, participants in Mexico and all seven Central American countries (the region in which RTHUs spend their non-breeding months) watch for early arrivals in fall and late departures in spring. Participants also attempt to estimate numbers of RTHUs in local populations by counting the number of visits hummingbirds make to feeders and/or flowers in a 45-minute time block. Optional activities include observations of RTHU nesting behaviors and determining RTHU preferences for various species of native and exotic nectar sources. Participating schools are encouraged to establish Schoolyard Hummingbird Habitats in which to make their observations, but data may be collected in backyards or at local parks, nature centers, botanical gardens, and other sites where RTHUs occur. Adults not affiliated with K-12 schools are invited to become certified in

  8. Role of Public Outreach in the University Science Mission: Publishing K-12 Curriculum, Organizing Tours, and Other Methods of Engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Much attention has been devoted in recent years to the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education in K-12 curriculum for developing a capable workforce. Equally important is the role of the voting public in understanding STEM-related issues that impact public policy debates such as the potential impacts of climate change, hydraulic fracturing in oil and gas exploration, mining impacts on water quality, and science funding. Since voted officials have a major impact on the future of these policies, it is imperative that the general public have an understanding of the basic science behind these issues. By engaging with the public in a more fundamental way, university students can play an important role in educating the public while at the same time enhancing their communication skills and gaining valuable teaching experience. I will talk about my own experiences in (1) evaluating and publishing water chemistry and hazardous waste cleanup curriculum on the K-12 engineering platform TeachEngineering.org, (2) organizing public tours of water and energy sites (e.g., abandoned mine sites, coal power plants, wastewater treatment plants, hazardous waste treatment facilities), and (3) other outreach and communication activities including public education of environmental issues through consultations with customers of a landscaping/lawn mowing company. The main focus of this presentation will be the role that graduate students can play in engaging and educating their local community and lessons learned from community projects (Dittrich, 2014; 2012; 2011). References: Dittrich, T.M. 2014. Adventures in STEM: Lessons in water chemistry from elementary school to graduate school. Abstract ED13E-07 presented at 2014 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 15-19 Dec. Dittrich, T.M. 2012. Collaboration between environmental water chemistry students and hazardous waste treatment specialists on the University of Colorado-Boulder campus. Abstract ED53C

  9. Picturing the Earth: Geoscience in Public Art Abstract for AGU 2013: Geoscience through the Lens of Art. Author: Stacy Levy, Sere Ltd., Spring Mills, PA (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, S.

    2013-12-01

    wetland habitats, tides, prevailing winds, rain and microorganisms, and water pollution. In examining each project I will detail the essential collaborations with scientists and engineers that brought the projects to fruition. I will discuss how the cross-discipline approach of scientists, engineers and designers made effective and artful solutions to site issues, and created visually stimulating and educational places. I will also look at the role of truth and metaphor in art and compare how accuracy and data collection have differing thresholds in art and in science.

  10. Handman and Senson Receive 2003 Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism-Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Bob; Handman, Jim; Senson, Pat

    2004-03-01

    Patric Senson and James Handman received the Sullivan Award at AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 10 December 2003, in San Francisco, California. The award honors ``a single article or radio/television report that makes geophysical material accessible and interesting to the general public.'' ``Jim Handman is one of the best kept secrets at CBC Radio. For more than 20 years he has been a bastion of integrity and an endless source of wit and has consistently produced award-winning programs in radio news and current affairs. ``Jim is currently the senior producer of Quirks & Quarks, our national science radio program, now in its 27th season, but this role is only one of many over the course of his extensive broadcasting career.

