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Sample records for agua blanca fault

  1. New geologic slip rates for the Agua Blanca Fault, northern Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, P. O.; Behr, W. M.; Fletcher, J. M.; Hinojosa-Corona, A.; Rockwell, T. K.

    2015-12-01

    Within the southern San Andreas transform plate boundary system, relatively little is known regarding active faulting in northern Baja California, Mexico, or offshore along the Inner Continental Borderland. The inner offshore system appears to be fed from the south by the Agua Blanca Fault (ABF), which strikes northwest across the Peninsular Ranges of northern Baja California. Therefore, the geologic slip rate for the ABF also provides a minimum slip rate estimate for the offshore system, which is connected to the north to faults in the Los Angeles region. Previous studies along the ABF determined slip rates of ~4-6 mm/yr (~10% of relative plate motion). However, these rates relied on imprecise age estimates and offset geomorphic features of a type that require these rates to be interpreted as minima, allowing for the possibility that the slip rate for the ABF may be greater. Although seismically quiescent, the surface trace of the ABF clearly reflects Holocene activity, and given its connectivity with the offshore fault system, more quantitative slip rates for the ABF are needed to better understand earthquake hazard for both US and Mexican coastal populations. Using newly acquired airborne LiDAR, we have mapped primary and secondary fault strands along the segmented western 70 km of the ABF. Minimal development has left the geomorphic record of surface slip remarkably well preserved, and we have identified abundant evidence meter to km scale right-lateral displacement, including new Late Quaternary slip rate sites. We verified potential reconstructions at each site during summer 2015 fieldwork, and selected an initial group of three high potential slip rate sites for detailed mapping and geochronologic analyses. Offset landforms, including fluvial terrace risers, alluvial fans, and incised channel fill deposits, record displacements of ~5-80 m, and based on minimal soil development, none appear older than early Holocene. To quantitatively constrain landform ages

  2. Testing Pixel Translation Digital Elevation Models to Reconstruct Slip Histories: An Example from the Agua Blanca Fault, Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J.; Wetmore, P. H.; Malservisi, R.; Ferwerda, B. P.; Teran, O.

    2012-12-01

    We use recently collected slip vector and total offset data from the Agua Blanca fault (ABF) to constrain a pixel translation digital elevation model (DEM) to reconstruct the slip history of this fault. This model was constructed using a Perl script that reads a DEM file (Easting, Northing, Elevation) and a configuration file with coordinates that define the boundary of each fault segment. A pixel translation vector is defined as a magnitude of lateral offset in an azimuthal direction. The program translates pixels north of the fault and prints their pre-faulting position to a new DEM file that can be gridded and displayed. This analysis, where multiple DEMs are created with different translation vectors, allows us to identify areas of transtension or transpression while seeing the topographic expression in these areas. The benefit of this technique, in contrast to a simple block model, is that the DEM gives us a valuable graphic which can be used to pose new research questions. We have found that many topographic features correlate across the fault, i.e. valleys and ridges, which likely have implications for the age of the ABF, long term landscape evolution rates, and potentially provide conformation for total slip assessments The ABF of northern Baja California, Mexico is an active, dextral strike slip fault that transfers Pacific-North American plate boundary strain out of the Gulf of California and around the "Big Bend" of the San Andreas Fault. Total displacement on the ABF in the central and eastern parts of the fault is 10 +/- 2 km based on offset Early-Cretaceous features such as terrane boundaries and intrusive bodies (plutons and dike swarms). Where the fault bifurcates to the west, the northern strand (northern Agua Blanca fault or NABF) is constrained to 7 +/- 1 km. We have not yet identified piercing points on the southern strand, the Santo Tomas fault (STF), but displacement is inferred to be ~4 km assuming that the sum of slip on the NABF and STF is

  3. Constraining Basin Geometry and Fault Kinematics on the Santo Tomas Segment of the Agua Blanca Fault Through a Combined Geophysical and Structural Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, A.; Wetmore, P.; Fletcher, J.; Connor, C. B.; Callihan, S.; Beeson, J.; Wilson, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Santo Tomas basin, located in northern Baja California, formed at a right step in the dextral Agua Blanca fault (ABF). The ABF extends for more than 120km east from Punta Banda, with an east-west strike, and represents the southernmost fault in the San Andreas system of faulting. The basin is located roughly 40km south of Ensenada where the Agua Blanca fault intersects the Maximos fault. A detailed geophysical analysis defines the basin geometry, and helps to constrain the distribution and offset of mapped and concealed faults. Geophysical and structural data sets are combined to constrain the kinematic evolution of the Santo Tomas basin, including determining the relative amount of dip-slip and strike-slip motion on basin-bounding faults. Gravity data was collected over seven transects across and along the axis of the basin at 500 meter intervals, with 200 meter intervals at locations of known or inferred faults. Magnetic data were taken over the same lines, and are used in conjunction with gravity data to constrain the locations, geometries and displacements of intrabasinal faults. The combined gravity and magnetic data are modeled using Geosoft Oasis montaj software to create 2 3/4D models along profiles across the study area. Modeling of the geophysical data combined with structural mapping indicates that the Santo Tomas basin is bound by two major strike-slip faults, the ABF on the northeastern side and the Maximos fault on south, Based on offset markers, most of the strike-slip motion appears to be concentrated on the ABF on the north side of the basin. The ABF fault is characterized by multiple subparallel fault strands that appear to coalesce into single strands to the northwest and southeast of the basin. The Maximos is characterized by a single strand throughout the basin and it exhibits a minor dip-slip component. Basin sediments thicken slightly against the Maximos fault to as much as 1km. A third fault, cutting across the basin southeast of the

  4. Thermal Fluid and Fault Interactions at the Intersection of Two Faults, Agua Caliente, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, R. E.; Evans, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Agua Caliente Springs lies at a unique intersection between the NNW-trending Elsinore fault and the 40° northeast-dipping, likely inactive West Salton detachment fault; it provides an opportunity to study damage zone geometry, fault behavior in crystalline rocks, a left-stepover zone between the Julian and Coyote segments, microseismicity, and the influence of thermal fluids on rock deformation. The Elsinore fault bounds the northwestern flank of the Tierra Blanca Mountains with strike-slip and normal motion; the detachment fault wraps around the northernmost portion of the mountains. Damage along the Elsinore ranges in thickness from a narrow slip plane to > 100 m along the eastern flank of the Tierra Blanca Mountains. Subsidiary faults trend northeast and southeast, and slip orientations vary from normal to strike-slip horizontal motion. Thermal fluids (~30°C) emerge at the intersection of the West Salton detachment and Elsinore faults actively alter the 94 Ma La Posta tonalite pluton, already fractured and crushed during fault slip, to a fine-grained white to orange powder through mineral re-equilibration. Grain sizes decrease with closer proximity to the faults. Fault cores contain thin dark green zones of chlorite ± epidote, and fault surfaces are coated with a thin layer of the same. Origin of the mineralization may be from reworked biotite crystals. We present water chemistry data from the hot springs at Agua Caliente in conjunction with geochemical and petrographic analysis of the surrounding rock. Water analyses include cation and anion measurements, bicarbonate, stable isotopes, tritium, and a multi-month recording of spring conductivity, water level, and temperature fluctuations. Cation geothermometry shows the fluids are enriched in Na, Ca, Mg, K, and Si from broken down quartz, plagioclase, and orthoclase. Water level and temperature data are compared to seismicity during the logging interval; temperatures so far have diurnal fluctuations indicating

  5. The Cordillera Blanca normal fault and its contribution to the Andean topographic evolution (northern Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margirier, Audrey; Robert, Xavier; Schwartz, Stéphane; Audin, Laurence

    2015-04-01

    Nature and localization of Quaternary tectonics remains largely unconstrained in Peruvian Andes as well as the mechanism driving rock uplift. The Cordillera Blanca normal fault accommodates extension in a convergent context. The fault system trends parallel to the subduction zone, just above the Peruvian flat-slab, and separate the Cordilleras Blanca and Negra. The Cordillera Blanca batholith (8-5 Ma) is an elongated pluton, emplaced at ~6 km depth in the Jurassic sedimentary country rocks. The Cordillera Blanca range (6768 m) that comprises the highest Peruvian peak built the footwall of the fault. The ~200 km-long fault has showed ~4500 m of vertical displacement since 5 Ma. This normal fault is described as active despite the lack of historical seismicity and constitutes a striking singularity within the prevailing compressional setting of the Andean orogeny. This region is a perfect target to explore the contribution of large normal fault in relief building. Our goals are to determine if the fault was pre-existing before the Cordillera Blanca batholith emplacement, when it has been reactivated and how does it interact with the batholith exhumation. For that purpose, we focus on brittle deformation analysis from a regional scale (faults trends) to outcrop scale (fault planes, striaes and kinematics). We present here new structural data and focal mechanisms indicating a senestral transtensive component on the Cordillera Blanca normal fault and a regional extensional regime in the Cordillera Negra area. We compare the paleotensors obtained from the inversion of the microstructural data and focal mechanisms with the exhumation history deduced from the thermochronological data to constrain the role of the normal fault in relation with relief building. We propose that the Cordillera Blanca normal fault is an inherited tectonic feature reactivated in transtension after the slab flattening at ~8 Ma. The differential exhumation of the Cordillera Blanca with respect to

  6. Paleoseismicity and neotectonics of the Cordillera Blanca fault zone, Northern Peruvian Andes.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, D.P.

    1988-01-01

    The Cordillera Blanca fault zone is a major W dipping normal fault that bounds the W side of a 120- 170-km wide zone of active extension along the crest of the N Peruvian Andes. The fault is approximately 210 km long and exhibits continuous geomorphic evidence of repeated late Pleistocene and Holocene displacements but has not been the source of historical or teleseismically recorded earthquakes. Trenching and mapping of fault scarps provide new information on earthquake recurrence, slip rate, timing of the most recent events and Andean neotectonics. At Quebrada Queroccocha, 55 km from valley fill lacustrine and fluvial deposits are displaced 7.5-8 m. Scarp profiles, tectonic terraces, and trench exposures indicate 5 to 7 scarp-forming earthquakes of 2-3 m per event during the past 11 000-14 000 yrs at this location.-from Author

  7. Asymmetrical Growth of Footwall Topography in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru: Implications for Normal Fault Control on Landscape Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanni, M. K.; Horton, B. K.

    2007-12-01

    Morphometric parameters and hypsometry of the >5-km-high Cordillera Blanca in Peru provide insights into the topographic evolution of the uplifted footwall of an active, high-magnitude-slip, low-angle normal fault within a contractional orogenic belt. The modern tectonic activity, mappable fault trace, high relief, and uniform footwall lithology make the Cordillera Blanca an ideal locality to test models for the evolution of topography related to normal faulting. Most models for normal fault growth suggest a tectonic and geomorphic symmetry in which maximum slip and maximum surface uplift occur along the central segments of the fault, with net slip, footwall uplift, and hangingwall subsidence diminishing along strike toward the fault tips. A digital elevation model (DEM) of the Cordillera Blanca permits extraction of important geomorphic metrics for footwall transverse drainages and the hanging-wall axial river, including hypsometry, drainage area, drainage length, relief, channel gradient, surface slope, aspect ratio, and longitudinal profile. These data reveal a pronounced asymmetry in which footwall relief, exposed fault relief, channel gradient, and surface slope are greatest along the northern fault segment and become systematically lower southward along strike. In contrast to most models for normal fault growth, largely based on late Cenozoic systems in the Basin and Range province of the western United States, the Cordillera Blanca demonstrates that abrupt and significant along-strike variations in displacement and footwall uplift are possible in major normal fault systems. The causes of an asymmetric distribution of fault slip and footwall topography in the Cordillera Blanca may be related to: (a) mechanical coupling between the subducting flat Nazca slab and the overriding South American plate; (b) gravitational collapse of overthickened crust along reactivated thrust faults; (c) climatic processes linked to the effect of glacial erosion in the footwall

  8. Slab flattening, dynamic topography and normal faulting in the Cordillera Blanca region (northern Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margirier, A.; Robert, X.; Laurence, A.; Gautheron, C.; Bernet, M.; Simon-Labric, T.; Hall, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Processes driving surface uplift in the Andes are still debated and the role of subduction processes as slab flattening on surface uplift and relief building in the Andes is not well understood. Some of the highest Andean summits, the Cordillera Blanca (6768 m) and the Cordillera Negra (5187 m), are located above a present flat subduction zone (3-15°S), in northern Peru. In this area, both the geometry and timing of the flattening of the slab are well constrained (Gutscher et al., 1999; Rosenbaum et al., 2005). This region is thus a perfect target to explore the effect of slab flattening on the Andean topography and uplift. We obtained new apatite (U-Th)/He and fission-track ages from three vertical profiles located in the Cordillera Blanca and the Cordillera Negra. Time-temperature paths obtained from inverse modeling of the thermochronological data indicates a Middle Miocene cooling for both Cordillera Negra profiles. We interpret it as regional exhumation in the Cordillera Occidental starting in Middle Miocene, synchronous with the onset of the subduction of the Nazca ridge (Rosenbaum et al., 2005). We propose that the Nazca ridge subduction at 15 Ma and onset of slab flattening in northern Peru drove regional positive dynamic topography and thus enhanced exhumation in the Cordillera Occidental. This study provides new evidence of the impact subduction processes and associated dynamic topography on paleogeography and surface uplift in the Andes.

  9. The Point Sal–Point Piedras Blancas correlation and the problem of slip on the San Gregorio–Hosgri fault, central California Coast Ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colgan, Joseph P.; Stanley, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Existing models for large-magnitude, right-lateral slip on the San Gregorio–Hosgri fault system imply much more deformation of the onshore block in the Santa Maria basin than is supported by geologic data. This problem is resolved by a model in which dextral slip on this fault system increases gradually from 0–10 km near Point Arguello to ∼150 km at Cape San Martin, but such a model requires abandoning the cross-fault tie between Point Sal and Point Piedras Blancas, which requires 90–100 km of right-lateral slip on the southern Hosgri fault. We collected stratigraphic and detrital zircon data from Miocene clastic rocks overlying Jurassic basement at both localities to determine if either section contained unique characteristics that could establish how far apart they were in the early Miocene. Our data indicate that these basins formed in the early Miocene during a period of widespread transtensional basin formation in the central Coast Ranges, and they filled with sediment derived from nearby pre-Cenozoic basement rocks. Although detrital zircon data do not indicate a unique source component in either section, they establish the maximum depositional age of the previously undated Point Piedras Blancas section to be 18 Ma. We also show that detrital zircon trace-element data can be used to discriminate between zircons of oceanic crust and arc affinity of the same age, a potentially useful tool in future studies of the California Coast Ranges. Overall, we find no characteristics in the stratigraphy and provenance of the Point Sal and Point Piedras Blancas sections that are sufficiently unique to prove whether they were far apart or close together in the early Miocene, making them of questionable utility as piercing points.

  10. Structural analysis of the Cordillera Blanca detachment: Geometry, kinematics and fault rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, C. A.; Jessup, M. J.; Hughes, C. A.; Newell, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Cordillera Banca Detachment (CBD) in the north-central Peruvian Andes is recognized as a rare example of active extension parallel to the direction of shortening within a convergent orogenic setting. Despite longstanding interest in the geodynamic significance of the CBD relatively little work has been done to characterize the basic geometry, kinematics and evolution of the detachment or the petrology and distribution of brittle and ductile tectonites within the fault zone. This contribution presents preliminary results of a basic structural analysis of the CBD based on field observations, laboratory results, and GIS analysis. Basic structural observations of fault geometry and kinematics are needed to constrain the regional geodynamic role of the CBD. The NNW topographic trace of the CBD is defined by faceted ridges up to 2000 m in height. The lower slopes of the facets are locally cut by steep fault scarps that offset quaternary glacial moraines, debris fans and colluvium. The shear zone comprises both brittle and ductile tectonites including mylonite series rocks, pseudotachylyte, and breccia - often highly silicified. Highly polished mirrored surfaces are observed locally. Deformation mechanisms show a consistent progression from plastic in structurally lower positions to brittle in structurally higher positions. Evidence for overprinting deformation mechanisms is preserved in many samples. The shear zone ranges up to about 200 m thick. The average orientation of mylonitic foliation and fault slip surfaces (strike/dip = 140/30) and lineations/slickenlines (plunge-trend = 35-235) is quite consistent along the ~200 km detachment, but some systematic variation along strike may be related to concave fault segments or corrugations. Slip indicators are nearly down-dip with a minor left-lateral or right-lateral component in some locations. Offsets in marker horizons constrain total offset between about 4500 m near the central section of the fault to near zero

  11. THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Saulnier Jr; W. Statham

    2006-03-10

    The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site. (1) Analogous source: UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geologic setting: fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs overlying carbonate rocks; (3) Analogous climate: Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous geochemistry: Oxidizing conditions; and (5) Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table. The Nopal I deposit is approximately 8 {+-} 0.5 million years old and has been exposed to oxidizing conditions during the last 3.2 to 3.4 million years. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model considers that the uranium oxide and uranium silicates in the ore deposit were originally analogous to uranium-oxide spent nuclear fuel. The Pena Blanca site has been characterized using field and laboratory investigations of its fault and fracture distribution, mineralogy, fracture fillings, seepage into the mine adits, regional hydrology, and mineralization that shows the extent of radionuclide migration. Three boreholes were drilled at the Nopal I mine site in 2003 and these boreholes have provided samples for lithologic characterization, water-level measurements, and water samples for laboratory

  12. Miocene Blanca Fan, Northern Channel Islands, California: Small fans reflecting tectonism and volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLean, H.; Howell, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    Blanca fan is a submarine fan composed of Miocene volcaniclastic strata. Parts of the fan system are exposed on Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa Islands, and possibly correlative strata crop out on San Miguel and Santa Catalina Islands. The Blanca fan and underlying breccia reflect regional transcurrent faulting in the California Continental Borderland and development of a system of rapidly subsiding basins and uplifted linear ridges during early and middle Miocene time. Erosion of uplifted crystalline basement rocks followed by the onset of silicic volcanism created linear sediment sources for the alluvial and submarine fans, respectively. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  13. Holocene denudation and landscape deformation in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodson, K. R.; Hall, S. R.; Michalak, M.; Farber, D.; Hourigan, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Active orogenic systems are subject to a host of processes that influence their topographic and structural evolution. Broadly speaking, these processes can be divided into two general groups: tectonics and climate. Both are capable of inducing profound changes within an orogen, although many specifics regarding their forcings, interactions, and feedbacks remain unclear. Here, we address the evolution of the Cordillera Blanca Mountain Range of northern Peru: an elevated, high-relief, 200km long string of glaciated peaks along the spine of the Andes. The striking Cordillera Blanca Detachment Fault (CBDF) is actively facilitating the production of several kilometers of relief along the western flank of the range, and abundant records of past glaciations span from >440 ka to the present. Thus, tectonics (active faulting) and climate (glacial erosion) are operating in tandem to produce some of the highest topography in the western hemisphere, affording the opportunity to investigate their potential interactions. Through the use of cosmogenic 10Be, low temperature thermochronology and digital terrain analysis we characterize the rates of landscape change as well as the present morphology. Significant variation in range elevation (maximum, mean, modal and minimum), relief (local and within basins) and slope (maximum, mean and minimum) exist along the strike of the range, potentially reflecting variable displacement along the CBDF, varying degrees of glacial erosion along the mountain range, or some combination of the two. The morphology of the adjacent supradetachment basin varies as well, containing zones with distinct styles of faulting and basin growth likely defined by the segmentation history of the CBDF. New thermochronologic data extends the current dataset, which we combine with 10Be basin-averaged erosion rates from basins along the range. These two datasets constrain the exhumational and erosional history of the range-forming Cordillera Blanca Batholith from the

  14. Regional Analysis of the Hazard Level of Glacial Lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisolm, Rachel E.; Jhon Sanchez Leon, Walter; McKinney, Daene C.; Cochachin Rapre, Alejo

    2016-04-01

    of glacial lakes and their hazard potential. This phase of glacial lake hazard assessment aims to be geographically comprehensive in order to identify potentially dangerous lakes that may have previously been ignored. A second phase of analysis that includes site visits will be necessary for a thorough analysis at each lake to determine the potential hazard for downstream communities. The objective of the work presented here is to identify potentially dangerous lakes that warrant further study rather than provide a final hazard assessment for each lake of the glacial lake inventory in the Cordillera Blanca. References: Emmer, A. and Vilímek, V.: New method for assessing the potential hazardousness of glacial lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., 11, 2391-2439, 2014. UGRH - Unidad de Glaciologia y Recursos Hidricos. Inventario de Lagunas Glaciares del Peru. Ministerio de Agricultura y Riego, Autoridad Nacional del Agua, Direcccion de Conservacion y Planeamiento de Recursos Hidricos, Huaraz, Peru, 2014. Wang, W., Yao, T., Gao, Y., Yang, X., and Kattel, D. B.: A first-order method to identify potentially dangerous glacial lakes in a region of the southeastern Tibetan Plateau, Mountain Res. Develop., 31, 122-130, 2011.

  15. REGIONAL HYDROLOGY OF THE NOPAL I SITE, SIERRA DE PENA BLANCA, CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Rodriguez-Pineda; P. Goodell; P.F. Dobson; J. Walton; R. Oliver; De La Garza; S. Harder

    2005-07-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy sponsored the drilling of three wells in 2003 near the Nopal I uranium deposit at the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico. Piezometric information is being collected to understand groundwater flow at local and regional levels as part of an ongoing natural analogue study of radionuclide migration. Water level monitoring reported at these and other wells in the region is combined with archival data to provide a better understanding of the hydrology at Nopal I. Initial results suggest that the local hydrology is dependent on the regional hydrologic setting and that this groundwater system behaves as an unconfined aquifer. The region is dominated by an alternating sequence of highlands and basins that step down from west to east. The Sierra de Pena Blanca was downdropped from the cratonic block to the west during Cenozoic extension. The Nopal I area is near the intersection of two large listric faults, and the questa of ash flow tuffs that hosts the deposit has been subjected to complex structural events. The Pena Blanca Uranium District was originally characterized by 105 airborne radiometric anomalies, indicating widespread uranium mineralization. The Nopal I uranium deposit is located in the Sierra del Pena Blanca between the Encinillas Basin to the west, with a mean elevation of 1560 m, and the El Cuervo Basin to the east, with a mean elevation of 1230 m. The Nopal I + 10 level is at an intermediate elevation of 1463 m, with a corresponding groundwater elevation of approximately 1240 m. The regional potentiometric surface indicates flow from west to east, with the El Cuervo Basin being the discharge zone for the regional flow system. However, it appears that the local groundwater potential beneath the Nopal I site is more in accordance with the water table of the El Cuervo Basin than with that of the Encinillas Basin. This might indicate that there is limited groundwater flow between the Encinillas Basin and the Nopal I area.

  16. Natural Analog Studies at Pena Blanca, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Simmons

    2005-07-11

    The significance of the Pena Blanca uranium deposits in the State of Chihuahua, Mexico as potential natural analogs for a nuclear waste repository in unsaturated welded tuff was first recognized in the 1980s. In the 1970s, the Pena Blanca region was a major target of uranium exploration and exploitation by the Mexican government. Since then the Nopal I uranium deposit has been studied extensively by researchers in the U.S., Mexico, and Europe. The Nopal I deposit represents an environment similar to that of the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain in many ways. Both are located in semi-arid regions. Both are located in Tertiary rhyolitic tuffs overlying carbonate rocks that have been subjected to basin and range-style tectonic deformation. Both are located in a chemically oxidizing, unsaturated zone 200 m or more above the water table. The alteration of uraninite to secondary minerals at Nopal I may be similar to the alteration of uranium fuel rods in this type of setting. Investigations at Nopal I and in the surrounding Sierra Pena Blanca have included detailed outcrop mapping, hydrologic and isotopic studies of flow and transport, studies of mineral alteration, modeling, and performance assessment.

  17. Recent (0-8 Ma) tectonics and exhumation processes in Cordilleras Blanca and Negra, Central Peru: Constraints from (U-Th)/He dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margirier, Audrey; Robert, Xavier; Gautheron, Cécile; Audin, Laurence

    2014-05-01

    The Central Andes are a classical example of topography building in front of an oceanic subduction. However, many first order questions are still debated: How do subduction processes and observed tectonic uplift interact along the Andean margin? What is the impact of tectonic, magmatism and climate on exhumation? The Cordilleras Blanca (6768 m) and Negra (5181 m), in north Central Peru, belong to the highest Andean reliefs. Both ranges trend parallel to the subduction zone and are separated by the NW-SE Rio Santa valley. The Cordillera Blanca pluton formed in an active subduction context at 8-5 Ma and renders an abnormal magmatic activity over a planar subduction. In contrast with the Cordillera Blanca, the Cordillera Negra is an older relief, which evolution and exhumation history has never been studied. A remarkable ~200 km-long normal fault system showing ~4500 m of vertical displacement since 5 Ma edges the western flank of the Cordillera Blanca. This region is a perfect target to study the impact of magmatism and subduction processes on exhumation. We perform a morphotectonic study on both cordilleras coupled with low-temperature thermochronology apatite (U-Th)/He dating to quantify these processes. Geomorphic parameters and altitude contrasts between these two ranges indicate a differential uplift. The Cordillera Negra displays a smooth and asymmetric relief from the West to the East whereas the Cordillera Blanca shows higher and sharper relief with North/South and East/West contrasts. We obtain apatite (U-Th)/He ages for twenty samples located along vertical and horizontal profiles at different latitudes of the Cordilleras Blanca and Negra. The (U-Th)/He ages range from 13.4 ± 1.3 to 5.6 ± 0.6 Ma in the Cordillera Negra and range from 11.8 ± 1.2 to 2.0 ± 0.2 Ma in the Cordillera Blanca. We use them as inputs in QTQt tools for time-temperature reconstructions and thus to constrain the exhumation history. Whole ages evidence a more regional exhumation than

  18. Remote Sensing Analysis of the Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site, Hudspeth County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    LeMone, D. V.; Dodge, R.; Xie, H.; Langford, R. P.; Keller, G. R.

    2002-02-26

    Remote sensing images provide useful physical information, revealing such features as geological structure, vegetation, drainage patterns, and variations in consolidated and unconsolidated lithologies. That technology has been applied to the failed Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) shallow burial low-level radioactive waste disposal site selected by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority. It has been re-examined using data from LANDSAT satellite series. The comparison of the earlier LANDSAT V (5/20/86) (30-m resolution) with the later new, higher resolution ETM imagery (10/23/99) LANDSAT VII data (15-m resolution) clearly shows the superiority of the LANDSAT VII data. The search for surficial indications of evidence of fatal flaws at the Sierra Blanca site utilizing was not successful, as it had been in the case of the earlier remote sensing analysis of the failed Fort Hancock site utilizing LANDSAT V data. The authors conclude that the tectonic activity at the Sierra Blanca site is much less recent and active than in the previously studied Fort Hancock site. The Sierra Blanca site failed primarily on the further needed documentation concerning a subsurface fault underneath the site and environmental justice issues. The presence of this fault was not revealed using the newer LANDSAT VII data. Despite this fact, it must be remembered that remote sensing provides baseline documentation for determining future physical and financial remediation responsibilities. On the basis of the two sites examined by LANDSAT remote sensing imaging, it is concluded that it is an essential, cost-effective tool that should be utilized not only in site examination but also in all nuclear-related facilities.

  19. Slope stability of moraines, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimes, J.; Novotny, J.

    2012-12-01

    Landslides originating from inner slopes of moraine dams are often capable of producing glacial lakes outburst floods (GLOFs). Therefore assessing stability conditions of the moraines is important for predicting this potentially damaging phenomenon. Characteristics of the basic mechanical properties of the material and geophysical investigations were applied to collect necessary information for slope stability assessment of the Palcacocha Lake moraine dam, Peru. The lake is situated in the Cordillera Blanca Mts. at the altitude of about 4,500m asl and produced catastrophic GLOF in 1941. Another minor flood originated in 2003 due to landslide impact into the lake. Detailed investigations of this landslide site included geomorphological mapping, geophysical investigations and characterization of basic mechanical properties of the forming material. Geomorphological mapping identified dormant landslide with scarp up to 2m high which developed on the edge of the inner moraine slope. It is conditioned by set of parallel extension trenches which also affected the origin of 2003 landslide. Within its scarp area, significant water bearing layer was noticed around 10 m bellow the moraine surface. Three profiles were investigated using electric resistivity tomography performed on 4poing light instrument with 24 electrodes and with spacing ranging from 1 to 4m. Results helped to verify geometry of the main shear plane of the mapped landslide as well as the spacing and depth of extension trenches. Significant heterogeneity in the moraine resistivity characteristics was found. The high resistivity regions are explained by rock block accumulation whereas the low resistivity may represent wet layers within the moraine body. Grain size distribution of 33 disturbed soil samples originating from moraine material within the Cordillera Blanca Mts., Peru were determined and classified according to the UCSC classification system. The samples were taken from moraine dams and slopes

  20. Mantle to Surface Fluid Transfer Above a Flat Slab Subduction Zone: Isotopic Evidence from Hot Springs in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, D. L.; Jessup, M. J.; Hilton, D. R.; Shaw, C. A.; Hughes, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal springs in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, provide geochemical evidence for deeply circulated hydrothermal fluids that carry significant mantle-derived helium. The Cordillera Blanca is a ~200 km-long NNW-SSE trending mountain range in the Peruvian Andes located above an amagmatic flat-slab subduction segment. The west side of the range is bounded by the Cordillera Blanca detachment that preserves a progression of top to the west ductile shear to brittle normal faulting since ~5 Ma. We report aqueous and stable isotope geochemical results from fluid and gas samples collected in 2013 and 2015 from 13 hot springs emanating from the Cordillera Blanca detachment and associated hanging wall faults. Most springs are vigorously bubbling (degassing), and range in temperature, pH, and conductivity from 17-89 °C, 5.95-8.87, and 0.17-21.5 mS, respectively. The hottest springs issue directly from the northern segment of the detachment. Geochemically, springs are CO2-rich, alkaline-chloride to alkaline-carbonate waters, with elevated trace metal contents including Fe, Cu, As, Zn, Sb, and Tl. Notably, As contents are ≤11 ppm, indicating that thermal waters may be adversely impacting local water quality. Water δ18O and δD, trends in elemental chemistry, and cation geothermometry collectively demonstrate mixing of hot (200-260 °C) saline fluid with cold meteoric recharge along the fault. Helium isotope ratios (3He/4He) for dissolved gases in the hot springs range from 0.62 to 1.98 RC/RA, indicating the presence of ~25% mantle-derived helium, assuming mixing of an asthenospheric end-member with the crustal helium reservoir. CO2/3He and carbon stable isotope ratios indicate a carbon source derived from mixing of crustal sources with minor mantle carbon. Overall, the volatile signature overlaps with orogen-wide datasets where crustal overprinting has modified mantle contributions at active arc volcanoes. Given the long duration since active magmatism in the Cordillera

  1. Epithermal uranium deposits in a volcanogenic context: the example of Nopal 1 deposit, Sierra de Pena Blanca, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calas, G.; Angiboust, S.; Fayek, M.; Camacho, A.; Allard, T.; Agrinier, P.

    2009-12-01

    The Peña Blanca molybdenum-uranium field (Chihuahua, Mexico) exhibits over 100 airborne anomalies hosted in tertiary ignimbritic ash-flow tuffs (44 Ma) overlying the Pozos conglomerate and a sequence of Cretaceous carbonate rocks. Uranium occurrences are associated with breccia zones at the intersection of two or more fault systems. Periodic reactivation of these structures associated with Basin and Range and Rio Grande tectonic events resulted in the mobilization of U and other elements by meteoric fluids heated by geothermal activity. Trace element geochemistry (U, Th, REE) provides evidence for local mobilization of uranium under oxidizing conditions. In addition, O- and H-isotope geochemistry of kaolinite, smectite, opal and calcite suggests that argillic alteration proceeded at shallow depth with meteoric water at 25-75 °C. Focussed along breccia zones, fluids precipitated several generations of pyrite and uraninite together with kaolinite, as in the Nopal 1 mine, indicating that mineralization and hydrothermal alteration of volcanic tuffs are contemporaneous. Low δ34S values (~ -24.5 ‰) of pyrites intimately associated with uraninite suggest that the reducing conditions at the origin of the U-mineralization arise from biological activity. Later, the uplift of Sierra Pena Blanca resulted in oxidation and remobilization of uranium, as confirmed by the spatial distribution of radiation-induced defect centers in kaolinites. These data show that tectonism and biogenic reducing conditions can play a major role in the formation and remobilization of uranium in epithermal deposits. By comparison with the other uranium deposits at Sierra Pena Blanca and nearby Sierra de Gomez, Nopal 1 deposit is one of the few deposits having retained a reduced uranium mineralization.

  2. THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    G. Saulnier and W. Statham

    2006-04-16

    The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following analogous characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site: (1) Analogous source--UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geology--(i.e. fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs); (3) Analogous climate--Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous setting--Volcanic tuffs overlie carbonate rocks; and (5) Analogous geochemistry--Oxidizing conditions Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table.

  3. Influence of fault trend, fault bends, and fault convergence on shallow structure, geomorphology, and hazards, Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Watt, J. T.; Hartwell, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    We mapped a ~94-km-long portion of the right-lateral Hosgri Fault Zone from Point Sal to Piedras Blancas in offshore central California using high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, marine magnetic data, and multibeam bathymetry. The database includes 121 seismic profiles across the fault zone and is perhaps the most comprehensive reported survey of the shallow structure of an active strike-slip fault. These data document the location, length, and near-surface continuity of multiple fault strands, highlight fault-zone heterogeneity, and demonstrate the importance of fault trend, fault bends, and fault convergences in the development of shallow structure and tectonic geomorphology. The Hosgri Fault Zone is continuous through the study area passing through a broad arc in which fault trend changes from about 338° to 328° from south to north. The southern ~40 km of the fault zone in this area is more extensional, resulting in accommodation space that is filled by deltaic sediments of the Santa Maria River. The central ~24 km of the fault zone is characterized by oblique convergence of the Hosgri Fault Zone with the more northwest-trending Los Osos and Shoreline Faults. Convergence between these faults has resulted in the formation of local restraining and releasing fault bends, transpressive uplifts, and transtensional basins of varying size and morphology. We present a hypothesis that links development of a paired fault bend to indenting and bulging of the Hosgri Fault by a strong crustal block translated to the northwest along the Shoreline Fault. Two diverging Hosgri Fault strands bounding a central uplifted block characterize the northern ~30 km of the Hosgri Fault in this area. The eastern Hosgri strand passes through releasing and restraining bends; the releasing bend is the primary control on development of an elongate, asymmetric, "Lazy Z" sedimentary basin. The western strand of the Hosgri Fault Zone passes through a significant restraining bend and

  4. Cretaceous stratigraphy and biostratigraphy, Sierra Blanca basin, southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, S.G. ); Anderson, O.R. )

    1994-03-01

    The Sierra Blanca basin of Otero and Lincoln counties, New Mexico contains a Lower (upper Albian)-Upper (Santonian) Cretaceous section of marine and nonmarine strata as much as 700 m thick which represent the upper part of a regressive cycle followed by two transgressive-regressive deposition cycles. The lower 55 m of the Cretaceous section are the same tripartite Dakota Group units recognized in Guadalupe and San Miguel counties: basal Mesa Rica Sandstone (late Albian), medial Pajarito formation (late Albian) and upper Romeroville sandstone (earliest Cenomanian). The Mesa Rica and Pajarito represent a regression and are overlain disconformably by the transgressive Romeroville sandstone. Overlying transgressive marine clastics and minor carbonates of the Mancos Shale are as much as 73 m thick and include the early Turonian Greenhorn Limestone. The overlying Tres Hermanos formation (up to 91 m thick) consists of the (ascending order) Atarque sandstone and the Carthage and Fite Ranch sandstone members. These strata represent a mid-Turonian regression in response to regional tectonism (Atarque and Carthage), followed by a transgression (Fite Ranch sandstone) that ended in the deposition of the D-Cross Tongue of the Mancos Shale and Fort Hays Member of the Niobrara Formation during the late Turonian. The subsequent regression began with the Coniacian Gallup Sandstone (55 m) followed by coal-bearing Crevasse Canyon Formation (up to 244 m thick). The Coniacian-Santonian Crevasse Canyon Formation, the youngest Cretaceous unit in the basin, is disconformably overlain by middle Eocene conglomerates and red-bed siliciclastics of the Cub Mountain formation. Dakota Group age determinations in the Sierra Blanca basin are those of well-dated sections to the north, but ammonites and inoceramid bivalves from the Sierra Blanca basin provide precise age control for Cenomanian-Santonian marine and marginal marine strata and palynology and megafossil plants for nonmarine strata.

  5. Geologic Mapping in Nogal Peak Quadrangle: Geochemistry, Intrusive Relations and Mineralization in the Sierra Blanca Igneous Complex, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, F.; Kelley, S. A.; Lawrence, J. R.; Cikowski, C. T.; Krier, D. J.; Goff, C. J.; McLemore, V. T.

    2011-12-01

    Nogal Peak quadrangle is located in the northern Sierra Blanca Igneous Complex (SBIC) and contains most of the White Mountain Wilderness (geologic map is available at http://geoinfo.nmt.edu/publications/maps/geologic/ofgm/details.cfml?Volume=134). The geology of the quad consists of a late Eocene to Oligocene volcanic pile (Sierra Blanca Volcanics, mostly alkali basalt to trachyte) intruded by a multitude of dikes, plugs and three stocks: Rialto, 31.4 Ma (mostly syenite), Three Rivers, ca. 29 to 27 Ma (quartz syenite intruded by subordinate alkali granite), and Bonito Lake, 26.6 Ma (mostly monzonite). Three Rivers stock is partially surrounded by alkali rhyolites that geochemically resemble the alkali granites. The circular shape of the stock and surrounding rhyolites suggests they form the root of a probable caldera. SBIC rocks have compositions typical of those found within the Rocky Mountain alkaline belt and those associated with continental rift zone magmatism. Because the volcanic host rocks are deeply eroded, intrusive relations with the stocks are well exposed. Most contacts at stock margins are near vertical. Roof pendants are common near some contacts and stoped blocks up to 700 m long are found within the Three Rivers stock. Contacts, pendants and stoped blocks generally display some combination of hornfelsing, brecciation, fracturing, faulting and mineralization. Sierra Blanca Volcanics display hydrothermal alteration increasing from argillic in the NW sector of the quad to high-temperature porpylitic near stock margins. Retrograde phyllic alteration occurs within breccia pipes and portions of the stocks. Mineral deposits consist of four types: Placer Au, fissure veins (mostly Ag-Pb-Zn±Au), breccia pipes (Au-Mo-Cu), and porphyry Mo-Cu. A singular pipe on the SW margin of Bonito Lake stock contains sapphire-lazulite-alunite. Although Au has been intermittently mined in the quad since 1865, best production of Au originated around the turn of the last

  6. Agua Caliente and Their Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryterband, Roman

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the traditional music of the Agua Caliente band of California's Desert Cahuilla Indian tribe, including accompanying instruments, types of songs, thematic material, and performance routines. Exploring the structure of the music, the article describes meter, tempo, harmony and tonal gravitations, and use of words. (DS)

  7. Characterization of Quartz and Feldspar Deformation in the Mid-crust: Insights from the Cordillera Blanca Shear Zone, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, C. A.; Jessup, M. J.; Shaw, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Deformation mechanisms within shear zones from various crustal levels must be characterized to develop accurate models of lithospheric rheology. The Cordillera Blanca Shear Zone (CBSZ) in the central Peruvian Andes records changes in temperature, microstructures, and deformation mechanisms that occurred during exhumation through the brittle-ductile-transition during normal-sense slip over the last ~5 m.y. The 100-500-m-thick mylonitic shear zone occupies the footwall of a 200-km-long normal detachment fault, marking the western boundary of the 8 Ma, leucogranodiorite Cordillera Blanca Batholith. Though local variations do occur, including recrystallized quartz veins and local, decimeter- to meter- scale shear zones, the CBSZ follows a general trend of increasing strain towards the detachment. Structurally lowest positions are weakly deformed and transition to protomylonite, mylonite, and ultramylonite at higher positions, truncating at a cataclasite nearest the detachment. We characterize strain using EBSD analyses of quartz lattice preferred orientations and deformation temperatures using quartz and feldspar textures and two-feldspar thermometry of asymmetric strain-induced myrmekite. At the deepest structural positions, feldspar grains record a complex history characterized by bulging recrystallization, myrmekite formation, and brittle fracture, while quartz exhibits dominant grain-boundary migration recrystallization (T> 500 °C) and prism slip. Intermediate samples exhibit more prevalent strain-induced myrmekite, brittle fracture in feldspar, and reaction-associated recrystallization of K-feldspar to mica; quartz records mainly subgrain-rotation recrystallization (400-500 °C) and dominant prism slip with a rhomb component. Shallower positions preserve fewer, smaller, and more rounded feldspar porphyroclasts with no myrmekite, and dominant bulging recrystallization (280-400 °C) in quartz that records prism , rhomb , and some basal slip.

  8. Zipper Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. P.; Passchier, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Intersecting simultaneously active pairs of faults with different orientations and opposing slip sense ("conjugate faults") present geometrical and kinematic problems. Such faults rarely offset each other, even when they have displacements of many km. A simple solution to the problem is that the two faults merge, either zippering up or unzippering, depending on the relationship between the angle of intersection and the slip senses. A widely recognized example of this is the so-called blind front developed in some thrust belts, where a backthrust branches off a decollement surface at depth. The decollement progressively unzippers, so that its hanging wall becomes the hanging wall of the backthrust, and its footwall becomes the footwall of the active decollement. The opposite situation commonly arises in core complexes, where conjugate low-angle normal faults merge to form a single detachment; in this case the two faults zipper up. Analogous situations may arise for conjugate pairs of strike-slip faults. We present kinematic and geometrical analyses of the Garlock and San Andreas faults in California, the Najd fault system in Saudi Arabia, the North and East Anatolian faults, the Karakoram and Altyn Tagh faults in Tibet, and the Tonale and Guidicarie faults in the southern Alps, all of which appear to have undergone zippering over distances of several tens to hundreds of km. The zippering process may produce complex and significant patterns of strain and rotation in the surrounding rocks, particularly if the angle between the zippered faults is large. A zippering fault may be inactive during active movement on the intersecting faults, or it may have a slip rate that differs from either fault. Intersecting conjugate ductile shear zones behave in the same way on outcrop and micro-scales.

  9. AGUA TIBIA PRIMITIVE AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irwin, William P.; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    The Agua Tibia Primitive Area in southwestern California is underlain by igneous and metamorphic rocks that are siilar to those widely exposed throughout much of the Peninsular Ranges. To detect the presence of any concealed mineral deposits, samples of stream sediments were collected along the various creeks that head in the mountain. As an additional aid in evaluating the mineral potential, an aeromagnetic survey was made and interpreted. A search for records of past or existing mining claims within the primitive area was made but none was found. Evidence of deposits of metallic or nonmetallic minerals was not seen during the study.

  10. Fault finder

    DOEpatents

    Bunch, Richard H.

    1986-01-01

    A fault finder for locating faults along a high voltage electrical transmission line. Real time monitoring of background noise and improved filtering of input signals is used to identify the occurrence of a fault. A fault is detected at both a master and remote unit spaced along the line. A master clock synchronizes operation of a similar clock at the remote unit. Both units include modulator and demodulator circuits for transmission of clock signals and data. All data is received at the master unit for processing to determine an accurate fault distance calculation.

  11. Characterisation of the Bahía Blanca estuary by data analysis and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campuzano, Francisco Javier; Pierini, Jorge O.; Leitão, Paulo C.; Gómez, Eduardo A.; Neves, Ramiro J.

    2014-01-01

    The Bahía Blanca estuary is a complex system of channels and tidal flats where the most important deep water harbour system of Argentina is located. The main goal of the present work was to obtain a hydrodynamic conceptual model for the Bahía Blanca coastal area. For this reason, a combined analysis of observed data and numerical modelling has been performed for the whole area. The gained knowledge on the system hydrodynamics could aid in the decision support for navigation security, waste water discharges management, sediment dredging and rejection operations among other applications. Due to the Bahía Blanca coastal vast area, hydrodynamic observations are scarce and located near the populated areas. In order to describe the hydrodynamics of such a complex and large system, the analysed tidal and current data from different periods have been completed through numerical modelling. Data analysis served to determine the main processes governing the Bahía Blanca hydrodynamics, to characterise the area using general descriptors, to provide inputs for the numerical model and to aid in evaluating its performance. In addition, a 2-dimensional application was set up using the MOHID water modelling system for the Bahía Blanca estuary. This application aimed to gain a better understanding of the system dynamics, to explain and test the consistency of the observed data and to reproduce the processes taking place. Model results were in good agreement with the analysed data and served to confirm an inconsistency found on the sea level observations. The combination of both methodologies served to further describe the hydrodynamic processes governing this coastal area and also to obtain a conceptual model for the water and property circulation in the Bahía Blanca estuary.

  12. Geologic structure and tectonics of inner continental borderland of northern Baja California

    SciTech Connect

    Legg, M.R.; Victor, W.O.; Francisco, S.V.

    1987-05-01

    Detailed marine geophysical surveys of the inner California continental borderland west of northern Baja California show that the region is underlain by two major, northwest-trending, Quaternary, dextral wrench fault systems. The San Clemente fault system lies along the western part of the inner borderland and is delineated by the San Clemente and San Isidro fault zones. Together, these fault zones connect to form a long (300 km), narrow (5-10 km), continuous zone of faulting that is very similar to the larger San Andreas fault system onshore. The Agua Blanca fault system is a complex zone of shear delineated by three or more subparallel wrench fault zones in the eastern part of the inner borderland. The westernmost San Diego Trough-Bahia Soledad fault zone consists of relatively long (50 km), continuous, main fault traces which cut the Quaternary sediments of the nearshore basin trough. The Coronado Bank-Agua Blanca fault zone is more complicated, with numerous discontinuous, subparallel, right- and left-stepping, anastomosing fault traces which are associated with significant structural relief. A nearshore zone of faults, marked by the Newport-Inglewood-Rose Canyon fault zone in the north and the Estero-Descanso fault zone in the south, parallels the coast and defines the eastern boundary of the California continental borderland structural province. All of these eastern fault zones merge into the transpeninsular Agua Blanca fault, and their N30/sup 0/W trend differs substantially from the trend of the major peninsular ranges fault zones.

  13. Flying High With Civil Air Patrol: The Sierra Blanca Civil Air Patrol Squadron.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnicom, Gene E.

    The Sierra Blanca Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Cadet Squadron from Mescalero, New Mexico, is a program funded by the tribe and the state of New Mexico for Mescalero Apache youth. The national CAP Cadet Program promotes moral leadership, aerospace education, leadership, and physical fitness; Mescalero cadets have learned self-confidence and leadership…

  14. STRATIGRAPHY OF THE PB-1 WELL, NOPAL 1 URANIUM DEPOSIT, PENA BLANCA, CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dobson

    2005-09-14

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Stratigraphic study part of integrated research project examining migration of radionuclides at Pena Blanca; (2) Immediate objectives of study include: locate stratigraphic contacts in third dimension; measure rock properties (matrix permeability, porosity, mineralogy, cation exchange capacity) of cored section; determine fracture frequency and orientation; (3) Results of study serve as primary inputs to flow and transport models.

  15. Composition and spectrum of cosmic rays at the knee measured by the CASA-BLANCA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Joseph Westbrook

    2000-07-01

    The energy spectrum and primary composition of cosmic rays with energy between 0.25PeV and 30PeV have been studied using the CASA-BLANCA detector. In this energy range, a ``knee'' in the spectrum has been recognized for over 40 years, but the astrophysical origins of the knee remain unknown. Measuring the spectrum and elemental composition of cosmic rays near the knee can help to address the problem. The favored model of acceleration in supernova shock waves predicts that cosmic rays with energy above 10PeV are heavy nuclei. The measurements were made by BLANCA, a new array of 144 angle-integrating Cherenkov light detectors located at the CASA-MIA site in Utah. CASA data on particle density are used to find the core and direction of air showers, while BLANCA measures the lateral distribution of Cherenkov light about the core. The advantages of Cherenkov light allow BLANCA to measure shower energy with minimal composition bias and to estimate accurately the depth of shower maximum. The cosmic ray flux measured by BLANCA exhibits a knee in the range of 2-3PeV with a width of approximately 0.5 decades in primary energy. The power law indices of the differential flux above and below the knee are -2.72 +/- 0.02 and -2.95 +/- 0.02. The data on mean shower depth indicate that the composition is lighter at 3 PeV than below the knee and that it becomes heavier with increasing energy above 3PeV. Cherenkov measurements are interpreted using the predictions of the CORSIKA Monte Carlo air shower simulation coupled with each of four hadronic interaction codes (QGSJET, VENUS, SIBYLL, and HDPM). The distribution of air shower depths can be reproduced well at all energies by the QGSJET and VENUS models, and these distributions suggest the same composition trends exhibited by the mean depth of maximum results.

  16. 72. Headgates for Agua Fria project canal on east end ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. Headgates for Agua Fria project canal on east end of diversion dam. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. 54. Downstream face of Agua Fria project's diversion dam showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Downstream face of Agua Fria project's diversion dam showing initial masonry construction and poured concrete capping. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. 61. View of the Agua Fria River stream bed from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. View of the Agua Fria River stream bed from atop Waddell Dam. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  19. 74. View of flume crossing the Agua Fria River from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. View of flume crossing the Agua Fria River from the east embankment. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. Fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  1. Fault mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent observational, experimental, and theoretical modeling studies of fault mechanics are discussed in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics examined include interseismic strain accumulation, coseismic deformation, postseismic deformation, and the earthquake cycle; long-term deformation; fault friction and the instability mechanism; pore pressure and normal stress effects; instability models; strain measurements prior to earthquakes; stochastic modeling of earthquakes; and deep-focus earthquakes. Maps, graphs, and a comprehensive bibliography are provided. 220 refs.

  2. Geologic studies in the Sierra de Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Cortes, Ignacio Alfonso

    The Sierra del Cuervo has been endowed with uranium mineralization, which has attracted many geological studies, and recently the author was part of a team with the goal of selecting a site of a radioactive waste repository. The first part of the work adds to the regional framework of stratigraphy and tectonics of the area. It includes the idea of a pull apart basin development, which justifies the local great thickness of the Cuervo Formation. It includes the regional structural frame work and the composite stratigraphic column of the Chihuahua Trough and the equivalent Cretaceous Mexican Sea. The general geologic features of the NE part of the Sierra del Cuervo are described, which include the folded ignimbrites and limestones in that area; the irregular large thicknesses of the Cuervo Formation; and the western vergence of the main folding within the area. Sanidine phenocrystals gave ages of 54.2 Ma and 51.8 Ma ± 2.3 Ma. This is the first time these dates have been reported in print. This age indicates a time before the folded structures which outcrop in the area, and 44 Ma is a date after the Cuervo Formation was folded. The Hidalgoan orogeny cycle affected the rocks between this lapse of time. Since then the area has been partially affected by three tensional overlapped stages, which resulted in the actual Basin and Range physiography. The jarosite related to the tectonic activity mineralization has been dated by the Ar-Ar method and yields an age of 9.8 Ma. This is the first report of a date of mineralization timing at Pena Blanca Uranium District in the Sierra del Cuervo. These are some of the frame work features that justify the allocation of a radioactive waste repository in the Sierra del Cuervo. An alluvial fan system within the Boquilla Colorada microbasin was selected as the best target for more detailed site assessment. The study also included the measurement of the alluvium thicknesses by geoelectric soundings; studies of petrography and weathered

  3. 7. Photocopy of map of the Agua Fria Valley and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of map of the Agua Fria Valley and lands to be irrigated by the Agua Fria Water and Land Company. Photographer Mark Durben, 1987 Source: 'Map of the Agua Fria Valley and the Western Portion of the Salt River Valley Showing the System of Reservoirs and Canals of the Agua Fria Water and Land Company and the Land to be Irrigated Thereby 160,000 Acres of New Land to be Reclaimed in the Maricopa County, Arizona Territory,' (Brochure) Union Photo Engraving Company, c. 1895, Salt River Project Research Archives, Tempe, Arizona. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  4. 2. William Beardsley standing along the Agua Fria River near ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. William Beardsley standing along the Agua Fria River near construction site of the Agua Fria project. Photographer James Dix Schuyler, 1903. Source: Schuyler, James D. 'Report on the Water Supply of the Agua Fria River, and the Storage Reservoir Project of the Agua Fria Water and Land Company For Irrigation in the Gila River Valley, Arizona,' (September 29, 1903). Arizona Historical Collection, Hayden Library, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona. (Typewritten.) - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. Wind Transport of Radionuclide- Bearing Dust, Peña Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, R.; Goodell, P. C.; Gill, T. E.; Arimoto, R.

    2007-05-01

    This investigation evaluates radionuclide fractionation during wind erosion of high-grade uranium ore storage piles at Peña Blanca (50km north of Chihuahua City), Chihuahua, Mexico. The aridity of the local environment promotes dust resuspension by high winds. Although active operations ceased in 1983, the Peña Blanca mining district is one of Mexico`s most important uranium ore reserves. The study site contains piles of high grade ore, left loose on the surface, and separated by the specific deposits from which they were derived (Margaritas, Nopal I, and Puerto I). Similar locations do not exist in the United States, since uranium mining sites in the USA have been reclaimed. The Peña Blanca site serves as an analog for the Yucca Mountain project. Dust deposition is collected at Peña Blanca with BSNE sediment catchers (Fryrear, 1986) and marble dust traps (Reheis, 1999). These devices capture windblown sediment; subsequently, the sample data will help quantify potentially radioactive short term field sediment loss from the repository surface and determine sediment flux. Aerosols and surface materials will be analyzed and radioactivity levels established utilizing techniques such as gamma spectroscopy. As a result, we will be able to estimate how much radionuclide contaminated dust is being transported or attached geochemically to fine grain soils or minerals (e.g., clays or iron oxides). The high-grade uranium-bearing material is at secular equilibrium, thus the entire decay series is present. Of resulting interest is not only the aeolian transport of uranium, but also of the other daughter products. These studies will improve our understanding of geochemical cycling of radionuclides with respect to sources, transport, and deposition. The results may also have important implications for the geosciences and homeland security, and potential applications to public health. Funding for this project is provided in part via a NSF grant to Arimoto.

  6. Predictive optimal control of sewer networks using CORAL tool: application to Riera Blanca catchment in Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Puig, V; Cembrano, G; Romera, J; Quevedo, J; Aznar, B; Ramón, G; Cabot, J

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the global control of the Riera Blanca catchment in the Barcelona sewer network using a predictive optimal control approach. This catchment has been modelled using a conceptual modelling approach based on decomposing the catchments in subcatchments and representing them as virtual tanks. This conceptual modelling approach allows real-time model calibration and control of the sewer network. The global control problem of the Riera Blanca catchment is solved using a optimal/predictive control algorithm. To implement the predictive optimal control of the Riera Blanca catchment, a software tool named CORAL is used. The on-line control is simulated by interfacing CORAL with a high fidelity simulator of sewer networks (MOUSE). CORAL interchanges readings from the limnimeters and gate commands with MOUSE as if it was connected with the real SCADA system. Finally, the global control results obtained using the predictive optimal control are presented and compared against the results obtained using current local control system. The results obtained using the global control are very satisfactory compared to those obtained using the local control. PMID:19700825

  7. Secondary natural gas recovery in mature fluvial sandstone reservoirs, Frio Formation, Agua Dulce Field, South Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.A.; Levey, R.A. ); Vidal, J.M. ); Sippel, M.A. ); Ballard, J.R. ); Coover, D.M. Jr. ); Bloxsom, W.E. )

    1993-09-01

    An approach that integrates detailed geologic, engineering, and petrophysical analyses combined with improved well-log analytical techniques can be used by independent oil and gas companies of successful infield exploration in mature Gulf Coast fields that larger companies may consider uneconomic. In a secondary gas recovery project conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology and funded by the Gas Research Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy, a potential incremental natural gas resource of 7.7 bcf, of which 4.0 bcf may be technically recoverable, was identified in a 490-ac lease in Agua Dulce field. Five wells in this lease had previously produced 13.7 bcf from Frio reservoirs at depths of 4600-6200 ft. The pay zones occur in heterogeneous fluvial sandstones offset by faults associated with the Vicksburg fault zone. The compartments may each contain up to 1.0 bcf of gas resources with estimates based on previous completions and the recent infield drilling experience of Pintas Creek Oil Company. Uncontacted gas resources occur in thin (typically less than 10 ft) bypassed zones that can be identified through a computed log evaluation that integrates open-hole logs, wireline pressure tests, fluid samples, and cores. At Agua Dulce field, such analysis identified at 4-ft bypassed zone uphole from previously produced reservoirs. This reservoir contained original reservoir pressure and flowed at rates exceeding 1 mmcf/d. The expected ultimate recovery is 0.4 bcf. Methodologies developed in the evaluation of Agua Dulce field can be successfully applied to other mature gas fields in the south Texas Gulf Coast. For example, Stratton and McFaddin are two fields in which the secondary gas recovery project has demonstrated the existence of thin, potentially bypassed zones that can yield significant incremental gas resources, extending the economic life of these fields.

  8. A 3-D view of field-scale fault-zone cementation from geologically ground-truthed electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, H.; Spinelli, G. A.; Mozley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Fault-zones are an important control on fluid flow, affecting groundwater supply, hydrocarbon/contaminant migration, and waste/carbon storage. However, current models of fault seal are inadequate, primarily focusing on juxtaposition and entrainment effects, despite the recognition that fault-zone cementation is common and can dramatically reduce permeability. We map the 3D cementation patterns of the variably cemented Loma Blanca fault from the land surface to ~40 m depth, using electrical resistivity and induced polarization (IP). The carbonate-cemented fault zone is a region of anomalously low normalized chargeability, relative to the surrounding host material. Zones of low-normalized chargeability immediately under the exposed cement provide the first ground-truth that a cemented fault yields an observable IP anomaly. Low-normalized chargeability extends down from the surface exposure, surrounded by zones of high-normalized chargeability, at an orientation consistent with normal faults in the region; this likely indicates cementation of the fault zone at depth, which could be confirmed by drilling and coring. Our observations are consistent with: 1) the expectation that carbonate cement in a sandstone should lower normalized chargeability by reducing pore-surface area and bridging gaps in the pore space, and 2) laboratory experiments confirming that calcite precipitation within a column of glass beads decreases polarization magnitude. The ability to characterize spatial variations in the degree of fault-zone cementation with resistivity and IP has exciting implications for improving predictive models of the hydrogeologic impacts of cementation within faults.

  9. Slab flattening driving regional uplift in the Cordilleras Blanca and Negra, Western Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margirier, Audrey; Audin, Laurence; Robert, Xavier; Bernet, Matthias; Gautheron, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    The Andean range topographic evolution is known to have had a strong impact on regional climate by building an orographic barrier that preserved its western flank from the south Atlantic moisture. Even if largely invoked, the impact of subduction processes on the uplift and relief building is not yet well understood in the Andes. The northern Peru is characterized by a present day flat subduction zone (3-15°S), where both the geometry and temporal evolution of the flat-slab are well constrained. The subduction of two buoyant anomalies, the Nazca ridge and the lost Inca plateau controlled the slab flattening. The highest Peruvian peaks in the Cordillera Blanca (6768 m), and the Cordillera Negra (5187 m) are located just above the flat-slab segment. Both ranges trend parallel to the subduction zone and are separated by the NW-SE Rio Santa valley. The Cordillera Blanca batholith emplaced at 8-5 Ma and renders of an abnormal magmatic activity over a planar subduction. This area is a perfect target to explore the impact of slab flattening on the topography and uplift in the Occidental Cordillera of the Andes. We present new AHe and AFT data from three vertical profiles located in both the Cordilleras Blanca and Negra. We compare time-temperature paths obtained from inverse modeling of the thermochronological data with the timing of the slab flattening, the arrival of the Nazca ridge and magmatism. Our thermochronological data evidences a regional exhumation in the Occidental Cordillera from ~10 Ma. We propose that the Nazca ridge subduction below the Occidental Cordillera (11 Ma) and slab flattening (8 Ma) drive the Occidental Cordillera uplift and thus exhumation. We evidence the important contribution of the magmatism in the Cordillera Blanca exhumation and high relief building in the Occidental Cordillera. Our new thermochronological data highlight the control of both the subduction processes and magmatism on the paleogeography and uplift in the Andes. Finally, the

  10. A study of microseismicity in northern Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. L.; Koczynski, T.; Madrid, J.

    1976-01-01

    Five microearthquake instruments were operated for 2 months in 1974 in a small mobile array deployed at various sites near the Agua Blanca and San Miguel faults. An 80-km-long section of the San Miguel fault zone is presently active seismically, producing the vast majority of recorded earthquakes. Very low activity was recorded on the Agua Blanca fault. Events were also located near normal faults forming the eastern edge of the Sierra Juarez suggesting that these faults are active. Hypocenters on the San Miguel fault range in depth from 0 to 20 km although two-thirds are in the upper 10 km. A composite focal mechanism showing a mixture of right-lateral and dip slip, east side up, is similar to a solution obtained for the 1956 San Miguel earthquake which proved consistent with observed surface deformation.

