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Sample records for agulhas current transport

  1. New Thought on the Agulhas Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, A. A.; Lutjeharms, J. R.; Whittle, C.; Weeks, S.; Roy, C.

    2002-12-01

    A more complete understanding of the fundamental dynamics of the Agulhas Current Proper is evolving rapidly because of new discoveries. The discovery of the Agulhas Undercurrent (Beal and Bryden, 1997) had a profound effect on the overall estimate of the Agulhas Current transport. Also, the discovery of Schouten et al. (2002) that Mozambique Channel Eddies are responsible for the formation of Natal Pulses, which in turn is significantly related to the Indian-Atlantic Interocean leakage of water masses, had a profound effect on how the Agulhas Current System is now perceived. These new insights, historical hydrographic data, and satellite remote sensed data contributed to the formulation of 3 hypotheses on the fundamental dynamics of the Agulhas Current Proper. Hypothesis one: Directly north of the Delagoa Bight the Mozambique Channel Eddies encounter the most northern extend of the shallow Agulhas Current and interact with the seaward side of this Western Boundary Current to form the Delagoa Pulse, obtaining its required cyclonicity from the Delagoa Bight Lee Eddy. Hypothesis two: Water masses of the Agulhas Undercurrent and Red Sea Water are upwelled within the Delagoa Bight Lee eddy which forms the southward propagating Delagoa Pulse. Hence, parts of the Agulhas Undercurrent are transported back into the Atlantic Ocean via a fast-track (10 to 20 km/day) mechanism, the Delagoa Pulse. Hypothesis three: Delagoa Pulses act as mechanisms for the injection of upwelled Agulhas Undercurrent water masses and Red Sea Water onto the eastern Agulhas Bank, supplying a semi-continuous density flow along the 100 m isobath. This density current originates from the Indian Ocean sector of the Agulhas Bank at the Port Alfred Upwelling Cell, feeds the cold bottom ridge, rounds the Alphard Banks, and enters the Atlantic Ocean sector of the Agulhas Bank. The physical and chemical properties of the density flow coined the Lutjeharms (Indian-Atlantic Interocean secondary leakage) Return

  2. Wind changes above warm Agulhas Current eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouault, M.; Verley, P.; Backeberg, B.

    2016-04-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) estimated from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer E onboard the Aqua satellite and altimetry-derived sea level anomalies are used south of the Agulhas Current to identify warm-core mesoscale eddies presenting a distinct SST perturbation greater than to 1 °C to the surrounding ocean. The analysis of twice daily instantaneous charts of equivalent stability-neutral wind speed estimates from the SeaWinds scatterometer onboard the QuikScat satellite collocated with SST for six identified eddies shows stronger wind speed above the warm eddies than the surrounding water in all wind directions, if averaged over the lifespan of the eddies, as was found in previous studies. However, only half of the cases showed higher wind speeds above the eddies at the instantaneous scale; 20 % of cases had incomplete data due to partial global coverage by the scatterometer for one path. For cases where the wind is stronger above warm eddies, there is no relationship between the increase in surface wind speed and the SST perturbation, but we do find a linear relationship between the decrease in wind speed from the centre to the border of the eddy downstream and the SST perturbation. SST perturbations range from 1 to 6 °C for a mean eddy SST of 15.9 °C and mean SST perturbation of 2.65 °C. The diameter of the eddies range from 100 to 250 km. Mean background wind speed is about 12 m s-1 (mostly southwesterly to northwesterly) and ranging mainly from 4 to 16 m s-1. The mean wind increase is about 15 %, which corresponds to 1.8 m s-1. A wind speed increase of 4 to 7 m s-1 above warm eddies is not uncommon. Cases where the wind did not increase above the eddies or did not decrease downstream had higher wind speeds and occurred during a cold front associated with intense cyclonic low-pressure systems, suggesting certain synoptic conditions need to be met to allow for the development of wind speed anomalies over warm-core ocean eddies. In many cases

  3. Coastal upwelling on the far eastern Agulhas Bank associated with large meanders in the Agulhas Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goschen, W. S.; Bornman, T. G.; Deyzel, S. H. P.; Schumann, E. H.

    2015-06-01

    Six large solitary meanders in the Agulhas Current, so-called Natal Pulses, propagated down the eastern coast of South Africa between 2009 and 2011. Their influence on the coastal waters between Port Alfred and Algoa Bay, on the far eastern Agulhas Bank, was measured by thermistor strings moored at 30-80 m bottom depths and two current metres (30 m bottom depth) located at both sides of Algoa Bay. During all events active upwelling lasting 1-3 weeks was observed over the inner shelf and in Algoa Bay. During upwelling the isotherms ascended at an average rate of 1.8 m day-1 as the cold bottom layer increased in thickness to 40-60 m, although upwelled water did not break the surface in all cases. Cold water remained in the area for a further 2-3 weeks. During three Natal Pulses the water temperatures at the outer moorings initially increased as the plume of the leading edge (crest) of the meander moved onshore. During one Natal Pulse upwelling was recorded before the warm water plume impacted the moorings. At the onset of upwelling currents switched to the southwest in the case of Bird Island and southward at the Cape Recife inner-bay site and reached a maximum speed of 80 cm s-1. During all Natal Pulses cold bottom water (10-12 °C) flooded over the 80 m bottom depth moorings as the crest of the meander moved onshore, but also around the same time the core of the Agulhas Current began to move offshore. In all cases upwelling was wide-spread.

  4. Red Sea Intermediate Water in the source regions of the Agulhas Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, R. E.; Lutjeharms, J. R. E.

    2009-06-01

    Red Sea Intermediate Water (RSIW) has been shown to move down the Agulhas Current as distinct lenses. It has been assumed that this intermittency is the result of variable input. To clarify and quantify the nature of RSIW contributions from the source regions of the Agulhas Current observations at 15 hydrographic sections were examined using a multi-parameter analysis. In the northern Mozambique Channel RSIW is found to be layer-like, but with patches of distinctly different contributions. In the southern part of the channel the layer-like distribution disappears with RSIW mostly confined within anticyclonic and cyclonic eddies exhibiting varying maximum contributions ranging from 15-20% to 25-30% purity. Net transports across the channel ranged from -0.45 to -0.7 Sv. At the southern tip of Madagascar RSIW contributions exhibited similar purity variability ranging from 10-15% to 15-20%. The net southward transport of RSIW in the East Madagascar Current displayed an even greater variability due to changes in the flux of the undercurrent ranging from negligible to -0.3 Sv. Indications therefore were that the transport of RSIW to the Agulhas Current occurs in both cyclones and anti-cyclones through the Mozambique Channel whilst from the East Madagascar Current it is mostly confined to anti-cyclones. This variability in the inflow was also reflected in the northern part of the Agulhas Current proper. The maximum contributions of RSIW range here from 10-15% to 20-25% purity and net transports from -0.75 to -1.39 Sv off Durban. As it was east of Madagascar RSIW was mostly confined to the slope.

  5. Local water mass modifications by a solitary meander in the Agulhas Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leber, Greta M.; Beal, Lisa M.

    2015-06-01

    We present full-depth hydrographic and velocity observations across a solitary meander within the Agulhas Current, and assess the degree to which the meander causes upwelling, cross-frontal mixing, and diapycnal transport. These events can input nutrients onto the continental shelf as well as advect larvae offshore. We find that the meander drives inshore upwelling with vertical velocities of at least 13 m d-1. The meander also causes diapycnal transport resulting in 1°C cooler and 0.25 fresher central waters and 1°C warmer, 0.25 saltier intermediate waters below the thermocline. We introduce a new coordinate system that separates these changes into kinematic changes due to meandering and property changes along transport streamlines. This reveals that most of the observed diapycnal transport below the thermocline is due to property changes. We find a small amount of enhanced cross-frontal mixing associated with solitary meanders of the Agulhas Current, but it is statistically insignificant. We believe this is due to the strongly barotropic nature of the meandering Agulhas Current, which maintains a deep steering level that inhibits mixing.

  6. Evaluating two numerical advection schemes in HYCOM for eddy-resolving modelling of the Agulhas Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, B. C.; Bertino, L.; Johannessen, J. A.

    2009-06-01

    A 4th order advection scheme is applied in a nested eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) of the greater Agulhas Current system for the purpose of testing advanced numerics as a means for improving the model simulation for eventual operational implementation. Model validation techniques comparing sea surface height variations, sea level skewness and variogram analyses to satellite altimetry measurements quantify that generally the 4th order advection scheme improves the realism of the model simulation. The most striking improvement over the standard 2nd order momentum advection scheme, is that the southern Agulhas Current is simulated as a well-defined meandering current, rather than a train of successive eddies. A better vertical structure and stronger poleward transports in the Agulhas Current core contribute toward a better southwestward penetration of the current, and its temperature field, implying a stronger Indo-Atlantic inter-ocean exchange. It is found that the transport, and hence this exchange, is sensitive to the occurrences of mesoscale features originating upstream in the Mozambique Channel and southern East Madagascar Current, and that the improved HYCOM simulation is well suited for further studies of these inter-actions.

  7. Evaluating two numerical advection schemes in HYCOM for eddy-resolving modelling of the Agulhas Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, B. C.; Bertino, L.; Johannessen, J. A.

    2009-02-01

    A 4th order advection scheme is applied in a nested eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) of the greater Agulhas Current system for the purpose of testing advanced numerics as a means for improving the model simulation for eventual operational implementation. Model validation techniques comparing sea surface height variations, sea level skewness and variogram analyses to satellite altimetry measurements quantify that generally the 4th order advection scheme improves the realism of the model simulation. The most striking improvement over the standard 2nd order momentum advection scheme, is that the Southern Agulhas Current is simulated as a well-defined meandering current, rather than a train of successive eddies. A better vertical structure and stronger poleward transports in the Agulhas Current core contribute toward a better southwestward penetration of the current, and its temperature field, implying a stronger Indo-Atlantic inter-ocean exchange. It is found that the transport, and hence this exchange, is sensitive to the occurrences of mesoscale features originating upstream in the Mozambique Channel and Southern East Madagascar Current, and that the improved HYCOM simulation is well suited for further studies of these inter-actions.

  8. Origins and impacts of mesoscale meanders in the Agulhas Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elipot, S.; Beal, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Agulhas Current (AC) is the western boundary current of the South Indian subtropical gyre and is also the pathway for the inter-basin exchange of water, heat and salt between the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean, and thus a crucial part of the global overturning circulation of the world ocean. The AC, which otherwise flows stably along the coast of South Africa, undergoes dramatic offshore excursions from its mean path, forming large mesoscale solitary meanders propagating downstream and potentially linked to the leakage of Indian Ocean waters to the South Atlantic. These irregular meander events have been referred to as Natal Pulses.Here we present new observations and analyses of Agulhas meanders using full-depth velocity mooring observations from the Agulhas Current Time series experiment (ACT). Detailed analyses of the in-situ velocity reveal important differences between the behavior of the flow during solitary meander events and during meander events of smaller amplitude. During solitary meanders, an onshore cyclonic circulation and an offshore anticyclonic circulation act in concert to displace the jet offshore, leading to sudden and strong positive conversion of kinetic energy of the mean flow to the meander. In contrast, smaller amplitude meanderings are principally represented by a single cyclonic circulation spanning the entire jet that acts to displace the jet without significantly extracting kinetic energy from the mean flow. Solitary meander events can be traced upstream using satellite altimetry and linked to either Mozambique Channel eddies or Madagascar dipoles, the latter possibly part of a basin-wide pattern of propagating sea level anomalies consistent with Rossby wave dynamics. However, only a small number of these anomalies lead to solitary meanders. Altimetric observations suggest 1.5 meanders per year and show that the two-year period during ACT when no events were observed is unprecedented in the 20-year satellite record.

  9. Madagascar: A pacemaker for the Agulhas Current system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penven, P.; Lutjeharms, J. R. E.; Florenchie, P.

    2006-09-01

    Western boundary currents are driven by zonally integrated wind-stress curl over the width of subtropical basins. This cross-basin integration is interrupted in the South Indian Ocean where Madagascar presents a formidable barrier. Nevertheless, a western boundary current has been thought to exist in the Mozambique Channel, the Mozambique Current. Recent observations have however shown that no such current exists and that the flow in the channel instead consists of a train of eddies. Is this western boundary anomaly due to the presence of Madagascar? We have used a primitive equations model to investigate the flow in the South West Indian Ocean as if there were no Madagascar. We show that a normal, continuous western boundary current is then formed that constitutes a continuum with the Agulhas Current. The presence of Madagascar is shown to affect the frequency of inter-ocean exchange events south of Africa.

  10. The importance of flow in the Mozambique Channel to seasonality in the Greater Agulhas Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biastoch, A.; Reason, C. J. C.; Lutjeharms, J. R. E.; Boebel, O.

    The temporal variability of the greater Agulhas Current system has important climatological consequences. Some recent results have suggested that this variability contains a large seasonal component, due to changes in the circulation at latitudes poleward of Madagascar only. A model simulation shows that the contribution of Tropical Surface Water to Agulhas Current waters, via the Mozambique Channel, also has a distinct seasonal characteristic that is brought about by the seasonal wind stress over the tropical Indian Ocean. This simulated flow through the Channel contributes substantially to the seasonality of the Agulhas Current. This model result is shown to be not inconsistent with available hydrographic observations.

  11. Ocean plankton. Environmental characteristics of Agulhas rings affect interocean plankton transport.

    PubMed

    Villar, Emilie; Farrant, Gregory K; Follows, Michael; Garczarek, Laurence; Speich, Sabrina; Audic, Stéphane; Bittner, Lucie; Blanke, Bruno; Brum, Jennifer R; Brunet, Christophe; Casotti, Raffaella; Chase, Alison; Dolan, John R; d'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Grima, Nicolas; Guidi, Lionel; Hill, Christopher N; Jahn, Oliver; Jamet, Jean-Louis; Le Goff, Hervé; Lepoivre, Cyrille; Malviya, Shruti; Pelletier, Eric; Romagnan, Jean-Baptiste; Roux, Simon; Santini, Sébastien; Scalco, Eleonora; Schwenck, Sarah M; Tanaka, Atsuko; Testor, Pierre; Vannier, Thomas; Vincent, Flora; Zingone, Adriana; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Acinas, Silvia G; Bork, Peer; Boss, Emmanuel; de Vargas, Colomban; Gorsky, Gabriel; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stéphane; Sullivan, Matthew B; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Wincker, Patrick; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; Not, Fabrice; Hingamp, Pascal; Iudicone, Daniele

    2015-05-22

    Agulhas rings provide the principal route for ocean waters to circulate from the Indo-Pacific to the Atlantic basin. Their influence on global ocean circulation is well known, but their role in plankton transport is largely unexplored. We show that, although the coarse taxonomic structure of plankton communities is continuous across the Agulhas choke point, South Atlantic plankton diversity is altered compared with Indian Ocean source populations. Modeling and in situ sampling of a young Agulhas ring indicate that strong vertical mixing drives complex nitrogen cycling, shaping community metabolism and biogeochemical signatures as the ring and associated plankton transit westward. The peculiar local environment inside Agulhas rings may provide a selective mechanism contributing to the limited dispersal of Indian Ocean plankton populations into the Atlantic. PMID:25999514

  12. Wave-current interaction in the northern Agulhas Current and shipping safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uys, Louw

    2015-04-01

    The Agulhas Current along the south east coast of South Africa is well known for severe wave conditions and the occurrence of rogue waves. The statistical probability of rogue wave occurrence is a well-known topic, but the occurrence of rogue waves cannot be predicted. Similarly, interaction between the Agulhas Current and wave fields emanating from the south west is a known phenomenon, which results in the creation of modified waves that could be different from those predicted by standard models. Although this modelled interaction can contribute much to the research on rogue waves, the enhancement or attenuation of wave fields due to wave-current interaction, is seen as a stand-alone phenomenon. Currently, standard models generating wave field prediction do not make provision for the interaction between waves and currents. Modelling the wave-current interaction in a main shipping route and providing the results thereof for use in the shipping industry, is a necessity not widely available yet. This area spans a grid of 800 km by 240 km between Richards Bay in the north and Port Elizabeth in the south. Using a conventional model in an area that it was not necessarily intended for, can contribute significantly towards knowledge expansion in this field. The SWAN model is a near shore wave model that is widely used in the field of coastal engineering. This readily available model provides for wave-current interaction and its limited resource requirements makes it ideal to supply information on wave interaction to the shipping community. Although this may not be seen to be the best model to provide a final accurate product of wave interaction prediction to the shipping community, it does serve to provide a very good baseline for the provision of safety information. This safety information can be produced and used for the safe routing of ships as well as in the ship design process during the determination of Response Amplitude Operators (RAO).

  13. Influences of the Agulhas Current on South African terrestrial climate as inferred from speleothem stable isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, K.; Bar-Matthews, M.; Ayalon, A.; Marean, C.; Herries, A. I. R.; Zahn, R.; Matthews, A.

    2012-04-01

    South African (SA) climate is strongly influenced by the circulation systems surrounding the subcontinent. The warm tropical Agulhas Current provides large amounts of moisture, transported onshore by south-easterly trade winds during summer. As the trade wind shifts north during winter, the south-western tip of SA is especially affected by temperate westerlies. High amounts of rainfall from the Benguela region off the west coast then only affect the very south-west of the country. This seasonal pattern creates a highly variable terrestrial climate, characterized by strong E-W gradients in the seasonal distribution and amount of rainfall. As summer and winter rain is derived from sources with different properties (density, salinity, temperature), the rainfall also displays seasonal isotopic compositional variations, as for example the present mean δ18O of rainfall in Mossel Bay located in the transition region varies from ~0.13‰ in January to -6.05‰ in July. Vegetation type (C3 vs C4) also follows the rainfall regime with C4 vegetation dominating in the summer rainfall region. As part of the GATEWAYS project, speleothems are used as an excellent, high resolution, precisely dated archive of terrestrial paleoenvironmental conditions[1]. This study focuses on a speleothem record from Crevice Cave on the South African south coast (near Mossel Bay), covering the interval between ~111 and ~53 ka[1,2]. At present, the area is influenced by both summer and winter rainfall, and has mostly C3 type vegetation. Variations in the past show more positive δ18O and δ13C values in the interval corresponding to the glacial MIS 4 and indicate increased summer rainfall and C4 vegetation. This contradicts the common assumption that MIS 4 was characterized by a northward shift of the climatic belts over SA and an increase of winter rainfall and C3 vegetation in the cave area[3]. Comparison of the record to marine sediment cores from the Agulhas Retroflection area[4] and the Cape

  14. Geodesic detection of Agulhas rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beron-Vera, F. J.; Wang, Y.; Olascoaga, M. J.; Goni, G. J.; Haller, G.

    2012-12-01

    Mesoscale oceanic eddies are routinely detected from instantaneous velocities. While simple to implement, this Eulerian approach gives frame-dependent results and often hides true material transport by eddies. Building on the recent geodesic theory of transport barriers, we develop an objective (i.e., frame-independent) method for accurately locating coherent Lagrangian eddies. These eddies act as compact water bodies, with boundaries showing no leakage or filamentation over long periods of time. Applying the algorithm to altimetry-derived velocities in the South Atlantic, we detect, for the first time, Agulhas rings that preserve their material coherence for several months, while eddy candidates yielded by other approaches tend to disperse or leak within weeks. These findings suggest that current Eulerian estimates of the Agulhas leakage need significant revision.Temporal evolution of fluid patches identified as eddies by different methods. First column: eddies extracted using geodesic eddy identification [1,2]. Second column: eddies identified from sea surface height (SSH) using the methodology of Chelton et al. [2] with U/c > 1. Third column: eddies identified as elliptic regions by the Okubo-Weiss (OW) criterion [e.g., 3]. Fourth column: eddies identified as mesoelliptic (ME) regions by Mezic et al.'s [4] criterion. References: [1] Beron-Vera et al. (2012). Geodesic eddy detection suggests reassessment of Agulhas leakage. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA, submitted. [2] Haller & Beron-Vera (2012). Geodesic theory of transport barriers in two-dimensional flows. Physica D, in press. [2] Chelton et al. (2011). Prog. Oceanog. 91, 167. [3] Chelton et al. (2007). Geophys. Res. Lett. 34, L5606. [4] Mezic et al. (2010). Science 330, 486.

  15. Spatio-temporal characteristics of Agulhas leakage: a model inter-comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holton, L.; Deshayes, J.; Backeberg, B. C.; Loveday, B. R.; Hermes, J. C.; Reason, C. J. C.

    2016-05-01

    Investigating the variability of Agulhas leakage, the volume transport of water from the Indian Ocean to the South Atlantic Ocean, is highly relevant due to its potential contribution to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation as well as the global circulation of heat and salt and hence global climate. Quantifying Agulhas leakage is challenging due to the non-linear nature of this process; current observations are insufficient to estimate its variability and ocean models all have biases in this region, even at high resolution . An Eulerian threshold integration method is developed to examine the mechanisms of Agulhas leakage variability in six ocean model simulations of varying resolution. This intercomparison, based on the circulation and thermohaline structure at the Good Hope line, a transect to the south west of the southern tip of Africa , is used to identify features that are robust regardless of the model used and takes into account the thermohaline biases of each model. When determined by a passive tracer method, 60 % of the magnitude of Agulhas leakage is captured and more than 80 % of its temporal fluctuations, suggesting that the method is appropriate for investigating the variability of Agulhas leakage. In all simulations but one, the major driver of variability is associated with mesoscale features passing through the section. High resolution ({<} 1/10°) hindcast models agree on the temporal (2-4 cycles per year) and spatial (300-500 km) scales of these features corresponding to observed Agulhas Rings. Coarser resolution models ({<} 1/4^°/) reproduce similar time scale of variability of Agulhas leakage in spite of their difficulties in representing the Agulhas rings properties. A coarser resolution climate model (2° ) does not resolve the spatio-temporal mechanism of variability of Agulhas leakage. Hence it is expected to underestimate the contribution of Agulhas Current System to climate variability.

  16. Spatio-temporal characteristics of Agulhas leakage: a model inter-comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holton, L.; Deshayes, J.; Backeberg, B. C.; Loveday, B. R.; Hermes, J. C.; Reason, C. J. C.

    2016-05-01

    Investigating the variability of Agulhas leakage, the volume transport of water from the Indian Ocean to the South Atlantic Ocean, is highly relevant due to its potential contribution to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation as well as the global circulation of heat and salt and hence global climate. Quantifying Agulhas leakage is challenging due to the non-linear nature of this process; current observations are insufficient to estimate its variability and ocean models all have biases in this region, even at high resolution . An Eulerian threshold integration method is developed to examine the mechanisms of Agulhas leakage variability in six ocean model simulations of varying resolution. This intercomparison, based on the circulation and thermohaline structure at the Good Hope line, a transect to the south west of the southern tip of Africa , is used to identify features that are robust regardless of the model used and takes into account the thermohaline biases of each model. When determined by a passive tracer method, 60 % of the magnitude of Agulhas leakage is captured and more than 80 % of its temporal fluctuations, suggesting that the method is appropriate for investigating the variability of Agulhas leakage. In all simulations but one, the major driver of variability is associated with mesoscale features passing through the section. High resolution ({<} 1/10°) hindcast models agree on the temporal (2-4 cycles per year) and spatial (300-500 km) scales of these features corresponding to observed Agulhas Rings. Coarser resolution models ({<} 1/4°) reproduce similar time scale of variability of Agulhas leakage in spite of their difficulties in representing the Agulhas rings properties. A coarser resolution climate model (2°) does not resolve the spatio-temporal mechanism of variability of Agulhas leakage. Hence it is expected to underestimate the contribution of Agulhas Current System to climate variability.

  17. Madagascar corals track sea surface temperature variability in the Agulhas Current core region over the past 334 years

    PubMed Central

    Zinke, J.; Loveday, B. R.; Reason, C. J. C.; Dullo, W.-C.; Kroon, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Agulhas Current (AC) is the strongest western boundary current in the Southern Hemisphere and is key for weather and climate patterns, both regionally and globally. Its heat transfer into both the midlatitude South Indian Ocean and South Atlantic is of global significance. A new composite coral record (Ifaty and Tulear massive Porites corals), is linked to historical AC sea surface temperature (SST) instrumental data, showing robust correlations. The composite coral SST data start in 1660 and comprise 200 years more than the AC instrumental record. Numerical modelling exhibits that this new coral derived SST record is representative for the wider core region of the AC. AC SSTs variabilities show distinct cooling through the Little Ice Age and warming during the late 18th, 19th and 20th century, with significant decadal variability superimposed. Furthermore, the AC SSTs are teleconnected with the broad southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans, showing that the AC system is pivotal for inter-ocean heat exchange south of Africa. PMID:24637665

  18. Agulhas Leakage changes in the Pliocene as a modulator of AMOC strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, N. P.; Deconto, R. M.; Condron, A.

    2015-12-01

    The leakage of Agulhas Current water into the South Atlantic is now thought to be a major player in global climate change. Its volume is linked to the strength and position of southern westerlies. Past changes in the westerly winds over the southern ocean have been noted on glacial-interglacial timescales, in response to both Northern Hemispheric conditions and changes in Antarctic ice volume. The Pliocene to Pleistocene transition, associated cooling and Northern Hemisphere glaciation may have related to changes in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean, affecting both the position and strength of southern westerly winds. A northward shift in the westerlies, observed in past records of glaciation events, is thought to restrict the flow of warm, salty water from the Indian Ocean into the Atlantic, potentially impacting the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and North Atlantic SSTs. A weakening of the Agulhas Leakage therefore could transmit changes in the southern hemisphere to the northern hemisphere. Much of the Agulhas leakage is carried in small eddies rotating off the main flow south of Cape Horn. High ocean model resolution (< 1/2°) is therefore required to realistically simulate the leakage's response to the overlying wind field. Here we run a series of global high-resolution ocean model (1/6°) experiments using the MITgcm to test the effect of a shift in the southern hemisphere westerlies on the Agulhas Leakage, during a past climate (Pliocene) warmer than today. A prescribed perturbation of the winds near South Africa shows a significant increase in Agulhas eddies into the Atlantic. Following this, we have performed longer simulations (> 25 model years) on the simulated Pliocene Ocean reflecting past shifts in the wind field quantify changes in Agulhas Leakage transport and salinity anomalies into the South Atlantic. We then investigate whether there is any corresponding change in North Atlantic Deep Water formation and the overall response of

  19. The Agulhas circulation simulated by the global OGCM FESOM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sein, Dmitry; Wang, Qiang; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Harig, Sven; Durgadoo, Jonathan; Biastoch, Arne

    2015-04-01

    The Agulhas Current system, comprising of various components, is of relevance for global and regional climate on all timescales. Work undertaken in this area over the last few years have highlighted that this region is sensitive to changes of the global overturning circulation. In particular, an increase in the amount of the Indian Ocean waters entering the Atlantic has been attributed to the changes in the wind pattern in the Southern Hemisphere. Such intrusion of additional heat and salt into the Atlantic may potentially impact the stability of the meridional overturning circulation and the heat transport into the North Atlantic. We identify critical questions of both global and regional importance and aim to address them using a numerical modelling approach. The models employed are a next generation finite-element model (FESOM) developed in AWI and a state-of-the-art nested model (INALT01) developed in GEOMAR. Both models have approximately 8 km resolution in the Agulhas region. In addition the global FESOM resolution is adjusted to the sea surface height (SSH) variance obtained from the satellite observations (AVISO), i.e. the higher is the SSH variance, the higher is the FESOM resolution, varying from 6 to 100 km. The results obtained by FESOM are validated against observations, as well as against INATL01. We investigate the FESOM ability to simulate the Agulhas system, the influence of the locally eddy-permitting resolution on the general Atlantic Ocean circulation, in particular Atlantic Meridional Overturning, and the interaction of the Agulhas system with Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

  20. The spatial evolution of t he directional wave spectrum in the Southern Ocean: Its relation to extreme waves in Agulhas Current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R. C.; Goldfinger, A.; Irvine, D.; Monaldo, F.; Tilley, D.; Shuchman, R.; Lyzenga, D.; Lyden, J.; Deleonibus, P.; Rufenach, C.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment using the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) to monitor certain properties of the ocean wave directional spectrum and to track the long swell systems as they propagate northward to encounter the Agulhas near the southeastern coast of Africa is discussed. The experiment is designed around the unique capability of SIR-B to overcome key limitations of the Seasat synthetic aperture radar data set, and to extend the existing Seasat results into new areas. Ocean wave systems will be tracked. The variable-incidence-angle capability to examine wave imaging quality will be utilized. Doppler current measurements will be attempted. An effort will be made to verify that the lower range-to-velocity ratio of SIR-B will lead to the improved response of azimuth-traveling wave systems.

  1. Sea surface temperatures from the southern Benguela region from the Pliocene and Pleistocene: tracking Agulhas Current input into the SE Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, B. F.; McClymont, E.; Felder, S.; Lloyd, J. M.; Leng, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Pliocene and-Pleistocene epochs provide a way to understand the effect of past climate changes on key ocean currents. Here, we show results from ODP Site1087 (31.28'S, 15.19'E, 1374m water depth) to investigate changes in ocean circulation over the period of the mid-Pliocene warm period 3.0-3.5 Ma and compare these to the time of the 100 kyr Pleistocene glacial cycles. ODP 1087 is located in the South-eastern Atlantic Ocean, outside of the Benguela upwelling region; reconstructing the temperature history of the site will therefore provide an important data set from a part of the ocean that has few orbital-scale and continuous Pliocene temperature reconstructions. ODP 1087 can be used to investigate the history of the heat and salt transfer to the Atlantic Ocean from the Indian Ocean via the Agulhas Retroflection, which plays an important part in the global thermohaline circulation (Lutjeharms, 2007). Climate models and reconstructions for the most recent glacial-interglacial cycles have shown that changes to the strength of the heat transfer may cause major climatic changes and may play a role in transitions from glacial to interglacial events (Knorr & Lohmann, 2003). It is unknown how this transfer reacted to generally warmer global temperatures during the mid-Pliocene. Because the mid-Pliocene is seen as a model for future climate change it might provide a model for ocean circulations in a warmer world. Our approach is to apply several organic geochemistry proxies and foraminiferal analyses to reconstruct the history of ODP 1087. The UK37' index records differences in the unsaturated bonds in the C37 alkenones to reconstruct sea surface temperatures (Brassell et al., 1986). We present SSTs generated for the mid-Pliocene Warm period with a resolution of 4000 years. We compare this data to the time of the 100 kyr glacial cycles during the late Pleistocene. Even though ODP 1087 is located outside the Benguela upwelling system, it has lower Pliocene temperatures

  2. Frontolysis by surface heat flux in the Agulhas Return Current region with a focus on mixed layer processes: observation and a high-resolution CGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohishi, Shun; Tozuka, Tomoki; Komori, Nobumasa

    2016-02-01

    Detailed mechanisms for frontogenesis/frontolysis of the Agulhas Return Current (ARC) Front, defined as the maximum of the meridional sea surface temperature (SST) gradient at each longitude within the ARC region (40°-50°E, 55°-35°S), are investigated using observational datasets. Due to larger (smaller) latent heat release to the atmosphere on the northern (southern) side of the front, the meridional gradient of surface net heat flux (NHF) is found throughout the year. In austral summer, surface warming is weaker (stronger) on the northern (southern) side, and thus the NHF tends to relax the SST front. The weaker (stronger) surface warming, at the same time, leads to the deeper (shallower) mixed layer on the northern (southern) side. This enhances the frontolysis, because deeper (shallower) mixed layer is less (more) sensitive to surface warming. In austral winter, stronger (weaker) surface cooling on the northern (southern) side contributes to the frontolysis. However, deeper (shallower) mixed layer is induced by stronger (weaker) surface cooling on the northern (southern) side and suppresses the frontolysis, because the deeper (shallower) mixed layer is less (more) sensitive to surface cooling. Therefore, the frontolysis by the NHF becomes stronger (weaker) through the mixed layer processes in austral summer (winter). The cause of the meridional gradient of mixed layer depth is estimated using diagnostic entrainment velocity and the Monin-Obukhov depth. Furthermore, the above mechanisms obtained from the observation are confirmed using outputs from a high-resolution coupled general circulation model. Causes of model biases are also discussed.

  3. A major perturbation in the Agulhas retroflection area in 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, L. V.; Agenbag, J. J.; Walker, N. D.; Lutjeharms, J. R. E.

    1990-03-01

    During late 1985 and in 1986 a major perturbation in the retroflection of the Agulhas Current occurred. A combination of climatological data and satellite-derived sea surface temperature observations are used to describe the evolution of the disturbance which resulted in 1986 being the warmest year on record in the southeast Atlantic. Possible causes of the changes in the retroflection and the associated input of Agulhas water into the southern Benguela Current region are discussed. Results show that, following intermittent leakage of elements of the Agulhas Current around the Cape of Good Hope, during the second half of 1985 and the first part of 1986, an offshoot of the Current developed in June as a flow into the Atlantic around the edge of the Agulhas Bank. Subsequently a major change in the retroflection occurred, and in August 1986 a large body of warm water joined to the Current moved northwards and was situated within 20 km of the Cape Peninsula and Cape Columbine. Boundary thermal gradients associated with this warm intrusion were 3-4°C in 25 km. This intrusion moved progressively northwards and westwards at 4.5-9.5 cm s -1 during the winter and spring of 1986 and had a typical zonal width of 240 km. The intrusion was evidently terminated when filaments of subtarctic water moved northwards, flooding much of the area with cold water during December 1986 and January 1987. Although intermittent leakage of Agulhas water into the southeast Atlantic continued during 1987, it was not substantial. By late 1987 the situation in the retroflection area had returned to normal. The observations of the Agulhas intrusion, when viewed in the light of changes in wind stress in the southwest Indian Ocean and south of Africa, are consistent with published numerical modelling results which predict a substantial flow of Agulhas water around the Cape of Good Hope under certain conditions.

  4. A new Eulerian method to estimate "spicy" Agulhas leakage in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putrasahan, D. A.; Beal, Lisa M.; Kirtman, Ben P.; Cheng, Yu

    2015-06-01

    The Agulhas leakage brings warm and saline water from the Indian Ocean into the South Atlantic, forming part of the returning branch of the global thermohaline circulation, an important component of climate. We develop a new method using the passive tracer spice, to estimate Agulhas leakage transport in an ocean eddy-resolving climate model that properly captures Agulhas Retroflection and leakage. We identify Agulhas leakage waters as positive spice anomalies (≥ +0.1) and are able to trace leakage to depths greater than 1000 m. Spice-based Eulerian Agulhas leakage captures spikes in Lagrangian leakage transport which coincide with the passage of Agulhas rings, yielding a statistically significant correlation (0.47). On interannual times scales, differences between Eulerian and Lagrangian transports are reduced and correlation increases to 0.77. We obtain a mean spice-based Eulerian Agulhas leakage of 17 ± 4 sverdrup (Sv) and Lagrangian Agulhas leakage of 18 ± 2 Sv, which are within the range of observational estimates.

  5. Mechanisms of nearshore retention and offshore export of mussel larvae over the Agulhas Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidberg, Nicolás; Porri, Francesca; Von der Meden, Charles E. O.; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Goschen, Wayne; McQuaid, Christopher D.

    2015-04-01

    Ecological connectivity is critical for population dynamics but in many benthic species it is complicated by a planktonic larval phase, whose dispersal remains poorly understood. Using a plankton pump, we examine the distribution of intertidal mussel larvae along three axes: alongshore, cross-shelf and by depth during a large scale (600 km) cruise over the Agulhas Bank off southern Africa in August/September 2010. As a general pattern, higher veliger abundances were found close to the coast. Our analyses of the nearshore flow, estimated from ADCP data and the vertical distribution of larvae, show that onshore larval retention may be mediated by active vertical swimming through the water column guided by light and wind-induced turbulence. A massive offshore export of larvae off St Francis Bay was, however, observed during an Agulhas Current meander which influenced inner shelf waters. We hypothesize that, by increasing and homogenizing flow, the Agulhas Current may erase the effects of larval vertical positioning on onshore retention and transport larvae offshore. Our study highlights the need to integrate the effects of complex, region-specific physical dynamics with the swimming behaviour of larvae in order to explain their spatial distribution, population connectivity and the consequences for population dynamics.

  6. Impact of intensified Indian Ocean winds on mesoscale variability in the Agulhas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, Björn C.; Penven, Pierrick; Rouault, Mathieu

    2012-08-01

    South of Africa, the Agulhas Current retroflects and a portion of its waters flows into the South Atlantic Ocean, typically in the form of Agulhas rings. This flux of warm and salty water from the Indian to the Atlantic Ocean (the Agulhas leakage) is now recognized as a key element in global climate. An Agulhas leakage shutdown has been associated with extreme glacial periods, whereas a vigorous increase has preceded shifts towards interglacials. In the absence of a coherent observing system, studies of the Agulhas have relied heavily on ocean models, which have revealed a possible recent increase in Agulhas leakage. However, owing to the high levels of oceanic turbulence, model solutions of the region are highly sensitive to their numerical choices, stressing the need for observations to confirm these important model results. Here, using satellite altimetry observations from 1993 to 2009, we show that the mesoscale variability of the Agulhas system, in particular in the Mozambique Channel and south of Madagascar, has intensified. This seems to result from an increased South Equatorial Current driven by enhanced trade winds over the tropical Indian Ocean. Overall, the intensified mesoscale variability of the Agulhas system is reflected in accelerated eddy propagation, in its source regions as well as the retroflection from which eddies propagate into the South Atlantic Ocean. This suggests that the Agulhas leakage may have increased from 1993 to 2009, confirming previous modelling studies that have further implied an increased Agulhas leakage may compensate a deceleration of meridional overturning circulation associated with a freshening of the North Atlantic Ocean.

  7. On Madagascar, Mozambique and Agulhas eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasce, J. H.; Isachsen, P. E.

    2006-12-01

    Agulhas, Madagascar and Mozambique eddies are vortices which form in the southwest Indian Ocean. All are in excess of 100 km in size, extend deep in the water column and drift westward from their respective formation sites. We suggest all three phenomena may originate from discontinuities in the wind-driven Sverdrup circulation. These discontinuities produce westward-flowing jets which are barotropically unstable, and thus generate vortices. We illustrate the idea using a linear analytical model and a nonlinear numerical model. The linear model produces westward jets off the northern and southern tips of Madagascar, and off the southern tip of South Africa. All these are unstable by the Rayleigh-Kuo criterion. Vortices of realistic size form in all three locations in the numerical model and subsequently drift westward, as observed. The primary shortcoming in the models is their failure to produce a strong retroflection of the Agulhas Current. Further model simulations suggest that both topography and stratification are required for this, consistent with previous numerical results.

  8. Inter-comparison studies between high-resolution HYCOM simulation and observational data: The South Atlantic and the Agulhas leakage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, P.; Campos, E. J. D.; Giddy, I.; Santis, W.

    2016-07-01

    Statistical analyses and model-data inter-comparisons are performed to evaluate the model's ability to reproduce the dynamics in the upper layers (< 2000 m) of the South Atlantic ocean. Outputs of an eddy-resolving Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) are analyzed and compared with observed data. The model, a 1/12-degree, 22-layer implementation of the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) to the South Atlantic, was forced with monthly-mean products from the NCEP Reanalysis for the period 1960 to 2010. The numerical experiment was capable to reproduce the large scale and the mesoscale dynamic in the South Atlantic and in the Agulhas region. The vertical structure is in agreement with in situ data, the model has lower skill when compared with PIRATA lower temperatures, and is able to capture the seasonal and annual variability in the tropical Atlantic. Furthermore, sensitive change until 2007 is clear in the vertical structure, at 4°N-38°W; 0°-35°W and 10°S-10°W, suggesting an important change in the stratification. The primary results concern a significant change in the decadal anomalies of the temperatures and salinity, which exhibit a warmer and saltier water in the southeastern Atlantic. Furthermore, linear trends found in the transport time-series in the North Brazil Current, and the South Equatorial Current were seen to correspond with increasing trends of the warmer water from the Agulhas Current into South Atlantic. The integrated transport during the period 1960-2010, shows an increase in westward changes in the large-scale circulation south of Africa are show in the negative trends indicate a widening of the "Agulhas gap" and increase in westward volume transport since 1980. It is therefore suggested that variability in the Agulhas System on the last two decades is affecting the dynamic in the South Atlantic, namely the temperature and the volume transport, reach the tropical region of the Atlantic.

  9. Retroflection from slanted and kinked coastlines: models for Agulhas leakage variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, V.; Nof, D.; Weijer, W.

    2010-12-01

    Agulhas leakage, the transport of Agulhas Current water from the Indian Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean, has been shut off during past glacial periods, a phenomenon tentatively ascribed to northward migration of westerly wind bands. At present, the leakage is significant and its magnitude exhibits an anti-correlation with the current's incoming mass flux. Our work shows that both these phenomena can be explained by the orientation of the coastline along which the Agulhas Retroflection shifts. We developed two semi-analytical nonlinear 1 1/2 -layer models of current retroflection from slanted and ‘kinked’ coastlines on the β-plane. 'Slant,' γ, refers to the angle of the coastline relative to the zonal direction; a 'kink' is an abrupt change in that angle. Based on these models, we define lower and upper boundaries for the radius of a detached eddy, its propagation velocity, and its detachment period. For the case of a straightforward slanted coast, such limits are shown to intersect for a critical value of γ, thus imposing a strong restriction on ring detachment from the retroflection area when γ exceeds this critical value. In the case of a kinked coast with an eastern high-slant region and a western low-slant region, free westward propagation of eddies along the low-angle section is allowed. For a wide range of eastern slant, rings are shed from the retroflection area regardless of the degree of slant. However, when this eastern slant is nearly 90 degrees, the regime is nearly critical and few rings are shed. Glacial/interglacial migration of the Agulhas Retroflection was investigated using the slanted-coast (no-kink) model. Ring shedding in this case occurs only when the point of vanishing wind stress curl is located along a coastline of sufficiently low slant. During glacial periods, wind stress curl vanishes at a relatively low latitude, where the angle of the African coastline is greater than the critical angle, thus prohibiting the retroflection from

  10. Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction Over Agulhas Extension Meanders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Xie, Xiaosu; Niiler, Pearn P.

    2007-01-01

    Many years of high-resolution measurements by a number of space-based sensors and from Lagrangian drifters became available recently and are used to examine the persistent atmospheric imprints of the semi-permanent meanders of the Agulhas Extension Current (AEC), where strong surface current and temperature gradients are found. The sea surface temperature (SST) measured by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) and the chlorophyll concentration measured by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) support the identification of the meanders and related ocean circulation by the drifters. The collocation of high and low magnitudes of equivalent neutral wind (ENW) measured by Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT), which is uniquely related to surface stress by definition, illustrates not only the stability dependence of turbulent mixing but also the unique stress measuring capability of the scatterometer. The observed rotation of ENW in opposition to the rotation of the surface current clearly demonstrates that the scatterometer measures stress rather than winds. The clear differences between the distributions of wind and stress and the possible inadequacy of turbulent parameterization affirm the need of surface stress vector measurements, which were not available before the scatterometers. The opposite sign of the stress vorticity to current vorticity implies that the atmosphere spins down the current rotation through momentum transport. Coincident high SST and ENW over the southern extension of the meander enhance evaporation and latent heat flux, which cools the ocean. The atmosphere is found to provide negative feedback to ocean current and temperature gradients. Distribution of ENW convergence implies ascending motion on the downwind side of local SST maxima and descending air on the upwind side and acceleration of surface wind stress over warm water (deceleration over cool water); the convection may escalate the contrast of

  11. Increase in Agulhas leakage due to poleward shift of Southern Hemisphere westerlies.

    PubMed

    Biastoch, A; Böning, C W; Schwarzkopf, F U; Lutjeharms, J R E

    2009-11-26

    The transport of warm and salty Indian Ocean waters into the Atlantic Ocean-the Agulhas leakage-has a crucial role in the global oceanic circulation and thus the evolution of future climate. At present these waters provide the main source of heat and salt for the surface branch of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC). There is evidence from past glacial-to-interglacial variations in foraminiferal assemblages and model studies that the amount of Agulhas leakage and its corresponding effect on the MOC has been subject to substantial change, potentially linked to latitudinal shifts in the Southern Hemisphere westerlies. A progressive poleward migration of the westerlies has been observed during the past two to three decades and linked to anthropogenic forcing, but because of the sparse observational records it has not been possible to determine whether there has been a concomitant response of Agulhas leakage. Here we present the results of a high-resolution ocean general circulation model to show that the transport of Indian Ocean waters into the South Atlantic via the Agulhas leakage has increased during the past decades in response to the change in wind forcing. The increased leakage has contributed to the observed salinification of South Atlantic thermocline waters. Both model and historic measurements off South America suggest that the additional Indian Ocean waters have begun to invade the North Atlantic, with potential implications for the future evolution of the MOC. PMID:19940923

  12. The life cycle of a coherent Lagrangian Agulhas ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Beron-Vera, F. J.; Olascoaga, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    We document the long-term evolution of an Agulhas ring detected from satellite altimetry using a technique from nonlinear dynamical systems that enables objective (i.e., observer-independent) eddy framing. Such objectively detected eddies have Lagrangian (material) boundaries that remain coherent (unfilamented) over the detection period. The ring preserves a quite compact material entity for a period of about 2 years even after most initial coherence is lost within 5 months after detection. We attribute this to the successive development of short-term coherent material boundaries around the ring. These boundaries provide effective short-term shielding for the ring, which prevents a large fraction of the ring's interior from being mixed with the ambient turbulent flow. We show that such coherence regain events cannot be inferred from Eulerian analysis. This process is terminated by a ring-splitting event which marks the ring demise, near the South American coast. The genesis of the ring is characterized by a ring-merging event away from the Agulhas retroflection, followed by a 4 month-long partial coherence stage, scenario that is quite different than a current occlusion and subsequent eddy pinch off.

  13. Current Issues in Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Ernest

    1984-01-01

    Challenges facing school transportation programs include pressure from community groups for extended service, austerity imposed by conservative county commissions, increasing driver militancy, declining district purchasing power, rapid turnover of drivers, and growing disciplinary problems aboard buses. (MCG)

  14. On transport-driven currents

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, S.; Dawson, J.M. )

    1994-08-01

    An empirical electron viscosity is incorporated into Ohm's law to examine the effect of current diffusion on bootstrap currents. It is shown that for sufficiently large viscosity, no seed current is needed for steady state operation of tokamaks. This is expressed by the scaling law [Gamma][ital R][sup 2][sub [ital m

  15. Agulhas salt-leakage oscillations during abrupt climate changes of the Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Gianluca; Zahn, Rainer; Ziegler, Martin; Purcell, Conor; Knorr, Gregor; Hall, Ian R.; Ziveri, Patrizia; Elderfield, Henry

    2013-09-01

    An ensemble of new, high-resolution records of surface ocean hydrography from the Indian-Atlantic oceanic gateway, south of Africa, demonstrates recurrent and high-amplitude salinity oscillations in the Agulhas Leakage area during the penultimate glacial-interglacial cycle. A series of millennial-scale salinification events, indicating strengthened salt leakage into the South Atlantic, appear to correlate with abrupt changes in the North Atlantic climate and Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). This interhemispheric coupling, which plausibly involved changes in the Hadley Cell and midlatitude westerlies that impacted the interocean transport at the tip of Africa, suggests that the Agulhas Leakage acted as a source of negative buoyancy for the perturbed AMOC, possibly aiding its return to full strength. Our finding points to the Indian-to-Atlantic salt transport as a potentially important modulator of the AMOC during the abrupt climate changes of the Late Pleistocene.