  11. Mitchell Receives 2013 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Jonathan L.

    2014-07-01

    I am honored to receive this award in memory of Ron Greeley. Although I did not have the opportunity to know him, I had the pleasure of getting to know his wife, Cynthia, at a luncheon prior to the special awards session at the AGU Fall Meeting. Cynthia is an intelligent and elegant southern woman with a confident gaze. She spoke fondly of Ron and of her sincere respect for his work ethic and dedication to planetary science. What most impressed me, though, was the respect Ron showed to her and the kids by always "giving them the evenings"; no matter how busy things got, Ron always kept his evenings open for Cynthia. This clearly meant the world to her. As a family man, I can only hope that my wife and kids will speak so kindly of me many years from now. I would like to dedicate this award to them in gratitude for their seemingly unconditional love and support.

  12. Deconstructing science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonas, Peter Pericles

    2012-12-01

    In this paper I expand on the premises of Jesse Bazzul's thesis in his paper, Neoliberal ideology, global capitalism, and science education: engaging the question of subjectivity, exploring the implications of the ideologies within the culturally emerging logic of science exposes the incommensurability of intents and purposes in its methods and epistemology. I argue that science needs to acknowledge the subjectivity at its core to make space for non-absolute agents and new fields of study.

  13. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Contains 31 activities and experiments from the biological and physical sciences. Addresses such areas as reproduction, biotechnology, ecology, proteins, nitrates, aerosols, metal crystallinity, circuit boards, and photoswitching. (ML)

  14. Defining Canadian Perspectives on Climate Change Science and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, C.; Byrne, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the overwhelming scientific evidence of potentially disastrous change in global climate, little is being accomplished in climate mitigation or adaptation in Canada. The energy sector in Canada is still primarily oil and gas, with huge tax breaks to the industry in spite of well known harmful regional and global impacts of fossil fuel pollution. One of the largest concerns for the climate science community is the variable and often complacent attitude many Canadians share on the issue of climate change. The objective herein is twofold: (1) a survey tool will be used to assess the views and opinions of Canadians on climate change science and solutions; (2) develop better communication methods for industry, government and NGOs to share the science and solutions with the public. The study results will inform the Canadian public, policy makers and industry of practical, effective changes needed to address climate change challenges. A survey of Canadians' perspectives is an important step in policy changing research. The climate research and application community must know the most effective ways to communicate the science and solutions with a public that is often resistant to change. The AGU presentation will feature the results of the survey, while continued work into 2015 will be towards advancing communication. This study is both timely and crucial for science communicators in understanding how Canadians view climate change, considering, for example, devastatingly extreme weather being experienced of late and its effect on the economy. The results will assist in recognizing how to encourage Canadians to work towards a more sustainable and resilient energy sector in Canada and abroad.

  15. Frontiers in Ecosystem Science: Energizing the Research Agenda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weathers, K. C.; Groffman, P. M.; VanDolah, E.

    2014-12-01

    Ecosystem science has a long history as a core component of the discipline of Ecology, and although topics of research have fluctuated over the years, it retains a clear identity and continues to be a vital field. As science is becoming more interdisciplinary, particularly the science of global environmental change, ecosystem scientists are addressing new and important questions at the interface of multiple disciplines. Over the last two years, we organized a series of workshops and discussion groups at multiple scientific-society meetings, including AGU to identify frontiers in ecosystem research. The workshops featured short "soapbox" presentations where speakers highlighted key questions in ecosystem science. The presentations were recorded (video and audio) and subjected to qualitative text analysis for identification of frontier themes, attendees completed surveys, and a dozen additional "key informants" were interviewed about their views about frontiers of the discipline. Our effort produced 253 survey participants; the two largest groups of participants were full professors (24%) and graduate students (24%); no other specific group was > 10%. Formal text analysis of the soapbox presentations produced three major themes; "frontiers," "capacity building," and "barriers to implementation" with four or five sub-themes within each major theme. Key "frontiers" included; 1) better understanding of the drivers of ecosystem change, 2) better understanding of ecosystem process and function, 3) human dimensions of ecosystem science, and 4) problem-solving/applied research. Under "capacity building," key topics included: holistic approaches, cross-disciplinary collaboration, public support for research, data, training, and technology investment. Under "barriers" key topics included: limitations in theoretical thinking, insufficient funding/support, fragmentation across discipline, data access and data synthesis. In-depth interviews with 13 experts validated findings