  11. Major QTLs control resistance to rice hoja blanca virus and its vector Tagosodes orizicolus.

    PubMed

    Romero, Luz E; Lozano, Ivan; Garavito, Andrea; Carabali, Silvio J; Triana, Monica; Villareal, Natalia; Reyes, Luis; Duque, Myriam C; Martinez, César P; Calvert, Lee; Lorieux, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Rice hoja blanca (white leaf) disease can cause severe yield losses in rice in the Americas. The disease is caused by the rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV), which is transmitted by the planthopper vector Tagosodes orizicolus. Because classical breeding schemes for this disease rely on expensive, time-consuming screenings, there is a need for alternatives such as marker-aided selection. The varieties Fedearroz 2000 and Fedearroz 50, which are resistant to RHBV and to the feeding damage caused by T. orizicolus, were crossed with the susceptible line WC366 to produce segregating F2:3 populations. The F3 families were scored for their resistance level to RHBV and T. orizicolus. The F2:3 lines of both crosses were genotyped using microsatellite markers. One major QTL on the short arm of chromosome 4 was identified for resistance to RHBV in the two populations. Two major QTL on chromosomes 5 and 7 were identified for resistance to T. orizicolus in the Fd2000 × WC366 and Fd50 × WC366 crosses, respectively. This comparative study using two distinct rice populations allowed for a better understanding of how the resistance to RHBV and its vector are controlled genetically. Simple marker-aided breeding schemes based on QTL information can be designed to improve rice germplasm to reduce losses caused by this important disease. PMID:24240781

  12. Major QTLs Control Resistance to Rice Hoja Blanca Virus and Its Vector Tagosodes orizicolus

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Luz E.; Lozano, Ivan; Garavito, Andrea; Carabali, Silvio J.; Triana, Monica; Villareal, Natalia; Reyes, Luis; Duque, Myriam C.; Martinez, César P.; Calvert, Lee; Lorieux, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Rice hoja blanca (white leaf) disease can cause severe yield losses in rice in the Americas. The disease is caused by the rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV), which is transmitted by the planthopper vector Tagosodes orizicolus. Because classical breeding schemes for this disease rely on expensive, time-consuming screenings, there is a need for alternatives such as marker-aided selection. The varieties Fedearroz 2000 and Fedearroz 50, which are resistant to RHBV and to the feeding damage caused by T. orizicolus, were crossed with the susceptible line WC366 to produce segregating F2:3 populations. The F3 families were scored for their resistance level to RHBV and T. orizicolus. The F2:3 lines of both crosses were genotyped using microsatellite markers. One major QTL on the short arm of chromosome 4 was identified for resistance to RHBV in the two populations. Two major QTL on chromosomes 5 and 7 were identified for resistance to T. orizicolus in the Fd2000 × WC366 and Fd50 × WC366 crosses, respectively. This comparative study using two distinct rice populations allowed for a better understanding of how the resistance to RHBV and its vector are controlled genetically. Simple marker-aided breeding schemes based on QTL information can be designed to improve rice germplasm to reduce losses caused by this important disease. PMID:24240781

  13. Fault slip distribution and fault roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, Thibault; Renard, François; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Bouchon, Michel; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2011-11-01

    We present analysis of the spatial correlations of seismological slip maps and fault topography roughness, illuminating their identical self-affine exponent. Though the complexity of the coseismic spatial slip distribution can be intuitively associated with geometrical or stress heterogeneities along the fault surface, this has never been demonstrated. Based on new measurements of fault surface topography and on statistical analyses of kinematic inversions of slip maps, we propose a model, which quantitatively characterizes the link between slip distribution and fault surface roughness. Our approach can be divided into two complementary steps: (i) Using a numerical computation, we estimate the influence of fault roughness on the frictional strength (pre-stress). We model a fault as a rough interface where elastic asperities are squeezed. The Hurst exponent ?, characterizing the self-affinity of the frictional strength field, approaches ?, where ? is the roughness exponent of the fault surface in the direction of slip. (ii) Using a quasi-static model of fault propagation, which includes the effect of long-range elastic interactions and spatial correlations in the frictional strength, the spatial slip correlation is observed to scale as ?, where ? represents the Hurst exponent of the slip distribution. Under the assumption that the origin of the spatial fluctuations in frictional strength along faults is the elastic squeeze of fault asperities, we show that self-affine geometrical properties of fault surface roughness control slip correlations and that ?. Given that ? for a wide range of faults (various accumulated displacement, host rock and slip movement), we predict that ?. Even if our quasi-static fault model is more relevant for creeping faults, the spatial slip correlations observed are consistent with those of seismological slip maps. A consequence is that the self-affinity property of slip roughness may be explained by fault geometry without considering

  14. The Agua Salud Project, Central Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stallard, R. F.; Elsenbeer, H.; Ogden, F. L.; Hall, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    The Agua Salud Project utilizes the Panama Canal's central role in world commerce to focus global attention on the ecosystem services provided by tropical forests. It will be the largest field experiment of its kind in the tropics aimed at quantifying the environmental services (water, carbon, and biodiversity) provided by tropical forests. The Agua Salud Watershed is our principal field site. This watershed and the headwaters of several adjacent rivers include both protected mature forests and a wide variety of land uses that are typical of rural Panama. Experiments at the scale of entire catchments will permit complete water and carbon inventories and exchanges for different landscape uses. The following questions will be addressed: (1) How do landscape treatments and management approaches affect ecosystem services such as carbon storage, water quality and quantity, dry- season water supply, and biodiversity? (2) Can management techniques be designed to optimize forest production along with ecosystem services during reforestation? (3) Do different tree planting treatments and landscape management approaches influence groundwater storage, which is thought to be critical to maintaining dry-season flow, thus insuring the full operation of the Canal during periods of reduced rainfall and severe climatic events such as El Niño. In addition we anticipate expanding this project to address biodiversity, social, and economic values of these forests.

  15. Flight elements: Fault detection and fault management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, H.; Patterson-Hine, A.; Edge, J. T.; Lawler, D.

    1990-01-01

    Fault management for an intelligent computational system must be developed using a top down integrated engineering approach. An approach proposed includes integrating the overall environment involving sensors and their associated data; design knowledge capture; operations; fault detection, identification, and reconfiguration; testability; causal models including digraph matrix analysis; and overall performance impacts on the hardware and software architecture. Implementation of the concept to achieve a real time intelligent fault detection and management system will be accomplished via the implementation of several objectives, which are: Development of fault tolerant/FDIR requirement and specification from a systems level which will carry through from conceptual design through implementation and mission operations; Implementation of monitoring, diagnosis, and reconfiguration at all system levels providing fault isolation and system integration; Optimize system operations to manage degraded system performance through system integration; and Lower development and operations costs through the implementation of an intelligent real time fault detection and fault management system and an information management system.

  16. Fault damage zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Seog; Peacock, David C. P.; Sanderson, David J.

    2004-03-01

    Damage zones show very similar geometries across a wide range of scales and fault types, including strike-slip, normal and thrust faults. We use a geometric classification of damage zones into tip-, wall-, and linking-damage zones, based on their location around faults. These classes can be sub-divided in terms of fault and fracture patterns within the damage zone. A variety of damage zone structures can occur at mode II tips of strike-slip faults, including wing cracks, horsetail fractures, antithetic faults, and synthetic branch faults. Wall damage zones result from the propagation of mode II and mode III fault tips through a rock, or from damage associated with the increase in slip on a fault. Wall damage zone structures include extension fractures, antithetic faults, synthetic faults, and rotated blocks with associated triangular openings. The damage formed at the mode III tips of strike-slip faults (e.g. observed in cliff sections) are classified as wall damage zones, because the damage zone structures are distributed along a fault trace in map view. Mixed-mode tips are likely to show characteristics of both mode II and mode III tips. Linking damage zones are developed at steps between two sub-parallel faults, and the structures developed depend on whether the step is extensional or contractional. Extension fractures and pull-aparts typically develop in extensional steps, whilst solution seams, antithetic faults and synthetic faults commonly develop in contractional steps. Rotated blocks, isolated lenses or strike-slip duplexes may occur in both extensional and contractional steps. Damage zone geometries and structures are strongly controlled by the location around a fault, the slip mode at a fault tip, and by the evolutionary stage of the fault. Although other factors control the nature of damage zones (e.g. lithology, rheology and stress system), the three-dimensional fault geometry and slip mode at each tip must be considered to gain an understanding of

  17. U-Series Transport Studies at the Pena Blanca, Mexico Natural Analog Site

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Simmons; M. T. Murrell

    2001-05-31

    Natural analogs provide a line of evidence that supports the understanding of how natural and engineered processes would occur over long time frames and large spatial scales at a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Studies of U-series disequilibria within and around uranium deposits can provide valuable information on the timing of actinide mobility and hence the stability of a potential repository over geologic time scales. The Nopal I uranium deposit at Pena Blanca, Mexico, is situated in unsaturated tuff that is similar in composition to the Topopah Spring Tuff of Yucca Mountain and closely matches other evaluation criteria for suitable natural analogs. By modeling the observed radioactive isotope disequilibria at Nopal I, we can estimate the rates of sorption-desorption and dissolution-precipitation of the radionuclides over time. Such information is vital to the testing or validation of performance assessment models for geologic nuclear waste disposal.

  18. Dust from Anthropogenic Sources in the Snowpack on Glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semborski, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    The tropical glaciers in the high mountains of Peru are currently experiencing rapid melting due to climate change and to increased human activities. The objective of my research project is to quantify the impact of deposited airborne particulates including dust on the spectral albedo of the glacial snowpack in the Cordillera Blanca located in Huascaran National Park, Ancash Region of Peru. Snow and ice samples collected from several peaks throughout the range will be melted and filtered through 25 mm quartz filters (Pallflex Tissuquartz, 0.7 micron pore size). The filters will be analyzed using two methods: Optical and Thermal. Collected spectral albedo measurements will be used to help quantify the results. The results will help determine spatial variability, and therefore potential sources and quantitative impact on snowpack albedo and glacial melting.

  19. Measurements of light-absorbing particles on the glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J. D.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Celestian, A.

    2015-02-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been rapidly losing mass since the 1970s. In addition to the documented increase in temperature, increases in light-absorbing particles deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we report on measurements of light-absorbing particles sampled from glaciers during three surveys in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains in Peru. During three research expeditions in the dry seasons (May-August) of 2011, 2012 and 2013, 240 snow samples were collected from 15 mountain peaks over altitudes ranging from 4800 to nearly 6800 m. Several mountains were sampled each of the 3 years and some mountains were sampled multiple times during the same year. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field then later analyzed using the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM), a new technique that measures the ability of particles on filters to absorb visible light. LAHM results have been calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). As sample filters often contain dust in addition to BC, results are presented in terms of effective black carbon (eBC). During the 2013 survey, snow samples were collected and kept frozen for analysis with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Calculated eBC mass from the LAHM analysis and the SP2 refractory black carbon (rBC) results were well correlated (r2 = 0.92). These results indicate that a substantial portion of the light-absorbing particles in the more polluted regions were likely BC. The 3 years of data show that glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains close to human population centers have substantially higher levels of eBC (as high as 70 ng g-1) than remote glaciers (as low as 2.0 ng g-1 eBC), indicating that population centers can influence local glaciers by sourcing BC.

  20. Measurements of light absorbing particulates on the glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J. D.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Celestian, A.

    2014-10-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been rapidly losing mass since the 1970s. In addition to the documented increase in air temperature, increases in light absorbing particulates deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we report on measurements of light absorbing particulates sampled from glaciers during three surveys in the Cordillera Blanca in Peru. During three research expeditions in the dry seasons (May-August) of 2011, 2012 and 2013, two hundred and forty snow samples were collected from fifteen mountain peaks over altitudes ranging from 4800 to nearly 6800 m. Several mountains were sampled each of the three expeditions and some mountains were sampled multiple times during the same expedition. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field then later analyzed using the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM), a new technique that measures the ability of particulates on filters to absorb visible light. LAHM results have been calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). As sample filters often contain dust in addition to BC, results are presented in terms of effective Black Carbon (eBC). During the 2013 survey, snow samples were collected and kept frozen for analysis with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Calculated eBC mass from the filter analysis and the SP2 refractory Black Carbon (rBC) results were well correlated (r2 = 0.92). These results indicate that a substantial portion of the light absorbing particulates in the more polluted areas were likely BC. The three years of data show that glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains close to human population centers have substantially higher levels of eBC (as high as 70 ng g-1) than remote glaciers (as low as 2.0 ng g-1 eBC), indicating that population centers can influence local glaciers by sourcing BC.

  1. Sources and pathways of stream generation in tropical proglacial valleys of the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Ryan P.; Lautz, Laura K.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M.; Mark, Bryan G.; Chavez, Daniel; Baraer, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Tropical glaciers supply approximately half of dry-season stream discharge in glacierized valleys of the Cordillera Blanca, Peru. The remainder of streamflow originates as groundwater stored in alpine meadows and other proglacial geomorphic features. A better understanding of the hydrogeology of alpine groundwater, including sources, storage zones, and the locations and magnitudes of contributions to streamflow, is important for making accurate estimates of glacial inputs to the hydrologic budget, and for our ability to make predictions about future water resources as glaciers retreat. This field study focuses on two high-elevation meadows in valleys of the Cordillera Blanca, in headwaters and mid-valley locations. Tracer measurements of stream and spring discharge and groundwater-surface water exchange were combined with synoptic sampling of water isotopic and geochemical composition in order to characterize and quantify contributions to streamflow from different groundwater reservoirs. At the headwaters site, groundwater supplied approximately half of stream discharge from a small meadow, with most originating in an alluvial fan adjacent to the meadow and little (6%) from the meadow itself; however, at the mid-valley site, where meadows are extensive, local groundwater has a large impact on streamflow and chemistry through large net contributions to discharge and turnover of surface water due to gross exchanges with groundwater. At the mid-valley site, stream discharge increased by 200 L s-1 (18% of average discharge) over 1.2 km as it descended a moraine between two meadows. Such valley-crossing moraines, which create significant steps in the down-valley slope, are likely locations of substantial groundwater contribution to streams.

  2. Spatial distribution of canine zoonotic enteroparasites in Bahía Blanca, Argentina.

    PubMed

    La Sala, Luciano F; Leiboff, Anastasia; Burgos, Julián M; Costamagna, Sixto R

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research were: (1) to determine the occurrence of zoonotic enteroparasites in dog feces from Bahía Blanca, Argentina; (2) to characterize the spatial distribution of the parasites found in association with the quality of life index (QLI) in neighborhoods of Bahía Blanca; and (3) to determine if the presence of a particular parasite genus in a stool sample was facilitated or impeded by the presence of other parasite genera. Samples of dog stools (n=475) were collected between December 2012 and December 2013 in areas with varying QLI. The association between QLI values and the presence of parasites was analyzed using logistic regression. Overall enteroparasite occurrence was 36.6%. Parasitic forms found included nematode larvae, cysts of Blastocystis spp., Giardia spp., and oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp., and eggs of Ancylostoma caninum, Toxocara canis, cestodes and Trichuris spp. For certain enteroparasites, we detected significant associations between their occurrence and QLI. Feces collected in areas with medium and low QLI were 2.46 and 5.43 times more likely, respectively, to contain A. caninum than stools from the high-QLI area. Samples from areas with low QLI were 2.36 times more likely to contain Trichuris spp. than those from the high QLI area. Regarding protozoa, feces from areas with low QLI were 2.4 times more likely to be positive than those from areas with high QLI. We demonstrated that canine zoonotic parasites have a wide distribution in the study area, and that occurrence is higher in neighborhoods with lower QLI. PMID:25705047

  3. Single layer centrifugation (SLC) improves sperm quality of cryopreserved Blanca-Celtibérica buck semen.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Rabadán, P; Morrell, J M; Johannisson, A; Ramón, M; García-Álvarez, O; Maroto-Morales, A; Alvaro-García, P J; Pérez-Guzmán, M D; Fernández-Santos, M R; Garde, J J; Soler, A J

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of sperm selection by means of single layer centrifugation (SLC) on sperm quality after cryopreservation, either when SLC is used before freezing or after thawing, using Blanca-Celtibérica buck semen collected by electroejaculation (EE). Ejaculates from six bucks were collected by EE and divided into two aliquots. One of them (unselected) was diluted with Biladyl(®) by the two-step method and frozen over nitrogen vapor. The other aliquot was selected by the SLC technique and subsequently frozen in the same way as the unselected samples (SLC before freezing). In a further treatment, two unselected straws were thawed and SLC was carried out (SLC after thawing). At thawing, sperm motility of all samples ((i) unselected; (ii) selected before freezing and (iii) selected after thawing) was evaluated by CASA. In addition, integrity of the plasma membrane, mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS production and DNA fragmentation index were assessed by flow cytometry. Most of the sperm parameters were improved (P≤0.001) in samples selected by SLC after thawing in relation to unselected or selected by SLC before freezing. The percentage of progressive motile spermatozoa was greater (86%) for sperm samples selected after thawing compared with unselected (58%) or selected before freezing (54%). Moreover, percentages of spermatozoa with intact plasma membrane and spermatozoa with high mitochondrial membrane potential (hMMP) were also greater for sperm samples selected after thawing compared to sperm samples unselected or selected before freezing (spermatozoa with intact plasma membrane: 80% vs. 32% vs. 12%; spermatozoa with hMMP: 54% vs. 1% vs. 15%; respectively). Therefore, sperm quality after cryopreservation is improved in Blanca-Celtibérica buck ejaculates collected by EE when a sperm selection technique such as SLC is carried out after thawing. PMID:23084569

  4. Lahar hazards at Agua volcano, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Vallance, J.W.; Matías, O.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    At 3760 m, Agua volcano towers more than 3500 m above the Pacific coastal plain to the south and 2000 m above the Guatemalan highlands to the north. The volcano is within 5 to 10 kilometers (km) of Antigua, Guatemala and several other large towns situated on its northern apron. These towns have a combined population of nearly 100,000. It is within about 20 km of Escuintla (population, ca. 100,000) to the south. Though the volcano has not been active in historical time, or about the last 500 years, it has the potential to produce debris flows (watery flows of mud, rock, and debris—also known as lahars when they occur on a volcano) that could inundate these nearby populated areas.

  5. Fault tree handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Haasl, D.F.; Roberts, N.H.; Vesely, W.E.; Goldberg, F.F.

    1981-01-01

    This handbook describes a methodology for reliability analysis of complex systems such as those which comprise the engineered safety features of nuclear power generating stations. After an initial overview of the available system analysis approaches, the handbook focuses on a description of the deductive method known as fault tree analysis. The following aspects of fault tree analysis are covered: basic concepts for fault tree analysis; basic elements of a fault tree; fault tree construction; probability, statistics, and Boolean algebra for the fault tree analyst; qualitative and quantitative fault tree evaluation techniques; and computer codes for fault tree evaluation. Also discussed are several example problems illustrating the basic concepts of fault tree construction and evaluation.

  6. Prevalence of Pediculus humanus capitis infestation among kindergarten children in Bahía Blanca city, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, María Mercedes; González, Jorge Werdin; Stefanazzi, Natalia; Serralunga, Gabriela; Yañez, Loreto; Ferrero, Adriana Alicia

    2012-09-01

    The human head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer (Anoplura: Pediculidae), is a worldwide public health concern. This human obligate ectoparasite usually infests school age children. The aim of this work was to investigate the prevalence of head lice in kindergarten children from Bahia Blanca. In addition, the influence of risk factors for pediculosis infestation, such as gender, hair characteristics, and socioeconomic class, was studied in relation to the prevalence of this ectoparasite. From a total of 220 pupils examined (125 girls and 95 boys), 94 showed pediculosis. The overall prevalence of head lice infestation was 42.7 %. Pediculosis was more frequent in girls (53.6 %) than in boys (28.4 %) and in medium, long, and very long hairs. No differences were found between socioeconomic classes. This indicated that head lice are relatively common in kindergarten children from Bahía Blanca. PMID:22752696

  7. Uranium-rich opal from the Nopal I uranium deposit, Peña Blanca, Mexico: Evidence for the uptake and retardation of radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Michael; Fayek, Mostafa; Hawthorne, Frank C.

    2010-01-01

    The Nopal I uranium deposit of the Sierra Peña Blanca, Mexico, has been the focus of numerous studies because of its economic importance and its use as a natural analog for nuclear-waste disposal in volcanic tuff. Secondary uranyl minerals such as uranophane, Ca[(UO 2)(SiO 3OH)] 2(H 2O) 5, and weeksite, (K,Na) 2[(UO 2) 2(Si 5O 13)](H 2O) 3, occur in the vadose zone of the deposit and are overgrown by silica glaze. These glazes consist mainly of opal A, which contains small particles of uraninite, UO 2, and weeksite. Close to a fault between brecciated volcanic rocks and welded tuff, a greenish silica glaze coats the altered breccia. Yellow silica glazes from the center of the breccia pipe and from the high-grade pile coat uranyl-silicates, predominantly uranophane and weeksite. All silica glazes are strongly zoned with respect to U and Ca, and the distribution of these elements indicates curved features and spherical particles inside the coatings. The concentrations of U and Ca correlate in the different zones and both elements inversely correlate with the concentration of Si. Zones within the silica glazes contain U and Ca in a 1:1 ratio with maximum concentrations of 0.08 and 0.15 at.% for the greenish and yellow glazes, respectively, suggesting trapping of either Ca 1U 1-aqueous species or -particles in the colloidal silica. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), and oxygen-isotope ratios measured by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) indicate higher U 6+/U 4+ ratios, higher proportions of Si-OH groups and lower δ 18O values for the greenish silica glaze than for the yellow silica glaze. These differences in composition reflect increasing brecciation, porosity, and permeability from the center of the breccia pipe (yellow silica glaze) toward the fault (green silica glaze), where the seepage of meteoric water and Eh are higher.

  8. Remote sensing analysis for fault-zones detection in the Central Andean Plateau (Catamarca, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traforti, Anna; Massironi, Matteo; Zampieri, Dario; Carli, Cristian

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing techniques have been extensively used to detect the structural framework of investigated areas, which includes lineaments, fault zones and fracture patterns. The identification of these features is fundamental in exploration geology, as it allows the definition of suitable sites for the exploitation of different resources (e.g. ore mineral, hydrocarbon, geothermal energy and groundwater). Remote sensing techniques, typically adopted in fault identification, have been applied to assess the geological and structural framework of the Laguna Blanca area (26°35'S-66°49'W). This area represents a sector of the south-central Andes localized in the Argentina region of Catamarca, along the south-eastern margin of the Puna plateau. The study area is characterized by a Precambrian low-grade metamorphic basement intruded by Ordovician granitoids. These rocks are unconformably covered by a volcano-sedimentary sequence of Miocene age, followed by volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of Upper Miocene to Plio-Pleistocene age. All these units are cut by two systems of major faults, locally characterized by 15-20 m wide damage zones. The detection of main tectonic lineaments in the study area was firstly carried out by classical procedures: image sharpening of Landsat 7 ETM+ images, directional filters applied to ASTER images, medium resolution Digital Elevation Models analysis (SRTM and ASTER GDEM) and hill shades interpretation. In addition, a new approach in fault zone identification, based on multispectral satellite images classification, has been tested in the Laguna Blanca area and in other sectors of south-central Andes. In this perspective, several prominent fault zones affecting basement and granitoid rocks have been sampled. The collected fault gouge samples have been analyzed with a Field-Pro spectrophotometer mounted on a goniometer. We acquired bidirectional reflectance spectra, from 0.35μm to 2.5μm with 1nm spectral sampling, of the sampled fault rocks

  9. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  10. Fault recovery characteristics of the fault tolerant multi-processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Peter A.

    1990-01-01

    The fault handling performance of the fault tolerant multiprocessor (FTMP) was investigated. Fault handling errors detected during fault injection experiments were characterized. In these fault injection experiments, the FTMP disabled a working unit instead of the faulted unit once every 500 faults, on the average. System design weaknesses allow active faults to exercise a part of the fault management software that handles byzantine or lying faults. It is pointed out that these weak areas in the FTMP's design increase the probability that, for any hardware fault, a good LRU (line replaceable unit) is mistakenly disabled by the fault management software. It is concluded that fault injection can help detect and analyze the behavior of a system in the ultra-reliable regime. Although fault injection testing cannot be exhaustive, it has been demonstrated that it provides a unique capability to unmask problems and to characterize the behavior of a fault-tolerant system.

  11. Past peak water in Peru's Cordillera Blanca: diagnosing the demise of glacier influence on stream discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraer, M.; Mark, B. G.; McKenzie, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    In conditions of continuous retreat, glaciers generate a temporary increase in stream runoff as they lose mass. Yet as the extant glacier volume diminishes, the annual runoff reaches a peak and is followed by a persistent decrease. In the present study we explore historical and modern discharge measurements measured between 1952 and 2010 at nine stations across the upper Rio Santa watershed, the basin that drains most of the western Cordillera Blanca, Peru, and situate the regional stream hydrology within this glacier influence change sequence. The relation between glacial retreat and stream discharge is investigated by the use of a simple water balance model that simulates glacier retreat influence on the annual and dry-season discharge, as well as on the annual discharge variability, permitting distinction between four phases of glacier retreat hydrological impact. The link between the modeled synthetic time series and the Cordillera Blanca discharge records is assessed using polynomial regressions and the Mann-Kendall non-parametric statistical test on daily discharge series for three hydrograph parameters: the yearly average, the dry season discharge and the variability coefficient. The glacial retreat for the same period is estimated using existing historical data of glacial coverage from an analysis of composite ASTER imagery that shows accelerating glacier recession in the upper Rio Santa watershed, with the overall glacierized area decreasing annually by 0.81 % between 1990 and 2009. The results provide statistically significant evidence that seven of the nine discharge time series have crossed a critical transition, and now exhibit a decreasing trend related to glacier retreat. La Balsa station measures discharge from the entire upper Rio Santa before entering a major hydro-electrical power plant, and it is undergoing a decline in dry season flow that probably began during the 1970s. Our results predict that if the glaciers completely melt, stream

  12. Panama Canal Watershed Experiment- Agua Salud Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stallard, Robert F.; Ogden, Fred L.; Elsenbeer, Helmut; Hall, Jefferson S.

    2010-01-01

    The Agua Salud Project utilizes the Panama Canal’s (Canal) central role in world commerce to focus global attention on the ecosystem services provided by tropical forests. The Canal was one of the great engineering projects in the world. Completed in 1914, after almost a decade of concerted effort, its 80 km length greatly shortened the voyage between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. An entire class of ships, the Panamax, has been constructed to maximize the amount of cargo that can be carried in a Canal passage. In today’s parlance, the Canal is a “green” operation, powered largely by water (Table 1). The locks, three pairs on each end with a net lift of 27 meters, are gravity fed. For each ton of cargo that is transferred from ocean to ocean, about 13 tons of water (m3) are used. Lake Gatún forms much of the waterway in the Canal transect. Hydroelectricity is generated at the Gatún dam, whenever there is surplus water, and at Madden Dam (completed in 1936) when water is transferred from Lake Alhajuela to Lake Gatún. The Canal watershed is the source of drinking water for Panama City and Colon City, at either end of the Canal, and numerous towns in between.

  13. Fault model development for fault tolerant VLSI design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, C. R.; Lala, P. K.; Ali, A. M.; Visweswaran, G. S.; Ganguly, S.

    1988-05-01

    Fault models provide systematic and precise representations of physical defects in microcircuits in a form suitable for simulation and test generation. The current difficulty in testing VLSI circuits can be attributed to the tremendous increase in design complexity and the inappropriateness of traditional stuck-at fault models. This report develops fault models for three different types of common defects that are not accurately represented by the stuck-at fault model. The faults examined in this report are: bridging faults, transistor stuck-open faults, and transient faults caused by alpha particle radiation. A generalized fault model could not be developed for the three fault types. However, microcircuit behavior and fault detection strategies are described for the bridging, transistor stuck-open, and transient (alpha particle strike) faults. The results of this study can be applied to the simulation and analysis of faults in fault tolerant VLSI circuits.

  14. Morphology and dynamics of large subtidal dunes in Bahia Blanca estuary, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minor Salvatierra, Marta; Aliotta, Salvador; Ginsberg, Silvia Susana

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to carry out a detailed analysis of subtidal dune morphology and temporal variability and to estimate dune migration rate to improve knowledge of this topic, and so enhance the existing data on different marine environments in the world and especially in South America where this information is limited. Two swath bathymetry surveys were conducted across a dune field in the Bahia Blanca Estuary (Argentina). Morphometric parameters and migration rate according to the dune type, were analyzed. The field is composed of large dunes exhibiting two morphological configurations, which are differentiated into sinuous and barchan dunes. The dunes studied are the largest of the estuary, with heights and wavelengths greater than 5 m and 130 m, respectively. The crests of the large dunes are arranged with an orientation perpendicular to the axis of the channel. From geometrical analysis of the parameters, the dunes show a weakly positive correlation between dune height and wavelength as too between dune height and water depth. No clear relationship was observed between maximum height and wavelength parameters with water depth. Across the estuary, the bedforms migrate in the ebb direction, with mean rate of 43 m year- 1. Comparison of our results with previous data shows that during three decades the western boundary of dune field has been displaced 900 m towards the outer estuary, however the dune field configuration and distribution of diverse types of bedform appear to be relatively stable.

  15. Uranium-series dating of actinide decay series mobility at Pena Blanca

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, P.R.; Goldstein, S.J.; Murrell, M.T.

    1997-12-31

    Studies of U-series disequilibria near uranium ore deposits can provide valuable information on the mobility of actinides and their daughters over the range of timescales needed to assess the stability of proposed waste repositories. We have applied highly sensitive TIMS methods to obtain 238U-234U-230Th dates for three whole rock samples within a {approximately}30 in long fracture emanating into surrounding tuff from the deposit at Pena Blanca, Mexico. The 238U-234U-230Th data lie on a whole-rock isochron that requires closed-system behavior for the last 380 ka. Preliminary 231Pa-235U data for the U-rich vein also indicates closed system behavior for at least the last 100 ka. In contrast, 226Ra/230Th activity ratios range from 0.76-0.99 which indicates more recent Ra mobility within the fracture most likely due to surface water infiltration. Our results require uranium, thorium and protactinium stability despite recent radium mobility and provide important constraints on repository stability over {approximately}100 ka timescales.

  16. FTAPE: A fault injection tool to measure fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1995-01-01

    The paper introduces FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The tool combines system-wide fault injection with a controllable workload. A workload generator is used to create high stress conditions for the machine. Faults are injected based on this workload activity in order to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio and performance degradation are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  17. FTAPE: A fault injection tool to measure fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1994-01-01

    The paper introduces FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The tool combines system-wide fault injection with a controllable workload. A workload generator is used to create high stress conditions for the machine. Faults are injected based on this workload activity in order to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio and performance degradation are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  18. FTAPE: A fault injection tool to measure fault tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1994-07-01

    The paper introduces FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The tool combines system-wide fault injection with a controllable workload. A workload generator is used to create high stress conditions for the machine. Faults are injected based on this workload activity in order to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio and performance degradation are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  19. Isolability of faults in sensor fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Reza; Langari, Reza

    2011-10-01

    A major concern with fault detection and isolation (FDI) methods is their robustness with respect to noise and modeling uncertainties. With this in mind, several approaches have been proposed to minimize the vulnerability of FDI methods to these uncertainties. But, apart from the algorithm used, there is a theoretical limit on the minimum effect of noise on detectability and isolability. This limit has been quantified in this paper for the problem of sensor fault diagnosis based on direct redundancies. In this study, first a geometric approach to sensor fault detection is proposed. The sensor fault is isolated based on the direction of residuals found from a residual generator. This residual generator can be constructed from an input-output or a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) based model. The simplicity of this technique, compared to the existing methods of sensor fault diagnosis, allows for more rational formulation of the isolability concepts in linear systems. Using this residual generator and the assumption of Gaussian noise, the effect of noise on isolability is studied, and the minimum magnitude of isolable fault in each sensor is found based on the distribution of noise in the measurement system. Finally, some numerical examples are presented to clarify this approach.

  20. Mapping Active Faults and Tectonic Geomorphology offshore central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Watt, J. T.; Hart, P. E.; Sliter, R. W.; Wong, F. L.

    2009-12-01

    In June 2008, and July 2009, the USGS conducted two high-resolution, marine, seismic-reflection surveys across the continental shelf and upper slope between Piedras Blancas and Point Sal, central California, in order to better characterize regional earthquake sources. More than 1,300 km of single-channel seismic data were acquired aboard the USGS R/V Parke Snavely using a 500-joule mini-sparker source fired at a 0.5-second shot interval and recorded with a 15-meter streamer. Most tracklines were run perpendicular to the coast at 800-meter spacing, extending from the nearshore (~ 10-15 m water depth) to as far as 20 km offshore. Sub-bottom imaging varies with substrate, ranging from outstanding (100 to 150 m of penetration) in inferred Quaternary shallow marine, shelf and upper slope deposits to poor (0 to 10 m) in the Mesozoic basement rocks. Marine magnetic data were collected simultaneously on this survey, and both data sets are being integrated with new aeromagnetic data, publicly available industry seismic-reflection data, onshore geology, seismicity, and high-resolution bathymetry. Goals of the study are to map geology, structure, and sediment distribution; to document fault location, length, segmentation, shallow geometry and structure; and to identify possible sampling targets for constraining fault slip rates, earthquake recurrence, and tsunami hazard potential. The structure and tectonic geomorphology of the >100-km-long, right-lateral, Hosgri fault zone and its connections to the Los Osos, Pecho, Oceano and other northwest-trending inboard faults are the focus of this ongoing work. The Hosgri fault forms the eastern margin of the offshore Santa Maria basin and coincides in places with the outer edge of the narrow (5- to 15-km-wide), structurally complex continental shelf. The Hosgri is imaged as a relatively continuous, vertical fault zone that extends upward to the seafloor; varies significantly and rapidly along strike; and incorporates numerous

  1. Slope deformations in high-mountain regions as observed by InSAR: Examples from the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Holger; Strozzi, Tazio; Caduff, Rafael; Huggel, Christian; Klimeš, Jan; Vilímek, Vít; Wiesmann, Andreas; Kääb, Andreas; Cochachin, Alejo; Plummer, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Steep topography, the world's highest concentration of tropical glaciers, numerous glacial lakes and strong seismic activity combined with a densely populated valley bottom in the Rio Santa basin characterize the Cordillera Blanca in Peru. Besides glacier-related processes, a variety of landslide types and processes is present outside the glaciated areas, favoured by the steep terrain, geological conditions, sparse vegetation, intense precipitation, and strong seismicity. This combination of high hazard potentials and vulnerabilities results in a long list of natural disasters. Information on surface displacements is very valuable for early detection of emerging hazard potentials and their assessment. Interferometric processing of SAR data (InSAR) provides the possibility to remotely detect different types of surface displacement processes, also in remote locations where no other monitoring data are available. This contribution, developed under the ESA-funded S:GLA:MO project (sglamo.gamma-rs.ch), shows the potential of InSAR products for hazard assessments and glaciological investigations in high-mountain regions. We present a selection of different surface displacements as observed in the Cordillera Blanca based on InSAR data: a landslide zone near the Rampac Grande village, where in 2009 a landslide caused casualties and property loss; a landslide at the entry of the Santa Cruz Valley, northern Cordillera Blanca, where the displacement history could be reconstructed over five years; surface displacements at the interior moraine slopes surrounding Laguna Palcacocha, a major glacier lake above the city of Huaraz, which are compared to and complemented by geophysical investigations in the field; surface displacements at the moraine damming Laguna Safuna Alta, a glacier lake in the northern part of the Cordillera Blanca; glacier velocities across the entire Cordillera Blanca, revealing ice flow velocities of more than 200 m yr-1 at certain locations at the end of

  2. Constraining Subsurface Structure and Composition Using Seismic Refraction Surveys of Proglacial Valleys in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glas, R. L.; Lautz, L.; McKenzie, J. M.; Mark, B. G.; Baker, E. A.; Aubry-Wake, C.; Somers, L. D.; Wigmore, O.

    2015-12-01

    As tropical glaciers rapidly recede in response to climate change, the storage and discharge of groundwater will play an increasing role in regulating river baseflow, particularly during the dry season, when stream flow is currently sustained predominantly by glacial melt. Little is understood regarding the hydrogeologic processes controlling base flow characteristics of low-gradient proglacial valleys of the Cordillera Blanca in Northwestern Peru, which has the world's highest density of tropical glaciers. To better understand the processes of groundwater storage and discharge in proglacial meadows, we completed seismic refraction surveys in three representative valleys of the Cordillera Blanca range: the Quilcayhuanca, Yanamarey, and Pachacoto valleys. The locations of survey transects were chosen based on locations of previous sediment core sampling, GPR lines, and quantification of groundwater-surface water interaction derived from dye and temperature tracing experiments. The seismic surveys consisted of 48 vertical component geophones with 2.5 m spacing. Across the three representative valleys a total of 15 surveys were conducted, covering a distance of 1800 m in cross, down, and oblique-valley directions. Preliminary interpretation of the seismic refraction data indicates a maximum imaging depth of 16 m below land surface, and a transition from glacio-lacustrine sediments to buried saturated talus at a depth of 6 m in the Quilcayhuanca valley. The organic-rich glacio-lacustrine sediments in the Yanamarey valley have seismic velocities ranging from 300 to 800 m/s and are >16 m in thickness at mid- valley. Weathered metasedimentary bedrock in the Pachacoto valley was imaged at ~5 m below the valley surface, exhibiting a p-wave velocity of 3400 m/s. The knowledge of hydrogeologic structure derived from seismic refraction surveys will provide crucial boundary conditions for future groundwater models of the valleys of the Cordillera Blanca.

  3. Reinterpretation of the formation of the "crooked moraine" of the debris-covered Hatunraju Glacier (Cordillera Blanca, Perú)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrizaga, L.

    2012-04-01

    The Hatunraju Glacier (9°00'S/70°40'W) is located in the Parón valley in the northern part of the Cordillera Blanca. The almost 4 km long and steeply inclined glacier flows down from the Huandoy-N-Side (6395 m) into the Parón valley to an elevation of 4250 m a.s.l.. The extremely narrow glacier is in its entire ablation area heavily debris-covered. It is one of the few glaciers, which dam with its debris-mantled glacier tongue a main river in this mountain range. In this case the Hatunraju glacier produces the largest glacier-dammed lake in the Cordillera Blanca, the Laguna Parón. In some other aspects, this glacier proves to be distinct from the majority of the glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca: It is flowing on an almost up to 250 m high moraine pedestal ("moraine-dammed raised bed glacier") and the glacier makes a bend of almost 90° when entering into the main valley. The present paper focuses in particular on the last point: the formation of the so called "crooked moraine". It has been explained by Lliboutry (1977) as a result of a glacier lake outburst and the subsequent destruction of the latero-frontal moraine. The later process supposed to be the trigger of the abrupt change in the flow direction of the lower part of the glacier. Recent investigations suggest an alternative genesis of the crooked moraine considering the distinct phases of the glaciation history of the Parón valley. The here proposed formation pattern is also paradigmatic for other crooked debris-covered glaciers, especially in High Asia. Comparative examples will be provided from the Karakoram and Himalayas. The research work on the Hatunraju Glacier is part of a project on the glacial geomorphology in the Tropical Andes financed by the Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation.

  4. Three-dimensional fault drawing

    SciTech Connect

    Dongan, L. )

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the author presents a structure interpretation based on three-dimensional fault drawing. It is required that fault closure must be based on geological theory, spacial plotting principle and restrictions in seismic exploration. Geological structure can be well ascertained by analysing the shapes and interrelation of the faults which have been drawn through reasonable fault point closure and fault point correlation. According to this method, the interrelation of fault points is determined by first closing corresponding fault points in intersecting sections, then reasonably correlating the relevant fault points. Fault point correlation is not achieved in base map, so its correctness can be improved greatly. Three-dimensional fault closure is achieved by iteratively revising. The closure grid should be densified gradually. The distribution of major fault system is determined prior to secondary faults. Fault interpretation by workstation also follows this procedure.

  5. Trace elements in mineral separates of the Pena Blanca Spring aubrite - Implications for the evolution of the aubrite parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lodders, K.; Palme, H.; Wlotzka, F.

    1993-01-01

    A detailed chemical study is conducted of the Pena Blanca Spring aubrite in order to clarify both the origin of the aubrite parent body (APB) and its relation to the enstatite chondrites. The distribution of REE among aubritic minerals cannot be the result of fractional distillation, which would occur if high degrees of partial melting had occurred on the APB. The REE distributions instead indicate a complete equilibrium of oldhamite and other phases, so that a brief nonequilibrium melting episode must have led to the segregation of metal and sulfides.

  6. Mapping Glacier Dynamics and Proglacial Wetlands with a Multispectral UAV at 5000m in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigmore, O.; Mark, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    The glaciers of the Cordillera Blanca, Peru are rapidly retreating as a result of rising temperatures, transforming the hydrology and impacting the socio-economic and environmental systems of the Rio Santa basin. Documenting the heterogeneous spatial patterns of these changes to understand processes of water storage and flow is hindered by technologic and logistic challenges. Highly complex topography, cloud cover and coarse spatial resolution limit the application of satellite data while airborne data collection remains costly and potentially dangerous. However, recent developments have made Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technology a viable and potentially transformative method for studying glacier dynamics and proglacial hydrology. The extreme altitudes (4000-6700m) of the Cordillera Blanca limit the use of 'off the shelf' UAVs. Therefore we developed a low cost multispectral (visible, near-infrared and thermal infrared) multirotor UAV capable of conducting fully autonomous aerial surveys at elevations over 5000m within the glacial valleys of the Cordillera Blanca. Using this platform we have completed repeat aerial surveys (in 2014 and 2015) of the debris covered Llaca Glacier, generating highly accurate 10-20cm DEM's and 5cm orthomosaics using a structure from motion workflow. Analysis of these data reveals a highly dynamic system with some areas of the glacier losing as much as 16m of vertical elevation, while other areas have gained up to 5m of elevation over one year. The magnitude and direction of these changes appears to be associated with the presence of debris free ice faces and meltwater ponds. Additionally, we have mapped proglacial meadow and wetland systems. Thermal mosaics at 10-20cm resolution are providing novel insights into the hydrologic pathways of glacier meltwater including mapping the distribution of artesian springs that feed these wetland systems. The high spatial resolution of these UAV datasets facilitates a better understanding of the

  7. How Faults Shape the Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

    1992-01-01

    Presents fault activity with an emphasis on earthquakes and changes in continent shapes. Identifies three types of fault movement: normal, reverse, and strike faults. Discusses the seismic gap theory, plate tectonics, and the principle of superposition. Vignettes portray fault movement, and the locations of the San Andreas fault and epicenters of…

  8. Stratigraphy of the PB-1 well, Nopal I uranium deposit, Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, P.; Fayek, M.; Goodell, P.; Ghezzehei, T.; Melchor, F.; Murrell, M.; Oliver, R.; Reyes-Cortes, I.A.; de la Garza, R.; Simmons, A.

    2008-08-01

    The Nopal I site in the Pena Blanca uranium district has a number of geologic and hydrologic similarities to the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, making it a useful analogue to evaluate process models for radionuclide transport. The PB-1 well was drilled in 2003 at the Nopal I uranium deposit as part of a DOE-sponsored natural analogue study to constrain processes affecting radionuclide transport. The well penetrates through the Tertiary volcanic section down to Cretaceous limestone and intersects the regional aquifer system. The well, drilled along the margin of the Nopal I ore body, was continuously cored to a depth of 250 m, thus providing an opportunity to document the local stratigraphy. Detailed observations of these units were afforded through petrographic description and rock-property measurements of the core, together with geophysical logs of the well. The uppermost unit encountered in the PB-1 well is the Nopal Formation, a densely welded, crystal-rich, rhyolitic ash-flow tuff. This cored section is highly altered and devitrified, with kaolinite, quartz, chlorite, and montmorillonite replacing feldspars and much of the groundmass. Breccia zones within the tuff contain fracture fillings of hematite, limonite, goethite, jarosite, and opal. A zone of intense clay alteration encountered in the depth interval 17.45-22.30 m was interpreted to represent the basal vitrophyre of this unit. Underlying the Nopal Formation is the Coloradas Formation, which consists of a welded lithic-rich rhyolitic ash-flow tuff. The cored section of this unit has undergone devitrification and oxidation, and has a similar alteration mineralogy to that observed in the Nopal tuff. A sharp contact between the Coloradas tuff and the underlying Pozos Formation was observed at a depth of 136.38 m. The Pozos Formation consists of poorly sorted conglomerate containing clasts of subangular to subrounded fragments of volcanic rocks, limestone, and chert

  9. Fault detection and fault tolerance in robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visinsky, Monica; Walker, Ian D.; Cavallaro, Joseph R.

    1992-01-01

    Robots are used in inaccessible or hazardous environments in order to alleviate some of the time, cost and risk involved in preparing men to endure these conditions. In order to perform their expected tasks, the robots are often quite complex, thus increasing their potential for failures. If men must be sent into these environments to repair each component failure in the robot, the advantages of using the robot are quickly lost. Fault tolerant robots are needed which can effectively cope with failures and continue their tasks until repairs can be realistically scheduled. Before fault tolerant capabilities can be created, methods of detecting and pinpointing failures must be perfected. This paper develops a basic fault tree analysis of a robot in order to obtain a better understanding of where failures can occur and how they contribute to other failures in the robot. The resulting failure flow chart can also be used to analyze the resiliency of the robot in the presence of specific faults. By simulating robot failures and fault detection schemes, the problems involved in detecting failures for robots are explored in more depth.

  10. Infrared Imaging and Modeling of Proglacial Stream Temperature in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. A.; Lautz, L.; McKenzie, J. M.; Aubry-Wake, C.; Somers, L. D.; Wigmore, O.; Glose, A.; Glas, R. L.; Mark, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    In the tropical Andes, glacial meltwater is an important water resource for downstream communities, especially during the dry season. Due to climate change, glacial retreat is accelerating and straining already limited water resources in the region. It is hypothesized that groundwater storage and discharge will play a critical role in sustaining future river flows. To improve our understanding of the hydrologic fluxes in proglacial valleys of the tropical Andes, we monitored a ~1.2 km reach of the Quilcayhuanca River, in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, using a high resolution infrared (IR) camera and in-stream temperature sensors. We positioned the IR camera on the southern valley wall, 96 m above the valley floor, and collected >700 IR images at 10 minute intervals over 5 days. We deployed 40 temperature sensors along the stream at ~25 m intervals and 10 sensors at additional control points throughout the surrounding valley, recording temperature at 10 minute intervals. Groundwater temperature was recorded in 6 wells in the study area. The reach had diurnal temperature fluctuations from ~4 to 13°C, but did not exhibit large longitudinal temperature differences. Stream temperature profiles within the water column show stream water is well mixed, improving the ability of the IR camera to accurately observe the stream temperature at this research site. Temperature sensors in 4 reach tributaries recorded warmer temperatures than the main channel. The daily temperatures of one tributary fluctuated within the range of the groundwater temperature (~9 to 11°C), while another tributary exhibited a range of ~18°C. A weather station in the study area recorded climate data (air temperature, humidity, wind speed, solar radiation) at 10 minute intervals. We used this field data as input for a spatial and temporal energy balance model of the reach. Our model demonstrates the utility of IR imagery to monitor stream temperatures and improves our understanding of energy fluxes in

  11. Water Resources and Groundwater in a Glaciated Andean Watershed (Cordillera Blanca, Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, J. M.; Gordon, R.; Baraer, M.; Lautz, L.; Mark, B. G.; Wigmore, O.; Chavez, D.; Aubry-Wake, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is estimated that almost 400 million people live in watersheds where glaciers provide at least 10% of the runoff, yet many questions remain regarding the impact of climate change and glacier recession on water resources derived from these high mountain watersheds. We present research from the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, an area with the highest density of glaciers in the tropics. While glacier meltwater buffers stream discharge throughout the range, groundwater is a major component of dry season runoff, contributing up to 50-70% of outflow in some tributaries. In order to predict future changes to water resources it is critical to understand how groundwater can offset future hydrologic stress by maintaining stream baseflow, including recharge mechanisms, subsurface pathways, storage, and net fluxes to rivers. We present a synthesis of results based on hydrologic modeling, drilling/piezometers, geophysics, and artificial and natural hydrologic tracers. Our findings show that 'pampas', low-relief mountain valleys, are critical for baseflow generation by storing groundwater on interannual timescales. Pampas have a total area of ~65 km2 and are comprised of unconsolidated glacial, talus, lacustrine and wetland (bofedales) deposits. The valleys commonly have buried talus aquifers that are overlain by low permeability, glaciolacustrine deposits. Glaciofluvial outwash deposits and small wetlands also act as unconfined aquifers. These groundwater systems appear to be primarily recharged by wet season precipitation, and at higher elevations also by glacial meltwater. Additionally a ubiquitous feature in the valleys are springs, often located at the base of talus deposits, which generate a large hydrologic flux within the hydrologic systems. While glaciers are the most visible and vulnerable component of the Andean waterscape, we argue that it is crucial to understand the complete mountain hydrologic cycle, including groundwater, in order to understand the ongoing

  12. Characterization of U-series disequilibria at the Pena Blanca natural analogue site, Chihuahua, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, V.; Goodell, P.C.; Anthony, E.Y.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate radionuclide migration from a uranium-mineralized breccia pipe. The site provides an excellent opportunity to evaluate radionuclide mobility in a geochemical environment similar to that around the proposed high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Samples represent fracture-infillings from both within and outside the breccia pipe. Mineral assemblages within the fractures include (1) pure kaolinite, (2) a mixture of iron-oxyhydroxides (goethite and hematite) with associated alunite and jarosite, which the authors refer to as the Fe-mineral assemblage, and (3) carbonates. Uranophane, weeksite, soddyite, and boltwoodite are associated with samples from within the breccia zone. The authors obtain radionuclide activities from gamma-ray rather than alpha spectroscopy, and the methodology for these measurements is presented in detail. Plots of {sup 230}Th/{sup 238}U vs. {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th show three distinct mobility trends. (1) The majority of the Fe-mineral samples from within the breccia pipe yield values between 1.0 and 1.1 for both ratios, (2) Fe-mineral samples from outside the ore zone and a kaolinite from within the ore zone have {sup 230}Th/{sup 238}U of 0.58 to 0.83 and {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th of 1.09 to 1.42, and (3) some Fe-mineral samples from within the breccia pipe have values of 1.2 and 0.9 respectively. These data, combined with those from other studies at Pena Blanca suggest that U and Ra are sometimes mobile in the near-surface environment and that multiple episodes of enrichment and leaching are required to explain the trends.

  13. ENSO influence on surface energy and mass balance at Shallap Glacier, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maussion, F.; Gurgiser, W.; Großhauser, M.; Kaser, G.; Marzeion, B.

    2015-05-01

    The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a major driver of climate variability in the tropical Andes, where recent Niño and Niña events left an observable footprint on glacier mass balance. The nature and strength of the relationship between ENSO and glacier mass balance, however, varies between regions and time periods, leaving several unanswered questions about its exact mechanisms. The starting point of this study is a four-year long time series of distributed surface energy and mass balance (SEB/SMB) calculated using a process-based model driven by observations at Shallap Glacier (Cordillera Blanca, Peru). These data are used to calibrate a regression-based downscaling model that links the local SEB/SMB fluxes to atmospheric reanalysis variables on a monthly basis, allowing an unprecedented quantification of the ENSO influence on the SEB/SMB at climatological time scales (1980-2013, ERA-Interim period). We find a stronger and steadier anti-correlation between pacific sea surface temperature (SST) and glacier mass balance than previously reported. This relationship is most pronounced during the wet season (December-May) and at low altitudes where Niño (Niña) events are accompanied with a snowfall deficit (excess) and a higher (lower) radiation energy input. We detect a weaker but significant ENSO anti-correlation with total precipitation (Niño dry signal) and positive correlation with the sensible heat flux, but find no ENSO influence on sublimation. Sensitivity analyses comparing several downscaling methods and reanalysis datasets resulted in stable mass balance correlations with pacific SST but also revealed large uncertainties in computing the mass balance trend of the last decades. The newly introduced open-source downscaling tool can be applied easily to other glaciers in the tropics, opening new research possibilities on even longer time scales.

  14. ENSO influence on surface energy and mass balance at Shallap Glacier, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maussion, F.; Gurgiser, W.; Großhauser, M.; Kaser, G.; Marzeion, B.

    2015-08-01

    The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a major driver of climate variability in the tropical Andes, where recent Niño and Niña events left an observable footprint on glacier mass balance. The nature and strength of the relationship between ENSO and glacier mass balance, however, varies between regions and time periods, leaving several unanswered questions about its exact mechanisms. The starting point of this study is a 4-year long time series of distributed surface energy and mass balance (SEB/SMB) calculated using a process-based model driven by observations at Shallap Glacier (Cordillera Blanca, Peru). These data are used to calibrate a regression-based downscaling model that links the local SEB/SMB fluxes to atmospheric reanalysis variables on a monthly basis, allowing an unprecedented quantification of the ENSO influence on the SEB/SMB at climatological time scales (1980-2013, ERA-Interim period). We find a stronger and steadier anti-correlation between Pacific sea-surface temperature (SST) and glacier mass balance than previously reported. This relationship is most pronounced during the wet season (December-May) and at low altitudes where Niño (Niña) events are accompanied with a snowfall deficit (excess) and a higher (lower) radiation energy input. We detect a weaker but significant ENSO anti-correlation with total precipitation (Niño dry signal) and positive correlation with the sensible heat flux, but find no ENSO influence on sublimation. Sensitivity analyses comparing several downscaling methods and reanalysis data sets resulted in stable mass balance correlations with Pacific SST but also revealed large uncertainties in computing the mass balance trend of the last decades. The newly introduced open-source downscaling tool can be applied easily to other glaciers in the tropics, opening new research possibilities on even longer time scales.

  15. Improved cryopreservation protocol for Blanca-Celtibérica buck semen collected by electroejaculation.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Rabadán, Pilar; Ramón, Manuel; García-Álvarez, Olga; Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; Alvaro-García, Pablo J; Del Olmo, Enrique; Pérez-Guzmán, M Dolores; Fernández-Santos, M Rocio; Julián Garde, J; Soler, Ana J

    2013-12-01

    The collection of sperm samples by electroejaculation (EE) leads to an increase of the production of seminal plasma which could modify the tolerance of spermatozoa to the cryopreservation procedure. This study aims to compare a standard sperm cryopreservation protocol for samples collected by artificial vagina (AV) with the same protocol and modifications to this for samples obtained by EE. Semen from six males of Blanca-Celtibérica goat breed was collected by AV (control) and EE, and three experiments were conducted. In Experiment 1, it was examined the effects of egg yolk concentration contained in freezing extender (0%, 1.5%, 10% and 20% of egg yolk); in Experiment 2, it was evaluated the cooling rate from 30 to 5 °C (fast: 10 min and slow: 90 min) and the temperature of glycerol addition (30 and 5 °C); and in Experiment 3, it was examined the time of equilibration at 5 °C (0, 1, 2 or 3h). A heterologous in vitro fertilization test was carried out in order to compare the fertility of control samples with that resulting from the EE protocol which showed the highest sperm quality. Results showed greater sperm motility parameters after thawing for control samples cryopreserved in standard conditions in the three experiments. For samples collected by EE, extender with 20% egg yolk, a slow cooling rate and a longer equilibration time (3h) provided higher sperm quality, and no differences were observed between temperatures of glycerol addition. Samples collected by EE and cryopreserved with the protocol which yielded the best sperm quality after thawing showed higher fertility compared to AV. PMID:23958413

  16. New measurements of particulates in glacial snow and ice in the Cordillera Blanca mountains of Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    All, J.; Schmitt, C.; Celestian, A. J.; Rucks, M.; Arnott, W. P.; Cole, R.

    2012-12-01

    During the local dry season (June/July) of 2011 and 2012, the American Climber Science Program (organized with the assistance of the American Alpine Club) conducted scientific expeditions in Huascaran National Park in Peru. The Park is located in the Cordillera Blanca mountain range and contains the world's largest collection of tropical mountain glaciers. One component of the environmental research program was sampling particulates on glacier surfaces by means of snow collection and filtration. Over 150 samples were collected during the two expeditions by volunteer climbers working with scientists in the field. Glacier snows were collected on over fifteen peaks throughout the range at altitudes from 4800 to nearly 6800 meters. Snow samples were kept frozen until the climber-scientists returned to basecamp - at which point they were rapidly melted and then immediately filtered through 0.7 micron PallFlex tissuequartz filters. The particulates captured on the filters have been analyzed for their bulk heat absorption properties as well as to determine the properties of individual particles through X-ray diffraction for bulk mineral identification, and Raman microscopy for chemical mapping of minerals. Preliminary results indicate that snow age, altitude, as well as geographic location (with respect to urban areas, mines, and predominant wind direction) all play significant roles in the amount and types of contaminants. Multiple locations were sampled during both expeditions as well as at different times during the same climbing season. Results include the relative heating capacity of the samples at various wavelengths as well as mineral composition information across the range. Local weather patterns and geographic observations will be used to identify potential sources of contaminants. Sampling will continue under the American Climber Science Program in 2013 and beyond.

  17. Amino acid epimerization dating of Quaternary coastal deformation in SE Iberian Peninsula: The region between Aguas and Antas Rivers' mouths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Trinidad; Ortiz, José E.; Sánchez-Palencia, Yolanda

    2016-05-01

    The coastal area between the mouths of the Aguas and Antas Rivers presents a deformed system of raised marine deposits, some of which have been strongly affected by active tectonics. The use of amino acid epimerization dating of Glycymeris shells from raised coastal deposits allowed determining the age of these marine deposits, all of them linked to highstand sea levels in the Mediterranean realm, with ages between MIS 11 and MIS 1. These results allowed corroborating the age of some previously studied sites, and using new sampling sites, the general aminostratigraphy for the Quaternary raised marine deposits on the Mediterranean coast was confirmed. The main deformation event took place after MIS 11 and continued until MIS 5, and was linked to the activity of the Palomares Fault.

  18. The Cerro Aguas Calientes caldera, NW Argentina: An example of a tectonically controlled, polygenetic collapse caldera, and its regional significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrinovic, I. A.; Martí, J.; Aguirre-Díaz, G. J.; Guzmán, S.; Geyer, A.; Paz, N. Salado

    2010-07-01

    Polygenetic, silicic collapse calderas are common in the central Andes. Here we describe in detail the Cerro Aguas Calientes caldera in NW Argentina, which comprises two caldera-forming episodes that occurred at 17.15 Ma and 10.3 Ma. We analyse the significance of its structural setting, composition, size and the subsidence style of both caldera episodes. We find that the caldera eruptions had a tectonic trigger. In both cases, an homogeneous dacitic crystal-rich (>60 vol.% of crystals) reservoir of batholithic size became unstable due to the effect of increasing regional transpression, which favoured local dilation through minor strike-slip faults from which ring faults nucleated and permitted caldera collapse. Both calderas are similar in shape, location and products. The 17.15 Ma caldera has an elliptical shape (17 × 14 km) elongated in a N30° trend; both intracaldera and extracaldera ignimbrites covered an area of around 620 km 2 with a minimum volume estimate of 140 km 3 (DRE). The 10.3 Ma episode generated another elliptical caldera (19 × 14 km), with the same orientation as the previous one, from which intracaldera and outflow ignimbrites covered a total area of about 1700 km 2, representing a minimum eruption volume of 350 km 3(DRE). In this paper we discuss the significance of the Cerro Aguas Calientes caldera in comparison with other well known examples from the central Andes in terms of tectonic setting, eruption mechanisms, and volumes of related ignimbrites. We suggest that our kinematic model is a common volcano-tectonic scenario during the Cenozoic in the Puna and Altiplano, which may be applied to explain the origin of other large calderas in the same region.

  19. The Cerro Aguas Calientes caldera, NW Argentina: an example of a tectonically controlled, polygenetic, collapse caldera, and its regional significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrinovic, Ivan A.; Martí, Joan; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo J.; Guzmán, Silvina R.; Geyer, Adelina; Grosse, Pablo; Salado Paz, Natalia

    2010-05-01

    Polygenetic, silicic collapse calderas such as Cerro Galán, Pastos Grandes, La Pacana, Vilama, Negra Muerta, Farallón Negro, Cerro Guacha, among others are common in the central Andes. Here we describe in detail the Cerro Aguas Calientes caldera in NW Argentina, which comprises two caldera-forming episodes occurred at 17.15 Ma and 10.3 Ma, respectively. We analyse the significance of its structural setting, composition, size and the subsidence style of both caldera episodes. Our results reveal that the caldera eruptions had a tectonic trigger. In both cases, an homogeneous dacitic crystal-rich (>60 vol. % of crystals) reservoir of batholitic size became unstable due to the effect of increasing regional transpression, favouring local dilation throughout minor strike slip faults from which ring faults nucleated and permitted caldera collapse. Both episodes are similar in shape, location and products of the resulting calderas. The 17.15 Ma caldera has an elliptical shape (17 × 14 km) and is elongated in a N30° trend; both intracaldera and extracaldera ignimbrites covered an area of around 620 km2 with a minimum volume estimate of 138 km3 (DRE). The 10.3 Ma episode generated another elliptical caldera (19 ×14 km), with the same orientation as the previous one, from which intracaldera and outflow ignimbrites covered a total area of about 1,700 km2, representing a minimum eruption volume of 341 km3 (DRE). In this work we discuss the significance of the Cerro Aguas Calientes caldera in comparison with other well known examples from the central Andes in terms of tectonic setting, eruption mechanisms, and volumes of related ignimbrites. We suggest that our kinematic model is a common volcano-tectonic scenario during the Cenozoic in the Puna and Altiplano, which may be applied to explain the origin of other large calderas in the same region.