  16. On transport-driven currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Sifeng; Dawson, John M.

    1994-08-01

    An empirical electron viscosity is incorporated into Ohm's law to examine the effect of current diffusion on bootstrap currents. It is shown that for sufficiently large viscosity, no seed current is needed for steady state operation of tokamaks. This is expressed by the scaling law ΓR2m=4/27 where Rm is the magnetic Reynolds number and Γ is viscosity normalized to νeia2 (νei is the electron-ion collision frequency and a is the system size).

  17. Atlantic multi-decadal oscillation covaries with Agulhas leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biastoch, Arne; Durgadoo, Jonathan V.; Morrison, Adele K.; van Sebille, Erik; Weijer, Wilbert; Griffies, Stephen M.

    2015-12-01

    The interoceanic transfer of seawater between the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic, `Agulhas leakage', forms a choke point for the overturning circulation in the global ocean. Here, by combining output from a series of high-resolution ocean and climate models with in situ and satellite observations, we construct a time series of Agulhas leakage for the period 1870-2014. The time series demonstrates the impact of Southern Hemisphere westerlies on decadal timescales. Agulhas leakage shows a correlation with the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation on multi-decadal timescales; the former leading by 15 years. This is relevant for climate in the North Atlantic.

  18. Atlantic multi-decadal oscillation covaries with Agulhas leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Biastoch, Arne; Durgadoo, Jonathan V.; Morrison, Adele K.; van Sebille, Erik; Weijer, Wilbert; Griffies, Stephen M.

    2015-12-10

    The interoceanic transfer of seawater between the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic, ‘Agulhas leakage’, forms a choke point for the overturning circulation in the global ocean. Here, by combining output from a series of high-resolution ocean and climate models with in situ and satellite observations, we construct a time series of Agulhas leakage for the period 1870–2014. The time series demonstrates the impact of Southern Hemisphere westerlies on decadal timescales. Agulhas leakage shows a correlation with the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation on multi-decadal timescales; the former leading by 15 years. Lastly, this is relevant for climate in the North Atlantic.

  19. Atlantic multi-decadal oscillation covaries with Agulhas leakage

    PubMed Central

    Biastoch, Arne; Durgadoo, Jonathan V.; Morrison, Adele K.; van Sebille, Erik; Weijer, Wilbert; Griffies, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    The interoceanic transfer of seawater between the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic, ‘Agulhas leakage', forms a choke point for the overturning circulation in the global ocean. Here, by combining output from a series of high-resolution ocean and climate models with in situ and satellite observations, we construct a time series of Agulhas leakage for the period 1870–2014. The time series demonstrates the impact of Southern Hemisphere westerlies on decadal timescales. Agulhas leakage shows a correlation with the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation on multi-decadal timescales; the former leading by 15 years. This is relevant for climate in the North Atlantic. PMID:26656850

  20. Atlantic multi-decadal oscillation covaries with Agulhas leakage.

    PubMed

    Biastoch, Arne; Durgadoo, Jonathan V; Morrison, Adele K; van Sebille, Erik; Weijer, Wilbert; Griffies, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    The interoceanic transfer of seawater between the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic, 'Agulhas leakage', forms a choke point for the overturning circulation in the global ocean. Here, by combining output from a series of high-resolution ocean and climate models with in situ and satellite observations, we construct a time series of Agulhas leakage for the period 1870-2014. The time series demonstrates the impact of Southern Hemisphere westerlies on decadal timescales. Agulhas leakage shows a correlation with the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation on multi-decadal timescales; the former leading by 15 years. This is relevant for climate in the North Atlantic. PMID:26656850

  1. A current view of serotonin transporters.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Louis J

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are largely recognized for one aspect of their function-to transport serotonin back into the presynaptic terminal after its release. Another aspect of their function, however, may be to generate currents large enough to have physiological consequences. The standard model for electrogenic transport is the alternating access model, in which serotonin is transported with a fixed ratio of co-transported ions resulting in net charge per cycle. The alternating access model, however, cannot account for all the observed currents through SERT or other monoamine transporters.  Furthermore, SERT agonists like ecstasy or antagonists like fluoxetine generate or suppress currents that the standard model cannot support.  Here we survey evidence for a channel mode of transport in which transmitters and ions move through a pore. Available structures for dopamine and serotonin transporters, however, provide no evidence for a pore conformation, raising questions of whether the proposed channel mode actually exists or whether the structural data are perhaps missing a transient open state. PMID:27540474

  2. A current view of serotonin transporters

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Louis J.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are largely recognized for one aspect of their function—to transport serotonin back into the presynaptic terminal after its release. Another aspect of their function, however, may be to generate currents large enough to have physiological consequences. The standard model for electrogenic transport is the alternating access model, in which serotonin is transported with a fixed ratio of co-transported ions resulting in net charge per cycle. The alternating access model, however, cannot account for all the observed currents through SERT or other monoamine transporters.  Furthermore, SERT agonists like ecstasy or antagonists like fluoxetine generate or suppress currents that the standard model cannot support.  Here we survey evidence for a channel mode of transport in which transmitters and ions move through a pore. Available structures for dopamine and serotonin transporters, however, provide no evidence for a pore conformation, raising questions of whether the proposed channel mode actually exists or whether the structural data are perhaps missing a transient open state. PMID:27540474

  3. Revisiting Antarctic Circumpolar Current Transport Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommers, L. A.; Donohue, K. A.; Rosburg, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) is the world's strongest current, and acts as a conduit that transports water between Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. ACC transport is a key metric used to evaluate the accuracy of ocean and climate models. The canonical transport of 134 Sv through Drake Passage, the narrowest choke point of the ACC, derives from a year-long experiment conducted in 1979 (DRAKE79). Recent studies suggest that this historical value may be biased low by as much as 20%. DRAKE79 transport estimates resulted from a complicated synthesis of historical data and in-situ measurements, and relied heavily on the outcome of referencing three hydrographic sections with directly measured currents. This study focuses on evaluating DRAKE79's geostrophic referencing technique. We hypothesized that the horizontal spacing and temporal averaging of current meters led to a bias in the historical estimate. Southern Ocean State Estimate (SOSE) was used as a test bed to evaluate DRAKE79 methods. A mean AAC transport of 181.5 ± 17.6 Sv was obtained by applying DRAKE79 methods to 2005 SOSE output. This value is greater than SOSE's "true" geostrophic transport (153.0 ± 5.7) by 29 Sv. This difference resulted primarily from linear interpolation between two lost moorings; however the horizontal spacing of the current meters did not resolve the narrow jets of the ACC regardless of mooring loss. Within SOSE, geostrophic transports referenced with velocities at all mooring locations resulted in a mean transport of 161.0 ± 10.2 Sv. Temporal smoothing of the reference velocities, using up to a 20-day running mean, had minimal impact on the mean transport estimate. A next step would evaluate whether the mooring positions should be modified within SOSE to capture the same circulation features as DRAKE79.

  4. High current ion beam transport using solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, R.; Spaedtke, P.

    2008-02-15

    In the framework of the future project FAIR several upgrade programs and construction of new facilities are in progress such as the U{sup 4+} upgrade for the existing high current injector and the new 70 MeV proton injector. For both injectors solenoids in the low energy beam transport section are foreseen to inject the beam into the following rf accelerator. The paper presents beam quality measurements of high current ion beams behind a solenoid using a slit-grid emittance measurement device, viewing targets, and a pepper pot measurement device at the high current test bench at GSI.

  5. Transport currents in Bose quantum liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Apaja, V.; Krotscheck, E.; Rimnac, A.; Zillich, R. E.

    2006-09-07

    Until now, most of what has been said about excitations in quantum liquids has concerned the dynamic structure function, which is observable by means of neutron scattering. The dynamic structure function can be calculated using standard linear response theory. However, at this level one needs only transition densities <0{rho}n> or transition currents <0jn>, which are oscillatory in time and hence do not describe mass transport. In this work we go a step further and study transport currents in excited states, , which requires the calculation of to second order. For that purpose, we take a well-tested microscopic theory of inhomogeneous quantum liquids and extend it to find the currents formed when helium atoms scatter off a helium slab or when excitations evaporate atoms (a setup experimented by A. F. G. Wyatt's group in Exeter). Current conservation was already a major theoretical problem encountered by R. Feynman and led him to introduce backflow corrections. We show that perfect current conservation is expected only for exact solutions of the time-dependent many-body Schroedinger equation. This is the first extensive theoretical study of transport phenomena in a quantum liquid based on an accurate microscopic theory.

  6. Modes of the southern extension of the East Madagascar Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siedler, Gerold; Rouault, Mathieu; Biastoch, Arne; Backeberg, Bjorn; Reason, Chris J. C.; Lutjeharms, Johann R. E.

    2009-01-01

    Data sets from satellite observations and a nested high-resolution model are used to study a source region of the Agulhas Current. Altimeter-derived geostrophic surface currents are averaged over varying periods, providing evidence of the persistence of flow patterns in the extension of the southern branch of the East Madagascar Current (SEMC). South of Madagascar, the SEMC separates into one branch toward the Agulhas Current and into a second branch retroflecting and connecting to the Subtropical Indian Ocean Countercurrent (SICC). Good agreement is found between long-term mean patterns of observational and model dynamic heights. Two basic modes are identified in the SEMC extension, with anticyclonic motion favoring retroflection in the northern Mozambique Basin when the extension is in a southwestward direction and cyclonic motion occurring in the case of the SEMC flowing westward along the southern Madagascar slope. A cross-correlation sequence between model SEMC transports and the modal changes in the extension region displays a correlation at about 1-month lag which agrees with eddy propagation time from the SEMC to the outflow region. Mean model SEMC transports are determined using floats released at 21°S, and the contribution of the SEMC to the SICC is obtained using floats injected at 55°E with the model running backward. Almost half of the SEMC volume transport contributes to the Agulhas system, and about 40% of SICC water originates from the SEMC.

  7. Current density fluctuations and ambipolarity of transport

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.; Dexter, R.N.; Prager, S.C.

    1991-10-01

    The fluctuation in the plasma current density is measured in the MIST reversed field pinch experiment. Such fluctuations, and the measured radial profile of the k spectrum of magnetic fluctuations, supports the view and that low frequency fluctuations (f < 30 kHz) are tearing modes and high frequency fluctuations (30 kHz < f < 250 kHz) are localized turbulence in resonance with the local equilibrium magnetic field (i.e., k {center_dot} B = 0). Correlation of current density and magnetic fluctuations (< {tilde j}{parallel}{tilde B}{sub r} >) demonstrates that radial particle transport from particle motion parallel to a fluctuating magnetic field is ambipolar over the full frequency range.

  8. Current density fluctuations and ambipolarity of transport

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.; Dexter, R.N.; Prager, S.C.

    1991-10-01

    The fluctuation in the plasma current density is measured in the MIST reversed field pinch experiment. Such fluctuations, and the measured radial profile of the k spectrum of magnetic fluctuations, supports the view and that low frequency fluctuations (f < 30 kHz) are tearing modes and high frequency fluctuations (30 kHz < f < 250 kHz) are localized turbulence in resonance with the local equilibrium magnetic field (i.e., k {center dot} B = 0). Correlation of current density and magnetic fluctuations (< {tilde j}{parallel}{tilde B}{sub r} >) demonstrates that radial particle transport from particle motion parallel to a fluctuating magnetic field is ambipolar over the full frequency range.

  9. Salinity changes in the Agulhas leakage area recorded by stable hydrogen isotopes of C37 alkenones during Termination I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, S.; van der Meer, M. T. J.; Mets, A.; Zahn, R.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Schouten, S.

    2014-02-01

    At the southern tip of Africa, the Agulhas Current reflects back into the Indian Ocean causing so-called "Agulhas rings" to spin off and release relatively warm and saline water into the South Atlantic Ocean. Previous reconstructions of the dynamics of the Agulhas Current, based on paleo-sea surface temperature and sea surface salinity proxies, inferred that Agulhas leakage from the Indian Ocean to the South Atlantic was reduced during glacial stages as a consequence of shifted wind fields and a northwards migration of the subtropical front. Subsequently, this might have led to a buildup of warm saline water in the southern Indian Ocean. To investigate this latter hypothesis, we reconstructed sea surface salinity changes using alkenone δD, and paleo-sea surface temperature using TEXH86 and UK'37, from two sediment cores (MD02-2594, MD96-2080) located in the Agulhas leakage area during Termination I and II. Both UK'37 and TEXH86 temperature reconstructions indicate an abrupt warming during the glacial terminations, while a shift to more negative δDalkenone values of approximately 14‰ during glacial Termination I and II is also observed. Approximately half of the isotopic shift can be attributed to the change in global ice volume, while the residual isotopic shift is attributed to changes in salinity, suggesting relatively high salinities at the core sites during glacials, with subsequent freshening during glacial terminations. Approximate estimations suggest that δDalkenone represents a salinity change of ca. 1.7-1.9 during Termination I and Termination II. These estimations are in good agreement with the proposed changes in salinity derived from previously reported combined planktonic Foraminifera δ18O values and Mg/Ca-based temperature reconstructions. Our results confirm that the δD of alkenones is a potentially suitable tool to reconstruct salinity changes independent of planktonic Foraminifera δ18O.

  10. Studying an Agulhas ring's long-term pathway and decay with finite-time coherent sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froyland, Gary; Horenkamp, Christian; Rossi, Vincent; van Sebille, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Coherent sets in dynamical systems are regions in phase space that optimally "carry mass" with them under the system's evolution, so that these regions experience minimal leakage. The dominant tool for determining coherent sets is the transfer operator, which provides a complete description of Lagrangian mass transport. In this work, we combine existing transfer operator methods with a windowing scheme to study the spatial and temporal evolution of a so-called Agulhas ring: a large anticyclonic mesoscale eddy playing a key role in inter-ocean exchange of climate-relevant properties. Our focus is on ring decay over time and the windowing scheme enables us to study how the most coherent region (our estimate of the ring) varies in position and size over a period of more than two years. We compare the eddy-like structure and its spatio-temporal changes as revealed by our method and by a classical Eulerian approach.

  11. Pleistocene ice-rafted debris events recorded at the Agulhas Plateau - indicators of intermittent Indian-Atlantic gateway closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, M.; Hall, I. R.; Siret, P. J.; Zahn, R.

    2012-04-01

    Interocean exchange of heat and salt around South Africa - the so called 'Agulhas Leakage' - is thought to be a key link in the maintenance of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). It takes place at the Agulhas Retroflection, largely by the intermittent shedding of enormous rings that penetrate into the South Atlantic Ocean (Lutjeharms, 1996, Biastoch et al., 2008; Beal et al., 2011). Recent palaeoceanographic studies suggest that variability in the latitudinal position of the subtropical front (STF) in the Southern Ocean, act as a gatekeeper for the Agulhas retroflection and moreover, that a variable northward migration of the STF potentially modulated the severity of glacial periods by altering the amount of Agulhas leakage with consequences for the AMOC (Bard and Rickaby, 2009). Here we present a high-resolution record of ice rafted debris (IRD) from the southern Agulhas Plateau (sediment core MD02-2588, 41°19,90 S and 25°49,70 E, 2907 m water depth) covering the last 350,000 years. We find distinct millennial scale events with high abundances of IRD in the sediments. Scanning-electron microscope analysis of individual grains shows a wide range of morphologies, with a high degree of angularity being a dominant feature, with surface microfeatures (linear fractures, grooves and troughs) that are typical for glacial origin and transport. We interpret these IRD events as indicators for a northward shift of the Southern Ocean frontal system, thereby allowing sufficient cooling and iceberg survivability as far north as the Agulhas Plateau. Our proxy record suggests significant millennial scale variability of the frontal movements throughout the last three glacial cycles. Largest IRD peaks occur during marine isotope stage 8 (~300 ka BP) and hence during a period for which an extreme northward shift in the STF has been identified previously (Bard and Rickaby, 2009). We compare our IRD record with records of millennial scale climate variability in

  12. Assimilating along-track SLA data using the EnOI in an eddy resolving model of the Agulhas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, Björn C.; Counillon, François; Johannessen, Johnny A.; Pujol, Marie-Isabelle

    2014-08-01

    The greater Agulhas Current is one of the most energetic current systems in the global ocean. It plays a fundamental role in determining the mean state and variability of the regional marine environment, affecting its resources and ecosystem, the regional weather and the global climate on a broad range of temporal and spatial scales. In the absence of a coherent in-situ and satellite-based observing system in the region, modelling and data assimilation techniques play a crucial role in both furthering the quantitative understanding and providing better forecasts of this complicated western boundary current system. In this study, we use a regional implementation of the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model and assimilate along-track satellite sea level anomaly (SLA) data using the Ensemble Optimal Interpolation (EnOI) data assimilation scheme. This study lays the foundation towards the development of a regional prediction system for the greater Agulhas Current system. Comparisons to independent in-situ drifter observations show that data assimilation reduces the error compared to a free model run over a 2-year period. Mesoscale features are placed in more consistent agreement with the drifter trajectories and surface velocity errors are reduced. While the model-based forecasts of surface velocities are not as accurate as persistence forecasts derived from satellite altimeter observations, the error calculated from the drifter measurements for eddy kinetic energy is significantly lower in the assimilation system compared to the persistence forecast. While the assimilation of along-track SLA data introduces a small bias in sea surface temperatures, the representation of water mass properties and deep current velocities in the Agulhas system is improved.

  13. Continental crust beneath the Agulhas Plateau, Southwest Indian Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Tucholke, B.E.; Houtz, R.E.; Barrett, D.M.

    1981-05-10

    The Agulhas Plateau lies 500 km off the Cape of Good Hope in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Acoustic basement beneath the northern one third of this large, aseismic structural high has rugged morphology, but basement in the south is anomalously smooth, excepting a 30- to 90-km-wide zone with irregular relief that trends south-southwest through the center of the plateau. Seismic refraction profiles across the southern plateau indicate that the zone of irregular acoustic basement overlies thickened oceanic crust and that continental crust, locally thinned and intruded by basalts, underlies several regions of smooth acoustic basement. Recovery of quartzo-feldspathic gneisses in dredge hauls confirms the presence of continental crust. The smoothness of acoustic basement probably results from erosion (perhaps initially subaerial) of topographic highs with depositions and cementation of debris in ponds to form high-velocity beds. Basalt flows and sills also may contribute locally to form smooth basement. The rugged basement of the northern plateau appears to be of oceanic origin. A plate reconstruction to the time of initial opening of the South Atlantic places the continental part of the southern plateau adjacent to the southern edge of the Falkland Plateau, and both abut the western Mozambique Ridge. Both the Agulhas and Falkland plateaus were displaced westward during initial rifting in the Early Cretaceous. Formation of an RRR triple junction at the northern edge of the Agulhas continental fragment during middle Cretaceous time may explain the origin of the rugged, thickened oceanic crust beneath plateau as well as the apparent extension of the continental crust and intrusion of basaltic magmas beneath the southern plateau.

  14. Current understanding of SEP acceleration and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, C. M. S.

    2016-03-01

    Through new missions and unusual solar conditions, solar cycle 24 has afforded the opportunity for expanding our understanding of solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration and transport. With complementary SEP observations from multiple spacecraft separated significantly in longitude, it has been possible to examine the longitudinal distribution of energetic particles in individual events, rather than relying on statistical event studies. Unprecedented 360° views of the Sun, in multiple wavelengths and coronagraphs, has made it possible to identify solar source regions regardless of where they are located and to more accurately determine the properties of related coronal mass ejections. The unusually quiet conditions during the onset of cycle 24 allowed smaller SEP events to be examined and their source regions to be unambiguously identified. This paper reviews some of the unexpected results from multi-spacecraft SEP observations made over this solar cycle and discusses their implications for particle acceleration near the Sun and transport through the inner heliosphere.

  15. Superconducting fault current limiter for railway transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, L. M. Alferov, D. F.; Akhmetgareev, M. R.; Budovskii, A. I.; Evsin, D. V.; Voloshin, I. F.; Kalinov, A. V.

    2015-12-15

    A resistive switching superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) for DC networks with voltage of 3.5 kV and nominal current of 2 kA is developed. The SFCL consists of two series-connected units: block of superconducting modules and high-speed vacuum breaker with total disconnection time not more than 8 ms. The results of laboratory tests of superconducting SFCL modules in current limiting mode are presented. The recovery time of superconductivity is experimentally determined. The possibility of application of SFCL on traction substations of Russian Railways is considered.

  16. Superconducting fault current limiter for railway transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, L. M.; Alferov, D. F.; Akhmetgareev, M. R.; Budovskii, A. I.; Evsin, D. V.; Voloshin, I. F.; Kalinov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    A resistive switching superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) for DC networks with voltage of 3.5 kV and nominal current of 2 kA is developed. The SFCL consists of two series-connected units: block of superconducting modules and high-speed vacuum breaker with total disconnection time not more than 8 ms. The results of laboratory tests of superconducting SFCL modules in current limiting mode are presented. The recovery time of superconductivity is experimentally determined. The possibility of application of SFCL on traction substations of Russian Railways is considered.

  17. Computer simulation of transport driven current in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunan, W. J.; Dawson, J. M.

    1994-09-01

    We have investigated transport driven current in tokamaks via 2+1/2 dimensional, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations. These have demonstrated a steady increase of toroidal current in centrally fueled plasmas. Neoclassical theory predicts that the bootstrap current vanishes at large aspect ratio, but we see equal or greater current growth in straight cylindrical plasmas. These results indicate that a centrally fueled and heated tokamak may sustain its toroidal current, even without the ``seed current'' which the neoclassical bootstrap theory requires.

  18. Fuel consumption improvement in current transport engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, R. W.; Ziemianski, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    A review is conducted of improvements which can be made with respect to the fuel consumption of current engines and new production versions of current engines. A description is presented of an engine diagnostics program which has the objective to identify and quantify the causes and sources of performance deterioration in the JT9D turbofan engine and to develop basic data which will be applied to minimize performance degradation of current and future engines. General areas where performance losses occur are examined, taking into account seals, blades and vanes, and cases. Potential performance improvement concepts are related to improved component aerodynamics, improved flowpath sealing, blade tip clearance control, improved turbine cooling effectiveness, improved turbine materials and coatings, duct and nozzle aerodynamic refinements, nacelle aerodynamic refinements, forced exhaust mixers, advanced nacelle materials, and advanced fuel control.

  19. Space charge effects in current transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Developments on the subject of noise in single and double injection currents in solids are reviewed. Results are discussed in detail and a bibliography of published work in the field is provided. Conflicting findings and opinions are examined in the light of the present understanding of the subject.

  20. Magneto-optical imaging of transport current densities in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G.W.; Welp, U.; Gunter, D.O.; Zhong, W.; Balachandran, U.; Haldar, P.; Sokolowski, R.S.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V.K.; Nikitenko, V.I.

    1995-12-31

    Direct imaging of the paths of transport currents in superconductors creates many new possibilities for exploring the basic features of vortex pinning mechanisms and for improving the performance of superconducting materials. A technique for imaging the path and magnitude of the transport current density flowing in superconductors is described. Results are given for a 37-filament BSCCO 2223 powder-in-tube wire, showing a highly inhomogeneous current path within the filaments.

  1. Current injection and transport in polyfluorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chieh-Kai; Yang, Chia-Ming; Liao, Hua-Hsien; Horng, Sheng-Fu; Meng, Hsin-Fei

    2007-08-01

    A comprehensive numerical model is established for the electrical processes in a sandwich organic semiconductor device with high carrier injection barrier. The charge injection at the anode interface with 0.8eV energy barrier is dominated by the hopping among the gap states of the semiconductor caused by disorders. The Ohmic behavior at low voltage is demonstrated to be not due to the background doping but the filaments formed by conductive clusters. In bipolar devices with low work function cathode it is shown that near the anode the electron traps significantly enhance hole injection through Fowler-Nordheim tunneling, resulting in rapid increases of the hole carrier and current in comparison with the hole-only devices.

  2. Revisiting the relationship between Loop Current rings and Florida Current transport variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildner, Tanja C.; Eden, Carsten; Czeschel, Lars

    2013-12-01

    It is suggested that internal ocean variability plays a significant role in Florida Current transport variability on interannual time scales. A clear relationship is found between different stages within a ring shedding cycle of the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico and minima in the Florida Current transport in mesoscale eddy-permitting ocean model simulations. Available observations are generally in agreement with such a relation but too sparse to give full evidence. Before the Loop Current intrudes far into the Gulf of Mexico a coherent eddy within the Loop Current partly blocks the inflow from the Caribbean Sea through Yucatan Channel leading to a minimum in the Florida Current transport. Such a blocking situation typically occurs over a period of 1-2 months. The irregular blocking leads to interannual variability explaining large parts of the variability of the Florida Current transport in the model simulations, even exceeding atmospheric forcing variability on the considered time scales. Model simulations without ring shedding produce significantly less variability in Florida Current transport. Simulations without interannual variability in the surface forcing show almost as large (or even larger) interannual Florida Current transport changes as without forcing variability. Adding a seasonal cycle can lead to a beat frequency which might be important for the decadal variability.

  3. Accelerated sea level rise and Florida Current transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Sweet, W.

    2015-04-01

    The Florida Current is the headwater of the Gulf Stream and is a component of the North Atlantic western boundary current from which a geostrophic balance between sea surface height and mass transport directly influence coastal sea levels along the Florida Straits. A linear regression of daily Florida Current transport estimates does not find a significant change in transport over the last decade, however, a nonlinear trend extracted from empirical mode decomposition suggests a 3 Sv decline in mean transport. This decline is consistent with observed tide gauge records in Florida Bay and the Straits, all exhibiting an acceleration of mean sea level rise over the decade. It is not known whether this recent change represents natural variability or the onset of the anticipated secular decline in Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, nonetheless, such changes have direct impacts on the sensitive ecological systems of the Everglades as well as the climate of western Europe and eastern North America.

  4. Accelerated sea level rise and Florida Current transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Sweet, W.

    2015-07-01

    The Florida Current is the headwater of the Gulf Stream and is a component of the North Atlantic western boundary current from which a geostrophic balance between sea surface height and mass transport directly influence coastal sea levels along the Florida Straits. A linear regression of daily Florida Current transport estimates does not find a significant change in transport over the last decade; however, a nonlinear trend extracted from empirical mode decomposition (EMD) suggests a 3 Sv decline in mean transport. This decline is consistent with observed tide gauge records in Florida Bay and the straits exhibiting an acceleration of mean sea level (MSL) rise over the decade. It is not known whether this recent change represents natural variability or the onset of the anticipated secular decline in Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC); nonetheless, such changes have direct impacts on the sensitive ecological systems of the Everglades as well as the climate of western Europe and eastern North America.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic transport equations for high current propagation in overdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Xuejun; Wang, Yan; Han, Shensheng

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, it is presented that the full set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations which may be used to study the transport mechanism for the high current relativistic electron beams (current intensity 100˜1000 MA, electron energy ˜ MeV) by the laser in background overdense plasma (1022-1026cm). The transport of intense relativistic electron beams (REB) has two basic characteristics: the first is that the forward current is a giga-ampere and the forward current density is about 10 14 A/cm 2 which exceeds the Alfven current limit [M. Tabak et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057305 (2005)]; the second is the propagation of the intense forward current in the presence of a background overdense plasma which may have very strong MHD instability. The transport problem can be solved by MHD equations that describe the dynamic, self consistent collisional and electromagnetic interaction of REB with overdense hydrogenic plasmas or arbitrary atomic-number plasmas. The full set of equations consists of the REB transport equations which are coupled to Maxwell's equations through the electromagnetic-field terms and two-fluid plasma dynamical equations for the background overdense plasma through the collision term.

  6. Electric current induced forward and anomalous backward mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somaiah, Nalla; Sharma, Deepak; Kumar, Praveen

    2016-05-01

    Multilayered test samples were fabricated in form of standard Blech structure, where W was used as the interlayer between SiO2 substrate and Cu film. Electromigration test was performed at 250 °C by passing an electric current with a nominal density of 3.9  ×  1010 A m‑2. In addition to the regular electromigration induced mass transport ensuing from the cathode towards the anode, we also observed anomalous mass transport from the anode to the cathode, depleting Cu from the anode as well. We propose an electromigration-thermomigration coupling based reasoning to explain the observed mass transport.

  7. Transport and sedimentation in unconfined experimental dilute pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, G.; Andrews, B. J.; Dennen, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from experiments conducted in a new facility that permits the study of large, unconfined particle laden density currents that are dynamically similar to natural dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). Experiments were run in a sealed, air-filled tank measuring 8.5 m long by 6.1 m wide by 2.6 m tall. Currents were generated by feeding mixture of heated particles (5 μm aluminum oxide, 25 μm talc, 27 μm walnut shell, 76 μm glass beads) down a chute at controlled rates to produce dilute, turbulent gravity currents. Comparison of experimental currents with natural PDCs shows good agreement between Froude, densimetric and thermal Richardson, and particle Stokes and settling numbers; experimental currents have lower Reynolds numbers than natural PDCs, but are fully turbulent. Currents were illuminated with 3 orthogonal laser sheets (650, 532, and 450 nm wavelengths) and recorded with an array of HD video cameras and a high speed camera (up to 3000 fps). Deposits were mapped using a grid of sedimentation traps. We observe distinct differences between ambient temperature and warm currents: * warm currents have shorter run out distances, narrow map view distributions of currents and deposits, thicken with distance from the source, and lift off to form coignimbrite plumes; * ambient temperature currents typically travel farther, spread out radially, do not thicken greatly with transport distance, and do not form coignimbrite plumes. Long duration currents (600 s compared to 30-100 s) oscillate laterally with time (e.g. transport to the right, then the left, and back); this oscillation happens prior to any interaction with the tank walls. Isopach maps of the deposits show predictable trends in sedimentation versus distance in response to eruption parameters (eruption rate, duration, temperature, and initial current mass), but all sedimentation curves can be fit with 2nd order polynomials (R2>.9). Proximal sedimentation is similar in comparable warm

  8. Salinity changes in the Agulhas leakage area recorded by stable hydrogen isotopes of C37 alkenones during Termination I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, S.; van der Meer, M. T. J.; Mets, A.; Zahn, R.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Schouten, S.

    2013-06-01

    At the southern tip of the African shelf, the Agulhas Current reflects back into the Indian Ocean causing so called "Agulhas rings" to spin off and release relatively warm and saline water into the South Atlantic Ocean. Previous reconstructions of the dynamics of the Agulhas current, based on paleo sea surface temperature and sea surface salinity proxies, inferred that Agulhas leakage from the Indian Ocean to the South Atlantic is reduced as a consequence of changes in wind fields related to a northwards migration of ice masses and the subtropical front during glacial stages. Subsequently, this might have led to a build-up of warm saline water in the southern Indian Ocean. To investigate this latter hypothesis, we reconstructed sea surface salinity changes using alkenone δ D, and paleo sea surface temperature using TEXH86 and UK'37, from two sediment cores (MD02-2594, MD96-2080) located in the Agulhas leakage area during Termination I and II. Both UK'37 and TEXH86 temperature reconstructions infer an abrupt warming during the glacial terminations, which is different from the gradual warming trend previously reconstructed based on Mg/Ca ratios of Globigerina bulloides. These differences in temperature reconstructions might be related to differences in the growth season or depth habitat between organisms. A shift to more negative δ Dalkenone values of approximately 14‰ during glacial Termination I and approximately 13‰ during Termination II is also observed. Approximately half of these shifts can be attributed to the change in global ice volume, while the residual isotopic shift is attributed to changes in salinity, suggesting relatively high salinities at the core sites during glacials, with subsequent freshening during glacial terminations. Approximate estimations suggest that δ Dalkenone represents a salinity change of ca. 1.7-2 during Termination I and ca. 1.5-1.7 during Termination II. These estimations are in good agreement with the proposed changes in

  9. High-current beam dynamics and transport, theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of beam physics and technology factors determining the current and brightness of ion and electron beams in linear accelerators will be reviewed. Topics to be discussed including phase-space density constraints of particle sources, low-energy beam transport include charge neutralization, emittance growth due to mismatch, energy exchange, instabilities, nonlinear effects, and longitudinal bunching.

  10. Proteins interacting with monoamine transporters: current state and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Sager, Jonathan J; Torres, Gonzalo E

    2011-08-30

    Plasma membrane and vesicular transporters for the biogenic amines, dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, represent a group of proteins that play a crucial role in the regulation of neurotransmission. Clinically, mono amine transporters are the primary targets for the actions of many therapeutic agents used to treat mood disorders, as well as the site of action for highly addictive psychostimulants such as cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine. Over the past decade, the use of approaches such as yeast two-hybrid and proteomics has identified a multitude of transporter interacting proteins, suggesting that the function and regulation of these transporters are more complex than previously anticipated. With the increasing number of interacting proteins, the rules dictating transporter synthesis, assembly, targeting, trafficking, and function are beginning to be deciphered. Although many of these protein interactions have yet to be fully characterized, current knowledge is beginning to shed light on novel transporter mechanisms involved in monoamine homeostasis, the molecular actions of psychostimulants, and potential disease mechanisms. While future studies resolving the spatial and temporal resolution of these, and yet unknown, interactions will be needed, the realization that monoamine transporters do not work alone opens the path to a plethora of possible pharmacological interventions. PMID:21797260

  11. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.W.; Schulz, M.; Lyons, L.R.; Gorney, D.J.

    1993-04-01

    This is an investigation of stormtime particle transport that leads to formation of the ring current. The method is to trace the guiding-center motion of representative ions (having selected first adiabatic invariants [mu]) in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field. The simulation results are compared qualitatively with existing analytically tractable idealizations of particle transport (direct convective access and radial diffusion) in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For [mu] approximately less than 10 MeV/G (E approximately less than 10 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period on the final (ring-current) drift shell of interest (L equivalent to 3) exceeds the duration of the main phase of the model storm, and the authors find that the transport of ions to this drift shell is appropriately idealized as direct convective access, typically from open drift paths. Ion transport to a final closed drift path from an open (plasma-sheet) drift trajectory is possible for those portions of that drift path that lie outside the mean stormtime separatrix between closed and open drift trajectories, For [mu] approximately 10-25 MeV/G (110 keV approximately less than E approximately less than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the drift period at L equivalent to 3 is comparable to the postulated 3-hr duration of the storm, and the mode of transport is transitional between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. (This particle population is transitional between the ring current and radiation belt). For [mu] approximately greater than 25 MeV/G (radiation-belt ions having E approximately greater than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period is considerably shorter than the main phase of a typical storm, and ions gain access to the ring-current region essentially via radial diffusion.

  12. AC and DC transport currents in melt-grown YBCO

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Z.; Ashworth, S.; Becluz, C.; Scurlock, R.G. )

    1991-03-01

    It has been suggested that the transport J{sub c} in multi-grain samples of bulk YBCO are limited by the intergrain links. This paper reports on preliminary measurements of intergrain currents. The intergrain critical currents in melt grown YBCO do not appear to be as sensitive to the precise crystallographic alignment of adjacent grains a has been reported for thin films. The measured critical current of similar grain boundaries varies widely, between 15000 A/cm{sup 2} and 200A/Cm{sub 2} for adjacent boundaries in the same sample.

  13. Status of high transport current ROEBEL assembled coated conductor cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldacker, Wilfried; Frank, Antje; Kudymow, Andrej; Heller, Reinhard; Kling, Andrea; Terzieva, Stanimira; Schmidt, Curt

    2009-03-01

    Assembling coated conductors (CC) into flat ROEBEL bars (RACC cable) was introduced in 2005 by the authors as a practicable method of reaching high transport currents in a low AC loss cable, which is a cable design suited for application in windings. The transport current of 1.02 kA in self-field at 77 K achieved so far, however, is still too low for several applications in electrical machinery such as larger transformers and generators/motors. A new cable concept for further increased currents was presented just recently. The goal of the new design was primarily to demonstrate the possibility of strongly increased transport currents without changing the important cable features for low AC losses. such as, for example, the transposition length of the strands. We present detailed investigations of the properties of this progressed cable design, which has threefold layered strands, an unchanged transposition pitch of 18.8 cm and finally the application of 45 coated conductors in the cable. A 1.1 m long sample (equivalent to six transposition lengths) was prepared from commercial Cu stabilized coated conductors purchased from Superpower. The measured new record DC transport current of the cable was 2628 A at 77 K in self-field (5 µV cm-1 criterion). The use of three slightly different current carrying batches of strand material (± 10%) was a special feature of the cable, which allowed for interesting investigations of current redistribution effects in the cable, by monitoring a representative strand of each batch during the critical current measurement. Although current redistribution effects showed a complex situation, the behaviour of the cable was found to be absolutely stable under all operational conditions, even above the critical current. The high self-field degradation of the critical current reached the order of 60% at 77 K, and could be modelled satisfactory with calculations based on a proven Biot-Savart-law approach, adapted to the specific boundary

  14. Universal scaling of optimal current distribution in transportation networks.

    PubMed

    Simini, Filippo; Rinaldo, Andrea; Maritan, Amos

    2009-04-01

    Transportation networks are inevitably selected with reference to their global cost which depends on the strengths and the distribution of the embedded currents. We prove that optimal current distributions for a uniformly injected d -dimensional network exhibit robust scale-invariance properties, independently of the particular cost function considered, as long as it is convex. We find that, in the limit of large currents, the distribution decays as a power law with an exponent equal to (2d-1)/(d-1). The current distribution can be exactly calculated in d=2 for all values of the current. Numerical simulations further suggest that the scaling properties remain unchanged for both random injections and by randomizing the convex cost functions. PMID:19518304

  15. Measurement of critical current for bulk superconductors by transport method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikegawa, T. S.; Sasaki, H.; Tada, H.; Kudo, T.; Kikuchi, H.; Konno, K.; Muralidhar, M.; Murakami, M.; Noto, K.; Awaji, S.; Watanabe, K.

    2005-10-01

    The method of critical current measurement in a magnetic field using a DC transport current has been developed for bulk superconductors. The measurement of the critical current, Ic, up to 50 A at a temperature of 77 K became possible by reducing thermal and mechanical stresses caused in the sample due to rapid cooling from the room temperature to 77 K and a electromagnetic force (Lorentz force), etc. The critical current of 50 A is reduced into 14,000 A/cm 2 of critical current density, Jc, with a cross section of 0.0035 cm 2. The magnetic field dependence of Jc was investigated from 1 T to 10 T for (Nd 0.33Eu 0.38Gd 0.28)Ba 2Cu 3O y bulk superconductors. The magnetization measurement was performed for the sample cut out from the same part of the same crystal as that used for the transport measurement of Ic, from which the critical current density was also estimated. In low magnetic fields, the magnitude of critical current density obtained by the transport method, JcT, was larger than that estimated from the magnetization, JcM. This result reflects the difference of criterion to determine the value of JcT and JcM. In higher magnetic fields, however, it was observed that JcT was smaller than JcM and the irreversibility field estimated from JcT- B curve is slightly lower than that given by the magnetic hysteresis. When the external magnetic field was applied, anomalous voltage peaks in the I- V curve were observed below IcT, which may be caused by the sample slightly moving by the Lorentz force.

  16. Current Issues in Electron and Positron Transport Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, Robert

    2007-10-01

    In this paper we review the current status of transport theory for low energy electrons or positrons in gases, in the context of both kinetic theory and fluid modelling. In particular, we focus on the following issues: (i) Muliterm vs two-term representation of the velocity distribution function in solution of Boltzmann's equation; (ii) the effect of non-conservative collisions (attachment, ionization, positron annihilation) on transport properties; (iii) the enduring electron- hydrogen vibrational cross section controversy and possible implications for the Boltzmann equation itself; (iv) closure of the fluid equations and the heat flux ansatz; and (v) correct use of swarm transport coefficients in fluid modelling of low temperature plasmas. Both hydrodynamic and non-hydrodynamic examples will be given, with attention focussed on the Franck-Hertz experiment, particularly the ``window'' of fields in which oscillations of transport properties are produced, and the way in which electric and magnetic fields combine to affect transport properties. In collaboration with co-authors Z. LJ. Petrovi'c, Institute of Physics Belgrade, and R.D. White, James Cook University.

  17. Agulhas leakage as a key process in the modes of Quaternary climate changes.

    PubMed

    Caley, Thibaut; Giraudeau, Jacques; Malaizé, Bruno; Rossignol, Linda; Pierre, Catherine

    2012-05-01

    Heat and salt transfer from the Indian Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean (Agulhas leakage) has an important effect on the global thermohaline circulation and climate. The lack of long transfer record prevents elucidation of its role on climate changes throughout the Quaternary. Here, we present a 1,350-ka accumulation rate record of the planktic foraminiferal species Globorotalia menardii. We demonstrate that, according to previous assumptions, the presence and reseeding of this fauna in the subtropical southeast Atlantic was driven by interocean exchange south of Africa. The Agulhas transfer strengthened at glacial ice-volume maxima for every glacial-interglacial transition, with maximum reinforcements organized according to a 400-ka periodicity. The long-term dynamics of Agulhas leakage may have played a crucial role in regulating meridional overturning circulation and global climate changes during the Mid-Brunhes event and the Mid-Pleistocene transition, and could also play an important role in the near future. PMID:22508999

  18. Modeling coastal current transport in the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetland, Robert D.; Signell, Richard P.

    2005-09-01

    A numerical simulation of the circulation in the Gulf of Maine is compared with observations taken during the spring and summer of 1994, focusing on two distinct coastal current systems. The eastern Maine coastal current is well mixed out to approximately 50m depth, with the influence of tidal mixing extending to 100m depth. In contrast, the western Maine coastal current consists mainly of a surface-trapped plume emanating from the Kennebec River. Various methods of model/data comparison are discussed, ranging from qualitative comparisons of surface temperature and currents to quantitative measurements of model skill. In particular, one primary metric of comparison is the amount and distribution of fresh water carried within the coastal current systems. In both coastal current systems, fresh-water flux has an approximately self-similar structure so that measurements taken at a single mooring location may be extrapolated to estimate the entire along-shore fresh-water flux. This self-similar structure is shown to be internally consistent within the model, and results in good model/data comparisons. The model has more skill at predicting fresh-water flux than other point-to-point surface property comparisons in all cases except surface salinity in the western Maine coastal current. This suggests fresh-water flux is a robust feature in the model, and a suitable metric for gauging the model ability to reproduce the broad-scale transport of the Maine coastal current system.

  19. Ocean Virtual Laboratory: A New Way to Explore Multi-Sensor Synergy Demonstrated over the Agulhas Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collard, F.; Quartly, G. D.; Konik, M.; Johannessen, J. A.; Korosov, A.; Chapron, B.; Piolle, J.-F.; Herledan, S.; Darecki, M.; Isar, A.; Nafornita, C.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean Virtual Laboratory is an ESA-funded project to prototype the concept of a single point of access for all satellite remote-sensing data with ancillary model output and in situ measurements for a given region. The idea is to provide easy access for the non-specialist to both data and state-of-the-art processing techniques and enable their easy analysis and display. The project, led by OceanDataLab, is being trialled in the region of the Agulhas Current, as it contains signals of strong contrast (due to very energetic upper ocean dynamics) and special SAR data acquisitions have been recorded there. The project also encourages the take up of Earth Observation data by developing training material to help those not in large scientific or governmental organizations make the best use of what data are available. The website for access is: http://ovlproject.oceandatalab.com/

  20. High-latitude forcing of diatom productivity in the southern Agulhas Plateau during the past 350 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, O. E.; Kim, J.-H.; Bárcena, M. A.; Hall, I. R.; Zahn, R.; Schneider, R.

    2015-02-01

    The hydrography of the Indian-Atlantic Ocean gateway has been connected to high-latitude climate dynamics by oceanic and atmospheric teleconnections on orbital and suborbital timescales. A wealth of sedimentary records aiming at reconstructing the late Pleistocene paleoceanography around the southern African continent has been devoted to understanding these linkages. Most of the records are, however, clustered close to the southern South African tip, with comparatively less attention devoted to areas under the direct influence of frontal zones of the Southern Ocean/South Atlantic. Here we present data of the composition and concentration of the diatom assemblage together with bulk biogenic content and the alkenone-based sea surface temperature (SST) variations for the past 350 kyr in the marine sediment core MD02-2588 (approximately 41°S, 26°E) recovered from the southern Agulhas Plateau. Variations in biosiliceous productivity show a varying degree of coupling with Southern Hemisphere paleoclimate records following a glacial-interglacial cyclicity. Ecologically well-constrained groups of diatoms record the glacial-interglacial changes in water masses dynamics, nutrient availability, and stratification of the upper ocean. The good match between the glacial maxima of total diatoms concentration, Chaetoceros spores abundance, and opal content with the maximum seasonal cover of Antarctic ice and the atmospheric dust records points to a dominant Southern Hemisphere forcing of diatom production. Suborbital variability of SST suggests rapid latitudinal migrations of the Subtropical Front and associated water masses over the southern Agulhas Plateau, following millennial contractions and expansions of the subtropical gyres. Warmings of the upper ocean over site MD02-2588 during terminations IV to I occurred earlier than that in the Antarctic Vostok, which is indicative of a Northern Hemisphere lead. Our multiparameter reconstruction highlights how high

  1. Modeling spin transport with current-sensing spin detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2010-03-01

    The impulse response (or ``Green's function'') of a current-sensing spin detector is derived analytically by incorporating the proper boundary conditions. This result is also compared to a Monte Carlo simulation (which automatically takes the proper boundary conditions into account) and an empirical spin transit time distribution obtained from experimental spin precession measurements. In the strong drift-dominated transport regime, this spin current impulse response can be approximated by multiplying the spin density impulse response by the average drift velocity. However, in weak drift fields, large modeling errors up to a factor of 3 in most-probable spin transit time can be incurred unless the full spin current Green's function is used.

  2. Modeling spin transport with current-sensing spin detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2009-10-01

    By incorporating the proper boundary conditions, we analytically derive the impulse response (or "Green's function") of a current-sensing spin detector. We also compare this result to a Monte Carlo simulation (which automatically takes the proper boundary condition into account) and an empirical spin transit time distribution obtained from experimental spin precession measurements. In the strong drift-dominated transport regime, this spin current impulse response can be approximated by multiplying the spin density impulse response by the average drift velocity. However, in weak drift fields, large modeling errors up to a factor of 3 in most-probable spin transit time can be incurred unless the full spin current Green's function is used.

  3. The Euler current and relativistic parity odd transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkar, Siavash; Roberts, Matthew M.; Son, Dam T.

    2015-04-01

    For a spacetime of odd dimensions endowed with a unit vector field, we introduce a new topological current that is identically conserved and whose charge is equal to the Euler character of the even dimensional spacelike foliations. The existence of this current allows us to introduce new Chern-Simons-type terms in the effective field theories describing relativistic quantum Hall states and (2 + 1) dimensional superfluids. Using effective field theory, we calculate various correlation functions and identify transport coefficients. In the quantum Hall case, this current provides the natural relativistic generalization of the Wen-Zee term, required to characterize the shift and Hall viscosity in quantum Hall systems. For the superfluid case this term is required to have nonzero Hall viscosity and to describe superfluids with non s-wave pairing.