  16. Well-being and excellence in the Earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Charles L.

    In the symposium on Earth Sciences and Society at the Spring AGU Meeting May 29-June 1, Baltimore, Md.), I was assigned to speak on the maintenance of excellence and national well-being in the Earth sciences. I developed serious writer's block every time I approached the topic until I remembered a paragraph at the beginning of Doug Adams' great text, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe [Adams, 1982]. It tells how [A race of highly intelligent pan-dimensional beings once built themselves a gigantic supercomputer called Deep Thought to calculate once and for all the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, Universe and Everything. For seven and a half million years, Deep Thought computed and calculated, and in the end announced that the answer was in fact Forty-two—and so another, even bigger, computer had to be built to find out what the actual question was. And this computer, which was called the Earth, was so large that it was frequently mistaken for a planet-especially by the strange apelike beings who roamed its surface, totally unaware that they were simply part of a gigantic computer program. And this is very odd, because without that fairly simple and obvious piece of knowledge, nothing that ever happened on the Earth could possibly make the slightest bit of sense.

  17. A network of weather camps to engage students in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Vernon R.; Mogil, H. Michael; Yu, Tsann-Wang

    2012-04-01

    Of the total U.S. population, 12.8% are African Americans, 16.3% are Hispanic Americans, and 1.1% are Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, and Alaska Natives based on the 2010 census. Although they form about 6%, 4.5%, and 3.2%, respectively, of the total student population entering Title IV colleges and universities each year, recent statistics on underrepresented minority (URM) students show that African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans earn only 2.1%, 3.3%, and 0.6%, respectively, of the Ph.D. degrees awarded annually in the physical sciences [National Academies Press, 2010]. A report issued by AGU and the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) reported that ethnic minorities earned fewer than 4% of the Ph.D.s in geosciences over the prior 5 years [AGI, 2009]. The report also stated that in the past 31 years combined (1973-2003) only 313 Hispanic Americans, 135 African Americans, and 49 Native Americans earned Ph.D.s in any of the geoscience fields, including Earth, atmospheric, and oceanic sciences.

  18. Science Fairs for Science Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Science literacy is imperative for well informed civic and personal decision making, yet only a quarter of American adults are proficient enough in science to understand science stories reported in the popular press. Hands-on research increases confidence in and understanding of science. When guiding students in designing and conducting science fair projects, mentors can foster science literacy by helping students focus on three goals: (1) articulating hypotheses or questions, (2) designing feasible projects, and (3) learning to make and interpret graphs. These objectives introduce students to the methodological nature of scientific research and give them the tools to interpret scientific facts and data in order to make informed decisions for themselves and society.

  19. Downscaling Climate Science to the Classroom: Diverse Opportunities for Teaching Climate Science in Diverse Ways to Diverse Undergraduate Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. M.; Gill, T. E.; Quesada, D.; Hedquist, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    Climate literacy and climate education are important topics in current socio-political debate. Despite numerous scientific findings supporting global climate changes and accelerated greenhouse warming, there is a social inertia resisting and slowing the rate at which many of our students understand and absorb these facts. A variety of reasons, including: socio-economic interests, political and ideological biases, misinformation from mass media, inappropriate preparation of science teachers, and lack of numancy have created serious challenges for public awareness of such an important issue. Different agencies and organizations (NASA, NOAA, EPA, AGU, APS, AMS and others) have created training programs for educators, not involved directly in climatology research, in order to learn climate science in a consistent way and then communicate it to the public and students. Different approaches on how to deliver such information to undergraduate students in diverse environments is discussed based on the author's experiences working in different minority-serving institutions across the nation and who have attended AMS Weather and Climate Studies training workshops, MSI-REACH, and the School of Ice. Different parameters are included in the analysis: demographics of students, size of the institutions, geographical locations, target audience, programs students are enrolled in, conceptual units covered, and availability of climate-related courses in the curricula. Additionally, the feasibility of incorporating a laboratory and quantitative analysis is analyzed. As a result of these comparisons it seems that downscaling of climate education experiences do not always work as expected in every institution regardless of the student body demographics. Different geographical areas, student body characteristics and type of institution determine the approach to be adopted as well as the feasibility to introduce different components for weather and climate studies. Some ideas are shared