  20. Normal faults, normal friction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Sibson, Richard H.

    2001-10-01

    Debate continues as to whether normal faults may be seismically active at very low dips (δ < 30°) in the upper continental crust. An updated compilation of dip estimates (n = 25) has been prepared from focal mechanisms of shallow, intracontinental, normal-slip earthquakes (M > 5.5; slip vector raking 90° ± 30° in the fault plane) where the rupture plane is unambiguously discriminated. The dip distribution for these moderate-to-large normal fault ruptures extends from 65° > δ > 30°, corresponding to a range, 25° < θr < 60°, for the reactivation angle between the fault and inferred vertical σ1. In a comparable data set previously obtained for reverse fault ruptures (n = 33), the active dip distribution is 10° < δ = θr < 60°. For vertical and horizontal σ1 trajectories within extensional and compressional tectonic regimes, respectively, dip-slip reactivation is thus restricted to faults oriented at θr ≤ 60° to inferred σ1. Apparent lockup at θr ≈ 60° in each dip distribution and a dominant 30° ± 5° peak in the reverse fault dip distribution, are both consistent with a friction coefficient μs ≈ 0.6, toward the bottom of Byerlee's experimental range, though localized fluid overpressuring may be needed for reactivation of less favorably oriented faults.

  1. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  2. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.; Pruett, Jr., James C.

    1986-01-01

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  3. Role of plate kinematics and plate-slip-vector partitioning in continental magmatic arcs: Evidence from the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, B.A.; Farber, D.L.; Wallace, G.S.; Lopez, R.; Palacios, O.

    1998-09-01

    New structural and geochronological data from the Cordillera Blanca batholith in the Peruvian Andes, coupled with Nazca-South American plate-slip-vector data, indicate that oblique convergence and associated strike-slip partitioning strongly influenced continental magmatic arc evolution. Both the strain field and mode of magmatism (plutonism vs. volcanism) in the late Miocene Peruvian Andes were controlled by the degree to which the arc-parallel component of the plate slip vector was partitioned into the arc. Strong strike-slip partitioning at ca. 8 Ma produced arc-parallel sinistral shear, strike-slip intercordilleran basins and east-west-oriented tension fractures that facilitated emplacement of the Cordillera Blanca batholith (ca. 8.2 {+-} 0.2 Ma). Periods during which the strike-slip component was not partitioned into the arc (ca. 10 and ca. 7 Ma) were associated with roughly arc-normal contraction and ignimbrite volcanism. The data thus support the contention that contraction within continental magmatic arcs favors volcanism, whereas transcurrent shear favors plutonism. The tie between oblique convergence and batholith emplacement in late Miocene Peruvian Andes provides a modern analogue for batholiths emplaced as the result of transcurrent shear in ancient arcs.

  4. Recent trends in annual snowline variations in the northern wet outer tropics: case studies from southern Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veettil, Bijeesh Kozhikkodan; Wang, Shanshan; Bremer, Ulisses Franz; de Souza, Sergio Florêncio; Simões, Jefferson Cardia

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the changes in the annual maximum snowlines of a selected set of mountain glaciers at the southern end of the Cordillera Blanca between 1984 and 2015 using satellite images. Furthermore, we analysed the existing glacier records in the Cordillera Blanca since the last glacial maximum to understand the evolution of glaciers in this region over a few centuries. There was a rise in the snowline altitude of glaciers in this region since the late 1990s with a few small glacier advances. Historical to the present El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) records were also analysed to understand whether there was a teleconnection between the glacier fluctuations in the region and the phase changes of ENSO and PDO. We also assessed the variations in three important climatic parameters that influence the glacier retreat—temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity—over a few decades. We calculated the anomalies as well as the seasonal changes in these variables since the mid-twentieth century. There was an increase in temperature during this period, and the decrease in precipitation was not so prominent compared with the temperature rise. There was an exceptionally higher increase in relative humidity since the early 2000s, which is relatively higher than that expected due to the observed rate of warming, and this increase in humidity is believed to be the reason behind the unprecedented rise in the snowline altitudes since the beginning of the twenty-first century.

  5. How clays weaken faults.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pluijm, Ben A.; Schleicher, Anja M.; Warr, Laurence N.

    2010-05-01

    The weakness of upper crustal faults has been variably attributed to (i) low values of normal stress, (ii) elevated pore-fluid pressure, and (iii) low frictional strength. Direct observations on natural faults rocks provide new evidence for the role of frictional properties on fault strength, as illustrated by our recent work on samples from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drillhole at Parkfield, California. Mudrock samples from fault zones at ~3066 m and ~3296 m measured depth show variably spaced and interconnected networks of displacement surfaces that consist of host rock particles that are abundantly coated by polished films with occasional striations. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction study of the surfaces reveal the occurrence of neocrystallized thin-film clay coatings containing illite-smectite (I-S) and chlorite-smectite (C-S) phases. X-ray texture goniometry shows that the crystallographic fabric of these faults rocks is characteristically low, in spite of an abundance of clay phases. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the illitic mix-layered coatings demonstrate recent crystallization and reveal the initiation of an "older" fault strand (~8 Ma) at 3066 m measured depth, and a "younger" fault strand (~4 Ma) at 3296 m measured depth. Today, the younger strand is the site of active creep behavior, reflecting continued activation of these clay-weakened zones. We propose that the majority of slow fault creep is controlled by the high density of thin (< 100nm thick) nano-coatings on fracture surfaces, which become sufficiently smectite-rich and interconnected at low angles to allow slip with minimal breakage of stronger matrix clasts. Displacements are accommodated by localized frictional slip along coated particle surfaces and hydrated smectitic phases, in combination with intracrystalline deformation of the clay lattice, associated with extensive mineral dissolution, mass transfer and continued growth of expandable layers. The

  6. The Kunlun Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Kunlun fault is one of the gigantic strike-slip faults that bound the north side of Tibet. Left-lateral motion along the 1,500-kilometer (932-mile) length of the Kunlun has occurred uniformly for the last 40,000 years at a rate of 1.1 centimeter per year, creating a cumulative offset of more than 400 meters. In this image, two splays of the fault are clearly seen crossing from east to west. The northern fault juxtaposes sedimentary rocks of the mountains against alluvial fans. Its trace is also marked by lines of vegetation, which appear red in the image. The southern, younger fault cuts through the alluvium. A dark linear area in the center of the image is wet ground where groundwater has ponded against the fault. Measurements from the image of displacements of young streams that cross the fault show 15 to 75 meters (16 to 82 yards) of left-lateral offset. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) acquired the visible light and near infrared scene on July 20, 2000. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and the U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  7. U-Sries Disequilibra in Soils, Pena Blanca Natural Analog, Chihuahua, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    D. French; E. Anthony; P. Goodell

    2006-03-16

    The Nopal I uranium deposit located in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Mexico. The deposit was mined in the early 1980s, and ore was stockpiled close by. This stockpile area was cleared and is now referred to as the Prior High Grade Stockpile (PHGS). Some of the high-grade boulders from the site rolled downhill when it was cleared in the 1990s. For this study soil samples were collected from the alluvium surrounding and underlying one of these boulders. A bulk sample of the boulder was also collected. Because the Prior High Grade Stockpile had no ore prior to the 1980s a maximum residence time for the boulder is about 25 years, this also means that the soil was at background as well. The purpose of this study is to characterize the transport of uranium series radionuclides from ore to the soil. Transport is characterized by determining the activities of individual radionuclides and daughter to parent ratios. Isotopes of the uranium series decay chain detected include {sup 210}Pb, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 214}Pb, and {sup 214}Bi. Peak areas for each isotope are determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy with a Canberra Ge (Li) detector and GENIE 2000 software. The boulder sample is close to secular equilibrium when compared to the standard BL-5 (Beaver Lodge Uraninite from Canada). Results for the soils, however, indicate that some daughter/parent pairs are in secular disequilibrium. These daughter/parent (D/P) ratios include {sup 230}Th/{sup 234}U, which is greater than unity, {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th, which is also greater than unity, and {sup 210}Pb/{sup 214}Bi, which is less than unity. The gamma-ray spectrum for organic material lacks {sup 230}Th peaks, but contains {sup 234}U and {sup 226}Ra, indicating that plants preferentially incorporate {sup 226}Ra. Our results, combined with previous studies require multistage history of mobilization of the uranium series radionuclides. Earlier studies at the ore zone could limit the time span for mobilization only

  8. Evolución de estrellas enanas blancas de Helio de masa baja e intermedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althaus, L. G.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    Numerosas observaciones realizadas particularmente en los últimos dos años parecen confirmar que las enanas blancas (EB) de helio de masa baja e intermedia son el resultado de la evolución de sistemas binarios cercanos. Con el objeto de realizar una adecuada interpretación de estos objetos son necesarios modelos de EBs de helio lo más detallado posibles. En este estudio presentamos cálculos detallados de la evolución de EBs de helio con masas entre M=0.1Msolar y M=0.5Msolar a intervalos de 0.05Msolar . Para ello, hemos tenido en cuenta los efectos de temperatura finita mediante un código de evolución estelar lo más actualizado posible. En particular, el transporte de energía es descripto en el marco del nuevo modelo para la convección turbulenta desarrollado por Canuto - Mazzitelli. Además hemos considerado la nueva ecuación de estado para plasmas de helio de Saumon et al. y nuevas opacidades radiativas OPAL. Las pérdidas por neutrinos fueron asimismo tenidas en cuenta. Excepto para las EBs más masivas, nuestros modelos iniciales están ubicados en las cercanías de la correspondiente línea de Hayashi para configuraciones de helio. Nuestros resultados muestran que existe una región prohibida en el diagrama observacional HR donde ninguna EB de helio puede encontrarse. Dicha región es para log{(L/Lsolar )}>= -0.25 and log{Teff} >= 4.45. Hemos encontrado también que los tracks evolutivos en el diagrama HR en el dominio de alta luminosidad (pre - EB) son fuertemente afectados por la eficiencia convectiva y que las pérdidas por neutrinos son importantes en los modelos más masivos. Finalmente hemos analizado la estructura de la zona convectiva externa encontrando que la teoría de Canuto - Mazzitelli conduce a un perfil convectivo muy diferente del dado por cualquier versión de la popular teoría de la mixing length. Si bién este comportamiento es decisivo en el contexto de las inestabilides pulsacionales, los radios y gravedades superficiales de

  9. Geochronology and Fluid-Rock Interaction Associated with the Nopal I Uranium Deposit, Pena Blanca, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    M. Fayek; P. Goodell; M. Ren; A. Simmons

    2005-07-11

    The Nopal I uranium (U) deposit, Pena Blanca District, Mexico, largely consists of secondary U{sup 6+} minerals, which occur within a breccia pipe mainly hosted by the 44 Ma Nopal and Colorados volcanic formations. These two units overly the Pozos conglomerate formation and Cretaceous limestone. Three new vertical diamond drill holes (DDHs) were recently drilled at Nopal I. DDH-PB1 with continuous core was drilled through the Nopal I deposit and two additional DDHs were drilled {approx}50 m on either side of the cored hole. These DDHs terminate 20 m below the current water table, thus allowing the detection of possible gradients in radionuclide contents resulting from transport from the overlying uranium deposit. Primary uraninite within the main ore body is rare and fine-grained ({approx}50 micrometers), thus making geochronology of the Nopal I deposit very difficult. Uranium, lead and oxygen isotopes can be used to study fluid-uraninite interaction, provided that the analyses are obtained on the micro-scale. Secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) permits in situ measurement of isotopic ratios with a spatial resolution on the scale of a few {micro}m. Preliminary U-Pb results show that uraninite from the main ore body gives an age of 32 {+-} 8 Ma, whereas uraninite from the uraniferous Pozos conglomerate that lies nearly 100 m below the main ore body and 25 meters above the water table, gives a U-Pb age that is <1 Ma. Oxygen isotopic analyses show that uraninite from the ore body has a {delta}{sup 18}O = -10.8{per_thousand}, whereas the uraninite within the Pozos conglomerate has a {delta}{sup 18}O = +1.5{per_thousand}. If it is assumed that both uraninites precipitated from meteoric water ({delta}{sup 18}O = -7{per_thousand}), then calculated precipitation temperatures are 55 C for the uraninite from the ore body and 20 C for uraninite hosted by the Pozos conglomerate. These temperatures are consistent with previous studies that calculated precipitation

  10. Cooling History for the Sierra Laguna Blanca (NW Argentina) on the Southern Puna Plateau, Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, R.; Schoenbohm, L. M.; Sobel, E. R.; Stockli, D. F.; Glodny, J.

    2014-12-01

    Various dynamic models have been proposed to explain deformation history and topographic evolution for the southern Altiplano-Puna Plateau, including inversion of the Cretaceous Salta rift structures, formation of an orogenic wedge, flat subduction, climate-tectonic coupling, and lithospheric foundering. Controversies persist in the southern Puna Plateau, where preexisting rift structures are unknown and Cenozoic shortening events are sparsely documented. The 6-km high Sierra Laguna Blanca (LB) (NW Argentina) is among the most outstanding topographic features in the interior of the southern Puna Plateau. We document cooling history for LB with apatite (U-Th)/He, apatite fission-track and zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometers for a vertical profile from 3.6-5.6 km on its eastern flank. Preliminary results from apatite fission-track (AFT) analysis yield ages ranging from 45-65 Ma, with top samples being the oldest. Dpar values for all samples are low (1.54 to 1.74), suggesting a relatively low-temperature partial annealing zone. All samples have shortened mean track lengths ranging from 10.9 to 12.3 micrometers, suggesting partial resetting. Preliminary apatite U-Th/He (AHe) ages are compatible with AFT ages but are widely dispersed, perhaps due to U zoning and small U-rich inclusions which have been observed on AFT external detectors. Inverse modeling of AFT data and selected AHe data using the HeFTy program reveal two major cooling events for LB. All models start ~90-70 Ma and immediately decrease their temperatures to ~60°C before ~50 Ma. Samples may have stayed ~60°C without additional thermal events until ~15-10 Ma, when the most recent cooling event took place, bringing all samples to surface temperature. Our first finding is that the interior of the southern Puna Plateau may have been influenced by the Salta Rift during the Cretaceous, extending the known zone of influence further west. Second, the most recent cooling phase (mid-late Miocene) is consistent

  11. Fault detection and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernath, Greg

    1994-01-01

    In order for a current satellite-based navigation system (such as the Global Positioning System, GPS) to meet integrity requirements, there must be a way of detecting erroneous measurements, without help from outside the system. This process is called Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI). Fault detection requires at least one redundant measurement, and can be done with a parity space algorithm. The best way around the fault isolation problem is not necessarily isolating the bad measurement, but finding a new combination of measurements which excludes it.

  12. Measuring fault tolerance with the FTAPE fault injection tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The major parts of the tool include a system-wide fault-injector, a workload generator, and a workload activity measurement tool. The workload creates high stress conditions on the machine. Using stress-based injection, the fault injector is able to utilize knowledge of the workload activity to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio, performance degradation, and number of system crashes are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  13. Measuring fault tolerance with the FTAPE fault injection tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The major parts of the tool include a system-wide fault-injector, a workload generator, and a workload activity measurement tool. The workload creates high stress conditions on the machine. Using stress-based injection, the fault injector is able to utilize knowledge of the workload activity to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio, performance degradation, and number of system crashes are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  14. OpenStudio - Fault Modeling

    2014-09-19

    This software record documents the OpenStudio fault model development portion of the Fault Detection and Diagnostics LDRD project.The software provides a suite of OpenStudio measures (scripts) for modeling typical HVAC system faults in commercial buildings and also included supporting materials: example projects and OpenStudio measures for reporting fault costs and energy impacts.

  15. Hayward Fault, California Interferogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image of California's Hayward fault is an interferogram created using a pair of images taken by Synthetic Aperture Radar(SAR) combined to measure changes in the surface that may have occurred between the time the two images were taken.

    The images were collected by the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing satellites ERS-1 and ERS-2 in June 1992 and September 1997 over the central San Francisco Bay in California.

    The radar image data are shown as a gray-scale image, with the interferometric measurements that show the changes rendered in color. Only the urbanized area could be mapped with these data. The color changes from orange tones to blue tones across the Hayward fault (marked by a thin red line) show about 2-3centimeters (0.8-1.1 inches) of gradual displacement or movement of the southwest side of the fault. The block west of the fault moved horizontally toward the northwest during the 63 months between the acquisition of the two SAR images. This fault movement is called a seismic creep because the fault moved slowly without generating an earthquake.

    Scientists are using the SAR interferometry along with other data collected on the ground to monitor this fault motion in an attempt to estimate the probability of earthquake on the Hayward fault, which last had a major earthquake of magnitude 7 in 1868. This analysis indicates that the northern part of the Hayward fault is creeping all the way from the surface to a depth of 12 kilometers (7.5 miles). This suggests that the potential for a large earthquake on the northern Hayward fault might be less than previously thought. The blue area to the west (lower left) of the fault near the center of the image seemed to move upward relative to the yellow and orange areas nearby by about 2 centimeters (0.8 inches). The cause of this apparent motion is not yet confirmed, but the rise of groundwater levels during the time between the images may have caused the reversal of a small portion of the subsidence that

  16. Glacier Changes in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, Derived From SPOT5 Imagery, GIS and Field- Based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racoviteanu, A.; Arnaud, Y.; Williams, M. W.; Singh Khalsa, S.

    2007-12-01

    There is urgency in deriving an extensive dataset for deriving glacier changes within the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, in a cost-effective and timely manner. Rapid glacial retreat during the last decades in this area poses a threat for water resources, hydroelectric power and local traditions. While there is some information on decadal changes in glacier extents, there still remains a paucity of mass balance measurements and glacier parameters such as hypsometry, size distribution and termini elevations. Here we investigate decadal changes in glacier parameters for Cordillera Blanca of Peru using data from Système Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) sensor, an old glacier inventory from 1970 aerial photography, field-based mass balance measurements and meteorological observations. Here we focus on: constructing a geospatial glacier inventory from 2003 SPOT scenes; mass balance estimations using remote sensing and field data; frequency distribution of glacier area; changes in termini elevations; hypsometry changes over time; glacier topography (slope, aspect, length/width ratio); AAR vs. mass balance for Artesonraju and Yanamarey benchmark glaciers; precipitation and temperature trends in the region. Over the last 25 years, mean temperatures increases of 0.09 deg.C/yr were greater at lower elevation than the 0.01 deg.C/yr at higher elevations, with little change in precipitation. Comparison of the new SPOT-based glacier inventory with the 1970 inventory shows that glaciers in Cordillera Blanca retreated at a rate of 0.6% per year over the last three decades, with no significant differences in the rate of area loss between E and W side. At lower elevations there is an upward shift of glacier termini along with a decrease in glacier area. Small glaciers are losing more area than large glaciers. Based on the relationship between specific mass balance (bn) and accumulation area ratio (AAR) for the two benchmark glaciers, we predicted a steady-state equilibrium line

  17. Cable-fault locator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cason, R. L.; Mcstay, J. J.; Heymann, A. P., Sr.

    1979-01-01

    Inexpensive system automatically indicates location of short-circuited section of power cable. Monitor does not require that cable be disconnected from its power source or that test signals be applied. Instead, ground-current sensors are installed in manholes or at other selected locations along cable run. When fault occurs, sensors transmit information about fault location to control center. Repair crew can be sent to location and cable can be returned to service with minimum of downtime.

  18. Fault rupture segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Kenneth Michael

    A critical foundation to earthquake study and hazard assessment is the understanding of controls on fault rupture, including segmentation. Key challenges to understanding fault rupture segmentation include, but are not limited to: What determines if a fault segment will rupture in a single great event or multiple moderate events? How is slip along a fault partitioned between seismic and seismic components? How does the seismicity of a fault segment evolve over time? How representative are past events for assessing future seismic hazards? In order to address the difficult questions regarding fault rupture segmentation, new methods must be developed that utilize the information available. Much of the research presented in this study focuses on the development of new methods for attacking the challenges of understanding fault rupture segmentation. Not only do these methods exploit a broader band of information within the waveform than has traditionally been used, but they also lend themselves to the inclusion of even more seismic phases providing deeper understandings. Additionally, these methods are designed to be fast and efficient with large datasets, allowing them to utilize the enormous volume of data available. Key findings from this body of work include demonstration that focus on fundamental earthquake properties on regional scales can provide general understanding of fault rupture segmentation. We present a more modern, waveform-based method that locates events using cross-correlation of the Rayleigh waves. Additionally, cross-correlation values can also be used to calculate precise earthquake magnitudes. Finally, insight regarding earthquake rupture directivity can be easily and quickly exploited using cross-correlation of surface waves.

  19. Fault lubrication during earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Di Toro, G; Han, R; Hirose, T; De Paola, N; Nielsen, S; Mizoguchi, K; Ferri, F; Cocco, M; Shimamoto, T

    2011-03-24

    The determination of rock friction at seismic slip rates (about 1 m s(-1)) is of paramount importance in earthquake mechanics, as fault friction controls the stress drop, the mechanical work and the frictional heat generated during slip. Given the difficulty in determining friction by seismological methods, elucidating constraints are derived from experimental studies. Here we review a large set of published and unpublished experiments (∼300) performed in rotary shear apparatus at slip rates of 0.1-2.6 m s(-1). The experiments indicate a significant decrease in friction (of up to one order of magnitude), which we term fault lubrication, both for cohesive (silicate-built, quartz-built and carbonate-built) rocks and non-cohesive rocks (clay-rich, anhydrite, gypsum and dolomite gouges) typical of crustal seismogenic sources. The available mechanical work and the associated temperature rise in the slipping zone trigger a number of physicochemical processes (gelification, decarbonation and dehydration reactions, melting and so on) whose products are responsible for fault lubrication. The similarity between (1) experimental and natural fault products and (2) mechanical work measures resulting from these laboratory experiments and seismological estimates suggests that it is reasonable to extrapolate experimental data to conditions typical of earthquake nucleation depths (7-15 km). It seems that faults are lubricated during earthquakes, irrespective of the fault rock composition and of the specific weakening mechanism involved. PMID:21430777

  20. How many populations set foot through the Patagonian door? Genetic composition of the current population of Bahía Blanca (Argentina) based on data from 19 Alu polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Resano, M; Esteban, E; González-Pérez, E; Vía, M; Athanasiadis, G; Avena, S; Goicoechea, A; Bartomioli, M; Fernández, V; Cabrera, A; Dejean, C; Carnese, F; Moral, P

    2007-01-01

    The city of Bahía Blanca occupies a strategic place in Argentina south of the Pampean region in the north-east corner of the Patagonia. Since 1828, this city has been the historical and political border between Amerindian lands in the south, and the lands of European colonists. Nowadays, Bahía Blanca is an urban population mainly composed by descendents of immigrants from Spain and other European countries with apparently low admixture with Amerindians. In view of the unexpectedly high Amerindian admixture levels (about 46.7%) suggested by mtDNA data, and protein markers (19.5%), we analyzed a set of 19 Alu polymorphisms (18 autosomal, 1 of Chromosome Y) in a well-documented genealogical sample from Bahía Blanca. The genotyped sample was made up of 119 unrelated healthy individuals whose birth place and grandparent origins were fully documented. According to available genealogical records, the total sample has been subdivided into two groups: Bahía Blanca Original (64 individuals with all 4 gandparents born in Argentina) and Bahía Blanca Mix (55 individuals with one to three grandparents born out of Argentina). Allele frequencies and gene diversity values in Bahía Blanca fit well into the European ranges. Population relationships have been tested for 8 Alu markers, whose variation has been described in several Amerindian and European samples. Reynolds genetic distances underline the significant genetic similarity of Bahía Blanca to Europeans (mean distance 0.044) and their differentiation from Amerindians (0.146). Interestingly enough, when the general sample is divided, Bahía Blanca Original appears slightly closer to Amerindians (0.127) in contrast to Bahía Blanca Mix (0.161). Furthermore, the genetic relationships depicted through a principal components analysis emphasize the relative similarity of Bahía Blanca Original to Amerindians. A thorough knowledge of the sample origins has allowed us to make a subtle distinction of the genetic composition of

  1. Packaged Fault Model for Geometric Segmentation of Active Faults Into Earthquake Source Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, T.; Kumamoto, T.

    2004-12-01

    In Japan, the empirical formula proposed by Matsuda (1975) mainly based on the length of the historical surface fault ruptures and magnitude, is generally applied to estimate the size of future earthquakes from the extent of existing active faults for seismic hazard assessment. Therefore validity of the active fault length and defining individual segment boundaries where propagating ruptures terminate are essential and crucial to the reliability for the accurate assessments. It is, however, not likely for us to clearly identify the behavioral earthquake segments from observation of surface faulting during the historical period, because most of the active faults have longer recurrence intervals than 1000 years in Japan. Besides uncertainties of the datasets obtained mainly from fault trenching studies are quite large for fault grouping/segmentation. This is why new methods or criteria should be applied for active fault grouping/segmentation, and one of the candidates may be geometric criterion of active faults. Matsuda (1990) used _gfive kilometer_h as a critical distance for grouping and separation of neighboring active faults. On the other hand, Nakata and Goto (1998) proposed the geometric criteria such as (1) branching features of active fault traces and (2) characteristic pattern of vertical-slip distribution along the fault traces as tools to predict rupture length of future earthquakes. The branching during the fault rupture propagation is regarded as an effective energy dissipation process and could result in final rupture termination. With respect to the characteristic pattern of vertical-slip distribution, especially with strike-slip components, the up-thrown sides along the faults are, in general, located on the fault blocks in the direction of relative strike-slip. Applying these new geometric criteria to the high-resolution active fault distribution maps, the fault grouping/segmentation could be more practically conducted. We tested this model

  2. Fault Roughness Records Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Candela, T.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Fault roughness is commonly ~0.1-1% at the outcrop exposure scale. More mature faults are smoother than less mature ones, but the overall range of roughness is surprisingly limited which suggests dynamic control. In addition, the power spectra of many exposed fault surfaces follow a single power law over scales from millimeters to 10's of meters. This is another surprising observation as distinct structures such as slickenlines and mullions are clearly visible on the same surfaces at well-defined scales. We can reconcile both observations by suggesting that the roughness of fault surfaces is controlled by the maximum strain that can be supported elastically in the wallrock. If the fault surface topography requires more than 0.1-1% strain, it fails. Invoking wallrock strength explains two additional observations on the Corona Heights fault for which we have extensive roughness data. Firstly, the surface is isotropic below a scale of 30 microns and has grooves at larger scales. Samples from at least three other faults (Dixie Valley, Mount St. Helens and San Andreas) also are isotropic at scales below 10's of microns. If grooves can only persist when the walls of the grooves have a sufficiently low slope to maintain the shape, this scale of isotropy can be predicted based on the measured slip perpendicular roughness data. The observed 30 micron scale at Corona Heights is consistent with an elastic strain of 0.01 estimated from the observed slip perpendicular roughness with a Hurst exponent of 0.8. The second observation at Corona Heights is that slickenlines are not deflected around meter-scale mullions. Yielding of these mullions at centimeter to meter scale is predicted from the slip parallel roughness as measured here. The success of the strain criterion for Corona Heights supports it as the appropriate control on fault roughness. Micromechanically, the criterion implies that failure of the fault surface is a continual process during slip. Macroscopically, the

  3. Fault reactivation control on normal fault growth: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellahsen, Nicolas; Daniel, Jean Marc

    2005-04-01

    Field studies frequently emphasize how fault reactivation is involved in the deformation of the upper crust. However, this phenomenon is generally neglected (except in inversion models) in analogue and numerical models performed to study fault network growth. Using sand/silicon analogue models, we show how pre-existing discontinuities can control the geometry and evolution of a younger fault network. The models show that the reactivation of pre-existing discontinuities and their orientation control: (i) the evolution of the main fault orientation distribution through time, (ii) the geometry of relay fault zones, (iii) the geometry of small scale faulting, and (iv) the geometry and location of fault-controlled basins and depocenters. These results are in good agreement with natural fault networks observed in both the Gulf of Suez and Lake Tanganyika. They demonstrate that heterogeneities such as pre-existing faults should be included in models designed to understand the behavior and the tectonic evolution of sedimentary basins.

  4. Relationship of physical factors and salinity with indicator bacteria in Bahía Blanca estuary waters, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cabezali, C B; Baldini, M D; Burgos, M A; Arango, J M

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between the number of Escherichia coli, terrestrial and marine heterotrophic bacteria, with certain physical and chemical parameters in Bahia Blanca estuary waters, were investigated by means of a statistical analysis of multiple linear regression. The samples were taken during a period of 16 months. Although distance from the sewage outlet seems to be the factor having the greatest effect on the number of alien bacteria, the models obtained for E. coli are inappropriate to predict bacterial behaviour in this particular natural habitat, while for heterotrophic bacteria descriptive models were selected. The results of this study suggest that many factors affect bacterial population densities in this estuarine ecosystem. This should be taken into account trying to solve the problem in order to avoid progressive degradation. PMID:7938503

  5. Legendary lost city Ciudad Blanca found under tropical forest in Honduras, using ERS-2 and JERS-1 SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakam-Simen, Francis; Nezry, Edmond; Ewing, James J.; Maschal, Ted

    1998-10-01

    The legendary 'Ciudad Blanca' of Honduras was first referred to under the name Xucutaco by the Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes already in 1526. Located in the remote, impenetrable and incompletely mapped rainforest of the Mosquito Coast, it was never conquered by the Spanish. With the time, it was slowly abandoned and forgotten. Two JERS-1 and one ERS-2 SLC Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images have been used to identify and to locate the lost city, a task made difficult due to the thick vegetation cover. To this end, advanced processing tools for the detection of artificial targets under forest cover, and for SAR data fusion have been used. Among the techniques used, a new Bayesian Distribution Entropy Maximum A Posteriori (DE-MAP) vector speckle filter, particularly suited for the restoration of a strongly textured scene, has been used to enhance the SAR images. This new speckle filter incorporates a statistical description of the effects of the SAR imaging system: in order to account for the effects due to the spatial correlation of the speckle in SAR images, an estimator originating from the local spatial autocorrelation function (ACF) of the SAR signal are incorporated to this filter, to refine the evaluation of the non-stationary first order local statistics, to improve the restoration of the scene textural properties, and to preserve the useful spatial resolution in the speckle filtered image. On the other hand, radargrammetric techniques have been used to: (1) produce a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the study area; (2) fuse ERS and JERS information in order to allow visual identification of the remnants of Ciudad Blanca by visual photo-interpretation. Using the processed images, geocoded UTM spatio-maps of the region have also been produced to locate accurately our findings, and guide a ground expedition in the future.

  6. From the Cordillera Blanca to the Pacific Ocean: hydrological changes and consequences across the Rio Santa watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraer, M.; Mark, B. G.; Wigmore, O.; Fernandez-Rivera, A.; McKenzie, J. M.; Walsh, E.

    2012-12-01

    The Rio Santa, Peru, drains the western slopes of the glacierized Cordillera Blanca and provides water resources for intense and diversified purposes. The Rio Santa basin sustains one of the most important hydropower plants in Peru, several middle-sized cities, high-elevation slope agriculture and mining industries. Glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca are rapidly retreating, modifying the hydrology of the upper Rio Santa watershed. Previous results show that the upper Rio Santa watershed has passed peak-water, the moment of maximum water availability, and now exhibit decreasing dry season discharge as a consequence of glacial retreat. We present results from data collected in July of 2011 and 2012, including discharge measurements using acoustic Doppler current profiling and major dissolved ion concentrations and stable isotopes of water. The hydrochemical data were analysed using the Hydrochemical Basin Characterization Method and the results are used to map the dry-season specific discharge variations across the entire Rio Santa watershed. Measurements from 2011 suggest that around 80% of current lower Rio Santa dry-season flows are diverted to supply water to major cities, intensive agriculture and hydro-electricity projects situated in the dry coastal area. Glacier retreat simulations are used to localize future hydrological changes and evaluate the downstream repercussions. Results show that glacierized catchments have higher specific discharge compared to non-glacierized catchments but the contribution of the glaciers during the dry season represent less than 30% of the Rio Santa discharge. As the glaciers further retreat, the Rio Santa dry-season outflows are going to progressively decrease to a level below the actual freshwater demand. These changes will adversely impact the socioeconomic vulnerability to water scarcity in the entire watershed while deepening the upstream/downstream disparity in water availability.

  7. Recalibration of the yellow Rhizocarpon growth curve in the Cordillera Blanca (Peru) and implications for LIA chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomelli, V.; Grancher, D.; Brunstein, D.; Solomina, O.

    2008-01-01

    A new lichen dating method and new moraine observations enabled us to improve the chronology of glacier advances in the Cordillera Blanca (Peru) during the Little Ice Age (LIA). Our results reveal that an early LIA glacial advance occurred around AD 1330 ± 29. However, a second major glacial advance at the beginning of the 17th century overlapped the earlier stage for most glaciers. Hence, this second glacial stage, dated from AD 1630 ± 27, is considered as the LIA maximum glacial advance in the Cordillera Blanca. During the 17th-18th centuries, at least three glacial advances were recorded synchronously for the different glaciers (AD 1670 ± 24, 1730 ± 21, and 1760 ± 19). The moraines corresponding to the two first stages are close to the one in 1630 suggesting a slow recession of about 18% in the total length of the glacier. From the LIA maximum extent to the beginning of the 20th century, the 24 glaciers have retreated a distance of about 1000 m, corresponding to a reduction of 30% in their length. This rate is comparable to that observed during the 20th century. Estimates of palaeo-Equilibrium Line Altitudes show an increase in altitude of about 100 m from the LIA maximum glacial extension at the beginning of the 17th century to the beginning of the 20th century. Because long time series are not available for precipitation and temperature, this glacial retreat is difficult to explain by past climate changes. However, there is a fair correspondence between changes in glacier length and the δ18O recorded in the Quelccaya ice core at a century timescale. Our current knowledge of tropical glaciers and isotope variations leads us to suggest that this common tropical signal reflects a change from a wet LIA to the drier conditions of today. Finally, a remarkable synchronicity is observed with glacial variations in Bolivia, suggesting a common regional climatic pattern during the LIA.

  8. Emerging Glacial Lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru: A Case Study at Arteson Glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisolm, R. E.; Mckinney, D. C.; Gomez, J.; Voss, K.

    2012-12-01

    Tropical glaciers are an essential component of the water resources systems in the mountainous regions where they are located, and a warming climate has resulted in the accelerated retreat of Andean glaciers in recent decades. The shrinkage of Andean glaciers influences the flood risk for communities living downstream as new glacial lakes have begun to form at the termini of some glaciers. As these lakes continue to grow in area and volume, they pose an increasing risk of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs). Ice thickness measurements have been a key missing link in studying the tropical glaciers in Peru and how climate change is likely to impact glacial melt and the growth of glacial lakes. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has rarely been applied to glaciers in Peru to measure ice thickness, and these measurements can tell us a lot about how a warming climate will affect glacier mass balance. This study presents GPR data taken in July 2012 at the Arteson glacier in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru. A new lake has begun to form at the terminus of the Arteson glacier, and this lake has key features, including overhanging ice and loose rock likely to create landslides, that could trigger a catastrophic GLOF if the lake continues to grow. This new lake is part of a series of three lakes that have formed below the Arteson glacier. The two lower lakes, Artesonraju and Paron, are much larger so that if there were an avalanche or landslide into the new lake below Arteson glacier, the impact could potentially be more catastrophic than a GLOF from one single lake. Estimates of how the lake mass balance is likely to evolve due to the retreating glacier are key to assessing the flood risk from this dynamic three-lake system. Because the glacier mass balance and lake mass balance are closely linked, the ice thickness measurements and measurements of the bed slope of the Arteson glacier and underlying bedrock give us a clue to how the lake is likely to evolve. GPR measurements of

  9. Modeling of U-series Radionuclide Transport Through Soil at Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekar, K. E.; Goodell, P. C.; Walton, J. C.; Anthony, E. Y.; Ren, M.

    2007-05-01

    The Nopal I uranium deposit is located at Pena Blanca in Chihuahua, Mexico. Mining of high-grade uranium ore occurred in the early 1980s, with the ore stockpiled nearby. The stockpile was mostly cleared in the 1990s; however, some of the high-grade boulders have remained there, creating localized sources of radioactivity for a period of 25-30 years. This provides a unique opportunity to study radionuclide transport, because the study area did not have any uranium contamination predating the stockpile in the 1980s. One high-grade boulder was selected for study based upon its shape, location, and high activity. The presumed drip-line off of the boulder was marked, samples from the boulder surface were taken, and then the boulder was moved several feet away. Soil samples were taken from directly beneath the boulder, around the drip-line, and down slope. Eight of these samples were collected in a vertical profile directly beneath the boulder. Visible flakes of boulder material were removed from the surficial soil samples, because they would have higher concentrations of U-series radionuclides and cause the activities in the soil samples to be excessively high. The vertical sampling profile used 2-inch thicknesses for each sample. The soil samples were packaged into thin plastic containers to minimize the attenuation and to standardize sample geometry, and then they were analyzed by gamma-ray spectroscopy with a Ge(Li) detector for Th-234, Pa-234, U-234, Th-230, Ra-226, Pb-214, Bi-214, and Pb-210. The raw counts were corrected for self-attenuation and normalized using BL-5, a uranium standard from Beaverlodge, Saskatchewan. BL-5 allowed the counts obtained on the Ge(Li) to be referenced to a known concentration or activity, which was then applied to the soil unknowns for a reliable calculation of their concentrations. Gamma ray spectra of five soil samples from the vertical profile exhibit decreasing activities with increasing depth for the selected radionuclides

  10. Validated Fault Tolerant Architectures for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on validated fault tolerant architectures for space station are presented. Topics covered include: fault tolerance approach; advanced information processing system (AIPS); and fault tolerant parallel processor (FTPP).

  11. 75 FR 21034 - Notice of Availability of Record of Decision for the Agua Fria National Monument and Bradshaw...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of Record of Decision for the Agua Fria National... Agua Fria National Monument and Bradshaw-Harquahala Planning Area, located in central Arizona. The... occupied or used portions of the planning area during prehistoric or historic times. The Agua Fria...

  12. Cable fault locator research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, C. A.; Honey, S. K.; Petro, J. P.; Phillips, A. C.

    1982-07-01

    Cable fault location and the construction of four field test units are discussed. Swept frequency sounding of mine cables with RF signals was the technique most thoroughly investigated. The swept frequency technique is supplemented with a form of moving target indication to provide a method for locating the position of a technician along a cable and relative to a suspected fault. Separate, more limited investigations involved high voltage time domain reflectometry and acoustical probing of mine cables. Particular areas of research included microprocessor-based control of the swept frequency system, a microprocessor based fast Fourier transform for spectral analysis, and RF synthesizers.

  13. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  14. Computer hardware fault administration

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-09-14

    Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

  15. Ius Chasma Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-415, 8 July 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a 'text-book example' of an offset in layered rock caused by a fault. The offset is most easily seen near the upper right of the image. The martian crust is faulted, and the planet has probably experienced 'earthquakes' (or, marsquakes) in the past. This scene is located on the floor of Ius Chasma near 7.8oS, 80.6oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  16. DIFFERENTIAL FAULT SENSING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, J.H.

    1961-09-01

    A differential fault sensing circuit is designed for detecting arcing in high-voltage vacuum tubes arranged in parallel. A circuit is provided which senses differences in voltages appearing between corresponding elements likely to fault. Sensitivity of the circuit is adjusted to some level above which arcing will cause detectable differences in voltage. For particular corresponding elements, a group of pulse transformers are connected in parallel with diodes connected across the secondaries thereof so that only voltage excursions are transmitted to a thyratron which is biased to the sensitivity level mentioned.

  17. Fault terminations, Seminoe Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Dominic, J.B.; McConnell, D.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Two basement-involved faults terminate in folds in the Seminoe Mountains. Mesoscopic and macroscopic structures in sedimentary rocks provide clues to the interrelationship of faults and folds in this region, and on the linkage between faulting and folding in general. The Hurt Creek fault trends 320[degree] and has maximum separation of 1.5 km measured at the basement/cover contact. Separation on the fault decreases upsection to zero within the Jurassic Sundance Formation. Unfaulted rock units form an anticline around the fault tip. The complementary syncline is angular with planar limbs and a narrow hinge zone. The syncline axial trace intersects the fault in the footwall at the basement/cover cut-off. Map patterns are interpreted to show thickening of Mesozoic units adjacent to the syncline hinge. In contrast, extensional structures are common in the faulted anticline within the Permian Goose Egg and Triassic Chugwater Formations. A hanging wall splay fault loses separation into the Goose Egg formation which is thinned by 50% at the fault tip. Mesoscopic normal faults are oriented 320--340[degree] and have an average inclination of 75[degree] SW. Megaboudins of Chugwater are present in the footwall of the Hurt Creek fault, immediately adjacent to the fault trace. The Black Canyon fault transported Precambrian-Pennsylvanian rocks over Pennsylvanian Tensleep sandstone. This fault is layer-parallel at the top of the Tensleep and loses separation along strike into an unfaulted syncline in the Goose Egg Formation. Shortening in the pre-Permian units is accommodated by slip on the basement-involved Black Canyon fault. Equivalent shortening in Permian-Cretaceous units occurs on a system of thin-skinned'' thrust faults.

  18. Fault displacement hazard for strike-slip faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.D.; Dawson, T.E.; Chen, R.; Cao, T.; Wills, C.J.; Schwartz, D.P.; Frankel, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology, data, and regression equations for calculating the fault rupture hazard at sites near steeply dipping, strike-slip faults. We collected and digitized on-fault and off-fault displacement data for 9 global strikeslip earthquakes ranging from moment magnitude M 6.5 to M 7.6 and supplemented these with displacements from 13 global earthquakes compiled byWesnousky (2008), who considers events up to M 7.9. Displacements on the primary fault fall off at the rupture ends and are often measured in meters, while displacements on secondary (offfault) or distributed faults may measure a few centimeters up to more than a meter and decay with distance from the rupture. Probability of earthquake rupture is less than 15% for cells 200 m??200 m and is less than 2% for 25 m??25 m cells at distances greater than 200mfrom the primary-fault rupture. Therefore, the hazard for off-fault ruptures is much lower than the hazard near the fault. Our data indicate that rupture displacements up to 35cm can be triggered on adjacent faults at distances out to 10kmor more from the primary-fault rupture. An example calculation shows that, for an active fault which has repeated large earthquakes every few hundred years, fault rupture hazard analysis should be an important consideration in the design of structures or lifelines that are located near the principal fault, within about 150 m of well-mapped active faults with a simple trace and within 300 m of faults with poorly defined or complex traces.

  19. GAMMA-RAY CHARACTERIZATION OF THE U-SERIES INTERMEDIATE DAUGHTERS FROM SOIL SAMPLES AT THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOG, CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    D.C. French; E.Y. Anthony; P.C. Goodell

    2005-07-18

    The Pena Blanca natural analog is located in the Sierra Pena Blanca, approximately 50 miles north of Chihuahua City, Mexico. The Sierra Pena Blanca is composed mainly of ash-flow tuffs, and the uranium in the region is contained in the brecciated zones of these tuffs. The Pena Blanca site is considered a natural analog to the proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository because they share similar characteristics of structure, volcanic lithology, tectonic activity, and hydrologic regime. One of the mineralized zones, the Nopal I deposit, was mined in the early 1980s and the ore was stockpiled close to the mine. This stockpile area has subsequently been cleared and is referred to as the prior high-grade stockpile (PHGS) site. Soil surrounding boulders of high-grade ore associated with the PHGS site have been sampled. The purpose of this study is to characterize the transport of uranium series radioisotopes from the boulder to the soil during the past 25 years. Transport is characterized by determining the activities of individual radionuclides and daughter to parent ratios. The daughter to parent ratios are used to establish whether the samples are in secular equilibrium. Activities are determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy. Isotopes of the uranium series decay chain detected by gamma-ray spectroscopy include {sup 210}Pb, {sup 234}U, {sup 234}Th, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 214}Pb, {sup 214}Bi, and {sup 234}Pa. Preliminary results indicate that some daughter to parent pairs appear to be in secular disequilibrium. Thorium is in excess relative to uranium, and radium is in excess relative to thorium. A deficiency appears to exist for {sup 210}Pb relative to {sup 214}Bi and {sup 214}Pb. If these results are borne out by further analysis, they would suggest transport of nuclides from the high-grade boulder into its surroundings, followed by continued leaching of uranium and lead from the environment.

  20. Digital aeromagnetic data and derivative products from a helicopter survey over the town of Blanca and surrounding areas, Alamosa and Costilla counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bankey, Viki; Grauch, V.J.S.; Fugro Airborne Surveys Corporation

    2004-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains digital data, image files, and text files describing data formats and survey procedures for aeromagnetic data collected during a helicopter geophysical survey in southern Colorado during October 2003. The survey covers the town of Blanca and surrounding communities in Alamosa and Costilla Counties. Several derivative products from these data are also presented, including reduced-to-pole, horizontal gradient magnitude, and downward continued grids and images.

  1. Fault tree models for fault tolerant hypercube multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Mark A.; Tuazon, Jezus O.

    1991-01-01

    Three candidate fault tolerant hypercube architectures are modeled, their reliability analyses are compared, and the resulting implications of these methods of incorporating fault tolerance into hypercube multiprocessors are discussed. In the course of performing the reliability analyses, the use of HARP and fault trees in modeling sequence dependent system behaviors is demonstrated.

  2. Evaluating glacier volume changes since the Little Ice Age maximum and consequences for stream flow by integrating models of glacier flow and hydrology in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, K. I.; Mark, B. G.; Baraer, M.; Ahn, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Assessing the historical contribution of glacier ice volume loss to stream flow based on reconstructed volume changes through Little Ice Age (LIA) can be directly related to the understanding of glacier-hydrology in the current epoch of rapid glacier ice loss that has disquieting implications for water resources in the Cordillera Blanca of the Peruvian Andes. However, the accurate prediction of the future glacial meltwater availability for the increasing regional Andean society needs more extensive quantitative estimation from long-term glacial meltwater of reconstructed glacial volume. Modeling LIA paleoglaciers using a cellular automata glacier flow model in different catchments of the Cordillera Blanca allows us to reconstruct glacier volume and its change from likely combinations of climatic control variables and time. We compute the rate and magnitude of glacier volume changes for Yanamarey and Queshque glaciers between the LIA and modern defined by 2011 Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model Version 2 (GDEM V2) from the Cordillera Blanca. Also, we employ a recently demonstrated hydrological stream model (Baraer et al., 2012) for integrating the reconstructed glacier volume and its change to calculate glacier contribution to meltwater runoff as a function of glacier loss rate in the Yanamarey and the Queshque catchments, and reconstruct long-term glacier significance to stream flow.

  3. Characteristics of On-fault and Off-fault displacement of various fault types based on numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, N.; Kitada, N.; Takemura, K.

    2015-12-01

    There are two types of fault displacement related to the earthquake fault: on-fault displacement and off-fault displacement. Off-fault displacement should be evaluated in important facilities, such as Nuclear Installations. Probabilistic Fault Displacement Hazard Analysis (PFDHA) is developing on the basis of PSHA. PFDHA estimates on-fault and off-fault displacement. For estimation, PFDHA uses distance-displacement functions, which are constructed from field measurement data. However, observed displacement data are still sparse, especially off-fault displacement. In Nuclear Installations, estimation of off-fault displacement is more important than that of on-fault. We carried out numerical fault displacement simulations to assist in understanding distance-displacement relations of on-fault and off-fault according to fault types, normal, reverse and strike fault. We used Okada's dislocation method. The displacements were calculated based on the single fault model with several rakes of slip. On-fault displacements (along the fault profile) of each fault types show a similar trend. Off-fault displacements (cross profile to the fault) of vertical (reverse and normal) fault types show the rapid decreasing displacement on the foot wall side. In the presentation, we will show the displacement profile and also stress, strain and so on. The dislocation model can not express discontinuous displacements. In the future, we will apply various numerical simulations (Finite Element Method, Distinct Element Method) in order to evaluate off-fault displacements. We will also compare numerical simulation results with observed data.

  4. The property of fault zone and fault activity of Shionohira Fault, Fukushima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshimo, K.; Aoki, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Niwa, M.; Kametaka, M.; Sakai, T.; Tanaka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The April 11, 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori Earthquake (hereafter the 4.11 earthquake) formed co-seismic surface ruptures trending in the NNW-SSE direction in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture, which were newly named as the Shionohira Fault by Ishiyama et al. (2011). This earthquake was characterized by a westward dipping normal slip faulting, with a maximum displacement of about 2 m (e.g., Kurosawa et al., 2012). To the south of the area, the same trending lineaments were recognized to exist even though no surface ruptures occurred by the earthquake. In an attempt to elucidate the differences of active and non-active segments of the fault, this report discusses the results of observation of fault outcrops along the Shionohira Fault as well as the Coulomb stress calculations. Only a few outcrops have basement rocks of both the hanging-wall and foot-wall of the fault plane. Three of these outcrops (Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto) were selected for investigation. In addition, a fault outcrop (Nameishi-minami) located about 300 m south of the southern tip of the surface ruptures was investigated. The authors carried out observations of outcrops, polished slabs and thin sections, and performed X-ray diffraction (XRD) to fault materials. As a result, the fault zones originating from schists were investigated at Kyodo-gawa and Betto. A thick fault gouge was cut by a fault plane of the 4.11 earthquake in each outcrop. The fault materials originating from schists were fault bounded with (possibly Neogene) weakly deformed sandstone at Shionohira. A thin fault gouge was found along the fault plane of 4.11 earthquake. A small-scale fault zone with thin fault gouge was observed in Nameishi-minami. According to XRD analysis, smectite was detected in the gouges from Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto, while not in the gouge from Nameishi-minami.

  5. Towards Fault Resilient Global Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Tipparaju, Vinod; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Palmer, Bruce J.; Petrini, Fabrizio; Nieplocha, Jaroslaw

    2007-09-03

    The focus of the current paper is adding fault resiliency to the Global Arrays. We extended the GA toolkit to provide a minimal level of capabilities to enable programmer to implement fault resiliency at the user level. Our fault-recovery approach is programmer assisted and based on frequent incremental checkpoints and rollback recovery. In addition, it relies of pool of spare nodes that are used to replace the failing node. We demonstrate usefulness of fault resilient Global Arrays in application context.

  6. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2012-02-07

    An apparatus, program product and method check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  7. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-02-23

    An apparatus and program product check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  8. Dynamic Fault Detection Chassis

    SciTech Connect

    Mize, Jeffery J

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The high frequency switching megawatt-class High Voltage Converter Modulator (HVCM) developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is now in operation. One of the major problems with the modulator systems is shoot-thru conditions that can occur in a IGBTs H-bridge topology resulting in large fault currents and device failure in a few microseconds. The Dynamic Fault Detection Chassis (DFDC) is a fault monitoring system; it monitors transformer flux saturation using a window comparator and dV/dt events on the cathode voltage caused by any abnormality such as capacitor breakdown, transformer primary turns shorts, or dielectric breakdown between the transformer primary and secondary. If faults are detected, the DFDC will inhibit the IGBT gate drives and shut the system down, significantly reducing the possibility of a shoot-thru condition or other equipment damaging events. In this paper, we will present system integration considerations, performance characteristics of the DFDC, and discuss its ability to significantly reduce costly down time for the entire facility.

  9. Row fault detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2008-10-14

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  10. Fault-Related Sanctuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardi, L.

    2001-12-01

    Beyond the study of historical surface faulting events, this work investigates the possibility, in specific cases, of identifying pre-historical events whose memory survives in myths and legends. The myths of many famous sacred places of the ancient world contain relevant telluric references: "sacred" earthquakes, openings to the Underworld and/or chthonic dragons. Given the strong correspondence with local geological evidence, these myths may be considered as describing natural phenomena. It has been possible in this way to shed light on the geologic origin of famous myths (Piccardi, 1999, 2000 and 2001). Interdisciplinary researches reveal that the origin of several ancient sanctuaries may be linked in particular to peculiar geological phenomena observed on local active faults (like ground shaking and coseismic surface ruptures, gas and flames emissions, strong underground rumours). In many of these sanctuaries the sacred area is laid directly above the active fault. In a few cases, faulting has affected also the archaeological relics, right through the main temple (e.g. Delphi, Cnidus, Hierapolis of Phrygia). As such, the arrangement of the cult site and content of relative myths suggest that specific points along the trace of active faults have been noticed in the past and worshiped as special `sacred' places, most likely interpreted as Hades' Doors. The mythological stratification of most of these sanctuaries dates back to prehistory, and points to a common derivation from the cult of the Mother Goddess (the Lady of the Doors), which was largely widespread since at least 25000 BC. The cult itself was later reconverted into various different divinities, while the `sacred doors' of the Great Goddess and/or the dragons (offspring of Mother Earth and generally regarded as Keepers of the Doors) persisted in more recent mythologies. Piccardi L., 1999: The "Footprints" of the Archangel: Evidence of Early-Medieval Surface Faulting at Monte Sant'Angelo (Gargano, Italy

  11. Quantifying Anderson's fault types

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Anderson [1905] explained three basic types of faulting (normal, strike-slip, and reverse) in terms of the shape of the causative stress tensor and its orientation relative to the Earth's surface. Quantitative parameters can be defined which contain information about both shape and orientation [Ce??le??rier, 1995], thereby offering a way to distinguish fault-type domains on plots of regional stress fields and to quantify, for example, the degree of normal-faulting tendencies within strike-slip domains. This paper offers a geometrically motivated generalization of Angelier's [1979, 1984, 1990] shape parameters ?? and ?? to new quantities named A?? and A??. In their simple forms, A?? varies from 0 to 1 for normal, 1 to 2 for strike-slip, and 2 to 3 for reverse faulting, and A?? ranges from 0?? to 60??, 60?? to 120??, and 120?? to 180??, respectively. After scaling, A?? and A?? agree to within 2% (or 1??), a difference of little practical significance, although A?? has smoother analytical properties. A formulation distinguishing horizontal axes as well as the vertical axis is also possible, yielding an A?? ranging from -3 to +3 and A?? from -180?? to +180??. The geometrically motivated derivation in three-dimensional stress space presented here may aid intuition and offers a natural link with traditional ways of plotting yield and failure criteria. Examples are given, based on models of Bird [1996] and Bird and Kong [1994], of the use of Anderson fault parameters A?? and A?? for visualizing tectonic regimes defined by regional stress fields. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Earthquakes and fault creep on the northern San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nason, R.

    1979-01-01

    At present there is an absence of both fault creep and small earthquakes on the northern San Andreas fault, which had a magnitude 8 earthquake with 5 m of slip in 1906. The fault has apparently been dormant after the 1906 earthquake. One possibility is that the fault is 'locked' in some way and only produces great earthquakes. An alternative possibility, presented here, is that the lack of current activity on the northern San Andreas fault is because of a lack of sufficient elastic strain after the 1906 earthquake. This is indicated by geodetic measurements at Fort Ross in 1874, 1906 (post-earthquake), and 1969, which show that the strain accumulation in 1969 (69 ?? 10-6 engineering strain) was only about one-third of the strain release (rebound) in the 1906 earthquake (200 ?? 10-6 engineering strain). The large difference in seismicity before and after 1906, with many strong local earthquakes from 1836 to 1906, but only a few strong earthquakes from 1906 to 1976, also indicates a difference of elastic strain. The geologic characteristics (serpentine, fault straightness) of most of the northern San Andreas fault are very similar to the characteristics of the fault south of Hollister, where fault creep is occurring. Thus, the current absence of fault creep on the northern fault segment is probably due to a lack of sufficient elastic strain at the present time. ?? 1979.

  13. An empirical comparison of software fault tolerance and fault elimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimeall, Timothy J.; Leveson, Nancy G.

    1991-01-01

    Reliability is an important concern in the development of software for modern systems. Some researchers have hypothesized that particular fault-handling approaches or techniques are so effective that other approaches or techniques are superfluous. The authors have performed a study that compares two major approaches to the improvement of software, software fault elimination and software fault tolerance, by examination of the fault detection obtained by five techniques: run-time assertions, multi-version voting, functional testing augmented by structural testing, code reading by stepwise abstraction, and static data-flow analysis. This study has focused on characterizing the sets of faults detected by the techniques and on characterizing the relationships between these sets of faults. The results of the study show that none of the techniques studied is necessarily redundant to any combination of the others. Further results reveal strengths and weakness in the fault detection by the techniques studied and suggest directions for future research.

  14. Fault diagnosis of analog circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Bandler, J.W.; Salama, A.E.

    1985-08-01

    In this paper, various fault location techniques in analog networks are described and compared. The emphasis is on the more recent developments in the subject. Four main approaches for fault location are addressed, examined, and illustrated using simple network examples. In particular, we consider the fault dictionary approach, the parameter identification approach, the fault verification approach, and the approximation approach. Theory and algorithms that are associated with these approaches are reviewed and problems of their practical application are identified. Associated with the fault dictionary approach we consider fault dictionary construction techniques, methods of optimum measurement selection, different fault isolation criteria, and efficient fault simulation techniques. Parameter identification techniques that either utilize linear or nonlinear systems of equations to identify all network elements are examined very thoroughly. Under fault verification techniques we discuss node-fault diagnosis, branch-fault diagnosis, subnetwork testability conditions as well as combinatorial techniques, the failure bound technique, and the network decomposition technique. For the approximation approach we consider probabilistic methods and optimization-based methods. The artificial intelligence technique and the different measures of testability are also considered. The main features of the techniques considered are summarized in a comparative table. An extensive, but not exhaustive, bibliography is provided.

  15. Fault Scarp Offsets and Fault Population Analysis on Dione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarlow, S.; Collins, G. C.

    2010-12-01

    Cassini images of Dione show several fault zones cutting through the moon’s icy surface. We have measured the displacement and length of 271 faults, and estimated the strain occurring in 6 different fault zones. These measurements allow us to quantify the total amount of surface strain on Dione as well as constrain what processes might have caused these faults to form. Though we do not have detailed topography across fault scarps on Dione, we can use their projected size on the camera plane to estimate their heights, assuming a reasonable surface slope. Starting with high resolution images of Dione obtained by the Cassini ISS, we marked points at the top to the bottom of each fault scarp to measure the fault’s projected displacement and its orientation along strike. Line and sample information for the measurements were then processed through ISIS to derive latitude/longitude information and pixel dimensions. We then calculate the three dimensional orientation of a vector running from the bottom to the top of the fault scarp, assuming a 45 degree angle with respect to the surface, and project this vector onto the spacecraft camera plane. This projected vector gives us a correction factor to estimate the actual vertical displacement of the fault scarp. This process was repeated many times for each fault, to show variations of displacement along the length of the fault. To compare each fault to its neighbors and see how strain was accommodated across a population of faults, we divided the faults into fault zones, and created new coordinate systems oriented along the central axis of each fault zone. We could then quantify the amount of fault overlap and add the displacement of overlapping faults to estimate the amount of strain accommodated in each zone. Faults in the southern portion of Padua have a strain of 0.031(+/-) 0.0097, central Padua exhibits a strain of .032(+/-) 0.012, and faults in northern Padua have a strain of 0.025(+/-) 0.0080. The western faults of

  16. Fault intersections along the Hosgri Fault Zone, Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, J. T.; Johnson, S. Y.; Langenheim, V. E.

    2011-12-01

    It is well-established that stresses concentrate at fault intersections or bends when subjected to tectonic loading, making focused studies of these areas particularly important for seismic hazard analysis. In addition, detailed fault models can be used to investigate how slip on one fault might transfer to another during an earthquake. We combine potential-field, high-resolution seismic-reflection, and multibeam bathymetry data with existing geologic and seismicity data to investigate the fault geometry and connectivity of the Hosgri, Los Osos, and Shoreline faults offshore of San Luis Obispo, California. The intersection of the Hosgri and Los Osos faults in Estero Bay is complex. The offshore extension of the Los Osos fault, as imaged with multibeam and high-resolution seismic data, is characterized by a west-northwest-trending zone (1-3 km wide) of near vertical faulting. Three distinct strands (northern, central, and southern) are visible on shallow seismic reflection profiles. The steep dip combined with dramatic changes in reflection character across mapped faults within this zone suggests horizontal offset of rock units and argues for predominantly strike-slip motion, however, the present orientation of the fault zone suggests oblique slip. As the Los Osos fault zone approaches the Hosgri fault, the northern and central strands become progressively more northwest-trending in line with the Hosgri fault. The northern strand runs subparallel to the Hosgri fault along the edge of a long-wavelength magnetic anomaly, intersecting the Hosgri fault southwest of Point Estero. Geophysical modeling suggests the northern strand dips 70° to the northeast, which is in agreement with earthquake focal mechanisms that parallel this strand. The central strand bends northward and intersects the Hosgri fault directly west of Morro Rock, corresponding to an area of compressional deformation visible in shallow seismic-reflection profiles. The southern strand of the Los Osos

  17. Abnormal fault-recovery characteristics of the fault-tolerant multiprocessor uncovered using a new fault-injection methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Peter A.