  4. [alpha]-particle transport-driven current in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A. ); Sipilae, S.K. )

    1995-03-01

    It is shown that the radial transport of fusion-born energetic [alpha] particles, induced by electrostatic waves traveling in one poloidal direction, is directly connected to a net momentum of [alpha] particles in the toroidal direction in tokamaks. Because the momentum change is almost independent of toroidal velocity, the energy required for the momentum generation remains small on an [alpha]-particle population sustained by an isotropic time-independent source. By numerical toroidal Monte Carlo calculations it is shown that the current carried by [alpha] particles in the presence of intense well penetrated waves can reach several mega-amperes in reactor-sized tokamaks. The current obtained can greatly exceed the neoclassical bootstrap current of the [alpha] particles.

  5. Global temperature responses to current emissions from the transport sectors

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, Terje; Fuglestvedt, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Transport affects climate directly and indirectly through mechanisms that cause both warming and cooling of climate, and the effects operate on very different timescales. We calculate climate responses in terms of global mean temperature and find large differences between the transport sectors with respect to the size and mix of short- and long-lived effects, and even the sign of the temperature response. For year 2000 emissions, road transport has the largest effect on global mean temperature. After 20 and 100 years the response in net temperature is 7 and 6 times higher, respectively, than for aviation. Aviation and shipping have strong but quite uncertain short-lived warming and cooling effects, respectively, that dominate during the first decades after the emissions. For shipping the net cooling during the first 4 decades is due to emissions of SO2 and NOx. On a longer timescale, the current emissions from shipping cause net warming due to the persistence of the CO2 perturbation. If emissions stay constant at 2000 levels, the warming effect from road transport will continue to increase and will be almost 4 times larger than that of aviation by the end of the century. PMID:19047640

  6. On tide-induced lagrangian residual current and residual transport: 1. Lagrangian residual current

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feng, Shizuo; Cheng, Ralph T.; Pangen, Xi

    1986-01-01

    Residual currents in tidal estuaries and coastal embayments have been recognized as fundamental factors which affect the long-term transport processes. It has been pointed out by previous studies that it is more relevant to use a Lagrangian mean velocity than an Eulerian mean velocity to determine the movements of water masses. Under weakly nonlinear approximation, the parameter k, which is the ratio of the net displacement of a labeled water mass in one tidal cycle to the tidal excursion, is assumed to be small. Solutions for tides, tidal current, and residual current have been considered for two-dimensional, barotropic estuaries and coastal seas. Particular attention has been paid to the distinction between the Lagrangian and Eulerian residual currents. When k is small, the first-order Lagrangian residual is shown to be the sum of the Eulerian residual current and the Stokes drift. The Lagrangian residual drift velocity or the second-order Lagrangian residual current has been shown to be dependent on the phase of tidal current. The Lagrangian drift velocity is induced by nonlinear interactions between tides, tidal currents, and the first-order residual currents, and it takes the form of an ellipse on a hodograph plane. Several examples are given to further demonstrate the unique properties of the Lagrangian residual current.

  7. Design of a proof of principle high current transport experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S.M.; Bangerter, R.O.; Barnard, J.J.; Celata, C.M.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Seidl, P.A.

    2000-01-15

    Preliminary designs of an intense heavy-ion beam transport experiment to test issues for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) are presented. This transport channel will represent a single high current density beam at full driver scale and will evaluate practical issues such as aperture filling factors, electrons, halo, imperfect vacuum, etc., that cannot be fully tested using scaled experiments. Various machine configurations are evaluated in the context of the range of physics and technology issues that can be explored in a manner relevant to a full scale driver. it is anticipated that results from this experiment will allow confident construction of next generation ''Integrated Research Experiments'' leading to a full scale driver for energy production.

  8. The high current transport experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Baca, D.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Morse, E.

    2004-05-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the US program to explore heavy-ion beam transport at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linac driver for fusion energy production. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge-dominated heavy-ion beams at high intensity (line charge density {approx} 0.2 {micro}C/m) over long pulse durations (4 {micro}s) in alternating gradient focusing lattices of electrostatic or magnetic quadrupoles. This experiment is testing transport issues resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and steering, envelope matching, image charges and focusing field nonlinearities, halo and, electron and gas cloud effects. We present the results for a coasting 1 MeV K{sup +} ion beam transported through ten electrostatic quadrupoles. The measurements cover two different fill factor studies (60% and 80% of the clear aperture radius) for which the transverse phase-space of the beam was characterized in detail, along with beam energy measurements and the first halo measurements. Electrostatic quadrupole transport at high beam fill factor ({approx}80%) is achieved with acceptable emittance growth and beam loss, even though the initial beam distribution is not ideal (but the emittance is low) nor in thermal equilibrium. We achieved good envelope control, and rematching may only be needed every ten lattice periods (at 80% fill factor) in a longer lattice of similar design. We also show that understanding and controlling the time dependence of the envelope parameters is critical to achieving high fill factors, notably because of the injector and matching section dynamics.

  9. Fabrication transport properties of QMG current limiting elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Mitsuru; Hirano, H.; Hayashi, H.; Terazono, K.; Kajikawa, K.; Funaki, K.; Hamajima, T.

    2004-10-01

    A high durability design for QMG current limiting elements was developed by reinforcement using metal bypasses. Metal bypasses with high specific resistivity were bonded to both surfaces of QMG bulk superconductor using solder. I-shaped short QMG current limiting elements with cross-sections of 2.2 × 0.8 mm and an effective length of 20 mm were reinforced by I-shaped NiCr or SUS bypasses. Meander-shaped QMG with cross-sections of 2.2 × 0.8 mm and an effective length of 180 mm was reinforced by meander-shaped NiCr bypasses. These elements were molded by resin and GFRP. The external bypass was jointed to the element in parallel electrically. The current limiting elements have a current capacity of 1 kA class in 77 K. In order to measure transport properties in fault conditions, a half cycle of sinusoidal current up to about 4 kA was applied to the elements. I-shaped short samples with 0.5 mm thick NiCr showed an endurance voltage of 13 V(electric field strength of 6.5 V/cm) without damage, when the peak value of applied current was 4.2 kA. For the meander-shaped samples, endurance voltage of 92 V was observed through one element, when the peak value of applied current was 4.0 kA. This voltage is about four times higher than that tolerated by conventional meander-shaped elements that have no NiCr bypass reinforcement. In the case of metal bypassing both sides of a superconductor in fault conditions, fault current flows through the metal bypasses. Then, both the superconductor and metal bypass expand by Joule heating. Therefore, the mechanical stress on a superconductor is reduced relative to the presence of metal bypasses. It is considered that metal bypasses lead to high durability against thermal shock.

  10. Current status of the PSG Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Leppaenen, J.

    2006-07-01

    PSG is a new Monte Carlo neutron transport code, developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). The code is mainly intended for fuel assembly-level reactor physics calculations, such as group constant generation for deterministic reactor simulator codes. This paper presents the current status of the project and the essential capabilities of the code. Although the main application of PSG is in lattice calculations, the geometry is not restricted in two dimensions. This paper presents the validation of PSG against the experimental results of the three-dimensional MOX fuelled VENUS-2 reactor dosimetry benchmark. (authors)

  11. Bottom current and sediment transport on San Pedro Shelf, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, David E.; Cacchione, David A.; Karl, Herman A.

    1985-01-01

    GEOPROBE (Geological Processes Bottom Environmental) tripods were used to measure bottom currents, pressure, and light transmission and scattering and to obtain time-series photographs of the sea floor at depths of 23 m and 67 m on San Pedro shelf between 18 April and 6 June 1978. Winds were light (< 5 m/s) with a mean direction from the southwest throughout the measurement period. Hourly averaged currents 1 m above the bottom never exceeded 21 cm/s; average speeds were about 5 cm/s at the 23-m site and 6.8 cm/s at 67 m, and the strongest currents were produced by the tides. The mean flow of bottom water was less than 3 cm/s at both GEOPROBES and was rather persistently southward (offshelf). Wave-generated bottom currents and bottom-pressure variations were sampled at hourly intervals; average wave period and wave height were 12.8 s and 0.44 m, respectively, at the 23-m site. Wave orbital velocities ranged from about 5 to 30 cm/s at 23 m and from 2 to 8 cm/s at 67 m. Bottom photographs at 67 m show that the relatively sluggish tide-generated and mean currents were below threshold velocity for the silty, very fine sand throughout the observational period. Threshold depth for wave rippling of very fine sand averaged about 28 m with a range from about 12 m to 50 m. Wave-generated currents were the only currents that exceeded threshold levels. The wave currents maintained relatively high concentrations of sediment in suspension near the bottom over the inner shelf (< 25 m), and this material (principally silt and clay) was transported offshore by the weak mean flow. Approximately 50% of this material was deposited as the bottom orbital velocities decreased to subthreshold values ( nearly equal 10-15 cm/s). The observed movement of fine sediment across the inner shelf can account for a portion of the mud content of the modern silty sands on the central shelf and on the outer shelf. However, it is clear that the sand fractions, which constitute greater than 70% of the

  12. Current-density fluctuations and ambipolarity of transport

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.; Dexter, R.N.; Prager, S.C. )

    1992-03-02

    The fluctuation in the plasma current density is measured in the MST reversed-field-pinch experiment. Such fluctuations, ad the measured radial profile of the {ital k} spectrum of magnetic fluctuations, support the view that low-frequency fluctuations ({ital f}{lt}30 kHz) are tearing modes and high-frequency fluctuations (30 kHz{lt}{ital f}{lt}250 kHz) are localized turbulence in resonance with the local equilibrium magnetic field (i.e., {bold k}{center dot}{bold B}=0). Correlation of current-density and magnetic fluctuations ({l angle}{ital {tilde j}}{sub {parallel}}{ital {tilde B}{ital r}}{r angle}) demonstrates that radial particle transport from particle motion parallel to a fluctuating magnetic field is ambipolar over the full frequency range.

  13. Persistent valley currents and topological transport in gapped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitov, Leonid

    2015-03-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE), arising due to Berry curvature in materials with broken inversion symmetry, results in topological currents flowing in system bulk transversely to the applied electric field. We will discuss recent work on AHE in materials with several valleys, such as e.g. graphene and transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers, where these currents have been observed [Mak et al., Science 344, 1489 (2014); Gorbachev et al., Science 346, 448 (2014)]. Interestingly, these materials do not fit the paradigm of topological materials with Chern bands and associated topologically protected edge modes dominating (quantized) Hall conductivity. Here, in contrast, gapless edge states may be absent since they are not enforced by topology or symmetry. Further, even when present, these states are not protected against backscattering due to roughness on the atomic scale. Naively, this would lead one to conclude that topological currents cease to exist. If true, this would imply that the key manifestations, such as the valley Hall conductivity and orbital magnetization, vanish in the gapped state. We will argue that the opposite is true: the absence of conducting edge modes does not present an obstacle since valley currents can be transmitted by the bulk states in the filled Fermi sea beneath the gap. This leads to an interesting behavior: rather than being vanishingly small, valley currents reach maximum value in the gapped state. Such undergap currents can also occur as persistent currents in the thermodynamic ground state and dominate orbital magnetization in valley-polarized gapped systems. We will conclude with discussing requirements for dissipationless valley transport and argue that they can be met under realistic conditions. Based on the work done in collaboration with Yuri Lensky, Polnop Samutpraphoot and Justin Song.

  14. Nonlinear transport current flow in superconductors with planar obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Alex; Friesen, Mark

    2000-08-01

    We present a detailed description of a hodograph method, which enables us to calculate analytically the two-dimensional distributions of the electric field E(r) and transport current density J(r) in superconductors, taking into account their highly nonlinear E-J characteristics. The method gives a unique solution E(r) of nonlinear steady-state Maxwell's equations for given boundary conditions, showing applicability limits of the critical state model and pointing out where it breaks down. The nonlinear problem of calculation of J(r) by the hodograph method reduces to solving a linear equation for the electric potential φ(E), or the current stream function ψ(E) as a function of E. For the power-law characteristics E=Ec(J/Jc)n, calculation of E(r) and J(r) can be mapped onto solutions of the London equation with the inverse screening length β=(n-1)/2n in the hodograph space (ExEy). We give general methods of solving the hodograph equations and obtain closed-form analytical solutions for particular current flows. The method is applied to calculate distributions of E(r) and dissipation in superconductors with macroscopic planar defects, such as high-angle grain boundaries, microcracks, etc. Current patterns around planar obstacles are shown to break up into domains of different orientations of J, separated by current domain walls. We calculate the structure of the current domain walls, whose width depends both on the geometry of current flow and the exponent n. These domain walls differ from the current discontinuity lines of the Bean model even in the limit n-->∞. We obtained a solution for current flow past a planar defect of length 2a in an infinite superconductor and showed that the defect causes strong local electric-field enhancement and long-range disturbances of E(r) on length scales L⊥~an>>a and L||~an>>a perpendicular and parallel to the mean current flow, respectively. This solution also exhibits large stagnation regions of magnetic flux near planar

  15. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael; Lyons, L. R.; Gorney, David J.

    1993-01-01

    This is an investigation of stormtime particle transport that leads to formation of the ring current. Our method is to trace the guiding-center motion of representative ions (having selected first adiabatic invariants mu) in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field. We compare our simulation results qualitatively with existing analytically tractable idealizations of particle transport (direct convective access and radial diffusion) in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For mu approximately less than 10 MeV/G (E approximately less than 10 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period on the final (ring-current) drift shell of interest (L equivalent to 3) exceeds the duration of the main phase of our model storm, and we find that the transport of ions to this drift shell is appropriately idealized as direct convective access, typically from open drift paths. Ion transport to a final closed drift path from an open (plasma-sheet) drift trajectory is possible for those portions of that drift path that lie outside the mean stormtime separatrix between closed and open drift trajectories, For mu approximately 10-25 MeV/G (110 keV approximately less than E approximately less than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the drift period at L equivalent to 3 is comparable to the postulated 3-hr duration of the storm, and the mode of transport is transitional between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. (This particle population is transitional between the ring current and radiation belt). For mu approximately greater than 25 MeV/G (radiation-belt ions having E approximately greater than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period is considerably shorter than the main phase of a typical storm, and ions gain access to the ring-current region essentially via radial diffusion. By computing the mean and mean-square cumulative changes in 1/L among (in this case) 12 representative

  16. Current density fluctuations, nonlinear coupling, and transport in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, S.C.; Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Cekic, M.; Chapman, B.E.; Crocker, N.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Dexter, R.N.; Fiksel, G.; Fonck, R.J.; Henry, J.S.; Hokin, S.A.; Holly, D.J.; Ji, H.; Rempel, T.D.; Sarff, J.S.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Sidikman, K.L.; Sprott, J.C.; Stoneking, M.R.; Watts, C.

    1992-09-01

    New information on magnetic fluctuations and transport in toroidal devices has been obtained in the MST reversed field pinch through measurement of nonlinear coupling of three waves in k-space, and measurement of current density fluctuations. Measurements of nonlinear coupling of magnetic fluctuations reveals that (1) two poloidal mode number m = 1 modes couple strongly to an m = 2 mode, (2) toroidal mode coupling is broad extending up to n = 20, (3) these features agree with predictions for tearing fluctuations from a nonlinear MHD code, (4) during a sawtooth crash the number of modes involved in nonlinear interactions increases dramatically and the k-spectrum broadens simultaneously. Measurements of current density fluctuations over the outer 20% of the minor radius reveal that (1) low frequency fluctuations are consistent with tearing modes, (2) high frequency fluctuations are localized turbulence which maintains resonance with the equilibrium field as q changes with radius, (3) particle transport from magnetic fluctuations is ambipolar (i.e., <{delta}j{sub {parallel}}B{sub r}> = O).

  17. Radial transport of storm time ring current ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, A.T.Y. )

    1993-01-01

    Radial transport of energetic ions for the development of the main phase of geomagnetic storms is investigated with data from the medium energy particle analyzer (MEPA) on the Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft, which monitored protons (E[sub p] > 56 keV), helium ions (E[sub He] > 72 keV), and the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen group, which is mostly dominated by oxygen ions (E[sub O] > 137 keV). From a study of four geomagnetic storms, we show that the flux increase of these ions in the inner ring current region (L [approx lt] 5) can be accounted for by an inward displacement of the ring current population by [approximately]0.5 to 3.5 R[sub E]. There is a general trend that a larger inward displacement occurs at higher L shells than at lower ones. These results are in agreement with previous findings. The radially injected population consists of the prestorm population modified by substorm injections which occur on a much shorter rime scale than that of a storm main phase. It is also found that the inward displacement is relatively independent of ion mass and energy, suggesting that the radial transport of these energetic ions is effected primarily by convective motion from a large electric field or by diffusion resulting from magnetic field fluctuations. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Radial transport of storm time ring current ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.

    1993-01-01

    Radial transport of energetic ions for the development of the main phase of geomagnetic storms is investigated with data from the medium energy particle analyzer (MEPA) on the Charge Composition Explorer spacecraft, which monitored protons, helium ions, and the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen group, which is mostly dominated by oxygen ions. From a study of four geomagnetic storms, we show that the flux increase of these ions in the inner ring current region can be accounted for by an inward displacement of the ring current population by 0.5 to 3.5 R(E). There is a general trend that a larger inward displacement occurs at higher L shells than at lower ones. These results are in agreement with previous findings. The radially injected population consists of the prestorm population modified by substorm injections which occur on a much shorter time scale than that for a storm main phase. It is also found that the inward displacement is relatively independent of ion mass and energy, suggesting that the radial transport of these energetic ions is effected primarily by convective motion from a large electric field or by diffusion resulting from magnetic field fluctuations.

  19. Agulhas Ridge, South Atlantic: the peculiar structure of a transform fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenzelmann-Neben, G.; Gohl, K.

    2003-04-01

    Transform faults constitute conservative plate boundaries, where adjacent plates are in tangential contact. Transform faults in the ocean are marked by fracture zones, which are long, linear, bathymetric depressions. One of the largest transform offsets on Earth can be found in the South Atlantic. The 1200 km long Agulhas Falkland Fracture Zone (AFFZ), form by this, developed during the Early Cretaceous break-up of West Gondwana. Between approx. 41°S, 16°E and 43°S, 9°E the Agulhas Falkland Fracture Zone is characterised by a pronounced topographic anomaly, the Agulhas Ridge. The Agulhas Ridge rises more than 2 km above the surrounding seafloor. The only equivalent to this kind of topographic high, as part of the AFFZ, is found in form of marginal ridges along the continental parts of the fracture zone, namely the Falkland Escarpment at the South American continent and the Diaz Ridge adjacent to South Africa. But the Agulhas Ridge differs from both the Falkland Escarpment and the Diaz Ridge in the facts (1) that it was not formed during the early rift-drift phase, and (2) that it separates oceanic crust of different age and not continental from oceanic crust. A set of high-resolution seismic reflection data (total length 2000 km) and a seismic refraction line across the Agulhas Ridge give new information on the crustal and basement structure of this tectonic feature. We have observed that within the Cape Basin, to the North, the basement and sedimentary layers are in parts strongly deformed. We observe basement highs, which point towards intrusions. Both the basement and the sedimentary sequence show strong faulting. This points towards a combined tectono-magmatic activity, which led to the formation of basement ridges parallel to the Agulhas Ridge. Since at least the pre-Oligocene parts and, locally, the whole sedimentary column are affected we infer that the renewed activity began in the Middle Oligocene and may have lasted into the Quaternary. As an origin

  20. Evolution of the southeast Atlantic thermocline during Marine Isotopic Stages 6-5: is it related to variations in the Agulhas Leakage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scussolini, P.; Peeters, F. J. C.

    2012-04-01

    The inter-basin exchange of Indian Ocean waters into the South Atlantic via the Agulhas Leakage (AL) is considered a modulator of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Paleoceanographic studies show that increased inputs of saline and relatively warm Agulhas Current waters are associated with late Pleistocene deglaciations. This suggests that this transfer of water masses may effectively regulate the buoyancy of the (South) Atlantic Ocean, and consequently the strength of the Atlantic thermohaline overturning. Our aim is to detect changes in the southeast Atlantic thermocline that may be dynamically linked to variations in the intensity of the AL. To test this relationship, within the frame of EU Marie Curie GATEWAYS project, we are studying a marine sediment record from the central Walvis Ridge, a site that is presently underneath the trajectory of northwest migrating Agulhas Rings. We focus on the δ18O and Mg/Ca ratio of certain planktic foraminifera species that are known to dwell at different depths in the upper ocean, in order to reconstruct the properties of water masses during the last two glacial cycles. The results so far show changes in the δ18O difference (Δδ18O) between surface and thermocline species along Marine Isotopic Stage 6. Such difference is interpreted as a proxy for the thermal gradient of the upper ca. 400 m of the water column. We conclude that the observed changes in the southeast Atlantic thermocline do not coincide with the AL peaks as indicated by published faunal counts (Peeters et al. 2004). The Mg/Ca paleotemperature proxy will be implemented to improve the interpretation of the hydrographic mechanisms underlying the observed changes in thermocline properties. Ref.: Peeters, F.J.C. et al., 2004. Vigorous exchange between the Indian and Atlantic oceans at the end of the past five glacial periods. Nature, 430(7000): 661-665.

  1. Hysteresis in Transport Critical-Current Measurements of Oxide Superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, L. F.; Stauffer, T. C.

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated magnetic hysteresis in transport critical-current (Ic) measurements of Ag-matrix (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10–x (Bi-2223) and AgMg-matrix Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x (Bi-2212) tapes. The effect of magnetic hysteresis on the measured critical current of high temperature superconductors is a very important consideration for every measurement procedure that involves more than one sweep of magnetic field, changes in field angle, or changes in temperature at a given field. The existence of this hysteresis is well known; however, the implications for a measurement standard or interlaboratory comparisons are often ignored and the measurements are often made in the most expedient way. A key finding is that Ic at a given angle, determined by sweeping the angles in a given magnetic field, can be 17 % different from the Ic determined after the angle was fixed in zero field and the magnet then ramped to the given field. Which value is correct is addressed in the context that the proper sequence of measurement conditions reflects the application conditions. The hysteresis in angle-sweep and temperature-sweep data is related to the hysteresis observed when the field is swept up and down at constant angle and temperature. The necessity of heating a specimen to near its transition temperature to reset it to an initial state between measurements at different angles and temperatures is discussed. PMID:27500042

  2. Deciphering ionic current signatures of DNA transport through a nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2010-01-01

    Within just a decade from the pioneering work demonstrating the utility of nanopores for molecular sensing, nanopores have emerged as versatile systems for single molecule manipulation and analysis. In a typical setup, a gradient of the electrostatic potential captures charged solutes from the solution and forces them to move through a single nanopore, across otherwise impermeable membrane. The ionic current blockades resulting from the presence of a solute in a nanopore can reveal the type of the solute, for example, the nucleotide makeup of a DNA strand. Despite great successes, the microscopic mechanisms underlying the functionality of such stochastic sensors remain largely unknown, as it is not currently possible to characterize the microscopic conformations of single biomolecules directly in a nanopore and thereby unequivocally establish the causal relationship between the observables and the microscopic events. Such a relationship can be determined using molecular dynamics—a computational method that can accurately predicts the time evolution of a molecular system starting from a given microscopic state. This article describes recent applications of this method to the process of DNA transport through biological and synthetic nanopores. PMID:20644747

  3. Deciphering ionic current signatures of DNA transport through a nanopore.

    PubMed

    Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2010-04-01

    Within just a decade from the pioneering work demonstrating the utility of nanopores for molecular sensing, nanopores have emerged as versatile systems for single-molecule manipulation and analysis. In a typical setup, a gradient of the electrostatic potential captures charged solutes from the solution and forces them to move through a single nanopore, across an otherwise impermeable membrane. The ionic current blockades resulting from the presence of a solute in a nanopore can reveal the type of the solute, for example, the nucleotide makeup of a DNA strand. Despite great success, the microscopic mechanisms underlying the functionality of such stochastic sensors remain largely unknown, as it is not currently possible to characterize the microscopic conformations of single biomolecules directly in a nanopore and thereby unequivocally establish the causal relationship between the observables and the microscopic events. Such a relationship can be determined using molecular dynamics-a computational method that can accurately predict the time evolution of a molecular system starting from a given microscopic state. This article describes recent applications of this method to the process of DNA transport through biological and synthetic nanopores. PMID:20644747

  4. Electron Cyclotron Current Drive by Radial Transport of Particles in the Continuous Current Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sanghyun

    dependence of the current generated, and its independence of the wave launch angles indicate that the nature of the plasma current driven is due to the radial transport of particles acted upon by the poloidal field, and not by the Dopper-shifted resonance absorption of wave energy by fast particles. This is further evidenced by the effect of horizontal field on the radial current profile, where current profile can be reserved for null current or it can be unidirectional for maximum current.

  5. Evaluating plasmonic transport in current-carrying silver nanowires.

    PubMed

    Song, Mingxia; Stolz, Arnaud; Zhang, Douguo; Arocas, Juan; Markey, Laurent; Colas des Francs, Gérard; Dujardin, Erik; Bouhelier, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonics is an emerging technology capable of simultaneously transporting a plasmonic signal and an electronic signal on the same information support. In this context, metal nanowires are especially desirable for realizing dense routing networks. A prerequisite to operate such shared nanowire-based platform relies on our ability to electrically contact individual metal nanowires and efficiently excite surface plasmon polaritons in this information support. In this article, we describe a protocol to bring electrical terminals to chemically-synthesized silver nanowires randomly distributed on a glass substrate. The positions of the nanowire ends with respect to predefined landmarks are precisely located using standard optical transmission microscopy before encapsulation in an electron-sensitive resist. Trenches representing the electrode layout are subsequently designed by electron-beam lithography. Metal electrodes are then fabricated by thermally evaporating a Cr/Au layer followed by a chemical lift-off. The contacted silver nanowires are finally transferred to a leakage radiation microscope for surface plasmon excitation and characterization. Surface plasmons are launched in the nanowires by focusing a near infrared laser beam on a diffraction-limited spot overlapping one nanowire extremity. For sufficiently large nanowires, the surface plasmon mode leaks into the glass substrate. This leakage radiation is readily detected, imaged, and analyzed in the different conjugate planes in leakage radiation microscopy. The electrical terminals do not affect the plasmon propagation. However, a current-induced morphological deterioration of the nanowire drastically degrades the flow of surface plasmons. The combination of surface plasmon leakage radiation microscopy with a simultaneous analysis of the nanowire electrical transport characteristics reveals the intrinsic limitations of such plasmonic circuitry. PMID:24378340

  6. Interannual forcing mechanisms of California Current transports II: Mesoscale eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Andrew; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele

    2015-02-01

    Mesoscale eddies exert dominant control of cross-shelf exchanges, yet the forcing dynamics underlying their interannual and decadal variability remain uncertain. Using an ensemble of high-resolution ocean model hindcasts of the central and eastern North Pacific from 1950 to 2010 we diagnose the forcing mechanisms of low-frequency eddy variability in the California Current System (CCS). We quantify eddy activity by developing eddy counts based on closed contours of the Okubo-Weiss parameter and find that the spatial and temporal features of model-derived counts largely reproduce the short AVISO observational record. Comparison of model ensemble members allows us to separate the intrinsic and deterministic fractions of eddy variability in the northern CCS (34.5-50°N) and in the southern CCS (28.5-34.5°N). In the North, a large fraction of low-frequency eddy variability (30% anticyclones, 20% cyclones) is deterministic and shared with satellite observations. We develop a diagnostic model based on indices of the large-scale barotropic and baroclinic states of the CCS which recovers this deterministic variance. This model also strongly correlates with local atmospheric forcing. In contrast to the North, Southern CCS eddy counts exhibit very little deterministic variance, and eddy formation closely resembles a red-noise process. This new understanding of the external forcings of eddy variability allows us to better estimate how climate variability and change impact mesoscale transports in the California Current. The skill of our diagnostic model and its close association with local wind stress curl indicate that local atmospheric forcing is the dominant driver of eddy activity on interannual and decadal time scales north of pt. conception (~33°N).

  7. LDL–cholesterol transport to the endoplasmic reticulum: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Pfisterer, Simon G.; Peränen, Johan; Ikonen, Elina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review In this article, we summarize the present information related to the export of LDL-derived cholesterol from late endosomes, with a focus on Nieman-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) cholesterol delivery toward the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We review data suggesting that several pathways may operate in parallel, including membrane transport routes and membrane contact sites (MCSs). Recent findings There is increasing appreciation that MCSs provide an important mechanism for intermembrane lipid transfer. In late endosome–ER contacts, three protein bridges involving oxysterol binding protein related protein (ORP)1L-vesicle associated membrane protein-associated protein (VAP), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)D3-VAP and ORP5-NPC1 proteins have been reported. How much they contribute to the flux of LDL–cholesterol to the ER is currently open. Studies for lipid transfer via MCSs have been most advanced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recently, a new sterol-binding protein family conserved between yeast and man was identified. Its members localize at MCSs and were named lipid transfer protein anchored at membrane contact sites (Lam) proteins. In yeast, sterol transfer between the ER and the yeast lysosome may be facilitated by a Lam protein. Summary Increasing insights into the role of MCSs in directional sterol delivery between membranes propose that they might provide routes for LDL–cholesterol transfer to the ER. Future work should reveal which specific contacts may operate for this, and how they are controlled by cholesterol homeostatic machineries. PMID:27054443

  8. Fast electron transport in lower-hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, K.; Bers, A.

    1991-01-01

    We generalize the quasilinear-Fokker-Planck formulation for lower-hybrid current drive to include the wave induced radial transport of fast electrons. Toroidal ray tracing shows that the wave fields in the plasma develop a large poloidal component associated with the upshift in k1l and the filling of the "spectral gap". These fields lead to an enhanced radial E x B drift of resonant electrons. Two types of radial flows are obtained: an outward convective flow driven by the asymmetry in the poloidal wave spectrum, and a diffusive flow proportional to the width of the poloidal spectrum. Simulations of Alcator C and JT60, show that the radial convection velocity has a broad maximum of nearly 1 m/sec and is independent of the amplitude of fields. In both cases, the radial diffusion is found to be highly localized near the magnetic axis. For JT60, the peak of the diffusion profile can be quite large, nearly 1 m2/sec.

  9. 25 CFR 39.707 - Which student transportation expenses are currently not eligible for Student Transportation Funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Which student transportation expenses are currently not eligible for Student Transportation Funding? 39.707 Section 39.707 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Student Transportation Eligibility for Funds § 39.707 Which...

  10. 25 CFR 39.707 - Which student transportation expenses are currently not eligible for Student Transportation Funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Which student transportation expenses are currently not eligible for Student Transportation Funding? 39.707 Section 39.707 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Student Transportation Eligibility for Funds § 39.707 Which...

  11. 25 CFR 39.707 - Which student transportation expenses are currently not eligible for Student Transportation Funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Which student transportation expenses are currently not eligible for Student Transportation Funding? 39.707 Section 39.707 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Student Transportation Eligibility for Funds § 39.707 Which...

  12. 25 CFR 39.707 - Which student transportation expenses are currently not eligible for Student Transportation Funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Which student transportation expenses are currently not eligible for Student Transportation Funding? 39.707 Section 39.707 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Student Transportation Eligibility for Funds § 39.707 Which...

  13. 25 CFR 39.707 - Which student transportation expenses are currently not eligible for Student Transportation Funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Which student transportation expenses are currently not eligible for Student Transportation Funding? 39.707 Section 39.707 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Student Transportation Eligibility for Funds § 39.707 Which...

  14. Clast comminution during pyroclastic density current transport: Mt St Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, B.; Brand, B. D.; Dufek, J.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic clasts within pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) tend to be more rounded than those in fall deposits. This rounding reflects degrees of comminution during transport, which produces an increase in fine-grained ash with distance from source (Manga, M., Patel, A., Dufek., J. 2011. Bull Volcanol 73: 321-333). The amount of ash produced due to comminution can potentially affect runout distance, deposit sorting, the volume of ash lofted into the upper atmosphere, and increase internal pore pressure (e.g., Wohletz, K., Sheridan, M. F., Brown, W.K. 1989. J Geophy Res, 94, 15703-15721). For example, increased pore pressure has been shown to produce longer runout distances than non-comminuted PDC flows (e.g., Dufek, J., and M. Manga, 2008. J. Geophy Res, 113). We build on the work of Manga et al., (2011) by completing a pumice abrasion study for two well-exposed flow units from the May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mt St Helens (MSH). To quantify differences in comminution from source, sampling and the image analysis technique developed in Manga et al., 2010 was completed at distances proximal, medial, and distal from source. Within the units observed, data was taken from the base, middle, and pumice lobes within the outcrops. Our study is unique in that in addition to quantifying the degree of pumice rounding with distance from source, we also determine the possible range of ash sizes produced during comminution by analyzing bubble wall thickness of the pumice through petrographic and SEM analysis. The proportion of this ash size is then measured relative to the grain size of larger ash with distance from source. This allows us to correlate ash production with degree of rounding with distance from source, and determine the fraction of the fine ash produced due to comminution versus vent-fragmentation mechanisms. In addition we test the error in 2D analysis by completing a 3D image analysis of selected pumice samples using a Camsizer. We find that the roundness of PDC

  15. Theoretical monochromatic-wave-induced currents in intermediate water with viscosity and nonzero mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talay, T. A.

    1975-01-01

    Wave-induced mass-transport current theories with both zero and nonzero net mass (or volume) transport of the water column are reviewed. A relationship based on the Longuet-Higgens theory is derived for wave-induced, nonzero mass-transport currents in intermediate water depths for a viscous fluid. The relationship is in a form useful for experimental applications; therefore, some design criteria for experimental wave-tank tests are also presented. Sample parametric cases for typical wave-tank conditions and a typical ocean swell were assessed by using the relation in conjunction with an equation developed by Unluata and Mei for the maximum wave-induced volume transport. Calculations indicate that substantial changes in the wave-induced mass-transport current profiles may exist dependent upon the assumed net volume transport. A maximum volume transport, corresponding to an infinite channel or idealized ocean condition, produces the largest wave-induced mass-transport currents. These calculations suggest that wave-induced mass-transport currents may have considerable effects on pollution and suspended-sediments transport as well as buoy drift, the surface and midlayer water-column currents caused by waves increasing with increasing net volume transports. Some of these effects are discussed.

  16. A connection between the South Equatorial Current north of Madagascar and Mozambique Channel Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, B. C.; Reason, C. J. C.

    2010-02-01

    Combining high resolution model output and geostrophic currents derived from satellite altimeter data, it is shown that the formation of mesoscale eddies in the Mozambique Channel (MZC) is connected to variability in the transport of the South Equatorial Current (SEC). Lagged cross-correlations of the currents north of Madagascar and vorticities in the MZC, combined with a composite analysis of the model output, show that eddies form in the narrows of the channel approximately 20 weeks following a westward transport pulse in the SEC. A relationship between MZC eddies and the large-scale variability of the South Indian Ocean may have downstream impacts on the Agulhas leakage, the Atlantic Meridional overturning circulation, and thus climate.

  17. [Current views on oxygen transport from blood to tissues].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, K P

    2001-01-01

    During the recent 25-30 years, sophisticated experiments and mathematical simulation significantly changed the generally accepted theory of oxygen transport in tissue, which was based on two major postulates, namely: 1) Blood flows in capillaries continuously at uniform velocity, 2) Gas circulation between blood and tissue takes place exclusively in capillaries. As was shown by modern research techniques, blood flow in microvessels has irregular sharp velocity fluctuations in very short time intervals (seconds). In addition, mean velocity of blood flow in microvessels of the same caliber and the same micro-region of tissue may differ several times. Therefore, efficiency of microcirculation reactions may be assessed exclusively witH mean blood velocity in capillaries of the whole micro-region, and with complicated changes of the histogram of mean velocity distribution in capillaries. It was shown that arteriolas and venulas of inactive muscles and brain account for 30 to 50% of gas circulation between blood and tissue. This resulted in fundamental change of the previous postulates in the area of tissue gas circulation physiology, and, in effect, in replacement of oxygen transport paradigm created by A. Krog. This study is an attempt to present a new modern concept of oxygen transport in tissue, to show its research significance, and possible applications. PMID:11764645

  18. Current problems in the study of colloidal transport in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shein, E. V.; Devin, B. A.

    2007-04-01

    A review of recent literature on the transport of organic and mineral colloids in soils demonstrated the role of such factors as the extrema of water flow velocities, the anisotropy of physical properties, and the presence of preferential water flows in macropores and fissures. In unsaturated soils, the concentration of colloids at the gas-water interphace and the amphiphilicity of their surface are of great importance. The transfer of “living collids” (bacteria and viruses) is mainly due to the convection mechanism; however, of great importance are the entrapping of microorganisms in fine pores, their adsorption (adhesion), their concentration on the gas-water interphace, their sedimentation, and the affecting chemical factors, such as the ionic strength and the pH of the solution. The effect of biological factors is related to the size of cells, chemotaxic mobility, and the growth and reproduction of the microbial biomass. The focal points of recent studies on colloid transport are considered: the study of mechanisms of colloid mobilization under different conditions, the improvement of methods for the direct observation of colloid migration (micromodels, computer tomography, etc.), and the possibility of quantitative description of the entrapping of colloidal particles in soil pores.

  19. Secondary Flows and Sediment Transport due to Wave - Current Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Nabil; Wiegel, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Objectives: The main purpose of this study is to determine the modifications of coastal processes driven by wave-current interaction and thus to confirm hydrodynamic mechanisms associated with the interaction at river mouths and tidal inlets where anthropogenic impacts were introduced. Further, the aim of the work has been to characterize the effect of the relative strength of momentum action of waves to the opposing current on the nearshore circulation where river flow was previously effective to entrain sediments along the shoreline. Such analytical information are useful to provide guidelines for sustainable design of coastal defense structures. Methodology and Analysis: Use is made of an earlier study reported by the authors (1983) on the interaction of horizontal momentum jets and opposing shallow water waves at shorelines, and of an unpublished laboratory study (1980). The turbulent horizontal discharge was shore-normal, directed offshore, and the incident wave direction was shore-normal, travelling toward shore. Flow visualization at the smooth bottom and the water surface, velocity and water surface elevation measurements were made. Results were obtained for wave , current modifications as well as the flow pattern in the jet and the induced circulation on both sides of the jet, for a range of wave and jet characteristics. The experimental data, obtained from measurement in the 3-D laboratory basin, showed several distinct flow pattern regimes on the bottom and the water surface. The observed flow circulation regimes were found to depend on the ratio of the wave momentum action on the jet to the jet initial momentum. Based on the time and length scales of wave and current parameters and using the time average of the depth integrated conservation equations, it is found that the relative strength of the wave action on the jet could be represented by a dimensionless expression; Rsm ( ) 12ρSa20g-L0h-Cg- 2 Rsm ≈ (C0 - U) /ρ0U w (1) In the above dimensionless

  20. Currents, drag, and sediment transport induced by a tsunami

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, Jessica R.; Rubin, David M.; Buscombe, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We report observations of water surface elevation, currents, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) from a 10-m deep site on the inner shelf in northern Monterey Bay during the arrival of the 2010 Chile tsunami. Velocity profiles were measured from 3.5 m above the bed (mab) to the surface at 2 min intervals, and from 0.1 to 0.7 mab at 1 Hz. SSC was determined from the acoustic backscatter of the near-bed profiler. The initial tsunami waves were directed cross shore and had a period of approximately 16 min. Maximum wave height was 1.1 m, and maximum current speed was 0.36 m/s. During the strongest onrush, near-bed velocities were clearly influenced by friction and a logarithmic boundary layer developed, extending more than 0.3 mab. We estimated friction velocity and bed shear stress from the logarithmic profiles. The logarithmic structure indicates that the flow can be characterized as quasi-steady at these times. At other phases of the tsunami waves, the magnitude of the acceleration term was significant in the near-bed momentum equation, indicating unsteady flow. The maximum tsunami-induced bed shear stress (0.4 N/m2) exceeded the critical shear stress for the medium-grained sand on the seafloor. Cross-shore sediment flux was enhanced by the tsunami. Oscillations of water surface elevation and currents continued for several days. The oscillations were dominated by resonant frequencies, the most energetic of which was the fundamental longitudinal frequency of Monterey Bay. The maximum current speed (hourly-timescale) in 18 months of observations occurred four hours after the tsunami arrived.

  1. RETURN CURRENTS AND ENERGY TRANSPORT IN THE SOLAR FLARING ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Codispoti, Anna; Torre, Gabriele; Piana, Michele; Pinamonti, Nicola

    2013-08-20

    According to the standard Ohmic perspective, the injection of accelerated electrons into the flaring region violates local charge equilibrium and therefore, in response, return currents are driven by an electric field to equilibrate such charge violation. In this framework, the energy loss rate associated with these local currents has an Ohmic nature and significantly shortens the accelerated electron path. In the present paper, we adopt a different viewpoint and, specifically, we study the impact of the background drift velocity on the energy loss rate of accelerated electrons in solar flares. We first utilize the Rutherford cross-section to derive the formula of the energy loss rate when the collisional target has a finite temperature and the background instantaneously and coherently moves up to equilibrate the electron injection. We then use the continuity equation for electrons and imaging spectroscopy data provided by RHESSI to validate this model. We show that this new formula for the energy loss rate provides a better fit of the experimental data with respect to the model based on the effects of standard Ohmic return currents.

  2. Potential of space-borne GNSS reflectometry to constrain simulations of the ocean circulation. A case study for the South African current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saynisch, Jan; Semmling, Maximilian; Wickert, Jens; Thomas, Maik

    2015-11-01

    The Agulhas current system transports warm and salty water masses from the Indian Ocean into the Southern Ocean and into the Atlantic. The transports impact past, present, and future climate on local and global scales. The size and variability, however, of the respective transports are still much debated. In this study, an idealized model based twin experiment is used to study whether sea surface height (SSH) anomalies estimated from reflected signals of the Global Navigation Satellite System reflectometry (GNSS-R) can be used to determine the internal water mass properties and transports of the Agulhas region. A space-borne GNSS-R detector on the International Space Station (ISS) is assumed and simulated. The detector is able to observe daily SSH fields with a spatial resolution of 1-5∘. Depending on reflection geometry, the precision of a single SSH observation is estimated to reach 3 cm (20 cm) when the carrier phase (code delay) information of the reflected GNSS signal is used. The average precision over the Agulhas region is 7 cm (42 cm). The proposed GNSS-R measurements surpass the radar-based satellite altimetry missions in temporal and spatial resolution but are less precise. Using the estimated GNSS-R characteristics, measurements of SSH are generated by sampling a regional nested general circulation model of the South African oceans. The artificial observations are subsequently assimilated with a 4DVAR adjoint data assimilation method into the same ocean model but with a different initial state and forcing. The assimilated and the original, i.e., the sampled model state, are compared to systematically identify improvements and degradations in the model variables that arise due to the assimilation of GNSS-R based SSH observations. We show that SSH and the independent, i.e., not assimilated model variables velocity, temperature, and salinity improve by the assimilation of GNSS-R based SSH observations. After the assimilation of 90 days of SSH observations

  3. Secondary Flows and Sediment Transport due to Wave - Current Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Nabil; Wiegel, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Objectives: The main purpose of this study is to determine the modifications of coastal processes driven by wave-current interaction and thus to confirm hydrodynamic mechanisms associated with the interaction at river mouths and tidal inlets where anthropogenic impacts were introduced. Further, the aim of the work has been to characterize the effect of the relative strength of momentum action of waves to the opposing current on the nearshore circulation where river flow was previously effective to entrain sediments along the shoreline. Such analytical information are useful to provide guidelines for sustainable design of coastal defense structures. Methodology and Analysis: Use is made of an earlier study reported by the authors (1983) on the interaction of horizontal momentum jets and opposing shallow water waves at shorelines, and of an unpublished laboratory study (1980). The turbulent horizontal discharge was shore-normal, directed offshore, and the incident wave direction was shore-normal, travelling toward shore. Flow visualization at the smooth bottom and the water surface, velocity and water surface elevation measurements were made. Results were obtained for wave , current modifications as well as the flow pattern in the jet and the induced circulation on both sides of the jet, for a range of wave and jet characteristics. The experimental data, obtained from measurement in the 3-D laboratory basin, showed several distinct flow pattern regimes on the bottom and the water surface. The observed flow circulation regimes were found to depend on the ratio of the wave momentum action on the jet to the jet initial momentum. Based on the time and length scales of wave and current parameters and using the time average of the depth integrated conservation equations, it is found that the relative strength of the wave action on the jet could be represented by a dimensionless expression; Rsm ( ) 12ρSa20g-L0h-Cg- 2 Rsm ≈ (C0 - U) /ρ0U w (1) In the above dimensionless

  4. Public transportation 1995: Current research in planning, management, technology, and ridesharing. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    ;Partial Contents: Long-Range Planning Issues for Small Transit Agencies; Methods and Strategies for Transit Benefit Measurement; Relationships Between Public Transport Finance and National Economy in The Netherlands; Modifying Transit Mode Share in Household Survey Expansion; Measuring Impacts of Transit Financing Policy in Geopolitical Context: Montreal Case; Perspective on Maglev Transit and Introduction of Personal Rapid Transit Maglev; Profile of Employee Transportation Coordinators; Demographics of Carpooling; Carpooling with Co-workers in Los Angeles: Employer Involvement Does Make a Difference; Stated Choice-Based Performance Evaluation of Selected Transportation Control Measures and Their Transfer Across Sites; and Five-Year Results of Employee Commute Options in Southern California.

  5. Earthscope's Transportable Array: Current Status and Future Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, K.; Busby, R. W.; Woodward, R.

    2009-12-01

    The Transportable Array (TA) element of Earthscope/ US Array is a large deployment of 400 high quality broadband seismographs. The construction of this array began in September 2003 and the 400th station was installed in September of 2007. The full deployment is now continuously rolling from west to east across the continental US, requiring the installation (and removal) of approximately 18 stations each month for a ten year period. New stations have been installed in 2009 in a north-south swath extending from North Dakota to Texas. Stations were removed from Arizona northward to western Montana. We provide updates to equipment additions made to the TA, timing of data availability, and plans for future activities. Equipment improvements at the stations now include power regulation for sensors and the addition of data channels recording temperature and barometric pressure. Additional data channels are available that could be used for auxiliary sensors such as infrasound. Although all sites have real-time telemetry, on-site data recording hardware has also been improved to reduce the time required before the final and complete archival data are released. All data are telemetered via an Array Network Facility at UCSD to the IRIS DMC where they are available in real-time. The network up-time has averaged greater that 95%. The final data archiving for a TA station, which includes full quality control and fills in any remaining data gaps, takes place a few months after the station has been removed. The goal is to shorten this time, such that complete, updated archival data are available within a few months after real-time acquisition. In addition to hardware changes documented in the SEED metadata files, the TA now produces a narrative archival report for each station called a “Station Digest”. This report summarizes the details about the equipment, station performance and service history. This report is available as a Data Product from the IRIS Data Management

  6. Transport characteristics of meander and bispiral types resistive fault current limiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. B.; Nishimoto, M.; Joo, J. H.; Murase, S.

    2008-09-01

    The resistive type fault current limiter based on YBCO thin film with high critical current density was proposed and developed because of its fast recovery characteristics. We have been developing a magnetic field measurement system with hall sensor to study the critical current density distribution or magnetic properties of high- Tc superconductors such as thin film, tape conductor and coated conductors. In this study, the transport current distribution in straight line and U-corner region of meander type resistive fault current limiter using YBCO thin film was investigated experimentally. The both axial and radial self-magnetic field components according to the direct (DC) and alternating (AC) transport currents were measured by two-axis hall probe to estimate the current distribution. And also, the self-magnetic field at the corner of bispiral type fault current limiter was measured by two-axis hall probe with a high spatial resolution to compare with the meander type fault current limiter.