  20. The science in social science

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, H. Russell

    2012-01-01

    A recent poll showed that most people think of science as technology and engineering—life-saving drugs, computers, space exploration, and so on. This was, in fact, the promise of the founders of modern science in the 17th century. It is less commonly understood that social and behavioral sciences have also produced technologies and engineering that dominate our everyday lives. These include polling, marketing, management, insurance, and public health programs. PMID:23213222

  1. The sciences of science communication

    PubMed Central

    Fischhoff, Baruch

    2013-01-01

    The May 2012 Sackler Colloquium on “The Science of Science Communication” brought together scientists with research to communicate and scientists whose research could facilitate that communication. The latter include decision scientists who can identify the scientific results that an audience needs to know, from among all of the scientific results that it would be nice to know; behavioral scientists who can design ways to convey those results and then evaluate the success of those attempts; and social scientists who can create the channels needed for trustworthy communications. This overview offers an introduction to these communication sciences and their roles in science-based communication programs. PMID:23942125

  2. Integrated Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainey, Larry; Miller, Roxanne Greitz

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Integrated Science program that integrates biology, earth/space science, chemistry, and physics over a three-year, spiraling sequence arranged around broad themes such as cycles, changes, patterns, and waves. Includes weekly telecasts via public television and satellite, teacher manuals, student handbooks, e-mail connections, staff…

  3. Why Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primary Science Review, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article presents people from many walks of life, including some well-known names, who share their views about science. Adam Hart-Davis, who studied chemistry at university and is now an author, photographer, historian and broadcaster, explains why science cannot start too soon. Lis Nairn, Manager, Stratigraphy, with Fugro Robertson Ltd (Oil…

  4. Shrinking Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goates, Wayne

    2002-01-01

    Describes an activity based on shrinkable thermoplastics in which students explore the percentage of shrinkage of a plastic ruler when it is heated. Includes science content knowledge behind the shrink, national science education standards related to this activity, and a complete guide. (KHR)

  5. Personalizing Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielowich, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Science teachers are aware of many social issues that intersect with science. These socio-scientific issues (SSIs) are "open-ended problems without clear-cut solutions [that] can be informed by scientific principles, theories, and data, but…cannot be fully determined by [them]" (Sadler 2011, p. 4). This article describes the SSI lessons…

  6. "Children's Science"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Ian

    2007-01-01

    The revamped New Zealand curriculum emphasises "scientific literacy for all students" and provides teachers with an opportunity to promote science as an integral element of the primary school curriculum. Exploring and explaining the natural world in primary science can provide authentic contexts for the development of knowledge, skills, and…

  7. Learning Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapointe, Archie E.; And Others

    This publication reports the results of the second International Assessment of Educational Progress for science. Twenty countries assessed the mathematics and science achievement of 13-year-old students and 14 countries assessed 9-year-old students in these same subjects. In some cases, participants assessed virtually all age-eligible children in…

  8. Talking Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shwartz, Yael; Weizman, Ayelet; Fortus, David; Sutherland, LeeAnn; Merrit, Joi; Krajcik, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Science is a social process--one that involves particular ways of talking, reasoning, observing, analyzing, and writing, which often have meaning only when shared within the scientific community. Discussions are one of the best ways to help students learn to "talk science" and construct understanding in a social context. Since inquiry is an…

  9. Soundsational Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, Sarah J.; Scott, Catherine Marie; Hall, Debra T.

    2012-01-01

    The science of sound helps students learn that sound is energy traveling in waves as vibrations transfer the energy through various media: solids, liquids, and gases. In addition to learning about the physical science of sound, students can learn about the sounds of different animal species: how sounds contribute to animals' survival, and how…