    1991-03-01

    An investigation was made in AIRLAB of the fault handling performance of the Fault Tolerant MultiProcessor (FTMP). Fault handling errors detected during fault injection experiments were characterized. In these fault injection experiments, the FTMP disabled a working unit instead of the faulted unit once in every 500 faults, on the average. System design weaknesses allow active faults to exercise a part of the fault management software that handles Byzantine or lying faults. Byzantine faults behave such that the faulted unit points to a working unit as the source of errors. The design's problems involve: (1) the design and interface between the simplex error detection hardware and the error processing software, (2) the functional capabilities of the FTMP system bus, and (3) the communication requirements of a multiprocessor architecture. These weak areas in the FTMP's design increase the probability that, for any hardware fault, a good line replacement unit (LRU) is mistakenly disabled by the fault management software.

  18. Abnormal fault-recovery characteristics of the fault-tolerant multiprocessor uncovered using a new fault-injection methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Peter A.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was made in AIRLAB of the fault handling performance of the Fault Tolerant MultiProcessor (FTMP). Fault handling errors detected during fault injection experiments were characterized. In these fault injection experiments, the FTMP disabled a working unit instead of the faulted unit once in every 500 faults, on the average. System design weaknesses allow active faults to exercise a part of the fault management software that handles Byzantine or lying faults. Byzantine faults behave such that the faulted unit points to a working unit as the source of errors. The design's problems involve: (1) the design and interface between the simplex error detection hardware and the error processing software, (2) the functional capabilities of the FTMP system bus, and (3) the communication requirements of a multiprocessor architecture. These weak areas in the FTMP's design increase the probability that, for any hardware fault, a good line replacement unit (LRU) is mistakenly disabled by the fault management software.

  19. Holocene faulting on the Mission fault, northwest Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Ostenaa, D.A.; Klinger, R.E.; Levish, D.R. )

    1993-04-01

    South of Flathead Lake, fault scarps on late Quaternary surfaces are nearly continuous for 45 km along the western flank of the Mission Range. On late Pleistocene alpine lateral moraines, scarp heights reach a maximum of 17 m. Scarp heights on post glacial Lake Missoula surfaces range from 2.6--7.2 m and maximum scarp angles range from 10[degree]--24[degree]. The stratigraphy exposed in seven trenches across the fault demonstrates that the post glacial Lake Missoula scarps resulted from at least two surface-faulting events. Larger scarp heights on late Pleistocene moraines suggests a possible third event. This yields an estimated recurrence of 4--8 kyr. Analyses of scarp profiles show that the age of the most surface faulting is middle Holocene, consistent with stratigraphic evidence found in the trenches. Rupture length and displacement imply earthquake magnitudes of 7 to 7.5. Previous studies have not identified geologic evidence of late Quaternary surface faulting in the Rocky Mountain Trench or on faults north of the Lewis and Clark line despite abundant historic seismicity in the Flathead Lake area. In addition to the Mission fault, reconnaissance studies have located late Quaternary fault scarps along portions of faults bordering Jocko and Thompson Valleys. These are the first documented late Pleistocene/Holocene faults north of the Lewis and Clark line in Montana and should greatly revise estimates of earthquake hazards in this region.

  20. Managing Fault Management Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDougal, John M.

    2010-01-01

    As the complexity of space missions grows, development of Fault Management (FM) capabilities is an increasingly common driver for significant cost overruns late in the development cycle. FM issues and the resulting cost overruns are rarely caused by a lack of technology, but rather by a lack of planning and emphasis by project management. A recent NASA FM Workshop brought together FM practitioners from a broad spectrum of institutions, mission types, and functional roles to identify the drivers underlying FM overruns and recommend solutions. They identified a number of areas in which increased program and project management focus can be used to control FM development cost growth. These include up-front planning for FM as a distinct engineering discipline; managing different, conflicting, and changing institutional goals and risk postures; ensuring the necessary resources for a disciplined, coordinated approach to end-to-end fault management engineering; and monitoring FM coordination across all mission systems.

  1. Dynamic faulting on a conjugate fault system detected by near-fault tilt measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Eiichi

    2015-03-01

    There have been reports of conjugate faults that have ruptured during earthquakes. However, it is still unclear whether or not these conjugate faults ruptured coseismically during earthquakes. In this paper, we investigated near-fault ground tilt motions observed at the IWTH25 station during the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake ( M w 6.9). Since near-fault tilt motion is very sensitive to the fault geometry on which the slip occurs during an earthquake, these data make it possible to distinguish between the main fault rupture and a rupture on the conjugate fault. We examined several fault models that have already been proposed and confirmed that only the models with a conjugated fault could explain the tilt data observed at IWTH25. The results support the existence of simultaneous conjugate faulting during the main rupture. This will contribute to the understanding of earthquake rupture dynamics because the conjugate rupture releases the same shear strain as that released on the main fault, and thus it has been considered quite difficult for both ruptures to accelerate simultaneously.

  2. Microplankton dynamics under heavy anthropogenic pressure. The case of the Bahía Blanca Estuary, southwestern Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    López Abbate, M Celeste; Molinero, Juan Carlos; Guinder, Valeria A; Dutto, M Sofía; Barría de Cao, M Sonia; Ruiz Etcheverry, Laura A; Pettigrosso, Rosa E; Carcedo, M Cecilia; Hoffmeyer, Mónica S

    2015-06-15

    Quantifying biotic feedbacks in response to environmental signals is fundamental to assess ecosystem perturbation. We analyzed the joint effects of eutrophication, derived from sewage pollution, and climate at the base of the pelagic food web in the Bahía Blanca Estuary (SW Atlantic Ocean). A two-year survey of environmental conditions and microplankton communities was conducted in two sites affected by contrasting anthropogenic eutrophication conditions. Under severe eutrophication, we found higher phytoplankton abundance consistently dominated by smaller sized, non siliceous species, while microzooplankton abundance remained lower and nutrient stoichiometry showed conspicuous deviations from the Redfield ratio. Phytoplankton growth in such conditions appeared controlled by phosphorous. In turn, microplankton biomass and phytoplankton size ratio (<20μm:>20μm) displayed a saturation relationship with nutrients in the highly eutrophic area, although mean phytoplankton growth was similar in both eutrophic systems. The strength of links within the estuarine network, quantified through path analysis, showed enhanced relationships under larger anthropogenic eutrophication, which fostered the climate influence on microplankton communities. Our results show conspicuous effects of severe sewage pollution on the ecological stoichiometry, i.e., N and P excess with respect to Si, altering nutrient ratios for microplankton communities. This warns on wide consequences on food web dynamics and ultimately in ecosystem assets of coastal pelagic environments. PMID:25837775

  3. Analysis of 15 autosomal STR loci from Mar del Plata and Bahia Blanca (Central Region of Argentina).

    PubMed

    Parolin, María Laura; Carreras-Torres, Robert; Sambuco, Lorena Andrea; Jaureguiberry, Stella Maris; Iudica, Celia Estela

    2014-05-01

    Allele frequencies for the 15 short tandem repeats (STRs) loci included in the AmpFlSTR® Identifiler kit were estimated in a sample of unrelated individuals from Mar del Plata (MDQ; N = 180) and Bahia Blanca (BB; N = 85) (Buenos Aires, Argentina). Biological samples were obtained from voluntary donors and forensic cases. Both populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction, except for locus vWA in MDQ and D2S1338 in BB. FGA was the most informative locus, and the least discriminating locus was TPOX in both samples. The combined power of discrimination (PDc) and the combined probability of exclusion (PEc) were similar in MDQ and BB samples (0.999999998 < PDc < 0.999999999 and 0.999999979 < PEc < 0.999999989). The multidimentional scaling plot from Rst genetic distance matrix and the interethnic admixture estimation supported a higher European contribution in populations of the central region compared with populations from other regions of Argentina with higher Amerindian composition. These results enlarge the Argentine databases of autosomal STR loci, revealed as an excellent tool for human identification tests and population genetic analysis. PMID:24257759

  4. Investigation of environmental pollution effects on stone monuments in the case of Santa Maria La Blanca, Seville (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, P.; Vázquez, M. A.; Ortiz, R.; Martin, J. M.; Ctvrtnickova, T.; Mateo, M. P.; Nicolas, G.

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize specimens submitted to the effects of weathering in an urban atmosphere. Samples investigated were stones covered by crusts and deposits of thickness ranging from micrometers to millimetres due to traffic pollutants and mineral dust. The pieces were collected in the Church of Santa Maria La Blanca in Seville (South Spain). In the Historical Centre of this city, the traffic is the main source of sulphur oxides. Several analytical techniques have been employed to determine composition of specimens: OM, XRD, XRF, SEM-EDX and LIBS. The main weathering form was gypsum (CaSO4ṡ2H2O), and it has its source in sulphur oxides from traffic. Over this alteration layer, the deposits of atmospheric particles have been found. According to LIBS results, these particles can be composed of Al, Si, Ba, K, Na, Ti, V, Mg and Ca, while XRF technique also detect S, Fe, Mn and P. These atmospheric particles can have an anthropogenic or terrigenous origin, including the weathering of the building materials and its restoration products.

  5. PHASE ANALYSES OF URANIUM-BEARING MINERALS FROM THE HIGH GRADE ORE, NOPAL I, PENA BLANCA, MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ren; P. Goodell; A. Kelts; E.Y. Anthony; M. Fayek; C. Fan; C. Beshears

    2005-07-11

    The Nopal I uranium deposit is located in the Pena Blanca district, approximately 40 miles north of Chihuahua City, Mexico. The deposit was formed by hydrothermal processes within the fracture zone of welded silicic volcanic tuff. The ages of volcanic formations are between 35 to 44 m.y. and there was secondary silicification of most of the formations. After the formation of at least part of the uranium deposit, the ore body was uplifted above the water table and is presently exposed at the surface. Detailed petrographic characterization, electron microprobe backscatter electron (BSE) imagery, and selected x-ray maps for the samples from Nopal I high-grade ore document different uranium phases in the ore. There are at least two stages of uranium precipitation. A small amount of uraninite is encapsulated in silica. Hexavalent uranium may also have been a primary precipitant. The uranium phases were precipitated along cleavages of feldspars, and along fractures in the tuff. Energy dispersive spectrometer data and x-ray maps suggest that the major uranium phases are uranophane and weeksite. Substitutions of Ca and K occur in both phases, implying that conditions were variable during the mineralization/alteration process, and that compositions of the original minerals have a major influence on later stage alteration. Continued study is needed to fully characterize uranium behavior in these semi-arid to arid conditions.

  6. Fluid involvement in normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    2000-04-01

    Evidence of fluid interaction with normal faults comes from their varied role as flow barriers or conduits in hydrocarbon basins and as hosting structures for hydrothermal mineralisation, and from fault-rock assemblages in exhumed footwalls of steep active normal faults and metamorphic core complexes. These last suggest involvement of predominantly aqueous fluids over a broad depth range, with implications for fault shear resistance and the mechanics of normal fault reactivation. A general downwards progression in fault rock assemblages (high-level breccia-gouge (often clay-rich) → cataclasites → phyllonites → mylonite → mylonitic gneiss with the onset of greenschist phyllonites occurring near the base of the seismogenic crust) is inferred for normal fault zones developed in quartzo-feldspathic continental crust. Fluid inclusion studies in hydrothermal veining from some footwall assemblages suggest a transition from hydrostatic to suprahydrostatic fluid pressures over the depth range 3-5 km, with some evidence for near-lithostatic to hydrostatic pressure cycling towards the base of the seismogenic zone in the phyllonitic assemblages. Development of fault-fracture meshes through mixed-mode brittle failure in rock-masses with strong competence layering is promoted by low effective stress in the absence of thoroughgoing cohesionless faults that are favourably oriented for reactivation. Meshes may develop around normal faults in the near-surface under hydrostatic fluid pressures to depths determined by rock tensile strength, and at greater depths in overpressured portions of normal fault zones and at stress heterogeneities, especially dilational jogs. Overpressures localised within developing normal fault zones also determine the extent to which they may reutilise existing discontinuities (for example, low-angle thrust faults). Brittle failure mode plots demonstrate that reactivation of existing low-angle faults under vertical σ1 trajectories is only likely if

  7. Fault management for data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Mark A.; Iverson, David L.; Patterson-Hine, F. Ann

    1993-01-01

    Issues related to automating the process of fault management (fault diagnosis and response) for data management systems are considered. Substantial benefits are to be gained by successful automation of this process, particularly for large, complex systems. The use of graph-based models to develop a computer assisted fault management system is advocated. The general problem is described and the motivation behind choosing graph-based models over other approaches for developing fault diagnosis computer programs is outlined. Some existing work in the area of graph-based fault diagnosis is reviewed, and a new fault management method which was developed from existing methods is offered. Our method is applied to an automatic telescope system intended as a prototype for future lunar telescope programs. Finally, an application of our method to general data management systems is described.

  8. Experimental Fault Reactivation on Favourably and Unfavourably Oriented Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Sibson, R. H.; Renner, J.; Toy, V. G.; di Toro, G.; Smith, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we introduce work which aims assess the loading of faults to failure under different stress regimes in a triaxial deformation apparatus. We explore experimentally the reshear of an existing fault in various orientations for particular values of (σ1 - σ3) and σ3' for contrasting loading systems - load-strengthening (equivalent to a thrust fault) with σ1' increasing at constant σ3', versus load-weakening (equivalent to a normal fault) with reducing σ3' under constant σ1'. Experiments are conducted on sawcut granite samples with fault angles at a variety of orientations relative to σ1 , ranging from an optimal orientation for reactivation to lockup angles where new faults are formed in preference to reactivating the existing sawcut orientation. Prefailure and postfailure behaviour is compared in terms of damage zone development via monitoring variations in ultrasonic velocity and acoustic emission behaviour. For example, damage surrounding unfavourably oriented faults is significantly higher than that seen around favourably orientated faults due to greater maximum stresses attained prior to unstable slip, which is reflected by the increased acoustic emission activity leading up to failure. In addition, we also experimentally explore the reshear of natural pseudotachylytes (PSTs) from two different fault zones; the Gole Larghe Fault, Adamello, Italy in which the PSTs are in relatively isotropic Tonalite (at lab sample scale) and the Alpine Fault, New Zealand in which the PSTs are in highly anisotropic foliated shist. We test whether PSTs will reshear in both rock types under the right conditions, or whether new fractures in the wall rock will form in preference to reactivating the PST (PST shear strength is higher than that of the host rock). Are PSTs representative of one slip event?

  9. Fault welding by pseudotachylyte generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Toy, V. G.; Di Toro, G.; Renner, J.

    2014-12-01

    During earthquakes, frictional melts can localize on slip surfaces and dramatically weaken faults by melt lubrication. Once seismic slip is arrested, the melt cools and solidifies to form pseudotachylyte (PST), the presence of which is commonly used to infer earthquake slip on ancient exhumed faults. Little is known about the effect of solidified melt on the strength of faults directly preceding a subsequent earthquake. We performed triaxial deformation experiments on cores of tonalite (Gole Larghe fault zone, N. Italy) and mylonite (Alpine fault, New Zealand) in order to assess the strength of PST bearing faults in the lab. Three types of sample were prepared for each rock type; intact, sawcut and PST bearing, and were cored so that the sawcut, PST and foliation planes were orientated at 35° to the length of the core and direction of σ1, i.e., a favorable orientation for reactivation. This choice of samples allowed us to compare the strength of 'pre-earthquake' fault (sawcut) to a 'post-earthquake' fault with solidified frictional melt, and assess their strength relative to intact samples. Our results show that PST veins effectively weld fault surfaces together, allowing previously faulted rocks to regain cohesive strengths comparable to that of an intact rock. Shearing of the PST is not favored, but subsequent failure and slip is accommodated on new faults nucleating at other zones of weakness. Thus, the mechanism of coseismic weakening by melt lubrication does not necessarily facilitate long-term interseismic deformation localization, at least at the scale of these experiments. In natural fault zones, PSTs are often found distributed over multiple adjacent fault planes or other zones of weakness such as foliation planes. We also modeled the temperature distribution in and around a PST using an approximation for cooling of a thin, infinite sheet by conduction perpendicular to its margins at ambient temperatures commensurate with the depth of PST formation

  10. Fault-tolerant processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A fault-tolerant, fiber optic interconnect, or backplane, which serves as a via for data transfer between modules. Fault tolerance algorithms are embedded in the backplane by dividing the backplane into a read bus and a write bus and placing a redundancy management unit (RMU) between the read bus and the write bus so that all data transmitted by the write bus is subjected to the fault tolerance algorithms before the data is passed for distribution to the read bus. The RMU provides both backplane control and fault tolerance.

  11. Fault interaction near Hollister, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mavko, G.M.

    1982-09-10

    A numerical model is used to study fault stress slip near Hollister, California. The geometrically complex system of interacting faults, including the San Andreas, Calaveras, Sargent, and Busch faults, is approximated with a two-dimensional distribution of short planar fault segments in an elastic medium. The steady stress and slip rate are simulated by specifying frictional strength and stepping the remote stress ahead in time. The resulting computed fault stress is roughly proportional to the observed spatial density of small earthquakes, suggesting that the distinction between segments characterized by earthquakes and those with aseismic creep results, in part, from geometry. A nonsteady simulation is made by introducing, in addition, stress drops for individual moderate earthquakes. A close fit of observed creep with calculated slip on the Calaveras and San Andreas faults suggests that many changes in creep rate (averaged over several months) are caused by local moderate earthquakes. In particular, a 3-year creep lag preceding the August 6, 1979, Coyote Lake earthquake on the Calaveras fault seems to have been a direct result of the November 28, 1974, Thanksgiving Day earthquake on the Busch fault. Computed lags in slip rate preceding some other moderate earthquakes in the area are also due to earlier earthquakes. Although the response of the upper 1 km of the fault zone may cause some individual creep events and introduce delays in others, the long-term rate appears to reflect deep slip.

  12. Fault interaction near Hollister, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavko, Gerald M.

    1982-09-01

    A numerical model is used to study fault stress and slip near Hollister, California. The geometrically complex system of interacting faults, including the San Andreas, Calaveras, Sargent, and Busch faults, is approximated with a two-dimensional distribution of short planar fault segments in an elastic medium. The steady stress and slip rate are simulated by specifying frictional strength and stepping the remote stress ahead in time. The resulting computed fault stress is roughly proportional to the observed spatial density of small earthquakes, suggesting that the distinction between segments characterized by earthquakes and those with aseismic creep results, in part, from geometry. A nosteady simulation is made by introducing, in addition, stress drops for individual moderate earthquakes. A close fit of observed creep with calculated slip on the Calaveras and San Andreas faults suggests that many changes in creep rate (averaged over several months) are caused by local moderate earthquakes. In particular, a 3-year creep lag preceding the August 6, 1979, Coyote Lake earthquake on the Calaveras fault seems to have been a direct result of the November 28, 1974, Thanksgiving Day earthquake on the Busch fault. Computed lags in slip rate preceding some other moderate earthquakes in the area are also due to earlier earthquakes. Although the response of the upper 1 km of the fault zone may cause some individual creep events and introduce delays in others, the long-term rate appears to reflect deep slip.

  13. Perspective View, Garlock Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    California's Garlock Fault, marking the northwestern boundary of the Mojave Desert, lies at the foot of the mountains, running from the lower right to the top center of this image, which was created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February 2000. The data will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. These mountains are the southern end of the Sierra Nevada and the prominent canyon emerging at the lower right is Lone Tree canyon. In the distance, the San Gabriel Mountains cut across from the leftside of the image. At their base lies the San Andreas Fault which meets the Garlock Fault near the left edge at Tejon Pass. The dark linear feature running from lower right to upper left is State Highway 14 leading from the town of Mojave in the distance to Inyokern and the Owens Valley in the north. The lighter parallel lines are dirt roads related to power lines and the Los Angeles Aqueduct which run along the base of the mountains.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast

  14. Fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  15. Final Technical Report: PV Fault Detection Tool.

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce Hardison; Jones, Christian Birk

    2015-12-01

    The PV Fault Detection Tool project plans to demonstrate that the FDT can (a) detect catastrophic and degradation faults and (b) identify the type of fault. This will be accomplished by collecting fault signatures using different instruments and integrating this information to establish a logical controller for detecting, diagnosing and classifying each fault.

  16. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment, that... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507...

  17. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment, that... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507...

  18. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment, that... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507...

  19. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment, that... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507...

  20. Assessing the variability of glacier lake bathymetries and potential peak discharge based on large-scale measurements in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochachin, Alejo; Huggel, Christian; Salazar, Cesar; Haeberli, Wilfried; Frey, Holger

    2015-04-01

    Over timescales of hundreds to thousands of years ice masses in mountains produced erosion in bedrock and subglacial sediment, including the formation of overdeepenings and large moraine dams that now serve as basins for glacial lakes. Satellite based studies found a total of 8355 glacial lakes in Peru, whereof 830 lakes were observed in the Cordillera Blanca. Some of them have caused major disasters due to glacial lake outburst floods in the past decades. On the other hand, in view of shrinking glaciers, changing water resources, and formation of new lakes, glacial lakes could have a function as water reservoirs in the future. Here we present unprecedented bathymetric studies of 124 glacial lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Huallanca, Huayhuash and Raura in the regions of Ancash, Huanuco and Lima. Measurements were carried out using a boat equipped with GPS, a total station and an echo sounder to measure the depth of the lakes. Autocad Civil 3D Land and ArcGIS were used to process the data and generate digital topographies of the lake bathymetries, and analyze parameters such as lake area, length and width, and depth and volume. Based on that, we calculated empirical equations for mean depth as related to (1) area, (2) maximum length, and (3) maximum width. We then applied these three equations to all 830 glacial lakes of the Cordillera Blanca to estimate their volumes. Eventually we used three relations from the literature to assess the peak discharge of potential lake outburst floods, based on lake volumes, resulting in 3 x 3 peak discharge estimates. In terms of lake topography and geomorphology results indicate that the maximum depth is located in the center part for bedrock lakes, and in the back part for lakes in moraine material. Best correlations are found for mean depth and maximum width, however, all three empirical relations show a large spread, reflecting the wide range of natural lake bathymetries. Volumes of the 124 lakes with bathymetries amount to 0

  1. Central Asia Active Fault Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

    2014-05-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late

  2. Fault Management Design Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John C.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of dependable systems relies on the ability of the system to determine and respond to off-nominal system behavior. Specification and development of these fault management capabilities must be done in a structured and principled manner to improve our understanding of these systems, and to make significant gains in dependability (safety, reliability and availability). Prior work has described a fundamental taxonomy and theory of System Health Management (SHM), and of its operational subset, Fault Management (FM). This conceptual foundation provides a basis to develop framework to design and implement FM design strategies that protect mission objectives and account for system design limitations. Selection of an SHM strategy has implications for the functions required to perform the strategy, and it places constraints on the set of possible design solutions. The framework developed in this paper provides a rigorous and principled approach to classifying SHM strategies, as well as methods for determination and implementation of SHM strategies. An illustrative example is used to describe the application of the framework and the resulting benefits to system and FM design and dependability.

  3. SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Petrini, Fabrizio; Nieplocha, Jarek; Tipparaju, Vinod

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we will present a new technology that we are currently developing within the SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance FastOS project which seeks to implement fault tolerance at the operating system level. Major design goals include dynamic reallocation of resources to allow continuing execution in the presence of hardware failures, very high scalability, high efficiency (low overhead), and transparency—requiring no changes to user applications. Our technology is based on a global coordination mechanism, that enforces transparent recovery lines in the system, and TICK, a lightweight, incremental checkpointing software architecture implemented as a Linux kernel module. TICK is completely user-transparent and does not require any changes to user code or system libraries; it is highly responsive: an interrupt, such as a timer interrupt, can trigger a checkpoint in as little as 2.5μs; and it supports incremental and full checkpoints with minimal overhead—less than 6% with full checkpointing to disk performed as frequently as once per minute.

  4. Colorado Regional Faults

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  5. Dynamics of fault interaction - Parallel strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Ruth A.; Day, Steven M.

    1993-03-01

    We use a 2D finite difference computer program to study the effect of fault steps on dynamic ruptures. Our results indicate that a strike-slip earthquake is unlikely to jump a fault step wider than 5 km, in correlation with field observations of moderate to great-sized earthquakes. We also find that dynamically propagating ruptures can jump both compressional and dilational fault steps, although wider dilational fault steps can be jumped. Dilational steps tend to delay the rupture for a longer time than compressional steps do. This delay leads to a slower apparent rupture velocity in the vicinity of dilational steps. These 'dry' cases assumed hydrostatic or greater pore-pressures but did not include the effects of changing pore pressures. In an additional study, we simulated the dynamic effects of a fault rupture on 'undrained' pore fluids to test Sibson's (1985, 1986) suggestion that 'wet' dilational steps are a barrier to rupture propagation. Our numerical results validate Sibson's hypothesis.

  6. Fault deformation mechanisms and fault rocks in micritic limestones: Examples from Corinth rift normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussolotto, M.; Benedicto, A.; Moen-Maurel, L.; Invernizzi, C.

    2015-08-01

    A multidisciplinary study investigates the influence of different parameters on fault rock architecture development along normal faults affecting non-porous carbonates of the Corinth rift southern margin. Here, some fault systems cut the same carbonate unit (Pindus), and the gradual and fast uplift since the initiation of the rift led to the exhumation of deep parts of the older faults. This exceptional context allows superficial active fault zones and old exhumed fault zones to be compared. Our approach includes field studies, micro-structural (optical microscope and cathodoluminescence), geochemical analyses (δ13C, δ18O, trace elements) and fluid inclusions microthermometry of calcite sin-kinematic cements. Our main results, in a depth-window ranging from 0 m to about 2500 m, are: i) all cements precipitated from meteoric fluids in a close or open circulation system depending on depth; ii) depth (in terms of P/T condition) determines the development of some structures and their sealing; iii) lithology (marly levels) influences the type of structures and its cohesive/non-cohesive nature; iv) early distributed rather than final total displacement along the main fault plane is the responsible for the fault zone architecture; v) petrophysical properties of each fault zone depend on the variable combination of these factors.

  7. Time-lapse and UAV Thermal Imaging of Glacial and Periglacial Environments in the Peruvian Andes (Cordillera Blanca, Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, J. M.; Wigmore, O.; Aubry-Wake, C.; Mark, B. G.; Hellstrom, R. A.; Lautz, L.

    2015-12-01

    In the tropics, the acquisition of high-resolution geospatial data of high-mountain glacial and periglacial systems presents unique challenges due to remote site access and very high elevations. For glaciers and hydrologic systems, a key variable of interest is surface temperature as it constrains glacier melt rates, traces hydrologic processes, and is needed for the calibration of energy budget models. We present results from two studies that acquired high resolution temperature data from the Cuchillacocha Glacier, Peru (9.24°S, 77.21°W). The glacier resides on the western drainage of the Cordillera Blanca with an elevation range of 4700 to 6096 m. In the first study we use high resolution time-lapse infrared imagery (5-10 minute interval over 3 days; 0.6 m2 pixel size) to observe diel changes in the surface energy budget of the glacier and to demonstrate how radiation from bare rock adjacent to the glacier may affect melt rates. In the second study we use a newly developed, inexpensive unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for high resolution multispectral mapping of the glacier (2 cm resolution orthomosaic and 5 cm resolution DEM). We present results showing how the time-lapse and the high-resolution UAV imagery can be combined to further strengthen our understanding of the Cuchillacocha Glacier's energy budget and possible insights about turbulent heat fluxes. While the new instruments provide unprecedented data acquisition capabilities, there is an outstanding need for proper data correction. Spatial/thermal control points and post-processing algorithms are needed to produce quantifiable datasets. For example, our post-processed time-lapse imagery has an r2 > 0.9 after emissivity, transmissivity and offset corrections.

  8. Investigating potential precipitation changes with impacts on small-scale farming in mountain villages, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurgiser, Wolfgang; Hofer, Marlis; Juen, Irmgard; Schauwecker, Simone; Singer, Katrin; Neuburger, Martina; Kaser, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Small subsistence farmers on the slopes above the city of Huaraz in the Peruvian Cordillera Blanca assign recent challenges in agricultural production - beyond other factors - to decreasing precipitation during the early crop cultivation period in August and September. In general, local climate is characterized by low annual variation in air temperature but a strong seasonality in precipitation. While driest conditions prevail in June and July, precipitation increases gradually towards the October to April wet season with strong topographically induced gradients. Because seeding occurs soon after the core dry months, cultivation is highly vulnerable to potential alterations in the transition period from dry to wet conditions. Within this study we try to find "data-based" evidence for changes in precipitation patterns, even though the availability of meteorological information for proving precipitation trends is generally poor for this region. We currently investigate the respective potential of connecting approx. 10 years (2003-2013) of ground measurements (weekly resolution with some gaps) with ERA-interim total precipitation output (0.75 deg. resolution) by (1) selecting those adjacent model grid points that explain measured precipitation variability best and by (2) fitting the data from the selected grid points to the measurements with quantile mapping. Uncertainties arising from the transfer functions are assessed with a cross validation approach. Our preliminary results suggest that (1) ground measurements are fairly explained by ERA interim data (despite the very complex topography), that (2) no significant trends in precipitation at the end of the dry season (August, September) are detectable for the period 1979-2013, but relatively high year-to-year variability occurs and that (3) process based limited area modeling might be required to effectively assess specific requests of user groups related to local precipitation variability.

  9. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to..., educational, or linguistic limitations (including any lack of facility with the English language)...

  10. Chip level simulation of fault tolerant computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Chip-level modeling techniques in the evaluation of fault tolerant systems were researched. A fault tolerant computer was modeled. An efficient approach to functional fault simulation was developed. Simulation software was also developed.

  11. Accelerometer having integral fault null

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An improved accelerometer is introduced. It comprises a transducer responsive to vibration in machinery which produces an electrical signal related to the magnitude and frequency of the vibration; and a decoding circuit responsive to the transducer signal which produces a first fault signal to produce a second fault signal in which ground shift effects are nullified.

  12. Experimental Fault Reactivation on Favourably and Unfavourably Oriented Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Renner, J.; Sibson, R. H.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we assess the loading of faults to failure under different stress regimes in a triaxial deformation apparatus, both in dry and saturated conditions. We explore experimentally the reshear of an existing fault in various orientations for particular values of (σ_1 - σ_3) and σ_3' for contrasting loading systems - load-strengthening (equivalent to a thrust fault) with σ1' increasing at constant σ_3', versus load-weakening (equivalent to a normal fault) with reducing σ_3' under constant σ_1'. Experiments are conducted on sawcut granite samples with fault angles at a variety of orientations relative to σ_1, ranging from an optimal orientation for reactivation to lockup angles where new faults are formed in preference to reactivating the existing sawcut orientation. Prefailure and postfailure behaviour is compared in terms of damage zone development via monitoring variations in ultrasonic velocity and acoustic emission behaviour. For example, damage surrounding unfavourably oriented faults is significantly higher than that seen around favourably orientated faults due to greater maximum stresses attained prior to unstable slip, which is reflected by the increased acoustic emission activity leading up to failure. In addition, we explore reshear conditions under an initial condition of (σ_1' = σ_3'), then inducing reshear on the existing fault first by increasing σ_1'(load-strengthening), then by decreasing σ_3' (load-weakening), again comparing relative damage zone development and acoustic emission levels. In saturated experiments, we explore the values of pore fluid pressure (P_f) needed for re-shear to occur in preference to the formation of a new fault. Typically a limiting factor in conventional triaxial experiments performed in compression is that P_f cannot exceed the confining pressure (σ_2 and σ_3). By employing a sample assembly that allows deformation while the loading piston is in extension, it enables us to achieve pore pressures in

  13. How do normal faults grow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher; Bell, Rebecca; Rotevatn, Atle; Tvedt, Anette

    2016-04-01

    Normal faulting accommodates stretching of the Earth's crust, and it is arguably the most fundamental tectonic process leading to continent rupture and oceanic crust emplacement. Furthermore, the incremental and finite geometries associated with normal faulting dictate landscape evolution, sediment dispersal and hydrocarbon systems development in rifts. Displacement-length scaling relationships compiled from global datasets suggest normal faults grow via a sympathetic increase in these two parameters (the 'isolated fault model'). This model has dominated the structural geology literature for >20 years and underpins the structural and tectono-stratigraphic models developed for active rifts. However, relatively recent analysis of high-quality 3D seismic reflection data suggests faults may grow by rapid establishment of their near-final length prior to significant displacement accumulation (the 'coherent fault model'). The isolated and coherent fault models make very different predictions regarding the tectono-stratigraphic evolution of rift basin, thus assessing their applicability is important. To-date, however, very few studies have explicitly set out to critically test the coherent fault model thus, it may be argued, it has yet to be widely accepted in the structural geology community. Displacement backstripping is a simple graphical technique typically used to determine how faults lengthen and accumulate displacement; this technique should therefore allow us to test the competing fault models. However, in this talk we use several subsurface case studies to show that the most commonly used backstripping methods (the 'original' and 'modified' methods) are, however, of limited value, because application of one over the other requires an a priori assumption of the model most applicable to any given fault; we argue this is illogical given that the style of growth is exactly what the analysis is attempting to determine. We then revisit our case studies and demonstrate

  14. Differential Fault Analysis of Rabbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kircanski, Aleksandar; Youssef, Amr M.

    Rabbit is a high speed scalable stream cipher with 128-bit key and a 64-bit initialization vector. It has passed all three stages of the ECRYPT stream cipher project and is a member of eSTREAM software portfolio. In this paper, we present a practical fault analysis attack on Rabbit. The fault model in which we analyze the cipher is the one in which the attacker is assumed to be able to fault a random bit of the internal state of the cipher but cannot control the exact location of injected faults. Our attack requires around 128 - 256 faults, precomputed table of size 241.6 bytes and recovers the complete internal state of Rabbit in about 238 steps.

  15. The Lawanopo Fault, central Sulawesi, East Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natawidjaja, Danny Hilman; Daryono, Mudrik R.

    2015-04-01

    The dominant tectonic-force factor in the Sulawesi Island is the westward Bangga-Sula microplate tectonic intrusion, driven by the 12 mm/year westward motion of the Pacific Plate relative to Eurasia. This tectonic intrusion are accommodated by a series of major left-lateral strike-slip fault zones including Sorong Fault, Sula-Sorong Fault, Matano Fault, Palukoro Fault, and Lawanopo Fault zones. The Lawanopo fault has been considered as an active left-lateral strike-slip fault. The natural exposures of the Lawanopo Fault are clear, marked by the breaks and liniemants of topography along the fault line, and also it serves as a tectonic boundary between the different rock assemblages. Inpections of IFSAR 5m-grid DEM and field checks show that the fault traces are visible by lineaments of topographical slope breaks, linear ridges and stream valleys, ridge neckings, and they are also associated with hydrothermal deposits and hot springs. These are characteristics of young fault, so their morphological expressions can be seen still. However, fault scarps and other morpho-tectonic features appear to have been diffused by erosions and young sediment depositions. No fresh fault scarps, stream deflections or offsets, or any influences of fault movements on recent landscapes are observed associated with fault traces. Hence, the faults do not show any evidence of recent activity. This is consistent with lack of seismicity on the fault.

  16. Faulted Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the layered, sedimentary rock outcrops that occur in a crater located at 8oN, 7oW, in western Arabia Terra. Dark layers and dark sand have enhanced the contrast of this scene. In the upper half of the image, one can see numerous lines that off-set the layers. These lines are faults along which the rocks have broken and moved. The regularity of layer thickness and erosional expression are taken as evidence that the crater in which these rocks occur might once have been a lake. The image covers an area about 1.9 km (1.2 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  17. Fault Tolerant State Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Gary R.; Taft, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    State machines are commonly used to control sequential logic in FPGAs and ASKS. An errant state machine can cause considerable damage to the device it is controlling. For example in space applications, the FPGA might be controlling Pyros, which when fired at the wrong time will cause a mission failure. Even a well designed state machine can be subject to random errors us a result of SEUs from the radiation environment in space. There are various ways to encode the states of a state machine, and the type of encoding makes a large difference in the susceptibility of the state machine to radiation. In this paper we compare 4 methods of state machine encoding and find which method gives the best fault tolerance, as well as determining the resources needed for each method.

  18. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  19. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  20. The West Salton Detachment Fault, Salton Trough, California: a Primary Low-Angle Normal Fault in an Evolving Dextral Wrench Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axen, G. J.; Janecke, S.; Steely, A.; Shirvell, C.; Fluette, A.; Kairouz, M.; Housen, B.; Stockli, D.; Dorsey, R.; Grove, M.

    2006-12-01

    The west Salton detachment fault (WSDF), bounded the W rift flank, and was largely coeval with the southern San Andreas fault (SSAF). The WSDF is exposed in ~E-trending folds: broad, apparently primary corrugations S. Santa Rosa Mts., Borrego Valley-Pinyon Mts., Whale Peak, Vallecito Valley, and Tiera Blanca Mts) and narrow, post-WSDF folds (e.g., adjacent to San Felipe and Earthquake Valley faults). WSDF slip may have begun at ~12+, ~8.1, 5.5 or 4.6 Ma and was probably rapid from ~5 to 2 Ma. Two (U-Th)/He vertical transects from the WSDF footwall show rapid cooling since 12 Ma, and very rapid cooling between ~5.5-4.5 and ~2 Ma. Subsidence curves from the Fish Creek Vallecito basin (FCVB; Dorsey et al., this session) show increased rates at ~8.1 Ma, 5.5, and 4.6 Ma. Syntectonic conglomerate (base ~8.1 Ma) there records earliest extension, but may have been only local. Widespread marine deposits (~6.3 to 4.25 Ma) locally contain syndetachment fault-scarp facies; eustatic sea level rise may have controlled initial marine flooding. Subsidence was most rapid from ~4.6 to 3 Ma. Upper-plate normal faults are rare but folds formed locally. At Borrego Mtn. a WNW-trending anticline formed by ~6 Ma and persisted until after 4 Ma, coeval with WSDF slip. Folding at Split Mtn may have begun earlier. The WSDF has at least 5 km of E or NE slip, from offset basement but higher WSDF strands carry syntectonic conglomerates some additional distance. (U-Th)/He apatite ages from the upper and lower plates suggest ~2.4 km of footwall exhumation, yielding 5-15 km of slip, depending upon dip assumed. WSDF striae scatter widely, but concentrate at 090-110, probably the main or most recent slip direction. CW vertical- axis rotations have occurred (Housen et al., this session): ~3-4 m.y. old FCVB strata are rotated 19° ± 12°, and footwall La Posta pluton at Whale Peak rotated perhaps 36° (relative to the Peninsular Range La Posta). Similar rotations were common in N Baja CA in latest

  1. Improving Multiple Fault Diagnosability using Possible Conflicts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Bregon, Anibal; Biswas, Gautam; Koutsoukos, Xenofon; Pulido, Belarmino

    2012-01-01

    Multiple fault diagnosis is a difficult problem for dynamic systems. Due to fault masking, compensation, and relative time of fault occurrence, multiple faults can manifest in many different ways as observable fault signature sequences. This decreases diagnosability of multiple faults, and therefore leads to a loss in effectiveness of the fault isolation step. We develop a qualitative, event-based, multiple fault isolation framework, and derive several notions of multiple fault diagnosability. We show that using Possible Conflicts, a model decomposition technique that decouples faults from residuals, we can significantly improve the diagnosability of multiple faults compared to an approach using a single global model. We demonstrate these concepts and provide results using a multi-tank system as a case study.

  2. Comparison of Cenozoic Faulting at the Savannah River Site to Fault Characteristics of the Atlantic Coast Fault Province: Implications for Fault Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbest, R.J.

    2000-11-14

    This study compares the faulting observed on the Savannah River Site and vicinity with the faults of the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province and concludes that both sets of faults exhibit the same general characteristics and are closely associated. Based on the strength of this association it is concluded that the faults observed on the Savannah River Site and vicinity are in fact part of the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province. Inclusion in this group means that the historical precedent established by decades of previous studies on the seismic hazard potential for the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province is relevant to faulting at the Savannah River Site. That is, since these faults are genetically related the conclusion of ''not capable'' reached in past evaluations applies.In addition, this study establishes a set of criteria by which individual faults may be evaluated in order to assess their inclusion in the Atlantic Coast Fault Province and the related association of the ''not capable'' conclusion.

  3. Subaru FATS (fault tracking system)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winegar, Tom W.; Noumaru, Junichi

    2000-07-01

    The Subaru Telescope requires a fault tracking system to record the problems and questions that staff experience during their work, and the solutions provided by technical experts to these problems and questions. The system records each fault and routes it to a pre-selected 'solution-provider' for each type of fault. The solution provider analyzes the fault and writes a solution that is routed back to the fault reporter and recorded in a 'knowledge-base' for future reference. The specifications of our fault tracking system were unique. (1) Dual language capacity -- Our staff speak both English and Japanese. Our contractors speak Japanese. (2) Heterogeneous computers -- Our computer workstations are a mixture of SPARCstations, Macintosh and Windows computers. (3) Integration with prime contractors -- Mitsubishi and Fujitsu are primary contractors in the construction of the telescope. In many cases, our 'experts' are our contractors. (4) Operator scheduling -- Our operators spend 50% of their work-month operating the telescope, the other 50% is spent working day shift at the base facility in Hilo, or day shift at the summit. We plan for 8 operators, with a frequent rotation. We need to keep all operators informed on the current status of all faults, no matter the operator's location.

  4. ANNs pinpoint underground distribution faults

    SciTech Connect

    Glinkowski, M.T.; Wang, N.C.

    1995-10-01

    Many offline fault location techniques in power distribution circuits involve patrolling along the lines or cables. In overhead distribution lines, most of the failures can be located quickly by visual inspection without the aid of special equipment. However, locating a fault in underground cable systems is more difficult. It involves additional equipment (e.g., thumpers, radars, etc.) to transform the invisibility of the cable into other forms of signals, such as acoustic sound and electromagnetic pulses. Trained operators must carry the equipment above the ground, follow the path of the signal, and draw lines on their maps in order to locate the fault. Sometimes, even smelling the burnt cable faults is a way of detecting the problem. These techniques are time consuming, not always reliable, and, as in the case of high-voltage dc thumpers, can cause additional damage to the healthy parts of the cable circuit. Online fault location in power networks that involve interconnected lines (cables) and multiterminal sources continues receiving great attention, with limited success in techniques that would provide simple and practical solutions. This article features a new online fault location technique that: uses the pattern recognition feature of artificial neural networks (ANNs); utilizes new capabilities of modern protective relaying hardware. The output of the neural network can be graphically displayed as a simple three-dimensional (3-D) chart that can provide an operator with an instantaneous indication of the location of the fault.

  5. The Dynamics of Fault Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, W. D.; Beroza, G.; Kind, R.

    2006-05-01

    Geophysical studies of the Earth's crust, including fault zones, have developed over the past 80 years. Among the first methods to be employed, seismic refraction and reflection profiles were recorded in the North American Gulf Coast to detect salt domes which were known to trap hydrocarbons. Seismic methods continue to be the most important geophysical technique in use today due to the methods' relatively high accuracy, high resolution, and great depth of penetration. However, in the past decade, a much expanded repertoire of seismic and non-seismic techniques have been brought to bear on studies of the Earth's crust and uppermost mantle. Important insights have also been obtained using seismic tomography, measurements of seismic anisotropy, fault zone guided waves, borehole surveys, and geo-electrical, magnetic, and gravity methods. In this presentation, we briefly review recent geophysical progress in the study of the structure and internal properties of faults zones, from their surface exposures to their lower limit. We focus on the structure of faults within continental crystalline and competent sedimentary rock rather than within the overlying, poorly consolidated sedimentary rocks. A significant body of literature exists for oceanic fracture zones, however, due to space limitations we restrict this review to faults within and at the margins of the continents. We also address some unanswered questions, including: 1) Does fault-zone complexity, as observed at the surface, extend to great depth, or do active faults become thin simple planes at depth? and 2) How is crustal deformation accommodated within the lithospheric mantle?

  6. Fault Injection Campaign for a Fault Tolerant Duplex Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Gian Franco; Ferraro, Robert D.; von llmen, Paul; Rennels, Dave A.

    2007-01-01

    Fault tolerance is an efficient approach adopted to avoid or reduce the damage of a system failure. In this work we present the results of a fault injection campaign we conducted on the Duplex Framework (DF). The DF is a software developed by the UCLA group [1, 2] that uses a fault tolerant approach and allows to run two replicas of the same process on two different nodes of a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) computer cluster. A third process running on a different node, constantly monitors the results computed by the two replicas, and eventually restarts the two replica processes if an inconsistency in their computation is detected. This approach is very cost efficient and can be adopted to control processes on spacecrafts where the fault rate produced by cosmic rays is not very high.

  7. Finding faults with the data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Rudolph Giuliani and Hillary Rodham Clinton are crisscrossing upstate New York looking for votes in the U.S. Senate race. Also cutting back and forth across upstate New York are hundreds of faults of a kind characterized by very sporadic seismic activity according to Robert Jacobi, professor of geology at the University of Buffalo (UB), who conducted research with fellow UB geology professor John Fountain."We have proof that upstate New York is crisscrossed by faults," Jacobi said. "In the past, the Appalachian Plateau—which stretches from Albany to Buffalo—was considered a pretty boring place structurally without many faults or folds of any significance."

  8. Method of locating ground faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Rose, Allen H.; Cull, Ronald C.

    1994-11-01

    The present invention discloses a method of detecting and locating current imbalances such as ground faults in multiwire systems using the Faraday effect. As an example, for 2-wire or 3-wire (1 ground wire) electrical systems, light is transmitted along an optical path which is exposed to magnetic fields produced by currents flowing in the hot and neutral wires. The rotations produced by these two magnetic fields cancel each other, therefore light on the optical path does not read the effect of either. However, when a ground fault occurs, the optical path is exposed to a net Faraday effect rotation due to the current imbalance thereby exposing the ground fault.

  9. Method of locating ground faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L. (Inventor); Rose, Allen H. (Inventor); Cull, Ronald C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention discloses a method of detecting and locating current imbalances such as ground faults in multiwire systems using the Faraday effect. As an example, for 2-wire or 3-wire (1 ground wire) electrical systems, light is transmitted along an optical path which is exposed to magnetic fields produced by currents flowing in the hot and neutral wires. The rotations produced by these two magnetic fields cancel each other, therefore light on the optical path does not read the effect of either. However, when a ground fault occurs, the optical path is exposed to a net Faraday effect rotation due to the current imbalance thereby exposing the ground fault.

  10. Granular packings and fault zones

    PubMed

    Astrom; Herrmann; Timonen

    2000-01-24

    The failure of a two-dimensional packing of elastic grains is analyzed using a numerical model. The packing fails through formation of shear bands or faults. During failure there is a separation of the system into two grain-packing states. In a shear band, local "rotating bearings" are spontaneously formed. The bearing state is favored in a shear band because it has a low stiffness against shearing. The "seismic activity" distribution in the packing has the same characteristics as that of the earthquake distribution in tectonic faults. The directions of the principal stresses in a bearing are reminiscent of those found at the San Andreas Fault. PMID:11017335

  11. [Water birds from Agua Dulce lake and El Ermitaño estuary, Jalisco, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Hernández Vázquez, Salvador

    2005-01-01

    Waterbird abundance, and seasonal and spatial distribution, were studied in two natural water pools at Jalisco, Mexico, from December 1997 through November 1998. Maximum monthly abundance in Agua Dulce lake and El Ermitaño estuary was 86 471 birds (29 686 in Agua Dulce and 56 785 in Ermitaño), with a total cummulative abundance of 179 808 individuals (66 976 in Agua Dulce and 112 832 in Ermitaño). A total of 87 waterbirds species were recorded, 78 in Agua Dulce and 73 in Ermitaño. The higher species richness and abundance was observed during winter, when migratory species arrived. Most species prefered shallow waters, except seabirds which prefered protected areas such as dunes in Agua Dulce. Other groups, like clucks and related species. prefered low salinity areas, for example in the south-east area of Ermitaño. The higher abundance of the shorehirds was found when the water level on the estuary was low. Herons were seen often at areas with high salinity and influenced by tides (e.g. mouth of Ermitaño). PMID:17354436

  12. Fault-free performance validation of fault-tolerant multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeck, Edward W.; Feather, Frank E.; Grizzaffi, Ann Marie; Segall, Zary Z.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.

    1987-01-01

    A validation methodology for testing the performance of fault-tolerant computer systems was developed and applied to the Fault-Tolerant Multiprocessor (FTMP) at NASA-Langley's AIRLAB facility. This methodology was claimed to be general enough to apply to any ultrareliable computer system. The goal of this research was to extend the validation methodology and to demonstrate the robustness of the validation methodology by its more extensive application to NASA's Fault-Tolerant Multiprocessor System (FTMP) and to the Software Implemented Fault-Tolerance (SIFT) Computer System. Furthermore, the performance of these two multiprocessors was compared by conducting similar experiments. An analysis of the results shows high level language instruction execution times for both SIFT and FTMP were consistent and predictable, with SIFT having greater throughput. At the operating system level, FTMP consumes 60% of the throughput for its real-time dispatcher and 5% on fault-handling tasks. In contrast, SIFT consumes 16% of its throughput for the dispatcher, but consumes 66% in fault-handling software overhead.

  13. Spatio-temporal assessment of WRF, TRMM and in situ precipitation data in a tropical mountain environment (Cordillera Blanca, Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourre, L.; Condom, T.; Junquas, C.; Lebel, T.; Sicart, J. E.; Figueroa, R.; Cochachin, A.

    2015-07-01

    The estimation of precipitation over the broad range of scales of interest for climatologists, meteorologists and hydrologists is challenging in high altitudes of tropical regions, where the spatial variability of precipitation is important while in situ measurements remain scarce largely due to operational constraints. Three different types of rainfall products - ground based, satellite derived, RCM outputs - are compared here during the hydrological year 2012/13 in order to retrieve rainfall patterns at time scales ranging from sub-daily to annual over a watershed of approximately 10 000 km2 in Peru. It is a high altitude catchment, located in the region of the Cordillera Blanca, with 41 % of its area above 4000 m a.s.l. and 340 km2 glaciated. Daily in situ data are interpolated using a kriging with external drift (KED) algorithm; the satellite product is TRMM 3B42, which incorporates monthly gauge data; RCM outputs are obtained from WRF run with a Thompson microphysical scheme at three nested resolutions: 27, 9 and 3 km. The performances of each product are assessed from a double perspective. A local comparison with gauge data is first carried out when relevant (diurnal and seasonal cycles, statistics of rainfall occurrence); then the ability of each product to reproduce some well-known spatial features of rain fields at various time scales (from annual down to daily) is analysed. WRF simulations largely overestimate the annual totals, especially at low spatial resolution, while reproducing correctly the diurnal cycle and locating the spots of heavy rainfall more realistically than either the ground-based KED or the TRMM products. The main weakness of the KED data is the production of annual rainfall maxima over the summit rather than on the slopes, induced by a lack of in situ data above 3800 m a.s.l. One main limitation of the TRMM product is its poor performance over ice-covered areas because ice on the ground behaves in a similar way as rain or ice drops in

  14. Modelling cascading and erosional processes for glacial lake outburst floods in the Quillcay catchment, Huaraz, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Patrick; Huggel, Christian; Frey, Holger; Chisolm, Rachel; McKinney, Daene; McArdell, Brian; Portocarrero, Cesar; Cochachin, Alejo

    2016-04-01

    Huaraz as the largest city in Cordillera Blanca has faced a major disaster in 1941, when an outburst flood from Lake Palcacocha killed several thousand people and caused widespread destruction. Recent studies on glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) modelling and early warning systems focussed on Lake Palcacocha which has regrown after the 1941 event, from a volume of half a million m3 in 1974 to a total volume of more than 17 million m3 today. However, little research has been conducted so far concerning the situation of other lakes in the Quillcay catchment, namely Lake Tullparaju (12 mill. m3) and Cuchillacocha (2.5 mill. m3), which both also pose a threat to the city of Huaraz. In this study, we modelled the cascading processes at Lake Tullparaju and Lake Cuchillacocha including rock/ice avalanches, flood wave propagation in the lake and the resulting outburst flood and debris flows. We used the 2D model RAMMS to simulate ice avalanches. Model output was used as input for analytical 2D and 3D calculations of impact waves in the lakes that allowed us to estimate dam overtopping wave height. Since the dimension of the hanging glaciers above all three lakes is comparable, the scenarios in this study have been defined similar to the previous study at Lake Palcacocha. The flow propagation model included sediment entrainment in the steeper parts of the catchment, adding up to 50% to the initial flow volume. The results for total travel time as well as for inundated areas and flow depth and velocity in the city of Huaraz are comparable to the previous studies at Lake Palcacocha. This underlines the importance of considering also these lakes within an integral hazard analysis for the city of Huaraz. A main challenge for modelling GLOFs in the Quillcay catchment using RAMMS is the long runout distance of over 22 km combined with the very low slope gradient of the river. Further studies could improve the process understanding and could focus on more detailed investigations

  15. Normal faults geometry and morphometry on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, D. A.; Spagnuolo, M. G.; Silvestro, S.

    2014-04-01

    In this report, we show how normal faults scarps geometry and degradation history can be accessed using high resolution imagery and topography. We show how the initial geometry of the faults can be inferred from faulted craters and we demonstrate how a comparative morphometric analysis of faults scarps can be used to study erosion rates through time on Mars.

  16. 20 CFR 410.561b - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 410.561b Section 410.561b Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Payment of Benefits § 410.561b Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see §...

  17. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  18. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  19. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  20. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  1. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  2. 20 CFR 410.561b - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 410.561b Section 410.561b Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Payment of Benefits § 410.561b Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see §...

  3. 76 FR 63614 - Agua Caliente Solar, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Agua Caliente Solar, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...-referenced proceeding of Agua Caliente Solar, LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with...

  4. A fault-tolerant clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daley, W. P.; Mckenna, J. F., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Computers must operate correctly even though one or more of components have failed. Electronic clock has been designed to be insensitive to occurrence of faults; it is substantial advance over any known clock.

  5. Spontaneous rupture on irregular faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is now know (e.g. Robinson et al., 2006) that when ruptures propagate around bends, the rupture velocity decrease. In the extreme case, a large bend in the fault can stop the rupture. We develop a 2-D finite difference method to simulate spontaneous dynamic rupture on irregular faults. This method is based on a second order leap-frog finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh of triangles. A relaxation method is used to generate an irregular fault geometry-conforming mesh from the uniform mesh. Through this numerical coordinate mapping, the elastic wave equations are transformed and solved in a curvilinear coordinate system. Extensive numerical experiments using the linear slip-weakening law will be shown to demonstrate the effect of fault geometry on rupture properties. A long term goal is to simulate the strong ground motion near the vicinity of bends, jogs, etc.

  6. The fault-tree compiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martensen, Anna L.; Butler, Ricky W.

    1987-01-01

    The Fault Tree Compiler Program is a new reliability tool used to predict the top event probability for a fault tree. Five different gate types are allowed in the fault tree: AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, INVERT, and M OF N gates. The high level input language is easy to understand and use when describing the system tree. In addition, the use of the hierarchical fault tree capability can simplify the tree description and decrease program execution time. The current solution technique provides an answer precise (within the limits of double precision floating point arithmetic) to the five digits in the answer. The user may vary one failure rate or failure probability over a range of values and plot the results for sensitivity analyses. The solution technique is implemented in FORTRAN; the remaining program code is implemented in Pascal. The program is written to run on a Digital Corporation VAX with the VMS operation system.

  7. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2009-05-05

    A method determines a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  8. Weakening inside incipient thrust fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, B.; Tesei, T.; Collettini, C.; Oliot, E.

    2013-12-01

    In fold-and-thrust belts, shortening is mainly accommodated by thrust faults that nucleate along décollement levels. Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that these faults might be weak because of a combination of processes such as pressure-solution, phyllosilicates reorientation and delamination, and fluid pressurization. In this study we aim to decipher the processes and the kinetics responsible for weakening of tectonic décollements. We studied the Millaris thrust (Southern Pyrenees): a fault representative of a décollement in its incipient stage. This fault accommodated a total shortening of about 30 meters and is constituted by a 10m thick, intensively foliated phyllonite developed inside a homogeneous marly unit. Detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses have been carried out to characterize the mineralogical change, the chemical transfers and volume change in the fault zone compared to non-deformed parent sediments. We also carried out microstructural analysis on natural and experimentally deformed rocks. Illite and chlorite are the main hydrous minerals. Inside fault zone, illite minerals are oriented along the schistosity whereas chlorite coats the shear surfaces. Mass balance calculations demonstrated a volume loss of up to 50% for calcite inside fault zone (and therefore a relative increase of phyllosilicates contents) because of calcite pressure solution mechanisms. We performed friction experiments in a biaxial deformation apparatus using intact rocks sheared in the in-situ geometry from the Millaris fault and its host sediments. We imposed a range of normal stresses (10 to 50 MPa), sliding velocity steps (3-100 μm/s) and slide-hold slide sequences (3 to 1000 s hold) under saturated conditions. Mechanical results demonstrate that both fault rocks and parent sediments are weaker than average geological materials (friction μ<<0.6) and have velocity-strengthening behavior because of the presence of phyllosilicate horizons. Fault rocks are

  9. Seismic fault zone trapped noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillers, G.; Campillo, M.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Roux, P.

    2014-07-01

    Systematic velocity contrasts across and within fault zones can lead to head and trapped waves that provide direct information on structural units that are important for many aspects of earthquake and fault mechanics. Here we construct trapped waves from the scattered seismic wavefield recorded by a fault zone array. The frequency-dependent interaction between the ambient wavefield and the fault zone environment is studied using properties of the noise correlation field. A critical frequency fc ≈ 0.5 Hz defines a threshold above which the in-fault scattered wavefield has increased isotropy and coherency compared to the ambient noise. The increased randomization of in-fault propagation directions produces a wavefield that is trapped in a waveguide/cavity-like structure associated with the low-velocity damage zone. Dense spatial sampling allows the resolution of a near-field focal spot, which emerges from the superposition of a collapsing, time reversed wavefront. The shape of the focal spot depends on local medium properties, and a focal spot-based fault normal distribution of wave speeds indicates a ˜50% velocity reduction consistent with estimates from a far-field travel time inversion. The arrival time pattern of a synthetic correlation field can be tuned to match properties of an observed pattern, providing a noise-based imaging tool that can complement analyses of trapped ballistic waves. The results can have wide applicability for investigating the internal properties of fault damage zones, because mechanisms controlling the emergence of trapped noise have less limitations compared to trapped ballistic waves.

  10. Fault Tree Analysis: A Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Fault tree analysis is a top-down approach to the identification of process hazards. It is as one of the best methods for systematically identifying an graphically displaying the many ways some things can go wrong. This bibliography references 266 documents in the NASA STI Database that contain the major concepts. fault tree analysis, risk an probability theory, in the basic index or major subject terms. An abstract is included with most citations, followed by the applicable subject terms.

  11. Hardware Fault Simulator for Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, L. M.; Timoc, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    Breadboarded circuit is faster and more thorough than software simulator. Elementary fault simulator for AND gate uses three gates and shaft register to simulate stuck-at-one or stuck-at-zero conditions at inputs and output. Experimental results showed hardware fault simulator for microprocessor gave faster results than software simulator, by two orders of magnitude, with one test being applied every 4 microseconds.

  12. Fault-tolerant rotary actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2006-10-17

    A fault-tolerant actuator module, in a single containment shell, containing two actuator subsystems that are either asymmetrically or symmetrically laid out is provided. Fault tolerance in the actuators of the present invention is achieved by the employment of dual sets of equal resources. Dual resources are integrated into single modules, with each having the external appearance and functionality of a single set of resources.

  13. Software Fault Tolerance: A Tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2000-01-01

    Because of our present inability to produce error-free software, software fault tolerance is and will continue to be an important consideration in software systems. The root cause of software design errors is the complexity of the systems. Compounding the problems in building correct software is the difficulty in assessing the correctness of software for highly complex systems. After a brief overview of the software development processes, we note how hard-to-detect design faults are likely to be introduced during development and how software faults tend to be state-dependent and activated by particular input sequences. Although component reliability is an important quality measure for system level analysis, software reliability is hard to characterize and the use of post-verification reliability estimates remains a controversial issue. For some applications software safety is more important than reliability, and fault tolerance techniques used in those applications are aimed at preventing catastrophes. Single version software fault tolerance techniques discussed include system structuring and closure, atomic actions, inline fault detection, exception handling, and others. Multiversion techniques are based on the assumption that software built differently should fail differently and thus, if one of the redundant versions fails, it is expected that at least one of the other versions will provide an acceptable output. Recovery blocks, N-version programming, and other multiversion techniques are reviewed.

  14. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

    1999-04-06

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

  15. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Daniel J.; Cha, Yung S.

    1999-01-01

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  16. Aeromagnetic anomalies over faulted strata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V.J.S.; Hudson, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic surveys are now an industry standard and they commonly detect anomalies that are attributed to faults within sedimentary basins. However, detailed studies identifying geologic sources of magnetic anomalies in sedimentary environments are rare in the literature. Opportunities to study these sources have come from well-exposed sedimentary basins of the Rio Grande rift in New Mexico and Colorado. High-resolution aeromagnetic data from these areas reveal numerous, curvilinear, low-amplitude (2–15 nT at 100-m terrain clearance) anomalies that consistently correspond to intrasedimentary normal faults (Figure 1). Detailed geophysical and rock-property studies provide evidence for the magnetic sources at several exposures of these faults in the central Rio Grande rift (summarized in Grauch and Hudson, 2007, and Hudson et al., 2008). A key result is that the aeromagnetic anomalies arise from the juxtaposition of magnetically differing strata at the faults as opposed to chemical processes acting at the fault zone. The studies also provide (1) guidelines for understanding and estimating the geophysical parameters controlling aeromagnetic anomalies at faulted strata (Grauch and Hudson), and (2) observations on key geologic factors that are favorable for developing similar sedimentary sources of aeromagnetic anomalies elsewhere (Hudson et al.).