  7. Current-based detection of nonlocal spin transport in graphene for spin-based logic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hua; Zhu, Tiancong; Luo, Yunqiu Kelly; Amamou, Walid; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2014-05-01

    Graphene has been proposed for novel spintronic devices due to its robust and efficient spin transport properties at room temperature. Some of the most promising proposals require current-based readout for integration purposes, but the current-based detection of spin accumulation has not yet been developed. In this work, we demonstrate current-based detection of spin transport in graphene using a modified nonlocal geometry. By adding a variable shunt resistor in parallel to the nonlocal voltmeter, we are able to systematically cross over from the conventional voltage-based detection to current-based detection. As the shunt resistor is reduced, the output current from the spin accumulation increases as the shunt resistance drops below a characteristic value R*. We analyze this behavior using a one-dimensional drift-diffusion model, which accounts well for the observed behavior. These results provide the experimental and theoretical foundation for current-based detection of nonlocal spin transport.

  8. Current transport in Boeing CdS/CuInSe2 solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, W. A.; Olsen, L. C.

    The current versus voltage (I-V) and capacitance characteristics of Boeing (Cd,Zn)S/CuInSe2 solar cells have been investigated and a model for the current transport is proposed. Current transport appears to involve tunneling and interface recombination in series. The degree of tunneling or interface recombination character of the current transport appears to be correlated to the degree to which the I-V curves fail to translate from dark to illuminated conditions. Cells showing good translation also have I-V characteristics close to those of simple interface recombination, while cells showing pronounced nontranslation also show strong tunneling character under dark conditions and enhancement of the tunneling under illumination. The proposed model can explain these features assuming deep levels in the selenide depletion layer which charge by photogenerated electrons. In addition, capacitance analyses have corroborated this and other assumptions concerning the band structure and have provided independent demonstration of tunneling transport.

  9. Transportation for School-Age Child Care: Current Status in Westchester County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Council of Westchester, Inc., White Plains, NY.

    Based on countywide interviews with transportation and child care personnel in Westchester County, New York, this report describes current practices, legislation, and issues related to the transportation of elementary school children to and from child care providers. Following a brief introduction, the report discusses various regulated and…

  10. Spin polarized current injection and transportation in a double T-shaped organic spintronic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, JunFeng; Song, RuiRong; Yuan, XiaoBo; Hu, GuiChao

    2015-03-01

    A double T-shaped device model is constructed to investigate the spin polarized current injection and transportation properties in organic semiconductors. Based on the spin diffusion theory and Ohm's law and considering the different charge-spin relationship of the special carriers in organic semiconductors, the current spin polarization has been obtained. Effects of the branch current ratio and the polaron proportion on the spin polarized current injection efficiency are studied. From the calculation, it is found that the improvement of the spin polarized current injection efficiency can be obtained by adjusting the branch current ratio; moreover, high polaron proportion in organic semiconductors is beneficial for obtaining high current spin polarization.

  11. Amino acid residues that control pH modulation of transport-associated current in mammalian serotonin transporters.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Li, M; Mager, S; Lester, H A

    1998-10-01

    The rat and human serotonin transporters (rSERT and hSERT, respectively) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and studied using site-directed mutagenesis, electrophysiological recordings, and [3H]5-HT uptake measurements. rSERT, but not hSERT, displayed increased transport-associated current at low pH. Chimeras and point mutations showed that, of the 52 nonidentical residues, a single residue at position 490 (threonine in rSERT and lysine in hSERT) governs this difference. Furthermore, potentiation required the glutamate residue at position 493. Cysteine substitution and alkylation experiments showed that residue 493 is extracellular. Cysteine at 493 increased, whereas aspartate decreased, the net charge movement per transported 5-HT molecule. The mutations at this region did not significantly affect other aspects of SERT function, including agonist-independent leakage current, voltage-dependent transient current, and H+ current. This region may therefore be part of an external gate required for rSERT function. The data and analyses show that, in the absence of detailed structural information, a gate-lumen-gate scheme is useful for interpreting results from mutations that alter functional properties of neurotransmitter transporters. PMID:9742144

  12. North Atlantic Current long-term transport observations at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessler, Achim; Rhein, Monika; Kieke, Dagmar; Mertens, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The North Atlantic Current (NAC) brings warm and saline water, exported by the Gulf Stream from the tropics/subtropics, from the western in the eastern basin. Four Inverted Echo Sounders were moored between 47°40'N and 52°30'N to study the transport variations of the NAC at the gateway between western and eastern Atlantic. The separation in three segments (northern, central, and southern) allows to resolve the meandering of the NAC between the spreading paths through the different fracture zones. We utilise the correlation between the NAC transport inferred from the 2006 to 2010 moored instruments and the geostrophic surface velocity from altimeter data to construct a time series of NAC transports from 1992 to 2013. By analysing the two time series we compute the transport means and trends, resolve the variations from daily to inter-annual time scales, and calculate transport composites to investigate the relation between the North Atlantic Oscillation and NAC transport variations.

  13. The freshwater transport and dynamics of the western Maine coastal current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, W. R.; Signell, R. P.; Fong, D. A.; Wang, J.; Anderson, D. M.; Keafer, B. A.

    2004-08-01

    Observations in the Gulf of Maine, USA, were used to characterize the freshwater transport, temporal variability and dynamics of the western Maine coastal current. These observations included moored measurements, multiple hydrographic surveys, and drifter releases during April-July of 1993 and 1994. There is a strong seasonal signal in salinity and along-shore velocity of the coastal current, caused by the freshwater inputs of the rivers entering the western Gulf. Surface salinity within the coastal current during the spring freshet is typically 2 psu below ambient, and along-shore currents in the surface layer are directed southwestward at speeds of 0.10-0.20 m s -1, occasionally reaching 0.50 m s -1. The plume thickness is typically 10-20 m in water depths of 50-100 m, thus it is well isolated from the bottom over most of its areal extent. The along-coast freshwater transport within the plume varies considerably due to variations in wind stress, but on time scales of weeks to months it follows the variations of riverine input, with a time lag consistent with the advective velocity. Less than half of the transport of the coastal current is explained by the baroclinic gradient; the barotropic forcing associated with the larger-scale dynamics of the Gulf of Maine accounts for about 60% of the transport. The volume of freshwater transport in the coastal current exceeds the local riverine input of fresh water by 30%, suggesting a significant contribution of freshwater transport from the St. John River, 500 km northeastward. The measurements within the western Maine coastal current, however, indicate a significant decrease in the baroclinic transport of fresh water along the coast, with an e-folding scale of approximately 200 km.

  14. Radial transport and electron-cyclotron-current drive in the TCV and DIII-D tokamaks.

    PubMed

    Harvey, R W; Sauter, O; Prater, R; Nikkola, P

    2002-05-20

    Calculation of electron-cyclotron-current drive (ECCD) with the comprehensive CQL3D Fokker-Planck code for a TCV tokamak shot gives 550 kA of driven toroidal current, in marked disagreement with the 100-kA experimental value. Published ECCD efficiencies calculated with CQL3D in the much larger, higher-confinement DIII-D tokamak are in excellent agreement with experiment. The disagreement is resolved by including in the calculations electrostatic-type radial transport at levels given by global energy confinement in tokamaks. The radial transport of energy and toroidal current are in agreement. PMID:12005571

  15. Method for determining transport critical current densities and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, Ulf E. (Inventor); Strayer, Donald M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A contact-less method for determining transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductor material. A compressor having a hollow interior and a plunger for selectively reducing the free space area for distribution of the magnetic flux therein are formed of superconductor material. Analytical relationships, based upon the critical state model, Maxwell's equations and geometrical relationships define transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in terms of the initial trapped magnetic flux density and the ratio between initial and final magnetic flux densities whereby data may be reliably determined by means of the simple test apparatus for evaluating the current density and flux penetration depth.

  16. A Semiconductor Device Noise Model: A Deterministic Approach to Semiconductor Device Current Noise for Semiclassical Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Noaman, B. A.; Korman, C. E.

    2009-04-23

    In this paper, we present a deterministic approach to calculate terminal current noise characteristics in semiconductor devices in the framework of semiclassical transport based on the spherical harmonics of the Boltzmann Transport Equation. The model relies on the solution of the Boltzmann equation in the frequency domain with special initial and boundary conditions. The terminal current fluctuation is directly related to scattering without the additional Langevin noise term added to the calculation. Simulation results are presented for the terminal current spectral density for a 1-D n{sup +}nn{sup +} structure due to elastic-acoustic and intervally scattering.

  17. Variability of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current transport through the Fawn Trough, Kerguelen Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivier, Frédéric; Park, Young-Hyang; Sekma, Hela; Le Sommer, Julien

    2015-04-01

    The Kerguelen Plateau is a major topographic obstacle to the eastward flowing Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). While approximately two-third of the ACC transport is diverted to the North, most of the remaining flow engulfs in the Fawn Trough, the only deep passage across the plateau. As part of the TRACK (TRansport ACross the Kerguelen plateau) project, three mooring lines of current meters were deployed in the Fawn Trough for one year in February 2009, underneath ground-track 94 of the Jason-2 satellite altimeter. Full depth CTD-LADCP casts carried out during the deployment cruise were previously analyzed to provide a comprehensive description of the regional circulation, featuring in particular a volume transport of ~43 Sv across the Fawn Trough (Park et al., 2009). Here we present a time series of the transport in the Fawn Trough estimated from current meter observations, featuring a mean eastward transport of 34 Sv (possibly biased low by at most 5 Sv) and a root mean squared variability of 6 Sv, consistent with LADCP estimates (43 Sv in February 2009 and 38 Sv in January 2010). In addition, we analyze to what extent the transport can be directly monitored from along-track satellite altimeter data, which would enable study of the variability of the Fawn Trough Current from a now 20-year long archive. The ability to reconstruct the flow from a limited set of moored instruments as well as from altimeter-derived surface geostrophic velocity is further assessed from synthetic data extracted from a high-resolution peri-Antarctic simulation. While a canonical method to derive transport from altimetry, previously applied to the Malvinas Current, gives here unsatisfactory comparisons with in situ estimates, an ad hoc approach using only the two northernmost mooring lines yields an estimate well correlated (~0.8) with in situ transport at subseasonal time scales during the one year period of observations. At interannual time scales, however, both methods provide

  18. Investigation of current transport normal and parallel to the tape plane in BSCCO/Ag tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Maley, M.P.; Cho, J.H.; Willis, J.O.; Bulaevskii, L.N.

    1995-07-01

    We have performed transport, resistivity and critical current measurements on Bi-2223/Ag and Bi-2212/Ag tapes with current directions both parallel and perpendicular to the tape plane in magnetic fields up to 7 T and 50current along the tape normal exhibits magnetic field and field orientation dependences similar to those for current flow along the tape plane. These results indicate that current flow along CuO{sub 2} planes dominates current transport even along the tape normal in highly textured tapes.

  19. Measurement of plasma current dependent changes in impurity transport and comparison with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; White, A. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Ernst, D.; Podpaly, Y.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Candy, J.

    2012-05-15

    Measured impurity transport coefficients are found to demonstrate a strong dependence on plasma current in the core of Alcator C-Mod. These measurements are compared directly with linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation in an attempt to both qualitatively and quantitatively reproduce the measured impurity transport. Discharges constituting a scan of plasma current from 0.6 to 1.2 MA were performed during the 2010 run campaign. The impurity transport from these discharges was determined using a novel set of spectroscopic diagnostics available on Alcator C-Mod. This diagnostic suite allowed for the effective constraint of impurity transport coefficient profiles inside of r/a = 0.6. A decrease in the measured impurity diffusivity and inward convection is found with increased plasma current. Global, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations were performed using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] for all discharges in the experimental scan and are found to reproduce the experimental trends, while demonstrating good quantitative agreement with measurement. A more comprehensive quantitative comparison was performed on the 0.8 MA discharge of the current scan which demonstrates that simultaneous agreement between experiment and simulation in both the impurity particle transport and ion heat transport channels is attainable within experimental uncertainties.

  20. Measurement of plasma current dependent changes in impurity transport and comparison with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; White, A. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Ernst, D.; Podpaly, Y.; Candy, J.

    2012-05-01

    Measured impurity transport coefficients are found to demonstrate a strong dependence on plasma current in the core of Alcator C-Mod. These measurements are compared directly with linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation in an attempt to both qualitatively and quantitatively reproduce the measured impurity transport. Discharges constituting a scan of plasma current from 0.6 to 1.2 MA were performed during the 2010 run campaign. The impurity transport from these discharges was determined using a novel set of spectroscopic diagnostics available on Alcator C-Mod. This diagnostic suite allowed for the effective constraint of impurity transport coefficient profiles inside of r/a = 0.6. A decrease in the measured impurity diffusivity and inward convection is found with increased plasma current. Global, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations were performed using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] for all discharges in the experimental scan and are found to reproduce the experimental trends, while demonstrating good quantitative agreement with measurement. A more comprehensive quantitative comparison was performed on the 0.8 MA discharge of the current scan which demonstrates that simultaneous agreement between experiment and simulation in both the impurity particle transport and ion heat transport channels is attainable within experimental uncertainties.

  1. Fluctuation and transport reduction in a reversed field pinch by inductive poloidal current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Sarff, J.S.; Hokin, S.A.; Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Sovinec, C.R.

    1993-12-01

    An auxilliay poloidal inductive electric field applied to a reversed field pinch plasma reduces the current density gradient, slows the growth of m=1 tearing fluctations, suppresses their associated sawteeth, and doubles the energy confinement time. Small sawteeth occur in the improved state but with m=0 precursors. By requiring a change of toroidal flux embedding the plasma, inductive poloidal current profile drive is transient, but the improvement encourages the program of RFP transport suppression using current profile control.

  2. Transport of volume, heat, and salt towards the Arctic in the Faroe Current 1993-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Larsen, K. M. H.; Hátún, H.; Kristiansen, R.; Mortensen, E.; Østerhus, S.

    2015-09-01

    The flow of warm and saline water from the Atlantic Ocean, across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge, into the Nordic Seas - the Atlantic inflow - is split into three separate branches. The most intense of these branches is the inflow between Iceland and the Faroe Islands (Faroes), which is focused into the Faroe Current, north of the Faroes. The Atlantic inflow is an integral part of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC), which is projected to weaken during the 21st century and might conceivably reduce the oceanic heat and salt transports towards the Arctic. Since the mid-1990s, hydrographic properties and current velocities of the Faroe Current have been monitored along a section extending north from the Faroe shelf. From these in situ observations, time series of volume, heat, and salt transport have previously been reported, but the high variability of the transport has made it difficult to establish whether there are trends. Here, we present results from a new analysis of the Faroe Current where the in situ observations have been combined with satellite altimetry. For the period 1993 to 2013, we find the average volume transport of Atlantic water in the Faroe Current to be 3.8 ± 0.5 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1) with a heat transport relative to 0 °C of 124 ± 15 TW (1 TW = 1012 W). Consistent with other results for the Northeast Atlantic component of the THC, we find no indication of weakening. The transports of the Faroe Current, on the contrary, increased. The overall increase over the 2 decades of observation was 9 ± 8 % for volume transport and 18 ± 9 % for heat transport (95 % confidence intervals). During the same period, the salt transport relative to the salinity of the deep Faroe Bank Channel overflow (34.93) more than doubled, potentially strengthening the feedback on thermohaline intensity. The increased heat and salt transports are partly caused by the increased volume transport and partly by increased temperatures and salinities of the

  3. The Benguela Current: An ecosystem of four components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchings, L.; van der Lingen, C. D.; Shannon, L. J.; Crawford, R. J. M.; Verheye, H. M. S.; Bartholomae, C. H.; van der Plas, A. K.; Louw, D.; Kreiner, A.; Ostrowski, M.; Fidel, Q.; Barlow, R. G.; Lamont, T.; Coetzee, J.; Shillington, F.; Veitch, J.; Currie, J. C.; Monteiro, P. M. S.

    2009-12-01

    sulphur eruptions result from local and remote forcing, restricting the habitat available for pelagic and demersal fish species. The Luderitz-Orange River Cone is an intensive perennial upwelling cell where strong winds, high turbulence and strong offshore transport constitute a partial barrier to epipelagic fish species. Upwelling source water alters in salinity and oxygen, across this boundary zone. A decline in upwelling-favourable winds occurred between 1990 and 2005. The southern Benguela region is characterised by a pulsed, seasonal, wind-driven upwelling at discrete centres and warm Agulhas water offshore. High primary productivity forms a belt of enrichment along the coast, constrained by a front. Low-oxygen water, which only occurs close inshore, may adversely affect some resources. The west coast is primarily a nursery ground for several fish species which spawn on the Agulhas Bank and are transported by alongshore jet currents to the west coast. The Agulhas Bank forms the southern boundary of the Benguela system and it displays characteristics of both an upwelling and a temperate shallow shelf system, with seasonal stratification and mixing, coastal, shelf-edge and dynamic upwelling, moderate productivity and a well oxygenated shelf. A large biomass of fish occupies the Bank during the summer season, with some evidence for tight coupling between trophic levels. A cool ridge of upwelled water, with links to coastal upwelling and to the Agulhas Current, appears to play an important but poorly understood role affecting the distribution and productivity of pelagic fish. A boom in sardine and anchovy populations was accompanied by an eastward shift, followed by 5 years of poor recruitment by sardine but successful recruitment of anchovy, indicating changes in the early life-history patterns of these two species.

  4. Branching of the vortex nucleation period in superconductor Nb microtubes due to an inhomogeneous transport current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaev, R. O.; Levchenko, E. A.; Fomin, V. M.

    2016-04-01

    An inhomogeneous transport current, which is introduced through multiple electrodes in an open Nb microtube, is shown to lead to a controllable branching of the vortex nucleation period. The detailed mechanism of this branching is analyzed using the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation. The relative change of the vortex nucleation period strongly depends on the geometry of multiple electrodes. The average number of vortices occurring in the tube per nanosecond can be effectively reduced using the inhomogeneous transport current, which is important for noise and energy dissipation reduction in superconductor applications, e.g. for an extension of the operation regime of superconductor-based sensors to lower frequencies.

  5. Ocean circulation in the southern Benguela region from the Pliocene to the Pleistocene: tracking Agulhas leakage into the SE Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, Benjamin; McClymont, Erin; Felder, Sojna; Leng, Melanie

    2013-04-01

    The transition from the warmth of the middle Pliocene to the large amplitude, 100 kyr glacial-interglacial cycles of the late Pleistocene provides a way to understand the forcings and impacts of regional and global climate change. Here, we investigate changes in ocean circulation over the period from 3.5 Ma to present using a marine sediment core, ODP Site 1087 (31o28'S, 15o19'E, 1374m water depth). ODP 1087 is located in the South-east Atlantic Ocean, outside the Benguela upwelling region. Its location allows investigation of the history of the heat and salt transfer to the Atlantic Ocean from the Indian Ocean ("Agulhas leakage"), which plays an important part in the global thermohaline circulation. It is not known how this transfer reacted to generally warmer global temperatures during the mid-Pliocene, nor to the transition to a globally cooler climate in the early Pleistocene. Our approach is to apply several organic geochemistry proxies and foraminiferal analyses to reconstruct the history of ODP 1087. These include the U37K' index to reconstruct sea surface temperatures, pigment analysis for understanding productivity changes, and foraminifera assemblage analysis to detect the presence of different water masses at the site. We have identified changes in SSTs and biological productivity that we argue to reflect shifts in the position of the Benguela upwelling cells, and a changing influence of Agulhas leakage. Our new data reveal a different organization in the Southeast Atlantic. It shows that during the Pliocene ODP 1087 was dominated by Benguela upwelling which had shifted south. We find no evidence for Agulhas leakage during the mid Pliocene, which could mean that Agulhas Leakage was severely reduced during the mid Pliocene. The implications of these results for understanding Plio-Pleistocene climate changes will be explored here.

  6. Evidence for a Role of Transporter-Mediated Currents in the Depletion of Brain Serotonin Induced by Serotonin Transporter Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Michael H; Bulling, Simon; Benaderet, Tova S; Saha, Kusumika; Ayestas, Mario A; Partilla, John S; Ali, Syed F; Stockner, Thomas; Rothman, Richard B; Sandtner, Walter; Sitte, Harald H

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) substrates like fenfluramine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine cause long-term depletion of brain 5-HT, while certain other substrates do not. The 5-HT deficits produced by SERT substrates are dependent upon transporter proteins, but the exact mechanisms responsible are unclear. Here, we compared the pharmacology of several SERT substrates: fenfluramine, d-fenfluramine, 1-(m-chlorophenyl)piperazine (mCPP) and 1-(m-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperainze (TFMPP), to establish relationships between acute drug mechanisms and the propensity for long-term 5-HT depletions. In vivo microdialysis was carried out in rat nucleus accumbens to examine acute 5-HT release and long-term depletion in the same subjects. In vitro assays were performed to measure efflux of [3H]5-HT in rat brain synaptosomes and transporter-mediated ionic currents in SERT-expressing Xenopus oocytes. When administered repeatedly to rats (6 mg/kg, i.p., four doses), all drugs produce large sustained elevations in extracellular 5-HT (>5-fold) with minimal effects on dopamine. Importantly, 2 weeks after dosing, only rats exposed to fenfluramine and d-fenfluramine display depletion of brain 5-HT. All test drugs evoke fluoxetine-sensitive efflux of [3H]5-HT from synaptosomes, but d-fenfluramine and its bioactive metabolite d-norfenfluramine induce significantly greater SERT-mediated currents than phenylpiperazines. Our data confirm that drug-induced 5-HT release probably does not mediate 5-HT depletion. However, the magnitude of transporter-mediated inward current may be a critical factor in the cascade of events leading to 5-HT deficits. This hypothesis warrants further study, especially given the growing popularity of designer drugs that target SERT. PMID:24287719

  7. Current transport characteristics of pSe-nMoSe2 heterojunction diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumesh, C. K.; Patel, K. D.; Pathak, V. M.; Srivastava, R.

    2010-12-01

    The characteristics of heterojunction diode pSe-nMoSe2 fabricated from thermally evaporated p-Se films on n-type Molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) grown by direct vapour transport (DVT) technique have been examined by using current-voltage measurements. To investigate the dark current transport mechanism in pSe-nMoSe2 heterojunctions the current-voltage characteristics were measured in the temperature range 100-300 K. The prepared diode shows a rectification ratio of the order of 103 within the range -2 to 2 V. A multi-step tunnelling model was used to analyze the I-V-T characteristics of the prepared device. The activation energy determined from the saturation current was about 1.16 eV.

  8. Poloidal asymmetric flow and current relaxation of ballooned transport during I-phase in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Fuchert, G.; Cavedon, M.; Conway, G. D.; Maraschek, M.; Medvedeva, A.; Mink, F.; Scott, B. D.; Shao, L. M.; Stroth, U.

    2016-05-01

    Turbulence driven poloidal asymmetric parallel flow and current perturbations are studied for tokamak plasmas of circular geometry. Whereas zonal flows can lead to in-out asymmetry of parallel flows and currents via the Pfirsch-Schlüter mechanism, ballooned transport can result in an up-down asymmetry due to the Stringer spin-up mechanism. Measurements of up-down asymmetric parallel current fluctuations occurring during the I-phase in ASDEX Upgrade are not responses to the equilibrium by the Pfirsch-Schlüter current, but can be interpreted as a response to strongly ballooned plasma transport coupled with the Stringer spin-up mechanism. A good agreement of the experimental measured limit-cycle frequencies during I-phase with the Stringer spin-up relaxation frequency is found.

  9. Current-Driven Drift Wave Turbulence and Electron Thermal Transport in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Diamond, P. H.; Porkolab, M.

    2009-11-01

    Recent analyses (Y. Lin, M. Porkolab; 2009) have indicated that the ``usual suspects'' for the mechanism of electron thermal transport, such as ITG, ETG, CTEM modes, etc, cannot explain results from modest density, Te>Ti plasmas, in either OH or ECH heating regimes. Interestingly, such plasmas exhibit very large toroidal current drift parameters vd/cs, thus naturally suggesting a re-visitation of current driven drift waves. In this paper, we discuss the linear, quasilinear and non-linear theory of current driven drift waves in tokamaks. Parallel electron velocity scattering, a critical effect beyond the capacity of most, gyrokinetic codes is a major focus of investigations. The coupled transport of current density and heat are considered. Work is ongoing and results will be presented.

  10. Current developments in interim transport (storage) media in dentistry: an update.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, N

    2011-07-01

    Healing following avulsion and replantation is dependent on the extent of pulpal and periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue damage. Therefore, immediate replantation is the recommended treatment of choice for an avulsed permanent tooth. To achieve a more favourable prognosis following tooth replantation, use of an appropriate interim transport medium is usually advocated. Numerous studies have researched and advocated the use of media like saliva, milk, Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) and ViaSpan. However, current research has indicated the use of few newer media as promising interim transport media for an avulsed tooth. This review summarises the current developments regarding the introduction of newer interim transport media for the treatment of avulsed teeth. PMID:21738189

  11. Current transport across the pentacene/CVD-grown graphene interface for diode applications.

    PubMed

    Berke, K; Tongay, S; McCarthy, M A; Rinzler, A G; Appleton, B R; Hebard, A F

    2012-06-27

    We investigate the electronic transport properties across the pentacene/graphene interface. Current transport across the pentacene/graphene interface is found to be strikingly different from transport across pentacene/HOPG and pentacene/Cu interfaces. At low voltages, diodes using graphene as a bottom electrode display Poole–Frenkel emission, while diodes with HOPG and Cu electrodes are dominated by thermionic emission. At high voltages conduction is dominated by Poole–Frenkel emission for all three junctions. We propose that current across these interfaces can be accurately modeled by a combination of thermionic and Poole–Frenkel emission. Results presented not only suggest that graphene provides low resistive contacts to pentacene where a flat-laying orientation of pentacene and transparent metal electrodes are desired but also provides further understanding of the physics at the organic semiconductor/graphene interface. PMID:22652899

  12. The potential of current- and wind-driven transport for environmental management of the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Soomere, Tarmo; Döös, Kristofer; Lehmann, Andreas; Meier, H E Markus; Murawski, Jens; Myrberg, Kai; Stanev, Emil

    2014-02-01

    The ever increasing impact of the marine industry and transport on vulnerable sea areas puts the marine environment under exceptional pressure and calls for inspired methods for mitigating the impact of the related risks. We describe a method for preventive reduction of remote environmental risks caused by the shipping and maritime industry that are transported by surface currents and wind impact to the coasts. This method is based on characterizing systematically the damaging potential of the offshore areas in terms of potential transport to vulnerable regions of an oil spill or other pollution that has occurred in a particular area. The resulting maps of probabilities of pollution to be transported to the nearshore and the time it takes for the pollution to reach the nearshore are used to design environmentally optimized fairways for the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Proper, and south-western Baltic Sea. PMID:24414808

  13. Mean Flow Velocities and Mass Transport for Equatorially-Trapped Water Waves with an Underlying Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, David; Sastre-Gomez, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the mean flow velocities, and related mass transport, which are induced by certain equatorially-trapped water waves. In particular, we examine a recently-derived exact and explicit solution to the geophysical governing equations in the {β} -plane approximation at the equator which incorporates a constant underlying current.

  14. Transport patterns of Pacific sardine Sardinops sagax eggs and larvae in the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Edward D.; Chao, Yi; Chai, Fei; McClatchie, Sam

    2015-06-01

    We simulated transport of Pacific sardine eggs captured offshore of California in spring of 2001-2012 using a regional ocean circulation model. Eggs were assumed to have developed into larvae within a few days and were modeled using five behavioral patterns: passive transport, diel vertical migration, diel vertical migration combined with swimming against the current, diel migration combined with migration toward shore, and diel migration combined with migration toward the best habitat. Simulated larvae with no swimming behavior were advected far offshore to poor habitat where they were unlikely to survive. Diel vertical migration resulted in less offshore transport because larvae were less affected by surface currents during the day. However, in half the years simulated nearly all juveniles were also located in poor habitat by late summer in this scenario. Swimming against the current combined with diel vertical migration resulted in similar transport patterns to the diel-vertical-migration scenario because currents dominated the transport of eggs and small larvae during the spring and early summer. Migration toward shore resulted in a large fraction of juveniles being located in appropriate habitat during late summer in all years. Migration toward the best habitat was the best strategy modeled. This strategy resulted in a slightly greater proportion of larvae being located in appropriate habitat at the end of summer than the swimming-toward-shore scenario, despite the fact that most larvae were located farther offshore. These results suggest that larval sardine might use directed horizontal swimming behavior to remain in suitable habitat conditions. A large fraction of larvae were transported south into Mexican waters by late summer in all five scenarios. Surveying juvenile sardines in fall near the border of the U.S. and Mexico may be an efficient means of estimating recruitment because the advection pattern of eggs and larvae to the south is opposite the adult

  15. Limited Agulhas Leakage as a potential trigger for reduced AMOC intensity before the onset of Heinrich events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, M.; Hall, I. R.; Knorr, G.; Zahn, R.

    2012-12-01

    Interocean exchange of heat and salt around South Africa - the so called 'Agulhas Leakage' - is thought to be a key link in the maintenance of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). It takes place at the Agulhas Retroflection, largely by the intermittent shedding of enormous rings that penetrate into the South Atlantic Ocean. Recent palaeoceanographic studies suggest that variability in the latitudinal position of the subtropical front (STF) in the Southern Ocean, acts as a gatekeeper for the Agulhas retroflection and moreover, that a variable northward migration of the STF potentially modulated the severity of glacial periods by altering the amount of Agulhas leakage with consequences for the AMOC. Here we present a high-resolution record of ice rafted debris (IRD) from the southern Agulhas Plateau (sediment core MD02-2588, 41'19,90 S and 25'49,70 E, 2907 m water depth) covering the last 350,000 years. We find distinct millennial-scale events with high abundances of IRD. These IRD events are indicators for a northward shift of the Southern Ocean frontal system, thereby allowing sufficient cooling and iceberg survivability as far north as the Agulhas Plateau. Our proxy record suggests significant millennial scale variability of the frontal movements throughout the last three glacial cycles. Largest IRD peaks occur during marine isotope stage 8 (~300,000 years BP) and hence during a period for which an extreme northward shift in the STF has been identified previously. We compare our IRD record with records of millennial scale climate variability in the North Atlantic after careful synchronization of individual age models using benthic oxygen isotopes. In general, IRD peaks recorded on the Agulhas Plateau occur during globally cold conditions but in anti-phase with coldest events (Heinrich events) in the North Atlantic, which systematically occur at the culmination of large reductions in AMOC. This observation is in line with the concept of a bipolar

  16. (In)validity of the constant field and constant currents assumptions in theories of ion transport.

    PubMed Central

    Syganow, A; von Kitzing, E

    1999-01-01

    Constant electric fields and constant ion currents are often considered in theories of ion transport. Therefore, it is important to understand the validity of these helpful concepts. The constant field assumption requires that the charge density of permeant ions and flexible polar groups is virtually voltage independent. We present analytic relations that indicate the conditions under which the constant field approximation applies. Barrier models are frequently fitted to experimental current-voltage curves to describe ion transport. These models are based on three fundamental characteristics: a constant electric field, negligible concerted motions of ions inside the channel (an ion can enter only an empty site), and concentration-independent energy profiles. An analysis of those fundamental assumptions of barrier models shows that those approximations require large barriers because the electrostatic interaction is strong and has a long range. In the constant currents assumption, the current of each permeating ion species is considered to be constant throughout the channel; thus ion pairing is explicitly ignored. In inhomogeneous steady-state systems, the association rate constant determines the strength of ion pairing. Among permeable ions, however, the ion association rate constants are not small, according to modern diffusion-limited reaction rate theories. A mathematical formulation of a constant currents condition indicates that ion pairing very likely has an effect but does not dominate ion transport. PMID:9929480

  17. Revealing origin of quasi-one dimensional current transport in defect rich two dimensional materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lotz, Mikkel R.; Boll, Mads; Bøggild, Peter; Petersen, Dirch H.; Hansen, Ole; Kjær, Daniel

    2014-08-04

    The presence of defects in graphene have for a long time been recognized as a bottleneck for its utilization in electronic and mechanical devices. We recently showed that micro four-point probes may be used to evaluate if a graphene film is truly 2D or if defects in proximity of the probe will lead to a non-uniform current flow characteristic of lower dimensionality. In this work, simulations based on a finite element method together with a Monte Carlo approach are used to establish the transition from 2D to quasi-1D current transport, when applying a micro four-point probe to measure on 2D conductors with an increasing amount of line-shaped defects. Clear 2D and 1D signatures are observed at low and high defect densities, respectively, and current density plots reveal the presence of current channels or branches in defect configurations yielding 1D current transport. A strong correlation is found between the density filling factor and the simulation yield, the fraction of cases with 1D transport and the mean sheet conductance. The upper transition limit is shown to agree with the percolation threshold for sticks. Finally, the conductance of a square sample evaluated with macroscopic edge contacts is compared to the micro four-point probe conductance measurements and we find that the micro four-point probe tends to measure a slightly higher conductance in samples containing defects.

  18. Gliders Measure Western Boundary Current Transport from the South Pacific to the Equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. E.; Kessler, W. S.; Sherman, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Since 2007, the Consortium on the Ocean's Role in Climate (CORC) has used repeated glider transects across the southern Solomon Sea to measure the previously nearly unsampled mass and heat transport from the South Pacific to the equatorial zone. Mean transport is dominated by the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent (NGCUC). This low-latitude western boundary current is a major element of the shallow meridional overturning circulation, returning water from the subtropical South Pacific to the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) where it upwells. We find the mean NGCUC to be a jet less than 100 km wide, centered near 300 m depth, with equatorward velocities reaching 35 cm/s and salinity anomalies on isopycnals up to 0.05. Weaker poleward flow is found near the surface in the eastern basin. Equatorward transport above 700 m is typically 20 Sv, but nearly vanished during two La Niñas and reached 25 Sv during an El Niño. Within these events the seasonal cycle cannot yet be defined. Transport variability is strongest outside the boundary current and appears to consist of two independently moving layers with a boundary near 250 m. ENSO variability is predominantly in the upper layer. The relation of Solomon Sea mass and heat transport with ENSO indicators will be discussed The ability to initiate and maintain measurements that support such quantitative analyses with a small effort in a remote site far from research institutions demonstrates that gliders can be a productive part of the global ocean observing system.

  19. Energy transport by energetic electrons released during solar flares. II - Current filamentation and plasma heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.; Pritchett, P. L.

    1988-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrostatic particle simulations are performed in order to investigate energy transport associated with the propagation of energetic electrons through a flaring flux tube. Results indicate that as the energetic electrons flow outward, a return current of ambient plasma electrons is drawn inward (to maintain quasi-neutrality) which can be spatially separate from the primary current carried by the energetic electrons. Return current electrons are shown to accumulate on either side of the acceleration region of the energetic electrons, and depletions of ambient plasma electrons develop in the return current regions. Plasma ions accelerate across the field lines to produce current closure or charge neutralization, achieving energies comparable to those of the energetic electrons.

  20. Nonequilibrium Distribution of the Microscopic Thermal Current in Steady Thermal Transport Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukawa, S.; Ogushi, F.; Shimada, T.; Ito, N.

    Nonequilibrium distribution of the microscopic thermal current is investigated by direct molecular dynamics simulations. The microscopic thermal current in this study is defined by a flow of kinetic energy carried by a single particle. Asymptotic parallel and antiparallel tails of the nonequilibrium distribution to an average thermal current are identical to ones of equilibrium distribution with different temperatures. These temperatures characterizing the tails are dependent on a characteristic length in which a memory of dynamics is completely erased by several particle collisions. This property of the tails of nonequilibrium distribution is confirmed in other thermal transport systems. In addition, statistical properties of a particle trapped by a harmonic potential in a steady thermal conducting state are also studied. This particle feels a finite force parallel to the average thermal current as a consequence of the skewness of the distribution of the current. This for ce is interpreted as the microscopic origin of thermophoresis.

  1. Bottom currents and sediment transport in Long Island Sound: A modeling study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, R.P.; List, J.H.; Farris, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    A high resolution (300-400 m grid spacing), process oriented modeling study was undertaken to elucidate the physical processes affecting the characteristics and distribution of sea-floor sedimentary environments in Long Island Sound. Simulations using idealized forcing and high-resolution bathymetry were performed using a three-dimensional circulation model ECOM (Blumberg and Mellor, 1987) and a stationary shallow water wave model HISWA (Holthuijsen et al., 1989). The relative contributions of tide-, density-, wind- and wave-driven bottom currents are assessed and related to observed characteristics of the sea-floor environments, and simple bedload sediment transport simulations are performed. The fine grid spacing allows features with scales of several kilometers to be resolved. The simulations clearly show physical processes that affect the observed sea-floor characteristics at both regional and local scales. Simulations of near-bottom tidal currents reveal a strong gradient in the funnel-shaped eastern part of the Sound, which parallels an observed gradient in sedimentary environments from erosion or nondeposition, through bedload transport and sediment sorting, to fine-grained deposition. A simulation of estuarine flow driven by the along-axis gradient in salinity shows generally westward bottom currents of 2-4 cm/s that are locally enhanced to 6-8 cm/s along the axial depression of the Sound. Bottom wind-driven currents flow downwind along the shallow margins of the basin, but flow against the wind in the deeper regions. These bottom flows (in opposition to the wind) are strongest in the axial depression and add to the estuarine flow when winds are from the west. The combination of enhanced bottom currents due to both estuarine circulation and the prevailing westerly winds provide an explanation for the relatively coarse sediments found along parts of the axial depression. Climatological simulations of wave-driven bottom currents show that frequent high

  2. 3-D Particl-in-Cell Simulations of Transport Driven Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsung, F. S.; Dawson, J. M.

    1997-11-01

    In the advanced tokamak regime, transport phenomena can account for a signficant fraction of the toroidal current, possibly over that driven directly by the ohmic heating electric fields. Although bootstrap theory accounts for contributions of the collisional modification of banana orbits on the toroidal currents, the corresponding transport theory does not accurately predict the transport of particles and heat in present-day tokamak experiments. Furthermore, in our previous simulations in 21/2-D, currents were spontaneously generated in both the cylindrical and the toroidal geometries, contrary to neoclassical predictions. In these calculations, it was believed that the driving mechanism is the preferential loss of particles whose initial velocity is opposite to that of the plasma current. Because the preferential loss mechanism assumes the conservation of toroidal angular momentum, we have extended these simulations to three dimensions to study the effects of toroidal assymetries. A parallel, 3-D electromagnetic PIC code running on the IBM SP, with a localized field-solver has been developed to investigate the effects of perturbations parallel to the field lines, and direct comparisons has been made between the 21/2-D and 3-D simulations, and we have found good agreements between the 2 1/2-D calculations and the 3-D results. We will present these results at the meeting.

  3. Transport and coastal zooplankton communities in the northern California Current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Hongsheng; Peterson, William T.; Strub, Paul T.

    2011-06-01

    Alongshore transport was estimated from the gridded AVISO altimeter data and water level data from NOAA tide gauges (1993-2010) for the northern California Current (NCC) system. The biomass of the cold neritic copepods including Calanus marshallae, Pseudocalanus mimus and Acartia longiremis (dominants in the eastern Bering Sea, coastal Gulf of Alaska, and NCC) was estimated from a 15 year time series of zooplankton samples (1996-2010) collected biweekly at a coastal station 9 km off Newport Oregon U.S.A. The alongshore currents and the biomass of the cold neritic copepods exhibit a strong seasonal pattern and fluctuate in opposite phase: positive alongshore current (from south) leads to low biomass in winter and negative alongshore current (from north) leads to high biomass in summer. When the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) is positive, i.e., warm conditions around the northeast Pacific, there is more movement of water from the south in the NCC during winter. When the PDO is negative, there is more movement of water from the north during summer. The mean biomass of cold neritic copepods was positively correlated with the survival rate of juvenile coho salmon and cumulative transport was negatively correlated with coho salmon survival, i.e., in years when a greater portion of the source waters feeding the NCC enters from the north, the greater the salmon survival. We conclude that alongshore transport manifests PDO signals and serves as a linkage between large scale forcing to local ecosystem dynamics.

  4. Magnetic and transport eddy-current anomalies in cylinders owing to magnetization rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.-X.; Pascual, L.

    2001-06-01

    For a magnetic conducting cylinder with a coaxial core, where the spontaneous magnetization Ms is helical, the technical magnetization under an axial AC magnetic field or AC transport current is carried out by Ms rotations, which induce normal and lateral eddy currents. The low-frequency eddy-current anomaly factors for the magnetic and the transport case, η, are calculated as functions of the radius ratio of the core to the cylinder, p= rb/ r0, the scalar susceptibility of the shell normalized to the normal susceptibility of the core, q= χs/ χzz or χs/ χφφ, and the helical angle with respect to the z-axis, α. It is shown that for the typical case of α= π/4, the lateral-eddy-current loss is appreciably less and greater than the normal one in the magnetic and transport case, respectively, which is in contrast to the situation of a slab where both losses are equal.

  5. Freshwater transport in the coastal buoyancy-driven current affected by variable downwelling-favorable winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovsky, A. E.; Rogers-Cotrone, J.; Maze, G.; Weingartner, T. J.

    2009-04-01

    A typical feature of coastal circulation in mid- and high latitudes is the existence of buoyancy-driven currents originating from multiple or continuous sources of fresh (or brackish) water and propagating downstream, in the direction of a Kelvin wave. The examples include the Alaska Coastal Current (ACC), the East Greenland Coastal Current, the Norwegian Coastal Current, and the coastal current in the Gulf of Maine. These systems are affected by wind forcing, and previous studies found that downwelling-favorable winds trap buoyant water near the coast, steepen the isopycnals, and enhance the downstream velocity and freshwater transport in the coastal current. In this study we present a series of numerical experiments demonstrating that under certain conditions the downwelling favorable winds reduce the downstream freshwater transport compared to no-wind conditions due to some freshwater being transported offshore. These situations include: 1. Light average wind stresses (0.025 Pa or less), especially when the wind varies alongshore. The offshore freshwater transport is eddy-driven and is enhanced in the areas of converging wind stress. Eddy generation is associated with the wind-induced deepening of a buoyant layer near the coast. When the surface boundary layer is thin under light wind, this deepening translates into an enhanced vertical shear of the alongshore current through the thermal wind balance (geostrophic shear). 2. The cyclonic atmospheric system coming ashore builds up a sea level bulge at the coast upstream from the cyclone's center. This high pressure forms a filament transporting the freshwater offshore along the upstream flank of the cyclone. We apply the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) configured as a periodic channel and forced by multiple freshwater sources in the central part of the domain, and by the downwelling-favorable wind stress, both constant and variable. In particular, a moving cyclonic atmospheric system in the gradient wind

  6. The heliospheric current sheet and cosmic-ray transport in the heliosheath

    SciTech Connect

    Florinski, V.

    2012-05-21

    I propose a new mechanism of energetic particle transport in a heliosheath plasma that involves a tightly folded heliospheric current sheet. The distance between magnetic sectors of opposite polarity decreases with increasing heliocentric distance from the termination shock toward the heliopause, due to a slowdown of the flow of heliosheath plasma. If the sector width is comparable or smaller than the cyclotron radius of a galactic cosmic ray ion, the latter can efficiently traverse a stack of sectors via a drift-like or a diffusive mechanism. This mechanism could be responsible for record high intensities of galactic cosmic rays measured by Voyager 1 during 2010-2011. I also discuss the effects of the solar-cycle variations of the current sheet tilt for magnetic field topology in the vicinity of the heliopause and its implications for particle transport in that region.

  7. Transport and Measurements of High-Current Electron Beams from X pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonov, Alexey V.; Mingaleev, Albert R.; Romanova, Vera M.; Tarakanov, Vladimir P.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Blesener, Isaac C.; Kusse, Bruce R.; Hammer, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Generation of electron beams is an unavoidable property of X-pinches and other pulsed-power-driven pinches of different geometry. Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups with different geometry's are discussed. Of particular interest is the partially neutralized nature of the beam propagating from the X-pinch to a diagnostic system. Two scenarios of electron beam propagation from X-pinch to Faraday cup are analyzed by means of computer simulation using the PIC-code KARAT. The first is longitudinal neutralization by ions extracted from plasma at an output window of the X-pinch diode; the second is the beam transport through a plasma background between the diode and a diagnostic system.

  8. Transport and Measurements of High-Current Electron Beams from X pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Agafonov, Alexey V.; Mingaleev, Albert R.; Romanova, Vera M.; Tarakanov, Vladimir P.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Blesener, Isaac C.; Kusse, Bruce R.; Hammer, David A.

    2009-01-21

    Generation of electron beams is an unavoidable property of X-pinches and other pulsed-power-driven pinches of different geometry. Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups with different geometry's are discussed. Of particular interest is the partially neutralized nature of the beam propagating from the X-pinch to a diagnostic system. Two scenarios of electron beam propagation from X-pinch to Faraday cup are analyzed by means of computer simulation using the PIC-code KARAT. The first is longitudinal neutralization by ions extracted from plasma at an output window of the X-pinch diode; the second is the beam transport through a plasma background between the diode and a diagnostic system.

  9. Electrical transport properties and current density - voltage characteristic of PVA-Ag nanocomposite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A. K.; Dutta, B.; Sinha, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Basu, S.; Meikap, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    Silver (Ag) nanoparticle and Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) - Silver (Ag) composite have been prepared and its dielectric constant, ac conductivity, and current density-voltage characteristics have been studied, at and above room temperature. Here correlated barrier hopping found to be the dominant charge transport mechanism with maximum barrier height of 0.11 eV. The sample, under ±5 V applied voltage, show back to back Schottky diode behaviour.

  10. Tidal currents in the Indonesian Seas and their effect on transport and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatayama, Takaki; Awaji, Toshiyuki; Akitomo, Kazunori

    1996-05-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of tides and tidal currents in the Indonesian Seas, with particular emphasis on the predominant constituents, the barotropic M2 and K1 components. The calculated harmonic constants of the M2 and K1 tides agree well with those obtained from extensive tide gauge observations: the mean root-mean-square errors between models and observations for M2 and K1 over the entire Indonesian Seas are 11.2 and 8.65 cm, respectively, smaller than previous studies. The features of the tidal current field are qualitatively similar to those reported by Wyrtki [1961]. Relatively strong tidal currents are found in the Java Sea and in the vicinities of the narrow straits, such as the Lombok and Malacca Straits. Tracking of numerous labeled particles in the calculated velocity field clearly shows that the tidal currents play essential roles in the transport and mixing processes in the Indonesian Seas. For example, in the eastern Indonesian Seas a significant clockwise residual circulation appears around Buru Island, due primarily to the tidal rectification over variable bottom topography, with a minor impact from the nonlinear effects around narrow straits. The tide-induced residual transport from the Seram Sea to the eastern Banda Sea attains about 3.8 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1), comparable to that of the Indo-Pacific throughflow along the eastern route. In the western Indonesian Seas (the Java Sea and the Makassar Strait) the residual transport is much smaller than the throughflow transport along the western route. Our result suggests, however, that the properties of water flowing through this route could be modified by strong tidal mixing around the shelf of the southern Makassar Strait and the Lombok Strait.