  10. Deconstructing Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trifonas, Peter Pericles

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I expand on the premises of Jesse Bazzul's thesis in his paper, "Neoliberal ideology, global capitalism, and science education: engaging the question of subjectivity," exploring the implications of the ideologies within the culturally emerging logic of science exposes the incommensurability of intents and purposes in its methods and…

  11. Legendary Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, William A.; Joe, Jimson

    1998-01-01

    Spiders and insects are studied in both Navajo Studies and science classes at a middle school in New Mexico. In Navajo Studies, students learn the names of ground-dwelling insects and the connection between those names and traditional Navajo stories. In science class, students study arthropods to illustrate taxonomy of life, trophic and biological…

  12. Life sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Day, L.

    1991-04-01

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs. (MHB)

  13. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, A. J. S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents 31 science activities for use with high school or college science classes. Topics included are: chromatography, ecology, invertebrates, enzymes, genetics, botany, creep, crystals, diffusion, computer interfaces, acid rain, teaching techniques, chemical reactions, waves, electric fields, rainbows, electricity, magnetic fields, and a Pitot…

  14. H.R. 1085: A Bill to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act to provide congressional authorization for State and local flow control authority over solid waste, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session, February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The report H.R. 1085 is a bill to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act to provide congressional authorization for State and local flow control authority over solid waste. The proposed legislative text is provided.

  15. Science teaching in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Brendan E.; Dopico, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Reading the interesting article Discerning selective traditions in science education by Per Sund, which is published in this issue of CSSE, allows us to open the discussion on procedures for teaching science today. Clearly there is overlap between the teaching of science and other areas of knowledge. However, we must constantly develop new methods to teach and differentiate between science education and teaching science in response to the changing needs of our students, and we must analyze what role teachers and teacher educators play in both. We must continually examine the methods and concepts involved in developing pedagogical content knowledge in science teachers. Otherwise, the possibility that these routines, based on subjective traditions, prevent emerging processes of educational innovation. Modern science is an enormous field of knowledge in its own right, which is made more expansive when examined within the context of its place in society. We propose the need to design educative interactions around situations that involve science and society. Science education must provide students with all four dimensions of the cognitive process: factual knowledge, conceptual knowledge, procedural knowledge, and metacognitive knowledge. We can observe in classrooms at all levels of education that students understand the concepts better when they have the opportunity to apply the scientific knowledge in a personally relevant way. When students find value in practical exercises and they are provided opportunities to reinterpret their experiences, greater learning gains are achieved. In this sense, a key aspect of educational innovation is the change in teaching methodology. We need new tools to respond to new problems. A shift in teacher education is needed to realize the rewards of situating science questions in a societal context and opening classroom doors to active methodologies in science education to promote meaningful learning through meaningful teaching.

  16. Science teaching in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Brendan E.; Dopico, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    Reading the interesting article Discerning selective traditions in science education by Per Sund , which is published in this issue of CSSE, allows us to open the discussion on procedures for teaching science today. Clearly there is overlap between the teaching of science and other areas of knowledge. However, we must constantly develop new methods to teach and differentiate between science education and teaching science in response to the changing needs of our students, and we must analyze what role teachers and teacher educators play in both. We must continually examine the methods and concepts involved in developing pedagogical content knowledge in science teachers. Otherwise, the possibility that these routines, based on subjective traditions, prevent emerging processes of educational innovation. Modern science is an enormous field of knowledge in its own right, which is made more expansive when examined within the context of its place in society. We propose the need to design educative interactions around situations that involve science and society. Science education must provide students with all four dimensions of the cognitive process: factual knowledge, conceptual knowledge, procedural knowledge, and metacognitive knowledge. We can observe in classrooms at all levels of education that students understand the concepts better when they have the opportunity to apply the scientific knowledge in a personally relevant way. When students find value in practical exercises and they are provided opportunities to reinterpret their experiences, greater learning gains are achieved. In this sense, a key aspect of educational innovation is the change in teaching methodology. We need new tools to respond to new problems. A shift in teacher education is needed to realize the rewards of situating science questions in a societal context and opening classroom doors to active methodologies in science education to promote meaningful learning through meaningful teaching.