  17. Normal fault earthquakes or graviquakes

    PubMed Central

    Doglioni, C.; Carminati, E.; Petricca, P.; Riguzzi, F.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquakes are dissipation of energy throughout elastic waves. Canonically is the elastic energy accumulated during the interseismic period. However, in crustal extensional settings, gravity is the main energy source for hangingwall fault collapsing. Gravitational potential is about 100 times larger than the observed magnitude, far more than enough to explain the earthquake. Therefore, normal faults have a different mechanism of energy accumulation and dissipation (graviquakes) with respect to other tectonic settings (strike-slip and contractional), where elastic energy allows motion even against gravity. The bigger the involved volume, the larger is their magnitude. The steeper the normal fault, the larger is the vertical displacement and the larger is the seismic energy released. Normal faults activate preferentially at about 60° but they can be shallower in low friction rocks. In low static friction rocks, the fault may partly creep dissipating gravitational energy without releasing great amount of seismic energy. The maximum volume involved by graviquakes is smaller than the other tectonic settings, being the activated fault at most about three times the hypocentre depth, explaining their higher b-value and the lower magnitude of the largest recorded events. Having different phenomenology, graviquakes show peculiar precursors. PMID:26169163

  18. Normal fault earthquakes or graviquakes.

    PubMed

    Doglioni, C; Carminati, E; Petricca, P; Riguzzi, F

    2015-01-01

    Earthquakes are dissipation of energy throughout elastic waves. Canonically is the elastic energy accumulated during the interseismic period. However, in crustal extensional settings, gravity is the main energy source for hangingwall fault collapsing. Gravitational potential is about 100 times larger than the observed magnitude, far more than enough to explain the earthquake. Therefore, normal faults have a different mechanism of energy accumulation and dissipation (graviquakes) with respect to other tectonic settings (strike-slip and contractional), where elastic energy allows motion even against gravity. The bigger the involved volume, the larger is their magnitude. The steeper the normal fault, the larger is the vertical displacement and the larger is the seismic energy released. Normal faults activate preferentially at about 60° but they can be shallower in low friction rocks. In low static friction rocks, the fault may partly creep dissipating gravitational energy without releasing great amount of seismic energy. The maximum volume involved by graviquakes is smaller than the other tectonic settings, being the activated fault at most about three times the hypocentre depth, explaining their higher b-value and the lower magnitude of the largest recorded events. Having different phenomenology, graviquakes show peculiar precursors. PMID:26169163

  19. Fault diagnosis of power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, Y. ); Akimoto, Y. ); Kunugi, M. )

    1992-05-01

    Fault diagnosis of power systems plays a crucial role in power system monitoring and control that ensures stable supply of electrical power to consumers. In the case of multiple faults or incorrect operation of protective devices, fault diagnosis requires judgment of complex conditions at various levels. For this reason, research into application of knowledge-based systems go an early start and reports of such systems have appeared in may papers. In this paper, these systems are classified by the method of inference utilized in the knowledge-based systems for fault diagnosis of power systems. The characteristics of each class and corresponding issues as well as the state-of-the-art techniques for improving their performance are presented. Additional topics covered are user interfaces, interfaces with energy management systems (EMS's), and expert system development tools for fault diagnosis. Results and evaluation of actual operation in the field are also discussed. Knowledge-based fault diagnosis of power systems will continue to disseminate.

  20. Tutorial: Advanced fault tree applications using HARP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, Joanne Bechta; Bavuso, Salvatore J.; Boyd, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    Reliability analysis of fault tolerant computer systems for critical applications is complicated by several factors. These modeling difficulties are discussed and dynamic fault tree modeling techniques for handling them are described and demonstrated. Several advanced fault tolerant computer systems are described, and fault tree models for their analysis are presented. HARP (Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor) is a software package developed at Duke University and NASA Langley Research Center that is capable of solving the fault tree models presented.

  1. Nonlinear Network Dynamics on Earthquake Fault Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle, Paul B.; Rundle, John B.; Tiampo, Kristy F.; Sa Martins, Jorge S.; McGinnis, Seth; Klein, W.

    2001-10-01

    Earthquake faults occur in interacting networks having emergent space-time modes of behavior not displayed by isolated faults. Using simulations of the major faults in southern California, we find that the physics depends on the elastic interactions among the faults defined by network topology, as well as on the nonlinear physics of stress dissipation arising from friction on the faults. Our results have broad applications to other leaky threshold systems such as integrate-and-fire neural networks.

  2. Temporal variation in abundance and fecundity of the invading copepod Eurytemora americana in Bahía Blanca Estuary during an unusual year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berasategui, Anabela A.; Hoffmeyer, Mónica S.; Biancalana, Florencia; Fernandez Severini, Melisa; Menendez, María C.

    2009-10-01

    Eurytemora americana has been only reported as invader in Bahía Blanca Estuary, Argentina within the South Hemisphere. There are a few experimental researches under laboratory conditions done with this species and its reproductive behaviour around the world is very scarce. Consequently, it is still not possible to completely understand its population dynamics. In the present study, E. americana reproductive temporal behaviour and relationships among abundance, female size, egg production and hatching success were examined in the Bahía Blanca Estuary, during 2007 pulse. In order to determine the potential relationships between these variables and the environmental variables, experimental incubations were conducted in the laboratory simulating natural conditions. Spearman's rank correlation was used to analyze the relationships among all variables. Temporal change of biotic and environmental variables was corroborated by a Mann-Whitney/Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric tests, with significant differences ( p ≪ 0.01) in all variables throughout the study. Abundance population results showed very high values in relation to those recorded in recent years in Bahía Blanca Estuary. This response could be due to the unusual combination of environmental factors (polar wave with temperatures ≤6 °C and a drought period with high salinities, 32.7-36.6) recorded during the studied winter period. Significant positive correlations between abundance and salinity ( p < 0.01, n = 226), and hatching success ( p < 0.01, n = 25) as well as a significant negative correlation between abundance and chlorophyll a ( p < 0.01, n = 226) were found. Although E. americana shows a k-strategy within its annual pulse, it presented two markedly distinct behaviours depending on temporal environmental variability. From July to early september, when the estuary evidenced high salinity, low temperature and high food availability, E. Americana showed large females, large clutch size and high hatching

  3. The source, discharge, and chemical characteristics of water from Agua Caliente Spring, Palm Springs, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Martin, Peter, (Edited By); Contributors: Brandt, Justin; Catchings, Rufus D.; Christensen, Allen H.; Flint, Alan L.; Gandhok, Gini; Goldman, Mark R.; Halford, Keith J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Martin, Peter; Rymer, Michael J.; Schroeder, Roy A.; Smith, Gregory A.; Sneed, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Numerical models of fluid and temperature flow were developed for the Agua Caliente Spring to (1) test the validity of the conceptual model that the Agua Caliente Spring enters the valley-fill deposits from fractures in the underlying basement complex and rises through more than 800 feet of valley-fill deposits by way of a washed-sand conduit and surrounding low-permeability deposits (spring chimney) of its own making, (2) evaluate whether water-level declines in the regional aquifer will influence the temperature of discharging water, and (3) determine the source of thermal water in the perched aquifer. A radial-flow model was used to test the conceptual model and the effect of water-level declines. The observed spring discharge and temperature could be simulated if the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the spring orifice was about 200 feet per day and the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the orifice (spring chimney) was about 0.00002 feet per day. The simulated vertical hydraulic conductivity is within the range of values reported for sand; however, the low value simulated for the horizontal hydraulic conductivity suggests that the spring chimney is cemented with increasing depth. Chemical data collected for this study indicate that the water at Agua Caliente Spring is at saturation with respect to both calcite and chalcedony, which provides a possible mechanism for cementation of the spring chimney. A simulated decline of about 100 feet in the regional aquifer had no effect on the simulated discharge of Agua Caliente Spring and resulted in a slight increase in the temperature of the spring discharge. Results from the radial-flow- and three-dimensional models of the Agua Caliente Spring area demonstrate that the distribution and temperature of thermal water in the perched water table can be explained by flow from a secondary shallow-subsurface spring orifice of the Agua Caliente Spring not contained by the steel collector tank, not by leakage from the

  4. Fault Management Guiding Principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Marilyn E.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Fesq, Lorraine; Barley, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of the mission type: deep space or low Earth orbit, robotic or human spaceflight, Fault Management (FM) is a critical aspect of NASA space missions. As the complexity of space missions grows, the complexity of supporting FM systems increase in turn. Data on recent NASA missions show that development of FM capabilities is a common driver for significant cost overruns late in the project development cycle. Efforts to understand the drivers behind these cost overruns, spearheaded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), indicate that they are primarily caused by the growing complexity of FM systems and the lack of maturity of FM as an engineering discipline. NASA can and does develop FM systems that effectively protect mission functionality and assets. The cost growth results from a lack of FM planning and emphasis by project management, as well the maturity of FM as an engineering discipline, which lags behind the maturity of other engineering disciplines. As a step towards controlling the cost growth associated with FM development, SMD has commissioned a multi-institution team to develop a practitioner's handbook representing best practices for the end-to-end processes involved in engineering FM systems. While currently concentrating primarily on FM for science missions, the expectation is that this handbook will grow into a NASA-wide handbook, serving as a companion to the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. This paper presents a snapshot of the principles that have been identified to guide FM development from cradle to grave. The principles range from considerations for integrating FM into the project and SE organizational structure, the relationship between FM designs and mission risk, and the use of the various tools of FM (e.g., redundancy) to meet the FM goal of protecting mission functionality and assets.

  5. Agua Caliente Wind/Solar Project at Whitewater Ranch

    SciTech Connect

    Hooks, Todd; Stewart, Royce

    2014-12-16

    Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) was awarded a grant by the Department of Energy (DOE) to study the feasibility of a wind and/or solar renewable energy project at the Whitewater Ranch (WWR) property of ACBCI. Red Mountain Energy Partners (RMEP) was engaged to conduct the study. The ACBCI tribal lands in the Coachella Valley have very rich renewable energy resources. The tribe has undertaken several studies to more fully understand the options available to them if they were to move forward with one or more renewable energy projects. With respect to the resources, the WWR property clearly has excellent wind and solar resources. The DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has continued to upgrade and refine their library of resource maps. The newer, more precise maps quantify the resources as among the best in the world. The wind and solar technology available for deployment is also being improved. Both are reducing their costs to the point of being at or below the costs of fossil fuels. Technologies for energy storage and microgrids are also improving quickly and present additional ways to increase the wind and/or solar energy retained for later use with the network management flexibility to provide power to the appropriate locations when needed. As a result, renewable resources continue to gain more market share. The transitioning to renewables as the major resources for power will take some time as the conversion is complex and can have negative impacts if not managed well. While the economics for wind and solar systems continue to improve, the robustness of the WWR site was validated by the repeated queries of developers to place wind and/or solar there. The robust resources and improving technologies portends toward WWR land as a renewable energy site. The business case, however, is not so clear, especially when the potential investment portfolio for ACBCI has several very beneficial and profitable alternatives.

  6. Fault Analysis in Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ye

    Fault analysis in solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays is a fundamental task to increase reliability, efficiency and safety in PV systems. Conventional fault protection methods usually add fuses or circuit breakers in series with PV components. But these protection devices are only able to clear faults and isolate faulty circuits if they carry a large fault current. However, this research shows that faults in PV arrays may not be cleared by fuses under some fault scenarios, due to the current-limiting nature and non-linear output characteristics of PV arrays. First, this thesis introduces new simulation and analytic models that are suitable for fault analysis in PV arrays. Based on the simulation environment, this thesis studies a variety of typical faults in PV arrays, such as ground faults, line-line faults, and mismatch faults. The effect of a maximum power point tracker on fault current is discussed and shown to, at times, prevent the fault current protection devices to trip. A small-scale experimental PV benchmark system has been developed in Northeastern University to further validate the simulation conclusions. Additionally, this thesis examines two types of unique faults found in a PV array that have not been studied in the literature. One is a fault that occurs under low irradiance condition. The other is a fault evolution in a PV array during night-to-day transition. Our simulation and experimental results show that overcurrent protection devices are unable to clear the fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition". However, the overcurrent protection devices may work properly when the same PV fault occurs in daylight. As a result, a fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition" might be hidden in the PV array and become a potential hazard for system efficiency and reliability.

  7. Faulting processes at high fluid pressures: An example of fault valve behavior from the Wattle Gully Fault, Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Stephen F.

    1995-07-01

    The internal structures of the Wattle Gully Fault provide insights about the mechanics and dynamics of fault systems exhibiting fault valve behavior in high fluid pressure regimes. This small, high-angle reverse fault zone developed at temperatures near 300°C in the upper crust, late during mid-Devonian regional crustal shortening in central Victoria, Australia. The Wattle Gully Fault forms part of a network of faults that focused upward migration of fluids generated by metamorphism and devolatilisation at deeper crustal levels. The fault has a length of around 800 m and a maximum displacement of 50 m and was oriented at 60° to 80° to the maximum principal stress during faulting. The structure was therefore severely misoriented for frictional reactivation. This factor, together with the widespread development of steeply dipping fault fill quartz veins and associated subhorizontal extension veins within the fault zone, indicates that faulting occurred at low shear stresses and in a near-lithostatic fluid pressure regime. The internal structures of these veins, and overprinting relationships between veins and faults, indicate that vein development was intimately associated with faulting and involved numerous episodes of fault dilatation and hydrothermal sealing and slip, together with repeated hydraulic extension fracturing adjacent to slip surfaces. The geometries, distribution and internal structures of veins in the Wattle Gully Fault Zone are related to variations in shear stress, fluid pressure, and near-field principal stress orientations during faulting. Vein opening is interpreted to have been controlled by repeated fluid pressure fluctuations associated with cyclic, deformation-induced changes in fault permeability during fault valve behavior. Rates of recovery of shear stress and fluid pressure after rupture events are interpreted to be important factors controlling time dependence of fault shear strength and slip recurrence. Fluctuations in shear stress

  8. Software reliability through fault-avoidance and fault-tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vouk, Mladen A.; Mcallister, David F.

    1991-01-01

    Twenty independently developed but functionally equivalent software versions were used to investigate and compare empirically some properties of N-version programming, Recovery Block, and Consensus Recovery Block, using the majority and consensus voting algorithms. This was also compared with another hybrid fault-tolerant scheme called Acceptance Voting, using dynamic versions of consensus and majority voting. Consensus voting provides adaptation of the voting strategy to varying component reliability, failure correlation, and output space characteristics. Since failure correlation among versions effectively reduces the cardinality of the space in which the voter make decisions, consensus voting is usually preferable to simple majority voting in any fault-tolerant system. When versions have considerably different reliabilities, the version with the best reliability will perform better than any of the fault-tolerant techniques.

  9. Fault zone connectivity: slip rates on faults in the san francisco bay area, california.

    PubMed

    Bilham, R; Bodin, P

    1992-10-01

    The slip rate of a fault segment is related to the length of the fault zone of which it is part. In turn, the slip rate of a fault zone is related to its connectivity with adjoining or contiguous fault zones. The observed variation in slip rate on fault segments in the San Francisco Bay area in California is consistent with connectivity between the Hayward, Calaveras, and San Andreas fault zones. Slip rates on the southern Hayward fault taper northward from a maximum of more than 10 millimeters per year and are sensitive to the active length of the Maacama fault. PMID:17835127

  10. Spatiotemporal variability and differentiation between anthropogenic and natural contamination of heavy metals of surface water: a case study in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guittard, A.; Baraer, M.; McKenzie, J. M.; Mark, B. G.; Fernandez, A.; Walsh, E.; Santos Perez, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Rio Santa, Peru, drains the western slopes of the glacierized Cordillera Blanca and provides water resources at almost all levels of the watershed. As it flows away from the valleys of the Cordillera Blanca, the Rio Santa takes out pollution from numerous sources, including acid mine drainage and natural sulfide oxidation by-products. The Rio Santa dry season discharge decline that is projected to be a consequence of glaciers retreat will probably have implications for the evolution of water pollution. This threat makes the characterization of the actual contamination mechanisms of primary importance. The present study focuses, first, on the spatiotemporal variability of heavy metal contamination across the entire Rio Santa Watershed and secondly on differentiating anthropogenic and natural contaminated sites. First, a macroscale sampling has been done during the summer 2013 to provide an overview of the contamination by trace metal, in water, suspended sediments and riverbed sediments. In addition, 30 water samples were taken from a point next to the city of Huaraz at a frequency of once every 2 weeks and analyzed for trace metals. Secondly, in order to identify hydrochemical contaminant origin dependant signatures in the Rio Santa watershed, 5 areas of known contamination origins were sampled during the summer 2014.Spatially speaking, we observed that most pollution is located in the south of the watershed, and that a large part of the arsenic that reaches the Santa in an aqueous phase does not make it to the outlet but remains trapped in the riverbed. Annual variation in water shows a very unusual fluctuation in Mn compare to other trace metal which are relatively stable. By differencing anthropogenic and natural sites and by considering glaciers melt and decrease water in future what would be the impact of the part of natural contaminated sites versus anthropogenic, mining and cities, on the water quality? Preliminary results show that anthropogenic sites

  11. Reconsidering Fault Slip Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, J. S.; Wech, A.; Creager, K. C.; Obara, K.; Agnew, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The scaling of fault slip events given by the relationship between the scalar moment M0, and duration T, potentially provides key constraints on the underlying physics controlling slip. Many studies have suggested that measurements of M0 and T are related as M0=KfT3 for 'fast' slip events (earthquakes) and M0=KsT for 'slow' slip events, in which Kf and Ks are proportionality constants, although some studies have inferred intermediate relations. Here 'slow' and 'fast' refer to slip front propagation velocities, either so slow that seismic radiation is too small or long period to be measurable or fast enough that dynamic processes may be important for the slip process and measurable seismic waves radiate. Numerous models have been proposed to explain the differing M0-T scaling relations. We show that a single, simple dislocation model of slip events within a bounded slip zone may explain nearly all M0-T observations. Rather than different scaling for fast and slow populations, we suggest that within each population the scaling changes from M0 proportional to T3 to T when the slipping area reaches the slip zone boundaries and transitions from unbounded, 2-dimensional to bounded, 1-dimensional growth. This transition has not been apparent previously for slow events because data have sampled only the bounded regime and may be obscured for earthquakes when observations from multiple tectonic regions are combined. We have attempted to sample the expected transition between bounded and unbounded regimes for the slow slip population, measuring tremor cluster parameters from catalogs for Japan and Cascadia and using them as proxies for small slow slip event characteristics. For fast events we employed published earthquake slip models. Observations corroborate our hypothesis, but highlight observational difficulties. We find that M0-T observations for both slow and fast slip events, spanning 12 orders of magnitude in M0, are consistent with a single model based on dislocation

  12. Rupture interaction with fault jogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    Propagation of moderate to large earthquake ruptures within major transcurrent fault systems is affected by their large-scale brittle infrastructure, comprising echelon segmentation and curvature of principal slip surfaces (PSS) within typically ˜1 km wide main fault zones. These PSS irregularities are classified into dilational and antidilational fault jogs depending on the tendency for areal increase or reduction, respectively, across the jog structures. High precision microearthquake studies show that the jogs often extend throughout the seismogenic regime to depths of around 10 km. On geomorphic evidence, the larger jogs may persist for periods >105 years. While antidilational jogs form obstacles to both short- and long-term displacements, dilational jogs appear to act as kinetic barriers capable of perturbing or arresting earthquake ruptures, but allowing time-dependent slip transfer. In the case of antidilational jogs slip transfer is accommodated by widespread subsidiary faulting, but for dilational jogs it additionally involves extensional fracture opening localized in the echelon stepover. In fluid-saturated crust, the rapid opening of linking extensional fracture systems to allow passage of earthquake ruptures is opposed by induced suctions which scale with the width of the jog. Rupture arrest at dilational jogs may then be followed by delayed slip transfer as fluid pressures reequilibrate by diffusion. Aftershock distributions associated with the different fault jogs reflect these contrasts in their internal structure and mechanical response.

  13. Reducing risks from hazardous glacier lakes in the Cordillera Blanca (Peru): Six decades of experience and perspectives for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portocarrero, Cesar; Cochachin, Alejo; Frey, Holger; González, Cesar; Haeberli, Wilfried; Huggel, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Outbursts from glacier lakes at various spatial and temporal scales have had marked geomorphological effects in many mountain ranges. In many glacierized Andean mountain regions substrates of human settlements made out of flood and debris-flow deposits are testimonies of such events. Examples in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, are the towns of Caraz, Carhuaz or parts of Huaraz. Continued glacier shrinking since the end of the Little Ice Age caused the formation or enlargement of numerous lakes. The outburst of Laguna Palcacocha, destroying the centre of Huaraz and causing more than 1800 losses of life in December 1941, marked the beginning of systematic risk reduction work in Peru. Corresponding efforts included glacier and lake inventories, hazard assessments, definition of high-risk situations, and completion of engineering work for lake-level lowering in more than 30 cases. The latter comprises outlet reinforcements on morainic dams as well as artificial tunnels in bedrock thresholds. This work has been remarkably efficient as documented in the latest case of the Laguna Huallcacocha (Carhuaz-Ancash), where the earlier made installations withstood the erosive power of an impact wave from an ice avalanche in 2015. In the case of the Laguna 513, the impact wave and far-reaching flood caused by a rock/ice avalanche from Nevado Hualcán in April 2010 showed that the risk had been essentially reduced by the preventive lake-level lowering in the early 1990s but not to zero. Risk assessments, planning, construction and non-structural risk reduction efforts continue. Work is in progress to increase the safety of Laguna Palcacocha where extensive assessments and model calculations had been carried out. Risks related to rock/ice avalanches into lakes from steep icy slopes and related to de-buttressing processes as well as long-term permafrost degradation increases. Based on morphological indications and numerical modelling (GlabTop) an inventory of possible future lakes

  14. Faulting in porous carbonate grainstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondi, Emanuele; Agosta, Fabrizio

    2010-05-01

    In the recent past, a new faulting mechanism has been documented within porous carbonate grainstones. This mechanism is due to strain localization into narrow tabular bands characterized by both volumetric and shear strain; for this reason, these features are named compactive shear bands. In the field, compactive shear bands are easily recognizable because they are lightly coloured with respect to the parent rock, and/or show a positive relief because of their increased resistance to weathering. Both characteristics, light colours and positive relief, are a consequence of the compaction processes that characterize these bands, which are the simplest structure element that form within porous carbonate grainstones. With ongoing deformation, the single compactive shear bands, which solve only a few mm of displacement, may evolve into zone of compactive shear bands and, finally, into well-developed faults characterized by slip surfaces and fault rocks. Field analysis conducted in key areas of Italy allow us to documented different modalities of interaction and linkage among the compactive shear bands: (i) a simple divergence of two different compactive shear bands from an original one, (ii) extensional and contractional jogs formed by two continuous, interacting compactive shear bands, and (iii) eye structures formed by collinear interacting compactive shear bands, which have been already described for deformation bands in sandstones. The last two types of interaction may localize the formation of compaction bands, which are characterized by pronounced component of compaction and negligible components of shearing, and/or pressure solution seams. All the aforementioned types of interaction and linkage could happen at any deformation stage, single bands, zone of bands or well developed faults. The transition from one deformation process to another, which is likely to be controlled by the changes in the material properties, is recorded by different ratios and

  15. Intelligent fault-tolerant controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chien Y.

    1987-01-01

    A system with fault tolerant controls is one that can detect, isolate, and estimate failures and perform necessary control reconfiguration based on this new information. Artificial intelligence (AI) is concerned with semantic processing, and it has evolved to include the topics of expert systems and machine learning. This research represents an attempt to apply AI to fault tolerant controls, hence, the name intelligent fault tolerant control (IFTC). A generic solution to the problem is sought, providing a system based on logic in addition to analytical tools, and offering machine learning capabilities. The advantages are that redundant system specific algorithms are no longer needed, that reasonableness is used to quickly choose the correct control strategy, and that the system can adapt to new situations by learning about its effects on system dynamics.

  16. Transient Faults in Computer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    A powerful technique particularly appropriate for the detection of errors caused by transient faults in computer systems was developed. The technique can be implemented in either software or hardware; the research conducted thus far primarily considered software implementations. The error detection technique developed has the distinct advantage of having provably complete coverage of all errors caused by transient faults that affect the output produced by the execution of a program. In other words, the technique does not have to be tuned to a particular error model to enhance error coverage. Also, the correctness of the technique can be formally verified. The technique uses time and software redundancy. The foundation for an effective, low-overhead, software-based certification trail approach to real-time error detection resulting from transient fault phenomena was developed.

  17. Approximate Entropy Based Fault Localization and Fault Type Recognition for Non-solidly Earthed Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Qingle; Liu, Xinyun; Sun, Bo; Ling, Qunli

    2012-12-01

    For non-solidly earthed network, the fault localization of single phase grounding fault has been a problem. A novel fault localization and fault type recognition method of single phase grounding fault based on approximate entropy is presented. The approximate entropies of transient zero sequence current at both ends of healthy section are approximately equal, and the ratio is close to 1. On the contrary, the approximate entropies at both ends of fault section are different, and the ratio is far from 1. So, the fault section is located. At the same fault section, the smaller is the fault resistance, the larger is the approximate entropy of transient zero sequence current. According to the function between approximate entropy and fault resistance, the fault type is determined. The method has the advantages of transferring less data and unneeded synchronous sampling accurately. The simulation results show that the proposed method is feasible and accurate.

  18. InSAR measurements around active faults: creeping Philippine Fault and un-creeping Alpine Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series analyses have been frequently applied to measure the time-series of small and quasi-steady displacements in wide areas. Large efforts in the methodological developments have been made to pursue higher temporal and spatial resolutions by using frequently acquired SAR images and detecting more pixels that exhibit phase stability. While such a high resolution is indispensable for tracking displacements of man-made and other small-scale structures, it is not necessarily needed and can be unnecessarily computer-intensive for measuring the crustal deformation associated with active faults and volcanic activities. I apply a simple and efficient method to measure the deformation around the Alpine Fault in the South Island of New Zealand, and the Philippine Fault in the Leyte Island. I use a small-baseline subset (SBAS) analysis approach (Berardino, et al., 2002). Generally, the more we average the pixel values, the more coherent the signals are. Considering that, for the deformation around active faults, the spatial resolution can be as coarse as a few hundred meters, we can severely 'multi-look' the interferograms. The two applied cases in this study benefited from this approach; I could obtain the mean velocity maps on practically the entire area without discarding decorrelated areas. The signals could have been only partially obtained by standard persistent scatterer or single-look small-baseline approaches that are much more computer-intensive. In order to further increase the signal detection capability, it is sometimes effective to introduce a processing algorithm adapted to the signal of interest. In an InSAR time-series processing, one usually needs to set the reference point because interferograms are all relative measurements. It is difficult, however, to fix the reference point when one aims to measure long-wavelength deformation signals that span the whole analysis area. This problem can be

  19. 25 CFR 115.106 - Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians. 115.106 Section 115.106 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.106 Assets of members of the...

  20. 25 CFR 115.106 - Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians. 115.106 Section 115.106 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.106 Assets of members of the...

  1. Geologie study off gravels of the Agua Fria River, Phoenix, AZ

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Dewitt, E.; Adams, D.T.; O'Briens, T.

    2010-01-01

    The annual consumption of sand and gravel aggregate in 2006 in the Phoenix, AZ metropolitan area was about 76 Mt (84 million st) (USGS, 2009), or about 18 t (20 st) per capita. Quaternary alluvial deposits in the modern stream channel of the Agua Fria River west of Phoenix are mined and processed to provide some of this aggregate to the greater Phoenix area. The Agua Fria drainage basin (Fig. 1) is characterized by rugged mountains with high elevations and steep stream gradients in the north, and by broad alluvial filled basins separated by elongated faultblock mountain ranges in the south. The Agua Fria River, the basin’s main drainage, flows south from Prescott, AZ and west of Phoenix to the Gila River. The Waddel Dam impounds Lake Pleasant and greatly limits the flow of the Agua Fria River south of the lake. The southern portion of the watershed, south of Lake Pleasant, opens out into a broad valley where the river flows through urban and agricultural lands to its confluence with the Gila River, a tributary of the Colorado River.

  2. 25 CFR 115.106 - Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians. 115.106 Section 115.106 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.106 Assets of members of the...

  3. 25 CFR 115.106 - Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians. 115.106 Section 115.106 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.106 Assets of members of the...

  4. Update: San Andreas Fault experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Satellite laser ranging techniques are used to monitor the broad motion of the tectonic plates comprising the San Andreas Fault System. The San Andreas Fault Experiment, (SAFE), has progressed through the upgrades made to laser system hardware and an improvement in the modeling capabilities of the spaceborne laser targets. Of special note is the launch of the Laser Geodynamic Satellite, LAGEOS spacecraft, NASA's only completely dedicated laser satellite in 1976. The results of plate motion projected into this 896 km measured line over the past eleven years are summarized and intercompared.

  5. Uranium concentrations and /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratios in fault-associated groundwater as possible earthquake precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Finkel, R.C.

    1981-05-01

    In order to assess the utility of uranium isotopes as fluid phase earthquake precursors, uranium concentrations and /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratios have been monitored on a monthly or bimonthly basis in water from 24 wells and springs associated with Southern California fault zones. Uranium concentrations vary from 0.002 ppb at Indian Canyon Springs on the San Jacinto fault to 8.3 ppb at Lake Hughes well on the San Andreas fault in the Palmdale area. /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratios vary from 0.88 at Agua Caliente Springs on the Elsinore fault to 5.4 at Niland Slab well on the San Andreas fault in the Imperial Valley. There was one large earthquake in the study area during 1979, the 15 October 1979 M = 6.6 Imperial Valley earthquake. Correlated with this event, uranium concentrations varied by a factor of more than 60 and activity ratios by a factor of 3 at the Niland Slab site, about 70 km from the epicenter. At the other sites monitored, uranium concentrations varied in time, but with no apparent pattern, while uranium activity ratios remained essentially constant throughout the monitoring period.

  6. Faulting at Mormon Point, Death Valley, California: A low-angle normal fault cut by high-angle faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keener, Charles; Serpa, Laura; Pavlis, Terry L.

    1993-04-01

    New geophysical and fault kinematic studies indicate that late Cenozoic basin development in the Mormon Point area of Death Valley, California, was accommodated by fault rotations. Three of six fault segments recognized at Mormon Point are now inactive and have been rotated to low dips during extension. The remaining three segments are now active and moderately to steeply dipping. From the geophysical data, one active segment appears to offset the low-angle faults in the subsurface of Death Valley.

  7. Maximum Magnitude in Relation to Mapped Fault Length and Fault Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, N.; Jackson, D.; Rockwell, T.

    2004-12-01

    Earthquake hazard zones are highlighted using known fault locations and an estimate of the fault's maximum magnitude earthquake. Magnitude limits are commonly determined from fault geometry, which is dependent on fault length. Over the past 30 years it has become apparent that fault length is often poorly constrained and that a single event can rupture across several individual fault segments. In this study fault geometries are analyzed before and after several moderate to large magnitude earthquakes to determine how well fault length can accurately assess seismic hazard. Estimates of future earthquake magnitudes are often inferred from prior determinations of fault length, but use magnitude regressions based on rupture length. However, rupture length is not always limited to the previously estimated fault length or contained on a single fault. Therefore, the maximum magnitude for a fault may be underestimated, unless the geometry and segmentation of faulting is completely understood. This study examines whether rupture/fault length can be used to accurately predict the maximum magnitude for a given fault. We examine earthquakes greater than 6.0 that occurred after 1970 in Southern California. Geologic maps, fault evaluation reports, and aerial photos that existed prior to these earthquakes are used to obtain the pre-earthquake fault lengths. Pre-earthquake fault lengths are compared with rupture lengths to determine: 1) if fault lengths are the same before and after the ruptures and 2) to constrain the geology and geometry of ruptures that propagated beyond the originally recognized endpoints of a mapped fault. The ruptures examined in this study typically follow one of the following models. The ruptures are either: 1) contained within the dimensions of the original fault trace, 2) break through one or both end points of the originally mapped fault trace, or 3) break through multiple faults, connecting segments into one large fault line. No rupture simply broke a

  8. Active fault traces along Bhuj Fault and Katrol Hill Fault, and trenching survey at Wandhay, Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morino, Michio; Malik, Javed N.; Mishra, Prashant; Bhuiyan, Chandrashekhar; Kaneko, Fumio

    2008-06-01

    Several new active fault traces were identified along Katrol Hill Fault (KHF). A new fault (named as Bhuj Fault, BF) that extends into the Bhuj Plain was also identified. These fault traces were identified based on satellite photo interpretation and field survey. Trenches were excavated to identify the paleoseismic events, pattern of faulting and the nature of deformation. New active fault traces were recognized about 1km north of the topographic boundary between the Katrol Hill and the plain area. The fault exposure along the left bank of Khari River with 10m wide shear zone in the Mesozoic rocks and showing displacement of the overlying Quaternary deposits is indicative of continued tectonic activity along the ancient fault. The E-W trending active fault traces along the KHF in the western part changes to NE-SW or ENE-WSW near Wandhay village. Trenching survey across a low scarp near Wandhay village reveals three major fault strands F1, F2, and F3. These fault strands displaced the older terrace deposits comprising Sand, Silt and Gravel units along with overlying younger deposits from units 1 to 5 made of gravel, sand and silt. Stratigraphic relationship indicates at least three large magnitude earthquakes along KHF during Late Holocene or recent historic past.

  9. Parametric Modeling and Fault Tolerant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, N. Eva; Ju, Jianhong

    2000-01-01

    Fault tolerant control is considered for a nonlinear aircraft model expressed as a linear parameter-varying system. By proper parameterization of foreseeable faults, the linear parameter-varying system can include fault effects as additional varying parameters. A recently developed technique in fault effect parameter estimation allows us to assume that estimates of the fault effect parameters are available on-line. Reconfigurability is calculated for this model with respect to the loss of control effectiveness to assess the potentiality of the model to tolerate such losses prior to control design. The control design is carried out by applying a polytopic method to the aircraft model. An error bound on fault effect parameter estimation is provided, within which the Lyapunov stability of the closed-loop system is robust. Our simulation results show that as long as the fault parameter estimates are sufficiently accurate, the polytopic controller can provide satisfactory fault-tolerance.

  10. Detection of faults and software reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Specific topics briefly addressed include: the consistent comparison problem in N-version system; analytic models of comparison testing; fault tolerance through data diversity; and the relationship between failures caused by automatically seeded faults.

  11. Solar Dynamic Power System Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Dias, Lakshman G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct various fault simulation studies for diagnosing the type and location of faults in the power distribution system. Different types of faults are simulated at different locations within the distribution system and the faulted waveforms are monitored at measurable nodes such as at the output of the DDCU's. These fault signatures are processed using feature extractors such as FFT and wavelet transforms. The extracted features are fed to a clustering based neural network for training and subsequent testing using previously unseen data. Different load models consisting of constant impedance and constant power are used for the loads. Open circuit faults and short circuit faults are studied. It is concluded from present studies that using features extracted from wavelet transforms give better success rates during ANN testing. The trained ANN's are capable of diagnosing fault types and approximate locations in the solar dynamic power distribution system.

  12. Fault seals in oil fields in Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, N.H.; Veal, H.K.; Bortz, L.C.

    1987-08-01

    Faults forms seals for oil accumulations in the Eagle Springs, Trap Spring, and Blackburn fields, and probably in the Grant Canyon field, in Nevada. The main boundary fault on the east side of the Pine Valley graben forms a seal in the Blackburn field. A fault on the west side of the trap Spring field forms a seal. In Grant Canyon field, it is interpreted that the main boundary fault on the east side of the Railroad Valley graben forms a seal. Calcite is deposited by hot spring activity, plugging up many fault zones and, in some cases, forming seals. Some fault zones have calcite mineralization up to several thousand feet wide. Within the Eagle Springs field on the east side of the Railroad Valley graben, a northeast-trending fault separates oil accumulations with different oil-water contacts. This separation indicates that the fault forms at least a partial seal within the accumulation.

  13. Seismology: Diary of a wimpy fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürgmann, Roland

    2015-05-01

    Subduction zone faults can slip slowly, generating tremor. The varying correlation between tidal stresses and tremor occurring deep in the Cascadia subduction zone suggests that the fault is inherently weak, and gets weaker as it slips.

  14. Implementing fault-tolerant sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzullo, Keith

    1989-01-01

    One aspect of fault tolerance in process control programs is the ability to tolerate sensor failure. A methodology is presented for transforming a process control program that cannot tolerate sensor failures to one that can. Additionally, a hierarchy of failure models is identified.

  15. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2011-04-19

    An apparatus and program product determine a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  16. MOS integrated circuit fault modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, M.

    1985-01-01

    Three digital simulation techniques for MOS integrated circuit faults were examined. These techniques embody a hierarchy of complexity bracketing the range of simulation levels. The digital approaches are: transistor-level, connector-switch-attenuator level, and gate level. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Failure characteristics are also described.

  17. FAULT & COORDINATION STUDY FOR T PLANT COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD, G.P.; BOYD-BODIAU, E.A.

    2004-09-01

    A short circuit study is performed to determine the maximum fault current that the system protective devices, transformers, and interconnections would he subject to in event of a three phase, phase-to-phase, or phase-to-ground fault. Generally, the short circuit study provides the worst case fault current levels at each bus or connection point of the system.

  18. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  19. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  20. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solum, John G.; Davatzes, Nicholas C.; Lockner, David A.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ˜1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon.

  1. Fault tolerant software modules for SIFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M.; Hecht, H.

    1982-01-01

    The implementation of software fault tolerance is investigated for critical modules of the Software Implemented Fault Tolerance (SIFT) operating system to support the computational and reliability requirements of advanced fly by wire transport aircraft. Fault tolerant designs generated for the error reported and global executive are examined. A description of the alternate routines, implementation requirements, and software validation are included.

  2. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  3. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  4. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  5. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  6. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  7. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  8. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  9. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  10. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  11. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  12. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  13. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  14. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  15. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  16. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  17. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  18. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  19. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  20. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solum, J.G.; Davatzes, N.C.; Lockner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ???1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Ground Fault--A Health Hazard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Clinton O.

    1977-01-01

    A ground fault is especially hazardous because the resistance through which the current is flowing to ground may be sufficient to cause electrocution. The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (G.F.C.I.) protects 15 and 25 ampere 120 volt circuits from ground fault condition. The design and examples of G.F.C.I. functions are described in this article.…

  2. Reliability computation using fault tree analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelson, P. O.

    1971-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating event probabilities from an arbitrary fault tree. The method includes an analytical derivation of the system equation and is not a simulation program. The method can handle systems that incorporate standby redundancy and it uses conditional probabilities for computing fault trees where the same basic failure appears in more than one fault path.

  3. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  4. Fault tolerant control of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard

    Autonomous multiple spacecraft formation flying space missions demand the development of reliable control systems to ensure rapid, accurate, and effective response to various attitude and formation reconfiguration commands. Keeping in mind the complexities involved in the technology development to enable spacecraft formation flying, this thesis presents the development and validation of a fault tolerant control algorithm that augments the AOCS on-board a spacecraft to ensure that these challenging formation flying missions will fly successfully. Taking inspiration from the existing theory of nonlinear control, a fault-tolerant control system for the RyePicoSat missions is designed to cope with actuator faults whilst maintaining the desirable degree of overall stability and performance. Autonomous fault tolerant adaptive control scheme for spacecraft equipped with redundant actuators and robust control of spacecraft in underactuated configuration, represent the two central themes of this thesis. The developed algorithms are validated using a hardware-in-the-loop simulation. A reaction wheel testbed is used to validate the proposed fault tolerant attitude control scheme. A spacecraft formation flying experimental testbed is used to verify the performance of the proposed robust control scheme for underactuated spacecraft configurations. The proposed underactuated formation flying concept leads to more than 60% savings in fuel consumption when compared to a fully actuated spacecraft formation configuration. We also developed a novel attitude control methodology that requires only a single thruster to stabilize three axis attitude and angular velocity components of a spacecraft. Numerical simulations and hardware-in-the-loop experimental results along with rigorous analytical stability analysis shows that the proposed methodology will greatly enhance the reliability of the spacecraft, while allowing for potentially significant overall mission cost reduction.

  5. Fault Diagnosis in HVAC Chillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Kihoon; Namuru, Setu M.; Azam, Mohammad S.; Luo, Jianhui; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Modern buildings are being equipped with increasingly sophisticated power and control systems with substantial capabilities for monitoring and controlling the amenities. Operational problems associated with heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems plague many commercial buildings, often the result of degraded equipment, failed sensors, improper installation, poor maintenance, and improperly implemented controls. Most existing HVAC fault-diagnostic schemes are based on analytical models and knowledge bases. These schemes are adequate for generic systems. However, real-world systems significantly differ from the generic ones and necessitate modifications of the models and/or customization of the standard knowledge bases, which can be labor intensive. Data-driven techniques for fault detection and isolation (FDI) have a close relationship with pattern recognition, wherein one seeks to categorize the input-output data into normal or faulty classes. Owing to the simplicity and adaptability, customization of a data-driven FDI approach does not require in-depth knowledge of the HVAC system. It enables the building system operators to improve energy efficiency and maintain the desired comfort level at a reduced cost. In this article, we consider a data-driven approach for FDI of chillers in HVAC systems. To diagnose the faults of interest in the chiller, we employ multiway dynamic principal component analysis (MPCA), multiway partial least squares (MPLS), and support vector machines (SVMs). The simulation of a chiller under various fault conditions is conducted using a standard chiller simulator from the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). We validated our FDI scheme using experimental data obtained from different types of chiller faults.

  6. Fault-crossing P delays, epicentral biasing, and fault behavior in Central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marks, S.M.; Bufe, C.G.

    1979-01-01

    The P delays across the San Andreas fault zone in central California have been determined from travel-time differences at station pairs spanning the fault, using off-fault local earthquake or quarry blast sources. Systematic delays as large as 0.4 sec have been observed for paths crossing the fault at depths of 5-10 km. These delays can account for the apparent deviation of epicenters from the mapped fault trace. The largest delays occur along the San Andreas fault between San Juan Bautista and Bear Valley and Between Bitterwater Valley and Parkfield. Spatial variations in fault behavior correlate with the magnitude of the fault-crossing P delay. The delay decreases to the northwest of San Juan Bautista across the "locked" section of the San Andreas fault and also decreases to the southeast approaching Parkfield. Where the delay is large, seismicity is relatively high and the fault is creeping. ?? 1979.

  7. Architecture of small-scale fault zones in the context of the Leinetalgraben Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyer, Dorothea; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2010-05-01

    Understanding fault zone properties in different geological settings is important to better assess the development and propagation of faults. In addition this allows better evaluation and permeability estimates of potential fault-related geothermal reservoirs. The Leinetalgraben fault system provides an outcrop analogue for many fault zones in the subsurface of the North German Basin. The Leinetalgraben is a N-S-trending graben structure, initiated in the Jurassic, in the south of Lower Saxony and as such part of the North German Basin. The fault system was reactivated and inverted during Alpine compression in the Tertiary. This complex geological situation was further affected by halotectonics. Therefore we can find different types of fault zones, that is normal, reverse, strike-slip an oblique-slip faults, surrounding the major Leinetalgraben boundary faults. Here we present first results of structural geological field studies on the geometry and architecture of fault zones in the Leinetalgraben Fault System in outcrop-scale. We measured the orientations and displacements of 17 m-scale fault zones in limestone (Muschelkalk) outcrops, the thicknesses of their fault cores and damage zones, as well as the fracture densities and geometric parameters of the fracture systems therein. We also analysed the effects of rock heterogeneities, particularly stiffness variations between layers (mechanical layering) on the propagation of natural fractures and fault zones. The analysed fault zones predominantly show similar orientations as the major fault zones they surround. Other faults are conjugate or perpendicular to the major fault zones. The direction of predominant joint strike corresponds to the orientation of the fault zones in the majority of cases. The mechanical layering of the limestone and marlstone stratification obviously has great effects on fracture propagation. Already thin layers (mm- to cm-scale) of low stiffness - here marl - seem to suffice to change the

  8. Synchronous unroofing and faulting in the Precordillera of Argentina: thermochronometric constraints on fault-propagation in a thin- to thick-skinned orogenic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosdick, J. C.; Carrapa, B.

    2013-12-01

    Mass removal via erosion is an important process that interacts with deformation in convergent mountain belts such as the Andes, and improved quantification of denudation is critical for elucidating spatio-temporal patterns of deformation. We report new apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He (AHe, ZHe) and apatite fission track (AFT) results from the Precordillera of Argentina that record Neogene fault-related unroofing during growth of the Andean retroarc fold-and-thrust belt. The Precordillera fold-and-thrust belt of Argentina is located west of the thick-skinned Sierras Pampeanas and evolved concurrently with the Bermejo retroarc foreland basin since at least the early Miocene. At the Rio Jáchal latitude (30°S), most crustal shortening associated with the Andean orogen is accommodated across the Precordillera, however, its unroofing record remains poorly constrained. Here we test the relationships between thrust faulting and exhumation and quantify the erosional input of sediments to the foreland basin. ZHe samples from Silurian-Carboniferous metasedimentary rocks collected across the Rio Jáchal transect yield entirely Permo-Triassic cooling ages, indicating that the present-day erosional depth of the Precordillera has resided above the ZHe partial retention zone (PRZ) throughout Mesozoic-Cenozoic time. Preliminary AFT data of the Precordillera also indicate mixed pre-Cenozoic ages. ZHe and AFT ages provide a nominal <6-7 km maximum constraint on the degree of erosion associated with Andean deformation, despite over 50% shortening. In contrast, AHe dates range between ~2 to 16 Ma and track eastward with the progressive faulting of the Blanca, San Roque, and Niquivil thrust sheets from ~16 to 2 Ma. Cooling related to out-of-sequence thrusting is also reflected by the AHe results; the youngest AHe ages (5-2 Ma) are located along the margins of the Iglesia piggy-back basin and the Las Salinas anticline at the eastern boundary between the Precordillera and Pampean craton

  9. Three-dimensional Geology of the Hayward Fault and its Correlation with Fault Behavior, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, D. A.; Graymer, R. C.; Jachens, R. C.; Simpson, R. W.; Phelps, G. A.; Wentworth, C. M.

    2004-12-01

    Relationships between fault behavior and geology along the Hayward Fault were investigated using a three-dimensional geologic model of the Hayward fault and vicinity. The three-dimensional model, derived from geologic, geophysical, and seismicity data, allowed the construction of a `geologic map' of east- and west-side surfaces, maps that show the distribution of geologic units on either side of the fault that truncate against the fault surface. These two resulting geologic maps were compared with seismicity and creep along the Hayward Fault using three-dimensional visualization software. The seismic behavior of the Hayward Fault correlates with rock unit contacts along the fault, rather than in rock types across the fault. This suggests that fault activity is, in part, controlled by the physical properties of the rocks that abut the fault and not by properties of the fault zone itself. For example, far fewer earthquakes occur along the northern part of the fault where an intensely sheared Franciscan mélange on the west side abuts the fault face, compared to the region to the south where more coherent rocks of other Franciscan terranes or the Coast Range Ophiolite are present. More locally, clusters of earthquakes correlate spatially with some of the contacts between Franciscan terranes as well as mafic rocks of the Coast Range Ophiolite. Steady creep rates along the fault correlate with the lateral extent of the San Leandro gabbro, and changes in creep rate correlate with changes in geology. Although preliminary, the results of comparing fault behavior with the inferred three-dimensional geology adjacent to the Hayward Fault suggest that any attempt to understand the detailed distribution of earthquakes or creep along the fault should include consideration of the rock types that abut the fault surface. Such consideration would benefit greatly from incorporating into the three-dimensional geologic model the physical properties of the rock types along the fault.

  10. Recurrent late Quaternary surface faulting along the southern Mohawk Valley fault zone, NE California

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, T.L.; Hemphill-Haley, M.A. ); Page, W.D. )

    1993-04-01

    The Mohawk Valley fault zone comprises NW- to NNW-striking, normal and strike-slip( ) faults that form the western edge of the Plumas province, a diffuse transitional zone between the Basin and Range and the northern Sierra Nevada. The authors detailed evaluation of the southern part of the fault zone reveals evidence for recurrent late Pleistocene to possibly Holocene, moderate to large surface-faulting events. The southern Mohawk fault zone is a complex, 6-km-wide zone of faults and related features that extends from near the crest of the Sierra Nevada to the middle of southern Sierra Valley. The fault zone has two distinct and generally parallel subzones, 3 km apart, that are delineated by markedly different geomorphic characteristics and apparently different styles of faulting. Paleoseismic activity of the western subzone was evaluated in two trenches: one across a fault antithetic to the main range-bounding fault, and the other across a splay fault delineated by a 3.7-m-high scarp in alluvium. Stratigraphic relations, soil development, and radiocarbon dates indicate that at least four mid- to late-Pleistocene surface-faulting events, having single-event displacements in excess of 1.6 to 2.6 m, occurred along the splay fault prior to 12 ka. The antithetic fault has evidence of three late Pleistocene events that may correspond to event documented on the splay fault, and a Holocene event that is inferred from youthful scarplets and small closed depressions.

  11. Novel neural networks-based fault tolerant control scheme with fault alarm.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qikun; Jiang, Bin; Shi, Peng; Lim, Cheng-Chew

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the problem of adaptive active fault-tolerant control for a class of nonlinear systems with unknown actuator fault is investigated. The actuator fault is assumed to have no traditional affine appearance of the system state variables and control input. The useful property of the basis function of the radial basis function neural network (NN), which will be used in the design of the fault tolerant controller, is explored. Based on the analysis of the design of normal and passive fault tolerant controllers, by using the implicit function theorem, a novel NN-based active fault-tolerant control scheme with fault alarm is proposed. Comparing with results in the literature, the fault-tolerant control scheme can minimize the time delay between fault occurrence and accommodation that is called the time delay due to fault diagnosis, and reduce the adverse effect on system performance. In addition, the FTC scheme has the advantages of a passive fault-tolerant control scheme as well as the traditional active fault-tolerant control scheme's properties. Furthermore, the fault-tolerant control scheme requires no additional fault detection and isolation model which is necessary in the traditional active fault-tolerant control scheme. Finally, simulation results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the developed techniques. PMID:25014982

  12. Predeployment validation of fault-tolerant systems through software-implemented fault insertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeck, Edward W.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.; Segall, Zary Z.

    1989-01-01

    Fault injection-based automated testing (FIAT) environment, which can be used to experimentally characterize and evaluate distributed realtime systems under fault-free and faulted conditions is described. A survey is presented of validation methodologies. The need for fault insertion based on validation methodologies is demonstrated. The origins and models of faults, and motivation for the FIAT concept are reviewed. FIAT employs a validation methodology which builds confidence in the system through first providing a baseline of fault-free performance data and then characterizing the behavior of the system with faults present. Fault insertion is accomplished through software and allows faults or the manifestation of faults to be inserted by either seeding faults into memory or triggering error detection mechanisms. FIAT is capable of emulating a variety of fault-tolerant strategies and architectures, can monitor system activity, and can automatically orchestrate experiments involving insertion of faults. There is a common system interface which allows ease of use to decrease experiment development and run time. Fault models chosen for experiments on FIAT have generated system responses which parallel those observed in real systems under faulty conditions. These capabilities are shown by two example experiments each using a different fault-tolerance strategy.

  13. Multiple Fault Isolation in Redundant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Iverson, David

    1997-01-01

    Fault diagnosis in large-scale systems that are products of modern technology present formidable challenges to manufacturers and users. This is due to large number of failure sources in such systems and the need to quickly isolate and rectify failures with minimal down time. In addition, for fault-tolerant systems and systems with infrequent opportunity for maintenance (e.g., Hubble telescope, space station), the assumption of at most a single fault in the system is unrealistic. In this project, we have developed novel block and sequential diagnostic strategies to isolate multiple faults in the shortest possible time without making the unrealistic single fault assumption.

  14. Detection of faults and software reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Multiversion or N-version programming was proposed as a method of providing fault tolerance in software. The approach requires the separate, independent preparation of multiple versions of a piece of software for some application. Specific topics addressed are: failure probabilities in N-version systems, consistent comparison in N-version systems, descriptions of the faults found in the Knight and Leveson experiment, analytic models of comparison testing, characteristics of the input regions that trigger faults, fault tolerance through data diversity, and the relationship between failures caused by automatically seeded faults.

  15. Multiple Fault Isolation in Redundant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pattipati, Krishna R.

    1997-01-01

    Fault diagnosis in large-scale systems that are products of modem technology present formidable challenges to manufacturers and users. This is due to large number of failure sources in such systems and the need to quickly isolate and rectify failures with minimal down time. In addition, for fault-tolerant systems and systems with infrequent opportunity for maintenance (e.g., Hubble telescope, space station), the assumption of at most a single fault in the system is unrealistic. In this project, we have developed novel block and sequential diagnostic strategies to isolate multiple faults in the shortest possible time without making the unrealistic single fault assumption.

  16. Managing Space System Faults: Coalescing NASA's Views

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muirhead, Brian; Fesq, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Managing faults and their resultant failures is a fundamental and critical part of developing and operating aerospace systems. Yet, recent studies have shown that the engineering "discipline" required to manage faults is not widely recognized nor evenly practiced within the NASA community. Attempts to simply name this discipline in recent years has been fraught with controversy among members of the Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM), Fault Management (FM), Fault Protection (FP), Hazard Analysis (HA), and Aborts communities. Approaches to managing space system faults typically are unique to each organization, with little commonality in the architectures, processes and practices across the industry.

  17. Experiments in fault tolerant software reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, David F.; Vouk, Mladen A.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty functionally equivalent programs were built and tested in a multiversion software experiment. Following unit testing, all programs were subjected to an extensive system test. In the process sixty-one distinct faults were identified among the versions. Less than 12 percent of the faults exhibited varying degrees of positive correlation. The common-cause (or similar) faults spanned as many as 14 components. However, a majority of these faults were trivial, and easily detected by proper unit and/or system testing. Only two of the seven similar faults were difficult faults, and both were caused by specification ambiguities. One of these faults exhibited variable identical-and-wrong response span, i.e. response span which varied with the testing conditions and input data. Techniques that could have been used to avoid the faults are discussed. For example, it was determined that back-to-back testing of 2-tuples could have been used to eliminate about 90 percent of the faults. In addition, four of the seven similar faults could have been detected by using back-to-back testing of 5-tuples. It is believed that most, if not all, similar faults could have been avoided had the specifications been written using more formal notation, the unit testing phase was subject to more stringent standards and controls, and better tools for measuring the quality and adequacy of the test data (e.g. coverage) were used.

  18. Model-Based Fault Tolerant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Aditya; Viassolo, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The Model Based Fault Tolerant Control (MBFTC) task was conducted under the NASA Aviation Safety and Security Program. The goal of MBFTC is to develop and demonstrate real-time strategies to diagnose and accommodate anomalous aircraft engine events such as sensor faults, actuator faults, or turbine gas-path component damage that can lead to in-flight shutdowns, aborted take offs, asymmetric thrust/loss of thrust control, or engine surge/stall events. A suite of model-based fault detection algorithms were developed and evaluated. Based on the performance and maturity of the developed algorithms two approaches were selected for further analysis: (i) multiple-hypothesis testing, and (ii) neural networks; both used residuals from an Extended Kalman Filter to detect the occurrence of the selected faults. A simple fusion algorithm was implemented to combine the results from each algorithm to obtain an overall estimate of the identified fault type and magnitude. The identification of the fault type and magnitude enabled the use of an online fault accommodation strategy to correct for the adverse impact of these faults on engine operability thereby enabling continued engine operation in the presence of these faults. The performance of the fault detection and accommodation algorithm was extensively tested in a simulation environment.

  19. Tool for Viewing Faults Under Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Herbert, L.; Li, P. Peggy

    2005-01-01

    Multi Surface Light Table (MSLT) is an interactive software tool that was developed in support of the QuakeSim project, which has created an earthquake- fault database and a set of earthquake- simulation software tools. MSLT visualizes the three-dimensional geometries of faults embedded below the terrain and animates time-varying simulations of stress and slip. The fault segments, represented as rectangular surfaces at dip angles, are organized into collections, that is, faults. An interface built into MSLT queries and retrieves fault definitions from the QuakeSim fault database. MSLT also reads time-varying output from one of the QuakeSim simulation tools, called "Virtual California." Stress intensity is represented by variations in color. Slips are represented by directional indicators on the fault segments. The magnitudes of the slips are represented by the duration of the directional indicators in time. The interactive controls in MSLT provide a virtual track-ball, pan and zoom, translucency adjustment, simulation playback, and simulation movie capture. In addition, geographical information on the fault segments and faults is displayed on text windows. Because of the extensive viewing controls, faults can be seen in relation to one another, and to the terrain. These relations can be realized in simulations. Correlated slips in parallel faults are visible in the playback of Virtual California simulations.

  20. A Quaternary fault database for central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd Alan; Bendick, Rebecca; Stübner, Konstanze; Strube, Timo

    2016-02-01

    Earthquakes represent the highest risk in terms of potential loss of lives and economic damage for central Asian countries. Knowledge of fault location and behavior is essential in calculating and mapping seismic hazard. Previous efforts in compiling fault information for central Asia have generated a large amount of data that are published in limited-access journals with no digital maps publicly available, or are limited in their description of important fault parameters such as slip rates. This study builds on previous work by improving access to fault information through a web-based interactive map and an online database with search capabilities that allow users to organize data by different fields. The data presented in this compilation include fault location, its geographic, seismic, and structural characteristics, short descriptions, narrative comments, and references to peer-reviewed publications. The interactive map displays 1196 fault traces and 34 000 earthquake locations on a shaded-relief map. The online database contains attributes for 123 faults mentioned in the literature, with Quaternary and geodetic slip rates reported for 38 and 26 faults respectively, and earthquake history reported for 39 faults. All data are accessible for viewing and download via http://www.geo.uni-tuebingen.de/faults/. This work has implications for seismic hazard studies in central Asia as it summarizes important fault parameters, and can reduce earthquake risk by enhancing public access to information. It also allows scientists and hazard assessment teams to identify structures and regions where data gaps exist and future investigations are needed.

  1. Arc burst pattern analysis fault detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting an arcing fault on a power line carrying a load current. Parameters indicative of power flow and possible fault events on the line, such as voltage and load current, are monitored and analyzed for an arc burst pattern exhibited by arcing faults in a power system. These arcing faults are detected by identifying bursts of each half-cycle of the fundamental current. Bursts occurring at or near a voltage peak indicate arcing on that phase. Once a faulted phase line is identified, a comparison of the current and voltage reveals whether the fault is located in a downstream direction of power flow toward customers, or upstream toward a generation station. If the fault is located downstream, the line is de-energized, and if located upstream, the line may remain energized to prevent unnecessary power outages.

  2. Multiple Fault Isolation in Redundant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakeri, M.; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Raghavan, V.; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Iverson, David L.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the problem of sequencing tests to isolate multiple faults in redundant (fault-tolerant) systems with minimum expected testing cost (time). It can be shown that single faults and minimal faults, i.e., minimum number of failures with a failure signature different from the union of failure signatures of individual failures, together with their failure signatures, constitute the necessary information for fault diagnosis in redundant systems. In this paper, we develop an algorithm to find all the minimal faults and their failure signatures. Then, we extend the Sure diagnostic strategies [1] of our previous work to diagnose multiple faults in redundant systems. The proposed algorithms and strategies are illustrated using several examples.

  3. Parallel fault-tolerant robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D. L.; Bennett, J. K.; Walker, I. D.

    1992-01-01

    A shared memory multiprocessor architecture is used to develop a parallel fault-tolerant robot controller. Several versions of the robot controller are developed and compared. A robot simulation is also developed for control observation. Comparison of a serial version of the controller and a parallel version without fault tolerance showed the speedup possible with the coarse-grained parallelism currently employed. The performance degradation due to the addition of processor fault tolerance was demonstrated by comparison of these controllers with their fault-tolerant versions. Comparison of the more fault-tolerant controller with the lower-level fault-tolerant controller showed how varying the amount of redundant data affects performance. The results demonstrate the trade-off between speed performance and processor fault tolerance.

  4. Alp Transit: Crossing Faults 44 and 49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Tani, M.; Bremen, R.

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the crossing of faults 44 and 49 when constructing the 57 km Gotthard base tunnel of the Alp Transit project. Fault 44 is a permeable fault that triggered significant surface deformations 1,400 m above the tunnel when it was reached by the advancing excavation. The fault runs parallel to the downstream face of the Nalps arch dam. Significant deformations were measured at the dam crown. Fault 49 is sub-vertical and permeable, and runs parallel at the upstream face of the dam. It was necessary to assess the risk when crossing fault 49, as a limit was put on the acceptable dam deformation for structural safety. The simulation model, forecasts and action decided when crossing over the faults are presented, with a brief description of the tunnel, the dam, and the monitoring system.