  11. Sources and transport of the Deep Western Boundary Current East of the Kerguelen Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohue, Kathleen A.; Hufford, Gwyneth E.; McCartney, Michael S.

    East of the Kerguelen Plateau, a deep western boundary current in the Australian-Antarctic Basin brings cold dense waters north from the margins of Antarctica. Geostrophic velocities referenced to acoustic Doppler current profiler data, both shipboard and lowered, suggest the flow is unidirectional throughout the water column with estimated northwestward transport below potential temperature 1°C of 28 ± 7 × 106 m³s-1 and 49 ± 9 × 106 m³s-1 respectively. Hydrographie and acoustic Doppler current profiler data show that the deep boundary current is supplied by northward flow emerging from the confluence of westward flow along the Antarctic continental slope and eastward flow of Weddell Basin waters through the Princess Elizabeth Trough to the south of the Kerguelen Plateau.

  12. Imaging of inhomogeneous magnetization and currents coupled with anomalous transport properties in manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, M.; Song, H.; Tokunaga, Y.; Tamegai, T.

    2006-05-01

    Using magneto-optical imaging technique, real-space distributions of magnetic fields are visualized in images of a polarized-light microscope. Application of this technique to crystals of (La1-z Prz )0.7Ca0.3MnO3 (z = 0.7) and Nd0.5Ca0.5Mn1-y Cry O3 (y = 0.03) revealed inhomogeneous magnetization and currents in the phase-separated states into ferromagnetic metal and antiferromagnetic insulator. Increase of the transport current switches this inhomogeneous current flow to homogeneous one concomitantly with abrupt increase in resistivity. Using magnetic field dependence of this switching phenomenon, operation fields for colossal magnetoresistance effects can be significantly reduced. Empirical relation between the magnitude of bias currents and transition fields is provided.

  13. Current transport mechanisms in epitaxial CdS/CdTe heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercelebi, C.; Brinkman, A. W.; Furlong, T. S.; Woods, J.

    1990-04-01

    Epitaxial n-CdS/p-CdTe heterojunctions have been fabricated by the vacuum evaporation of CdS onto phosphorus doped {⦶111} B CdTe substrates. Analysis of the current-voltage and capacitance-voltage characteristics suggests that electrical transport across the junction is dominated by a multi-step tunneling process. Although open circuit voltage and short circuit current values were high, the overall photovoltaic conversion efficiency of the devices was restricted to ≈ 6%, because of the relatively high resistivity of the CdTe substrates.

  14. Long-term trends in the East Australian Current separation latitude and eddy driven transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetina-Heredia, P.; Roughan, M.; van Sebille, E.; Coleman, M. A.

    2014-07-01

    An observed warming of the Tasman Sea in recent decades has been linked to a poleward shift of the maximum wind stress curl, and a strengthening of the poleward flow along the coast of southeastern Australia. However, changes in the East Australian Current (EAC) separation latitude, as well as in the contribution of the EAC, the EAC extension and its eddy field to the total southward transport due to such a strengthening remain unknown. This study uses 30 years (1980-2010) of the Ocean Forecast for the Earth Simulator (OFES) sea surface height and velocity outputs to obtain a three decade long-time series of (i) the EAC separation latitude, (ii) the southward transport along the coast of southeastern Australia (28°S-39°S), and (iii) the southward transport across the EAC separation latitude. A Lagrangian approach is implemented and the spin parameter Ω is used to provide a quantitative distinction between the transports occurring outside and inside (cyclonic and anticyclonic) eddies. Significant positive trends of the low pass southward transports indicate that the intensification of the poleward flow has occurred both within the EAC and in the EAC extension. In addition, a significant increase in southward transport inside and outside eddies is found. Importantly, the contribution of eddy driven transport has a large temporal variability and shows a sharp increase from 2005 onward. Finally our results show that the EAC has not penetrated further south but it has separated more frequently at the southernmost latitudes within the region where it typically turns eastward.

  15. Current flow paths in deformed graphene: from quantum transport to classical trajectories in curved space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmann, Thomas; Szpak, Nikodem

    2016-05-01

    In this work we compare two fundamentally different approaches to the electronic transport in deformed graphene: (a) the condensed matter approach in which current flow paths are obtained by applying the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) method to the tight-binding model with local strain, (b) the general relativistic approach in which classical trajectories of relativistic point particles moving in a curved surface with a pseudo-magnetic field are calculated. The connection between the two is established in the long-wave limit via an effective Dirac Hamiltonian in curved space. Geometrical optics approximation, applied to focused current beams, allows us to directly compare the wave and the particle pictures. We obtain very good numerical agreement between the quantum and the classical approaches for a fairly wide set of parameters, improving with the increasing size of the system. The presented method offers an enormous reduction of complexity from irregular tight-binding Hamiltonians defined on large lattices to geometric language for curved continuous surfaces. It facilitates a comfortable and efficient tool for predicting electronic transport properties in graphene nanostructures with complicated geometries. Combination of the curvature and the pseudo-magnetic field paves the way to new interesting transport phenomena such as bending or focusing (lensing) of currents depending on the shape of the deformation. It can be applied in designing ultrasensitive sensors or in nanoelectronics.

  16. Influence of electrolyte and voltage on the direct current enhanced transport of iron nanoparticles in clay.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Helena I; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B; Pamukcu, Sibel

    2014-03-01

    Zero valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) transport for soil and groundwater remediation is slowed down or halted by aggregation or fast depletion in the soil pores. Direct electric current can enhance the transport of nZVI in low permeability soils. However operational factors, including pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), voltage and ionic strength of the electrolyte can play an important role in the treatment effectiveness. Experiments were conducted to enhance polymer coated nZVI mobility in a model low permeability soil medium (kaolin clay) using low direct current. Different electrolytes of varying ionic strengths and initial pH and high nZVI concentrations were applied. Results showed that the nZVI transport is enhanced by direct current, even considering concentrations typical of field application that favor nanoparticle aggregation. However, the factors considered (pH, ORP, voltage and electrolyte) failed to explain the iron concentration variation. The electrolyte and its ionic strength proved to be significant for pH and ORP measured during the experiments, and therefore will affect aggregation and fast oxidation of the particles. PMID:24252496

  17. Transport, deposition, and liftoff in laboratory density currents composed of hot particles in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.; Manga, M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of transport, deposition, and air entrainment in pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) is required for accurate predictions of future current behaviors and interpretations of ancient deposits, but directly observing the interiors of natural PDCs is effectively impossible. We model PDCs with scaled, hot, particle-laden density currents generated in a 6 m long, 0.6 m wide, 1.8 m tall air-filled tank. Comparison of relevant scaling between our experiments and natural PDCs indicates that we are accurately capturing much of the dynamics of dilute PDCs: * Reynolds numbers of our experiments are lower than natural currents, 10^3 compared to 10^6, but still fully turbulent; * Densimetric and Thermal Richardson numbers are of O(1) in both natural and modeled currents; * Stokes and settling numbers for particles in the experiments fall within the expected range for natural PDCs. Conditions within the tank are monitored with temperature and humidity probes. Experiments are illuminated with sheet lighting, and recorded with high-definition video cameras. In general, currents have average velocities of 10-20 cm/s, initial thicknesses of 10-20 cm (although thickness greatly increases as currents entrain and expand air), and run out or lift off distances of 3-5 m. Large Kelvin-Helmholtz type eddies usually form along the top of the current immediately behind the head; these vortices are similar in size to the total current thickness. In currents that lift off, the distal current end typically retreats with time. Preliminary results suggest that lift off distance decreases with increasing thermal Richardson number. Analysis of turbulent structures indicates that the current heads are dominated by large coherent structures with length scales, L, comparable to the current thickness. Within 5-10 L of the current fronts, sequences of similar large eddies often occur. At greater distances behind the current fronts, turbulent structures become smaller and less

  18. Changing surface water conditions for the last 500 ka in the Southeast Atlantic: Implications for variable influences of Agulhas leakage and Benguela upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, Benjamin F.; McClymont, Erin L.; Marret, Fabienne; Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2015-09-01

    The Southeast Atlantic Ocean is an important component of global ocean circulation, as it includes heat and salt transfer into the Atlantic through the Agulhas leakage as well as the highly productive Benguela upwelling system. Here we reconstruct sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1087 in the Southeast Atlantic to investigate surface ocean circulation patterns during the late Pleistocene (0-500 ka). The UK'37 index and dinoflagellate cyst assemblages are used to reconstruct SSTs, δDalkenone is used to reconstruct changes in sea surface salinity, and mass accumulation rates of alkenones and chlorine pigments are quantified to detect changing marine export productivity. The greatest amplitude of SST warming precedes decreases in benthic δ18O and therefore occurs early in the transition from glacials to interglacials. The δDalkenone, as a salinity indicator, increases before SSTs, suggesting that the pattern of Agulhas leakage is more complex than suggested by SST proxies. Marine isotope stage (MIS) 10 shows an anomalous pattern: it is marked by a pronounced increase in chlorine concentration, which may be related to enhanced/expanded Benguela upwelling reaching the core site. We find no evidence of an absence of Agulhas leakage throughout the record, suggesting that there is no Agulhas cutoff even during MIS 10. Finally, the ODP Site 1087 record shows an increasing strength of Agulhas leakage towards the present day, which may have impacted the intensity of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. As a result, the new analyses from ODP Site 1087 demonstrate a complex interaction between influences of the Benguela upwelling and the Agulhas leakage through the late Pleistocene, which are inferred here to reflect changing circulation patterns in the Southern Ocean and in the atmosphere.

  19. Pulsed currents carried by whistlers. VII. Helicity and transport in heat pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R.L.; Urrutia, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    In a uniform magnetoplasma ({ital n}{approx_equal}10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}3}, {ital kT}{sub {ital e}}{ge}0.5 eV, {ital B}{sub 0}{ge}15 G, 1 m {times} 2.5 m), electrons are heated locally and temporally by applying a short current pulse to a loop antenna or disk electrode. Electron magnetohydrodynamics characterize the experimental conditions. After the end of the applied current pulse and whistler wave transients, a current system driven by temperature gradients remains embedded in the plasma. The current system exhibits helicity. The associated electron drifts convect heat out of the flux tube. From diamagnetic field measurements, the decay of the electron temperature is obtained with high sensitivity ({Delta}{ital kT}{sub {ital e}}{approx_equal}0.001 eV). The heat transport is inferred from the space{endash}time dependence of the electron temperature. The temperature enhancement is confined to a channel whose length depends on heat input since the transport coefficients are temperature-dependent. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Current Status of Radiation Transport Tools for Proliferation and Terrorism Prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, K E

    2004-09-13

    We present the current status and future plans for the set of calculational tools and data bases developed and maintained at LLNL. The calculational tools include the Monte Carlo codes TART and COG as well as the deterministic code ARDRA. In addition to these codes presently in use there is a major development effort for a new massively parallel transport code. An important part of the capability we're developing is a sophisticated user interface, based on a commercial 3-D modeling product, to improve the model development process. A major part of this user interface tool is being developed by Strela under the Nuclear Cities Initiative. Strela has developed a hub-and-spoke technology for code input interconversions (between COG, TART and MCNP) and will produce the plug-ins that extend the capabilities of the 3-D modeler for use as a radiation transport input generator. The major advantages of this approach are the built-in user interface for 3-D modeling and the ability to read a large variety of CAD-file formats. In addition to supporting our current radiation transport codes and developing new capabilities we are working on some nuclear data needs for homeland security. These projects are carried out and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88'' cyclotron and at the Institute for Nuclear Research of the National Academy of Science of Ukraine under an STCU contract.

  1. Turbulent anomalous transport and anisotropic electron heating in a return current system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuang Wu; Buechner, Joerg

    2011-02-15

    Anisotropic electron heating due to self-generated electromagnetic turbulences is observed in collisionless return current plasmas. The corresponding energy conversion, electron heating, and associated anomalous momentum transport are investigated by means of a two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation code. The return current model consists of two counterstreaming electron beams with different temperatures and a stationary ion background. First, a general multifluid dispersion analyzer is presented in a clear matrix form that allows to study electron streaming instabilities. The numerical simulation confirms the predicted electrostatic electron-electron acoustic instability. Generating electromagnetic waves, the system evolves into a nonlinear stage. As a result, the electron drifts are slowed down due to turbulence-induced anomalous momentum exchange. Localized electric and magnetic field fluctuations play major roles in the energy conversion. Perpendicular electron heating follows the growth of magnetic field perturbations and the slowing of the electron drifts. Parallel and perpendicular electron heating occurs at different time scales. It is shown that the longer lasting perpendicular electron heating is caused by preheated parallel electron flows. The deflection of the preheated parallel electron flows in the localized turbulences, which is essentially a two-dimensional effect, leads to perpendicular electron heating even after the saturation of parallel electron heating. We conclude that the self-generated magnetic turbulence dominates the anomalous transport process in the late stage of return current system evolution.

  2. Current Transport in Al-Diffused ZnO/Si Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Jen; Tong, Chong; Yun, Juhyung; Anderson, Wayne A.

    2015-01-01

    The current-voltage-temperature (I-V-T) characteristics of transparent Al-doped ZnO (AZO) on n-Si heterojunction structures were analyzed with respect to two different Al diffusion temperatures, 200°C and 600°C. Thin films of Al were deposited on top of the ZnO/Si structures, followed by introducing the Al atoms into the ZnO to form AZO through a process of thermal diffusion. Measurements at temperatures of 150-400 K were carried out in order to understand the temperature dependence of the heterostructure diode characteristics for photovoltaic applications. The results indicated the difference in current mechanisms observed in the two diodes with different Al-diffusion temperatures and Al thicknesses. The charge transport mechanism in the 200°C diodes indicated thermionic field emission (TFE) as the dominating mechanism, whereas the 600°C diodes resulted in field emission (FE) as the dominating current transport. The differences in conduction mechanisms explain the better solar cell performance using the 200°C process.

  3. Current transport mechanisms in plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited AlN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Altuntas, Halit E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Donmez, Inci; Biyikli, Necmi E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr

    2015-04-21

    Here, we report on the current transport mechanisms in AlN thin films deposited at a low temperature (i.e., 200 °C) on p-type Si substrates by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition. Structural characterization of the deposited AlN was carried out using grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, revealing polycrystalline films with a wurtzite (hexagonal) structure. Al/AlN/ p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor structures were fabricated and investigated under negative bias by performing current-voltage measurements. As a function of the applied electric field, different types of current transport mechanisms were observed; i.e., ohmic conduction (15.2–21.5 MV/m), Schottky emission (23.6–39.5 MV/m), Frenkel-Poole emission (63.8–211.8 MV/m), trap-assisted tunneling (226–280 MV/m), and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling (290–447 MV/m). Electrical properties of the insulating AlN layer and the fabricated Al/AlN/p-Si MIS capacitor structure such as dielectric constant, flat-band voltage, effective charge density, and threshold voltage were also determined from the capacitance-voltage measurements.

  4. Structure of Dilute Pyroclastic Density Currents During Transport, Buoyancy Reversal and Liftoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    bypass region. Eddies that entrain air through the lateral margins grow in size with transport distance such that at the maximum runout distance, eddies have lengthscales comparable to the current width. The largest structures within the rising plumes have lengthscales comparable to the cross-stream plume width.

  5. Development of a three-dimensional, regional, coupled wave, current, and sediment-transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, J.C.; Sherwood, C.R.; Signell, R.P.; Harris, C.K.; Arango, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a three-dimensional numerical model that implements algorithms for sediment transport and evolution of bottom morphology in the coastal-circulation model Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS v3.0), and provides a two-way link between ROMS and the wave model Simulating Waves in the Nearshore (SWAN) via the Model-Coupling Toolkit. The coupled model is applicable for fluvial, estuarine, shelf, and nearshore (surfzone) environments. Three-dimensional radiation-stress terms have been included in the momentum equations, along with effects of a surface wave roller model. The sediment-transport algorithms are implemented for an unlimited number of user-defined non-cohesive sediment classes. Each class has attributes of grain diameter, density, settling velocity, critical stress threshold for erosion, and erodibility constant. Suspended-sediment transport in the water column is computed with the same advection-diffusion algorithm used for all passive tracers and an additional algorithm for vertical settling that is not limited by the CFL criterion. Erosion and deposition are based on flux formulations. A multi-level bed framework tracks the distribution of every size class in each layer and stores bulk properties including layer thickness, porosity, and mass, allowing computation of bed morphology and stratigraphy. Also tracked are bed-surface properties including active-layer thickness, ripple geometry, and bed roughness. Bedload transport is calculated for mobile sediment classes in the top layer. Bottom-boundary layer submodels parameterize wave-current interactions that enhance bottom stresses and thereby facilitate sediment transport and increase bottom drag, creating a feedback to the circulation. The model is demonstrated in a series of simple test cases and a realistic application in Massachusetts Bay. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anatomy of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current volume transports through Drake Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Zoé; Provost, Christine; Park, Young-Hyang; Ferrari, Ramiro; Sennéchael, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    The 20 year (October 1992 to August 2013) observation-based volume transport time series of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) through Drake Passage (DP) across the Jason altimeter track #104 is analyzed to better understand the ACC transport variability and its potential causes. The time series of three transport components (total (TT), barotropic (BT), and baroclinic (BC)) referenced to 3000 m present energetic intraseasonal fluctuations, with a salient spectral peak at 50 and 36 days, with the largest (least) variance being associated with the BT (BC) component. Low-frequency variations are much less energetic with a significant variance limited to the annual and biannual timescales and show a nonstationary intermittent link with the Southern Annular Mode and the Nino 3.4 index for interannual timescales. The region around 57°S in the Yaghan Basin appears to be a strategic point for a practical monitoring of the ACC transport, as the whole-track TT is significantly correlated with the local TT (r = 0.53) and BT (r = 0.69) around 57°S. These local BT (and TT) variations are associated with a well-defined tripole pattern in altimetric sea level anomaly (SLA). There is evidence that the tripole pattern associated with BT is locally generated when the BC-associated mesoscale SLAs, which have propagated eastward from an upstream area of DP, cross the Shackleton Fracture Zone to penetrate into the Yaghan Basin. Barotropic basin modes excited within the Yaghan Basin are discussed as a plausible mechanism for the observed energy-containing intraseasonal spectral peaks found in the transport variability.

  7. Time-resolved photoinduced thermoelectric and transport currents in GaAs nanowires.

    PubMed

    Prechtel, Leonhard; Padilla, Milan; Erhard, Nadine; Karl, Helmut; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Fontcuberta I Morral, Anna; Holleitner, Alexander W

    2012-05-01

    In order to clarify the temporal interplay of the different photocurrent mechanisms occurring in single GaAs nanowire based circuits, we introduce an on-chip photocurrent pump-probe spectroscopy with a picosecond time resolution. We identify photoinduced thermoelectric, displacement, and carrier lifetime limited currents as well as the transport of photogenerated holes to the electrodes. Moreover, we show that the time-resolved photocurrent spectroscopy can be used to investigate the drift velocity of photogenerated carriers in semiconducting nanowires. Hereby, our results are relevant for nanowire-based optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications. PMID:22494021

  8. Modelling the potential transport of tropical fish larvae in the Leeuwin Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, A.; Slawinski, D.; Feng, M.; Hutchins, B.; Fearns, P.

    2011-12-01

    Application of an individual-based particle tracking model to the migration of tropical fish larvae along the continental shelf between the Houtman Abrolhos Islands and Rottnest Island (Western Australia) has shown that there is potential for the southwards advection of passive particles/larvae in the Leeuwin Current system throughout the year. However, seasonal variations in the prevailing wind field result in corresponding seasonal changes in the surface current flow (both alongshore and cross-shelf) on the continental shelf, leading to a pulse of modelled particles arriving at Rottnest Island during the autumn months. This matches, within a month, the observed April/May peak in annual recruitment of 2 species of damselfish ( Abudefduf sexfasciatus and A. vaigiensis), at the time when the Leeuwin Current is strengthening. It is assumed that the larvae are in the uppermost 20 m of the water column and that there are no vertical diurnal movements. The model has a 10 km grid spacing, and so can resolve some of the current gradients across the continental shelf. Comparison of the modelled near-surface currents with ADCP measurements at 2 current mooring sites as well as with a broader range of historical current measurements off south-western Australia indicates that the alongshore net transport is reasonably well reproduced by the model, whereas agreement with the cross-shelf flow is not as good (this may be partly attributed to the paucity of high-quality near-surface current measurements in the area of study). Because of limitations in our knowledge of the swimming ability, choice of swimming direction and habitat selection of larval fish, as well as the inability of the model to reproduce the small-scale circulation around Rottnest Island, the swimming capacity of the late-stage larval fish is not specifically included; they are considered as potential settlers once they have reached within 20 km of the Island. The observed inter-annual variability in recruitment

  9. LETTER: Elongation and current scalings of local and global energy transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    2002-04-01

    The scaling of local and global energy confinement with elongation κ and current in L- and H-mode plasmas is explored. It is shown that the elongation enters global confinement only through the geometrical quantities of plasma volume and surface area, while local transport does not contribute. The global scaling τEproptoκ0.8 is caused by WproptonT0V with the volume Vproptoκ and the surface area leading to T0proptoκ-0.2. Empirical scalings of the effective heat diffusivity χ with κ, the current inside a flux surface I(x), Bp and q are presented. Applying I(x) makes χ independent of κ, while a formulation with q yields strong implicit and explicit κ dependences.

  10. Reaction kinetic parameters for ion transport from steady-state current-voltage curves.

    PubMed Central

    Gradmann, D; Klieber, H G; Hansen, U P

    1987-01-01

    This study demonstrates possible ways to estimate the rate constants of reaction kinetic models for ion transport from steady-state current-voltage data as measured at various substrate concentrations. This issue is treated theoretically by algebraic reduction and extension of a reaction kinetic four-state model for uniport. Furthermore, an example for application is given; current-voltage data from an open K+ selective channel (Schroeder, J.I., R. Hedrich, and J.M. Fernandez, 1984, Nature (Lond.), 312:361-362) supplemented by some new data have been evaluated. The analysis yields absolute numerical estimates of the 14 rate constants of a six-state model, which is discussed in a wider context. PMID:2437973

  11. Probability-current analysis of energy transport in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Jan J. J.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a probability-current analysis of excitation energy transfer between states of an open quantum system. Expressing the energy transfer through currents of excitation probability between the states in a site representation enables us to gain key insights into the energy transfer dynamics. In particular, the analysis yields direct identification of the pathways of energy transport in large networks of sites and quantifies their relative weights, as well as the respective contributions of unitary dynamics, coherence, dephasing, and relaxation and dissipation processes to the energy transfer. It thus provides much more information than studying only excitation probabilities of the states as a function of time. Our analysis is general and can be readily applied to a broad range of dynamical descriptions of open quantum system dynamics with coupling to non-Markovian or Markovian environments.

  12. Carrier transport in multilayer organic photodetectors: I. Effects of layer structure on dark current and photoresponse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jiangeng; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2004-02-01

    In this and the following article (Parts I and II, respectively), we discuss carrier transport in multilayer organic photodetectors. In Part I, we analyze carrier tunneling in multilayer organic photodetectors, both within the organic active region and at the anode/organic interface. The external quantum efficiency of an organic photodetector whose individual layers in the active region are ⩽30 Å thick shows an activation energy of ⩽0.1 eV, suggesting that the photogenerated carriers tunnel through the potential wells formed by the multilayer stack. In such photodetectors, electron tunneling injection from the anode into the organic active region dominates the dark current at T⩾200 K. Fitting of the dark current-voltage characteristics using a semiclassical tunneling model leads to barrier heights in agreement with experimental data. In Part II, the effects of anode preparation on performance of multilayer organic photodetectors are discussed.

  13. Current Transport and Onset-Related Phenomena in an MPD Thruster Modified by Applied Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Robert Carlos

    This work investigated the effects of tailored, externally-applied magnetic fields on current transport and near-anode processes in the plasma discharge of a magnetoplasmadynamic thruster (MPDT). Electrical and plasma diagnostics were used to determine whether applied magnetic fields could mitigate the effects of the "onset" phenomena, including large-amplitude terminal voltage fluctuations and high anode fall voltages associated with unstable operation and anode erosion. A new MPDT was developed and operated with quasi-steady 1 ms pulses from 36 kW to 3.3 MW with argon propellant. Three magnetic configurations studied included self-field operation (without external electromagnets) and two applied poloidal magnetic fields. One configuration used magnetic field lines tangential to the anode lip (and intersecting the anode further upstream) and the other created a magnetic cusp intersecting the anode downstream. The influence of the applied fields on the discharge current streamlines, current densities, and key plasma properties (electron temperature, number density, and plasma potential) was studied. Key findings included that the current pattern and current densities redistributed to follow the applied magnetic field lines. Also, the anode fall voltage was substantially reduced with both applied fields over a large range of currents (and eliminated at 8 kA). These results occurred because applied magnetic field lines intersecting the anode provided a high conductivity path and reduced the local electric field required to sustain the radial current densities. The applied fields reduced the amplitude and frequency of the terminal voltage fluctuations (up to 49%) over a broad range of currents and also decreased transients in the ion saturation current, which suggest reduction of current filamentation and surface-eroding anode spots. Additionally, the cusp field reduced mean terminal voltages over the entire range of discharge currents (up to 31%), and the tangential

  14. A Computer Code for 2-D Transport Calculations in x-y Geometry Using the Interface Current Method.

    1990-12-01

    Version 00 RICANT performs 2-dimensional neutron transport calculations in x-y geometry using the interface current method. In the interface current method, the angular neutron currents crossing region surfaces are expanded in terms of the Legendre polynomials in the two half-spaces made by the region surfaces.

  15. Investigation of nonthermal particle effects on ionization dynamics in high current density ion beam transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H. K.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Wang, P.; Moses, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Olson, C. L.; Welch, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    Light ion inertial fusion experiments require the presence of a moderate density background gas in the transport region to provide charge and current neutralization for a high current density ion beam. In this article, we investigate the effects of nonthermal particles such as beam ions or non-Maxwellian electron distributions on the ionization dynamics of the background gas. In particular, we focus on the case of Li beams being transported in an argon gas. Nonthermal particles as well as thermal electrons are included in time-dependent collisional-radiative calculations to determine time-dependent atomic level populations and charge state distributions in a beam-produced plasma. We also briefly discuss the effects of beam ions and energetic electrons on the visible and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral regions. It is found that the mean charge state of the gas, and hence the electron density, is significantly increased by collisions with energetic particles. This higher ionization significantly impacts the VUV spectral region, where numerous resonance lines occur. On the other hand, the visible spectrum tends to be less affected because the closely spaced excited states are populated by lower energy thermal electrons.

  16. Impurities in a non-axisymmetric plasma. Transport and effect on bootstrap current

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mollén, A.; Landreman, M.; Smith, H. M.; Braun, S.; Helander, P.

    2015-11-20

    Impurities cause radiation losses and plasma dilution, and in stellarator plasmas the neoclassical ambipolar radial electric field is often unfavorable for avoiding strong impurity peaking. In this work we use a new continuum drift-kinetic solver, the SFINCS code (the Stellarator Fokker-Planck Iterative Neoclassical Conservative Solver) [M. Landreman et al., Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014) 042503] which employs the full linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau operator, to calculate neoclassical impurity transport coefficients for a Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) magnetic configuration. We compare SFINCS calculations with theoretical asymptotes in the high collisionality limit. We observe and explain a 1/nu-scaling of the inter-species radial transport coefficient at lowmore » collisionality, arising due to the field term in the inter-species collision operator, and which is not found with simplified collision models even when momentum correction is applied. However, this type of scaling disappears if a radial electric field is present. We use SFINCS to analyze how the impurity content affects the neoclassical impurity dynamics and the bootstrap current. We show that a change in plasma effective charge Zeff of order unity can affect the bootstrap current enough to cause a deviation in the divertor strike point locations.« less

  17. Impurities in a non-axisymmetric plasma: Transport and effect on bootstrap current

    SciTech Connect

    Mollén, A.; Landreman, M.; Smith, H. M.; Helander, P.; Braun, S.

    2015-11-15

    Impurities cause radiation losses and plasma dilution, and in stellarator plasmas the neoclassical ambipolar radial electric field is often unfavorable for avoiding strong impurity peaking. In this work we use a new continuum drift-kinetic solver, the SFINCS code (the Stellarator Fokker-Planck Iterative Neoclassical Conservative Solver) [M. Landreman et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 042503 (2014)] which employs the full linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau operator, to calculate neoclassical impurity transport coefficients for a Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) magnetic configuration. We compare SFINCS calculations with theoretical asymptotes in the high collisionality limit. We observe and explain a 1/ν-scaling of the inter-species radial transport coefficient at low collisionality, arising due to the field term in the inter-species collision operator, and which is not found with simplified collision models even when momentum correction is applied. However, this type of scaling disappears if a radial electric field is present. We also use SFINCS to analyze how the impurity content affects the neoclassical impurity dynamics and the bootstrap current. We show that a change in plasma effective charge Z{sub eff} of order unity can affect the bootstrap current enough to cause a deviation in the divertor strike point locations.

  18. Impurities in a non-axisymmetric plasma. Transport and effect on bootstrap current

    SciTech Connect

    Mollén, A.; Landreman, M.; Smith, H. M.; Braun, S.; Helander, P.

    2015-11-20

    Impurities cause radiation losses and plasma dilution, and in stellarator plasmas the neoclassical ambipolar radial electric field is often unfavorable for avoiding strong impurity peaking. In this work we use a new continuum drift-kinetic solver, the SFINCS code (the Stellarator Fokker-Planck Iterative Neoclassical Conservative Solver) [M. Landreman et al., Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014) 042503] which employs the full linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau operator, to calculate neoclassical impurity transport coefficients for a Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) magnetic configuration. We compare SFINCS calculations with theoretical asymptotes in the high collisionality limit. We observe and explain a 1/nu-scaling of the inter-species radial transport coefficient at low collisionality, arising due to the field term in the inter-species collision operator, and which is not found with simplified collision models even when momentum correction is applied. However, this type of scaling disappears if a radial electric field is present. We use SFINCS to analyze how the impurity content affects the neoclassical impurity dynamics and the bootstrap current. We show that a change in plasma effective charge Zeff of order unity can affect the bootstrap current enough to cause a deviation in the divertor strike point locations.

  19. Barotropic and baroclinic processes in the transport variability of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbers, Dirk; Lettmann, Karsten

    2007-12-01

    Synoptic scale variability of the Southern Ocean wind field in the high-frequency range of barotropic Rossby waves results in transport variations of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), which are highly coherent with the bottom pressure field all around the Antarctic continent. The coherence pattern, in contrast to the steady state ACC, is steered by the geostrophic f/ h contours passing through Drake Passage and circling closely around the continent. At lower frequencies, with interannual and decadal periods, the correlation with the bottom pressure continues, but baroclinic processes gain importance. For periods exceeding a few years, variations of the ACC transport are in geostrophic balance with the pressure field associated with the baroclinic potential energy stored in the stratification, whereas bottom pressure plays a minor role. The low-frequency variability of the ACC transport is correlated with the baroclinic state variable in the entire Southern Ocean, mediated by baroclinic topographic-planetary Rossby waves that are not bound to f/ h contours. To clarify the processes of wave dynamics and pattern correlation, we apply a circulation model with simplified physics (the barotropic-baroclinic-interaction model BARBI) and use two types of wind forcing: the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) wind field with integrations spanning three decades and an artificial wind field constructed from the first three empirical orthogonal functions of NCEP combined with a temporal variability according to an autoregressive process. Experiments with this Southern Annular Mode type forcing have been performed for 1,800 years. We analyze the spin-up, trends, and variability of the model runs. Particular emphasis is placed on coherence and correlation patterns between the ACC transport, the wind forcing, the bottom pressure field and the pressure associated with the baroclinic potential energy. A stochastic dynamical model is developed that describes

  20. Transport mechanisms of leakage current in Al2O3/InAlAs MOS capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chengji; Lu, Hongliang; Zhang, Yimen; Zhang, Yuming; Guan, He; Wu, Lifan; Lu, Bin; Liu, Chen

    2016-09-01

    An Al2O3 layer is inserted between the InAlAs layer and the metal gate in InAs/AlSb HEMTs to suppress the leakage current. The transport mechanisms of leakage current in Al2O3/InAlAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors at both positive and negative biases at different temperatures ranging from 10 °C to 70 °C are investigated. For positive bias, the leakage current is dominated by Schottky emission. Based on the fitted straight lines, the relative dielectric constant of Al2O3 and the barrier height between Al2O3 and InAlAs are extracted. However, for negative bias, the leakage current is dominated by Frenkel-Poole (F-P) emission and the depth of the trap energy level from the conduction band (ϕt) is extracted. Furthermore, authors explain the reason why the dominating mechanisms at positive and negative biases are different.

  1. Stormtime ring current and radiation belt ion transport: Simulations and interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Larry R.; Gorney, David J.; Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael

    1995-01-01

    We use a dynamical guiding-center model to investigate the stormtime transport of ring current and radiation-belt ions. We trace the motion of representative ions' guiding centers in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field for a range of ion energies. Our simple magnetospheric model allows us to compare our numerical results quantitatively with analytical descriptions of particle transport, (e.g., with the quasilinear theory of radial diffusion). We find that 10-145-keV ions gain access to L approximately 3, where they can form the stormtime ring current, mainly from outside the (trapping) region in which particles execute closed drift paths. Conversely, the transport of higher-energy ions (approximately greater than 145 keV at L approximately 3) turns out to resemble radial diffusion. The quasilinear diffusion coefficient calculated for our model storm does not vary smoothly with particle energy, since our impulses occur at specific (although randomly determined) times. Despite the spectral irregularity, quasilinear theory provides a surprisingly accurate description of the transport process for approximately greater than 145-keV ions, even for the case of an individual storm. For 4 different realizations of our model storm, the geometric mean discrepancies between diffusion coefficients D(sup sim, sub LL) obtained from the simulations and the quasilinear diffusion coefficient D(sup ql, sub LL) amount to factors of 2.3, 2.3, 1.5, and 3.0, respectively. We have found that these discrepancies between D(sup sim, sub LL) and D(sup ql, sub LL) can be reduced slightly by invoking drift-resonance broadening to smooth out the sharp minima and maxima in D(sup ql, sub LL). The mean of the remaining discrepancies between D(sup sim, sub LL) and D(sup ql, sub LL) for the 4 different storms then amount to factors of 1.9, 2.1, 1.5, and 2.7, respectively. We find even better agreement when we reduce the impulse amplitudes systematically in

  2. Exploiting multi-proxy analysis of marine sediments in the southeast Atlantic: Intensification of Agulhas leakage tied to the start of the 100ka cycles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, Benjamin; McClymont, Erin; Marret, Fabienne

    2013-04-01

    The transition in orbital forcing from a 41 ka world to a 100 ka world was a major change in the climate regime over the last 1.5 Ma but its causes and its impacts are still being investigated. Here, we present reconstructions of sea-surface temperature (SST), salinity, and plankton assemblages obtained from a single core, ODP site 1087 (31°28'S, 15°19'E, 1374m water depth) spanning the last 1.5 Ma. Our hypothesis is that the response and position of the Agulhas leakage, which transfers heat and salt to the SE Atlantic region, has shifted as a result of changes in the dominant periodicity of orbital forcing. We draw on evidence from the alkenone (U37K') proxy for SST, dinoflagllate species analysis, and foraminifera oxygen isotopes for salinity and ice volume, to identify changes in the input of the Agulhas leakage to the SE Atlantic. We present the first continuous record of SE Atlantic SSTs reaching to 1.5 Ma which spans both the 41 kyr and 100 kyr glacial cycles. We identify large changes in SST and salinity on glacial-interglacial timescales, but show that there is a consistent pattern of SSTs leading salinity and then global ice volume change, so that deglaciation occurs some 5-10 kyr after the onset of rapid warming in the SE Atlantic during the recent glacials and interglacials. This early warming pattern, which characterizes the most recent cycles, began to develop as early at 900 ka, as the 100 kyr cycles became dominant. Before this time there is little evidence of Agulhas leakage in the ODP1087 record. We also show that over the last 600 ka there has been a strengthening of the Agulhas Leakage which has led to warmer interglacials over this time period. Overall the record shows that the strength and location of the Agulhas leakage is sensitive to changes in the dominant cycles in the climate.

  3. Changing surface water conditions for the last 500 ka in the Southeast Atlantic:Tracking Agulhas leakage using UK37' and δD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, Benjamin; McClymont, Erin; van der Meer, Marcel; Marret, Fabienne

    2015-04-01

    The Southeast Atlantic Ocean is an important component of global ocean circulation, as it includes heat and salt transfer into the Atlantic through Agulhas Leakage. Here, we reconstruct sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and sea surface salinity from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1087 in the Southeast Atlantic to investigate surface ocean circulation patterns during the late Pleistocene (0-500 ka). The alkenone-derived U37K'index and assemblages of dinoflagellate cysts are used to reconstruct SSTs. The hydrogen isotope composition of the alkenones (δDalkenone) is used to reconstruct changes in sea-surface salinity. The greatest amplitude of SST warming precedes decreases in benthic δ18O and therefore occurs early in the transition from glacials to interglacials. The timing of the early warming is consistent with previously published foraminifera reconstructions from the same site (Caley et al., 2012). However, δDalkenone decreases at the start of interglacials, suggesting that sea surface salinity increased earlier than the deglacial warmings, and indicating that the pattern of Agulhas leakage is more complex than suggested by SST proxies alone. Furthermore, the δDalkenonevalues indicate a strong salinity increases occurred before both MIS 11 and MIS 1, which are both periods where there is evidence of connection between increased Agulhas Leakage and a stronger Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Finally, the ODP site 1087 record shows an overall trend of increasing SSTs and δDalkenone towards the present day, suggesting that Agulhas leakage has strengthened since 500 ka, which may have impacted the intensity of the AMOC. Caley, T., Giraudeau, J., Malaize, B., Rossignol, L., Pierre, C., 2012. Agulhas leakage as a key process in the modes of Quaternary climate changes. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 109, 6835-6839. doi:10.1073/pnas.1115545109

  4. Regulation by equilibrative nucleoside transporter of adenosine outward currents in adult rat spinal dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kawasaki, Yasuhiko; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2004-07-30

    A current response induced by superfusing adenosine was examined in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of adult rat spinal cord slices by using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. In 78% of the neurons examined, adenosine induced an outward current at -70 mV [18.8 +/- 1.1 pA (n = 98) at 1mM] in a dose-dependent manner (EC(50) = 177 microM). A similar current was induced by A(1) agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (1 microM), whereas A(1) antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (1 microM) reversed the adenosine action. The adenosine current reversed its polarity at a potential being close to the equilibrium potential for K(+), and was attenuated by Ba(2+) (100 microM) and 4-aminopyridine (5mM) but not tetraethylammonium (5mM). The adenosine current was enhanced in duration by equilibrative nucleoside-transport (rENT1) inhibitor S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (1 microM) and adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (1 microM), and slowed in falling phase by adenosine kinase (AK) inhibitor iodotubercidine (1 microM). We conclude that a Ba(2+)- and 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K(+) channel in SG neurons is opened via the activation of A(1) receptors by adenosine whose level is possibly regulated by rENT1, adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase. Considering that intrathecally-administered adenosine analogues produce antinociception, the regulatory systems of adenosine may serve as targets for antinociceptive drugs. PMID:15275960

  5. Junction formation and current transport mechanisms in hybrid n-Si/PEDOT:PSS solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäckle, Sara; Mattiza, Matthias; Liebhaber, Martin; Brönstrup, Gerald; Rommel, Mathias; Lips, Klaus; Christiansen, Silke

    2015-08-01

    We investigated hybrid inorganic-organic solar cells combining monocrystalline n-type silicon (n-Si) and a highly conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The build-in potential, photo- and dark saturation current at this hybrid interface are monitored for varying n-Si doping concentrations. We corroborate that a high build-in potential forms at the hybrid junction leading to strong inversion of the n-Si surface. By extracting work function and valence band edge of the polymer from ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, a band diagram of the hybrid n-Si/PEDOT:PSS heterojunction is presented. The current-voltage characteristics were analyzed using Schottky and abrupt pn-junction models. The magnitude as well as the dependence of dark saturation current on n-Si doping concentration proves that the transport is governed by diffusion of minority charge carriers in the n-Si and not by thermionic emission of majorities over a Schottky barrier. This leads to a comprehensive explanation of the high observed open-circuit voltages of up to 634 mV connected to high conversion efficiency of almost 14%, even for simple planar device structures without antireflection coating or optimized contacts. The presented work clearly shows that PEDOT:PSS forms a hybrid heterojunction with n-Si behaving similar to a conventional pn-junction and not, like commonly assumed, a Schottky junction.

  6. Junction formation and current transport mechanisms in hybrid n-Si/PEDOT:PSS solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Jäckle, Sara; Mattiza, Matthias; Liebhaber, Martin; Brönstrup, Gerald; Rommel, Mathias; Lips, Klaus; Christiansen, Silke

    2015-01-01

    We investigated hybrid inorganic-organic solar cells combining monocrystalline n-type silicon (n-Si) and a highly conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The build-in potential, photo- and dark saturation current at this hybrid interface are monitored for varying n-Si doping concentrations. We corroborate that a high build-in potential forms at the hybrid junction leading to strong inversion of the n-Si surface. By extracting work function and valence band edge of the polymer from ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, a band diagram of the hybrid n-Si/PEDOT:PSS heterojunction is presented. The current-voltage characteristics were analyzed using Schottky and abrupt pn-junction models. The magnitude as well as the dependence of dark saturation current on n-Si doping concentration proves that the transport is governed by diffusion of minority charge carriers in the n-Si and not by thermionic emission of majorities over a Schottky barrier. This leads to a comprehensive explanation of the high observed open-circuit voltages of up to 634 mV connected to high conversion efficiency of almost 14%, even for simple planar device structures without antireflection coating or optimized contacts. The presented work clearly shows that PEDOT:PSS forms a hybrid heterojunction with n-Si behaving similar to a conventional pn-junction and not, like commonly assumed, a Schottky junction. PMID:26278010

  7. Dispersion and transport of hypersaline gravity currents in the presence of internal waves at a pycnocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, C. A. R.; Pietrasz, V. B.; Ouellette, N. T.; Koseff, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Desalination of seawater offers a source of potable water in arid regions and during drought. However, hypersaline discharge from desalination facilities presents environmental risks, particularly to benthic organisms. The risks posed by salt levels and chemical additives, which can be toxic to local ecosystems, are typically mitigated by ensuring high levels of dilution close to the source. We report on laboratory flume experiments examining how internal waves at the pycnocline of a layered ambient density stratification influence the transport of hypersaline effluent moving as a gravity current down the slope. We found that some of the hypersaline fluid from the gravity current was diverted away from the slope into an intrusion along the pycnocline. A parametric study investigated how varying the energy of the internal wave altered the amount of dense fluid that was diverted into the pycnocline intrusion. The results are compared to an analytical framework that compares the incident energy in the internal wave to potential energy used in diluting the gravity current. These results are significant for desalination effluents because fluid diverted into the intrusion avoids the ecologically sensitive benthic layer and disperses more quickly than if it had continued to propagate along the bed.

  8. Dynamical coupling between magnetic equilibrium and transport in tokamak scenario modelling, with application to current ramps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fable, E.; Angioni, C.; Ivanov, A. A.; Lackner, K.; Maj, O.; Medvedev, S. Yu; Pautasso, G.; Pereverzev, G. V.; Treutterer, W.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2013-07-01

    The modelling of tokamak scenarios requires the simultaneous solution of both the time evolution of the plasma kinetic profiles and of the magnetic equilibrium. Their dynamical coupling involves additional complications, which are not present when the two physical problems are solved separately. Difficulties arise in maintaining consistency in the time evolution among quantities which appear in both the transport and the Grad-Shafranov equations, specifically the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fluxes as a function of each other and of the geometry. The required consistency can be obtained by means of iteration cycles, which are performed outside the equilibrium code and which can have different convergence properties depending on the chosen numerical scheme. When these external iterations are performed, the stability of the coupled system becomes a concern. In contrast, if these iterations are not performed, the coupled system is numerically stable, but can become physically inconsistent. By employing a novel scheme (Fable E et al 2012 Nucl. Fusion submitted), which ensures stability and physical consistency among the same quantities that appear in both the transport and magnetic equilibrium equations, a newly developed version of the ASTRA transport code (Pereverzev G V et al 1991 IPP Report 5/42), which is coupled to the SPIDER equilibrium code (Ivanov A A et al 2005 32nd EPS Conf. on Plasma Physics (Tarragona, 27 June-1 July) vol 29C (ECA) P-5.063), in both prescribed- and free-boundary modes is presented here for the first time. The ASTRA-SPIDER coupled system is then applied to the specific study of the modelling of controlled current ramp-up in ASDEX Upgrade discharges.

  9. Spin projection and spin current density within relativistic electronic-transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lowitzer, S.; Koedderitzsch, D.; Ebert, H.

    2010-10-01

    A spin projection scheme is presented which allows the decomposition of the electric conductivity into two different spin channels within fully relativistic ab initio transport calculations that account for the impact of spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated by calculations of the spin-resolved conductivity of Fe{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x} and Co{sub 1-x}Pt{sub x} disordered alloys on the basis of the corresponding Kubo-Greenwood equation implemented using the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent-potential approximation band-structure method. In addition, results for the residual resistivity of diluted Ni-based alloys are presented that are compared to theoretical and experimental ones that rely on Mott's two-current model for spin-polarized systems. The application of the scheme to deal with the spin-orbit induced spin-Hall effect is discussed in addition.

  10. Impact of Current Profile on Transport and Stability in High Noninductive Fraction DIII-D Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, F.; Luce, T. C.; Ferron, J. R.; Politzer, P. A.; van Zeeland, M. A.; Smith, S. P.; Garofalo, A. M.; Turnbull, A. D.; Holcomb, C. T.; White, A. E.; Okabayashi, M.; in, Y.; Reimerdes, H.; Brennan, D. P.; Takahashi, R.

    2010-11-01

    Experiments addressing the issue of JBS and JEC alignment and the optimum q profile for stable noninductive operation show the JNI and J profiles are best aligned at qmin˜1.5, q95˜6.8. The kinetic profiles vary systematically with qmin and q95. Transport analysis shows that electrons dominate losses at low qmin, while at high qmin ions dominate. Drift wave stability analysis with the TGLF model shows trends in the linear growth rates that contradict these observations. Systematic scans of EC deposition indicate that a broad ECCD profile at ρ˜0.3-0.55 yields a J profile that is more stable to the tearing modes that limit the duration of the discharges. Optimal alignment of JEC for tearing stability coincides with the region where additional NI current is needed for fNI=1.

  11. Current and heat transport in the cannon-caliber electromagnetic gun armature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, John D.; Zielinski, Alexander E.

    1995-08-01

    A numerical model which we previously developed is extended and used to solve the equations which predict current and heat transport in a series-augmented, solid-armature railgun. The model is two-dimensional and fully time dependent. Specific calculations are carried out to analyze the armature recently designed and developed in the Cannon-Caliber Electromagnetic Launcher (CCEML) Program. The most extensive computations are for a situation in which the projectile is started at rest and accelerated to nearly 2 km/s in a time of 2 ms. Results of the calculations can be used to infer, for example, where melting in the armature is most likely to occur and where the electromagnetic stresses are largest. For comparison, calculations are also presented for a situation in which the projectile is held fixed. These calculations are intended to demonstrate the importance of velocity effects in the design of solid-armature railguns.