  17. ESF EUROCORES Programmes In Geosciences And Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, I. G.

    2007-12-01

    through these distinctive research initiatives, to build on the national research efforts and contribute to the capacity building, in relation with typically about 15-20 post-doc positions and/or PhD studentships supported nationally within each Programme. Typical networking activities are topical workshops, open sessions in a larger conference, Programme conference, (summer / winter) schools, exchange visits across projects or programmes. Overall, EUROCORES Programmes are supported by more than 60 national agencies from 30 countries and by the European Science Foundation (ESF) with support by the European Commission, DG Research (Sixth Framework Programme, contract ERAS-CT-2003-980409). In the framework of AGU, a series of present EUROCORES Programmes in the field of Geosciences and Environmental Sciences are presented (e.g., EuroDIVERSITY, EuroDEEP, EUROMARGINS, EuroCLIMATE, and EuroMinScI).

  18. Science Indicators and Science Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Harvey

    1982-01-01

    Discusses science/society interface and difficulties involved in developing realistic science indicators. Topics include: intrinsic vs. extrinsic indicators; four problems society faces as a result of technological activities (toxic chemicals, radioactive wastes, auto safety, cancer); research and development (R&D) priorities; international…

  19. Science packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    Primary science teachers in Scotland have a new updating method at their disposal with the launch of a package of CDi (Compact Discs Interactive) materials developed by the BBC and the Scottish Office. These were a response to the claim that many primary teachers felt they had been inadequately trained in science and lacked the confidence to teach it properly. Consequently they felt the need for more in-service training to equip them with the personal understanding required. The pack contains five disks and a printed user's guide divided up as follows: disk 1 Investigations; disk 2 Developing understanding; disks 3,4,5 Primary Science staff development videos. It was produced by the Scottish Interactive Technology Centre (Moray House Institute) and is available from BBC Education at £149.99 including VAT. Free Internet distribution of science education materials has also begun as part of the Global Schoolhouse (GSH) scheme. The US National Science Teachers' Association (NSTA) and Microsoft Corporation are making available field-tested comprehensive curriculum material including 'Micro-units' on more than 80 topics in biology, chemistry, earth and space science and physics. The latter are the work of the Scope, Sequence and Coordination of High School Science project, which can be found at http://www.gsh.org/NSTA_SSandC/. More information on NSTA can be obtained from its Web site at http://www.nsta.org.

  20. Revolutionary Science

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT On rare occasions in the history of science, remarkable discoveries transform human society and forever alter mankind’s view of the world. Examples of such discoveries include the heliocentric theory, Newtonian physics, the germ theory of disease, quantum theory, plate tectonics and the discovery that DNA carries genetic information. The science philosopher Thomas Kuhn famously described science as long periods of normality punctuated by times of crisis, when anomalous observations culminate in revolutionary changes that replace one paradigm with another. This essay examines several transformative discoveries in the light of Kuhn’s formulation. We find that each scientific revolution is unique, with disparate origins that may include puzzle solving, serendipity, inspiration, or a convergence of disparate observations. The causes of revolutionary science are varied and lack an obvious common structure. Moreover, it can be difficult to draw a clear distinction between so-called normal and revolutionary science. Revolutionary discoveries often emerge from basic science and are critically dependent on nonrevolutionary research. Revolutionary discoveries may be conceptual or technological in nature, lead to the creation of new fields, and have a lasting impact on many fields in addition to the field from which they emerge. In contrast to political revolutions, scientific revolutions do not necessarily require the destruction of the previous order. For humanity to continue to benefit from revolutionary discoveries, a broad palette of scientific inquiry with a particular emphasis on basic science should be supported. PMID:26933052