  5. Rule-based fault diagnosis of hall sensors and fault-tolerant control of PMSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ziyou; Li, Jianqiu; Ouyang, Minggao; Gu, Jing; Feng, Xuning; Lu, Dongbin

    2013-07-01

    Hall sensor is widely used for estimating rotor phase of permanent magnet synchronous motor(PMSM). And rotor position is an essential parameter of PMSM control algorithm, hence it is very dangerous if Hall senor faults occur. But there is scarcely any research focusing on fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control of Hall sensor used in PMSM. From this standpoint, the Hall sensor faults which may occur during the PMSM operating are theoretically analyzed. According to the analysis results, the fault diagnosis algorithm of Hall sensor, which is based on three rules, is proposed to classify the fault phenomena accurately. The rotor phase estimation algorithms, based on one or two Hall sensor(s), are initialized to engender the fault-tolerant control algorithm. The fault diagnosis algorithm can detect 60 Hall fault phenomena in total as well as all detections can be fulfilled in 1/138 rotor rotation period. The fault-tolerant control algorithm can achieve a smooth torque production which means the same control effect as normal control mode (with three Hall sensors). Finally, the PMSM bench test verifies the accuracy and rapidity of fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control strategies. The fault diagnosis algorithm can detect all Hall sensor faults promptly and fault-tolerant control algorithm allows the PMSM to face failure conditions of one or two Hall sensor(s). In addition, the transitions between health-control and fault-tolerant control conditions are smooth without any additional noise and harshness. Proposed algorithms can deal with the Hall sensor faults of PMSM in real applications, and can be provided to realize the fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control of PMSM.

  6. A “mesh” of crossing faults: Fault networks of southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecke, S. U.

    2009-12-01

    Detailed geologic mapping of active fault systems in the western Salton Trough and northern Peninsular Ranges of southern California make it possible to expand the inventory of mapped and known faults by compiling and updating existing geologic maps, and analyzing high resolution imagery, LIDAR, InSAR, relocated hypocenters and other geophysical datasets. A fault map is being compiled on Google Earth and will ultimately discriminate between a range of different fault expressions: from well-mapped faults to subtle lineaments and geomorphic anomalies. The fault map shows deformation patterns in both crystalline and basinal deposits and reveals a complex fault mesh with many curious and unexpected relationships. Key findings are: 1) Many fault systems have mutually interpenetrating geometries, are grossly coeval, and allow faults to cross one another. A typical relationship reveals a dextral fault zone that appears to be continuous at the regional scale. In detail, however, there are no continuous NW-striking dextral fault traces and instead the master dextral fault is offset in a left-lateral sense by numerous crossing faults. Left-lateral faults also show small offsets where they interact with right lateral faults. Both fault sets show evidence of Quaternary activity. Examples occur along the Clark, Coyote Creek, Earthquake Valley and Torres Martinez fault zones. 2) Fault zones cross in other ways. There are locations where active faults continue across or beneath significant structural barriers. Major fault zones like the Clark fault of the San Jacinto fault system appears to end at NE-striking sinistral fault zones (like the Extra and Pumpkin faults) that clearly cross from the SW to the NE side of the projection of the dextral traces. Despite these blocking structures, there is good evidence for continuation of the dextral faults on the opposite sides of the crossing fault array. In some instances there is clear evidence (in deep microseismic alignments of

  7. Tracing the Geomorphic Signature of Lateral Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvall, A. R.; Tucker, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    Active strike-slip faults are among the most dangerous geologic features on Earth. Unfortunately, it is challenging to estimate their slip rates, seismic hazard, and evolution over a range of timescales. An under-exploited tool in strike-slip fault characterization is quantitative analysis of the geomorphic response to lateral fault motion to extract tectonic information directly from the landscape. Past geomorphic work of this kind has focused almost exclusively on vertical motion, despite the ubiquity of horizontal motion in crustal deformation and mountain building. We seek to address this problem by investigating the landscape response to strike-slip faulting in two ways: 1) examining the geomorphology of the Marlborough Fault System (MFS), a suite of parallel strike-slip faults within the actively deforming South Island of New Zealand, and 2) conducting controlled experiments in strike-slip landscape evolution using the CHILD landscape evolution model. The MFS offers an excellent natural experiment site because fault initiation ages and cumulative displacements decrease from north to south, whereas slip rates increase over four fold across a region underlain by a single bedrock unit (Torlesse Greywacke). Comparison of planform and longitudinal profiles of rivers draining the MFS reveals strong disequilibrium within tributaries that drain to active fault strands, and suggests that river capture related to fault activity may be a regular process in strike-slip fault zones. Simple model experiments support this view. Model calculations that include horizontal motion as well as vertical uplift demonstrate river lengthening and shortening due to stream capture in response to shutter ridges sliding in front of stream outlets. These results suggest that systematic variability in fluvial knickpoint location, drainage area, and incision rates along different faults or fault segments may be expected in catchments upstream of strike-slip faults and could act as useful

  8. Has the San Gabriel fault been offset

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, J.R.

    1988-03-01

    The San Gabriel fault (SGF) in southern California is a right-lateral, strike-slip fault extending for 85 mi in an arcuate, southwestward-bowing curve from near the San Andreas fault at Frazier Mountain to its intersection with the left-lateral San Antonio Canyon fault (SACF) in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains. Termination of the SGF at the presently active SACF is abrupt and prompts the question Has the San Gabriel Fault been offset. Tectonic and geometric relationships in the area suggest that the SGF has been offset approximately 6 mi in a left-lateral sense and that the offset continuation of the SGF, across the SACF, is the right-lateral, strike-slip San Jacinto fault (SJF), which also terminates at the SACF. Reversing the left-lateral movement on the SACF to rejoin the offset ends of the SGF and SJF reveals a fault trace that is remarkably similar in geometry and movement (and perhaps in tectonic history), to the trace of the San Andreas fault through the southern part of the San Bernardino Mountains. The relationship of the Sierra Madre-Cucamonga fault system to the restored SGF-SJF fault is strikingly similar to the relationship of the Banning fault to the Mission Creek-Mill Creek portion of the San Andreas fault. Structural relations suggest that the San Gabriel-San Jacinto system predates the San Andreas fault in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains and that continuing movement on the SACF is currently affecting the trace of the San Andreas fault in the Cajon Pass area.

  9. Tropical glacier fluctuations in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru between 12.5 and 7.6 ka from cosmogenic 10Be dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, Neil F.; Clemmens, Samuel; Schnabel, Christoph; Fenton, Cassandra R.; McHargue, Lanny

    2009-12-01

    We report cosmogenic surface exposure 10Be ages of 21 boulders on moraines in the Jeullesh and Tuco Valleys, Cordillera Blanca, Peru (˜10°S at altitudes above 4200 m). Ages are based on the sea-level at high-latitude reference production rate and scaling system of Lifton et al. (2005. Addressing solar modulation and long-term uncertainties in scaling secondary cosmic rays for in situ cosmogenic nuclide applications. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 239, 140-161) in the CRONUS-Earth online calculator of Balco et al. (2008. A complete and easily accessible means of calculating surface exposure ages or erosion rates from 10Be and 26Al measurements. Quaternary Geochronology 3, 174-195). Using the Lifton system, large outer lateral moraines in the Jeullesh Valley have a 10Be exposure age of 12.4 ka, inside of which are smaller moraine systems dated to 10.8, 9.7 and 7.6 ka. Large outer lateral moraines in the Tuco Valley have a 10Be exposure age of 12.5 ka, with inner moraines dated to 11.3 and 10.7 ka. Collectively, these data indicate that glacier recession from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the Cordillera Blanca was punctuated by three to four stillstands or minor advances during the period 12.5-7.6 ka, spanning the Younger Dryas Chronozone (YDC; ˜12.9-11.6 ka) and the cold event identified in Greenland ice cores and many other parts of the world at 8.2 ka. The inferred fluctuations of tropical glaciers at these times, well after their withdrawal from the LGM, indicate an increase in precipitation or a decrease in temperature in this region. Although palaeoenvironmental records show regional and temporal variability, comparison with proxy records (lacustrine sediments and ice cores) indicate that regionally this was a cold, dry period so we ascribe these glacier advances to reduced atmospheric temperature rather than increased precipitation.

  10. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water, mussels ( Brachidontes sp., Tagelus sp.) and fish ( Odontesthes sp.) from Bahía Blanca Estuary, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Andres H.; Spetter, Carla V.; Freije, Rubén H.; Marcovecchio, Jorge E.

    2009-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), one of the major groups of anthropogenic environmental pollutants, were firstly identified and measured in coastal waters, native mussels and fish of an industrialized South American estuary. The aim of this study was to measure the PAHs concentrations and evaluate distribution and sources in surface seawater, native mussels ( Brachidontes sp. and Tagelus sp.) and fish ( Odontesthes sp.) from various coastal sites of the Bahía Blanca Estuary, in order to put the estuary in a global context and assess it ecotoxicological risk. For this, 40 samples of surface water were collected between August 2004 and February 2006 and analyzed by GC/MS for 17 PAHs, including the 16 EPA priority PAHs. In addition, main physicochemical parameters, nutrients and pigments were simultaneously obtained as key parameters to evaluate possible relationships. Finally, several native mussel communities and fish specimens were also analyzed for PAHs contents. The area of study is located at the Argentinean coast and presents an intensive human and industrial activity at the north shoreline. Total PAHs (Σ17 PAHs) in whole surface waters ranged from undetected to more than 4 μg/l. Seasonal PAHs levels relationship with master parameters suggested a relationship between the phytoplankton microbiological cycling and the dissolved/suspended PAHs occurrence in water. In addition, Cluster Analysis was performed to identify the homogeneous groups of individual PAHs in water and Principal Component Analysis to extract underlying common factors. The result of PCA was similar to that of the cluster analysis; both could differentiate two subsets of pyrogenic sources and a petrogenic origin. PAHs levels in indigenous mussels ( Brachidontes sp. and Tagelus sp.) ranged from 348 to 1597 ng/g (dry weight). Fish specimens ( Odontesthes sp.) showed a mean concentration of 1095 ng/g d.w. in whole tissues. Mussel source ratios and PCA results were in good agreement with

  11. Fault trees and imperfect coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, Joanne B.

    1989-01-01

    A new algorithm is presented for solving the fault tree. The algorithm includes the dynamic behavior of the fault/error handling model but obviates the need for the Markov chain solution. As the state space is expanded in a breadth-first search (the same is done in the conversion to a Markov chain), the state's contribution to each future state is calculated exactly. A dynamic state truncation technique is also presented; it produces bounds on the unreliability of the system by considering only part of the state space. Since the model is solved as the state space is generated, the process can be stopped as soon as the desired accuracy is reached.

  12. Perspective View, San Andreas Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is California's famous San Andreas Fault. The image, created with data from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. This segment of the fault lies west of the city of Palmdale, Calif., about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) northwest of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. Two large mountain ranges are visible, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains in the upper right. Another fault, the Garlock Fault lies at the base of the Tehachapis; the San Andreas and the Garlock Faults meet in the center distance near the town of Gorman. In the distance, over the Tehachapi Mountains is California's Central Valley. Along the foothills in the right hand part of the image is the Antelope Valley, including the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve. The data used to create this image were acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    SRTM uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space

  13. Heat flow, strong near-fault seismic waves, and near-fault tectonics on the central San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, Norman H.

    2016-05-01

    The main San Andreas Fault strikes subparallel to compressional folds and thrust faults. Its fault-normal traction is on average a factor of γ=1+2μthr>(√(1+μthr2)+μthr>), where μthr is the coefficient of friction for thrust faults, times the effective lithostatic pressure. A useful upper limit for μthr of 0.6 (where γ is 3.12) is obtained from the lack of heat flow anomalies by considering off-fault convergence at a rate of 1 mm/yr for 10 km across strike. If the fault-normal traction is in fact this high, the well-known heat flow constraint of average stresses of 10-20 MPa during strike slip on the main fault becomes more severe. Only a few percent of the total slip during earthquakes can occur at the peak stress before dynamic mechanisms weaken the fault. The spatial dimension of the high-stress rupture-tip zone is ˜10 m for γ = 3.12 and, for comparison, ˜100 m for γ = 1. High dynamic stresses during shaking occur within these distances of the fault plane. In terms of scalars, fine-scale tectonic stresses cannot exceed the difference between failure stress and dynamic stress. Plate-scale slip causes stresses to build up near geometrical irregularities of the fault plane. Strong dynamic stresses near the rupture tip facilitate anelastic deformation with the net effects of relaxing the local deviatoric tectonic stress and accommodating deformation around the irregularities. There also is a mild tendency for near-fault material to extrude upward. Slip on minor thrust faults causes the normal traction on the main fault to be spatially variable.

  14. New insights on Southern Coyote Creek Fault and Superstition Hills Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zandt, A. J.; Mellors, R. J.; Rockwell, T. K.; Burgess, M. K.; O'Hare, M.

    2007-12-01

    Recent field work has confirmed an extension of the southern Coyote Creek (CCF) branch of the San Jacinto fault in the western Salton trough. The fault marks the western edge of an area of subsidence caused by groundwater extraction, and field measurements suggest that recent strike-slip motion has occurred on this fault as well. We attempt to determine whether this fault connects at depth with the Superstition Hills fault (SHF) to the southeast by modeling observed surface deformation between the two faults measured by InSAR. Stacked ERS (descending) InSAR data from 1992 to 2000 is initially modeled using a finite fault in an elastic half-space. Observed deformation along the SHF and Elmore Ranch fault is modeled assuming shallow (< 5 km) creep. We test various models to explain surface deformation between the two faults.

  15. Fault growth and interactions in a multiphase rift fault network: Horda Platform, Norwegian North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Oliver B.; Bell, Rebecca E.; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Gawthorpe, Rob L.; Whipp, Paul S.

    2015-11-01

    Physical models predict that multiphase rifts that experience a change in extension direction between stretching phases will typically develop non-colinear normal fault sets. Furthermore, multiphase rifts will display a greater frequency and range of styles of fault interactions than single-phase rifts. Although these physical models have yielded useful information on the evolution of fault networks in map view, the true 3D geometry of the faults and associated interactions are poorly understood. Here, we use an integrated 3D seismic reflection and borehole dataset to examine a range of fault interactions that occur in a natural multiphase fault network in the northern Horda Platform, northern North Sea. In particular we aim to: i) determine the range of styles of fault interaction that occur between non-colinear faults; ii) examine the typical geometries and throw patterns associated with each of these different styles; and iii) highlight the differences between single-phase and multiphase rift fault networks. Our study focuses on a ca. 350 km2 region around the >60 km long, N-S-striking Tusse Fault, a normal fault system that was active in the Permian-Triassic and again in the Late Jurassic-to-Early Cretaceous. The Tusse Fault is one of a series of large (>1500 m throw) N-S-striking faults forming part of the northern Horda Platform fault network, which includes numerous smaller (2-10 km long), lower throw (<100 m), predominantly NW-SE-striking faults that were only active during the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. We examine how the 2nd-stage NW-SE-striking faults grew, interacted and linked with the N-S-striking Tusse Fault, documenting a range of interaction styles including mechanical and kinematic isolation, abutment, retardation and reactivated relays. Our results demonstrate that: i) isolated, and abutting interactions are the most common fault interaction styles in the northern Horda Platform; ii) pre-existing faults can act as sites of nucleation for

  16. Inverter Ground Fault Overvoltage Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hoke, Andy; Nelson, Austin; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Chebahtah, Justin; Wang, Trudie; McCarty, Michael

    2015-08-12

    This report describes testing conducted at NREL to determine the duration and magnitude of transient overvoltages created by several commercial PV inverters during ground fault conditions. For this work, a test plan developed by the Forum on Inverter Grid Integration Issues (FIGII) has been implemented in a custom test setup at NREL. Load rejection overvoltage test results were reported previously in a separate technical report.

  17. Fault detection using genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; B. Jack, Lindsay; Nandi, Asoke K.

    2005-03-01

    Genetic programming (GP) is a stochastic process for automatically generating computer programs. GP has been applied to a variety of problems which are too wide to reasonably enumerate. As far as the authors are aware, it has rarely been used in condition monitoring (CM). In this paper, GP is used to detect faults in rotating machinery. Featuresets from two different machines are used to examine the performance of two-class normal/fault recognition. The results are compared with a few other methods for fault detection: Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been used in this field for many years, while support vector machines (SVMs) also offer successful solutions. For ANNs and SVMs, genetic algorithms have been used to do feature selection, which is an inherent function of GP. In all cases, the GP demonstrates performance which equals or betters that of the previous best performing approaches on these data sets. The training times are also found to be considerably shorter than the other approaches, whilst the generated classification rules are easy to understand and independently validate.

  18. Watching Faults Grow in Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accretionary sandbox experiments provide a rich environment for investigating the processes of fault development. These experiments engage students because 1) they enable direct observation of fault growth, which is impossible in the crust (type 1 physical model), 2) they are not only representational but can also be manipulated (type 2 physical model), 3) they can be used to test hypotheses (type 3 physical model) and 4) they resemble experiments performed by structural geology researchers around the world. The structural geology courses at UMass Amherst utilize a series of accretionary sandboxes experiments where students first watch a video of an experiment and then perform a group experiment. The experiments motivate discussions of what conditions they would change and what outcomes they would expect from these changes; hypothesis development. These discussions inevitably lead to calculations of the scaling relationships between model and crustal fault growth and provide insight into the crustal processes represented within the dry sand. Sketching of the experiments has been shown to be a very effective assessment method as the students reveal which features they are analyzing. Another approach used at UMass is to set up a forensic experiment. The experiment is set up with spatially varying basal friction before the meeting and students must figure out what the basal conditions are through the experiment. This experiment leads to discussions of equilibrium and force balance within the accretionary wedge. Displacement fields can be captured throughout the experiment using inexpensive digital image correlation techniques to foster quantitative analysis of the experiments.

  19. CONTROL AND FAULT DETECTOR CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Winningstad, C.N.

    1958-04-01

    A power control and fault detectcr circuit for a radiofrequency system is described. The operation of the circuit controls the power output of a radio- frequency power supply to automatically start the flow of energizing power to the radio-frequency power supply and to gradually increase the power to a predetermined level which is below the point where destruction occurs upon the happening of a fault. If the radio-frequency power supply output fails to increase during such period, the control does not further increase the power. On the other hand, if the output of the radio-frequency power supply properly increases, then the control continues to increase the power to a maximum value. After the maximumn value of radio-frequency output has been achieved. the control is responsive to a ''fault,'' such as a short circuit in the radio-frequency system being driven, so that the flow of power is interrupted for an interval before the cycle is repeated.

  20. SEISMIC STUDY OF THE AGUA DE PAU GEOTHERMAL PROSPECT, SAO MIGUEL, AZORES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Rodrigues da Silva, Antonio; Iyer, H.M.; Evans, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A 16 station array was operated over the 200 km**2 central portion of Sao Miguel utilizing 8 permanent Instituto Nacional de Meterologia e Geofisica stations and 8 USGS portable stations. Forty four local events with well constrained solutions and 15 regional events were located. In addition, hundreds of unlocatable seismic events were recorded. The most interesting seismic activity occurred in a swarm on September 6 and 7, 1983 when over 200 events were recorded in a 16 hour period. The seismic activity around Agua de Pau was centered on the east and northeast slopes of the volcano. The data suggest a boiling hydrothermal system beneath the Agua de Pau volcano, consistent with a variety of other data.

  1. Flood of February 1980 along the Agua Fria River, Maricopa County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomsen, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    The flood of February 20, 1980, along the Agua Fria River below Waddell Dam, Maricopa County, Ariz., was caused by heavy rains during February 13-20. The runoff filled Lake Pleasant and resulted in the largest release--66,600 cubic feet per second--from the reservoir since it was built in 1927; the maximum inflow to the reservoir was about 73,300 cubic feet per second. The area inundated by the releases includes about 28 miles along the channel from the mouth of the Agua Fria River to the Beardsley Canal flume crossing 5 miles downstream from Waddell Dam. The flood of 1980 into Lake Pleasant has a recurrence interval of about 47 years, whereas the flood of record (1919) has a recurrence interval of about 100 years. (USGS)

  2. Agua Caliente Solar Feasibility and Pre-Development Study Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Carolyn T. Stewart, Managing Partner; Red Mountain Energy Partners

    2011-04-26

    Evaluation of facility- and commercial-scale solar energy projects on the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians Reservation in Palm Springs, CA. The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) conducted a feasibility and pre-development study of potential solar projects on its lands in southern California. As described below, this study as a logical and necessary next step for ACBCI. Support for solar project development in California, provided through the statewide California Solar Initiative (CSI), its Renewable Portfolio Standard and Feed-in Tariff Program, and recently announced Reverse Auction Mechanism, provide unprecedented support and incentives that can be utilized by customers of California's investor-owned utilities. Department of Energy (DOE) Tribal Energy Program funding allowed ACBCI to complete its next logical step to implement its Strategic Energy Plan, consistent with its energy and sustainability goals.

  3. From fissure to fault: A model of fault growth in the Krafla Fissure System, NE Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramham, Emma; Paton, Douglas; Wright, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Current models of fault growth examine the relationship of fault length (L) to vertical displacement (D) where the faults exhibit the classic fault shape of gradually increasing vertical displacement from zero at the fault tips to a maximum displacement (Dmax) at the middle of the fault. These models cannot adequately explain displacement-length observations at the Krafla fissure swarm, in Iceland's northern volcanic zone, where we observe that many of the faults with significant vertical displacements still retain fissure-like features, with no vertical displacement, along portions of their lengths. We have created a high resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the Krafla region using airborne LiDAR and measured the displacement/length profiles of 775 faults, with lengths ranging from 10s to 1000s of metres. We have categorised the faults based on the proportion of the profile that was still fissure-like. Fully-developed faults (no fissure-like regions) were further grouped into those with profiles that had a flat-top geometry (i.e. significant proportion of fault length with constant throw), those with a bell-shaped throw profile and those that show regions of fault linkage. We suggest that a fault can most easily accommodate stress by displacing regions that are still fissure-like, and that a fault would be more likely to accommodate stress by linkage once it has reached the maximum displacement for its fault length. Our results demonstrate that there is a pattern of growth from fissure to fault in the Dmax/L ratio of the categorised faults and propose a model for this growth. These data better constrain our understanding of how fissures develop into faults but also provide insights into the discrepancy in D/L profiles from a typical bell-shaped distribution.

  4. Microseismicity Studies in Northern Baja California: General Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frez, J.; Acosta, J.; Gonzalez, J.; Nava, F.; Suarez, F.

    2005-12-01

    Between 1997 and 2003, we installed local seismological networks in northern Baja California with digital, three-component, Reftek instruments, and with 100-125 Hz sampling. Each local network had from 15 to 40 stations over an area approximately of 50 x 50 km2. Surveys have been carried out for the Mexicali seismic zone and the Ojos Negros region (1997), the San Miguel fault system (1998), the Pacific coast between Tijuana and Ensenada (1999), the Agua Blanca and Vallecito fault systems (2001), the Sierra Juarez fault system (2002), and other smaller areas (2001 and 2003). These detailed microseismicity surveys are complemented with seismograms and arrival times from regional networks (RESNOM and SCSN). Selected locations presented here have errors (formal errors from HYPO71) less than 1 km. Phase reading errors are estimated at less than or about 0.03 s. Most of the activity is located between mapped fault traces, along alignments which do not follow the fault traces, and where tectonic alignments intersect. The results suggests an orthogonal pattern at various scales. Depth distributions generally have two maxima, one secondary maximum, at about 5 km; the other, located at 12-17 km. The Agua Blanca fault is essentially inactive for earthquakes with ML > 1.7. Most focal mechanisms are strike-slip with a minor normal component; the others are dominantly normal; the resulting pattern indicates a regional extensional regime for all the regions with an average NS azimuth for the P-axes. Fracture directions, obtained from directivity measurements, show orthogonal directions, one of which approximately coincides with the azimuth of mapped fault traces. These results indicate that the Pacific-North American interplate motion is not being entirely accommodated by the NW trending faults, but rather is creating a complex system of conjugate faults.

  5. Building the GEM Faulted Earth database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litchfield, N. J.; Berryman, K. R.; Christophersen, A.; Thomas, R. F.; Wyss, B.; Tarter, J.; Pagani, M.; Stein, R. S.; Costa, C. H.; Sieh, K. E.

    2011-12-01

    The GEM Faulted Earth project is aiming to build a global active fault and seismic source database with a common set of strategies, standards, and formats, to be placed in the public domain. Faulted Earth is one of five hazard global components of the Global Earthquake Model (GEM) project. A key early phase of the GEM Faulted Earth project is to build a database which is flexible enough to capture existing and variable (e.g., from slow interplate faults to fast subduction interfaces) global data, and yet is not too onerous to enter new data from areas where existing databases are not available. The purpose of this talk is to give an update on progress building the GEM Faulted Earth database. The database design conceptually has two layers, (1) active faults and folds, and (2) fault sources, and automated processes are being defined to generate fault sources. These include the calculation of moment magnitude using a user-selected magnitude-length or magnitude-area scaling relation, and the calculation of recurrence interval from displacement divided by slip rate, where displacement is calculated from moment and moment magnitude. The fault-based earthquake sources defined by the Faulted Earth project will then be rationalised with those defined by the other GEM global components. A web based tool is being developed for entering individual faults and folds, and fault sources, and includes capture of additional information collected at individual sites, as well as descriptions of the data sources. GIS shapefiles of individual faults and folds, and fault sources will also be able to be uploaded. A data dictionary explaining the database design rationale, definitions of the attributes and formats, and a tool user guide is also being developed. Existing national databases will be uploaded outside of the fault compilation tool, through a process of mapping common attributes between the databases. Regional workshops are planned for compilation in areas where existing

  6. Fault tolerant operation of switched reluctance machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    The energy crisis and environmental challenges have driven industry towards more energy efficient solutions. With nearly 60% of electricity consumed by various electric machines in industry sector, advancement in the efficiency of the electric drive system is of vital importance. Adjustable speed drive system (ASDS) provides excellent speed regulation and dynamic performance as well as dramatically improved system efficiency compared with conventional motors without electronics drives. Industry has witnessed tremendous grow in ASDS applications not only as a driving force but also as an electric auxiliary system for replacing bulky and low efficiency auxiliary hydraulic and mechanical systems. With the vast penetration of ASDS, its fault tolerant operation capability is more widely recognized as an important feature of drive performance especially for aerospace, automotive applications and other industrial drive applications demanding high reliability. The Switched Reluctance Machine (SRM), a low cost, highly reliable electric machine with fault tolerant operation capability, has drawn substantial attention in the past three decades. Nevertheless, SRM is not free of fault. Certain faults such as converter faults, sensor faults, winding shorts, eccentricity and position sensor faults are commonly shared among all ASDS. In this dissertation, a thorough understanding of various faults and their influence on transient and steady state performance of SRM is developed via simulation and experimental study, providing necessary knowledge for fault detection and post fault management. Lumped parameter models are established for fast real time simulation and drive control. Based on the behavior of the faults, a fault detection scheme is developed for the purpose of fast and reliable fault diagnosis. In order to improve the SRM power and torque capacity under faults, the maximum torque per ampere excitation are conceptualized and validated through theoretical analysis and

  7. Hydrologic characteristics of the Agua Fria National Monument, central Arizona, determined from the reconnaissance study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, John B.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrologic conditions in the newly created Agua Fria National Monument were characterized on the basis of existing hydrologic and geologic information, and streamflow data collected in May 2002. The study results are intended to support the Bureau of Land Management's future water-resource management responsibilities, including quantification of a Federal reserved water right within the monument. This report presents the study results, identifies data deficiencies, and describes specific approaches for consideration in future studies. Within the Agua Fria National Monument, the Agua Fria River flows generally from north to south, traversing almost the entire 23-mile length of the monument. Streamflow has been measured continuously at a site near the northern boundary of the monument since 1940. Streamflow statistics for this site, and streamflow measurements from other sites along the Agua Fria River, indicate that the river is perennial in the northern part of the monument but generally is intermittent in downstream reaches. The principal controls on streamflow along the river within the monument appear to be geology, the occurrence and distribution of alluvium, inflow at the northern boundary and from tributary canyons, precipitation, and evapotranspiration. At present, (2004) there is no consistent surface-water quality monitoring program being implemented for the monument. Ground-water recharge within the monument likely results from surface-water losses and direct infiltration of precipitation. Wells are most numerous in the Cordes Junction and Black Canyon City areas. Only eight wells are within the monument. Ground-water quality data for wells in the monument area consist of specific-conductance values and fluoride concentrations. During the study, ground-water quality data were available for only one well within the monument. No ground-water monitoring program is currently in place for the monument or surrounding areas.

  8. A Log-Scaling Fault Tolerant Agreement Algorithm for a Fault Tolerant MPI

    SciTech Connect

    Hursey, Joshua J; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Vallee, Geoffroy R; Graham, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    The lack of fault tolerance is becoming a limiting factor for application scalability in HPC systems. The MPI does not provide standardized fault tolerance interfaces and semantics. The MPI Forum's Fault Tolerance Working Group is proposing a collective fault tolerant agreement algorithm for the next MPI standard. Such algorithms play a central role in many fault tolerant applications. This paper combines a log-scaling two-phase commit agreement algorithm with a reduction operation to provide the necessary functionality for the new collective without any additional messages. Error handling mechanisms are described that preserve the fault tolerance properties while maintaining overall scalability.

  9. West Coast Tsunami: Cascadia's Fault?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Bernard, E. N.; Titov, V.

    2013-12-01

    The tragedies of 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Japan tsunamis exposed the limits of our knowledge in preparing for devastating tsunamis. The 1,100-km coastline of the Pacific coast of North America has tectonic and geological settings similar to Sumatra and Japan. The geological records unambiguously show that the Cascadia fault had caused devastating tsunamis in the past and this geological process will cause tsunamis in the future. Hypotheses of the rupture process of Cascadia fault include a long rupture (M9.1) along the entire fault line, short ruptures (M8.8 - M9.1) nucleating only a segment of the coastline, or a series of lesser events of M8+. Recent studies also indicate an increasing probability of small rupture occurring at the south end of the Cascadia fault. Some of these hypotheses were implemented in the development of tsunami evacuation maps in Washington and Oregon. However, the developed maps do not reflect the tsunami impact caused by the most recent updates regarding the Cascadia fault rupture process. The most recent study by Wang et al. (2013) suggests a rupture pattern of high- slip patches separated by low-slip areas constrained by estimates of coseismic subsidence based on microfossil analyses. Since this study infers that a Tokohu-type of earthquake could strike in the Cascadia subduction zone, how would such an tsunami affect the tsunami hazard assessment and planning along the Pacific Coast of North America? The rapid development of computing technology allowed us to look into the tsunami impact caused by above hypotheses using high-resolution models with large coverage of Pacific Northwest. With the slab model of MaCrory et al. (2012) (as part of the USGS slab 1.0 model) for the Cascadia earthquake, we tested the above hypotheses to assess the tsunami hazards along the entire U.S. West Coast. The modeled results indicate these hypothetical scenarios may cause runup heights very similar to those observed along Japan's coastline during the 2011

  10. Learning and diagnosing faults using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Bruce A.; Kiech, Earl L.; Ali, Moonis

    1990-01-01

    Neural networks have been employed for learning fault behavior from rocket engine simulator parameters and for diagnosing faults on the basis of the learned behavior. Two problems in applying neural networks to learning and diagnosing faults are (1) the complexity of the sensor data to fault mapping to be modeled by the neural network, which implies difficult and lengthy training procedures; and (2) the lack of sufficient training data to adequately represent the very large number of different types of faults which might occur. Methods are derived and tested in an architecture which addresses these two problems. First, the sensor data to fault mapping is decomposed into three simpler mappings which perform sensor data compression, hypothesis generation, and sensor fusion. Efficient training is performed for each mapping separately. Secondly, the neural network which performs sensor fusion is structured to detect new unknown faults for which training examples were not presented during training. These methods were tested on a task of fault diagnosis by employing rocket engine simulator data. Results indicate that the decomposed neural network architecture can be trained efficiently, can identify faults for which it has been trained, and can detect the occurrence of faults for which it has not been trained.

  11. Early weakening processes inside thrust fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, B.; Tesei, T.; Oliot, E.; Lahfid, A.; Collettini, C.

    2015-07-01

    Observations from deep boreholes at several locations worldwide, laboratory measurements of frictional strength on quartzo-feldspathic materials, and earthquake focal mechanisms indicate that crustal faults are strong (apparent friction μ ≥ 0.6). However, friction experiments on phyllosilicate-rich rocks and some geophysical data have demonstrated that some major faults are considerably weaker. This weakness is commonly considered to be characteristic of mature faults in which rocks are altered by prolonged deformation and fluid-rock interaction (i.e., San Andreas, Zuccale, and Nankai Faults). In contrast, in this study we document fault weakening occurring along a marly shear zone in its infancy (<30 m displacement). Geochemical mass balance calculation and microstructural data show that a massive calcite departure (up to 50 vol %) from the fault rocks facilitated the concentration and reorganization of weak phyllosilicate minerals along the shear surfaces. Friction experiments carried out on intact foliated samples of host marls and fault rocks demonstrated that this structural reorganization lead to a significant fault weakening and that the incipient structure has strength and slip behavior comparable to that of the major weak faults previously documented. These results indicate that some faults, especially those nucleating in lithologies rich of both clays and high-solubility minerals (such as calcite), might experience rapid mineralogical and structural alteration and become weak even in the early stages of their activity.

  12. A Quaternary Fault Database for Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, S.; Ehlers, T. A.; Bendick, R.; Stübner, K.; Strube, T.

    2015-09-01

    Earthquakes represent the highest risk in terms of potential loss of lives and economic damage for Central Asian countries. Knowledge of fault location and behavior is essential in calculating and mapping seismic hazard. Previous efforts in compiling fault information for Central Asia have generated a large amount of data that are published in limited-access journals with no digital maps publicly available, or are limited in their description of important fault parameters such as slip rates. This study builds on previous work by improving access to fault information through a web-based interactive map and an online database with search capabilities that allow users to organize data by different fields. The data presented in this compilation include fault location, its geographic, seismic and structural characteristics, short descriptions, narrative comments and references to peer-reviewed publications. The interactive map displays 1196 fault segments and 34 000 earthquake locations on a shaded-relief map. The online database contains attributes for 122 faults mentioned in the literature, with Quaternary and geodetic slip rates reported for 38 and 26 faults respectively, and earthquake history reported for 39 faults. This work has implications for seismic hazard studies in Central Asia as it summarizes important fault parameters, and can reduce earthquake risk by enhancing public access to information. It also allows scientists and hazard assessment teams to identify structures and regions where data gaps exist and future investigations are needed.

  13. Determining Fault Orientation with Sagnac Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruenwald, Konstantin; Dunn, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Typically, earthquake fault ruptures emit seismic waves in directions dependent on the fault's orientation. Specifically, as the fault slips to release strain, compressional P-waves propagate parallel and perpendicular to the fault plane, and transverse S-waves propagate at 45 degree angles to the fault-a result of the double-couple model of fault slippage. Sagnac Interferometers (ring-lasers) have been used to study wave components of several natural phenomena. We used the initial responses of a ring-laser from transverse S-waves to determine the orientation of the nearby Guy/Greenbrier fault, the source of an earthquake swarm in 2010-11 purportedly caused by hydraulic fracturing. This orientation was compared to the structure of the fault extracted by nearby seismogram responses. Our goal was to determine if ring-lasers could reinforce or add to the models of fault orientation constructed from seismographs. The results indicate that the ring-laser's responses can aid in constructing fault orientation in a manner similar to traditional seismographs. Funded by the Arkansas Space Grant Consortium and the National Science Foundation.

  14. Perspective View, San Andreas Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is the San Andreas Fault in an image created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. This segment of the fault lies west of the city of Palmdale, California, about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) northwest of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. This area is at the junction of two large mountain ranges, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains on the right. Quail Lake Reservoir sits in the topographic depression created by past movement along the fault. Interstate 5 is the prominent linear feature starting at the left edge of the image and continuing into the fault zone, passing eventually over Tejon Pass into the Central Valley, visible at the upper left.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994

  15. Off-fault tip splay networks: A genetic and generic property of faults indicative of their long-term propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Clément; Manighetti, Isabelle; Gaudemer, Yves

    2016-01-01

    We use fault maps and fault propagation evidences available in the literature to examine geometrical relations between parent faults and off-fault splays. The population includes 47 worldwide crustal faults with lengths from millimetres to thousands of kilometres and of different slip modes. We show that fault splays form adjacent to any propagating fault tip, whereas they are absent at non-propagating fault ends. Independent of fault length, slip mode, context, etc., tip splay networks have a similar fan shape widening in direction of long-term propagation, a similar relative length and width (∼ 30 and ∼ 10% of parent fault length, respectively), and a similar range of mean angles to parent fault (10-20°). We infer that tip splay networks are a genetic and a generic property of faults indicative of their long-term propagation. Their generic geometrical properties suggest they result from generic off-fault stress distribution at propagating fault ends.

  16. A record of uranium-series transport at Nopal I, Sierra Pena Blanca, Mexico: Implications for natural uranium deposits and radioactive waste repositories

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Denton, J. S.; Goldstein, S. J.; Paviet, P.; Nunn, A. J.; Amato, R. S.; Hinrichs, K. A.

    2016-09-15

    Studies of uranium-series (U-series) disequilibria within and around ore deposits provide valuable information on the extent and timing of actinide mobility, via mineral-fluid interaction, over a range of spatial and temporal scales. Such information is useful in studies of analogs of high-level nuclear-waste repositories, as well as for mining and mineral extraction sites, locations of previous nuclear weapons testing, and legacy nuclear waste contamination. In this study we present isotope dilution mass spectrometry U-series measurements for fracture-fill materials (hematite, goethite, kaolinite, calcite, dolomite and quartz) from one such analog; the Nopal I uranium ore deposit situated at Peña Blanca inmore » the Chihuahua region of northern Mexico. The ore deposit is located in fractured, unsaturated volcanic tuff and fracture-fill materials from surface fractures as well as fractures in a vertical drill core have been analyzed. High uranium concentrations in the fracture-fill materials (between 12 and 7700 ppm) indicate uranium mobility and transport from the deposit. Furthermore, uranium concentrations generally decrease with horizontal distance away from the deposit but in this deposit there is no trend with depth below the surface.« less

  17. The NS3 protein of Rice hoja blanca tenuivirus suppresses RNA silencing in plant and insect hosts by efficiently binding both siRNAs and miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hemmes, Hans; Lakatos, Lóránt; Goldbach, Rob; Burgyán, József; Prins, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    RNA silencing plays a key role in antiviral defense as well as in developmental processes in plants and insects. Negative strand RNA viruses such as the plant virus Rice hoja blanca tenuivirus (RHBV) replicate in plants and in their insect transmission vector. Like most plant-infecting viruses, RHBV encodes an RNA silencing suppressor, the NS3 protein, and here it is demonstrated that this protein is capable of suppressing RNA silencing in both plants and insect cells. Biochemical analyses showed that NS3 efficiently binds siRNA as well as miRNA molecules. Binding of NS3 is greatly influenced by the size of small RNA molecules, as 21 nucleotide (nt) siRNA molecules are bound > 100 times more efficiently than 26 nt species. Competition assays suggest that the activity of NS3 is based on binding to siRNAs prior to strand separation during the assembly of the RNA-induced silencing complex. In addition, NS3 has a high affinity for miRNA/miRNA* duplexes, indicating that its activity might also interfere with miRNA-regulated gene expression in both insects and plants. PMID:17513697

  18. Land cover changes in tidal salt marshes of the Bahía Blanca estuary (Argentina) during the past 40 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratolongo, Paula; Mazzon, Carla; Zapperi, Georgina; Piovan, María Julia; Brinson, Mark M.

    2013-11-01

    The present work describes land cover changes in the inner section of Canal Principal, in the Bahía Blanca estuary. The study area is subjected to a rising relative sea level, large interanual variations in rainfall, and recent changes human in land use. We used historical aerial photographs, high resolution satellite images, and GIS to quantify changes in land cover for the years 1967, 1996, and 2005. The replacement of Sarcocornia perennis marshes and halophytic shrub-like steppes by mudflats is a recurring pattern through the area. We estimated a total loss to mudflats of 33 and 6% of the area of marshes and steppes, respectively, and it may reflect increased erosion of relict Holocene coastal terraces in response to a rising sea level. Human activities have played a significant role in reshaping coastal landscape, particularly in the harbor area. Fifty percent of the area originally covered by shrub-like steppes and 33% of the Sarcocornia perennis marshes were replaced by human land uses. Major changes correspond to dredged spoil deposition and landfilling. One of the most striking changes observed is the increase of the area covered by Spartina alterniflora marshes. This type of replacement suggests the occurrence of depositional environments that, at least locally, allow bed elevation and vegetation growth. In the harbor area, an enhanced sedimentation may result from maintenance dredging. At the mouth of Maldonado channel, sediment deposition may occur during extraordinary heavy rainfall associated to El Niño.

  19. Paleomagnetic Data From the Rinconada Fault in Central California: Evidence for Off-fault Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, S.; Titus, S.; McGuire, Z.; Housen, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Rinconada fault is one of three major sub-parallel faults of the San Andreas fault system in central California. The fault has 18 km of dextral displacement since the Pliocene and up to 60 km of total displacement for the Tertiary. A fold and thrust best is well developed in Miocene and younger sedimentary rocks on either side of the Rinconada fault. We sampled ~150 sites from the Miocene Monterey Formation within this fold and thrust belt, a unit that is often used in regional paleomagnetic studies. The sites were located within 15 km of the fault trace along a segment of the Rinconada fault that stretches from Greenfield to Paso Robles. Because this unit was deposited while the San Andreas fault system was active at this latitude, any deformation recorded by these rocks is related to plate boundary deformation. Unlike the large (>90°) rotations observed in the Transverse Ranges to the south, vertical axis rotations adjacent to the Rinconada fault are smaller (<15°) and vary with distance from the fault as well as along strike. Thus, the model for rotations from the Transverse Ranges, where large fault-bound panels rotate within a system of conjugate strike-slip faults, does not apply for this region in central California. Instead, we believe rotations occur in small fault blocks and the magnitude of rotation may be affected by local parameters such as fault geometries, specific rock types, and structural complexities. One implication of these vertical axis rotations adjacent to the Riconada fault is that off-fault regions are accommodating some of the fault-parallel plate motion. This is important for our understanding of the partitioning of plate boundary deformation in California.

  20. Fault geometries in basement-induced wrench faulting under different initial stress states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, M. A.; Mandl, G.; Supesteijn, C. H. K.

    Scaled sandbox experiments were used to generate models for relative ages, dip, strike and three-dimensional shape of faults in basement-controlled wrench faulting. The basic fault sequence runs from early en échelon Riedel shears and splay faults through 'lower-angle' shears to P shears. The Riedel shears are concave upwards and define a tulip structure in cross-section. In three dimensions, each Riedel shear has a helicoidal form. The sequence of faults and three-dimensional geometry are rationalized in terms of the prevailing stress field and Coulomb-Mohr theory of shear failure. The stress state in the sedimentary overburden before wrenching begins has a substantial influence on the fault geometries and on the final complexity of the fault zone. With the maximum compressive stress (∂ 1) initially parallel to the basement fault (transtension), Riedel shears are only slightly en échelon, sub-parallel to the basement fault, steeply dipping with a reduced helicoidal aspect. Conversely, with ∂ 1 initially perpendicular to the basement fault (transpression), Riedel shears are strongly oblique to the basement fault strike, have lower dips and an exaggerated helicoidal form; the final fault zone is both wide and complex. We find good agreement between the models and both mechanical theory and natural examples of wrench faulting.

  1. Geometrical effects of fault bends on fault frictional and mechanical behavior: insights from Distinct Element simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Y.; Morgan, J.

    2006-12-01

    Strike slip and transform faults often consist of nonlinear segments, i.e., restraining bends and releasing bends that have significant impacts on stress pattern, strain accumulation, slip rate, and therefore the variation of seismicity along these faults. In order to study the geometrical effects of nonlinear faults on fault frictional and mechanical behavior during fault loading and slip, we simulate the rupture process of faults with bends using the Distinct Element Method (DEM) in 2-dimensions. Breakable elastic bonds were added between adjacent, closely packed circular particles to generate fault blocks. A nonlinear fault surface with a restraining bend and a releasing bend that are symmetrically distributed was defined in the middle of the fault blocks. Deformation was introduced by pulling a spring attached on one of fault zone boundaries at a constant velocity and keeping another boundary fixed, producing compression and contraction along the restraining bend, and tension and dilation along the releasing bend. Significant strain is accommodated adjacent to the restraining bend by formation of secondary faults and slip along them. The slip rates, fault frictional strengths, and rupture processes are affected by multiple parameters, including bond strength, loading velocity, bend angle and amplitude. Among these parameters, bend geometry plays a more important role in determining spatial and temporal distribution of contact slip and failure of our simulated nonlinear faults.

  2. Seismicity and fault geometry of the San Andreas fault around Parkfield, California and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woohan; Hong, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Junhyung; Taira, Taka'aki

    2016-05-01

    Fault geometry is a consequence of tectonic evolution, and it provides important information on potential seismic hazards. We investigated fault geometry and its properties in Parkfield, California on the basis of local seismicity and seismic velocity residuals refined by an adaptive-velocity hypocentral-parameter inversion method. The station correction terms from the hypocentral-parameter inversion present characteristic seismic velocity changes around the fault, suggesting low seismic velocities in the region east of the fault and high seismic velocities in the region to the west. Large seismic velocity anomalies are observed at shallow depths along the whole fault zone. At depths of 3-8 km, seismic velocity anomalies are small in the central fault zone, but are large in the northern and southern fault zones. At depths > 8 km, low seismic velocities are observed in the northern fault zone. High seismicity is observed in the Southwest Fracture Zone, which has developed beside the creeping segment of the San Andreas fault. The vertical distribution of seismicity suggests that the fault has spiral geometry, dipping NE in the northern region, nearly vertical in the central region, and SW in the southern region. The rapid twisting of the fault plane occurs in a short distance of approximately 50 km. The seismic velocity anomalies and fault geometry suggest location-dependent piecewise faulting, which may cause the periodic M6 events in the Parkfield region.

  3. Surface faulting along the Superstition Hills fault zone and nearby faults associated with the earthquakes of 24 November 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, R.V.

    1989-01-01

    The M6.2 Elmore Desert Ranch earthquake of 24 November 1987 was associated spatially and probably temporally with left-lateral surface rupture on many northeast-trending faults in and near the Superstition Hills in western Imperial Valley. Three curving discontinuous principal zones of rupture among these breaks extended northeastward from near the Superstition Hills fault zone as far as 9km; the maximum observed surface slip, 12.5cm, was on the northern of the three, the Elmore Ranch fault, at a point near the epicenter. Twelve hours after the Elmore Ranch earthquake, the M6.6 Superstition Hills earthquake occurred near the northwest end of the right-lateral Superstition Hills fault zone. We measured displacements over 339 days at as many as 296 sites along the Superstition Hills fault zone, and repeated measurements at 49 sites provided sufficient data to fit with a simple power law. The overall distributions of right-lateral displacement at 1 day and the estimated final slip are nearly symmetrical about the midpoint of the surface rupture. The average estimated final right-lateral slip for the Superstition Hills fault zone is ~54cm. The average left-lateral slip for the conjugate faults trending northeastward is ~23cm. The southernmost ruptured member of the Superstition Hills fault zone, newly named the Wienert fault, extends the known length of the zone by about 4km. -from Authors

  4. Software reliability through fault-avoidance and fault-tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vouk, Mladen A.; Mcallister, David F.

    1990-01-01

    The use of back-to-back, or comparison, testing for regression test or porting is examined. The efficiency and the cost of the strategy is compared with manual and table-driven single version testing. Some of the key parameters that influence the efficiency and the cost of the approach are the failure identification effort during single version program testing, the extent of implemented changes, the nature of the regression test data (e.g., random), and the nature of the inter-version failure correlation and fault-masking. The advantages and disadvantages of the technique are discussed, together with some suggestions concerning its practical use.

  5. Networking of Near Fault Observatories in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogfjörd, Kristín; Bernard, Pascal; Chiraluce, Lauro; Fäh, Donat; Festa, Gaetano; Zulficar, Can

    2014-05-01

    Networking of six European near-fault observatories (NFO) was established In the FP7 infrastructure project NERA (Network of European Research Infrastructures for Earthquake Risk Assessment and Mitigation). This networking has included sharing of expertise and know-how among the observatories, distribution of analysis tools and access to data. The focus of the NFOs is on research into the active processes of their respective fault zones through acquisition and analysis of multidisciplinary data. These studies include the role of fluids in fault initiation, site effects, derived processes such as earthquake generated tsunamis and landslides, mapping the internal structure of fault systems and development of automatic early warning systems. The six fault zones are in different tectonic regimes: The South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) in Iceland, the Marmara Sea in Turkey and the Corinth Rift in Greece are at plate boundaries, with strike-slip faulting characterizing the SISZ and the Marmara Sea, while normal faulting dominates in the Corinth Rift. The Alto Tiberina and Irpinia faults, dominated by low- and medium-angle normal faulting, respectively are in the Apennine mountain range in Italy and the Valais Region, characterized by both strike-slip and normal faulting is located in the Swiss Alps. The fault structures range from well-developed long faults, such as in the Marmara Sea, to more complex networks of smaller, book-shelf faults such as in the SISZ. Earthquake hazard in the fault zones ranges from significant to substantial. The Marmara Sea and Corinth rift are under ocean causing additional tsunami hazard and steep slopes and sediment-filled valleys in the Valais give rise to hazards from landslides and liquefaction. Induced seismicity has repeatedly occurred in connection with geothermal drilling and water injection in the SISZ and active volcanoes flanking the SISZ also give rise to volcanic hazard due to volcano-tectonic interaction. Organization among the

  6. Performance Analysis on Fault Tolerant Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Belcastro, Christine

    2005-01-01

    In a fault tolerant control (FTC) system, a parameter varying FTC law is reconfigured based on fault parameters estimated by fault detection and isolation (FDI) modules. FDI modules require some time to detect fault occurrences in aero-vehicle dynamics. In this paper, an FTC analysis framework is provided to calculate the upper bound of an induced-L(sub 2) norm of an FTC system with existence of false identification and detection time delay. The upper bound is written as a function of a fault detection time and exponential decay rates and has been used to determine which FTC law produces less performance degradation (tracking error) due to false identification. The analysis framework is applied for an FTC system of a HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) vehicle. Index Terms fault tolerant control system, linear parameter varying system, HiMAT vehicle.

  7. Fault-tolerant dynamic task graph scheduling

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt, Mehmet C.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Agrawal, Kunal; Agrawal, Gagan

    2014-11-16

    In this paper, we present an approach to fault tolerant execution of dynamic task graphs scheduled using work stealing. In particular, we focus on selective and localized recovery of tasks in the presence of soft faults. We elicit from the user the basic task graph structure in terms of successor and predecessor relationships. The work stealing-based algorithm to schedule such a task graph is augmented to enable recovery when the data and meta-data associated with a task get corrupted. We use this redundancy, and the knowledge of the task graph structure, to selectively recover from faults with low space and time overheads. We show that the fault tolerant design retains the essential properties of the underlying work stealing-based task scheduling algorithm, and that the fault tolerant execution is asymptotically optimal when task re-execution is taken into account. Experimental evaluation demonstrates the low cost of recovery under various fault scenarios.

  8. Probable origin of the Livingston Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, Watson H.

    1991-09-01

    Most faulting in the Coastal Plain is high angle and generally normal, but the faults in the Livingston Fault Zone are all medium-angle reverse, forming a series of parallel horsts and grabens. Parallel to the fault zone are a number of phenomena all leading to the conclusion that the faults result from the solution of a late Cretaceous salt anticline by fresh groundwater, which then migrated up to the Eutaw and perhaps Tuscaloosa aquifers, causing an anomalous elongated area of highly saline water. The origin of the Livingston Fault Zone and the association of salt water in underlying aquifers is of particular importance at this time in relation to environmental concerns associated with hazardous waste management in the area.

  9. Holocene fault scarps near Tacoma, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, B.L.; Brocher, T.M.; Weaver, C.S.; Bucknam, R.C.; Blakely, R.J.; Kelsey, H.M.; Nelson, A.R.; Haugerud, R.

    2004-01-01

    Airborne laser mapping confirms that Holocene active faults traverse the Puget Sound metropolitan area, northwestern continental United States. The mapping, which detects forest-floor relief of as little as 15 cm, reveals scarps along geophysical lineaments that separate areas of Holocene uplift and subsidence. Along one such line of scarps, we found that a fault warped the ground surface between A.D. 770 and 1160. This reverse fault, which projects through Tacoma, Washington, bounds the southern and western sides of the Seattle uplift. The northern flank of the Seattle uplift is bounded by a reverse fault beneath Seattle that broke in A.D. 900-930. Observations of tectonic scarps along the Tacoma fault demonstrate that active faulting with associated surface rupture and ground motions pose a significant hazard in the Puget Sound region.

  10. A new intelligent hierarchical fault diagnosis system

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.C.; Huang, C.L.; Yang, H.T.

    1997-02-01

    As a part of a substation-level decision support system, a new intelligent Hierarchical Fault Diagnosis System for on-line fault diagnosis is presented in this paper. The proposed diagnosis system divides the fault diagnosis process into two phases. Using time-stamped information of relays and breakers, phase 1 identifies the possible fault sections through the Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH) networks, and phase 2 recognizes the types and detailed situations of the faults identified in phase 1 by using a fast bit-operation logical inference mechanism. The diagnosis system has been practically verified by testing on a typical Taiwan power secondary transmission system. Test results show that rapid and accurate diagnosis can be obtained with flexibility and portability for fault diagnosis purpose of diverse substations.

  11. The fault-tolerant multiprocessor computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T. B., III (Editor); Lala, J. H. (Editor); Goldberg, J. (Editor); Kautz, W. H. (Editor); Melliar-Smith, P. M. (Editor); Green, M. W. (Editor); Levitt, K. N. (Editor); Schwartz, R. L. (Editor); Weinstock, C. B. (Editor); Palumbo, D. L. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The development and evaluation of fault-tolerant computer architectures and software-implemented fault tolerance (SIFT) for use in advanced NASA vehicles and potentially in flight-control systems are described in a collection of previously published reports prepared for NASA. Topics addressed include the principles of fault-tolerant multiprocessor (FTMP) operation; processor and slave regional designs; FTMP executive, facilities, acceptance-test/diagnostic, applications, and support software; FTM reliability and availability models; SIFT hardware design; and SIFT validation and verification.

  12. Hydrogen Embrittlement And Stacking-Fault Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, R. A.; Johnson, M. H.; Davis, J. H.; Oh, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Embrittlement in Ni/Cu alloys appears related to stacking-fault porbabilities. Report describes attempt to show a correlation between stacking-fault energy of different Ni/Cu alloys and susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Correlation could lead to more fundamental understanding and method of predicting susceptibility of given Ni/Cu alloy form stacking-fault energies calculated from X-ray diffraction measurements.

  13. Fault system polarity: A matter of chance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöpfer, Martin; Childs, Conrad; Manzocchi, Tom; Walsh, John; Nicol, Andy; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Many normal fault systems and, on a smaller scale, fracture boudinage exhibit asymmetry so that one fault dip direction dominates. The fraction of throw (or heave) accommodated by faults with the same dip direction in relation to the total fault system throw (or heave) is a quantitative measure of fault system asymmetry and termed 'polarity'. It is a common belief that the formation of domino and shear band boudinage with a monoclinic symmetry requires a component of layer parallel shearing, whereas torn boudins reflect coaxial flow. Moreover, domains of parallel faults are frequently used to infer the presence of a common décollement. Here we show, using Distinct Element Method (DEM) models in which rock is represented by an assemblage of bonded circular particles, that asymmetric fault systems can emerge under symmetric boundary conditions. The pre-requisite for the development of domains of parallel faults is however that the medium surrounding the brittle layer has a very low strength. We demonstrate that, if the 'competence' contrast between the brittle layer and the surrounding material ('jacket', or 'matrix') is high, the fault dip directions and hence fault system polarity can be explained using a random process. The results imply that domains of parallel faults are, for the conditions and properties used in our models, in fact a matter of chance. Our models suggest that domino and shear band boudinage can be an unreliable shear-sense indicator. Moreover, the presence of a décollement should not be inferred on the basis of a domain of parallel faults only.

  14. 31 CFR 29.522 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fault. 29.522 Section 29.522 Money... Overpayments § 29.522 Fault. (a) General rule. A debtor is considered to be at fault if he or she, or any other... requirement. (3) The following factors may affect the decision as to whether the debtor is or is not at...

  15. 31 CFR 29.522 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fault. 29.522 Section 29.522 Money... Overpayments § 29.522 Fault. (a) General rule. A debtor is considered to be at fault if he or she, or any other... requirement. (3) The following factors may affect the decision as to whether the debtor is or is not at...

  16. 31 CFR 29.522 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fault. 29.522 Section 29.522 Money... Overpayments § 29.522 Fault. (a) General rule. A debtor is considered to be at fault if he or she, or any other... requirement. (3) The following factors may affect the decision as to whether the debtor is or is not at...

  17. 31 CFR 29.522 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fault. 29.522 Section 29.522 Money... Overpayments § 29.522 Fault. (a) General rule. A debtor is considered to be at fault if he or she, or any other... requirement. (3) The following factors may affect the decision as to whether the debtor is or is not at...

  18. 31 CFR 29.522 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fault. 29.522 Section 29.522 Money... Overpayments § 29.522 Fault. (a) General rule. A debtor is considered to be at fault if he or she, or any other... requirement. (3) The following factors may affect the decision as to whether the debtor is or is not at...

  19. Diagnosing process faults using neural network models

    SciTech Connect

    Buescher, K.L.; Jones, R.D.; Messina, M.J.

    1993-11-01

    In order to be of use for realistic problems, a fault diagnosis method should have the following three features. First, it should apply to nonlinear processes. Second, it should not rely on extensive amounts of data regarding previous faults. Lastly, it should detect faults promptly. The authors present such a scheme for static (i.e., non-dynamic) systems. It involves using a neural network to create an associative memory whose fixed points represent the normal behavior of the system.

  20. Fault Zone Guided Wave generation on the locked, late interseismic Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eccles, J. D.; Gulley, A. K.; Malin, P. E.; Boese, C. M.; Townend, J.; Sutherland, R.

    2015-07-01

    Fault Zone Guided Waves (FZGWs) have been observed for the first time within New Zealand's transpressional continental plate boundary, the Alpine Fault, which is late in its typical seismic cycle. Ongoing study of these phases provides the opportunity to monitor interseismic conditions in the fault zone. Distinctive dispersive seismic codas (~7-35 Hz) have been recorded on shallow borehole seismometers installed within 20 m of the principal slip zone. Near the central Alpine Fault, known for low background seismicity, FZGW-generating microseismic events are located beyond the catchment-scale partitioning of the fault indicating lateral connectivity of the low-velocity zone immediately below the near-surface segmentation. Initial modeling of the low-velocity zone indicates a waveguide width of 60-200 m with a 10-40% reduction in S wave velocity, similar to that inferred for the fault core of other mature plate boundary faults such as the San Andreas and North Anatolian Faults.

  1. Focused fault injection testing of software implemented fault tolerance mechanisms of Voltan TMR nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, S.; Ezhilchelvan, P. D.; Shrivastava, S. K.

    1995-03-01

    One way of gaining confidence in the adequacy of fault tolerance mechanisms of a system is to test the system by injecting faults and see how the system performs under faulty conditions. This paper presents an application of the focused fault injection method that has been developed for testing software implemented fault tolerance mechanisms of distributed systems. The method exploits the object oriented approach of software implementation to support the injection of specific classes of faults. With the focused fault injection method, the system tester is able to inject specific classes of faults (including malicious ones) such that the fault tolerance mechanisms of a target system can be tested adequately. The method has been applied to test the design and implementation of voting, clock synchronization, and ordering modules of the Voltan TMR (triple modular redundant) node. The tests performed uncovered three flaws in the system software.

  2. Identifiability of Additive Actuator and Sensor Faults by State Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Upchurch, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    A class of fault detection and identification (FDI) methods for bias-type actuator and sensor faults is explored in detail from the point of view of fault identifiability. The methods use state augmentation along with banks of Kalman-Bucy filters for fault detection, fault pattern determination, and fault value estimation. A complete characterization of conditions for identifiability of bias-type actuator faults, sensor faults, and simultaneous actuator and sensor faults is presented. It is shown that FDI of simultaneous actuator and sensor faults is not possible using these methods when all sensors have unknown biases. The fault identifiability conditions are demonstrated via numerical examples. The analytical and numerical results indicate that caution must be exercised to ensure fault identifiability for different fault patterns when using such methods.

  3. Distributed bearing fault diagnosis based on vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolenc, Boštjan; Boškoski, Pavle; Juričić, Đani

    2016-01-01

    Distributed bearing faults appear under various circumstances, for example due to electroerosion or the progression of localized faults. Bearings with distributed faults tend to generate more complex vibration patterns than those with localized faults. Despite the frequent occurrence of such faults, their diagnosis has attracted limited attention. This paper examines a method for the diagnosis of distributed bearing faults employing vibration analysis. The vibrational patterns generated are modeled by incorporating the geometrical imperfections of the bearing components. Comparing envelope spectra of vibration signals shows that one can distinguish between localized and distributed faults. Furthermore, a diagnostic procedure for the detection of distributed faults is proposed. This is evaluated on several bearings with naturally born distributed faults, which are compared with fault-free bearings and bearings with localized faults. It is shown experimentally that features extracted from vibrations in fault-free, localized and distributed fault conditions form clearly separable clusters, thus enabling diagnosis.