  12. Current & Heat Transport in Graphene Nanoribbons: Role of Non-Equilibrium Phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, Gary; Finkenstadt, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    The conducting channel of a graphitic nanoscale device is expected to experience a larger degree of thermal isolation when compared to traditional inversion channels of electronic devices. This leads to enhanced non-equilibrium phonon populations which are likely to adversely affect the mobility of graphene-based nanoribbons due to enhanced phonon scattering. Recent reports indicating the importance of carrier scattering with substrate surface polar optical phonons in carbon nanotubes^1 and graphene^2,3 show that this mechanism may allow enhanced heat removal from the nanoribbon channel. To investigate the effects of hot phonon populations on current and heat conduction, we solve the graphene nanoribbon multiband Boltzmann transport equation. Monte Carlo transport techniques are used since phonon populations may be tracked and updated temporally.^4 The electronic structure is solved using the NRL Tight-Binding method,^5 where carriers are scattered by confined acoustic, optical, edge and substrate polar optical phonons. [1] S. V. Rotkin et al., Nano Lett. 9, 1850 (2009). [2] J. H. Chen, C. Jang, S. Xiao, M. Ishigami and M. S. Fuhrer, Nature Nanotech. 3, 206 (2008). [3] V. Perebeinos and P. Avouris, arXiv:0910.4665v1 [cond-mat.mes-hall] (2009). [4] P. Lugli et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 50, 1251 (1987). [5] D. Finkenstadt, G. Pennington & M.J. Mehl, Phys. Rev. B 76, 121405(R) (2007).

  13. Analog Study of Clastes Transport and Sedimentation in Pyroclastic Density Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHOUX, C.; DRUITT, T.

    2001-12-01

    Analog experiments using an aqueous lock-exchange flume were carried out to study the transport and sedimentation processes occurring in pyroclastic density currents (PDC) generating extensive sheet-like ignimbrites. Those experimental flows scaled to turbulent PDCs, focusing on : (i) a very wide range of particle sizes, and (ii) particles of two different densities (the water-immersed densities of which scaled to those of lithics and pumice in gas). A suspension, containing either one or two components of different densities (SiC:2600 kg.m-3 and LB:1440 kg.m-3), with a log-normal particle size distribution, produced flows of various initial concentration (0.6 to 23 vol.%). Hydrodynamic equivalence was respected in the two-component suspension. Development of stratification and particle segregation was followed in the moving flows. Originally in a homogeneous suspension, the dense component in the one- or two-components flow displayed vertically and laterally a normal grading in the flow, latter observed in the deposit. Its mass loading and grain size distribution was insensitive to the initial concentration of the flow. Deposit from a one-component flow provides little information on particle concentration of the parental flow. The transport and sedimentation behaviour of the light component in the two component experiments was extremely concentration sensitive. For dilute currents, dense and light particles settled respecting their hydrodynamic equivalence whereas they segregated efficiently for initial flow concentration higher than a few percent. In the moving flow of high initial concentration, the light component exhibited a reverse grading vertically and laterally. Their resulting deposit showed reverse grading and the site of their maximum accumulation was progressively displaced downstream, due to some increasing buoyancy effects. Segregation between pumice (light component) and lithics (dense component) occur in a PCD, the density of which is lower than

  14. Monitoring suspended sediment transport in an ice-affected river using acoustic Doppler current profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, S. A.; Ghareh Aghaji Zare, S.; Rennie, C. D.; Ahmari, H.; Seidou, O.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying sediment budgets and understanding the processes which control fluvial sediment transport is paramount to monitoring river geomorphology and ecological habitat. In regions that are subject to freezing there is the added complexity of ice. River ice processes impact flow distribution, water stage and sediment transport. Ice processes typically have the largest impact on sediment transport and channel morphodynamics when ice jams occur during ice cover formation and breakup. Ice jams may restrict flow and cause local acceleration when released. Additionally, ice can mechanically scour river bed and banks. Under-ice sediment transport measurements are lacking due to obvious safety and logistical reasons, in addition to a lack of adequate measurement techniques. Since some rivers can be covered in ice during six months of the year, the lack of data in winter months leads to large uncertainty in annual sediment load calculations. To address this problem, acoustic profilers are being used to monitor flow velocity, suspended sediment and ice processes in the Lower Nelson River, Manitoba, Canada. Acoustic profilers are ideal for under-ice sediment flux measurements since they can be operated autonomously and continuously, they do not disturb the flow in the zone of measurement and acoustic backscatter can be related to sediment size and concentration. In March 2012 two upward-facing profilers (1200 kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler, 546 KHz acoustic backscatter profiler) were installed through a hole in the ice on the Nelson River, 50 km downstream of the Limestone Generating Station. Data were recorded for four months, including both stable cover and breakup periods. This paper presents suspended sediment fluxes calculated from the acoustic measurements. Velocity data were used to infer the vertical distribution of sediment sizes and concentrations; this information was then used in the interpretation of the backscattered intensity data. It was found that

  15. Interconnections between magnetic state and transport currents in antiferromagnetic Sr2IrO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoi, Maxim

    Interconnections between magnetic state and transport currents in ferromagnetic (F) heterostructures are the basis for spintronic applications, e.g. tunneling magnetoresistance and spin-transfer torque phenomena provide a means to read and write information in magnetic memory devices like STTRAM. Similar interconnections were proposed to occur in systems where F-components are replaced with antiferromagnets (AFM). We demonstrated experimentally the existence of such interconnections in antiferromagnetic Mott insulator Sr2IrO4: first, we found a very large anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) which can be used to monitor (read) the magnetic state of AFM; second, we demonstrated the feasibility of reversible resistive switching driven by high-density currents/high electric fields which can be used for writing in AFM memory applications. These results support the feasibility of AFM spintronics where antiferromagnets are used in place of ferromagnets. This work was supported in part by C-SPIN, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA, and by NSF grants DMR-1207577, DMR-1265162 and DMR-1122603.

  16. On tide-induced Lagrangian residual current and residual transport: 2. Residual transport with application in south San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feng, Shizuo; Cheng, Ralph T.; Pangen, Xi

    1986-01-01

    The transports of solutes and other tracers are fundamental to estuarine processes. The apparent transport mechanisms are convection by tidal current and current-induced shear effect dispersion for processes which take place in a time period of the order of a tidal cycle. However, as emphasis is shifted toward the effects of intertidal processes, the net transport is mainly determined by tide-induced residual circulation and by residual circulation due to other processes. The commonly used intertidal conservation equation takes the form of a convection-dispersion equation in which the convective velocity is the Eulerian residual current, and the dispersion terms are often referred to as the phase effect dispersion or, sometimes, as the “tidal dispersion.” The presence of these dispersion terms is merely the result of a Fickian type hypothesis. Since the actual processes are not Fickian, thus a Fickian hypothesis obscures the physical significance of this equation. Recent research results on residual circulation have suggested that long-term transport phenomena are closely related to the Lagrangian residual current or the Lagrangian residual transport. In this paper a new formulation of an intertidal conservation equation is presented and examined in detail. In a weakly nonlinear tidal estuary the resultant intertidal transport equation also takes the form of a convection-dispersion equation without the ad hoc introduction of phase effect dispersion in a form of dispersion tensor. The convective velocity in the resultant equation is the first-order Lagrangian residual current (the sum of the Eulerian residual current and the Stokes drift). The remaining dispersion terms are important only in higher-order solutions; they are due to shear effect dispersion and turbulent mixing. There exists a dispersion boundary layer adjacent to shoreline boundaries. An order of magnitude estimate of the properties in the dispersion boundary layer is given. The present treatment

  17. Field-dependent critical state of high-Tc superconducting strip simultaneously exposed to transport current and perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Cun; He, An; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2013-12-01

    We present an exact analytical approach for arbitrary field-dependent critical state of high-Tc superconducting strip with transport current. The sheet current and flux-density profiles are derived by solving the integral equations, which agree with experiments quite well. For small transport current, the approximate explicit expressions of sheet current, flux-density and penetration depth for the Kim model are derived based on the mean value theorem for integration. We also extend the results to the field-dependent critical state of superconducting strip in the simultaneous presence of applied field and transport current. The sheet current distributions calculated by the Kim model agree with experiments better than that by the Bean model. Moreover, the lines in the Ia-Ba plane for the Kim model are not monotonic, which is quite different from that the Bean model. The results reveal that the maximum transport current in thin superconducting strip will decrease with increasing applied field which vanishes for the Bean model. The results of this paper are useful to calculate ac susceptibility and ac loss.

  18. Field-dependent critical state of high-Tc superconducting strip simultaneously exposed to transport current and perpendicular magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Cun; He, An; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2013-12-15

    We present an exact analytical approach for arbitrary field-dependent critical state of high-T{sub c} superconducting strip with transport current. The sheet current and flux-density profiles are derived by solving the integral equations, which agree with experiments quite well. For small transport current, the approximate explicit expressions of sheet current, flux-density and penetration depth for the Kim model are derived based on the mean value theorem for integration. We also extend the results to the field-dependent critical state of superconducting strip in the simultaneous presence of applied field and transport current. The sheet current distributions calculated by the Kim model agree with experiments better than that by the Bean model. Moreover, the lines in the I{sub a}-B{sub a} plane for the Kim model are not monotonic, which is quite different from that the Bean model. The results reveal that the maximum transport current in thin superconducting strip will decrease with increasing applied field which vanishes for the Bean model. The results of this paper are useful to calculate ac susceptibility and ac loss.

  19. Increasing transports of volume, heat, and salt towards the Arctic in the Faroe Current 1993-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Larsen, K. M. H.; Hátún, H.; Kristiansen, R.; Mortensen, E.; Østerhus, S.

    2015-06-01

    The flow of warm and saline water from the Atlantic Ocean, across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge, into the Nordic Seas - the Atlantic inflow - is split into three separate branches. The most intensive of these branches is the inflow between Iceland and the Faroe Islands (Faroes), which is focused into the Faroe Current, north of the Faroes. The Atlantic inflow is an integral part of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC), which is projected to weaken during the 21 century and might conceivably reduce the oceanic heat and salt transports towards the Arctic. Since the mid-1990s, hydrographic properties and current velocities of the Faroe Current have been monitored along a section extending north from the Faroe shelf. From these in situ observations, time series of volume, heat, and salt transport have previously been reported, but the high variability of the transport series has made it difficult to identify trends. Here, we present results from a new analysis of the Faroe Current where the in situ observations have been combined with satellite altimetry. For the period 1993 to 2013, we find the average volume transport of Atlantic water in the Faroe Current to be 3.8 ± 0.5 Sv (1 Sv =106 m3 s-1) with a heat transport relative to 0 °C of 124 ± 15 TW (1 TW =1012 W). Consistent with other results for the Northeast Atlantic component of the THC, we find no indication of weakening. The transports of the Faroe Current, on the contrary, increased. The overall trend over the two decades of observation was 9 ± 8% for volume transport and 18 ± 9% for heat transport (95% confidence intervals). During the same period, the salt transport relative to the salinity of the deep Faroe Bank Channel overflow (34.93) more than doubled, potentially strengthening the feedback on thermohaline intensity. The increased heat and salt transports are partly caused by the increased volume transport and partly by increased temperatures and salinities of the Atlantic inflow

  20. Mean transport and seasonal cycle of the Kuroshio east of Taiwan with comparison to the Florida Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Thomas N.; Johns, William E.; Liu, Cho-Teng; Zhang, Dongxiao; Zantopp, Rainer; Yang, Yih

    2001-10-01

    Moored observations of Kuroshio current structure and transport variability were made across the channel between northeast Taiwan and the Ryukyu Islands at 24°N from September 19, 1994, to May 27, 1996. This was a cooperative effort between the United States and Taiwan. The moored array was designated PCM-1, for the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) transport resolving array. The dominant current and transport variability occurred on 100-day timescales and is shown by Zhang et al. [2001] to be caused by warm mesoscale eddys merging with the Kuroshio south of the array causing offshore meandering and flow splitting around the Ryukyu Islands. An annual transport cycle could not be resolved from our 20-month moored record because of aliasing from the 100-day period events. Sea level difference data were used to extend the transport time series to 7 years giving a variation in the range of the annual transport cycle of 4-10 Sv, with a mean range closer to 4 Sv. The seasonal maximum of 24 Sv occurred in the summer and the seasonal minimum of 20 Sv occurred in the fall. A weaker secondary maximum also occurred in the winter. The cycle of Kuroshio transport appears to result from a combination of local along-channel wind forcing and Sverdrup forcing over the Philippine Sea. Our estimate of the mean transport of the Kuroshio at the entrance to the East China Sea from the moored array is 21.5±2.5 Sv. The mean transpacific balance of meridional flows forced by winds and thermohaline processes at this latitude requires an additional mean northward flow of 12 Sv with an annual cycle of ±8 Sv along the eastern boundary of the Ryukyu Islands. The mean transport and annual cycle of the Kuroshio were found to be in reasonable agreement with basin-scale wind-forced models. Remarkable similarities are shown to exist between the mean western boundary currents and their seasonal cycles in the Atlantic (Florida Current and Antilles Current) and Pacific (Kuroshio and boundary

  1. Absence of age-related dopamine transporter loss in current cocaine abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Fischman, M.

    1997-05-01

    The brain dopamine (DA) system appears to play a crucial role in the reinforcing properties of cocaine. Using PET we had previously shown significant decreases in DA D2 receptors but no changes in DA transporters (DAT) in detoxified cocaine abusers (>1 month after last cocaine use). This study evaluates DAT availability in current cocaine abusers (15 male and 5 female; age = 36.2{+-}5.3 years old) using PET and [C-11]cocaine, as a DAT ligand, and compares it to that in 18 male and 2 female age matched normal controls. Cocaine abusers had a history of abusing 4.2{+-}2.8 gm /week of cocaine for an average of 11.0{+-}4.9 years and their last use of cocaine was 5.4{+-}8 days prior to PET study. DAT availability was obtained using the ratio of the distribution volume in the region of interest (caudate, pulamen) to that in cerebellum which is a function of Bmax./Kd.+1. DAT availability in cocaine abusers did not differ to that in normals (N) (C= 1.78{+-}0.14, N= 1.77{+-}0.13). In addition, there were no differences between the groups in the distribution volume or the Kl (plasma to brain transfer constant) measures for [C-11]cocaine. However, in the normals but not in the abusers striatal DAT availability decreased with age (C: r = -0.07, p = 0.76; N: r = -0.55, p < 0.01). Though this study fails to show group differences in DAT availability between normals and current cocaine abusers it indicates a blunting of the age-related decline in DAT availability in the cocaine abusers. Future studies in older cocaine abusers at different time after detoxification arc required in order to assess if cocaine slows the loss of DAT with age or whether these changes reflect compensation to increased DAT blockade and recover with detoxification.

  2. Thermally-restorable optical degradation and the mechanism of current transport in Cu2S-CdS photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenbruch, A. L.; Bube, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    The photovoltaic properties of single-crystal Cu2S-CdS heterojunctions have been investigated as a function of heat treatment by detailed measurements of the dependence of short-circuit current on photon energy, temperature, and the state of optical degradation or enhancement. A coherent picture is formulated for the relationship between enhancement and optical degradation, and their effect on the transport of short-circuit photoexcited current and dark, forward-bias current in the cell. Optical degradation in the Cu2S-CdS cell is shown to be closely identical to optical degradation of lifetime in a homogeneous CdS:Cd:Cu crystal, indicating that the CdS:Cu layer near the junction interface controls carrier transport in the cell. It is proposed that both the photoexcited short-circuit current and the dark, forward-bias current are controlled by a tunneling-recombination process through interface states.

  3. Modeling alongshore propagating tides and currents around West Maui, Hawaii and implications for transport using Delft3D.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitousek, S.; Fletcher, C. H.; Storlazzi, C. D.

    2006-12-01

    Nearshore currents are driven by a number of components including tides, waves winds and even internal tides. To adequately simulate transport of sand and other constituents, the realistic behavior of the dominant current-generating phenomena should be resolved. This often requires sufficient observations and calibration/validation efforts to achieve realistic modeling results. The work explores the capabilities of modeling the currents along West Maui. The West Maui coast has a propagating tide where the observed peak tidal currents, which are directed parallel to the coast, occur very closely to the peak tidal water levels. In 2003, the USGS collected an extensive set of current observations along West Maui, Hawaii, with the goal of better understanding transport mechanisms of sediment, larvae, pollutants and other particles in coral reef settings. The observations included vessel mounted ADCP surveys and an array seafloor instruments at the 10m isobath along the coast. A simple 2DH model of West Maui using Delft3D shows good comparison of the modeled and observed currents. Nearshore currents driven by waves and winds are also considered. During the data collection period a significant erosion event occurred within the study domain at Kaanapali Beach. This event undermined several trees on the shoreline and threatened resort infrastructure. In modeling the nearshore currents of this region we hope to determine the potential for sand transport and shoreline change to hindcast this event.

  4. Regulating Current Rectification and Nanoparticle Transport Through a Salt Gradient in Bipolar Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Yuan; Yeh, Li-Hsien; Hsu, Jyh-Ping; Tseng, Shiojenn

    2015-09-16

    Tuning of ion and nanoparticle transport is validated through applying a salt gradient in two types of nanopores: the inner wall of a nanopore has bipolar charges and its outer wall neutral (type I), and both the inner and outer walls of a nanopore have bipolar charges (type II). The ion current rectification (ICR) behavior of these nanopores can be regulated by an applied salt gradient: if it is small, the degree of ICR in type II nanopore is more significant than that in type I nanopore; a reversed trend is observed at a sufficiently large salt gradient. If the applied salt gradient and electric field have the same direction, type I nanopore exhibits two significant features that are not observed in type II nanopore: (i) a cation-rich concentration polarization field and an enhanced funneling electric field are present near the cathode side of the nanopore, and (ii) the magnitude of the axial electric field inside the nanopore is reduced. These features imply that applying a salt gradient to type I nanopore is capable of simultaneously enhancing the nanoparticle capture into the nanopore and reducing its translocation velocity inside, so that high sensing performance and resolution can be achieved. PMID:26148458

  5. California coast nearshore processes study. [nearshore currents, sediment transport, estuaries, and river discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirie, D. M.; Steller, D. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Large scale sediment plumes from intermittent streams and rivers form detectable seasonal patterns on ERTS-1 imagery. The ocean current systems, as plotted from three California coast ERTS mosaics, were identified. Offshore patterns of sediment in areas such as the Santa Barbara Channel are traceable. These patterns extend offshore to heretofore unanticipated ranges as shown on the ERTS-1 imagery. Flying spot scanner enhancements of NASA tapes resulted in details of subtle and often invisible (to the eye) nearshore features. The suspended sediments off San Francisco and in Monterey Bay are emphasized in detail. These are areas of extremely changeable offshore sediment transport patterns. Computer generated contouring of radiance levels resulted in maps that can be used in determining surface and nearsurface suspended sediment distribution. Tentative calibrations of ERTS-1 spectral brightness against sediment load have been made using shipboard measurements. Information from the combined enhancement and interpretation techniques is applicable to operational coastal engineering programs.

  6. The transport mechanism of gate leakage current in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, D. F.; Wang, X. L.; Xiao, H. L.; Wang, C. M.; Jiang, L. J.; Feng, C.; Chen, H.; Hou, Q. F.; Deng, Q. W.; Bi, Y.; Kang, H.

    2011-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the I-V characteristics on Au/Ni-HEMT Schottky contacts was measured and analyzed. Large deviations from the thermionic emission and thermionic-field emission model were observed in the I-V-T characteristics. The thin surface barrier model only fits the measured curves in the high bias region, but deviates drastically in the low bias region. Using a revised thin surface barrier model, the calculated curves match well with the measured curves. It is also found that tunneling emission model is the dominant current transport mechanism at low temperature, yet thermionic-field emission model is the dominant current transport mechanism at high temperature.

  7. Spin-polarized transport current in n-type codoped ZnO thin films measured by Andreev spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, K. A.; Behan, A. J.; Neal, J. R.; Score, D. S.; Blythe, H. J.; Gehring, G. A.; Heald, S. M.; Branford, W. R.; Cohen, L. F.; Imperial Coll.; Univ. of Sheffield

    2009-12-01

    We use point-contact Andreev-reflection measurements to determine the spin polarization of the transport current in pulse laser deposited thin films of ZnO with 1% Al and with and without 2% Mn. Only films with Mn are ferromagnetic and show spin polarization of the transport current of up to 55 {+-} 0.5% at 4.2 K, in sharp contrast to measurements of the nonmagnetic films without Mn where the polarization is consistent with zero. Our results imply strongly that ferromagnetism in these Al-doped ZnO films requires the presence of Mn.

  8. Specific transport and storage solutions : waste management facing current and future stakes of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Choho, T.; Blachet, L.; Deniau, H.; Gagner, L.; Gendreau, F.; Presta, A.

    2007-07-01

    With major projects ongoing or being planned, and also with the daily management of radioactive waste from nuclear facilities, the role of transport and/or storage packaging has been often overlooked. Indeed, the packaging development process and transport solutions implemented are a key part of the waste management challenge : protection of people and of the environment. During over four decades, the AREVA Group has developed a complete and coherent system for the transport of waste produced by nuclear industries. The transport solutions integrate the factors to consider, as industrial transportation needs, various waste forms, associated hazards and current regulations. Thus, TN International has designed, licensed and manufactured a large number of different transport, storage and dual purpose cask models for residues and all kinds of radioactive wastes. The present paper proposes to illustrate how a company acting both as a cask designer and a carrier is key to the waste management issue and how it can support the waste management policy of nuclear waste producers through their operational choices. We will focus on the TN International technical solutions implemented to guarantee safe and secure transportation and storage solutions. We will describe different aspects of the cask design process, insisting on how it enables to fulfil both customer needs and regulation requirements. We will also mention the associated services developed by the AREVA Business Unit Logistics (TN International, TRANSNUCLEAR, MAINCO, and LMC) in order to manage transportation of liquid and solid waste towards interim or final storage sites. (authors)

  9. Current-direction dependence of the transport properties in single-crystalline face-centered-cubic cobalt films

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.; Liang, J. H.; Chen, B. L.; Li, J. X.; Ding, Z.; Wu, Y. Z.; Ma, D. H.

    2015-07-28

    Face-centered-cubic cobalt films are epitaxially grown on insulating LaAlO{sub 3}(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Transport measurements are conducted in different current directions relative to the crystal axes. We find that the temperature dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance ratio strongly depends on the current direction. However, the anomalous Hall effect shows isotropic behavior independent of the current direction. Our results demonstrate the interplay between the current direction and the crystalline lattice in single-crystalline ferromagnetic films. A phenomenological analysis is presented to interpret the experimental data.

  10. Current-direction dependence of the transport properties in single-crystalline face-centered-cubic cobalt films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, X.; Liang, J. H.; Chen, B. L.; Li, J. X.; Ma, D. H.; Ding, Z.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2015-07-01

    Face-centered-cubic cobalt films are epitaxially grown on insulating LaAlO3(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Transport measurements are conducted in different current directions relative to the crystal axes. We find that the temperature dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance ratio strongly depends on the current direction. However, the anomalous Hall effect shows isotropic behavior independent of the current direction. Our results demonstrate the interplay between the current direction and the crystalline lattice in single-crystalline ferromagnetic films. A phenomenological analysis is presented to interpret the experimental data.

  11. Barotropic and baroclinic contributions to along-stream and across-stream transport in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Molino, B.; Rintoul, S. R.; Mazloff, M. R.

    2014-11-01

    The Southern Ocean's ability to store and transport heat and tracers as well as to dissipate momentum and energy are intimately related to the vertical structure of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Here the partition between barotropic and baroclinic flow in the time-mean ACC is investigated in a Southern Ocean state estimate. The zonal geostrophic transport is predominantly baroclinic, with at most 25% of the transport at any longitude carried by the barotropic component. Following surface streamlines, changes in vertical shear and near-bottom velocity are large, and result in changes in the local partition of barotropic/baroclinic vertically integrated transport from 10/90% in the center of the basins, to 50/50% near complex topography. The velocity at depth is not aligned with the surface velocity. This nonequivalent barotropic flow supports significant cross-stream transports. Barotropic and baroclinic mass transport across the ACC is, on average, in opposite directions, with the net barotropic cross-stream transport being poleward and the net baroclinic equatorward. The sum partially cancels out, leaving a net geostrophic poleward transport across the different fronts between -5 and -20 Sv. Temperature is also transported across the fronts by the nonequivalent barotropic part of the ACC, with maximum values across the northern ACC fronts equivalent to -0.2 PW. The sign and magnitude of these transports are not sensitive to the choice of stream-coordinate. These cross-stream volume and temperature transports are variable in space, and dependent on the interactions between deep flow and bathymetry, thus difficult to infer from surface and hydrographic observations alone.

  12. Effect of inhibitors of auxin transport and of calmodulin on a gravisensing-dependent current in maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Some characteristics of the gravity sensing mechanism in maize root caps were investigated using a bioelectric current as an indicator of gravity sensing. This technique involves the measurement of a change in the current density which arises at the columella region coincidently with the presentation time. Two inhibitors of auxin transport, triiodobenzoic acid and naphthylphthalamic acid, blocked gravitropic curvature but not the change in current density. Two inhibitors of calmodulin activity, compound 48/80 and calmidazolium, blocked both curvature and gravity-induced current. The results suggest that auxin transport is not a component of gravity sensing in the root cap. By contrast, the results suggest that calmodulin plays an intrinsic role in gravity sensing.

  13. Effect of inhibitors of auxin transport and of calmodulin on a gravisensing-dependent current in maize roots.

    PubMed

    Björkman, T; Leopold, A C

    1987-01-01

    Some characteristics of the gravity sensing mechanism in maize root caps were investigated using a bioelectric current as an indicator of gravity sensing. This technique involves the measurement of a change in the current density which arises at the columella region coincidently with the presentation time. Two inhibitors of auxin transport, triiodobenzoic acid and naphthylphthalamic acid, blocked gravitropic curvature but not the change in current density. Two inhibitors of calmodulin activity, compound 48/80 and calmidazolium, blocked both curvature and gravity-induced current. The results suggest that auxin transport is not a component of gravity sensing in the root cap. By contrast, the results suggest that calmodulin plays an intrinsic role in gravity sensing. PMID:11539682

  14. Effect of Inhibitors of Auxin Transport and of Calmodulin on a Gravisensing-Dependent Current in Maize Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Björkman, Thomas; Leopold, A. Carl

    1987-01-01

    Some characteristics of the gravity sensing mechanism in maize root caps were investigated using a bioelectric current as an indicator of gravity sensing. This technique involves the measurement of a change in the current density which arises at the columella region coincidently with the presentation time. Two inhibitors of auxin transport, triiodobenzoic acid and naphthylphthalamic acid, blocked gravitropic curvature but not the change in current density. Two inhibitors of calmodulin activity, compound 48/80 and calmidazolium, blocked both curvature and gravity-induced current. The results suggest that auxin transport is not a component of gravity sensing in the root cap. By contrast, the results suggest that calmodulin plays an intrinsic role in gravity sensing. PMID:11539682

  15. Microstructural analysis of mass transport phenomena in gas diffusion media for high current density operation in PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotaka, Toshikazu; Tabuchi, Yuichiro; Mukherjee, Partha P.

    2015-04-01

    Cost reduction is a key issue for commercialization of fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). High current density operation is a solution pathway. In order to realize high current density operation, it is necessary to reduce mass transport resistance in the gas diffusion media commonly consisted of gas diffusion layer (GDL) and micro porous layer (MPL). However, fundamental understanding of the underlying mass transport phenomena in the porous components is not only critical but also not fully understood yet due to the inherent microstructural complexity. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of electron and oxygen transport in the GDL and MPL is conducted experimentally and numerically with three-dimensional (3D) microstructural data to reveal the structure-transport relationship. The results reveal that the mass transport in the GDL is strongly dependent on the local microstructural variations, such as local pore/solid volume fractions and connectivity. However, especially in the case of the electrical conductivity of MPL, the contact resistance between carbon particles is the dominant factor. This suggests that reducing the contact resistance between carbon particles and/or the number of contact points along the transport pathway can improve the electrical conductivity of MPL.

  16. 76 FR 52732 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation Notice of Intent To Publish Current and Future Launch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ...The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is changing the way the Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST) makes its permits, licenses, and all accompanying orders (authorizations) available to the public. The FAA intends to post all current and future authorizations online on the AST Web site \\1\\ beginning on October 24, 2011. The FAA will not publish license or permit applications or......

  17. AN APPROACH TO CALCULATING WIND-DRIVEN CURRENTS AND TRANSPORT OF SUBSTANCES IN UNSTRATIFIED WATER BODIES USING CURVILINEAR COORDINATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model of wind-driven currents and transport of substances in unstratified water bodies is presented. he model employs a coordinate system, consisting of curvilinear functions that are orthogonal in the horizontal plane and a coordinate of "normalized depth." The method of mergi...

  18. Observed bottom boundary layer transport and uplift on the continental shelf adjacent to a western boundary current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, A.; Roughan, M.; Wood, J. E.

    2014-08-01

    Western boundary currents strongly influence the dynamics on the adjacent continental shelf and in particular the cross-shelf transport and uplift through the bottom boundary layer. Four years of moored in situ observations on the narrow southeastern Australian shelf (in water depths of between 65 and 140 m) were used to investigate bottom cross-shelf transport, both upstream (30°S) and downstream (34°S) of the separation zone of the East Australian Current (EAC). Bottom transport was estimated and assessed against Ekman theory, showing consistent results for a number of different formulations of the boundary layer thickness. Net bottom cross-shelf transport was onshore at all locations. Ekman theory indicates that up to 64% of the transport variability is driven by the along-shelf bottom stress. Onshore transport in the bottom boundary layer was more intense and frequent upstream than downstream, occurring 64% of the time at 30°S. Wind-driven surface Ekman transport estimates did not balance the bottom cross-shelf flow. At both locations, strong variability was found in bottom water transport at periods of approximately 90-100 days. This corresponds with periodicity in EAC fluctuations and eddy shedding as evidenced from altimeter observations, highlighting the EAC as a driver of variability in the continental shelf waters. Ocean glider and HF radar observations were used to identify the bio-physical response to an EAC encroachment event, resulting in a strong onshore bottom flow, the uplift of cold slope water, and elevated coastal chlorophyll concentrations.

  19. Transport currents in Bi-2223/Ag tapes made using the tape-in-rectangular tube process, current distribution and Ic stress degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovác, P.; Husek, I.; Melisek, T.; Metz, A.; van Eck, H. J. N.; ten Haken, B.

    2002-04-01

    Using the tape-in-rectangular tube (TIRT) process, we have made multi-core Bi-2223/Ag tapes with various numbers of filaments (10-162), and with different filament architectures and orientations. We have measured the angular dependence of the transport current of the tape samples with 'parallel' and 'perpendicular' filaments. The transversal Ic distribution obtained by spatially resolved transport measurements ('magnetic knife') illustrates that the filament quality of the TIRT tapes is better at the tape edges than in the centre. The tapes were stressed by two types of tensioning set-up (a short straight sample and a U-shaped spring) and by bending at 77 K. The Ic degradation shows different behaviour for parallel and perpendicular filaments, which is attributed to the difference in filament density and crack propagation.

  20. Comparison between the magnetic and transport critical current densities in high critical current density melt-textured yttrium barium copper-oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, L.; Meng, R. L.; Xue, Y. Y.; Hor, P. H.; Chu, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    Using a recently developed pulsed critical current density (Jc) measuring system, the Jc of the high-Jc melt-textured YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) (Y123) bulk samples has been determined. I-V curves with a voltage resolution of 0.5 microV were obtained, and transport Jc's along the a-b plane as high as 7.2 x 10 to the 4th A/sq cm were extracted. These results are comparable to the values obtained magnetically. On the other hand, transport Jc along the c axis were found to be two orders of magnitude smaller, even though the magnetic Jc along the c axis is only about five times smaller than Jc along the a-b plane. It is suggested that for the high-temperature superconducting materials which are highly anisotropic, caution should be taken when using the nontransport magnetic methods to determine Jc.

  1. Current conceptual model of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Technical Area V.

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, Brennon R.; Dettmers, Dana L.

    2004-04-01

    The New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) requires a Corrective Measures Evaluation to evaluate potential remedial alternatives for contaminants of concern (COCs) in groundwater at Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico (SNUNM) Technical Area (TA)-V. These COCs consist of trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and nitrate. This document presents the current conceptual model of groundwater flow and transport at TA-V that will provide the basis for a technically defensible evaluation. Characterization is defined by nine requirement areas that were identified in the NMED Compliance Order on Consent. These characterization requirement areas consist of geohydrologic characteristics that control the subsurface distribution and transport of contaminants. This conceptual model document summarizes the regional geohydrologic setting of SNUNM TA-V. The document also presents a summary of site-specific geohydrologic data and integrates these data into the current conceptual model of flow and contaminant transport. This summary includes characterization of the local geologic framework; characterization of hydrologic conditions at TA-V, including recharge, hydraulics of vadose-zone and aquifer flow, and the aquifer field of flow as it pertains to downgradient receptors. The summary also discusses characterization of contaminant transport in the subsurface, including discussion about source term inventory, release, and contaminant distribution and transport in the vadose zone and aquifer.

  2. Experimental evidence of direct contact formation for the current transport in silver thick film metallized silicon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Enrique; Olibet, Sara; Glatz-Reichenbach, Joachim; Kopecek, Radovan; Reinke, Daniel; Schubert, Gunnar

    2011-12-01

    Great advances have been achieved in the development of silver pastes. The use of smaller silver particles, higher silver content, and, thus, less glass frit allow modern silver pastes to contact high resistive emitters without the necessity of a selective emitter or subsequent plating. To identify the microscopic key reasons behind the improvement of silver paste, it is essential to understand the current transport mechanism from the silicon emitter into the bulk of the silver finger. Two current transport theories predominate: i) The current flows through the Ag crystallites grown into the Si emitter, which are separated by a thin glass layer or possibly in direct contact with the silver finger. ii) The current is transported by means of multistep tunneling into the silver finger across nano-Ag colloids in the glass layer, which are formed at optimal firing conditions; the formation of Ag crystallites into the Si surface is synonymous with over-firing. In this study, we contact Si solar cell emitters with different silver pastes on textured and flat silicon surfaces. A sequential selective silver-glass etching process is employed to expose and isolate the different contact components for current transport. The surface configurations after the etching sequences are observed with scanning electron microscopy. Liquid conductive silver is then applied to each sample and the contact resistivity is measured to determine the dominant microscopic conduction path system. We observe glass-free emitter areas at the tops of the pyramidal-textured Si that lead to the formation of direct contacts between the Ag crystallites grown into the Si emitter and the bulk of the silver finger. We present experimental evidence that the major current flow into the silver finger is through these direct contacts.

  3. Effect of coastal-trapped waves and wind on currents and transport in the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Manuel O.; López, Manuel; Candela, Julio; Castro, Rubén.; Mascarenhas, Affonso; Collins, Curtis A.

    2014-08-01

    Subsurface pressure (SsP) observations from stations inside and outside of the Gulf of California (GC) are used to analyze the relationship between low-frequency currents, temperature, and transport inside the GC and intraseasonal coastal-trapped waves (CTWs), which propagate poleward along the coast toward the GC. Correlation functions and coherences of SsP stations were consistent with intraseasonal CTWs splitting in two at the mouth of the gulf: one part enters the gulf, propagates around the gulf, and eventually, toward the mouth, and another part that appears to "jump" the mouth of the gulf and travels poleward along the west coast of the peninsula. The correlation and coherence estimates of SsP at Manzanillo with currents showed that downwelling CTWs generated along-gulf current anomalies toward the head of the gulf at the mainland shelf of the mouth, whereas at Ballenas Channel sill (San Lorenzo sill) these waves generated current anomalies toward the mouth near the surface (bottom). At the San Lorenzo (SL) sill, downwelling CTWs increased the near-bottom (˜400 m) temperature and reduced the bottom transport of deep, fresher, and colder water that flows toward the head of the gulf. Cross-Calibrated Multiplatform winds were used to investigate their relationship with currents. The first empirical orthogonal function of the along-gulf wind stress showed that wind blowing toward the head of the gulf generated a reduction of bottom transport toward the head of the gulf through the SL sill, and intensified surface geostrophic current fluctuations toward the head of the gulf. There was also significant correlation between inflow bottom transport and outflow surface geostrophic velocities averaged across the gulf, consistent with the exchange pattern for the Northern Gulf.

  4. Observed sub-inertial current variability and volume transport over the continental shelf in the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wendong; Guo, Pu; Liu, Changjian; Fang, Guohong; Li, Shujiang

    2015-05-01

    Sub-inertial currents (SICs) over the continental shelf of the northern South China Sea (NSCS) are investigated using the in-situ current observations of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) mooring arrays off the Pearl River Estuary in 2006 and 2007. The survey was carried out in four separate time periods: summer, winter, spring (before the onset of the southwesterly monsoon), and fall (after the establishment of the northeasterly monsoon). The observations showed that the current directions were generally along the shelf, consistent with the directions of monsoonal winds. The currents were also affected by a few of mesoscale eddy events. In summer 2006, the volume transport was northeastward with a mean magnitude of 1.4 Sv through a cross-shelf section from the site of the depth of 135 m to the coast; in winter 2006/2007, spring 2007 and fall 2007, the volume transports were all southwestward with magnitudes of 2.0, 2.1, and 0.9 Sv, respectively, through a cross-shelf section from the site of the depth of 290 m to the coast. The standard deviations of the SICs were generally smaller than the velocities of the mean currents, and the variability of SICs showed significant correlation with the local sea surface winds. No persistent counter-wind currents were observed in the study area during the fall and winter observational periods.

  5. Airborne biological hazards and urban transport infrastructure: current challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Zaheer Ahmad; Campos, Luiza Cintra; Christie, Nicola; Colbeck, Ian

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to airborne biological hazards in an ever expanding urban transport infrastructure and highly diverse mobile population is of growing concern, in terms of both public health and biosecurity. The existing policies and practices on design, construction and operation of these infrastructures may have severe implications for airborne disease transmission, particularly, in the event of a pandemic or intentional release of biological of agents. This paper reviews existing knowledge on airborne disease transmission in different modes of transport, highlights the factors enhancing the vulnerability of transport infrastructures to airborne disease transmission, discusses the potential protection measures and identifies the research gaps in order to build a bioresilient transport infrastructure. The unification of security and public health research, inclusion of public health security concepts at the design and planning phase, and a holistic system approach involving all the stakeholders over the life cycle of transport infrastructure hold the key to mitigate the challenges posed by biological hazards in the twenty-first century transport infrastructure. PMID:27318484

  6. The serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT) variant and psychiatric disorders: review of current literature.

    PubMed

    Kuzelova, Hana; Ptacek, Radek; Macek, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Both serotonin and the serotonin transporter, which transports the neurotransmitter serotonin from synaptic spaces into presynaptic neurons, play an important role in the pathophysiology of several psychiatric disorders. Mutations associated with the serotonin transporter gene may result in changes in serotonin transporter function. The serotonin transporter gene promoter variant, consisting of a long (L) and a short (S) variant, is one of the major factors which contribute to the etiology of many psychiatric disorders. In this regard, many studies have been published on association of this variant with various psychiatric disorders. This repeat length variant in the promoter region of this gene has been shown to affect the rate of serotonin uptake and may play a role in post-traumatic stress disorder and depression-susceptibility in people experiencing emotional trauma. Associations between a functional variant in the serotonin transporter anxiety-related personality traits were found, as well as the risk of developing depression, alcoholism or suicidal behavior. Understanding of possible associations of these variants and psychiatric disorders would bring progress in principles and treatment of many disorders. PMID:20150867

  7. Current transport mechanisms in lattice-matched Pt/Au-InAlN/GaN Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jian; Yan, Dawei Yang, Guofeng; Wang, Fuxue; Xiao, Shaoqing; Gu, Xiaofeng

    2015-04-21

    Lattice-matched Pt/Au-In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N/GaN hetreojunction Schottky diodes with circular planar structure have been fabricated and investigated by temperature dependent electrical measurements. The forward and reverse current transport mechanisms are analyzed by fitting the experimental current-voltage characteristics of the devices with various models. The results show that (1) the forward-low-bias current is mainly due to the multiple trap-assisted tunneling, while the forward-high-bias current is governed by the thermionic emission mechanism with a significant series resistance effect; (2) the reverse leakage current under low electric fields (<6 MV/cm) is mainly carried by the Frenkel-Poole emission electrons, while at higher fields the Fowler-Nordheim tunneling mechanism dominates due to the formation of a triangular barrier.

  8. In situ observation of contour currents in the northern South China Sea: Applications for deepwater sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yulong; Liu, Zhifei; Zhang, Yanwei; Li, Jianru; Wang, Meng; Wang, Wenguang; Xu, Jingping

    2015-11-01

    Deepwater currents and related suspended sediment concentration were obtained by an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) mooring system in the northern South China Sea from September 2011 to May 2013 to characterize the occurrence of contour currents and to evaluate their sediment transport capacity. Magnitude of the current velocity generally varied in the range of 0-2 cm/s, with a dominant flow direction of ∼250° (southwestward). The observed contour current, defined as the along-slope component of the deepwater currents, has a tunnel-like vertical structure with the largest velocity occurring in the middle of the "tunnel" and decreasing outwards. Both the magnitude and the depth range of the maximum velocity display evident inter-seasonal variations, with the strongest velocity in summer and the weakest in spring, while the thickness of the contour currents was the highest in winter and the lowest in spring. We also found that passing-through of the deep-reaching mesoscale eddies significantly affected the magnitude and direction of the contour currents. The suspended sediment concentration (SSC) estimated from echo intensities of the ADCP is the highest at the near-bottom (>400 μg/L) and decreases upwards to <10 μg/L at water depth shallower than 1750 m. High SSC is mostly observed during periods of low magnitude of the contour currents, suggesting resuspension of sediment from the seafloor is not the major controlling factor of these high-SSC events. Our observation also suggests that the major role that contour currents play is to transport sediment from the sources through keeping sediment suspended above the lower continental slope of the South China Sea.

  9. Research of transportation efficiency of low-energy high- current electron beam in plasma channel in external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagin, E. S.; Grigoriev, V. P.

    2015-11-01

    Effective high current (5-20 kA) and low energy (tens of keV) electrons beam transportation is possible only with almost complete charging neutralization. It is also necessary to use quite high current neutralization for elimination beam self-pinching effect. The research is based on the self-consistent mathematical model that takes into account beam and plasma particles dynamic, current and charge neutralization of electron beam and examines the transportation of electron beam into a chamber with low-pressure plasma in magnetic field. A numerical study was conducted using particle in cell (PIC) method. The study was performed with various system parameters: rise time and magnitude of the beam current, gas pressure and plasma density and geometry of the system. Regularities of local virtual cathode field generated by the beam in the plasma channel, as well as ranges of parameters that let transportation beam with minimal losses, depending on the external magnetic field were determined through a series of numerical studies. In addition, the assessment of the impact of the plasma ion mobility during the transition period and during steady beam was performed.

  10. Transport studies in polymer electrolyte fuel cell with porous metallic flow field at ultra high current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srouji, Abdul-Kader

    Achieving cost reduction for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) requires a simultaneous effort in increasing power density while reducing precious metal loading. In PEFCs, the cathode performance is often limiting due to both the slow oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and mass transport limitation caused by limited oxygen diffusion and liquid water flooding at high current density. This study is motivated by the achievement of ultra-high current density through the elimination of the channel/land (C/L) paradigm in PEFC flow field design. An open metallic element (OME) flow field capable of operating at unprecedented ultra-high current density (3 A/cm2) introduces new advantages and limitations for PEFC operation. The first part of this study compares the OME with a conventional C/L flow field, through performance and electrochemical diagnostic tools such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results indicate the uniqueness of the OME's mass transport improvement. No sign of operation limitation due to flooding is noted. The second part specifically examines water management at high current density using the OME flow field. A unique experimental setup is developed to measure steady-state and transient net water drag across the membrane, in order to characterize the fundamental aspects of water transport at high current density with the OME. Instead of flooding, the new limitation is identified to be anode side dry-out of the membrane, caused by electroosmotic drag. The OME improves water removal from the cathode, which immediately improves oxygen transport and performance. However, the low water content in the cathode reduces back diffusion of water to the membrane, and electroosmotic drag dominates at high current density, leading to dry-out. The third part employs the OME flow field as a tool that avoids C/L effects endemic to a typical flow field, in order to study oxygen transport resistance at the catalyst layer of a PEFC. In open literature, a

  11. Sensitivity of transport and stability to the current profile in steady-state scenario plasmas in DIII-Da)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, F.; Holcomb, C. T.; Ferron, J. R.; Luce, T. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Park, J. M.; White, A. E.; Brennan, D. P.; Turnbull, A. D.; Hanson, J. M.; Okabayashi, M.; In, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have provided the first systematic data on the impact of the current profile on the transport and stability properties of high-performance, steady-state scenario plasmas. In a future tokamak, to achieve 100% noninductive conditions and produce net power, the current profile J must be sustained by a large fraction of bootstrap current JBS, which is nonlinearly coupled with the kinetic profiles. Systematic scans of qmin and q95 were performed to determine empirically the best alignment of the noninductive currents with J and the variation of the transport properties with q. Transport analysis indicates that χe and χi are sensitive to the details of J in a way that makes the pressure profile peaking and JBS scale nonlinearly with both q and β in the experiment. Drift wave stability analysis yields linear growth rates that do not reproduce experimental trends in χ with qmin and q95. At high beta, necessary to maximize fBS, the plasma duration is often limited by n =1 tearing modes, whose stability also depends on the J profile. Broadly deposited electron cyclotron (EC) current at mid-radius was found to supply part of the required noninductive current and to positively affect the tearing stability. The modes appear when JEC is turned off for stable cases and always appear when the EC deposition is shifted outwards. The variation in the EC scan results is consistent with PEST3 calculations, showing that the tearing stability becomes extremely sensitive to small perturbations of the equilibrium in wall-stabilized plasmas run close to the ideal MHD limit. These modeling results are being used to design new experiments with higher ideal and tearing limits. A new capability for off-axis neutral beam injection system will be used to explore higher qmin scenarios and different current alignments.

  12. Dynamic Resistance of YBCO-Coated Conductors in Applied AC Fields with DC Transport Currents and DC Background Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C; Zhang, Yifei; Ha, Tam T; Gouge, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    In order to predict heat loads in future saturable core fault-current-limiting devices due to ac fringing fields, dynamic resistance in YBCO-coated conductors was measured at 77 K in peak ac fields up to 25 mT at 60 Hz and in dc fields up to 1 T. With the sample orientation set such that the conductor face was either parallel or perpendicular to the ac and dc applied fields, the dynamic resistance was measured at different fractions of the critical current to determine the relationship between the dc transport current and the applied fields. With respect to field orientation, the dynamic resistance for ac fields that were perpendicular to the conductor face was significantly higher than when the ac fields were parallel to the conductor face. It was also observed that the dynamic resistance: (1) increased with increasing fraction of the dc transport current to the critical current, (2) was proportional to the inverse of the critical current, and (3) demonstrated a linear dependence with the applied ac field once a threshold field was exceeded. This functional behavior was consistent with a critical state model for the dynamic resistance, but discrepancies in absolute value of the dynamic resistance suggested that further theoretical development is needed.