  4. Software reliability through fault-avoidance and fault-tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vouk, Mladen A.; Mcallister, David F.

    1993-01-01

    Strategies and tools for the testing, risk assessment and risk control of dependable software-based systems were developed. Part of this project consists of studies to enable the transfer of technology to industry, for example the risk management techniques for safety-concious systems. Theoretical investigations of Boolean and Relational Operator (BRO) testing strategy were conducted for condition-based testing. The Basic Graph Generation and Analysis tool (BGG) was extended to fully incorporate several variants of the BRO metric. Single- and multi-phase risk, coverage and time-based models are being developed to provide additional theoretical and empirical basis for estimation of the reliability and availability of large, highly dependable software. A model for software process and risk management was developed. The use of cause-effect graphing for software specification and validation was investigated. Lastly, advanced software fault-tolerance models were studied to provide alternatives and improvements in situations where simple software fault-tolerance strategies break down.

  5. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  6. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting

    PubMed Central

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or “pseudotachylytes.” It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  7. Acoustic fault injection tool (AFIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1999-05-01

    On September 18, 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. The program was funded as part of the U.S. Navy's Air Vehicle Diagnostic Systems (AVDS) program. Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. The application of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults has proven the feasibility of the technology. The flight-test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. During the RAMS flight test, 12 test flights were flown from which 25 Gbyte of digital acoustic data and about 15 hours of analog flight data recorder (FDR) data were collected from the eight on-rotor acoustic sensors. The focus of this paper is to describe the CH-46 flight-test configuration and present design details about a new innovative machinery diagnostic technology called acoustic fault injection. This technology involves the injection of acoustic sound into machinery to assess health and characterize operational status. The paper will also address the development of the Acoustic Fault Injection Tool (AFIT), which was successfully demonstrated during the CH-46 flight tests.

  8. Chip level simulation of fault tolerant computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Chip level modeling techniques, functional fault simulation, simulation software development, a more efficient, high level version of GSP, and a parallel architecture for functional simulation are discussed.

  9. Sequential Test Strategies for Multiple Fault Isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakeri, M.; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Raghavan, V.; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Kell, T.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of constructing near optimal test sequencing algorithms for diagnosing multiple faults in redundant (fault-tolerant) systems. The computational complexity of solving the optimal multiple-fault isolation problem is super-exponential, that is, it is much more difficult than the single-fault isolation problem, which, by itself, is NP-hard. By employing concepts from information theory and Lagrangian relaxation, we present several static and dynamic (on-line or interactive) test sequencing algorithms for the multiple fault isolation problem that provide a trade-off between the degree of suboptimality and computational complexity. Furthermore, we present novel diagnostic strategies that generate a static diagnostic directed graph (digraph), instead of a static diagnostic tree, for multiple fault diagnosis. Using this approach, the storage complexity of the overall diagnostic strategy reduces substantially. Computational results based on real-world systems indicate that the size of a static multiple fault strategy is strictly related to the structure of the system, and that the use of an on-line multiple fault strategy can diagnose faults in systems with as many as 10,000 failure sources.

  10. Faults Discovery By Using Mined Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Fault discovery in the complex systems consist of model based reasoning, fault tree analysis, rule based inference methods, and other approaches. Model based reasoning builds models for the systems either by mathematic formulations or by experiment model. Fault Tree Analysis shows the possible causes of a system malfunction by enumerating the suspect components and their respective failure modes that may have induced the problem. The rule based inference build the model based on the expert knowledge. Those models and methods have one thing in common; they have presumed some prior-conditions. Complex systems often use fault trees to analyze the faults. Fault diagnosis, when error occurs, is performed by engineers and analysts performing extensive examination of all data gathered during the mission. International Space Station (ISS) control center operates on the data feedback from the system and decisions are made based on threshold values by using fault trees. Since those decision-making tasks are safety critical and must be done promptly, the engineers who manually analyze the data are facing time challenge. To automate this process, this paper present an approach that uses decision trees to discover fault from data in real-time and capture the contents of fault trees as the initial state of the trees.

  11. Mantle fault zone beneath Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, C.J.; Okubo, P.G.; Shearer, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Relocations and focal mechanism analyses of deep earthquakes (???13 kilometers) at Kilauea volcano demonstrate that seismicity is focused on an active fault zone at 30-kilometer depth, with seaward slip on a low-angle plane, and other smaller, distinct fault zones. The earthquakes we have analyzed predominantly reflect tectonic faulting in the brittle lithosphere rather than magma movement associated with volcanic activity. The tectonic earthquakes may be induced on preexisting faults by stresses of magmatic origin, although background stresses from volcano loading and lithospheric flexure may also contribute.

  12. Outer Rise Faulting And Mantle Serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranero, C. R.; Phipps Morgan, J.; McIntosh, K.; Reichert, C.

    Dehydration of serpentinized mantle of the downgoing slab has been proposed to cause both intermediate depth earthquakes (50-300 km) and arc volcanism at sub- duction zones. It has been suggested that most of this serpentinization occurs beneath the outer rise; where normal faulting earthquakes due to bending cut > 20 km deep into the lithosphere, allowing seawater to reach and react with underlying mantle. However, little is known about flexural faulting at convergent margins; about how many normal faults cut across the crust and how deeply they penetrate into the man- tle; about the true potential of faults as conduits for fluid flow and how much water can be added through this process. We present evidence that pervasive flexural faulting may cut deep into the mantle and that the amount of faulting vary dramatically along strike at subduction zones. Flexural faulting increases towards the trench axis indicat- ing that active extension occurs in a broad area. Multibeam bathymetry of the Pacific margin of Costa Rica and Nicaragua shows a remarkable variation in the amount of flexural faulting along the incoming ocean plate. Several parameters seem to control lateral variability. Off south Costa Rica thick crust of the Cocos Ridge flexes little, and little to no faulting develops near the trench. Off central Costa Rica, normal thick- ness crust with magnetic anomalies striking oblique to the trench displays small offset faults (~200 m) striking similar to the original seafloor fabric. Off northern Costa Rica, magnetic anomalies strike perpendicular to the trench axis, and a few ~100m-offset faults develop parallel to the trench. Further north, across the Nicaraguan margin, magnetic anomalies strike parallel to the trench and the most widespread faulting de- velops entering the trench. Multichannel seismic reflection images in this area show a pervasive set of trenchward dipping reflections that cross the ~6 km thick crust and extend into the mantle to depths of at

  13. Block rotations, fault domains and crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nur, A.; Ron, H.

    1987-01-01

    Much of the earth's crust is broken by sets of parallel strike-slip faults which are organized in domains. A simple kinematic model suggests that when subject to tectonic strain, the faults, and the blocks bound by them, rotate. The rotation can be estimated from the structurally-determined fault slip and fault spacing, and independently from local deviations of paleomagnetic declinations from global values. A rigorous test of this model was carried out in northern Israel, where good agreement was found between the two rotations.

  14. Applications of Fault Detection in Vibrating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eure, Kenneth W.; Hogge, Edward; Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Russell, Andrew; Hill, Boyd L.

    2012-01-01

    Structural fault detection and identification remains an area of active research. Solutions to fault detection and identification may be based on subtle changes in the time series history of vibration signals originating from various sensor locations throughout the structure. The purpose of this paper is to document the application of vibration based fault detection methods applied to several structures. Overall, this paper demonstrates the utility of vibration based methods for fault detection in a controlled laboratory setting and limitations of applying the same methods to a similar structure during flight on an experimental subscale aircraft.

  15. Fault tolerant filtering and fault detection for quantum systems driven by fields in single photon states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qing; Dong, Daoyi; Petersen, Ian R.; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to solve the fault tolerant filtering and fault detection problem for a class of open quantum systems driven by a continuous-mode bosonic input field in single photon states when the systems are subject to stochastic faults. Optimal estimates of both the system observables and the fault process are simultaneously calculated and characterized by a set of coupled recursive quantum stochastic differential equations.

  16. The morphology of strike-slip faults - Examples from the San Andreas Fault, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilham, Roger; King, Geoffrey

    1989-01-01

    The dilatational strains associated with vertical faults embedded in a horizontal plate are examined in the framework of fault kinematics and simple displacement boundary conditions. Using boundary element methods, a sequence of examples of dilatational strain fields associated with commonly occurring strike-slip fault zone features (bends, offsets, finite rupture lengths, and nonuniform slip distributions) is derived. The combinations of these strain fields are then used to examine the Parkfield region of the San Andreas fault system in central California.

  17. Fault-tolerant parallel processor

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, R.E.; Lala, J.H. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper addresses issues central to the design and operation of an ultrareliable, Byzantine resilient parallel computer. Interprocessor connectivity requirements are met by treating connectivity as a resource that is shared among many processing elements, allowing flexibility in their configuration and reducing complexity. Redundant groups are synchronized solely by message transmissions and receptions, which aslo provide input data consistency and output voting. Reliability analysis results are presented that demonstrate the reduced failure probability of such a system. Performance analysis results are presented that quantify the temporal overhead involved in executing such fault-tolerance-specific operations. Empirical performance measurements of prototypes of the architecture are presented. 30 refs.

  18. Estimating the distribution of fault latency in a digital processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Erik L.; Butler, Ricky W.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a statistical approach to measuring fault latency in a digital processor. The method relies on the use of physical fault injection where the duration of the fault injection can be controlled. Although a specific fault's latency period is never directly measured, the method indirectly determines the distribution of fault latency.

  19. Polyscale, polymodal fault geometries: evolution and predictive capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenkinsop, T. G.; Carvell, J.; Clarke, G.; Tonelli, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Late Permian Rangal coal measures on the edge of the Nebo synclinorium in the Bowen basin, NE Queensland, Australia, are cut by normal faults. Mining operations allow 13 faults to be mapped in some detail to depths of 200m. These faults cut Tertiary intrusions and a reverse fault as well as the coal seams, and show no obvious signs of reactivation. The steeply dipping faults are clustered into groups of two to four, separated by hundreds of meters. The faults trend ENE and NE; both trends of faults dip in both directions, defining a quadrimodal geometry. The odd axis construction for these faults suggests that vertical shortening was accompanied by horizontal extension along both principal directions of 153° and 063°. The mapped extents of the faults are limited by erosion and the depth to which the faults have been drilled, but displacement profiles along the lengths of the faults show maxima within the fault planes. The displacement profiles suggest that the currently mapped faults have similar lengths to the total preserved lengths of the faults, and that they will continue into the unmined ground to a limited, but predictable extent. The fault planes have a complex geometry, with segments of individual faults showing a similar variability in orientation to the ensemble of fault planes: the fault planes themselves are polymodal. Displacement profiles show a good correlation with segment orientation. An odd axis construction based on fault segments, rather than individual faults, gives principal extension directions within 4° of the above results. The variable orientation of fault segments, the correlation of the displacement profiles with fault orientation, and the similarity between the segment and ensemble fault kinematics suggest that the faults have evolved by propagation and linking of smaller polymodal faults in the same bulk strain field.ross section of polymodal fault at Hail Creek coal mine

  20. A novel KFCM based fault diagnosis method for unknown faults in satellite reaction wheels.

    PubMed

    Hu, Di; Sarosh, Ali; Dong, Yun-Feng

    2012-03-01

    Reaction wheels are one of the most critical components of the satellite attitude control system, therefore correct diagnosis of their faults is quintessential for efficient operation of these spacecraft. The known faults in any of the subsystems are often diagnosed by supervised learning algorithms, however, this method fails to work correctly when a new or unknown fault occurs. In such cases an unsupervised learning algorithm becomes essential for obtaining the correct diagnosis. Kernel Fuzzy C-Means (KFCM) is one of the unsupervised algorithms, although it has its own limitations; however in this paper a novel method has been proposed for conditioning of KFCM method (C-KFCM) so that it can be effectively used for fault diagnosis of both known and unknown faults as in satellite reaction wheels. The C-KFCM approach involves determination of exact class centers from the data of known faults, in this way discrete number of fault classes are determined at the start. Similarity parameters are derived and determined for each of the fault data point. Thereafter depending on the similarity threshold each data point is issued with a class label. The high similarity points fall into one of the 'known-fault' classes while the low similarity points are labeled as 'unknown-faults'. Simulation results show that as compared to the supervised algorithm such as neural network, the C-KFCM method can effectively cluster historical fault data (as in reaction wheels) and diagnose the faults to an accuracy of more than 91%. PMID:22035775

  1. Transform fault earthquakes in the North Atlantic: Source mechanisms and depth of faulting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Eric A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1987-01-01

    The centroid depths and source mechanisms of 12 large earthquakes on transform faults of the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge were determined from an inversion of long-period body waveforms. The earthquakes occurred on the Gibbs, Oceanographer, Hayes, Kane, 15 deg 20 min, and Vema transforms. The depth extent of faulting during each earthquake was estimated from the centroid depth and the fault width. The source mechanisms for all events in this study display the strike slip motion expected for transform fault earthquakes; slip vector azimuths agree to 2 to 3 deg of the local strike of the zone of active faulting. The only anomalies in mechanism were for two earthquakes near the western end of the Vema transform which occurred on significantly nonvertical fault planes. Secondary faulting, occurring either precursory to or near the end of the main episode of strike-slip rupture, was observed for 5 of the 12 earthquakes. For three events the secondary faulting was characterized by reverse motion on fault planes striking oblique to the trend of the transform. In all three cases, the site of secondary reverse faulting is near a compression jog in the current trace of the active transform fault zone. No evidence was found to support the conclusions of Engeln, Wiens, and Stein that oceanic transform faults in general are either hotter than expected from current thermal models or weaker than normal oceanic lithosphere.

  2. On Identifiability of Bias-Type Actuator-Sensor Faults in Multiple-Model-Based Fault Detection and Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores a class of multiple-model-based fault detection and identification (FDI) methods for bias-type faults in actuators and sensors. These methods employ banks of Kalman-Bucy filters to detect the faults, determine the fault pattern, and estimate the fault values, wherein each Kalman-Bucy filter is tuned to a different failure pattern. Necessary and sufficient conditions are presented for identifiability of actuator faults, sensor faults, and simultaneous actuator and sensor faults. It is shown that FDI of simultaneous actuator and sensor faults is not possible using these methods when all sensors have biases.

  3. Fault Management Techniques in Human Spaceflight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hagan, Brian; Crocker, Alan

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses human spaceflight fault management operations. Fault detection and response capabilities available in current US human spaceflight programs Space Shuttle and International Space Station are described while emphasizing system design impacts on operational techniques and constraints. Preflight and inflight processes along with products used to anticipate, mitigate and respond to failures are introduced. Examples of operational products used to support failure responses are presented. Possible improvements in the state of the art, as well as prioritization and success criteria for their implementation are proposed. This paper describes how the architecture of a command and control system impacts operations in areas such as the required fault response times, automated vs. manual fault responses, use of workarounds, etc. The architecture includes the use of redundancy at the system and software function level, software capabilities, use of intelligent or autonomous systems, number and severity of software defects, etc. This in turn drives which Caution and Warning (C&W) events should be annunciated, C&W event classification, operator display designs, crew training, flight control team training, and procedure development. Other factors impacting operations are the complexity of a system, skills needed to understand and operate a system, and the use of commonality vs. optimized solutions for software and responses. Fault detection, annunciation, safing responses, and recovery capabilities are explored using real examples to uncover underlying philosophies and constraints. These factors directly impact operations in that the crew and flight control team need to understand what happened, why it happened, what the system is doing, and what, if any, corrective actions they need to perform. If a fault results in multiple C&W events, or if several faults occur simultaneously, the root cause(s) of the fault(s), as well as their vehicle-wide impacts, must be

  4. Effects of Fault Displacement on Emplacement Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    F. Duan

    2000-04-25

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate potential effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts, including drip shields and waste packages emplaced in emplacement drifts. The output from this analysis not only provides data for the evaluation of long-term drift stability but also supports the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) process model report (PMR) and Disruptive Events Report currently under development. The primary scope of this analysis includes (1) examining fault displacement effects in terms of induced stresses and displacements in the rock mass surrounding an emplacement drift and (2 ) predicting fault displacement effects on the drip shield and waste package. The magnitude of the fault displacement analyzed in this analysis bounds the mean fault displacement corresponding to an annual frequency of exceedance of 10{sup -5} adopted for the preclosure period of the repository and also supports the postclosure performance assessment. This analysis is performed following the development plan prepared for analyzing effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts (CRWMS M&O 2000). The analysis will begin with the identification and preparation of requirements, criteria, and inputs. A literature survey on accommodating fault displacements encountered in underground structures such as buried oil and gas pipelines will be conducted. For a given fault displacement, the least favorable scenario in term of the spatial relation of a fault to an emplacement drift is chosen, and the analysis is then performed analytically. Based on the analysis results, conclusions are made regarding the effects and consequences of fault displacement on emplacement drifts. Specifically, the analysis will discuss loads which can be induced by fault displacement on emplacement drifts, drip shield and/or waste packages during the time period of postclosure.

  5. The work budget of rough faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Patrick J.; Ashley Griffith, W.

    2014-12-01

    Faults in nature have measurable roughness at many scales and are not planar as generally idealized. We utilize the boundary element method to model the geomechanical response of synthetic rough faults in an isotropic, linear elastic continuum to external tectonic loading in terms of the work budget. Faults are generated with known fractal roughness parameters, including the root mean square slope (β), a measure of roughness amplitude, and the Hurst exponent (H), a measure of geometric self-similarity. Energy within the fault models is partitioned into external work (Wext), internal elastic strain energy (Wint), gravitational work (Wgrav), frictional work (Wfric), and seismic energy (Wseis). Results confirm that Wext, or work done on the external model boundaries, is smallest for a perfectly planar fault, and steadily increases with increasing β. This pattern is also observed in Wint, the energy expended in deforming the host rock. The opposite is true for gravitational work, or work done against gravity in uplifting host rock, as well as with frictional work, or energy dissipated with frictional slip on the fault, and Wseis, or seismic energy released during slip events. Effects of variation in H are not as large as for β, but Wgrav, Wfric, and Wseis increase with increasing H, with Wint and Wext decreasing across the same range. Remarkably, however, for a narrow range of roughness amplitudes which are commonly observed along natural faults, the total work of the system remains approximately constant, while slightly larger than the total work of a planar fault. Faults evolve toward the most mechanically efficient configuration; therefore we argue that this range of roughness amplitudes may represent an energy barrier, preventing faults from removing asperities and evolving to smooth, planar discontinuities. A similar conclusion is drawn from simulations at relatively shallow depths, with results showing that shallower faults have larger energy barriers, and can

  6. Illuminating Northern California's Active Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Carol S.; Crosby, Christopher J.; Whitehill, Caroline S.; Arrowsmith, J. Ramón; Furlong, Kevin P.; Phillips, David A.

    2009-02-01

    Newly acquired light detection and ranging (lidar) topographic data provide a powerful community resource for the study of landforms associated with the plate boundary faults of northern California (Figure 1). In the spring of 2007, GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility construction project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, acquired approximately 2000 square kilometers of airborne lidar topographic data along major active fault zones of northern California. These data are now freely available in point cloud (x, y, z coordinate data for every laser return), digital elevation model (DEM), and KMZ (zipped Keyhole Markup Language, for use in Google Earth™ and other similar software) formats through the GEON OpenTopography Portal (http://www.OpenTopography.org/data). Importantly, vegetation can be digitally removed from lidar data, producing high-resolution images (0.5- or 1.0-meter DEMs) of the ground surface beneath forested regions that reveal landforms typically obscured by vegetation canopy (Figure 2).

  7. Fault Tolerant Homopolar Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Ming-Hsiu; Palazzolo, Alan; Kenny, Andrew; Provenza, Andrew; Beach, Raymond; Kascak, Albert

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic suspensions (MS) satisfy the long life and low loss conditions demanded by satellite and ISS based flywheels used for Energy Storage and Attitude Control (ACESE) service. This paper summarizes the development of a novel MS that improves reliability via fault tolerant operation. Specifically, flux coupling between poles of a homopolar magnetic bearing is shown to deliver desired forces even after termination of coil currents to a subset of failed poles . Linear, coordinate decoupled force-voltage relations are also maintained before and after failure by bias linearization. Current distribution matrices (CDM) which adjust the currents and fluxes following a pole set failure are determined for many faulted pole combinations. The CDM s and the system responses are obtained utilizing 1D magnetic circuit models with fringe and leakage factors derived from detailed, 3D, finite element field models. Reliability results are presented vs. detection/correction delay time and individual power amplifier reliability for 4, 6, and 7 pole configurations. Reliability is shown for two success criteria, i.e. (a) no catcher bearing contact following pole failures and (b) re-levitation off of the catcher bearings following pole failures. An advantage of the method presented over other redundant operation approaches is a significantly reduced requirement for backup hardware such as additional actuators or power amplifiers.

  8. Paleoseismicity of two historically quiescent faults in Australia: Implications for fault behavior in stable continental regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, A.J.; De Martini, P. M.; Machette, M.M.; Okumura, K.; Prescott, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Paleoseismic studies of two historically aseismic Quaternary faults in Australia confirm that cratonic faults in stable continental regions (SCR) typically have a long-term behavior characterized by episodes of activity separated by quiescent intervals of at least 10,000 and commonly 100,000 years or more. Studies of the approximately 30-km-long Roopena fault in South Australia and the approximately 30-km-long Hyden fault in Western Australia document multiple Quaternary surface-faulting events that are unevenly spaced in time. The episodic clustering of events on cratonic SCR faults may be related to temporal fluctuations of fault-zone fluid pore pressures in a volume of strained crust. The long-term slip rate on cratonic SCR faults is extremely low, so the geomorphic expression of many cratonic SCR faults is subtle, and scarps may be difficult to detect because they are poorly preserved. Both the Roopena and Hyden faults are in areas of limited or no significant seismicity; these and other faults that we have studied indicate that many potentially hazardous SCR faults cannot be recognized solely on the basis of instrumental data or historical earthquakes. Although cratonic SCR faults may appear to be nonhazardous because they have been historically aseismic, those that are favorably oriented for movement in the current stress field can and have produced unexpected damaging earthquakes. Paleoseismic studies of modern and prehistoric SCR faulting events provide the basis for understanding of the long-term behavior of these faults and ultimately contribute to better seismic-hazard assessments.

  9. Fault-tolerant software - Experiment with the sift operating system. [Software Implemented Fault Tolerance computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunelle, J. E.; Eckhardt, D. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted in the NASA Avionics Integrated Research Laboratory (AIRLAB) to investigate the implementation of fault-tolerant software techniques on fault-tolerant computer architectures, in particular the Software Implemented Fault Tolerance (SIFT) computer. The N-version programming and recovery block techniques were implemented on a portion of the SIFT operating system. The results indicate that, to effectively implement fault-tolerant software design techniques, system requirements will be impacted and suggest that retrofitting fault-tolerant software on existing designs will be inefficient and may require system modification.

  10. Implementation of a model based fault detection and diagnosis technique for actuation faults of the SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duyar, A.; Guo, T.-H.; Merrill, W.; Musgrave, J.

    1991-01-01

    In a previous study, Guo, Merrill and Duyar, 1990, reported a conceptual development of a fault detection and diagnosis system for actuation faults of the Space Shuttle main engine. This study, which is a continuation of the previous work, implements the developed fault detection and diagnosis scheme for the real time actuation fault diagnosis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The scheme will be used as an integral part of an intelligent control system demonstration experiment at NASA Lewis. The diagnosis system utilizes a model based method with real time identification and hypothesis testing for actuation, sensor, and performance degradation faults.

  11. Intermittent/transient fault phenomena in digital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the intermittent/transient (IT) fault study is presented. An interval survivability evaluation of digital systems for IT faults is discussed along with a method for detecting and diagnosing IT faults in digital systems.

  12. Intermittent/transient faults in digital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, G. M.; Glazer, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Containment set techniques are applied to 8085 microprocessor controllers so as to transform a typical control system into a slightly modified version, shown to be crashproof: after the departure of the intermittent/transient fault, return to one proper control algorithm is assured, assuming no permanent faults occur.

  13. A Game Theoretic Fault Detection Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Walter H.; Speyer, Jason L.

    1995-01-01

    The fault detection process is modelled as a disturbance attenuation problem. The solution to this problem is found via differential game theory, leading to an H(sub infinity) filter which bounds the transmission of all exogenous signals save the fault to be detected. For a general class of linear systems which includes some time-varying systems, it is shown that this transmission bound can be taken to zero by simultaneously bringing the sensor noise weighting to zero. Thus, in the limit, a complete transmission block can he achieved, making the game filter into a fault detection filter. When we specialize this result to time-invariant system, it is found that the detection filter attained in the limit is identical to the well known Beard-Jones Fault Detection Filter. That is, all fault inputs other than the one to be detected (the "nuisance faults") are restricted to an invariant subspace which is unobservable to a projection on the output. For time-invariant systems, it is also shown that in the limit, the order of the state-space and the game filter can be reduced by factoring out the invariant subspace. The result is a lower dimensional filter which can observe only the fault to be detected. A reduced-order filter can also he generated for time-varying systems, though the computational overhead may be intensive. An example given at the end of the paper demonstrates the effectiveness of the filter as a tool for fault detection and identification.

  14. Intraplate rotational deformation induced by faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembo, Neta; Hamiel, Yariv; Granot, Roi

    2015-11-01

    Vertical axis rotations provide important constraints on the tectonic history of plate boundaries. Geodetic measurements can be used to calculate interseismic rotations, whereas paleomagnetic remanence directions provide constraints on the long-term rotations accumulated over geological timescales. Here we present a new mechanical modeling approach that links between intraplate deformational patterns of these timescales. We construct mechanical models of active faults at their locked state to simulate the presumed to be elastic interseismic deformation rate observed by GPS measurements. We then apply a slip to the faults above the locking depth to simulate the long-term deformation of the crust from which we derive the accumulated rotations. We test this approach in northern Israel along the Dead Sea Fault and Carmel-Gilboa fault system. We use 12 years of interseismic GPS measurements to constrain a slip model of the major faults found in this region. Next, we compare the modeled rotations against long-term rotations determined based on new primary magnetic remanence directions from 29 sites with known age. The distributional pattern of site mean declinations is in general agreement with the vertical axis rotations predicted by the mechanical model, both showing anomalously high rotations near fault tips and bending points. Overall, the results from northern Israel validate the effectiveness of our approach and indicate that rotations induced by motion along faults may act in parallel (or alone) to rigid block rotations. Finally, the new suggested method unravels important insights on the evolution (timing, magnitude, and style) of deformation along major faults.

  15. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and...

  16. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet...

  17. Measurement selection for parametric IC fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, A.; Meador, J.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results obtained with the use of measurement reduction for statistical IC fault diagnosis are described. The reduction method used involves data pre-processing in a fashion consistent with a specific definition of parametric faults. The effects of this preprocessing are examined.

  18. The Curiosity Mars Rover's Fault Protection Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benowitz, Ed

    2014-01-01

    The Curiosity Rover, currently operating on Mars, contains flight software onboard to autonomously handle aspects of system fault protection. Over 1000 monitors and 39 responses are present in the flight software. Orchestrating these behaviors is the flight software's fault protection engine. In this paper, we discuss the engine's design, responsibilities, and present some lessons learned for future missions.

  19. Diagnostics Tools Identify Faults Prior to Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    Through the SBIR program, Rochester, New York-based Impact Technologies LLC collaborated with Ames Research Center to commercialize the Center s Hybrid Diagnostic Engine, or HyDE, software. The fault detecting program is now incorporated into a software suite that identifies potential faults early in the design phase of systems ranging from printers to vehicles and robots, saving time and money.

  20. Tractable particle filters for robot fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Vandi

    Experience has shown that even carefully designed and tested robots may encounter anomalous situations. It is therefore important for robots to monitor their state so that anomalous situations may be detected in a timely manner. Robot fault diagnosis typically requires tracking a very large number of possible faults in complex non-linear dynamic systems with noisy sensors. Traditional methods either ignore the uncertainly or use linear approximations of nonlinear system dynamics. Such approximations are often unrealistic, and as a result faults either go undetected or become confused with non-fault conditions. Probability theory provides a natural representation for uncertainty, but an exact Bayesian solution for the diagnosis problem is intractable. Classical Monte Carlo methods, such as particle filters, suffer from substantial computational complexity. This is particularly true with the presence of rare, yet important events, such as many system faults. The thesis presents a set of complementary algorithms that provide an approach for computationally tractable fault diagnosis. These algorithms leverage probabilistic approaches to decision theory and information theory to efficiently track a large number of faults in a general dynamic system with noisy measurements. The problem of fault diagnosis is represented as hybrid (discrete/continuous) state estimation. Taking advantage of structure in the domain it dynamically concentrates computation in the regions of state space that are currently most relevant without losing track of less likely states. Experiments with a dynamic simulation of a six-wheel rocker-bogie rover show a significant improvement in performance over the classical approach.

  1. Is the Lishan fault of Taiwan active?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo-Chen, Hao; Wu, Francis; Chang, Wu-Lung; Chang, Chih-Yu; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hirata, Naoshi

    2015-10-01

    The Lishan fault has been characterized alternately as a major discontinuity in stratigraphy, structures and metamorphism, a ductile shear zone, a tectonic suture or non-existent. In addition to being a geological boundary, it also marks transitions in subsurface structures. Thus, the seismicity to the west of the fault permeates through the upper and mid-crust while beneath the Central Range it is noticeably less and largely concentrated in the upper 12 km. A prominent west-dipping conductive zone extends upward to meet the Lishan fault. Also, the eastward increase of crust thickness from ~ 30 km in the Taiwan Strait quickens under the Lishan fault to form a root of over 50 km under the Central Range. In the past, the small magnitude seismicity along the Lishan fault has been noticed but is too diffuse for definitive association with the fault. Recent processing of aftershock records of the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake using Central Weather Bureau data and, especially, data from three post-Chi-Chi deployments of seismic stations across central Taiwan yielded hypocenters that appear to link directly to the Lishan structure. The presence of a near 4-km-long vertical seismic zone directly under the surface trace of the Lishan fault indicates that it is an active structure from the surface down to about 35 km, and the variety of focal mechanisms indicates that the fault motion can be complex and depth-dependent.

  2. Late Cenozoic intraplate faulting in eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaahmadi, Abbas; Rosenbaum, Gideon

    2014-12-01

    The intensity and tectonic origin of late Cenozoic intraplate deformation in eastern Australia is relatively poorly understood. Here we show that Cenozoic volcanic rocks in southeast Queensland have been deformed by numerous faults. Using gridded aeromagnetic data and field observations, structural investigations were conducted on these faults. Results show that faults have mainly undergone strike-slip movement with a reverse component, displacing Cenozoic volcanic rocks ranging in ages from ˜31 to ˜21 Ma. These ages imply that faulting must have occurred after the late Oligocene. Late Cenozoic deformation has mostly occurred due to the reactivation of major faults, which were active during episodes of basin formation in the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous and later during the opening of the Tasman and Coral Seas from the Late Cretaceous to the early Eocene. The wrench reactivation of major faults in the late Cenozoic also gave rise to the occurrence of brittle subsidiary reverse strike-slip faults that affected Cenozoic volcanic rocks. Intraplate transpressional deformation possibly resulted from far-field stresses transmitted from the collisional zones at the northeast and southeast boundaries of the Australian plate during the late Oligocene-early Miocene and from the late Miocene to the Pliocene. These events have resulted in the hitherto unrecognized reactivation of faults in eastern Australia.

  3. Friction, overpressure and fault normal compression

    SciTech Connect

    Byerlee, J. )

    1990-11-01

    More than twenty-five years ago Miller and Low reported the existence of a threshold pore pressure gradient below which water would not flow through clay. Recent experimental observations of the shear strength of structured water on biotite surfaces have provided a physical basis for understanding this threshold gradient. The existence of this phenomenon has profound implications for the rheological properties of mature fault zones, such as the San Andreas, that contain large thickness of fault gouge. For example, a clay-filled fault zone about 1 km wide at the base of the surface could support core fluid pressure equal to the maximum principal stress over the entire seismogenic zone. As a result, the fault would have near-zero strength and the maximum principal stress measured on the flanks of the fault, would be oriented normal to the fault surface. Another consequence of the threshold gradient is that normal hydrostatic fluid pressures outside the fault zone could coexist with near-lithostatic fluid pressures in the interior of the fault zone without the need for continual replenishment of the overpressured fluid. In addition, the pore pressure at any point should never exceed the local minimum principal stress so that hydrofracture will not occur.

  4. The cost of software fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Migneault, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed use of software fault tolerance techniques as a means of reducing software costs in avionics and as a means of addressing the issue of system unreliability due to faults in software is examined. A model is developed to provide a view of the relationships among cost, redundancy, and reliability which suggests strategies for software development and maintenance which are not conventional.

  5. Interactive Instruction in Solving Fault Finding Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke, J. B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A training program is described which provides, during fault diagnosis, additional information about the relationship between the remaining faults and the available indicators. An interactive computer program developed for this purpose and the first results of experimental training are described. (Author)

  6. Training for Skill in Fault Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    The Knitting, Lace and Net Industry Training Board has developed a training innovation called fault diagnosis training. The entire training process concentrates on teaching based on the experiences of troubleshooters or any other employees whose main tasks involve fault diagnosis and rectification. (Author/DS)

  7. Fault detection with principal component pursuit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yijun; Yang, Chunjie; Sun, Youxian; An, Ruqiao; Wang, Lin

    2015-11-01

    Data-driven approaches are widely applied for fault detection in industrial process. Recently, a new method for fault detection called principal component pursuit(PCP) is introduced. PCP is not only robust to outliers, but also can accomplish the objectives of model building, fault detection, fault isolation and process reconstruction simultaneously. PCP divides the data matrix into two parts: a fault-free low rank matrix and a sparse matrix with sensor noise and process fault. The statistics presented in this paper fully utilize the information in data matrix. Since the low rank matrix in PCP is similar to principal components matrix in PCA, a T2 statistic is proposed for fault detection in low rank matrix. And this statistic can illustrate that PCP is more sensitive to small variations in variables than PCA. In addition, in sparse matrix, a new monitored statistic performing the online fault detection with PCP-based method is introduced. This statistic uses the mean and the correlation coefficient of variables. Monte Carlo simulation and Tennessee Eastman (TE) benchmark process are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of monitored statistics.

  8. An example of complex fault geometries in a young, rapidly deforming transform fault system: The Maacama Fault in northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, R. D.; Brady, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Maacama Fault Zone (MFZ) in northern California is a young transform system that developed behind the northward migrating Mendocino Triple Junction, and comprises a complex set of active, linked fault strands that form a series of pull-apart basins within the rapidly slipping (~13.9 mm/yr) right-lateral fault system. Surface fault traces within the MFZ are defined by geomorphic features, shallow resistivity profiles, and previously published surface creep and paleoseismic trenching studies. The surface traces of these faults outline classic pull-apart rhomohedrons, with all of the bounding faults inferred to be kinematically linked and currenty active. This activity is supported not only by paleoseismic and surface creep studies, which have tended to focus on the single main strand of the Maacama Fault, but also by the location of tabular seismogenic zones that project from the subsurface into several of the mapped surface fault traces. For each of the 3 mapped pull-apart basins, at least two of the interpreted bounding faults can be shown to be currently active, requiring near-synchronous activity on all of the kinematically linked faults. Historically, active displacement across the MFZ has been assigned to only one relatively well-studied main strand of the fault zone, which slips at ~6.5 mm/yr, resulting in an apparent slip deficit of ~7.4 mm/yr. However, the newly studied adjacent faults in this complex system could accommodate as much or more slip than the historically defined main fault trace, thus resulting in a possibly broader zone of seismic hazard, but less risk of major earthquakes on the main trace. Timing of pull-apart basin initiations is not well constrained, with data permitting either the interpretation that basins formed due to oblique subduction and are currently being reactivated by similar stresses, or that they are newly formed and rapidly evolving. Limited data even allows that the largest pull-apart system may be a reactivated pre

  9. Geophysical characterization of buried active faults: the Concud Fault (Iberian Chain, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo Anchuela, Óscar; Lafuente, Paloma; Arlegui, Luis; Liesa, Carlos L.; Simón, José L.

    2015-12-01

    The Concud Fault is a ~14-km-long active fault that extends close to Teruel, a city with about 35,000 inhabitants in the Iberian Range (NE Spain). It shows evidence of recurrent activity during Late Pleistocene time, posing a significant seismic hazard in an area of moderate-to-low tectonic rates. A geophysical survey was carried out along the mapped trace of the southern branch of the Concud Fault to evaluate the geophysical signature from the fault and the location of paleoseismic trenches. The survey identified a lineation of inverse magnetic dipoles at residual and vertical magnetic gradient, a local increase in apparent conductivity, and interruptions of the underground sediment structure along GPR profiles. The origin of these anomalies is due to lateral contrast between both fault blocks and the geophysical signature of Quaternary materials located above and directly south of the fault. The spatial distribution of anomalies was successfully used to locate suitable trench sites and to map non-exposed segments of the fault. The geophysical anomalies are related to the sedimentological characteristics and permeability differences of the deposits and to deformation related to fault activity. The results illustrate the usefulness of geophysics to detect and map non-exposed faults in areas of moderate-to-low tectonic activity where faults are often covered by recent pediments that obscure geological evidence of the most recent earthquakes. The results also highlight the importance of applying multiple geophysical techniques in defining the location of buried faults.

  10. Spatial analysis of hypocenter to fault relationships for determining fault process zone width in Japan.

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Bill Walter; Roberts, Barry L.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Coburn, Timothy C. (Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX)

    2004-09-01

    Preliminary investigation areas (PIA) for a potential repository of high-level radioactive waste must be evaluated by NUMO with regard to a number of qualifying factors. One of these factors is related to earthquakes and fault activity. This study develops a spatial statistical assessment method that can be applied to the active faults in Japan to perform such screening evaluations. This analysis uses the distribution of seismicity near faults to define the width of the associated process zone. This concept is based on previous observations of aftershock earthquakes clustered near active faults and on the assumption that such seismic activity is indicative of fracturing and associated impacts on bedrock integrity. Preliminary analyses of aggregate data for all of Japan confirmed that the frequency of earthquakes is higher near active faults. Data used in the analysis were obtained from NUMO and consist of three primary sources: (1) active fault attributes compiled in a spreadsheet, (2) earthquake hypocenter data, and (3) active fault locations. Examination of these data revealed several limitations with regard to the ability to associate fault attributes from the spreadsheet to locations of individual fault trace segments. In particular, there was no direct link between attributes of the active faults in the spreadsheet and the active fault locations in the GIS database. In addition, the hypocenter location resolution in the pre-1983 data was less accurate than for later data. These pre-1983 hypocenters were eliminated from further analysis.

  11. Partial fault dictionary: A new approach for computer-aided fault localization

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, A.; Papathanasiou, A.

    1995-12-31

    The approach described in this paper has been developed to address the computation time and problem size of localization methodologies in VLSI circuits in order to speed up the overall time consumption for fault localization. The reduction of the problem to solve is combined with the idea of the fault dictionary. In a pre-processing phase, a possibly faulty area is derived using the netlist and the actual test results as input data. The result is a set of cones originating from each faulty primary output. In the next step, the best cone is extracted for the fault dictionary methodology according to a heuristic formula. The circuit nodes, which are included in the intersection of the cones, are combined to a fault list. This fault list together with the best cone can be used by the fault simulator to generate a small and manageable fault dictionary related to one faulty output. In connection with additional algorithms for the reduction of stimuli and netlist a partial fault dictionary can be set up. This dictionary is valid only for the given faulty device together with the given and reduced stimuli, but offers important benefits: Practical results show a reduction of simulation time and size of the fault dictionary by factors around 100 or even more, depending on the actual circuit and assumed fault. The list of fault candidates is significantly reduced, and the required number of steps during the process of localization is reduced, too.

  12. Active faulting in the Walker Lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesnousky, Steven G.

    2005-06-01

    Deformation across the San Andreas and Walker Lane fault systems accounts for most relative Pacific-North American transform plate motion. The Walker Lane is composed of discontinuous sets of right-slip faults that are located to the east and strike approximately parallel to the San Andreas fault system. Mapping of active faults in the central Walker Lane shows that right-lateral shear is locally accommodated by rotation of crustal blocks bounded by steep-dipping east striking left-slip faults. The left slip and clockwise rotation of crustal blocks bounded by the east striking faults has produced major basins in the area, including Rattlesnake and Garfield flats; Teels, Columbus and Rhodes salt marshes; and Queen Valley. The Benton Springs and Petrified Springs faults are the major northwest striking structures currently accommodating transform motion in the central Walker Lane. Right-lateral offsets of late Pleistocene surfaces along the two faults point to slip rates of at least 1 mm/yr. The northern limit of northwest trending strike-slip faults in the central Walker Lane is abrupt and reflects transfer of strike-slip to dip-slip deformation in the western Basin and Range and transformation of right slip into rotation of crustal blocks to the north. The transfer of strike slip in the central Walker Lane to dip slip in the western Basin and Range correlates to a northward broadening of the modern strain field suggested by geodesy and appears to be a long-lived feature of the deformation field. The complexity of faulting and apparent rotation of crustal blocks within the Walker Lane is consistent with the concept of a partially detached and elastic-brittle crust that is being transported on a continuously deforming layer below. The regional pattern of faulting within the Walker Lane is more complex than observed along the San Andreas fault system to the west. The difference is attributed to the relatively less cumulative slip that has occurred across the Walker

  13. Insights from analyzing and modelling cascading multi-lake outburst flood events in the Santa Cruz Valley (Cordillera Blanca, Perú)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmer, Adam; Mergili, Martin; Juřicová, Anna; Cochachin, Alejo; Huggel, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Since the end of Little Ice Age, the Cordillera Blanca of Perú has experienced tens of lake outburst floods (LOFs), resulting in the loss of thousands of lives and significant material damages. Most commonly involving glacial lakes, such events are often directly or indirectly related to glacier retreat. Here we analyze an event on 8th February 2012 involving four lakes and affecting two valleys (Santa Cruz and Artizón) in the northern part of the Cordillera Blanca. Using the combination of field data, satellite images, digital elevation model (DEM) and GIS-based modelling approaches, the main objectives are: (i) to better understand complex multi-lake outburst flood and related foregoing and induced geomorphological processes; and (ii) to evaluate and discuss the suitability, potentials and limitations of the r.avaflow model for modelling such complex process chains. Analyzing field geomorphological evidence and remotely-sensed images, we reconstruct the event as follows: a landslide from the recently deglaciated left lateral moraine of Lake Artizón Alto (4 639 m a.s.l.), characterized by steep slopes and a height of more than 200 m produced a displacement wave which overtopped the bedrock dam of the lake. The resulting flood wave breached the dam of the downstream moraine-/landslide-dammed Lake Artizón Bajo (4 477 m a.s.l.), decreasing the lake level by 10 m and releasing 3 x 105 m3 of water. Significant amounts of material were eroded from the steeper parts of the Artizón Valley (mean slope >15°) and deposited further downstream in the flatter part of the Santa Cruz Valley (mean slope <2°; confluence of the two valleys at 3 985 m a.s.l.). The flood affected two debris cone-dammed lakes (Jatuncocha and Ichiccocha) in the Santa Cruz Valley. Some minor damages to the dam of Lake Jatuncocha were documented. Geomprohological evidence of the event was observed more than 20 km downstream from Lake Artizón Alto. The described multi-LOF event was employed as a

  14. Physiochemical Evidence of Faulting Processes and Modeling of Fluid in Evolving Fault Systems in Southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Boles, James

    2013-05-24

    Our study targets recent (Plio-Pleistocene) faults and young (Tertiary) petroleum fields in southern California. Faults include the Refugio Fault in the Transverse Ranges, the Ellwood Fault in the Santa Barbara Channel, and most recently the Newport- Inglewood in the Los Angeles Basin. Subsurface core and tubing scale samples, outcrop samples, well logs, reservoir properties, pore pressures, fluid compositions, and published structural-seismic sections have been used to characterize the tectonic/diagenetic history of the faults. As part of the effort to understand the diagenetic processes within these fault zones, we have studied analogous processes of rapid carbonate precipitation (scaling) in petroleum reservoir tubing and manmade tunnels. From this, we have identified geochemical signatures in carbonate that characterize rapid CO2 degassing. These data provide constraints for finite element models that predict fluid pressures, multiphase flow patterns, rates and patterns of deformation, subsurface temperatures and heat flow, and geochemistry associated with large fault systems.

  15. Strike-slip faulting and block rotation in the Lake Mead fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, Hagai; Aydin, Atilla; Nur, Amos

    1986-12-01

    Strike-slip faults in the Basin and Range province have often been considered passive boundaries between differentially extended domains of tilted normal faults and are thus considered secondary in accommodating regional horizontal deformation. Paleomagnotic investigation of late Miocene age volcanic rocks, displaced by the left-lateral fault system of Lake Mead, Nevada, shows: (1) that these rocks have not been affected by significant structural tilt, the difference between observed and expected inclinations being only -0.6° ± 14.9° and (2) a significant horizontal counterclockwise rotation of -29.4° ± 8.5° about a vertical axis. This rotation was accommodated by slip on northwest-trending, right-lateral strike-slip faults; this implies significant west-northwest elongation. Results of the investigation indicate that strike-slip faulting is the primary process accommodating crustal deformation along the Lake Mead fault system and that tilting in response to normal faulting is secondary.

  16. Fault Detection for Automotive Shock Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Alcantara, Diana; Morales-Menendez, Ruben; Amezquita-Brooks, Luis

    2015-11-01

    Fault detection for automotive semi-active shock absorbers is a challenge due to the non-linear dynamics and the strong influence of the disturbances such as the road profile. First obstacle for this task, is the modeling of the fault, which has been shown to be of multiplicative nature. Many of the most widespread fault detection schemes consider additive faults. Two model-based fault algorithms for semiactive shock absorber are compared: an observer-based approach and a parameter identification approach. The performance of these schemes is validated and compared using a commercial vehicle model that was experimentally validated. Early results shows that a parameter identification approach is more accurate, whereas an observer-based approach is less sensible to parametric uncertainty.

  17. Mechanics of distributed fault and block rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nur, A.; Scotti, O.; Ron, H.

    1989-01-01

    Paleomagnetic data, structural geology, and rock mechanics are used to explore the validity and significance of the block rotation concept. The analysis is based on data from Northern Israel, where fault slip and spacing are used to predict block rotation; the Mojave Desert, with well documented strike-slip sets; the Lake Mead, Nevada fault system with well-defined sets of strike-slip faults; and the San Gabriel Mountains domain with a multiple set of strike-slip faults. The results of the analysis indicate that block rotations can have a profound influence on the interpretation of geodetic measurments and the inversion of geodetic data. Furthermore, the block rotations and domain boundaries may be involved in creating the heterogeneities along active fault systems which may be responsible for the initiation and termination of earthquake rupture.

  18. Self-triggering superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Xing; Tekletsadik, Kasegn

    2008-10-21

    A modular and scaleable Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. The matrix fault current limiter comprises a fault current limiter module that includes a superconductor which is electrically coupled in parallel with a trigger coil, wherein the trigger coil is magnetically coupled to the superconductor. The current surge doing a fault within the electrical power network will cause the superconductor to transition to its resistive state and also generate a uniform magnetic field in the trigger coil and simultaneously limit the voltage developed across the superconductor. This results in fast and uniform quenching of the superconductors, significantly reduces the burnout risk associated with non-uniformity often existing within the volume of superconductor materials. The fault current limiter modules may be electrically coupled together to form various "n" (rows).times."m" (columns) matrix configurations.

  19. Fault analysis of multichannel spacecraft power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugal-Whitehead, Norma R.; Lollar, Louis F.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center proposes to implement computer-controlled fault injection into an electrical power system breadboard to study the reactions of the various control elements of this breadboard. Elements under study include the remote power controllers, the algorithms in the control computers, and the artificially intelligent control programs resident in this breadboard. To this end, a study of electrical power system faults is being performed to yield a list of the most common power system faults. The results of this study will be applied to a multichannel high-voltage DC spacecraft power system called the large autonomous spacecraft electrical power system (LASEPS) breadboard. The results of the power system fault study and the planned implementation of these faults into the LASEPS breadboard are described.

  20. Active Fault Topography and Fault Outcrops in the Central Part of the Nukumi fault, the 1891 Nobi Earthquake Fault System, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, T.; Ueta, K.; Inoue, D.; Aoyagi, Y.; Yanagida, M.; Ichikawa, K.; Goto, N.

    2010-12-01

    It is important to evaluate the magnitude of earthquake caused by multiple active faults, taking into account the simultaneous effects. The simultaneity of adjacent active faults are often decided on the basis of geometric distances except for known these paleoseismic records. We have been studied the step area between the Nukumi fault and the Neodani fault, which appeared as consecutive ruptures in the 1891 Nobi earthquake, since 2009. The purpose of this study is to establish innovation in valuation technique of the simultaneity of adjacent active faults in addition to the paleoseismic record and the geometric distance. Geomorphological, geological and reconnaissance microearthquake surveys are concluded. The present work is intended to clarify the distribution of tectonic geomorphology along the Nukumi fault and the Neodani fault by high-resolution interpretations of airborne LiDAR DEM and aerial photograph, and the field survey of outcrops and location survey. The study area of this work is the southeastern Nukumi fault and the northwestern Neodani fault. We interpret DEM using shaded relief map and stereoscopic bird's-eye view made from 2m mesh DEM data which is obtained by airborne laser scanner of Kokusai Kogyo Co., Ltd. Aerial photographic survey is for confirmation of DEM interpretation using 1/16,000 scale photo. As a result of topographic survey, we found consecutive tectonic topography which is left lateral displacement of ridge and valley lines and reverse scarplets along the Nukumi fault and the Neodani fault . From Ogotani 2km southeastern of Nukumi pass which is located at the southeastern end of surface rupture along the Nukumi fault by previous study to Neooppa 9km southeastern of Nukumi pass, we can interpret left lateral topographies and small uphill-facing fault scarps on the terrace surface by detail DEM investigation. These topographies are unrecognized by aerial photographic survey because of heavy vegetation. We have found several new

  1. Practical application of fault tree analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Prugh, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed survey of standard and novel approaches to Fault Tree construction, based on recent developments at Du Pont, covers the effect-to-cause procedure for control systems as in process plants; the effect-to-cause procedure for processes; source-of-hazard analysis, as in pressure vessel rupture; use of the ''fire triangle'' in a Fault Tree; critical combinations of safeguard failures; action points for automatic or operator control of a process; situations involving hazardous reactant ratios; failure-initiating and failure-enabling events and intervention by the operator; ''daisy-chain'' hazards, e.g., in batch processes and ship accidents; combining batch and continuous operations in a Fault Tree; possible future structure-development procedures for fault-tree construction; and the use of quantitative results (calculated frequencies of Top-Event occurrence) to restructure the Fault Tree after improving the process to any acceptable risk level.

  2. Neural networks for fault location in substations

    SciTech Connect

    Alves da Silva, A.P.; Silveira, P.M. da; Lambert-Torres, G.; Insfran, A.H.F.

    1996-01-01

    Faults producing load disconnections or emergency situations have to be located as soon as possible to start the electric network reconfiguration, restoring normal energy supply. This paper proposes the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs), of the associative memory type, to solve the fault location problem. The main idea is to store measurement sets representing the normal behavior of the protection system, considering the basic substation topology only, into associated memories. Afterwards, these memories are employed on-line for fault location using the protection system equipment status. The associative memories work correctly even in case of malfunction of the protection system and different pre-fault configurations. Although the ANNs are trained with single contingencies only, their generalization capability allows a good performance for multiple contingencies. The resultant fault location system is in operation at the 500 kV gas-insulated substation of the Itaipu system.

  3. Maneuver Classification for Aircraft Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.

    2003-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data provide a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In the domain of fault detection in aircraft, identifying all possible faulty and proper operating modes is clearly impossible. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. To develop such a system, we use flight data collected under a controlled test environment, subject to many sources of variability. We explain where our classifier fits into the envisioned fault detection system as well as experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  4. Quantifying fault recovery in multiprocessor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malek, Miroslaw; Harary, Frank

    1990-01-01

    Various aspects of reliable computing are formalized and quantified with emphasis on efficient fault recovery. The mathematical model which proves to be most appropriate is provided by the theory of graphs. New measures for fault recovery are developed and the value of elements of the fault recovery vector are observed to depend not only on the computation graph H and the architecture graph G, but also on the specific location of a fault. In the examples, a hypercube is chosen as a representative of parallel computer architecture, and a pipeline as a typical configuration for program execution. Dependability qualities of such a system is defined with or without a fault. These qualities are determined by the resiliency triple defined by three parameters: multiplicity, robustness, and configurability. Parameters for measuring the recovery effectiveness are also introduced in terms of distance, time, and the number of new, used, and moved nodes and edges.

  5. Classification of Aircraft Maneuvers for Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data is a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In our domain of fault detection in aircraft, the first assumption is unreasonable and the second is difficult to determine. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. We explain where this subsystem fits into our envisioned fault detection system as well its experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  6. Classification of Aircraft Maneuvers for Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data provide a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In the domain of fault detection in aircraft, the first assumption is unreasonable and the second is difficult to determine. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. To develop such a system, we use flight data collected under a controlled test environment, subject to many sources of variability. We explain where our classifier fits into the envisioned fault detection system as well as experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  7. Lithography light source fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Matthew; Pantel, Erica; Nelissen, Patrick; Moen, Jeffrey; Tincu, Eduard; Dunstan, Wayne; Brown, Daniel

    2010-04-01

    High productivity is a key requirement for today's advanced lithography exposure tools. Achieving targets for wafers per day output requires consistently high throughput and availability. One of the keys to high availability is minimizing unscheduled downtime of the litho cell, including the scanner, track and light source. From the earliest eximer laser light sources, Cymer has collected extensive performance data during operation of the source, and this data has been used to identify the root causes of downtime and failures on the system. Recently, new techniques have been developed for more extensive analysis of this data to characterize the onset of typical end-of-life behavior of components within the light source and allow greater predictive capability for identifying both the type of upcoming service that will be required and when it will be required. The new techniques described in this paper are based on two core elements of Cymer's light source data management architecture. The first is enhanced performance logging features added to newer-generation light source software that captures detailed performance data; and the second is Cymer OnLine (COL) which facilitates collection and transmission of light source data. Extensive analysis of the performance data collected using this architecture has demonstrated that many light source issues exhibit recognizable patterns in their symptoms. These patterns are amenable to automated identification using a Cymer-developed model-based fault detection system, thereby alleviating the need for detailed manual review of all light source performance information. Automated recognition of these patterns also augments our ability to predict the performance trending of light sources. Such automated analysis provides several efficiency improvements for light source troubleshooting by providing more content-rich standardized summaries of light source performance, along with reduced time-to-identification for previously

  8. Modeling non-steady state radioisotope transport in the vadose zone--A case study using uranium isotopes at Pena Blanca, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, T. L.; Luo, S.; Goldstein, S. J.; Murrell, M. T.; Chu, W. L.; Dobson, P. F.

    2009-06-01

    Current models using U- and Th-series disequilibria to study radioisotope transport in groundwater systems mostly consider a steady-state situation. These models have limited applicability to the vadose zone (UZ) where the concentration and migratory behavior of radioisotopes in fluid are often transitory. We present here, as a first attempt of its kind, a model simulating the non-steady state, intermittent fluid transport in vadose layers. It provides quantitative constraints on in-situ migration of dissolved and colloidal radioisotopes in terms of retardation factor and rock-water interaction (or water transit) time. For uranium, the simulation predicts that intermittent flushing in the UZ leads to a linear relationship between reciprocal U concentration and {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratio in percolating waters, with the intercept and slope bearing information on the rates of dissolution and {alpha}-recoil of U isotopes, respectively. The general validity of the model appears to be borne out by the measurement of uranium isotopes in UZ waters collected at various times over a period during 1995-2006 from a site in the Pena Blanca mining district, Mexico, where the Nopal I uranium deposit is located. Enhanced {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratios in vadose-zone waters resulting from lengthened non-flushing time as prescribed by the model provide an interpretative basis for using {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U in cave calcites to reconstruct the regional changes in hydrology and climate. We also provide a theoretical account of the model's potential applications using radium isotopes.

  9. Modeling non-steady state radioisotope transport in the vadose zone - A case study using uranium isotopes at Peña Blanca, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, T. L.; Luo, S.; Goldstein, S. J.; Murrell, M. T.; Chu, W. L.; Dobson, P. F.

    2009-10-01

    Current models using U- and Th-series disequilibria to study radioisotope transport in groundwater systems mostly consider a steady-state situation. These models have limited applicability to the vadose zone (UZ) where the concentration and migratory behavior of radioisotopes in fluid are often transitory. We present here, as a first attempt of its kind, a model simulating the non-steady state, intermittent fluid transport in vadose layers. It provides quantitative constraints on in-situ migration of dissolved and colloidal radioisotopes in terms of retardation factor and rock-water interaction (or water transit) time. For uranium, the simulation predicts that intermittent flushing in the UZ leads to a linear relationship between reciprocal U concentration and 234U/ 238U ratio in percolating waters, with the intercept and slope bearing information on the rates of dissolution and α-recoil of U isotopes, respectively. The general validity of the model appears to be borne out by the measurement of uranium isotopes in UZ waters collected at various times over a period during 1995-2006 from a site in the Peña Blanca mining district, Mexico, where the Nopal I uranium deposit is located. Enhanced 234U/ 238U ratios in vadose-zone waters resulting from lengthened non-flushing time as prescribed by the model provide an interpretative basis for using 234U/ 238U in cave calcites to reconstruct the regional changes in hydrology and climate. We also provide a theoretical account of the model's potential applications using radium isotopes.

  10. Bent glacier tongues: A new look at Lliboutry's model of the evolution of the crooked Jatunraju Glacier (Parón Valley, Cordillera Blanca, Perú)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrizaga, Lasafam

    2013-09-01

    The article tackles the issue of which factors may influence the flow direction and morphological shape of glacier tongues terminating at tributary junctions to the main valley in high mountain landscapes. A very particular morphological form of a glacier tongue shows the Jatunraju Glacier in the Cordillera Blanca (Perú). It terminates in the superior Parón Valley with a prominent crooked form, embedded in a 250 m-high moraine pedestal. Lliboutry (1977) has explained the deviation of the Jatunraju Glacier tongue as a result of a proglacial lake outburst. Alternative hypothetical models on a general scale have been developed for the causes determining the morphological characteristics of glacier tongues. These are based on empirical field evidence from the Parón Valley and from glaciers located in other high mountain areas, in particular in the Himalaya Region, where glacier tongues in confluence settings are abundant. The comparative investigations demonstrate that the pronounced crooked form of the Jatunraju Glacier may not be the result of a single extreme event, but may have been produced as well by gradual processes. In a general context, the study shows that crooked glacier tongues are common landforms in other mountain regions and mainly intrinsic to debris-covered glaciers. The morphological evolution of glacier tongues may involve a polygenetic process pattern over a longer geological time period. Apart from the steepness of the valley gradient of the main valley, the former confluence from the source glacier with the main glacier during times of a more extensive glaciation is regarded as one of the dominating factors controlling the later evolution of glacier tongues in general ("inherited confluence model").

  11. Methodology for Designing Fault-Protection Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barltrop, Kevin; Levison, Jeffrey; Kan, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    A document describes a methodology for designing fault-protection (FP) software for autonomous spacecraft. The methodology embodies and extends established engineering practices in the technical discipline of Fault Detection, Diagnosis, Mitigation, and Recovery; and has been successfully implemented in the Deep Impact Spacecraft, a NASA Discovery mission. Based on established concepts of Fault Monitors and Responses, this FP methodology extends the notion of Opinion, Symptom, Alarm (aka Fault), and Response with numerous new notions, sub-notions, software constructs, and logic and timing gates. For example, Monitor generates a RawOpinion, which graduates into Opinion, categorized into no-opinion, acceptable, or unacceptable opinion. RaiseSymptom, ForceSymptom, and ClearSymptom govern the establishment and then mapping to an Alarm (aka Fault). Local Response is distinguished from FP System Response. A 1-to-n and n-to- 1 mapping is established among Monitors, Symptoms, and Responses. Responses are categorized by device versus by function. Responses operate in tiers, where the early tiers attempt to resolve the Fault in a localized step-by-step fashion, relegating more system-level response to later tier(s). Recovery actions are gated by epoch recovery timing, enabling strategy, urgency, MaxRetry gate, hardware availability, hazardous versus ordinary fault, and many other priority gates. This methodology is systematic, logical, and uses multiple linked tables, parameter files, and recovery command sequences. The credibility of the FP design is proven via a fault-tree analysis "top-down" approach, and a functional fault-mode-effects-and-analysis via "bottoms-up" approach. Via this process, the mitigation and recovery strategy(s) per Fault Containment Region scope (width versus depth) the FP architecture.