  13. The structure and stability of transport and mixing barriers in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C.; Blundell, J. R.; Hughes, C. W.; Mazloff, M.; Shuckburgh, E.; Thompson, A. F.

    2012-04-01

    As well as transporting water large distances between ocean basins, the ACC also regulates transport and mixing across its flow. Understanding the spatial and temporal variations in transport behaviour is highly relevant for modelling and predicting the global Meridional Overturning Circulation, the spread of heat content anomalies to or from Antarctica and the transport of dissolved carbon dioxide by the ocean. Both the multiple jet structure of the ACC and its intermittent mixing inhibition are locally describable by a zonally-uniform model of potential vorticity dynamics, called the Potential Vorticity Staircase, used to explain temporally-intermittent mixing across the atmospheric ozone hole boundary and the persistence of jets on Jupiter. In a previous study, we found support for the zonally-inhomogeneous Southern Ocean analogue of the PV Staircase, and that the PV structure changes downstream of major features of seafloor topography. Here, we test the details of the PV Staircase model in the Southern Ocean using over 600 years of eddy-resolving experiments with the Q-GCM, OFES and SOSE models. We develop tools based on kernel density estimation to identify the staircase structure in the isopycnic potential vorticity. Under present-day and increased eastward wind stress experiments, we determine the relationship of the structure and its stability to mesoscale eddy intensity, measures of transport and mixing, mean flow and seafloor topography. From the multi-decadal ensemble of wind stress trend experiments we find evidence of 'eddy saturation': minimal response in the zonal transport with respect to increasing wind stress. There is a relationship between the strength of the wind stress and of the eddies, and hence substantial changes to the multiple jet structure, as expected from the PV Staircase. However, this relationship is complicated by regional variations in seafloor topography and by internal variability.

  14. Impact of charge transport on current-voltage characteristics and power-conversion efficiency of organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Würfel, Uli; Neher, Dieter; Spies, Annika; Albrecht, Steve

    2015-04-01

    This work elucidates the impact of charge transport on the photovoltaic properties of organic solar cells. Here we show that the analysis of current-voltage curves of organic solar cells under illumination with the Shockley equation results in values for ideality factor, photocurrent and parallel resistance, which lack physical meaning. Drift-diffusion simulations for a wide range of charge-carrier mobilities and illumination intensities reveal significant carrier accumulation caused by poor transport properties, which is not included in the Shockley equation. As a consequence, the separation of the quasi Fermi levels in the organic photoactive layer (internal voltage) differs substantially from the external voltage for almost all conditions. We present a new analytical model, which considers carrier transport explicitly. The model shows excellent agreement with full drift-diffusion simulations over a wide range of mobilities and illumination intensities, making it suitable for realistic efficiency predictions for organic solar cells.

  15. Cross-shelf transport of pink shrimp larvae: Interactions of tidal currents, larval vertical migrations and internal tides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Criales, Maria M.; Browder, Joan A.; Mooers, C.N.K.; Robblee, M.B.; Cardenas, H.; Jackson, Thomas L.

    2007-01-01

    Transport and behavior of pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus duorarum larvae were investigated on the southwestern Florida (SWF) shelf of the Gulf of Mexico between the Dry Tortugas spawning grounds and Florida Bay nursery grounds. Stratified plankton samples and hydrographic data were collected at 2 h intervals at 3 stations located on a cross-shelf transect. At the Marquesas station, midway between Dry Tortugas and Florida Bay, internal tides were recognized by anomalously cool water, a shallow thermocline with strong density gradients, strong current shear, and a high concentration of pink shrimp larvae at the shallow thermocline. Low Richardson numbers occurred at the pycnocline depth, indicating vertical shear instability and possible turbulent transport from the lower to the upper layer where myses and postlarvae were concentrated. Analysis of vertically stratified plankton suggested that larvae perform vertical migrations and the specific behavior changes ontogenetically; protozoeae were found deeper than myses, and myses deeper than postlarvae. Relative concentrations of protozoea in the upper, middle and bottom layers were consistent with a diel vertical migration, whereas that of postlarvae and myses were consistent with the semidiurnal tides in phase with the flood tide. Postlarvae, the shallowest dwellers that migrate with a semidiurnal periodicity, experienced the largest net onshore flux and larval concentrations were highly correlated with the cross-shelf current. These results provide the first evidence of an onshore tidal transport (a type of selective tidal stream transport, STST), in decapod larvae migrating in continental shelf waters offshore, ca. 100 km from the coast and at a depth of 20 m, while approaching the coastal nursery grounds. Longer time series would be necessary to establish whether internal tides play any role in the larval onshore transport of this species and determine if the STST is the dominant onshore transport mechanism.

  16. Transport of time-varying plasma currents by whistler wave packets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.; Rousculp, C.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between pulsed currents and electromagnetic waves is examined in a regime characterized by electron MHD. Pulsed currents are generated by (1) collection/emission of charged particles by/from biased electrodes and (2) induction of currents by time-varying and moving magnetic fields. Pulsed currents are observed to propagate at the speed of whistler wave packets. Their field structure forms ropelike configurations which are electromagnetically force-free. Moving sources induce 'eddy' currents which excite waves and form Cerenkov-like whistler 'wings'. The radiation patterns of moving magnetic antennas and electrodynamic tethers are investigated. Nonlinear effects of large-amplitude, antenna-launched whistler pulses are observed. These involve a new modulational instability in which a channel of high conductivity which permits the wave/currents to penetrate deeply into a collisional plasma is formed.

  17. Liquid freshwater transport and Polar Surface Water characteristics in the East Greenland Current during the AO-02 Oden expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Johan; Björk, Göran; Rudels, Bert; Winsor, Peter; Torres, Daniel

    2008-07-01

    Dynamical features of the East Greenland Current (EGC) are synthesized from a survey conducted by the Swedish icebreaker Oden during the International Arctic Ocean - 02 expedition (AO-02) in May 2002 with emphasis on the liquid freshwater transport and Polar Surface Water. The data include hydrography and lowered acoustic doppler current profiler (LADCP) velocities in eight transects along the EGC, from the Fram Strait in the north to the Denmark Strait in the south. The survey reveals a strong confinement of the low-salinity polar water in the EGC to the continental slope/shelf-a feature of relevance for the stability of the thermohaline circulation in the Arctic Mediterranean. The southward transport of liquid freshwater in the EGC was found to vary considerably between the sections, ranging between 0.01 and 0.1 Sverdrup. Computations based on geostrophic as well as LADCP velocities give a section-averaged southward freshwater transport of 0.06 Sverdrup in the EGC during May 2002. Furthermore, Oden data suggest that the liquid freshwater transport was as large north of the Fram Strait as it was south of the Denmark Strait.

  18. TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CURRENT CIRCULATION AND CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main objectives of this paper are to briefly describe and evaluate three different applications of two-dimensional, depth-averaged, finite-element models for hydrodynamics (RMA2) and transport (RMA4) ([1] and [2], respectively), which were run using the FastTABS user interfac...

  19. Long-term observations of North Atlantic Current transport at the gateway between western and eastern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessler, Achim; Rhein, Monika; Kieke, Dagmar; Mertens, Christian

    2015-06-01

    In the western North Atlantic, warm and saline water is brought by the North Atlantic Current (NAC) from the subtropics into the subpolar gyre. Four inverted echo sounders with high precision pressure sensors (PIES) were moored between 47°40'N and 52°30'N to study the main pathways of the NAC from the western into the eastern basin. The array configuration that forms three segments (northern, central, and southern) allows partitioning of the NAC and some assessment of NAC flow paths through the different Mid-Atlantic Ridge fracture zones. We exploit the correlation between the NAC transport measured between 2006 and 2010 and the geostrophic velocity from altimeter data to extend the time series of NAC transports to the period from 1992 to 2013. The mean NAC transport over the entire 21 years is 27 ± 5 Sv, consisting of 60% warm water of subtropical origin and 40% subpolar water. We did not find a significant trend in the total transport time series, but individual segments had opposing trends, leading to a more focused NAC in the central subsection and decreasing transports in the southern and northern segments. The spectral analysis exhibits several significant peaks. The two most prominent are around 120 days, identified as the time scale of meanders and eddies, and at 4-9 years, most likely related to the NAO. Transport composites for the years of highest and lowest NAO indices showed a significantly higher transport (+2.9 Sv) during strong NAO years, mainly in the southern segment.

  20. Measurements of the momentum and current transport from tearing instability in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Kuritsyn, A.; Fiksel, G.; Almagri, A. F.; Miller, M. C.; Mirnov, V. V.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.

    2009-05-15

    In this paper measurements of momentum and current transport caused by current driven tearing instability are reported. The measurements are done in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch [R. N. Dexter, D. W. Kerst, T. W. Lovell, S. C. Prager, and J. C. Sprott, Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] in a regime with repetitive bursts of tearing instability causing magnetic field reconnection. It is established that the plasma parallel momentum profile flattens during these reconnection events: The flow decreases in the core and increases at the edge. The momentum relaxation phenomenon is similar in nature to the well established relaxation of the parallel electrical current and could be a general feature of self-organized systems. The measured fluctuation-induced Maxwell and Reynolds stresses, which govern the dynamics of plasma flow, are large and almost balance each other such that their difference is approximately equal to the rate of change of plasma momentum. The Hall dynamo, which is directly related to the Maxwell stress, drives the parallel current profile relaxation at resonant surfaces at the reconnection events. These results qualitatively agree with analytical calculations and numerical simulations. It is plausible that current-driven instabilities can be responsible for momentum transport in other laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  1. Measurements of the momentum and current transport from tearing instability in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pincha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuritsyn, A.; Fiksel, G.; Almagri, A. F.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Miller, M. C.; Mirnov, V. V.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.

    2009-05-01

    In this paper measurements of momentum and current transport caused by current driven tearing instability are reported. The measurements are done in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch [R. N. Dexter, D. W. Kerst, T. W. Lovell, S. C. Prager, and J. C. Sprott, Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] in a regime with repetitive bursts of tearing instability causing magnetic field reconnection. It is established that the plasma parallel momentum profile flattens during these reconnection events: The flow decreases in the core and increases at the edge. The momentum relaxation phenomenon is similar in nature to the well established relaxation of the parallel electrical current and could be a general feature of self-organized systems. The measured fluctuation-induced Maxwell and Reynolds stresses, which govern the dynamics of plasma flow, are large and almost balance each other such that their difference is approximately equal to the rate of change of plasma momentum. The Hall dynamo, which is directly related to the Maxwell stress, drives the parallel current profile relaxation at resonant surfaces at the reconnection events. These results qualitatively agree with analytical calculations and numerical simulations. It is plausible that current-driven instabilities can be responsible for momentum transport in other laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  2. Calorimetric AC loss measurement of MgB2 superconducting tape in an alternating transport current and direct magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, K. W.; Xu, X.; Horvat, J.; Cook, C. D.; Dou, S. X.

    2012-11-01

    Applications of MgB2 superconductors in electrical engineering have been widely reported, and various studies have been made to define their alternating current (AC) losses. However, studies on the transport losses with an applied transverse DC magnetic field have not been conducted, even though this is one of the favored conditions in applications of practical MgB2 tapes. Methods and techniques used to characterize and measure these losses have so far been grouped into ‘electrical’ and ‘calorimetric’ approaches with external conditions set to resemble the application conditions. In this paper, we present a new approach to mounting the sample and employ the calorimetric method to accurately determine the losses in the concurrent application of AC transport current and DC magnetic fields that are likely to be experienced in practical devices such as generators and motors. This technique provides great simplification compared to the pickup coil and lock-in amplifier methods and is applied to a long length (˜10 cm) superconducting tape. The AC loss data at 20 and 30 K will be presented in an applied transport current of 50 Hz under external DC magnetic fields. The results are found to be higher than the theoretical predictions because of the metallic fraction of the tape that contributes quite significantly to the total losses. The data, however, will allow minimization of losses in practical MgB2 coils and will be used in the verification of numerical coil models.

  3. Transport of North Pacific 137Cs labeled waters to the south-eastern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Cabeza, J. A.; Levy, I.; Gastaud, J.; Eriksson, M.; Osvath, I.; Aoyama, M.; Povinec, P. P.; Komura, K.

    2011-04-01

    During the reoccupation of the WOCE transect A10 at 30°S by the BEAGLE2003 cruise, the SHOTS project partners collected a large number of samples for the analysis of isotopic tracers. 137Cs was mostly deposited on the oceans surface during the late 1950s and early 1960s, after the atmospheric detonation of large nuclear devices, which mostly occurred in the Northern Hemisphere. The development of advanced radioanalytical and counting techniques allowed to obtain, for the first time in this region, a zonal section of 137Cs water concentrations, where little information existed before, thus constituting an important benchmark for further studies. 137Cs concentrations in the upper waters (0-1000 m) of the south-eastern Atlantic Ocean are similar to those observed in the south-western Indian Ocean, suggesting transport of 137Cs labeled waters by the Agulhas current to the Benguela Current region. In contrast, bomb radiocarbon data do not show this feature, indicating the usefulness of 137Cs as a radiotracer of water mass transport from the Indian to the South Atlantic Ocean.

  4. Device for plasma confinement and heating by high currents and nonclassical plasma transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Coppi, B.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1973-12-11

    A toroidal plasma containment device having means for inducing high total plasma currents and current densities and at the same time emhanced plasma heating, strong magnetic confinement, high energy density containment, magnetic modulation, microwaveinduced heating, and diagnostic accessibility is described. (Official Gazette)

  5. Strontium isotope investigation of ungulate movement patterns on the Pleistocene Paleo-Agulhas Plain of the Greater Cape Floristic Region, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, Sandi R.; Cawthra, Hayley C.; Fisher, Erich C.; Lee-Thorp, Julia A.; Cowling, Richard M.; le Roux, Petrus J.; Hodgkins, Jamie; Marean, Curtis W.

    2016-06-01

    Middle Stone Age sites located within the Greater Cape Floristic Region on the South African southern coast have material culture with early evidence for key modern human behaviors such as projectile weaponry, large animal hunting, and symbolic behavior. In order to interpret how and why these changes evolved, it is necessary to understand their ecological context as it has direct relevance to foraging behavior. During periods of lowered sea level, a largely flat and vast expanse of land existed south of the modern coastline, but it is now submerged by higher sea levels. This exposed area, the Paleo-Agulhas Plain, likely created an ecological context unlike anything in the region today, as evidenced by fossil assemblages dominated by migratory ungulates. One hypothesis is that the Paleo-Agulhas Plain supported a migration ecosystem of large grazers driven by summer rainfall, producing palatable forage during summer in the east, and winter rainfall, producing palatable forage during winter in the west. Alternatively, ungulates may have been moving from the coastal plain in the south to the interior north of the Cape Fold Mountains, as observed for elephants in historic times. In this study, we assess ungulate movement patterns with inter- and intra-tooth enamel samples for strontium isotopes in fossil fauna from Pinnacle Point sites PP13B and PP30. To accomplish our goals we created a bioavailable 87Sr/86Sr isoscape for the region by collecting plants at 171 sampling sites and developing a geospatial model. The strontium isotope results indicate that ungulates spent most of their time on the Paleo-Agulhas Plain and avoided dissected plain, foothill, and mountain habitats located more than about 15 km north of the modern coastline. The results clearly exclude a north-south (coastal-interior) movement or migration pattern, and cannot falsify the east-west movements hypothesized in the south coast migration ecosystem hypothesis.

  6. Strontium isotope investigation of ungulate movement patterns on the Pleistocene Paleo-Agulhas Plain of the Greater Cape Floristic Region, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, Sandi R.; Cawthra, Hayley C.; Fisher, Erich C.; Lee-Thorp, Julia A.; Cowling, Richard M.; le Roux, Petrus J.; Hodgkins, Jamie; Marean, Curtis W.

    2016-06-01

    Middle Stone Age sites located within the Greater Cape Floristic Region on the South African southern coast have material culture with early evidence for key modern human behaviors such as projectile weaponry, large animal hunting, and symbolic behavior. In order to interpret how and why these changes evolved, it is necessary to understand their ecological context as it has direct relevance to foraging behavior. During periods of lowered sea level, a largely flat and vast expanse of land existed south of the modern coastline, but it is now submerged by higher sea levels. This exposed area, the Paleo-Agulhas Plain, likely created an ecological context unlike anything in the region today, as evidenced by fossil assemblages dominated by migratory ungulates. One hypothesis is that the Paleo-Agulhas Plain supported a migration ecosystem of large grazers driven by summer rainfall, producing palatable forage during summer in the east, and winter rainfall, producing palatable forage during winter in the west. Alternatively, ungulates may have been moving from the coastal plain in the south to the interior north of the Cape Fold Mountains, as observed for elephants in historic times. In this study, we assess ungulate movement patterns with inter- and intra-tooth enamel samples for strontium isotopes in fossil fauna from Pinnacle Point sites PP13B and PP30. To accomplish our goals we created a bioavailable 87Sr/86Sr isoscape for the region by collecting plants at 171 sampling sites and developing a geospatial model. The strontium isotope results indicate that ungulates spent most of their time on the Paleo-Agulhas Plain and avoided dissected plain, foothill, and mountain habitats located more than about 15 km north of the modern coastline. The results clearly exclude a north-south (coastal-interior) movement or migration pattern, and cannot falsify the east-west movements hypothesized in the south coast migration ecosystem hypothesis.

  7. Equatorial transport of Saturn's ionosphere as driven by a dust-ring current system

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, W.; Mendis, D.A.

    1983-03-01

    The diurnal modulation of the dust ring current of Saturn's D-ring causes field-aligned Birkeland currents ot flow near the dawn and dusk terminators and close across the mid-latitude ionosphere. One consequence of this current system is the establishment of a global convection pattern in the equatorial outer ionosphere. Outward motion of the dayside ionosheric plasma as well as the corresponding absorption effect of the inner ring system might be one physical cause of the depletion of the ionospheric content of Saturn.

  8. On the equatorial transport of Saturn's ionosphere as driven by a dust-ring current system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ip, W.-H.; Mendis, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The diurnal modulation of the dust ring current of Saturn's D-ring causes field-aligned Birkeland currents to flow near the dawn and dusk terminators and close across the midlatitude ionosphere. One consequence of this current system is the establishment of a global convection pattern in the equatorial outer ionosphere. Outward motion of the dayside ionospheric plasma as well as the corresponding absorption effect of the inner ring system might be one physical cause of the depletion of the ionospheric content of Saturn.

  9. On the equatorial transport of Saturn's ionosphere as driven by a dust-ring current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, W.-H.; Mendis, D. A.

    1983-03-01

    The diurnal modulation of the dust ring current of Saturn's D-ring causes field-aligned Birkeland currents to flow near the dawn and dusk terminators and close across the mid-latitude ionosphere. One consequence of this current system is the establishment of a global convection pattern in the equatorial outer ionosphere. Outward motion of the dayside ionospheric plasma as well as the corresponding absorption effect of the inner ring system might be one physical cause of the depletion of the ionospheric content of Saturn.

  10. Cold smoke: smoke-induced density currents cause unexpected smoke transport near large wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lareau, N. P.; Clements, C. B.

    2015-07-01

    First observations of smoke-induced density currents originating from large wildfires are presented. Using a novel mobile Doppler LiDAR and additional in situ measurements we document a deep (~ 2 km) smoke-filled density current that propagates more than 25 km at speeds up to 4.5 m s-1 near a large forest fire in northern California. Based on these observations we show that the dynamics governing the spread of the smoke layer result from differential solar heating between the smoke-filled and smoke-free portions of the atmospheric boundary layer. A calculation of the theoretical density current speed agrees well with the observed propagation speed. Additional LiDAR and photographic documentation of other smoke-filled density currents demonstrate that these previously unknown phenomena are relatively common near large wildfires and can cause severe and unexpected smoke inundation of populated areas.

  11. Cold Smoke: smoke-induced density currents cause unexpected smoke transport near large wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lareau, N. P.; Clements, C. B.

    2015-10-01

    The first observations of smoke-induced density currents originating from large wildfires are presented. Using a novel mobile Doppler lidar and additional in situ measurements, we document a deep (~ 2 km) smoke-filled density current that propagates more than 25 km at speeds up to 4.5 m s-1 near a large forest fire in northern California. Based on these observations we show that the dynamics governing the spread of the smoke layer result from differential solar heating between the smoke-filled and smoke-free portions of the atmospheric boundary layer. A calculation of the theoretical density current speed agrees well with the observed propagation speed. Additional lidar and photographic documentation of other smoke-filled density currents demonstrate that these previously unknown phenomena are relatively common near large wildfires and can cause severe and unexpected smoke inundation of populated areas.

  12. Lower hybrid current drive in experiments for transport barriers at high {beta}{sub N} of JET (Joint European Torus)

    SciTech Connect

    Cesario, R. C.; Castaldo, C.; De Angelis, R.; Smeulders, P.; Calabro, G.; Pericoli, V.; Ravera, G.

    2007-09-28

    LHCD has been used in JET experiments aimed at producing internal transport barriers (ITBs) in highly triangular plasmas ({delta}{approx_equal}0.4) at high {beta}{sub N} (up to 3) for steady-state application. The LHCD is a potentially valuable tool for (i) modifying the target q-profile, which can help avoid deleterious MHD modes and favour the formation of ITBs, and (ii) contributing to the non-inductive current drive required to prolong such plasma regimes. The q-profile evolution has been simulated during the current ramp-up phase for such a discharge (B{sub 0} = 2.3 T, I{sub P} = 1.5 MA) where 2 MW of LHCD has been coupled. The JETTO code was used taking measured plasma profiles, and the LHCD profile modeled by the LHstar code. The results are in agreement with MSE measurements and indicate the importance of the elevated electron temperature due to LHCD, as well as the driven current. During main heating with 18 MW of NBI and 3 MW of ICRH the bootstrap current density at the edge also becomes large, consistently with the observed reduction of the local turbulence and of the MHD activity. JETTO modelling suggests that the bootstrap current can reduce the magnetic shear (sh) at large radius, potentially affecting the MHD stability and turbulence behaviour in this region. Keywords: lower hybrid current drive (LHCD), bootstrap current, q (safety factor) and shear (sh) profile evolutions.

  13. Dominant role of eddies and filaments in the offshore transport of carbon and nutrients in the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Takeyoshi; Gruber, Nicolas; Frenzel, Hartmut; Lachkar, Zouhair; McWilliams, James C.; Plattner, Gian-Kasper

    2015-08-01

    The coastal upwelling region of the California Current System (CalCS) is a well-known site of high productivity and lateral export of nutrients and organic matter, yet neither the magnitude nor the governing processes of this offshore transport are well quantified. Here we address this gap using a high-resolution (5 km) coupled physical-biogeochemical numerical simulation (ROMS). The results reveal (i) that the offshore transport is a very substantial component of any material budget in this region, (ii) that it reaches more than 800 km into the offshore domain, and (iii) that this transport is largely controlled by mesoscale processes, involving filaments and westward propagating eddies. The process starts in the nearshore areas, where nutrient and organic matter-rich upwelled waters pushed offshore by Ekman transport are subducted at the sharp lateral density gradients of upwelling fronts and filaments located at ˜25-100 km from the coast. The filaments are very effective in transporting the subducted material further offshore until they form eddies at their tips at about 100-200 km from the shore. The cyclonic eddies tend to trap the cold, nutrient, and organic matter-rich waters of the filaments, whereas the anticyclones formed nearby encapsulate the low nutrient and low organic matter waters around the filament. After their detachment, both types of eddies propagate further in offshore direction, with a speed similar to that of the first baroclinic mode Rossby waves, providing the key mechanism for long-range transport of nitrate and organic matter from the coast deep into the offshore environment.

  14. Angular Dependence of Transport AC Losses in Superconducting Wire with Position-Dependent Critical Current Density in a DC Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xing-liang; Xiong, Li-ting; Gao, Yuan-wen; Zhou, You-he

    2013-07-01

    Transport AC losses play a very important role in high temperature superconductors (HTSs), which usually carry AC transport current under applied magnetic field in typical application-like conditions. In this paper, we propose the analytical formula for transport AC losses in HTS wire by considering critical current density of both inhomogeneous and anisotropic field dependent. The angular dependence of critical current density is described by effective mass theory, and the HTS wire has inhomogeneous distribution cross-section of critical current density. We calculate the angular dependence of normalized AC losses under different DC applied magnetic fields. The numerical results of this formula agree well with the experiment data and are better than the results of Norris formula. This analytical formula can explain the deviation of experimental transport current losses from the Norris formula and apply to calculate transport AC losses in realistic practical condition.

  15. Current structure of the south Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Michael D.; Heywood, Karen J.; Brown, Juan; Stevens, David P.

    1996-03-01

    Using recently published atlas data [Olbers et al., 1992] and the Fine Resolution Antarctic Model (FRAM) [Webb et al., 1991], an investigation has been conducted into the structure of the frontal jets centered around the region of the islands of Crozet (46°27'S, 52°0'E) and Kerguelen (48°15'S, 69°10'E) in the south Indian Ocean. Geostrophic current velocities and transports were calculated from the temperature and salinity fields available from the atlas and compared with results from FRAM and previous studies. We have identified the Agulhas Return Front (ARF) and the Subtropical Front (STF), as well as the following fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC): the Subantarctic Front (SAF), the Polar Front (PF), and the Southern ACC Front (SACCF), from temperature and salinity characteristics and from geostrophic currents. This analysis of model and atlas data indicates that the jets associated with the ARF, STF, and SAF are topographically steered into a unique frontal system north of the islands, having some of the largest temperature and salinity gradients anywhere in the world ocean. The frontal jet associated with the ARF is detectable up to 75°E and has associated with it several northward branching jets. The PF bifurcates in the region of the Ob'Lena (Conrad) seamount; subsurface and surface expressions are identified, separated by as much as 8° of latitude immediately west of the Kerguelen Plateau. The surface expression, carrying the bulk of the transport (˜65 Sv), is steered through the col in the Kerguelen Plateau at 56°S, 6° south of the latitude normally associated with the PF at this meridian. On crossing the plateau it rejoins the subsurface expression. In the south, passing eastward along the margin of the Antarctic continent and through the Princess Elizabeth Trough, a frontal jet is identified transporting up to 35 Sv, believed to be the SACCF [Orsi et al., 1995], placing the southern extent of the ACC in the region at 67°S.

  16. Transport and bottom boundary layerobservations of the North Atlantic Deep Western Boundary Current at the Blake Outer Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahr, Frederick R.; Sanford, Thomas B.

    1999-01-01

    The North Atlantic Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC) was surveyed at the Blake Outer Ridge over 14 days in July and August 1992 to determine its volume transport and to investigate its bottom boundary layer (BBL). This site was chosen because previous investigations showed the DWBC to be strong and bottom-intensified on the ridge's flanks and to have a thick BBL. The primary instrument used was the Absolute Velocity Profiler, a free-falling velocity and conductivity-temperature-depth device. In two sections across the width of the DWBC, volume transports of 17±1 Sv and 18±1 Sv were measured for all water flowing equatorward below a potential temperature of 6°C (1 Sv=1×10 6 m 3 s -1). Transport values were derived using both absolute velocities and AVP-referenced geostrophic velocities and were the same within experimental uncertainty. Good agreement was found between our results and historical ones when both were similarly bounded and referenced. Although this was a short-term survey, the mean of a 9-day time series of absolute velocity profiles was the same as the means of year-long current-meter records at three depths in the same location. A turbulent planetary BBL was found everywhere under the current. The thickness of the bottom mixed layer (BML), where concentrations of density, nutrients, and suspended sediments were vertically uniform, was asymmetrical across the current and up to 5 times thicker than the BBL. There was no velocity shear above the BBL within the thicker BMLs, and the across-slope density gradient was very small. The extra-thick BML is perhaps maintained by a combination of processes, including turbulence, downwelling Ekman transport, a weak up-slope return flow above the BBL, and buoyant convection from the BBL into the BML. The frictional bottom stress was mostly balanced by a down-stream change in the current's external potential energy evidenced by a drop in the velocity core of the current.

  17. Drain Current Characteristics of Ferroelectric Gate-All-Around Si Nanowire Transistors Based on Drift/Diffusion Transport Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibata, Masakazu; Ohmi, Shun-ichiro; Ishiwara, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    The drain current vs gate voltage (ID-VG) and drain current vs drain voltage (ID-VD) characteristics of ferroelectric gate-all-around Si nanowire transistors are derived using the drift/diffusion transport theory. It is pointed out that the nonsaturated polarization in the ferroelectric film, which occurs near the drain region in the channel owing to the influence of the applied drain voltage, plays an important role in the calculation of the drain current as well as the polarization near the source region, and a graphical method using analytical expressions for the minor polarization hysteresis loops is presented to calculate the mobile charge density in the nanowire. By numerical analysis, the gate voltage range suitable for memory operation is determined in Si nanowire transistors with ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] gate films.

  18. Interannual variations of North Equatorial Current transport in the Pacific Ocean during two types of El Niño

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guoli; Zhai, Fangguo; Hu, Dunxin

    2016-05-01

    Interannual variations of Pacific North Equatorial Current (NEC) transport during eastern-Pacific El Niños (EP-El Niños) and central-Pacific El Niños (CP-El Niños) are investigated by composite analysis with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast Ocean Analysis/Reanalysis System 3. During EP-El Niño, NEC transport shows significant positive anomalies from the developing to decay phases, with the largest anomalies around the mature phase. During CP-El Niño, however, the NEC transport only shows positive anomalies before the mature phase, with much weaker anomalies than those during EP-El Niño. The NEC transport variations are strongly associated with variations of the tropical gyre and wind forcing in the tropical North Pacific. During EP-El Niño, strong westerly wind anomalies and positive wind stress curl anomalies in the tropical North Pacific induce local upward Ekman pumping and westward-propagating upwelling Rossby waves in the ocean, lowering the sea surface height and generating a cyclonic gyre anomaly in the western tropical Pacific. During CP-El Niño, however, strength of the wind and associated Ekman pumping velocity are very weak. Negative sea surface height and cyclonic flow anomalies are slightly north of those during EP El Niño.

  19. Eddy Surface properties and propagation at Southern Hemisphere western boundary current systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, G. S.; Mata, M. M.; Azevedo, J. L. L.

    2015-02-01

    Oceanic eddies occur in all world oceans, but are more energetic when associated to western boundary currents (WBC) systems. In these regions, eddies play an important role on mixing and energy exchange. Therefore, it is important to quantify and qualify eddies occurring within these systems. Previous studies performed eddy censuses in Southern Hemisphere WBC systems. However, important aspects of local eddy population are still unknown. Main questions to be answered relate to eddies' spatial distribution, propagation and lifetime within each system. Here, we use a global eddy dataset to qualify eddies based on their surface characteristics at the Agulhas Current (AC), the Brazil Current (BC) and the East Australian Current (EAC) Systems. We show that eddy propagation within each system is highly forced by the local mean flow and bathymetry. In the AC System, eddy polarity dictates its propagation distance. BC system eddies do not propagate beyond the Argentine Basin, and are advected by the local ocean circulation. EAC System eddies from both polarities cross south of Tasmania, but only anticyclonics reach the Great Australian Bight. Eddies in all systems and from both polarities presented a geographical segregation according to size. Large eddies occur along the Agulhas Retroflection, the Agulhas Return Current, the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence and the Coral Sea. Small eddies occur in the systems southernmost domains. Understanding eddies' propagation helps to establish monitoring programs, and to better understand how these features would affect local mixing.

  20. Transport of the Norwegian Atlantic current as determined from satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pistek, Pavel; Johnson, Donald R.

    1992-01-01

    Relatively warm and salty North Atlantic surface waters flow through the Faeroe-Shetland Channel into the higher latitudes of the Nordic Seas, preserving an ice-free winter environment for much of the exterior coast of northern Europe. This flow was monitored along the Norwegian coast using Geosat altimetry on two ascending arcs during the Exact Repeat Mission in 1987-1989. Concurrent undertrack CTD surveys were used to fix a reference surface for the altimeter-derived SSH anomalies, in effect creating time series of alongtrack surface dynamic height topographies. Climatologic CTD casts were then used, with empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, to derive relationships between historical surface dynamic heights and vertical temperature and salinity profiles. Applying these EOF relationships to the altimeter signals, mean transports of volume, heat, and salt were calculated at approximately 2.9 Sverdrups, 8.1 x 10 exp 11 KCal/s and 1.0 x 10 exp 8 Kg/s, respectively. Maximum transports occurred in February/March and minimum in July/August.

  1. Sensitivity of transport and stability to the current profile in steady-state scenario plasmas in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, F.; Hanson, J. M.; Holcomb, C. T.; Ferron, J. R.; Luce, T. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Turnbull, A. D.; Park, J. M.; White, A. E.; Brennan, D. P.; Okabayashi, M.; In, Y.

    2012-12-15

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have provided the first systematic data on the impact of the current profile on the transport and stability properties of high-performance, steady-state scenario plasmas. In a future tokamak, to achieve 100% noninductive conditions and produce net power, the current profile J must be sustained by a large fraction of bootstrap current J{sub BS}, which is nonlinearly coupled with the kinetic profiles. Systematic scans of q{sub min} and q{sub 95} were performed to determine empirically the best alignment of the noninductive currents with J and the variation of the transport properties with q. Transport analysis indicates that {chi}{sub e} and {chi}{sub i} are sensitive to the details of J in a way that makes the pressure profile peaking and J{sub BS} scale nonlinearly with both q and {beta} in the experiment. Drift wave stability analysis yields linear growth rates that do not reproduce experimental trends in {chi} with q{sub min} and q{sub 95}. At high beta, necessary to maximize f{sub BS}, the plasma duration is often limited by n=1 tearing modes, whose stability also depends on the J profile. Broadly deposited electron cyclotron (EC) current at mid-radius was found to supply part of the required noninductive current and to positively affect the tearing stability. The modes appear when J{sub EC} is turned off for stable cases and always appear when the EC deposition is shifted outwards. The variation in the EC scan results is consistent with PEST3 calculations, showing that the tearing stability becomes extremely sensitive to small perturbations of the equilibrium in wall-stabilized plasmas run close to the ideal MHD limit. These modeling results are being used to design new experiments with higher ideal and tearing limits. A new capability for off-axis neutral beam injection system will be used to explore higher q{sub min} scenarios and different current alignments.

  2. Suspended load and bed-load transport of particle-laden gravity currents: the role of particle-bed interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J.; Bergantz, G. W.

    2007-03-01

    The development of particle-enriched regions (bed-load) at the base of particle-laden gravity currents has been widely observed, yet the controls and relative partitioning of material into the bed-load is poorly understood. We examine particle-laden gravity currents whose initial mixture (particle and fluid) density is greater than the ambient fluid, but whose interstitial fluid density is less than the ambient fluid (such as occurs in pyroclastic flows produced during volcanic eruptions or when sediment-enriched river discharge enters the ocean, generating hyperpycnal turbidity currents). A multifluid numerical approach is employed to assess suspended load and bed-load transport in particle-laden gravity currents under varying boundary conditions. Particle-laden flows that traverse denser fluid (such as pyroclastic flows crossing water) have leaky boundaries that provide the conceptual framework to study suspended load in isolation from bed-load transport. We develop leaky and saltation boundary conditions to study the influence of flow substrate on the development of bed-load. Flows with saltating boundaries develop particle-enriched basal layers (bed-load) where momentum transfer is primarily a result of particle-particle collisions. The grain size distribution is more homogeneous in the bed-load and the saltation boundaries increase the run-out distance and residence time of particles in the flow by as much as 25% over leaky boundary conditions. Transport over a leaky substrate removes particles that reach the bottom boundary and only the suspended load remains. Particle transport to the boundary is proportional to the settling velocity of particles, and flow dilution results in shear and buoyancy instabilities at the upper interface of these flows. These instabilities entrain ambient fluid, and the continued dilution ultimately results in these currents becoming less dense than the ambient fluid. A unifying concept is energy dissipation due to particle

  3. Late-winter conditions and freshwater transport in the East Greenland Current: highlights from an icebreaker based survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, J.; Björk, G.; Lake, I.; Nohr, C.; Rudels, B.; Winsor, P.

    2003-04-01

    General dynamical features of East Greenland Current (EGC) are synthesized from a survey conducted by the icebreaker Oden during the Swedish Arctic Ocean Expedition 2002. The data includes hydrography and ADCP observations in eight transects of the EGC, from the Fram Strait in the north to the Denmark Strait in the south. The survey reveals a strong confinement of the low-saline polar water in the EGC to the continental slope/shelf --- a feature of relevance for the overall stability of the thermohaline circulation in the Arctic Ocean. The southward transport of liquid freshwater in the EGC was found to vary dramatically between transects: from peak values on the order of 0.06 Sverdrup to virtually zero. The dynamical origin of the observed alongstream pulsations in freshwater transport is briefly discussed from a theoretical standpoint, emphasizing the potential for freshwater leakage into the deep-water producing areas in the Greenland Sea.

  4. Temperature Effect on Ionic Current and ssDNA Transport through Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Payet, Linda; Martinho, Marlène; Merstorf, Céline; Pastoriza-Gallego, Manuela; Pelta, Juan; Viasnoff, Virgile; Auvray, Loïc; Muthukumar, Murugappan; Mathé, Jérôme

    2015-10-20

    We have investigated the role of electrostatic interactions in the transport of nucleic acids and ions through nanopores. The passage of DNA through nanopores has so far been conjectured to involve a free-energy barrier for entry, followed by a downhill translocation where the driving voltage accelerates the polymer. We have tested the validity of this conjecture by using two toxins, α-hemolysin and aerolysin, which differ in their shape, size, and charge. The characteristic timescales in each toxin as a function of temperature show that the entry barrier is ∼15 kBT and the translocation barrier is ∼35 kBT, although the electrical force in the latter step is much stronger. Resolution of this fact, using a theoretical model, reveals that the attraction between DNA and the charges inside the barrel of the pore is the most dominant factor in determining the translocation speed and not merely the driving electrochemical potential gradient. PMID:26488651

  5. USXR Based MHD, Transport, Equilibria and Current Profile Diagnostics for NSTX. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finkenthal, Michael

    2009-06-01

    The present report resumes the research activities of the Plasma Spectroscopy/Diagnostics Group at Johns Hopkins University performed on the NSTX tokamak at PPPL during the period 1999-2009. During this period we have designed and implemented XUV based diagnostics for a large number of tasks: study of impurity content and particle transport, MHD activity, time-resolved electron temperature measeurements, ELM research, etc. Both line emission and continuum were used in the XUV range. New technics and novel methods have been devised within the framework of the present research. Graduate and post-graduate students have been involved at all times in addition to the senior research personnel. Several tens of papers have been published and lectures have been given based on the obtained results at conferences and various research institutions (lists of these activities were attached both in each proposal and in the annual reports submitted to our supervisors at OFES).

  6. Current Status of the Development of a Transportable and Compact VLBI System by NICT and GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, Atsutoshi; Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Ujihara, Hideki; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Tetsuro; Kurihara, Shinobu; Miura, Yuji; Matsuzaka, Shigeru; Tanimoto, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    MARBLE (Multiple Antenna Radio-interferometer for Baseline Length Evaluation) is under development by NICT and GSI. The main part of MARBLE is a transportable VLBI system with a compact antenna. The aim of this system is to provide precise baseline length over about 10 km for calibrating baselines. The calibration baselines are used to check and validate surveying instruments such as GPS receiver and EDM (Electro-optical Distance Meter). It is necessary to examine the calibration baselines regularly to keep the quality of the validation. The VLBI technique can examine and evaluate the calibration baselines. On the other hand, the following roles are expected of a compact VLBI antenna in the VLBI2010 project. In order to achieve the challenging measurement precision of VLBI2010, it is well known that it is necessary to deal with the problem of thermal and gravitational deformation of the antenna. One promising approach may be connected-element interferometry between a compact antenna and a VLBI2010 antenna. By measuring repeatedly the baseline between the small stable antenna and the VLBI2010 antenna, the deformation of the primary antenna can be measured and the thermal and gravitational models of the primary antenna will be able to be constructed. We made two prototypes of a transportable and compact VLBI system from 2007 to 2009. We performed VLBI experiments using theses prototypes and got a baseline length between the two prototypes. The formal error of the measured baseline length was 2.7 mm. We expect that the baseline length error will be reduced by using a high-speed A/D sampler.

  7. Current knowledge on the transport and fate of spermatozoa in the reproductive tract of the bitch.

    PubMed

    Rijsselaere, T; England, Gcw; Freeman, Sl; Maes, D; Van Soom, A

    2014-06-01

    Canine sperm transport, distribution, storage and detachment is a complex, dynamic and highly regulated process. Transport of sperm within the bitch's reproductive tract is rapid and is influenced by the method of semen deposition (natural mating or artificial insemination) and by the timing of breeding in relation to the day of ovulation. The fertile lifespan of spermatozoa in the reproductive tract of the bitch is considerably longer than in most other domestic species, and the main sperm reservoirs appear to be the uterine crypts and the distal part of the uterotubal junction, where spermatozoa attach by their heads to uterine epithelium. While several in vitro studies demonstrated prolonged motility and viability of canine spermatozoa after coincubation with uterine tube explants, spermatozoal storage has not been documented in the canine uterine tube isthmus or ampulla in vivo. Several factors, including exposure to progesterone, solubilized zona pellucida proteins and post-ovulation uterine tube fluid, appear to trigger membrane events resulting in capacitation-like changes with subsequent motility pattern changes (transitional and hyperactivated) that are associated with sperm detachment. After mating or insemination, a normal low-magnitude post-mating uterine inflammatory response occurs, evidenced by an influx of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), increased uterine contractions and an increased uterine artery blood flow. Recently, it was also shown that normal dogs with cystic endometrial hyperplasia develop a more significant endometritis, show fewer mating-induced uterine contractions, a decreased ability of spermatozoa to bind to uterine explants in vitro and a slower uterine clearance after mating. PMID:24947854

  8. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  9. The Effects of Grain Boundaries on the Current Transport Properties in YBCO-Coated Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Xia, Yudong; Xue, Yan; Zhang, Fei; Tao, Bowan; Xiong, Jie

    2015-10-01

    We report a detailed study of the grain orientations and grain boundary (GB) networks in Y2O3 films grown on Ni-5 at.%W substrates. Electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) exhibited different GB misorientation angle distributions, strongly decided by Y2O3 films with different textures. The subsequent yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) barrier and CeO2 cap layer were deposited on Y2O3 layers by radio frequency sputtering, and YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition. For explicating the effects of the grain boundaries on the current carry capacity of YBCO films, a percolation model was proposed to calculate the critical current density ( J c) which depended on different GB misorientation angle distributions. The significantly higher J c for the sample with sharper texture is believed to be attributed to improved GB misorientation angle distributions.

  10. Current transport of leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) in the ocean.

    PubMed Central

    Luschi, P; Sale, A; Mencacci, R; Hughes, G R; Lutjeharms, J R E; Papi, F

    2003-01-01

    While the long-distance movements of pelagic vertebrates are becoming known thanks to satellite telemetry, the factors determining their courses have hardly been investigated. We have analysed the effects of oceanographic factors on the post-nesting movements of three satellite-tracked leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) moving in the southwest Indian Ocean. By superimposing the turtle tracks on contemporaneous images of sea-surface temperatures and sea height anomalies, we show that currentrelated features dominate the shape of the reconstructed routes. After an initial offshore movement, turtles moved along straight routes when in the core of the current, or executed loops within eddies. Large parts of the routes were strikingly similar to those of surface drifters tracked in the same region. These findings document that long-lasting oceanic movements of marine turtles may be shaped by oceanic currents. PMID:14667360

  11. Current transport of leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Luschi, P; Sale, A; Mencacci, R; Hughes, G R; Lutjeharms, J R E; Papi, F

    2003-11-01

    While the long-distance movements of pelagic vertebrates are becoming known thanks to satellite telemetry, the factors determining their courses have hardly been investigated. We have analysed the effects of oceanographic factors on the post-nesting movements of three satellite-tracked leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) moving in the southwest Indian Ocean. By superimposing the turtle tracks on contemporaneous images of sea-surface temperatures and sea height anomalies, we show that currentrelated features dominate the shape of the reconstructed routes. After an initial offshore movement, turtles moved along straight routes when in the core of the current, or executed loops within eddies. Large parts of the routes were strikingly similar to those of surface drifters tracked in the same region. These findings document that long-lasting oceanic movements of marine turtles may be shaped by oceanic currents. PMID:14667360

  12. Transport of Parallel Momentum Induced by Current-Symmetry Breaking in Toroidal Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Camenen, Y.; Peeters, A. G.; Casson, F. J.; Hornsby, W. A.; Snodin, A. P.; Angioni, C.; Strintzi, D.

    2009-03-27

    The symmetry of a physical system strongly impacts on its properties. In toroidal plasmas, the symmetry along a magnetic field line usually constrains the radial flux of parallel momentum to zero in the absence of background flows. By breaking the up-down symmetry of the toroidal currents, this constraint can be relaxed. The parallel asymmetry in the magnetic configuration then leads to an incomplete cancellation of the turbulent momentum flux across a flux surface. The magnitude of the subsequent toroidal rotation increases with the up-down asymmetry and its sign depends on the direction of the toroidal magnetic field and plasma current. Such a mechanism offers new insights in the interpretation and control of the intrinsic toroidal rotation in present day experiments.

  13. The Effects of Grain Boundaries on the Current Transport Properties in YBCO-Coated Conductors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Xia, Yudong; Xue, Yan; Zhang, Fei; Tao, Bowan; Xiong, Jie

    2015-12-01

    We report a detailed study of the grain orientations and grain boundary (GB) networks in Y2O3 films grown on Ni-5 at.%W substrates. Electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) exhibited different GB misorientation angle distributions, strongly decided by Y2O3 films with different textures. The subsequent yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) barrier and CeO2 cap layer were deposited on Y2O3 layers by radio frequency sputtering, and YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition. For explicating the effects of the grain boundaries on the current carry capacity of YBCO films, a percolation model was proposed to calculate the critical current density (J c) which depended on different GB misorientation angle distributions. The significantly higher J c for the sample with sharper texture is believed to be attributed to improved GB misorientation angle distributions. PMID:26497731

  14. Strontium isotope investigation of ungulate movement patterns on the Pleistocene Paleo-Agulhas Plain of the Greater Cape Floristic Region, South Africa

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Copeland, Sandi R.; Cawthra, Hayley C.; Fisher, Erich C.; Lee-Thorp, Julia A.; Cowling, Richard M.; le Roux, Petrus J.; Hodgkins, Jamie; Marean, Curtis W.

    2016-06-01

    Middle Stone Age sites located within the Greater Cape Floristic Region on the South African southern coast have material culture with early evidence for key modern human behaviors such as projectile weaponry, large animal hunting, and symbolic behavior. In order to interpret how and why these changes evolved, it is necessary to understand their ecological context as it has direct relevance to foraging behavior. During periods of lowered sea level, a largely flat and vast expanse of land existed south of the modern coastline, but it is now submerged by higher sea levels. This exposed area, the Paleo-Agulhas Plain, likelymore » created an ecological context unlike anything in the region today, as evidenced by fossil assemblages dominated by migratory ungulates. One hypothesis is that the Paleo-Agulhas Plain supported a migration ecosystem of large grazers driven by summer rainfall, producing palatable forage during summer in the east, and winter rainfall, producing palatable forage during winter in the west. Furthermore, ungulates may have been moving from the coastal plain in the south to the interior north of the Cape Fold Mountains, as observed for elephants in historic times.« less

  15. Contrasting local retention and cross-shore transports of the East Australian Current and the Leeuwin Current and their relative influences on the life histories of small pelagic fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condie, S. A.; Mansbridge, J. V.; Cahill, M. L.