  12. Use of Archival Sources to Improve Water-Related Hazard Assessments at Volcán de Agua, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, A. A.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.; Williams, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    This interdisciplinary study focuses on the use of archival sources from the 18th Century Spanish Empire to develop a greater understanding of mudflow trigger mechanisms at Volcán de Agua in Guatemala. Currently, hazard assessments of debris flows at Volcán de Agua are largely based on studies of analogous events, such as the mudflow at Casita Volcano in 1998 caused by excessive rainfall generated by Hurricane Mitch. A preliminary investigation of Spanish archival sources, however, indicates that a damaging mudflow from the volcano in 1717 may have been triggered by activity at the neighbouring Volcán de Fuego. A VEI 4 eruption of Fuego in late August 1717 was followed by 33 days of localized 'retumbos' and then a major local earthquake with accompanying mudflows from several 'bocas' on the southwest flank of Agua. Of particular importance for this study is an archival source from Archivos Generales de Centro América (AGCA) that consists of a series of letters, petitions and witness statements that were written and gathered following the catastrophic events of 1717. Their purpose was to argue for royal permission to relocate the capital city, which at the time was located on the lower flanks of Volcán de Agua. Within these documents there are accounts of steaming 'avenidas' of water with sulphurous smells, and quantitative descriptions that suggest fissure formation related to volcanic activity at Volcán de Fuego. Clear evidence for volcano-tectonic activity at the time, combined with the fact there is no mention of rainfall in the documents, suggest that outbursts of mud from Agua's south flank may have been caused by a volcanic perturbation of a hydrothermal system. This single example suggests that further analysis of archival documents will provide a more accurate and robust assessment of water related hazards at Volcán de Agua than currently exists.

  13. Fault Segmentation and its Implication to the Evaluation of Future Earthquakes from Active Faults in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awata, Y.; Yoshioka, T.

    2005-12-01

    Segmentation of active faults is essential for the evaluation both of past and future faulting using geologic data from paleoseismological sites. A behavioral segment is defined as the smallest segment of fault having a characteristic history of faulting. More over, we have to estimate the earthquake segments that can be consist of multiple faulting along a system of behavioral segments. Active fault strands in Japan are segmented into behavioral segments based on fault discontinuity of 2-3 km and larger (Active Fault Res. Group, GSJ, 2000), large bend of fault strand and paleoseismicity. 431 behavioral segments, >= 10 km in length and >= 0.1 m/ky in long-term slip-rate, are identified from a database of active faults in Japan, that is constructed at AFRC, GSJ/AIST. The length of the segments is averaged 21 km and approximately 70 km in maximum. Only 8 segments are exceed 45 km in length. These lengths are very similar to those of historical surface ruptures not only in Japan since 1891 Nobi earthquake, but also in other regions having different tectonic setting. According to the scaling law between fault length and amount of displacement of behavioral segment, a maximum length of ca. 70 km can estimate a slip of ca. 14 m. This amount of slip is as large as world largest slip occurred during the 1931 Fuyun earthquake of M 8, 1999 Chichi earthquake of M 7.4 and the 2001 Central Kunlun earthquake of M 7.9 in East Asia. Recent geological and seismological studies on large earthquakes have revealed that multiple-rupturing is very common during large earthquakes. Therefore, evaluation of simultaneous faulting along a system of active faults is indispensable for the estimation of earthquake size. A Matsuda's (1990) idea of "seismogenic faults", that is divided or grouped based on the geometric discontinuity of 5 km, may useful for the best estimation of earthquake segment. The Japanese behavioral segments are grouped into "seismogenic faults", each consists of about 2

  14. Fault reactivation: The Picuris-Pecos fault system of north-central New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, David Wilson

    The PPFS is a N-trending fault system extending over 80 km in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of northern New Mexico. Precambrian basement rocks are offset 37 km in a right-lateral sense; however, this offset includes dextral strike-slip (Precambrian), mostly normal dip-slip (Pennsylvanian), mostly reverse dip-slip (Early Laramide), limited strike-slip (Late Laramide) and mostly normal dip-slip (Cenozoic). The PPFS is broken into at least 3 segments by the NE-trending Embudo fault and by several Laramide age NW-trending tear faults. These segments are (from N to S): the Taos, the Picuris, and the Pecos segments. On the east side of the Picuris segment in the Picuris Mountains, the Oligocene-Miocene age Miranda graben developed and represents a complex extension zone south of the Embudo fault. Regional analysis of remotely sensed data and geologic maps indicate that lineaments subparallel to the trace of the PPFS are longer and less frequent than lineaments that trend orthogonal to the PPFS. Significant cross cutting faults and subtle changes in fault trends in each segment are clear in the lineament data. Detailed mapping in the eastern Picuris Mountains showed that the favorably oriented Picuris segment was not reactivated in the Tertiary development of the Rio Grande rift. Segmentation of the PPFS and post-Laramide annealing of the Picuris segment are interpreted to have resulted in the development of the subparallel La Serna fault. The Picuris segment of the PPFS is offset by several E-ESE trending faults. These faults are Late Cenozoic in age and interpreted to be related to the uplift of the Picuris Mountains and the continuing sinistral motion on the Embudo fault. Differential subsidence within the Miranda graben caused the development of several synthetic and orthogonal faults between the bounding La Serna and Miranda faults. Analysis of over 10,000 outcrop scale brittle structures reveals a strong correlation between faults and fracture systems. The dominant

  15. Simulation of Fault Zone Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, P.; Abe, S.; Place, D.

    2002-12-01

    Particle models such as the discrete element model for granular assemblies and the lattice solid model provide a means to study the dynamics of fault zones. The lattice solid model was developed with the aim of progressively building up the capacity to simulate all relevent physical processes in fault zones. The present implementation of the model is able to simulate the dynamics of a granular lattice consisting of bonded or unbonded circular (2D) or spherical (3D) particles. Thermal effects (frictional hear generation, thermal expansion, heat flow) and pore fluid effects (heat induced pore pressure gradients and the consequent Darcian flow and impact on effective friction) can be modelled. Past work involving both circular particles and non-circular grains constructed as groups of bonded particles have demonstrated that grain shape has a fundamental impact on zero-th order behaviour. When circular particles are used, rolling is the most efficient means to accomodate slip of a simulated fault gouge layer leading to unrealistically low friction, typically around 0.2. This is consistent with laboratory results by Mair and Marone which have demonstrated that gouge consisting entirely of spherical beads shows a lower coefficient of friction than gouge containing irregular shaped particles. Recent work comparing quasi-2D laboratory results using pasta (Marone) with 2D numerical results (Morgan) have confirmed that numerical and laboratory results with circular ``particles'' are in agreement. When irregular grains are modelled at the lowest scale, the friction of simulated gouge layers matches with laboratory observations of rock friction (μ ~ 0.6) and is insentitive to the value used for interparticle friction (Mora et al, 2000). This indicates a self-regulation mechanism is occurring in which the group behaviour of the gouge layer remains constant at around 0.6 by balancing the amount of slip and rolling of grains within the gouge layer. A limitation of these studies

  16. Magnetic fabric of brittle fault rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomella, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) has been recognized as a highly sensitive indicator of rock fabric and is widely employed in the field of structural geology. Brittle faults are often characterized by fault breccia and gouge, fault rocks with clast-in-matrix textures. A noteworthy property of both gouge and breccia is the often observed presence of a fabric that is defined by the preferred orientation of clasts and grains in the matrix. In the very fine-grained gouge and in the matrix of the breccia the fabric is not visible in the field or in thin sections but can probably be detected by AMS analyses. For the present study different kinds of brittle fault rocks have been sampled on two faults with known tectonic settings, in order to allow for a structural interpretation of the measured AMS signal. The measurements were carried out with an AGICO MFK1-FA Kappabridge and a CS4 furnace apparatus at the Institute of Geology, University of Innsbruck. Fault gouge was sampled on the Naif fault located in the Southern Alps, E of Meran, South Tyrol, Italy. Along this fault the Permian Granodiorite overthrusts the Southalpine basement and its Permomesozoic cover. The Neoalpine thrust fault is characterised by a wide cataclastic zone and an up to 1 m thick fault gouge. The gouge was sampled using paleomagnetic sample boxes. Heating experiments indicate that the magnetic fabric is dominated by paramagnetic minerals (>95%). The samples provide a magnetic susceptibility in the range of +10*E-5 [SI]. The K-min axis of the magnetic ellipsoid corresponds approximately to the pol of the fault plane measured in the field. However the whole magnetic ellipsoid shows a variation in the inclination compared to the structural data. Fine-grained ultracataclasites were sampled on the Assergi fault, located in the Abruzzi Apennines, NE of L'Aquila, Italy. This normal fault was active in historical time and crosscuts limestones as well as talus deposits. An up to 20 cm thick

  17. Reconfigurable fault tolerant avionics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, M. M.; Asami, K.; Cho, Mengu

    This paper presents the design of a reconfigurable avionics system based on modern Static Random Access Memory (SRAM)-based Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to be used in future generations of nano satellites. A major concern in satellite systems and especially nano satellites is to build robust systems with low-power consumption profiles. The system is designed to be flexible by providing the capability of reconfiguring itself based on its orbital position. As Single Event Upsets (SEU) do not have the same severity and intensity in all orbital locations, having the maximum at the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) and the polar cusps, the system does not have to be fully protected all the time in its orbit. An acceptable level of protection against high-energy cosmic rays and charged particles roaming in space is provided within the majority of the orbit through software fault tolerance. Check pointing and roll back, besides control flow assertions, is used for that level of protection. In the minority part of the orbit where severe SEUs are expected to exist, a reconfiguration for the system FPGA is initiated where the processor systems are triplicated and protection through Triple Modular Redundancy (TMR) with feedback is provided. This technique of reconfiguring the system as per the level of the threat expected from SEU-induced faults helps in reducing the average dynamic power consumption of the system to one-third of its maximum. This technique can be viewed as a smart protection through system reconfiguration. The system is built on the commercial version of the (XC5VLX50) Xilinx Virtex5 FPGA on bulk silicon with 324 IO. Simulations of orbit SEU rates were carried out using the SPENVIS web-based software package.

  18. Fault failure with moderate earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, M.J.S.; Linde, A.T.; Gladwin, M.T.; Borcherdt, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution strain and tilt recordings were made in the near-field of, and prior to, the May 1983 Coalinga earthquake (ML = 6.7, ?? = 51 km), the August 4, 1985, Kettleman Hills earthquake (ML = 5.5, ?? = 34 km), the April 1984 Morgan Hill earthquake (ML = 6.1, ?? = 55 km), the November 1984 Round Valley earthquake (ML = 5.8, ?? = 54 km), the January 14, 1978, Izu, Japan earthquake (ML = 7.0, ?? = 28 km), and several other smaller magnitude earthquakes. These recordings were made with near-surface instruments (resolution 10-8), with borehole dilatometers (resolution 10-10) and a 3-component borehole strainmeter (resolution 10-9). While observed coseismic offsets are generally in good agreement with expectations from elastic dislocation theory, and while post-seismic deformation continued, in some cases, with a moment comparable to that of the main shock, preseismic strain or tilt perturbations from hours to seconds (or less) before the main shock are not apparent above the present resolution. Precursory slip for these events, if any occurred, must have had a moment less than a few percent of that of the main event. To the extent that these records reflect general fault behavior, the strong constraint on the size and amount of slip triggering major rupture makes prediction of the onset times and final magnitudes of the rupture zones a difficult task unless the instruments are fortuitously installed near the rupture initiation point. These data are best explained by an inhomogeneous failure model for which various areas of the fault plane have either different stress-slip constitutive laws or spatially varying constitutive parameters. Other work on seismic waveform analysis and synthetic waveforms indicates that the rupturing process is inhomogeneous and controlled by points of higher strength. These models indicate that rupture initiation occurs at smaller regions of higher strength which, when broken, allow runaway catastrophic failure. ?? 1987.

  19. Robot Position Sensor Fault Tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldridge, Hal A.

    1997-01-01

    Robot systems in critical applications, such as those in space and nuclear environments, must be able to operate during component failure to complete important tasks. One failure mode that has received little attention is the failure of joint position sensors. Current fault tolerant designs require the addition of directly redundant position sensors which can affect joint design. A new method is proposed that utilizes analytical redundancy to allow for continued operation during joint position sensor failure. Joint torque sensors are used with a virtual passive torque controller to make the robot joint stable without position feedback and improve position tracking performance in the presence of unknown link dynamics and end-effector loading. Two Cartesian accelerometer based methods are proposed to determine the position of the joint. The joint specific position determination method utilizes two triaxial accelerometers attached to the link driven by the joint with the failed position sensor. The joint specific method is not computationally complex and the position error is bounded. The system wide position determination method utilizes accelerometers distributed on different robot links and the end-effector to determine the position of sets of multiple joints. The system wide method requires fewer accelerometers than the joint specific method to make all joint position sensors fault tolerant but is more computationally complex and has lower convergence properties. Experiments were conducted on a laboratory manipulator. Both position determination methods were shown to track the actual position satisfactorily. A controller using the position determination methods and the virtual passive torque controller was able to servo the joints to a desired position during position sensor failure.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Thrust Fault Rupture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabuchian, Vahe

    Thrust fault earthquakes are investigated in the laboratory by generating dynamic shear ruptures along pre-existing frictional faults in rectangular plates. A considerable body of evidence suggests that dip-slip earthquakes exhibit enhanced ground motions in the acute hanging wall wedge as an outcome of broken symmetry between hanging and foot wall plates with respect to the earth surface. To understand the physical behavior of thrust fault earthquakes, particularly ground motions near the earth surface, ruptures are nucleated in analog laboratory experiments and guided up-dip towards the simulated earth surface. The transient slip event and emitted radiation mimic a natural thrust earthquake. High-speed photography and laser velocimeters capture the rupture evolution, outputting a full-field view of photo-elastic fringe contours proportional to maximum shearing stresses as well as continuous ground motion velocity records at discrete points on the specimen. Earth surface-normal measurements validate selective enhancement of hanging wall ground motions for both sub-Rayleigh and super-shear rupture speeds. The earth surface breaks upon rupture tip arrival to the fault trace, generating prominent Rayleigh surface waves. A rupture wave is sensed in the hanging wall but is, however, absent from the foot wall plate: a direct consequence of proximity from fault to seismometer. Signatures in earth surface-normal records attenuate with distance from the fault trace. Super-shear earthquakes feature greater amplitudes of ground shaking profiles, as expected from the increased tectonic pressures required to induce super-shear transition. Paired stations measure fault parallel and fault normal ground motions at various depths, which yield slip and opening rates through direct subtraction of like components. Peak fault slip and opening rates associated with the rupture tip increase with proximity to the fault trace, a result of selective ground motion amplification in the

  1. Structural and geomorphic fault segmentations of the Doruneh Fault System, central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farbod, Yassaman; Bellier, Olivier; Shabanian, Esmaeil; Abbassi, Mohammad Reza

    2010-05-01

    The active tectonics of Iran results from the northward Arabia-Eurasia convergence at a rate of ~22±2 mm/yr at the longitude of Bahrain (e.g., Sella et al., 2002). At the southwestern and southern boundaries of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone, the convergence is taken up by the continental collision in the Zagros Mountains, and the active subduction of Makran, respectively. Further north, the northward motion not absorbed by the Makran subduction is expressed as the N-trending right lateral shear between central Iran and Eurasia at a rate of ~16 mm/yr (e.g., Regard et al., 2005; Vernant et al, 2004). This shear involves N-trending right-lateral fault systems, which are extended at both sides of the Lut block up to the latitude of 34°N. North of this latitude, about 35°N, the left-lateral Doruneh Fault separates the N-trending right-lateral fault systems from the northern deformation domains (i.e., the Alborz, Kopeh Dagh and Binalud mountain ranges). At the Iranian tectonic scale, the Doruneh Fault represents a curved-shape, 600-km-long structure through central Iran, which runs westward from the Iran-Afghanistan boundary (i.e., the eastern boundary of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone) to the Great Kavir desert. Nevertheless, east of the longitude of 56°45'E, the fault is expressed as an E-trending ~360-km-long fault (hereinafter the Doruneh Fault System - DFS) having a geological evolution history different from the western part (the Great Kavir Fault System). In this study, we look for characterizing geomorphic and structural features of active faulting on the DFS. Detailed structural and geomorphic mapping based on satellite Imageries (SPOT5 and Landsat ETM+) and SRTM digital topographic data, complemented with field surveys allowed us to establish structural and geomorphic segmentations along the DFS. According to our observations, the DFS is comprised of three distinct fault zones: (1) The 100-km-long, N75°E-trending western fault zone, which is

  2. The End Of Chi-Shan Fault:Tectonic of Transtensional Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, H.; Song, G.

    2011-12-01

    Chishan fault is an active strike-slip fault that located at the Southwestern Taiwan and extend to the offshore area of SouShan in Kaohsiung. The strike and dip of the fault is N80E,50N. It's believed that the Wushan Formation of Chishan fault, which is composed of sandstone, thrusts upon the Northwestern Kutingkeng Formation, which is composed of mudstone. Chishan fault is acting as a reversal fault with sinistral motion. (Tsan and Keng,1968; Hsieh, 1970; Wen-Pu Geng, 1981). This left-lateral strike-slip fault extend to shelf break and stop, with a transtensional basin at the termination. The transtensional basin has stopped extending to open sea, whereas it is spreading toward the inshore area. Therefore, we can know that a young extensional activity is developing at the offshore seabed of Tsoying Naval Port and the activity is relative to the transtension of left-lateral fault. ( Gwo-Shyh Song, 2010). Tectonic of transtensional basin deformed in strike-slip settings overland have been described by many authors, but the field outcrop could be distoryed by Weathering and made the tectonic features incomplete. Hence, this research use multibeam bathymetry and 3.5-kHz sub-bottom profiler data data collected from the offshore extended part of Chishan fault in Kaohsiung to define the transtensional characteristics of Chishan fault. At first, we use the multibeam bathymetry data to make a Geomorphological map of our research area and we can see a triangulate depressed area near shelf break. Then, we use Fledermaus to print 3D diagram for understanding the distribution of the major normal faults(fig.1). Furthermore, we find that there are amount of listric normal fault and the area between the listric faults is curving. After that, we use the 3.5-kHz sub-bottom profiler data to understand the subsurface structure of the normal faults and the curved area between the listric normal fault, which seems to be En e'chelon folds. As the amount of displacement on the wrench

  3. Microearthquake seismicity at the intersection between the Kazerun fault and the Main Recent Fault (Zagros, Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamini-Fard, Farzam; Hatzfeld, Denis; Tatar, Mohammad; Mokhtari, Mohammad

    2006-07-01

    Seismicity and fault plane solutions of earthquakes at the intersection between the Main Recent Fault (a right-lateral strike-slip fault that bounds the Zagros to the NE) and the Kazerun Fault system (another right-lateral zone that crosses the Zagros) show slip to be partitioned into nearly pure strike-slip at shallow depths and nearly pure thrust slip below 12 km. Such slip partitioning is commonly observed where oblique convergence occurs, but in general faults of different styles lie adjacent to one another, not at different depths with one below the other. We provide evidence for this partitioning in a microearthquake study in which we deployed a temporary network of 29 seismographs for 7 weeks. We located no activity north of the Main Zagros Reverse Fault (MZRF), which separates the Zagros fold belt from Central Iran. Most earthquakes occurred between the northern termination of the Kazerun Fault and the MZRF, but not near to known major faults. Activity is limited to the upper crust, between 2 and 16 km. Most of the focal mechanisms show strike-slip faulting, dextral if the NS striking plane is the active plane, but a few for the deepest events show reverse faulting, distributed between the Kazerun Fault and the MZRF, with P-axis trending consistently ~NS. This partitioning of the deformation with depth suggests that the brittle upper crust deforms by slip on pre-existing faults that strike obliquely but that the lower crust accommodates the shortening by reverse faulting. We infer that the deformation in the upper part of the crust reflects a stiffer medium in which pre-existing faults localize the deformation. The largest event recorded during this experiment, located at the same place as the destructive 1977 Naghan earthquake (Mw ~5.9, 348 victims), shows reverse faulting, likely related to the Dopolan High Zagros Fault. The crustal thickness deduced from receiver function analysis does not show a marked difference across the Kazerun fault, which suggests

  4. Is There any Relationship Between Active Tabriz Fault Zone and Bozkush Fault Zones, NW Iran?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ISIK, V.; Saber, R.; Caglayan, A.

    2012-12-01

    Tectonic plate motions and consequent earthquakes can be actively observed along the northwestern Iran. The Tabriz fault zone (TFZ), also called the North Tabriz fault, active right-lateral strike-slip fault zone with slip rates estimated as ~8 mm/yr, has been vigorously deforming much of northwestern Iran for over the past several million years. Historical earthquakes on the TFZ consist of large magnitude, complimentary rupture length and changed the landscape of regions surrounding the fault zone. The TFZ in the city of Bostanabad is more segmented with several strands and joined by a series of WNW-ESE trending faults, called the Bozkush fault zones. The Bozkush fault zones (BFZ's) (south and north), bounding arch-shaped Bozkush mountains, generates not only hundreds of small earthquakes each year but also has provided significant earthquakes that have been historically documented. The rock units deformed within the BFZ's include Eocene-Oligocene volcanic rocks with intercalation limestone, Oligo-Miocene clastic rocks with intercalation gypsiferous marl and Plio-Quaternary volcano-sedimentary rocks, travertine and alluvium. The North and South Bozkush fault zones are characterized by development of structures typically associated with transpression. These include right-lateral strike-slip faults, thrust faults and foldings. Our field studies indicate that these zones include step to sub-vertical fault surfaces trending NW and NE with slickenlines. Slickensides preserve brittle kinematic indicators (e.g., Riedel shear patterns, slickenside marks) suggesting both dextral displacements and top-to-the-NE/NW and-SE/SW sense of shearing. Besides, mesoscopic and microscopic ductile kinematic indicators (e.g., asymmetric porphyroclasts, C/S fabrics) within Miocene gypsum marl show dextral displacements. Fault rocks along most of these faults consist of incohesive fault breccia and gauge. Adjacent to the fault contact evidence of bedding in Oligo-Miocene and Plio

  5. Neotectonic faulting in northern Norway; the Stuoragurra and Nordmannvikdalen postglacial faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehls, John F.; Olesen, Odleiv; Olsen, Lars; Harald Blikra, Lars

    2000-10-01

    A systematic compilation and characterisation of many reports of neotectonic crustal deformation in Norway (both on local and regional scales) has identified two neotectonic faults in northern Norway. The Stuoragurra Fault is a large reverse fault in Finnmark County. The Nordmannvikdalen fault is a much smaller normal fault in Troms County. The Stuoragurra postglacial fault can be followed, in several discontinuous sections, for 80 km, in a NE-SW direction. The fault has up to 10 m of displacement. During 1998, two trenches were made across the fault. The hanging wall was seen to be thrust upwards over the footwall, with 7 m vertical displacement evident from displaced glacial contacts. The fault did not penetrate the overlying glacial materials, but rather folded them, forming a blind thrust. Large liquefaction and other deformation structures were found in the glaciofluvial sediments in both trenches. Veins of angular and subangular pebbles from the local bedrock penetrate more than 10 m laterally from the thrust plane and into the sediments in the footwall. It is thought that these veins were injected during the fault activity. The major deformation of the sediments has a décollement plane that continues laterally in the E/B horizon contact of the modern soil on top of the footwall. This may indicate that an initial pedogenesis had taken place before the fault activity occurred, however no macro plant fossils to support this were found in the possible buried soil. Deformational structures seen in the trench can be explained as a result of one major fault event. The Nordmannvikdalen postglacial fault is a NW-SE trending normal fault, dipping to the NE. The fault offsets till on the NW slope of Nordmannvikdalen. The escarpment varies in height from 0.5 to 1.5 m, with a trench often present between the hanging wall and the footwall. The fault locally splits into two subparallel branches, however this is probably only in the glacial overburden. Ground penetrating

  6. Fault activation due to glacially induced stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, R.; Lund, B.; Wu, P. P.

    2013-12-01

    Melting glaciers worldwide have an effect on sea level, but also on the stability of pre-existing faults. The load due to continental ice sheets or glaciers depresses the surface below, leading to changes in the lithospheric stresses. The accumulation of ice mass increases the vertical stress, and the horizontal stresses increase due to the accompanying flexure of the lithosphere. During deglaciation, ice-mass loss causes a simultaneous decrease in vertical stress; however, horizontal stresses decrease only slowly due to the slow readjusting of the Earth. After the end of deglaciation, only the induced horizontal stresses remain as the process of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) proceeds visco-elastically. The modelling of this process and the estimation of fault slip is enabled by a new GIA-fault model. However, this finite-element model is only available in two dimensions, and the extension to three dimensions is a necessary step further to allow the comparison of obtained fault slips to observations of glacially induced faults in Europe and North America. The model has several input parameters, which affect the activation time of faults and their resulting slip (e.g. ice history, rheology of the Earth, frictional properties, pore-fluid pressure). We will present the results of the new 3D model and show the sensitivity of faults with respect to modelling parameters. Furthermore, a comparison to observations will be presented.

  7. Fault activation due to glacially induced stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Rebekka; Lund, Björn

    2014-05-01

    Melting glaciers worldwide have an effect on sea level, but also on the stability of pre-existing faults. The load due to continental ice sheets or glaciers depresses the surface below, leading to changes in the lithospheric stresses. The accumulation of ice mass increases the vertical stress, and the horizontal stresses increase due to the accompanying flexure of the lithosphere. During deglaciation, ice-mass loss causes a simultaneous decrease in vertical stress; however, horizontal stresses decrease only slowly due to the slow readjusting of the Earth. After the end of deglaciation, only the induced horizontal stresses remain as the process of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) proceeds visco-elastically. The modelling of this process and the estimation of fault slip is enabled by a new GIA-fault model. However, this finite-element model is only available in two dimensions, and the extension to three dimensions is a necessary step further to allow the comparison of obtained fault slips to observations of glacially induced faults in Europe and North America. The model has several input parameters, which affect the activation time of faults and their resulting slip (e.g. ice history, rheology of the Earth, frictional properties, pore-fluid pressure). We will present the results of the new 3D model and show the sensitivity of faults with respect to modelling parameters. Furthermore, a comparison to observations will be presented.

  8. Earthquake faulting as a structural process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    Structural geology is concerned with the history of movement in the Earth's crust and the processes by which displacements occur. In the upper one third to one half of deforming continental crust, displacement is accommodated largely by seismic slip increments on existing faults. It follows that earthquakes and related processes are an integral part of structural geology. Traditionally, structural geologists have been preoccupied with the complexity of the finite deformation within fault zones and with the stress states prevailing at the initiation of faults in intact crust. Future structural work should be directed more towards understanding the dynamic character of fault reactivation during incremental slip, and related effects. Questions of interest include rheological and geometrical controls on the initiation, perturbation and termination of ruptures; directivity effects associated with rupture propagation; the recognition of structures resulting from repeated stress cycling within seismogenic crust; and identification of structural features diagnostic of shear stress levels during faulting. Structures arising from the inter-relationships between slip episodes and induced fluid flow are of special importance, because these dynamic fault processes appear influential in the development of much fault-hosted mineralization. Mesothermal gold-quartz lodes hosted in high-angle reverse shear zones of mixed brittle-ductile character form illustrative examples of structures that, arguably, can only be interpreted by seismo-structural analysis embodying the concepts listed above.

  9. Formal Validation of Fault Management Design Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Corrina; Karban, Robert; Andolfato, Luigi; Day, John

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this paper describes an approach used to develop SysML modeling patterns to express the behavior of fault protection, test the model's logic by performing fault injection simulations, and verify the fault protection system's logical design via model checking. A representative example, using a subset of the fault protection design for the Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) system, was modeled with SysML State Machines and JavaScript as Action Language. The SysML model captures interactions between relevant system components and system behavior abstractions (mode managers, error monitors, fault protection engine, and devices/switches). Development of a method to implement verifiable and lightweight executable fault protection models enables future missions to have access to larger fault test domains and verifiable design patterns. A tool-chain to transform the SysML model to jpf-Statechart compliant Java code and then verify the generated code via model checking was established. Conclusions and lessons learned from this work are also described, as well as potential avenues for further research and development.

  10. Data Fault Detection in Medical Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Qian; Gao, Zhipeng; Qiu, Xuesong; Meng, Luoming

    2015-01-01

    Medical body sensors can be implanted or attached to the human body to monitor the physiological parameters of patients all the time. Inaccurate data due to sensor faults or incorrect placement on the body will seriously influence clinicians’ diagnosis, therefore detecting sensor data faults has been widely researched in recent years. Most of the typical approaches to sensor fault detection in the medical area ignore the fact that the physiological indexes of patients aren’t changing synchronously at the same time, and fault values mixed with abnormal physiological data due to illness make it difficult to determine true faults. Based on these facts, we propose a Data Fault Detection mechanism in Medical sensor networks (DFD-M). Its mechanism includes: (1) use of a dynamic-local outlier factor (D-LOF) algorithm to identify outlying sensed data vectors; (2) use of a linear regression model based on trapezoidal fuzzy numbers to predict which readings in the outlying data vector are suspected to be faulty; (3) the proposal of a novel judgment criterion of fault state according to the prediction values. The simulation results demonstrate the efficiency and superiority of DFD-M. PMID:25774708

  11. Data fault detection in medical sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Qian; Gao, Zhipeng; Qiu, Xuesong; Meng, Luoming

    2015-01-01

    Medical body sensors can be implanted or attached to the human body to monitor the physiological parameters of patients all the time. Inaccurate data due to sensor faults or incorrect placement on the body will seriously influence clinicians' diagnosis, therefore detecting sensor data faults has been widely researched in recent years. Most of the typical approaches to sensor fault detection in the medical area ignore the fact that the physiological indexes of patients aren't changing synchronously at the same time, and fault values mixed with abnormal physiological data due to illness make it difficult to determine true faults. Based on these facts, we propose a Data Fault Detection mechanism in Medical sensor networks (DFD-M). Its mechanism includes: (1) use of a dynamic-local outlier factor (D-LOF) algorithm to identify outlying sensed data vectors; (2) use of a linear regression model based on trapezoidal fuzzy numbers to predict which readings in the outlying data vector are suspected to be faulty; (3) the proposal of a novel judgment criterion of fault state according to the prediction values. The simulation results demonstrate the efficiency and superiority of DFD-M. PMID:25774708

  12. On-line diagnosis of unrestricted faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. F.; Sundstrom, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A formal model for the study of on-line diagnosis is introduced and used to investigate the diagnosis of unrestricted faults. A fault of a system S is considered to be a transformation of S into another system S' at some time tau. The resulting faulty system is taken to be the system which looks like S up to time tau, and like S' thereafter. Notions of fault tolerance error are defined in terms of the resulting system being able to mimic some desired behavior as specified by a system similar to S. A notion of on-line diagnosis is formulated which involves an external detector and a maximum time delay within which every error caused by a fault in a prescribed set must be detected. It is shown that if a system is on-line diagnosable for the unrestricted set of faults then the detector is at least as complex, in terms of state set size, as the specification. The use of inverse systems for the diagnosis of unrestricted faults is considered. A partial characterization of those inverses which can be used for unrestricted fault diagnosis is obtained.

  13. Poro-Elasto-Plastic Off-Fault Response and Dynamics of Earthquake Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Evan Tyler

    Previous models of earthquake rupture dynamics have neglected interesting deformational properties of fault zone materials. While most current studies involving off-fault inelastic deformation employ simple brittle failure yield criteria such as the Drucker-Prager yield criterion, the material surrounding the fault plane itself, known as fault gouge, has the tendency to deform in a ductile manner accompanied by compaction. We incorporate this behavior into a new constitutive model of undrained fault gouge in a dynamic rupture model. Dynamic compaction of undrained fault gouge occurs ahead of the rupture front. This corresponds to an increase in pore pressure which preweakens the fault, reducing the static friction. Subsequent dilatancy and softening of the gouge causes a reduction in pore pressure, resulting in fault restrengthening and brief slip pulses. This leads to localization of inelastic failure to a narrow shear zone. We extend the undrained gouge model to a study of self-similar rough faults. Extreme compaction and dilatancy occur at restraining and releasing bends, respectively. The consequent elevated pore pressure at restraining bends weakens the fault and allows the rupture to easily pass, while the decrease in pore pressure at releasing bends dynamically strengthens the fault and slows rupture. In comparison to other recent models, we show that the effects of fault roughness on propagation distance, slip distribution, and rupture velocity are diminished or reversed. Next, we represent large subduction zone megathrust earthquakes with a dynamic rupture model of a shallow dipping fault underlying an accretionary wedge. In previous models by our group [Ma, 2012; Ma and Hirakawa, 2013], inelastic deformation of wedge material was shown to enhance vertical uplift and potential tsunamigenesis. Here, we include a shallow region of velocity strengthening friction with a rate-and-state framework. We find that coseismic increase of the basal friction drives

  14. Experimental study on propagation of fault slip along a simulated rock fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Around pre-existing geological faults in the crust, we have often observed off-fault damage zone where there are many fractures with various scales, from ~ mm to ~ m and their density typically increases with proximity to the fault. One of the fracture formation processes is considered to be dynamic shear rupture propagation on the faults, which leads to the occurrence of earthquakes. Here, I have conducted experiments on propagation of fault slip along a pre-cut rock surface to investigate the damaging behavior of rocks with slip propagation. For the experiments, I used a pair of metagabbro blocks from Tamil Nadu, India, of which the contacting surface simulates a fault of 35 cm in length and 1cm width. The experiments were done with the similar uniaxial loading configuration to Rosakis et al. (2007). Axial load σ is applied to the fault plane with an angle 60° to the loading direction. When σ is 5kN, normal and shear stresses on the fault are 1.25MPa and 0.72MPa, respectively. Timing and direction of slip propagation on the fault during the experiments were monitored with several strain gauges arrayed at an interval along the fault. The gauge data were digitally recorded with a 1MHz sampling rate and 16bit resolution. When σ is 4.8kN is applied, we observed some fault slip events where a slip nucleates spontaneously in a subsection of the fault and propagates to the whole fault. However, the propagation speed is about 1.2km/s, much lower than the S-wave velocity of the rock. This indicates that the slip events were not earthquake-like dynamic rupture ones. More efforts are needed to reproduce earthquake-like slip events in the experiments. This work is supported by the JSPS KAKENHI (26870912).

  15. Dissecting Oceanic Detachment Faults: Fault Zone Geometry, Deformation Mechanisms, and Nature of Fluid-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnemains, D.; Escartin, J.; Verlaguet, A.; Andreani, M.; Mevel, C.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the extreme strain localization at long-lived oceanic detachment faults rooting deeply below the axis, we present results of geological investigations at the 13°19'N detachment along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, conducted during the ODEMAR cruise (Nov-Dec13, NO Pourquoi Pas?) with ROV Victor6000 (IFREMER). During this cruise we investigated and sampled the corrugated fault to understand its geometry, nature of deformation, and links to fluid flow. We identified and explored 7 fault outcrops on the flanks of microbathymetric striations subparallel to extension. These outcrops expose extensive fault planes, with the most prominent ones extending 40-90m laterally, and up to 10 m vertically. These fault surfaces systematically show subhorizontal striations subparallel to extension, and define slabs of fault-rock that are flat and also striated at sample scale. Visual observations show a complex detachment fault zone, with anastomosing fault planes at outcrop scale (1-10 m), with a highly heterogeneous distribution of deformation. We observe heterogeneity in fault-rock nature at outcrop scale. In situ samples from striated faults are primarily basalt breccias with prior green-schist facies alteration, and a few ultramafic fault-rocks that show a complex deformation history, with early schistose textures, brittlely reworked as clasts within the fault. The basalt breccias show variable silicification and associated sulfides, recording important fluid-rock interactions during exhumation. To understand the link between fluid and deformation during exhumation, we will present microstructural observation of deformation textures, composition, and distribution and origin of quartz and sulfides, as well as constraints on the temperature of silicifying fluids from fluid inclusions in quartz. These results allow us to characterize in detail the detachment fault zone geometry, and investigate the timing of silicification relative to deformation.

  16. Geologic character of fault geometry and deformation of the Wildcat Fault, Berkeley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishi, C. T.; Karasaki, K.; Goto, J.; Moriya, T.; Ueta, K.; Tanaka, S.; Hamada, T.; Ito, H.; Tsukuda, K.

    2010-12-01

    In our analog study of fault hydrology, we use an interdisciplinary approach to investigate fault geology and its effects on regional hydrology. The study area is along the Wildcat Fault, a right-lateral strike-slip fault that is a splay of the Hayward Fault, which extends along the west side of the Berkeley Hills, California. Geologic mapping suggests that the Wildcat Fault here mainly separates the Miocene Claremont Formation composed of shale and cherts, and the Miocene-Pliocene Orinda Formation/San Pablo Group, composed of conglomerate, sandstone, and siltstone. We excavated several trenches to expose bedrock; we acquired seismic reflection and electrical resistivity data and three vertical boreholes and one inclined borehole cored across the Wildcat Fault. Trenching and coring indicate that the geology is more complex than the surface mapping indicates, especially along the contact between the Claremont Formation and Orinda Formation/San Pablo Group. In trench exposures, we mapped several zones of fault gouge that marked the contact between chert and siltstone, sandstone and siltstone, and chert and chert. At depths <150 m subsurface, we saw more than thirty zones of breccia and gouge, and two zones of cataclasite. Cores from vertical boring show a lithological dominance of Claremont Formation. We suggest that the Wildcat Fault in this area contains multiple shear zones in a zone of deformation at least 150 m wide. We have built a 3D geologic model to show the geometry of fault strands associated with the Wildcat Fault. The influence of fault gouge, breccia and cataclasite on the hydrology of the Wildcat Fault zone, slug, injection, and pumping tests in boreholes are reported by Karasaki et al. in a companion paper.

  17. Software-implemented fault insertion: An FTMP example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeck, Edward W.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.; Segall, Zary Z.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents a model for fault insertion through software; describes its implementation on a fault-tolerant computer, FTMP; presents a summary of fault detection, identification, and reconfiguration data collected with software-implemented fault insertion; and compares the results to hardware fault insertion data. Experimental results show detection time to be a function of time of insertion and system workload. For the fault detection time, there is no correlation between software-inserted faults and hardware-inserted faults; this is because hardware-inserted faults must manifest as errors before detection, whereas software-inserted faults immediately exercise the error detection mechanisms. In summary, the software-implemented fault insertion is able to be used as an evaluation technique for the fault-handling capabilities of a system in fault detection, identification and recovery. Although the software-inserted faults do not map directly to hardware-inserted faults, experiments show software-implemented fault insertion is capable of emulating hardware fault insertion, with greater ease and automation.

  18. Nonlinear Network Dynamics on Earthquake Fault Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, P. B.; Rundle, J. B.; Tiampo, K. F.

    2001-12-01

    Understanding the physics of earthquakes is essential if large events are ever to be forecast. Real faults occur in topologically complex networks that exhibit cooperative, emergent space-time behavior that includes precursory quiescence or activation, and clustering of events. The purpose of this work is to investigate the sensitivity of emergent behavior of fault networks to changes in the physics on the scale of single faults or smaller. In order to investigate the effect of changes at small scales on the behavior of the network, we need to construct models of earthquake fault systems that contain the essential physics. A network topology is therefore defined in an elastic medium, the stress Green's functions (i.e. the stress transfer coefficients) are computed, frictional properties are defined and the system is driven via the slip deficit as defined below. The long-range elastic interactions produce mean-field dynamics in the simulations. We focus in this work on the major strike-slip faults in Southern California that produce the most frequent and largest magnitude events. To determine the topology and properties of the network, we used the tabulation of fault properties published in the literature. We have found that the statistical distribution of large earthquakes on a model of a topologically complex, strongly correlated real fault network is highly sensitive to the precise nature of the stress dissipation properties of the friction laws associated with individual faults. These emergent, self-organizing space-time modes of behavior are properties of the network as a whole, rather than of the individual fault segments of which the network is comprised (ref: PBR et al., Physical Review Letters, in press, 2001).

  19. Fault interactions and growth in an outcrop-scale system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicol, Andy; Walsh, John; Childs, Conrad; Manzocchi, Tom; Schoepfer, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Fault geometries and strike-slip displacements in a moderately dipping (~50°) multi-layer sequence have been analysed to constrain the evolution of an outcrop-scale fault system in coastal New Zealand. Displacements and geometries of small faults (lengths 1-200 m and maximum displacements 0.007-3 m) were sampled from a horizontal shore platform up to 120 m wide and 1.5 km long with near 100% exposure. Displacement profiles have variable shapes that mainly reflect fault interactions, with individual faults being both hard- and soft-linked. Variable displacement profiles produce an average profile for all faults that is near-triangular, with displacement gradients (and displacement-length ratios) increasing by an order of magnitude from smallest to largest faults. Within fault zones these gradients are accompanied by secondary faults, which are typically of greatest density close to fault intersections, in relay zones and at fault tips. Horsetail and synthetic splays confined to the regions around fault tips are incompatible with gradual fault propagation for the duration of growth. Instead, fault displacements and tip geometries are consistent with growth initially dominated by fault propagation followed by displacement accumulation and approximately stationary fault tips. Retardation of propagation is thought to arise due to fault interactions and associated reduction of tip stresses, with the early change from propagation- to displacement-dominated growth stages produced by fault-system saturation (i.e., all faults are interacting). Initial rapid fault propagation succeeded by displacement-dominated growth accounts for different fault types over a range of scales suggesting that this fault growth model has wide application.

  20. Efficient fault diagnosis of helicopter gearboxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, H.; Danai, K.; Lewicki, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    Application of a diagnostic system to a helicopter gearbox is presented. The diagnostic system is a nonparametric pattern classifier that uses a multi-valued influence matrix (MVIM) as its diagnostic model and benefits from a fast learning algorithm that enables it to estimate its diagnostic model from a small number of measurement-fault data. To test this diagnostic system, vibration measurements were collected from a helicopter gearbox test stand during accelerated fatigue tests and at various fault instances. The diagnostic results indicate that the MVIM system can accurately detect and diagnose various gearbox faults so long as they are included in training.

  1. Geofluid Dynamics of Faulted Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garven, G.; Jung, B.; Boles, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Faults are known to affect basin-scale groundwater flow, and exert a profound control on petroleum migration/accumulation, the PVT-history of hydrothermal fluids, and the natural (submarine) seepage from offshore reservoirs. For example, in the Santa Barbara basin, measured gas flow data from a natural submarine seep area in the Santa Barbara Channel helps constrain fault permeability k ~ 30 millidarcys for the large-scale upward migration of methane-bearing formation fluids along one of the major fault zones. At another offshore site near Platform Holly, pressure-transducer time-series data from a 1.5 km deep exploration well in the South Ellwood Field demonstrate a strong ocean tidal component, due to vertical fault connectivity to the seafloor. Analytical solutions to the poroelastic flow equation can be used to extract both fault permeability and compressibility parameters, based on tidal-signal amplitude attenuation and phase shift at depth. These data have proven useful in constraining coupled hydrogeologic 2-D models for reactive flow and geomechanical deformation. In a similar vein, our studies of faults in the Los Angeles basin, suggest an important role for the natural retention of fluids along the Newport-Inglewood fault zone. Based on the estimates of fault permeability derived above, we have also constructed new two-dimensional numerical simulations to characterize large-scale multiphase flow in complex heterogeneous and anisotropic geologic profiles, such as the Los Angeles basin. The numerical model was developed in our lab at Tufts from scratch, and based on an IMPES-type algorithm for a finite element/volume mesh. This numerical approach allowed us model large differentials in fluid saturation and relative permeability, caused by complex geological heterogeneities associated with sedimentation and faulting. Our two-phase flow models also replicated the formation-scale patterns of petroleum accumulation associated with the basin margin, where deep

  2. Negative Selection Algorithm for Aircraft Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, D.; KrishnaKumar, K.; Wong, D.; Berry, M.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated a real-valued Negative Selection Algorithm (NSA) for fault detection in man-in-the-loop aircraft operation. The detection algorithm uses body-axes angular rate sensory data exhibiting the normal flight behavior patterns, to generate probabilistically a set of fault detectors that can detect any abnormalities (including faults and damages) in the behavior pattern of the aircraft flight. We performed experiments with datasets (collected under normal and various simulated failure conditions) using the NASA Ames man-in-the-loop high-fidelity C-17 flight simulator. The paper provides results of experiments with different datasets representing various failure conditions.

  3. Cooperative application/OS DRAM fault recovery.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Bridges, Patrick G.; Heroux, Michael Allen; Hoemmen, Mark; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2012-05-01

    Exascale systems will present considerable fault-tolerance challenges to applications and system software. These systems are expected to suffer several hard and soft errors per day. Unfortunately, many fault-tolerance methods in use, such as rollback recovery, are unsuitable for many expected errors, for example DRAM failures. As a result, applications will need to address these resilience challenges to more effectively utilize future systems. In this paper, we describe work on a cross-layer application/OS framework to handle uncorrected memory errors. We illustrate the use of this framework through its integration with a new fault-tolerant iterative solver within the Trilinos library, and present initial convergence results.

  4. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  5. Tunable architecture for aircraft fault detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, Subhabrata (Inventor); Papageorgiou, George (Inventor); Glavaski-Radovanovic, Sonja (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for detecting faults in an aircraft is disclosed. The method involves predicting at least one state of the aircraft and tuning at least one threshold value to tightly upper bound the size of a mismatch between the at least one predicted state and a corresponding actual state of the non-faulted aircraft. If the mismatch between the at least one predicted state and the corresponding actual state is greater than or equal to the at least one threshold value, the method indicates that at least one fault has been detected.

  6. An aircraft sensor fault tolerant system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caglayan, A. K.; Lancraft, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The design of a sensor fault tolerant system which uses analytical redundancy for the Terminal Configured Vehicle (TCV) research aircraft in a Microwave Landing System (MLS) environment was studied. The fault tolerant system provides reliable estimates for aircraft position, velocity, and attitude in the presence of possible failures in navigation aid instruments and onboard sensors. The estimates, provided by the fault tolerant system, are used by the automated guidance and control system to land the aircraft along a prescribed path. Sensor failures are identified by utilizing the analytic relationship between the various sensor outputs arising from the aircraft equations of motion.

  7. Concatenated codes for fault tolerant quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, E.; Laflamme, R.; Zurek, W.

    1995-05-01

    The application of concatenated codes to fault tolerant quantum computing is discussed. We have previously shown that for quantum memories and quantum communication, a state can be transmitted with error {epsilon} provided each gate has error at most c{epsilon}. We show how this can be used with Shor`s fault tolerant operations to reduce the accuracy requirements when maintaining states not currently participating in the computation. Viewing Shor`s fault tolerant operations as a method for reducing the error of operations, we give a concatenated implementation which promises to propagate the reduction hierarchically. This has the potential of reducing the accuracy requirements in long computations.

  8. Testing Distributed ABS System with Fault Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trawczyński, Dawid; Sosnowski, Janusz; Gawkowski, Piotr

    The paper deals with the problem of adapting software implemented fault injection technique (SWIFI) to evaluate dependability of reactive microcontroller systems. We present an original methodology of disturbing controller operation and analyzing fault effects taking into account reactions of the controlled object and the impact of the system environment. Faults can be injected randomly (in space and time) or targeted at the most sensitive elements of the controller to check it at high stresses. This approach allows identifying rarely encountered problems, usually missed in classical approaches. The developed methodology has been used successfully to verify dependability of ABS system. Experimental results are commented in the paper.

  9. On-line diagnosis of unrestricted faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. F.; Sundstrom, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Attention is given to the formal development of the notion of a discrete-time system and the associated concepts of fault, result of a fault, and error. The considered concept of on-line diagnosis is formalized and a diagnosis using inverse machines is discussed. The case of an inverse which is lossless is investigated. It is found that in such a case the class of unrestricted faults can be diagnosed with a delay equal to the delay of losslessness of the inverse system.

  10. Cooperative human-machine fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger; Palmer, Everett

    1987-01-01

    Current expert system technology does not permit complete automatic fault diagnosis; significant levels of human intervention are still required. This requirement dictates a need for a division of labor that recognizes the strengths and weaknesses of both human and machine diagnostic skills. Relevant findings from the literature on human cognition are combined with the results of reviews of aircrew performance with highly automated systems to suggest how the interface of a fault diagnostic expert system can be designed to assist human operators in verifying machine diagnoses and guiding interactive fault diagnosis. It is argued that the needs of the human operator should play an important role in the design of the knowledge base.

  11. Paleoseismology and Fault Interactions of the Pajarito Fault System, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. N.; Lewis, C. J.; Lavine, A.; Reneau, S. L.; Schultz, E. S.

    2006-12-01

    The Pajarito fault system is the local active boundary fault of the Rio Grande rift in the vicinity of Los Alamos, New Mexico. Detailed geologic and geomorphic mapping, and displacement-length profiles, reveal a complex pattern of structural deformation that suggests interaction and connective growth among the principal faults in the system (Pajarito, Rendija Canyon, Guaje Mountain, and Santa Clara faults, totaling ~55 km in length). At the surface, the Pajarito fault is not a single shear surface but a complex zone of deformation with considerable lateral variation in structural style from south to north. In the area of detailed mapping, the Pajarito fault is a broad zone of distributed deformation: at the southwest corner of the area, structure is dominated by a large monocline, but small faults and monoclines span a breadth of about 2 km with about 125 m of displacement in the last 1.2 million years; at the west central part of the area, the Pajarito fault is expressed as mainly a large normal fault with smaller faults spread across about 1 km with about 80 m of displacement in the last 1.2 million years; and, in the northwestern part of the area, structure is again dominated by a large monocline with normal faulting in a zone about 1.5 km wide with about 65 m of displacement in the last 1.2 million years. These along-strike variations in the deformation of the Pajarito fault suggest that in most places the tip of the master fault does not break the surface; instead, most of what can be observed is subsidiary structure. The implication of the complex structure and styles of deformation in the fault is that it severely complicates paleoseismic exploration for hazard analyses because different subsidiary structures rupture in different seismic events; no individual structure can be identified with even a near- complete paleoseismic record. Additionally, surface rupture hazards must be associated with broad zones instead of individual faults. Seven paleoseismic

  12. Fault roughness evolution with slip (Gole Larghe Fault Zone, Italian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, A.; Spagnuolo, E.; Di Toro, G.; Nielsen, S. B.; Griffith, W. A.

    2011-12-01

    Fault surface roughness is a principal factor influencing fault and earthquake mechanics. However, little is known on roughness of fault surfaces at seismogenic depths, and particularly on how it evolves with accumulating slip. We have studied seismogenic fault surfaces of the Gole Larghe Fault Zone, which exploit precursor cooling joints of the Adamello tonalitic pluton (Italian Alps). These faults developed at 9-11 km and 250-300°C. Seismic slip along these surfaces, which individually accommodated from 1 to 20 m of net slip, resulted in the production of cm-thick cataclasites and pseudotachylytes (solidified melts produced during seismic slip). The roughness of fault surfaces was determined with a multi-resolution aerial and terrestrial LIDAR and photogrammetric dataset (Bistacchi et al., 2011, Pageoph, doi: 10.1007/s00024-011-0301-7). Fault surface roughness is self-affine, with Hurst exponent H < 1, indicating that faults are comparatively smoother at larger wavelengths. Fault surface roughness is inferred to have been inherited from the precursor cooling joints, which show H ≈ 0.8. Slip on faults progressively modified the roughness distribution, lowering the Hurst exponent in the along-slip direction up to H ≈ 0.6. This behaviour has been observed for wavelengths up to the scale of the accumulated slip along each individual fault surface, whilst at larger wavelengths the original roughness seems not to be affected by slip. Processes that contribute to modify fault roughness with slip include brittle failure of the interacting asperities (production of cataclasites) and frictional melting (production of pseudotachylytes). To quantify the "wear" due to these processes, we measured, together with the roughness of fault traces and their net slip, the thickness and distribution of cataclasites and pseudotachylytes. As proposed also in the tribological literature, we observe that wearing is scale dependent, as smaller wavelength asperities have a shorter

  13. Characterization of leaky faults: Study of water flow in aquifer-fault-aquifer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Chao; Javandel, Iraj; Witherspoon, Paul A.

    Leaky faults provide important flow paths for fluids to move underground. It is often necessary to characterize such faults in engineering projects such as deep well injection of waste liquids, underground natural gas storage, and radioactive waste isolation. To provide this characterization, analytical solutions are presented for groundwater flow through saturated aquifer-fault-aquifer systems assuming that both the aquifers and the fault are homogeneous and that the fault has an insignificant effect on aquifer hydraulic properties. Three different conditions are considered: (1) drawdown in the unpumped aquifer is negligibly small; (2) drawdown in the unpumped aquifer is significant, and the two aquifers have the same diffusivity; and (3) drawdown in the unpumped aquifer is significant, and the two aquifers have different diffusivities. Methods are presented to determine the fault transmissivity from pumping test data.

  14. Fault detection in finite frequency domain for Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems with sensor faults.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jian; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2014-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the fault detection (FD) problem in finite frequency domain for continuous-time Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems with sensor faults. Some finite-frequency performance indices are initially introduced to measure the fault/reference input sensitivity and disturbance robustness. Based on these performance indices, an effective FD scheme is then presented such that the generated residual is designed to be sensitive to both fault and reference input for faulty cases, while robust against the reference input for fault-free case. As the additional reference input sensitivity for faulty cases is considered, it is shown that the proposed method improves the existing FD techniques and achieves a better FD performance. The theory is supported by simulation results related to the detection of sensor faults in a tunnel-diode circuit. PMID:24184791

  15. Probabilistic fault displacement hazards for the southern san andreas fault using scenarios and empirical slips

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, R.; Petersen, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    We apply a probabilistic method to develop fault displacement hazard maps and profiles for the southern San Andreas Fault. Two slip models are applied: (1) scenario slip, defined by the ShakeOut rupture model, and (2) empirical slip, calculated using regression equations relating global slip to earthquake magnitude and distance along the fault. The hazard is assessed using a range of magnitudes defined by the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast and the ShakeOut. For hazard mapping we develop a methodology to partition displacement among multiple fault branches basedon geological observations. Estimated displacement hazard extends a few kilometers wide in areas of multiple mapped fault branches and poor mapping accuracy. Scenario and empirical displacement hazard differs by a factor of two or three, particularly along the southernmost section of the San Andreas Fault. We recommend the empirical slip model with site-specific geological data to constrain uncertainties for engineering applications. ?? 2011, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  16. H∞ fault-tolerant control for time-varied actuator fault of nonlinear system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunsheng; Jiang, Bin

    2014-12-01

    This paper studies H∞ fault-tolerant control for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems subject to time-varied actuator faults. A radial basis function neural network is utilised to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions; an updating rule is designed to estimate on-line time-varied fault of actuator; and the controller with the states feedback and faults estimation is applied to compensate for the effects of fault and minimise H∞ performance criteria in order to get a desired H∞ disturbance rejection constraint. Sufficient conditions are derived, which guarantees that the closed-loop system is robustly stable and satisfies the H∞ performance in both normal and fault cases. In order to reduce computing cost, a simplified algorithm of matrix Riccati inequality is given. A spacecraft model is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  17. Deciphering Past and Present Tectonics of the Rio Grande Rift in New Mexico Utilizing Apatite Fission Track Thermochronology, Geochronology, Quaternary Faulting, and Cross-Section Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, J. W.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Kelley, S. A.; Priewisch, A.; Crossey, L. J.; Asmerom, Y.; Polyak, V.; Selmi, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Rio Grande rift provides an excellent laboratory for understanding styles and processes of extensional tectonics, and their driving forces. We apply apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronology, geochronology, fracture analysis, and cross-section restoration to decipher past and present tectonics of the Rio Grande rift. AFT data has been compiled from rift flank uplifts along the Rio Grande rift in an attempt to recognize long wavelength spatial and temporal patterns. AFT ages record time of cooling of rocks below ~110°C and, when cooling is due to exhumation, age elevation traverses can record upward advection of rocks through paleo 110°C isotherms. The relatively passive sides of half-grabens (e.g. Manzanos and Santa Fe Range) preserve Laramide AFT ages ranging from 45-70 Ma, indicating they were cooled during the Laramide Orogeny and have remained cooler than 110°C since then. Rift flanks on the tectonically active sides of half-grabens, (e.g. Sierra Ladrones, Sandias, Taos Range, and Sierra Blanca) have AFT ages that range from 35 Ma to <10 Ma, and record cooling that initiated with the Oligocene ignimbrite flare-up and continues through the Neogene. Our analysis tracks the approximate elevation of paleo 110°C isotherms in 10 Ma intervals from the Laramide to the present and shows that reconstructed paleoisotherms have been differentially uplifted, warped, and faulted since their time of formation, and hence serve as markers of uplift history and its mechanisms. AFT data at Ladron Peak, an active rift flank along the western margin of the Rio Grande rift in central New Mexico, indicates that it was rapidly unroofed between 20-10 Ma. Preliminary apatite helium data gives a similar age vs. elevation trend, but apatites have highly radiogenically damaged lattices and hence have corrected closure temperatures tens of degrees higher than AFT ages. The style of faulting at Ladron Peak is unusual because it is bounded by the anomalously low-angle (~15°) Jeter

  18. Fault Rock Variation as a Function of Host Rock Lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.; Diener, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fault rocks contain an integrated record of the slip history of a fault, and thereby reflect the deformation processes associated with fault slip. Within the Aus Granulite Terrane, Namibia, a number of Jurassic to Cretaceous age strike-slip faults cross-cut Precambrian high grade metamorphic rocks. These strike-slip faults were active at subgreenschist conditions and occur in a variety of host rock lithologies. Where the host rock contains significant amounts of hydrous minerals, representing granulites that have undergone retrogressive metamorphism, the fault rock is dominated by hydrothermal breccias. In anhydrous, foliated rocks interlayered with minor layers containing hydrous phyllosilicates, the fault rock is a cataclasite partially cemented by jasper and quartz. Where the host rock is an isotropic granitic rock the fault rock is predominantly a fine grained black fault rock. Cataclasites and breccias show evidence for multiple deformation events, whereas the fine grained black fault rocks appear to only record a single slip increment. The strike-slip faults observed all formed in the same general orientation and at a similar time, and it is unlikely that regional stress, strain rate, pressure and temperature varied between the different faults. We therefore conclude that the type of fault rock here depended on the host rock lithology, and that lithology alone accounts for why some faults developed a hydrothermal breccia, some cataclasite, and some a fine grained black fault rock. Consequently, based on the assumption that fault rocks reflect specific slip styles, lithology was also the main control on different fault slip styles in this area at the time of strike-slip fault activity. Whereas fine grained black fault rock is inferred to represent high stress events, hydrothermal breccia is rather related to events involving fluid pressure in excess of the least stress. Jasper-bearing cataclasites may represent faults that experienced dynamic weakening as seen

  19. Misbheaving Faults: The Expanding Role of Geodetic Imaging in Unraveling Unexpected Fault Slip Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, W. D.; Briggs, R.

    2015-12-01

    Geodetic imaging techniques enable researchers to "see" details of fault rupture that cannot be captured by complementary tools such as seismology and field studies, thus providing increasingly detailed information about surface strain, slip kinematics, and how an earthquake may be transcribed into the geological record. For example, the recent Haiti, Sierra El Mayor, and Nepal earthquakes illustrate the fundamental role of geodetic observations in recording blind ruptures where purely geological and seismological studies provided incomplete views of rupture kinematics. Traditional earthquake hazard analyses typically rely on sparse paleoseismic observations and incomplete mapping, simple assumptions of slip kinematics from Andersonian faulting, and earthquake analogs to characterize the probabilities of forthcoming ruptures and the severity of ground accelerations. Spatially dense geodetic observations in turn help to identify where these prevailing assumptions regarding fault behavior break down and highlight new and unexpected kinematic slip behavior. Here, we focus on three key contributions of space geodetic observations to the analysis of co-seismic deformation: identifying near-surface co-seismic slip where no easily recognized fault rupture exists; discerning non-Andersonian faulting styles; and quantifying distributed, off-fault deformation. The 2013 Balochistan strike slip earthquake in Pakistan illuminates how space geodesy precisely images non-Andersonian behavior and off-fault deformation. Through analysis of high-resolution optical imagery and DEMs, evidence emerges that a single fault map slip as both a strike slip and dip slip fault across multiple seismic cycles. These observations likewise enable us to quantify on-fault deformation, which account for ~72% of the displacements in this earthquake. Nonetheless, the spatial distribution of on- and off-fault deformation in this event is highly spatially variable- a complicating factor for comparisons

  20. Quaternary Geology and Surface Faulting Hazard: Active and Capable Faults in Central Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcucci, E.; Gori, S.

    2015-12-01

    The 2009 L'Aquila earthquake (Mw 6.1), in central Italy, raised the issue of surface faulting hazard in Italy, since large urban areas were affected by surface displacement along the causative structure, the Paganica fault. Since then, guidelines for microzonation were drew up that take into consideration the problem of surface faulting in Italy, and laying the bases for future regulations about related hazard, similarly to other countries (e.g. USA). More specific guidelines on the management of areas affected by active and capable faults (i.e. able to produce surface faulting) are going to be released by National Department of Civil Protection; these would define zonation of areas affected by active and capable faults, with prescriptions for land use planning. As such, the guidelines arise the problem of the time interval and general operational criteria to asses fault capability for the Italian territory. As for the chronology, the review of the international literature and regulatory allowed Galadini et al. (2012) to propose different time intervals depending on the ongoing tectonic regime - compressive or extensional - which encompass the Quaternary. As for the operational criteria, the detailed analysis of the large amount of works dealing with active faulting in Italy shows that investigations exclusively based on surface morphological features (e.g. fault planes exposition) or on indirect investigations (geophysical data), are not sufficient or even unreliable to define the presence of an active and capable fault; instead, more accurate geological information on the Quaternary space-time evolution of the areas affected by such tectonic structures is needed. A test area for which active and capable faults can be first mapped based on such a classical but still effective methodological approach can be the central Apennines. Reference Galadini F., Falcucci E., Galli P., Giaccio B., Gori S., Messina P., Moro M., Saroli M., Scardia G., Sposato A. (2012). Time