    2011-03-01

    Transport between shelf and offshore environments supports a significant proportion of ocean primary productivity and is critical to the life cycle of many marine species. While fundamental differences in the underlying dynamics of eastern and western boundary currents have been recognized and studied for more than half a century, the implications for physical dispersal rates have received much less attention. In this study we explore how Australia's two major boundary current systems, the East Australian Current and the Leeuwin Current, differ in their local retention and cross-shore transports in the upper water column and how these differences favor contrasting life histories of small pelagic fishes. The results suggest that the East Australian Current forms a partial barrier to onshore transport, but is effective in entraining shelf waters and transporting them offshore, particularly in the region where the current separates from the coast. Blue mackerel ( Scomber australasicus) spawn on the outer-shelf in this separation region and may thereby maximize the dispersion of eggs and larvae in the mainly oligotrophic waters of the southern Coral Sea. In contrast, the Leeuwin Current system promotes onshore transport through the combined effects of mean onshore flow and eddy-induced mixing. In the Great Australian Bight, sardine ( Sardinops sagax) and anchovy ( Engraulis australis) may exploit the high coastal retention of the Leeuwin Current system by spawning on the inner-shelf during summer when the current is weakest and winds assist retention and enhance production through local upwelling.

  16. Quench behavior of Sr0.6K0.4Fe2As2/Ag tapes with AC and DC transport currents at different temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi; Zhang, Guomin; Yang, Hua; Li, Zhenming; Liu, Wei; Jing, Liwei; Yu, Hui; Liu, Guole

    2016-09-01

    In applications, superconducting wires may carry AC or DC transport current. Thus, it is important to understand the behavior of normal zone propagation in conductors and magnets under different current conditions in order to develop an effective quench protection system. In this paper, quench behavior of Ag sheathed Sr0.6K0.4Fe2As2 (Sr-122 in the family of iron-based superconductor) tapes with AC and DC transport current is reported. The measurements are performed as a function of different temperature (20 K-30 K), varying transport current and operating frequency (50 Hz-250 Hz). The focus of the research is the minimum quench energy (MQE), the normal zone propagation velocity (NZPV) and the comparison of the related results with AC and DC transport current.

  17. Current transport and microstructural evolution in BSCCO tapes fabricated by groove rolling.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Iyer, A. N.; Mironova, M.; Salama, K.; Stolbov, S.; Vipulanandan, C.

    1999-01-27

    The powder-in-tube technique, consisting of wire drawing and rolling, has been widely used to fabricate superconducting tapes for possible electric power applications. In this study, instead of wire drawing, the starting billet was reduced in size by groove rolling. To optimize the deformation and thermomechanical treatment process, wires of varying dimensions were fabricated. The wires were flat-rolled to a final thickness of 250 mm. Short-length tapes were subjected to a series of thermal and deformation steps. Phase development and microstructural evolution during the process were monitored by XRD, SEM, and TEM. The BSCCO-2223 tapes, which were subjected to thermomechanical treatment, had average critical current densities of 18,000 A cm{sup {minus}2}. Colony boundaries, examined by TEM, near the superconductor-silver interface were found to form in certain preferred orientations. Polytypoids of 2212 phase were also observed at the colony boundary. The effects of grain boundary on superconducting order parameter and critical current density have also been examined.

  18. Enhanced current transport at grain boundaries in high-T(c) superconductors.

    PubMed

    Klie, R F; Buban, J P; Varela, M; Franceschetti, A; Jooss, C; Zhu, Y; Browning, N D; Pantelides, S T; Pennycook, S J

    2005-05-26

    Large-scale applications of high-transition-temperature (high-T(c)) superconductors, such as their use in superconducting cables, are impeded by the fact that polycrystalline materials (the only practical option) support significantly lower current densities than single crystals. The superconducting critical current density (J(c)) across a grain boundary drops exponentially if the misorientation angle exceeds 2 degrees -7 degrees. Grain texturing reduces the average misorientation angle, but problems persist. Adding impurities (such as Ca in YBa2Cu3O7-delta; YBCO) leads to increased J(c) (refs 9, 10), which is generally attributed to excess holes introduced by Ca2+ substituting for Y3+ (ref. 11). However, a comprehensive physical model for the role of grain boundaries and Ca doping has remained elusive. Here we report calculations, imaging and spectroscopy at the atomic scale that demonstrate that in poly-crystalline YBCO, highly strained grain-boundary regions contain excess O vacancies, which reduce the local hole concentration. The Ca impurities indeed substitute for Y, but in grain-boundary regions under compression and tension they also replace Ba and Cu, relieving strain and suppressing O-vacancy formation. Our results demonstrate that the ionic radii are more important than their electronic valences for enhancing J(c). PMID:15917804

  19. Observations of the southern East Madagascar Current and undercurrent and countercurrent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauw, J. J.; van Aken, H. M.; Webb, A.; Lutjeharms, J. R. E.; de Ruijter, W. P. M.

    2008-08-01

    In April 2001 four hydrographic sections perpendicular to the southern East Madagascar Current were surveyed as part of the Agulhas Current Sources Experiment. Observations with a vessel mounted and a lowered ADCP produced information on the current field while temperature, salinity, oxygen and nutrient data obtained with a CTD-Rosette system, gave information on the water mass structure of the currents southeast of Madagascar. The peak velocity in the pole-ward East Madagascar Current through these four sections had a typical magnitude of ˜110 cm/s, while the width of this current was of the order of 120 km. The mean pole-ward volume transport rate of this current during the survey above the 5°C isotherm was estimated to be 37 ± 10 Sv. On all four sections an undercurrent was observed at intermediate depths below the East Madagascar Current. Its equator-ward transport rate amounted to 2.8 ± 1.4 Sv. Offshore of the East Madagascar Current the shallow South Indian Ocean Countercurrent was observed. This eastward frontal jet coincided with the barotropic and thermohaline front that separates the saline Subtropical Surface Water from the fresher Tropical Surface Water in the East Madagascar Current. The near-surface geostrophic flow of the East Madagascar Current, derived from satellite altimetry data from 1992 to 2005, suggests a strong variability of this transport due to eddy variability and interannual changes. The long-term pole-ward mean transport of the East Madagascar Current, roughly estimated from those altimetry data amounts to 32 Sv. The upper-ocean water mass of the East Madagascar Current was very saline in 2001, compared to WOCE surveys from 1995. Comparison of our undercurrent data with those of the WOCE surveys in 1995 confirms that the undercurrent is a recurrent feature. Its water mass properties are relatively saline, due to the presence of water originating from the Red Sea outflow at intermediate levels. The saline water was advected from the

  20. Current-use pesticide transport to Costa Rica's high-altitude tropical cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Shunthirasingham, Chubashini; Gouin, Todd; Lei, Ying D; Ruepert, Clemens; Castillo, Luisa E; Wania, Frank

    2011-12-01

    To gain insight into the atmospheric transport and deposition of organic contaminants in high-altitude forests in the humid tropics, pesticides were analyzed in air, water, and soil samples from Costa Rica. Passive samplers deployed across the country revealed annually averaged air concentrations of chlorothalonil, endosulfan, and pendimethalin that were higher in areas with intensive agricultural activities than in more remote areas. Atmospheric concentrations were particularly high in the intensively cultivated central valley. Only endosulfan and its degradation products were found in soils sampled along an altitudinal transect on the northern side of Volcano Turrialba, which is facing heavily cultivated coastal plains. Consistent with calculations of cold trapping in tropical mountains, concentrations of endosulfan sulfate increased with altitude. Pesticide levels in lake, creek, fog, and arboreal water samples from high-elevation cloud forests were generally below 10 ng · L(-1). Endosulfan sulfate was the most abundant pesticide in water, with concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 9.4 ng · L(-1). Its levels were highest in water sampled from bromeliads. Levels of total endosulfan in water are much lower than the reported median lethal concentration (LC50) value for acute toxicity of α-endosulfan to tadpoles. Although this suggests that the presence of pesticide might not have a direct impact on amphibian populations, the possibility of effects of chronic exposure to a mixture of substances cannot be excluded. Fog was relatively enriched in some of the analyzed pesticides, such as dacthal and chlorothalonil, and may constitute an important deposition pathway to high-altitude tropical cloud forest. PMID:21898568

  1. Shelfal sediment transport by undercurrents forces turbidity current activity during high sea level, Chile continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Anne; Hebbeln, Dierk; Regenberg, Marcus; Lückge, Andreas; Strecker, Manfred. R.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the links between terrigenous sediment supply and marine transport and depositional processes along tectonically active margins is essential to decipher turbidite successions as potential archives of climatic and seismic forcings and to comprehend timing and quantity of marine clastic deposition. Sequence stratigraphic models predict coarse-grained terrigenous sediment delivery to deep-marine sites mainly during sea-level fall and lowstand. Marine clastic deposition during periods of transgression and highstand has been attributed to the continued geomorphic connectivity between terrestrial sediment sources and marine sinks (e.g., rivers connected to submarine canyons) often facilitated by narrow shelves, high sediment supply causing delta migration to the shelf edge, and/or abrupt increases in sediment supply due to climatic variability or catastrophic events. To decipher the controls on Holocene highstand turbidite deposition, we analyzed twelve sediment cores of spatially disparate, coeval Holocene turbidite systems along the Chile margin (29-40°S) with changing climatic and geomorphic characteristics but uniform changes of sea level. Intraslope basins in north-central Chile (29-33°S) offshore a narrow to absent shelf record a shut-off of turbidite activity during the Holocene. In contrast, core sites in south-central Chile (36-40°S) offshore a wide continental shelf have repeatedly experienced turbidite deposition during sea-level highstand conditions, even though most of the depocenters are not connected via canyons to sediment sources. The interplay of stable high sediment supply related to strong onshore precipitation in combination with a wide shelf, over which undercurrents move sediment towards the shelf edge, appears to control Holocene turbidite sedimentation and sediment export to the deep sea.

  2. The response of complex and direct-current electrical measurements in the presence of multirate solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, R. D.; Binley, A.; Keating, K.; Haggerty, R.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2012-12-01

    The advection-dispersion equation cannot describe non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media and often fails to match breakthrough curve (BTC) history. The multirate mass transfer (MRMT) model partitions the total porosity into immobile and mobile domains with a distribution of exchange rates between the two domains; consequently, the MRMT model produces a better fit to BTCs. However, direct experimental support for the MRMT model parameters remains elusive and model parameters are often estimated a posteriori by an optimization procedure. Complex and direct-current electrical resistivity methods have been used to monitor non-Fickian solute transport in groundwater, but the electrical response has yet to be interpreted within a multirate framework. Here, we investigate electrical geophysical methods to improve our characterization of MRMT parameters. We explore the electrical response in two separate steps: (1) we simulate the direct current electrical response within a multirate framework in order to estimate, from temporal moments, an effective, single rate of mass transfer, and; (2) we develop an empirical link between length scales of multirate mass transfer and length scales of relaxation time distributions measured from complex resistivity at the laboratory scale for the zeolite clinoptilolite which has previously demonstrated MRMT behavior. We use nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of the zeolite to estimate the mobile and immobile porosity of the sample. This study demonstrates our approach at the laboratory scale and offers future perspectives for field investigations.

  3. The Coupling of an Enzymatic Reaction to Transmembrane Flow of Electric Current in a Synthetic "Active Transport" System

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, R.; Caplan, S. R.; Kedem, O.

    1967-01-01

    If a chemical reaction is constrained to occur within an asymmetric structure, e.g. by the presence of bound or otherwise trapped enzyme, coupling of the reaction to the flow of one or more solutes, or to the flow of electric current, becomes possible. Such systems can serve as models in which transport is “driven” by chemical reaction. In this respect the processes involved are analogous to active transport, though the molecular mechanisms may be quite different from those in nature. A simple arrangement of this kind has been studied: a composite membrane consisting of two ion exchange membranes of opposite fixed charge, separated by an intermediate layer of solution containing papain. An uncharged substrate of low molecular weight acts as “fuel” for the system, N-acetyl-L-glutamic acid diamide. This material (not previously described) hydrolyzes in the presence of papain to ammonium N-acetyl-L-glutamine. The composite membrane gives rise to an electromotive force, ultimately reaching a stationary state, when clamped between two identical solutions in which the affinity of the reaction has been fixed. Onsager's reciprocity relation has not hitherto been tested in a case of coupling between chemical reaction and a vectorial flow (here electric current); its validity for this system, in which stationary-state coupling occurs, was established over the experimental range of affinities (up to 3 kcal/mole). PMID:19210996

  4. Intermodal Transportation: Current Fast Ship Designs Specify Propulsion Systems that Are about 20 Knots Faster than Ships in the Current Fleet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, Vincent W.

    2005-01-01

    Intermodal transportation is the moving of people or cargo using more than one mode of transportation. When a person drives to the airport, stands on a conveyor to move through the terminal, and flies to another city, then he or she is using intermodal transportation. Moving cargo in the first half of the twentieth century was a time-consuming and…

  5. Transport phenomena in intrinsic semiconductors and insulators at high current densities: Suppression of the broken neutrality drift

    SciTech Connect

    Mnatsakanov, T. T.; Tandoev, A. G.; Yurkov, S. N.; Levinshtein, M. E.

    2013-08-14

    It is shown that, in addition to the diffusion and broken neutrality drift (BND) modes well-known for insulators and very lightly doped semiconductors, the quasineutral drift (QND) mode is possible. The transition from the BND to QND mode is accompanied by the appearance of a portion with a very sharp current rise in the current-voltage characteristic. This effect is observed in a new type of semiconductor detectors (CIDs, Current Injected Detectors) of high-intensity neutron and proton radiation, suggested, in particular, for Large Hadron Collider. The effect is unambiguously attributed now to the presence of radiation-induced deep centers in a semiconductor. It is shown, however, in this paper that the effect of a very sharp rise in current upon a slight increase in voltage is even possible when there are no deep centers. An equation adequately describing the possible transport modes in intrinsic semiconductors and insulators is derived. The results of an analytical study are confirmed by an adequate simulation.

  6. Transport phenomena in intrinsic semiconductors and insulators at high current densities: Suppression of the broken neutrality drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mnatsakanov, T. T.; Levinshtein, M. E.; Tandoev, A. G.; Yurkov, S. N.

    2013-08-01

    It is shown that, in addition to the diffusion and broken neutrality drift (BND) modes well-known for insulators and very lightly doped semiconductors, the quasineutral drift (QND) mode is possible. The transition from the BND to QND mode is accompanied by the appearance of a portion with a very sharp current rise in the current-voltage characteristic. This effect is observed in a new type of semiconductor detectors (CIDs, Current Injected Detectors) of high-intensity neutron and proton radiation, suggested, in particular, for Large Hadron Collider. The effect is unambiguously attributed now to the presence of radiation-induced deep centers in a semiconductor. It is shown, however, in this paper that the effect of a very sharp rise in current upon a slight increase in voltage is even possible when there are no deep centers. An equation adequately describing the possible transport modes in intrinsic semiconductors and insulators is derived. The results of an analytical study are confirmed by an adequate simulation.

  7. Transport and fate of river waters under flood conditions and rim current influence: the Mississippi River test case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourafalou, Villy; Androulidakis, Yannis

    2013-04-01

    Large river plumes are a major supplier of freshwater, sediments and nutrients in coastal and shelf seas. Novel processes controlling the transport and fate of riverine waters (and associated materials) will be presented, under flood conditions and in the presence of complex topography, ambient shelf circulation and slope processes, controlled by the interaction with rim currents. The Mississippi River (MR) freshwater outflow is chosen as a test case, as a major circulation forcing mechanism for the Northern Gulf of Mexico and a unique river plume for the intense interactions with a large scale ocean current, namely the Loop Current branch of the Gulf Stream, and associated eddy field. The largest MR outflow in history (45,000 m3/sec in 2011) is compared with the second largest outflow in the last 8 years (41,000 m3/sec in 2008). Realistically forced simulations, based on the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) with careful treatment of river plume dynamics and nested to a data assimilated, basin-wide model, reveal the synergistic effect of enhanced discharge, winds, stratification of ambient shelf waters and offshore circulation over the transport of plume waters. The investigation targets a broader understanding of the dynamics of large scale river plumes in general, and of the MR plume in particular. In addition, in situ observations from ship surveys and satellite chl-a data showed that the mathematical simulations with high temporal resolution river outflow input may reproduce adequately the buoyant waters spreading over the Northern Gulf of Mexico shelf and offshore areas. The fate of the river plume is strongly determined and affected by deep basin processes. The strong impacts of the Loop Current system (and its frontal eddies) on river plume evolution are of particular importance under conditions of increased offshore spreading, which is presumed under large discharge rates and can cause loss of riverine materials to the basin interior. Flood conditions

  8. Correcting acoustic Doppler current profiler discharge measurements biased by sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Wagner, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) is attributed to the movement of sediment on or near the streambed, and is an issue widely acknowledged by the scientific community. The integration of a differentially corrected global positioning system (DGPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic bias associated with a moving bed. DGPS, however, cannot provide consistently accurate positions because of multipath errors and satellite signal reception problems on waterways with dense tree canopy along the banks, in deep valleys or canyons, and near bridges. An alternative method of correcting for the moving-bed bias, based on the closure error resulting from a two-way crossing of the river, is presented. The uncertainty in the mean moving-bed velocity measured by the loop method is shown to be approximately 0.6cm/s. For the 13 field measurements presented, the loop method resulted in corrected discharges that were within 5% of discharges measured utilizing DGPS to compensate for moving-bed conditions. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  9. Neutral currents probed by non-local transport in graphene with 5 d metal adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yilin; Cai, Xinghan; Xiao, Shudong; Bao, Wenzhong; Reutt-Robey, Janice; Fuhrer, Michael

    Adsorption of adatoms on graphene has been theoretically proposed as an effective means to enhance spin-orbit coupling in graphene. Here we use the non-local measurement geometry to detect neutral currents (spin, valley, energy) through their Hall and inverse Hall effects. Single-layer graphene devices are probed in-situ in ultra-high vacuum while depositing 5 d heavy metal atoms (Ir, Au) at a temperature of 7 K. Surprisingly, we detect a non-local signal in pristine devices as well as metal-atom modified devices, with a consistent dependence of the signal on length and gate voltage for several devices. Changes in the non-local signal upon deposition of 5 d metal atoms appear governed by charge carrier mobility (reduced with increasing metal atom concentration) and are difficult to understand with spin Hall/inverse spin Hall effects alone due to increased spin-orbit coupling in graphene. We will discuss other possible origins of the non-local signal. This work was supported by the U.S. ONR MURI. MSF was supported by an ARC Laureate Fellowship.

  10. Effects of Annealing on Electrical Characteristics and Current Transport Mechanisms of the Y/ p-GaN Schottky Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, V. Rajagopal; Asha, B.; Choi, Chel-Jong

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the effects of annealing on the electrical properties and current transport mechanism of Y/ p-GaN Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs). We found no significant change in the surface morphology of the Y Schottky contacts during the annealing process. The Schottky barrier height (SBH) of the as-deposited Y/ p-GaN SBD was estimated to be 0.95 eV ( I- V)/1.19 eV ( C- V). The SBH increased upon annealing at 400°C and 500°C, and then decreased slightly with annealing at 600°C. Thus the maximum SBH of the Y/ p-GaN SBD was achieved at 500°C, with values of 1.01 eV ( I- V)/1.29 eV ( C- V). In addition, the SBH values were estimated by Cheung's, Norde, and Ψs- V plots and were found to be in good agreement with one another. Series resistance ( R S) values were also calculated by I- V, Cheung's, and Norde functions at different annealing temperatures, with results showing a decrease in the interface state density of the SBD with annealing at 500°C, followed by a slight increase upon annealing at 600°C. The forward-bias current transport mechanism of SBD was investigated by the log I-log V plot at different annealing temperatures. Our investigations revealed that the Poole-Frenkel emission mechanism dominated the reverse leakage current in Y/ p-GaN SBD at all annealing temperatures.

  11. Variability of Surface pollutants and aerosol concentration over Abu Dhabi, UAE - sources, transport and current levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanikumar, Devulapalli V.; Basha, Ghouse; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2015-04-01

    pollutants are in contrast with the diurnal pattern of wind speed as evident from the previous observations. Wind rose diagram of pollutants reveal that the dominant source directions are scattered from northwesterly to southwesterly. Our results (2011-13) are compared with earlier observations from the same region (2007-08) and no alarming differences were observed in the pollutant levels. Our observations are discussed in the light of current understanding of pollutants sources over this region.

  12. Influence of electron-beam lithography exposure current level on the transport characteristics of graphene field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sangwoo; Movva, Hema C. P.; Sanne, Atresh; Rai, Amritesh; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2016-03-01

    Many factors have been identified to influence the electrical transport characteristics of graphene field-effect transistors. In this report, we examine the influence of the exposure current level used during electron beam lithography (EBL) for active region patterning. In the presence of a self-assembled hydrophobic residual layer generated by oxygen plasma etching covering the top surface of the graphene channel, we show that the use of low EBL current level results in higher mobility, lower residual carrier density, and charge neutrality point closer to 0 V, with reduced device-to-device variations. We show that this correlation originates from the resist heating dependent release of radicals from the resist material, near its interface with graphene, and its subsequent trapping by the hydrophobic polymer layer. Using a general model for resist heating, we calculate the difference in resist heating for different EBL current levels. We further corroborate our argument through control experiments, where radicals are either intentionally added or removed by other processes. We also utilize this finding to obtain mobilities in excess of 18 000 cm2/V s on silicon dioxide substrates. We believe these results are applicable to other 2D materials such as transition metal dichalcogenides and nanoscale devices in general.

  13. Current transport studies of ZnO/p-Si heterostructures grown by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.D.; Ling, C.C.; Fung, S.; Beling, C.D.; Mei, Y.F.; Fu, Ricky K.Y.; Siu, G.G.; Chu, Paul K.

    2006-03-27

    Rectifying undoped and nitrogen-doped ZnO/p-Si heterojunctions were fabricated by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. The undoped and nitrogen-doped ZnO films were n type (n{approx}10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) and highly resistive (resistivity {approx}10{sup 5} {omega} cm), respectively. While forward biasing the undoped-ZnO/p-Si, the current follows Ohmic behavior if the applied bias V{sub forward} is larger than {approx}0.4 V. However, for the nitrogen-doped-ZnO/p-Si sample, the current is Ohmic for V{sub forward}<1.0 V and then transits to J{approx}V{sup 2} for V{sub forward}>2.5 V. The transport properties of the undoped-ZnO/p-Si and the N-doped-ZnO/p-Si diodes were explained in terms of the Anderson model and the space charge limited current model, respectively.

  14. Paleoceanography of the southern Agulhas Plateau during the last 150 ka: Inferences from benthic foraminiferal assemblages and multispecies epifaunal carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diz, Paula; Hall, Ian R.; Zahn, Rainer; Molyneux, Elizabeth G.

    2007-12-01

    Benthic foraminiferal assemblages and the carbon isotope composition of the epifaunal benthic foraminifera Epistominella exigua and Fontbotia wuellerstorfi have been investigated along core MD02-2589 located at the southern Agulhas Plateau (41°26.03'S, 25°15.30'E, 2660 m water depth). This study aims to evaluate changes in the benthic paleoenvironment and its influence on benthic δ13C with a notable focus on E. exigua, a species associated with phytodetritus deposits and poorly studied in isotope paleoceanographic reconstructions. The benthic foraminiferal assemblages (>63 μm) show large fluctuations in species composition suggesting significant changes in the pattern of ocean surface productivity conceivably related to migrations of the Subtropical Convergence (STC) and Subantarctic Front (SAF). Low to moderate seasonality and relatively higher food supply to the seafloor are indicated during glacial marine isotope stages (MIS) 6, 4, and 2 and during MIS 3, probably associated with the northward migration of the SAF and confluence with the more stationary STC above the southern flank of the Agulhas Plateau. The lowest organic carbon supply to the seafloor is indicated from late MIS 5b to MIS 4 as a consequence of increased influence of the Agulhas Front (AF) and/or weakening of the influence of the STC over the region. Episodic delivery of fresh organic matter, similar to modern conditions at the core location, is indicated during MIS 5c-MIS 5e and at Termination I. Comparison of this paleoenvironmental information with the paired δ13C records of E. exigua and F. wuellerstorfi suggests that organic carbon offsets δ13C of E. exigua from ambient bottom water δ13CDIC, while its δ13C amplitude, on glacial-interglacial timescales, does not seem affected by changes of organic carbon supply to the seafloor. This suggests that this species calcifies preferentially during the short time span of the year when productivity peaks and phytodetritus is delivered to the

  15. Stable and null current hysteresis perovskite solar cells based nitrogen doped graphene oxide nanoribbons hole transport layer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmo; Mat Teridi, Mohd Asri; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid bin; Jang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells are becoming one of the leading technologies to reduce our dependency on traditional power sources. However, the frequently used component poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) has several shortcomings, such as an easily corroded indium-tin-oxide (ITO) interface at elevated temperatures and induced electrical inhomogeneity. Herein, we propose solution-processed nitrogen-doped graphene oxide nanoribbons (NGONRs) as a hole transport layer (HTL) in perovskite solar cells, replacing the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. The conversion efficiency of NGONR-based perovskite solar cells has outperformed a control device constructed using PEDOT:PSS. Moreover, our proposed NGONR-based devices also demonstrate a negligible current hysteresis along with improved stability. This work provides an effective route for substituting PEDOT:PSS as the effective HTL. PMID:27277388

  16. Stable and null current hysteresis perovskite solar cells based nitrogen doped graphene oxide nanoribbons hole transport layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeongmo; Mat Teridi, Mohd Asri; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid Bin; Jang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Perovskite solar cells are becoming one of the leading technologies to reduce our dependency on traditional power sources. However, the frequently used component poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) has several shortcomings, such as an easily corroded indium-tin-oxide (ITO) interface at elevated temperatures and induced electrical inhomogeneity. Herein, we propose solution-processed nitrogen-doped graphene oxide nanoribbons (NGONRs) as a hole transport layer (HTL) in perovskite solar cells, replacing the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. The conversion efficiency of NGONR-based perovskite solar cells has outperformed a control device constructed using PEDOT:PSS. Moreover, our proposed NGONR-based devices also demonstrate a negligible current hysteresis along with improved stability. This work provides an effective route for substituting PEDOT:PSS as the effective HTL.

  17. New Lagrangian tools for describing transport in aperiodic time dependent flows: a case study of the Kuroshio current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancho, Ana M.; Mendoza, Carolina

    2009-11-01

    In recent years there has been a lot of progress in the application of dynamical systems concepts to the description of transport in oceanic flows. In these flows the classical dynamical system theory does not apply since they are aperiodic and finite-time defined. Recently, for describing these flows a new definition of distinguished trajectory has been proposed (Madrid & Mancho, Chaos, 2009). Distinguished trajectories act as organizing centres of the geometrical template of aperiodic time-dependent flows, like fixed points and periodic orbits do in time independent or periodic flows. The computation of distinguished trajectories makes use of a function M of which we show contains a lot of Lagrangian information. In this presentation I will discuss how the visualization of this function M, allows identifying relevant Lagrangian features at a glance. In particular we report an application to real altimetry data taken from satellite in the area of the Kuroshio current. The function M also determines the stable and unstable subspaces of the distinguished hyperbolic trajectories which are tangent to the invariant manifolds. From the computation of stable and unstable manifolds we report an accurate description of transport routes in this region.

  18. Influence of Tailored Applied Magnetic Fields on High-Power MPD Thruster Current Transport and Onset-Related Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, Robert C.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    This work investigated the effects of tailored, externally-applied magnetic fields on current transport and near-anode processes in the plasma discharge of a magnetoplasmadynamic thruster (MPDT). Electrical and plasma diagnostics were used to investigate how localized applied magnetic fields could mitigate the effects of the "onset" phenomena, including large-amplitude terminal voltage fluctuations and high anode fall voltages associated with unstable operation and anode erosion. An MPDT with a multi-channel hollow cathode was developed and tested with quasi-steady pulses of 1 millisecond duration at power levels of 36 kilowatts (20 volts, 1800 amperes) to 3.3 milliwatts (255 volts, 13.1 kiloamperes) with argon propellant in three different magnetic configurations: self-field, applied B field tangential to the anode lip near the exit plane, and applied cusp B field. The current pattern and current densities redistributed to follow the applied poloidal magnetic field lines, which created increased conduction paths to the anode. Also, the anode fall voltage was substantially reduced with both applied B field topologies over a large range of currents. For example, at 10.7 kiloamperes, the cusp applied magnetic field decreased anode fall voltages from 45-83 volts down to 15 volts or lower along much of the anode. The amplitude and frequency of the voltage fluctuations were also reduced over a broad range of currents with the applied fields. E.g., the standard deviations of the fluctuations were lowered by 37-49 percent at 8-9 kiloamperes. In addition, decreases in the mean terminal voltages as large as 31 percent were measured with the applied magnetic fields. These effects are shown to be associated with the increased current conduction along the applied magnetic field lines in the near-anode region. These results also suggest a reduction in frequency and intensity of current-concentrating filaments and anode spots, which contribute to erosion. Overall, both applied

  19. Impact of submerged aquatic macrophytes on 3-dim current systems and hydrodynamic transport processes in Lake Constance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Thomas; Lüddeke, Frauke; Thiange, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    According to the assessment criteria of the European water framework directive Lake Constance is having a good water quality. Nevertheless upcoming criteria using environmental quality measures show that there are still problems with respect to micropollutants. In fact, we observe significantly enhanced concentrations of micropollutants close to river mouths and in the areas of shallow water zones within Lake Constance compared to deep water concentrations. These findings are caused by river water plumes which can flow over distances of kilometers in the lake without being diluted or mixed only weakly with the surrounding lake water body. Besides, in the area of interest exist large populations of submerged aquatic macrophytes (SAM). There is only little knowledge, how these influence the distribution and transport processes of micropollutants. In order to assess the impact and distribution of river water plumes in different areas of the lake we implemented a 3-dim hydrodynamic model using DELFT3D-FLOW on a locally refined numerical grid which enables to cover different process scales of the distribution of river water bodies ranging from a few meters up to basin wide scales in the order of a few kilometers. We used numerical tracers (conservative and non-conservative) in order to quantify the impact of different abstract substance classes which are distinguished by their decay rates. In order to asses the influence of SAM populations on current field and transport processes we used a special simulation technique - the trachytope concept. The results of our 3-dim hydrodynamic model showed significantly changed current velocities, residence times and age of water parameters within the SAM areas compared to the control simulation without SAM. By simulating the propagation of coliform bacteria using numerical tracers with spatially and temporarily variable decay rates, we found complex impact pattern of the SAM on the distribution of these potentially harmful

  20. Mass transport perspective on an accelerated exclusion process: Analysis of augmented current and unit-velocity phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jiajia; Klumpp, Stefan; Zia, R. K. P.

    2013-02-01

    In an accelerated exclusion process (AEP), each particle can “hop” to its adjacent site if empty as well as “kick” the frontmost particle when joining a cluster of size ℓ⩽ℓmax. With various choices of the interaction range, ℓmax, we find that the steady state of AEP can be found in a homogeneous phase with augmented currents (AC) or a segregated phase with holes moving at unit velocity (UV). Here we present a detailed study on the emergence of the novel phases, from two perspectives: the AEP and a mass transport process (MTP). In the latter picture, the system in the UV phase is composed of a condensate in coexistence with a fluid, while the transition from AC to UV can be regarded as condensation. Using Monte Carlo simulations, exact results for special cases, and analytic methods in a mean field approach (within the MTP), we focus on steady state currents and cluster sizes. Excellent agreement between data and theory is found, providing an insightful picture for understanding this model system.

  1. Observations of bottom currents and estimates of resuspended sediment transport at the New York Bight 12-mile dumpsite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, J. P.; Oey, L. Y.; Packer, D.; Vitaliano, J.; Finneran, T. W.; You, K. W.; Fromm, S.

    1994-05-01

    To document storm events that may induce a redistribution of sediment in the vicinity of the New York Bight 12-mile sewage sludge dumpsite, current meter moorings were deployed in water depths from 20 m (near the mouth of New York Harbor) to 53 m (within the Hudson Shelf Valley) from July 1986 through June 1989. Ten usable instrument records ranging from one month to one year in duration were obtained; eight of them near-bottom records. Seasonal and geographic variability of wind-induced flow were examined. The wind is most efficient in driving the subtidal currents in the 2-10 day frequency band during winter when the water column is well mixed and when the eastward component of the wind often induces and sustains an up-valley (northward) bottom flow. Maximum efficiency occurs for wind from 300° (WNW) and at sites located within the Hudson Shelf Valley. A continental shelf bottom boundary layer model (Glenn and Grant, 1987) was used to estimate resuspended sediment transport. Model inputs include bottom currents (observed), orbital wave velocities (estimated), and sediment grain size (from the literature). Model output indicates that sediment resuspension at the current meter sites occurs approximately 5% of the time, primarily during winter months. The difference in along-valley flux between two moorings provides a rough estimate (6-month time series) of deposition and erosion. The net deposition (+.02 mm) was no greater than the deposition and erosion resulting from individual storms. A three-dimensional circulation model (You et al., 1991) is applied to increase the spatial resolution of the near-bottom current field (4 km grid) for a storm event in May of 1987. Given these velocities that vary in space and time, the redistribution of sediment was modeled for different surface wave conditions. Areas of deposition aligned with the Hudson Shelf Valley due to less wave-induced resuspension in deeper waters. Given all the uncertainties in the input variables

  2. Across-Shelf Transport of Bivalve Larvae: Can the Interface between a Coastal Current and Inshore Waters Act as an Ecological Barrier to Larval Dispersal?

    PubMed Central

    Tilburg, Charles E.; McCartney, Michael A.; Yund, Philip O.

    2012-01-01

    Using an integrated physical and biological approach, we examined across-shelf advection and exchange and the associated transport of bivalve larvae in the presence of a strong coastal current separated from the coast by a stratified inshore environment. We tested the hypothesis that the interface of the coastal current and inshore waters can act as an ecological barrier to across-shelf transport of larvae but can be overcome by wind- or tidally-induced transport. Our study region in the Gulf of Maine encompasses a coastal current that diverges from the coast as it moves downshelf. The region inshore of this current is home to several species that exhibit limited recruitment in spite of extensive upshelf larval sources. Analysis of surface water temperatures and wind velocities revealed episodic decreases in temperature along the coast correlated with alongshelf (but not upwelling) winds, indicating wind-forced onshore movement of the cold coastal current. Such wind-driven onshore migrations are more common along the northern portion of the study region where the coastal current is near the coast, tidal currents are strong, and wind directions are more conducive to onshore migration, but rarer further south where the interface between inshore waters and the coastal current is further offshore and suitable wind events are less common. The distribution of bivalve larvae was consistent with the physical measurements. There was little across-shelf variation in larval abundance where the current abuts the coast, indicating strong across-shelf exchange of larvae, but strong across-shelf variation in larval density where the stratified inshore waters separate the current from the coast, indicating weak across-shelf transport of larvae. Our results suggest that the interface between the coastal current and inshore waters may constitute a major ecological barrier to larval dispersal in the southern part of the region that may only be overcome by rare, strong wind

  3. The SLC30 family of zinc transporters – a review of current understanding of their biological and pathophysiological roles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are two families of zinc transporters involved in zinc homeostasis in the body, the SLC30 (ZnT, zinc transporter,) and SLC39 (ZIP, ZRT1 and IRT-like protein). The two zinc transporter family members function in opposite directions to maintain cellular zinc homeostasis. ZnT proteins are require...

  4. Irreversibility and entropy production in transport phenomena, IV: Symmetry, integrated intermediate processes and separated variational principles for multi-currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masuo

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism of entropy production in transport phenomena is discussed again by emphasizing the role of symmetry of non-equilibrium states and also by reformulating Einstein’s theory of Brownian motion to derive entropy production from it. This yields conceptual reviews of the previous papers [M. Suzuki, Physica A 390 (2011) 1904; 391 (2012) 1074; 392 (2013) 314]. Separated variational principles of steady states for multi external fields {Xi} and induced currents {Ji} are proposed by extending the principle of minimum integrated entropy production found by the present author for a single external field. The basic strategy of our theory on steady states is to take in all the intermediate processes from the equilibrium state to the final possible steady states in order to study the irreversible physics even in the steady states. As an application of this principle, Gransdorff-Prigogine’s evolution criterion inequality (or stability condition) dXP≡∫dr∑iJidXi≤0 is derived in the stronger form dQi≡∫drJidXi≤0 for individual force Xi and current Ji even in nonlinear responses which depend on all the external forces {Xk} nonlinearly. This is called “separated evolution criterion”. Some explicit demonstrations of the present general theory to simple electric circuits with multi external fields are given in order to clarify the physical essence of our new theory and to realize the condition of its validity concerning the existence of the solutions of the simultaneous equations obtained by the separated variational principles. It is also instructive to compare the two results obtained by the new variational theory and by the old scheme based on the instantaneous entropy production. This seems to be suggestive even to the energy problem in the world.

  5. Chemical Transport and Reduced-Form Models for Assessing Air Quality Impacts of Current and Future Energy Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Though essential for informed decision-making, it is challenging to estimate the air quality and public health impacts associated with current and future energy generation scenarios because the analysis must address the complicated atmospheric processes that air pollutants undergo: emissions, dispersion, chemistry, and removal. Employing a chemical transport model (CTM) is the most rigorous way to address these atmospheric processes. However, CTMs are expensive from a computational standpoint and, therefore, beyond the reach of policy analysis for many types of problems. On the other hand, previously available reduced-form models used for policy analysis fall short of the rigor of CTMs and may lead to biased results. To address this gap, we developed the Estimating Air pollution Social Impacts Using Regression (EASIUR) method, which builds parameterizations that predict per-tonne social costs and intake fractions for pollutants emitted from any location in the United States. Derived from a large database of tagged CTM simulations, the EASIUR method predicts social costs almost indistinguishable from a full CTM but with negligible computational requirements. We found that the average mortality-related social costs from inorganic PM2.5 and its precursors in the United States are 150,000-180,000/t EC, 21,000-34,000/t SO2, 4,200-15,000/t NOx, and 29,000-85,000/t NH3. This talk will demonstrate examples of using both CTMs and reduced-form models for assessing air quality impacts associated with current energy production activities as well as a future deployment of carbon capture and sequestration.

  6. Design of a high-current low-energy beam transport line for an intense D-T/D-D neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaolong; Wang, Junrun; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jianyi; Xia, Li; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Yanyan; Jiang, Bing; Huang, Zhiwu; Ma, Zhanwen; Wei, Zheng; Qian, Xiangping; Xu, Dapeng; Lan, Changlin; Yao, Zeen

    2016-03-01

    An intense D-T/D-D neutron generator is currently being developed at the Lanzhou University. The Cockcroft-Walton accelerator, as a part of the neutron generator, will be used to accelerate and transport the high-current low-energy beam from the duoplasmatron ion source to the rotating target. The design of a high-current low-energy beam transport (LEBT) line and the dynamics simulations of the mixed beam were carried out using the TRACK code. The results illustrate that the designed beam line facilitates smooth transportation of a deuteron beam of 40 mA, and the number of undesired ions can be reduced effectively using two apertures.

  7. The Serotonin Transporter 5-HTTPR Polymorphism is associated with Current and Lifetime Depression in Persons with Chronic Psychotic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Javier; Hare, Liz; Camarena, Beatriz; Glahn, David; Dassori, Albana; Medina, Rolando; Contrerasa, Salvador; Ramirez, Mercedes; Armas, Regina; Munoz, Rodrigo; Mendoza, Rick; Raventos, Henriette; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Palmer, Raymond; Escamilla, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective Variation in the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) promoter region has been shown to influence depression in persons who have been exposed to a number of stressful life events. Method We evaluated whether genetic variation in 5-HTTLPR, influences current depression, lifetime history of depression and quantitative measures of depression in persons with chronic psychotic disorders. This is an association study of a genetic variant with quantitative and categorical definitions of depression conducted in the Southwest United States, Mexico, and Costa Rica. We analyzed 260 subjects with a history of psychosis, from a sample of 129 families. Results We found that persons carrying at least one short allele had a statistically significant increased lifetime risk for depressive syndromes (p<.02, Odds Ratio=2.18, 95% CI=1.10–4.20). Conclusion The “ss” or “sl” genotype at the 5-HTTLPR promoter polymorphic locus increases the risk of psychotic individuals to develop major depression during the course of their illness. PMID:19016667

  8. Transport of ions in presence of induced electric field and electrostatic turbulence - Source of ions injected into ring current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cladis, J. B.; Francis, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    The transport of ions from the polar ionosphere to the inner magnetosphere during stormtime conditions has been computed using a Monte Carlo diffusion code. The effect of the electrostatic turbulence assumed to be present during the substorm expansion phase was simulated by a process that accelerated the ions stochastically perpendicular to the magnetic field with a diffusion coefficient proportional to the energization rate of the ions by the induced electric field. This diffusion process was continued as the ions were convected from the plasma sheet boundary layer to the double-spiral injection boundary. Inward of the injection boundary, the ions were convected adiabatically. By using as input an O(+) flux of 2.8 x 10 to the 8th per sq cm per s (w greater than 10 eV) and an H(+) flux of 5.5 x 10 to the 8th per sq cm per s (w greater than 0.63 eV), the computed distribution functions of the ions in the ring current were found to be in good agreement, over a wide range in L (4 to 8), with measurements made with the ISEE-1 satellite during a storm. This O(+) flux and a large part of the H(+) flux are consistent with the DE satellite measurements of the polar ionospheric outflow during disturbed times.

  9. Effective transport for trauma patients under current circumstances in Korea: a single institution analysis of treatment outcomes for trauma patients transported via the domestic 119 service.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Heo, Yunjung; Lee, John C J; Baek, Sukja; Kim, Younghwan; Moon, Jonghwan; Youn, Seok Hwa; Wang, Heejung; Huh, Yo; Jung, Kyoungwon

    2015-03-01

    In Korea, which still lacks a well-established trauma care system, the inability to transport patients to adequate treatment sites in a timely manner is a cause of low trauma patient survival. As such, this study was conducted to serve as a basis for the establishment of a future trauma transport system. We performed a comparative analysis of the transport time, and treatment outcomes between trauma victims transported by ground ambulance (GAMB) and those transported via the helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) through the National Emergency Management Agency's 119 reporting system, which is similar to the 911 system of the United States, from March 2011 to May 2014. The HEMS-transported patients received treatment instructions, by remote communication, from our trauma specialists from the time of accident reporting; in certain instances, members of the trauma medical staff provided treatment at the scene. A total of 1,626 patients were included in the study; the GAMB and HEMS groups had 1,547 and 79 patients, respectively. The median transport time was different between 2 groups (HEMS, 60 min vs. GAMB, 47 min, P<0.001) but for all patients was 49 min (less than the golden hour). Outcomes were significantly better in the HEMS compared to the GAMB, using the trauma and injury severity score (survival rate, 94.9% vs. 90.5%; Z score, 2.83 vs. -1.96; W score, 6.7 vs. -0.8). A unified 119 service transport system, which includes helicopter transport, and the adoption of a trauma care system that allows active initial involvement of trauma medical personnel, could improve the treatment outcome of trauma patients. PMID:25729259

  10. Tracking Changes in Winds and Ocean Currents in the South Atlantic Using Terrigenous Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemming, S. R.; Goldstein, S. L.; Franzese, A. M.; Rutberg, R. L.; Piotrowski, A. M.

    2002-12-01

    Terrigenous sediments in the ocean can provide constraints on key climate variables such as winds and surface and deep currents. Sediments are brought to the ocean via river runoff, winds and ice, and are redistributed in the ocean by currents. Thus provenance and flux variations reflect the pathways of distribution. Temporal changes in sediment provenance may result from latitudinal wind shifts and ocean current patterns due to climate changes. In the South Atlantic, the pattern of clay minerals in surface sediments tracks the pattern of modern surface currents. Provenance boundaries cross large bathymetric features, indicating that surface currents are the first order control on terrigenous sediment distributions. Surface sediment Sr isotope ratios show systematic variations reflecting the geologic age of the sources. Southward from the Equator, South American sources show a gradient from from old (Brazil Craton) to young (Andes), and this is reflected in the Sr isotopes in proximal sediments. It appears to be possible to separate contributions from wind and surface and deep currents using provenance methods. South of 20oS westerly winds dominate, and South American sources are the most likely aeolian contributions. A counterclockwise gyre composed of the Benguela Current (fed partly by the Agulhas Current from the Indian Ocean), and the Equatorial, Brazil, and Falklands currents dominate the surface currents. Convergence of currents (the Agulhas Retroflection and Malvinas Confluence) produce areas that are potentially sensitive monitors of wind-driven circulation changes. Terrigenous sediment provenance studies in strategically chosen areas are powerful tools to constrain changes in wind, wind driven and deep circulation in paleoceanographic/paleoclimate studies. The Southern Cape Basin illustrates the utility of provenance studies in paleoclimate applications. Ancient continental crust of SE Africa is the source of Mozambique Channel detritus with with very

  11. Diagnosis of equilibrium magnetic profiles, current transport, and internal structures in a reversed-field pinch using electron temperature fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke, Eli

    Due to long fast ion confinement times, neutral beam injection (NBI) on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) yields large fast ion populations with substantial density gradients. Novel application of the unique high-rep-rate (>10 kHz) Thomson scattering diagnostic on MST has enabled characterization of a newly observed beam-driven instability, and detailed measurement of equilibrium changes caused by the fast ion population. While previous work has focused on high-frequency energetic particle modes (EPMs), recent observations indicate that fast ions drive a bursting instability near the plasma rotation frequency under appropriate conditions. The mode chirps strongly, with a frequency of approximately 7 kHz in the plasma reference frame at peak amplitude. Bursts are correlated with EPM activity and core neutral particle analyzer signals drop by 30% during a burst, suggesting that this mode participates in avalanches of the higher frequency EPMs and drives enhanced fast ion transport. Electron temperature fluctuations correlated with this low-frequency mode exhibit a core-peaked structure with a sensitive dependence on the safety factor q. Although this mode has not yet been positively identified, its characteristics and internal structure are suggestive of an internal kink (fishbone) or beta-induced Alfven eigenmode. In addition to driving EPMs, the large fast ion population also modifies the current profile. An increase in on-axis current density driven by NBI is offset by a reduction in the mid-radius, leading to net-zero current drive. This results in a slight flattening of the safety factor profile, observed by precise measurement of the rational surface locations of the dominant tearing modes; these are identified from the phase flip in correlated electron temperature fluctuations recorded by Thomson scattering. For the core n = 6 rational surface, an inward shift of 1.1 +/- 0.6 cm is observed, with an estimated reduction in q0 of 5%. This technique provides a

  12. {open_quotes}Local texture, current flow, and superconductive transport properties of Tl1223 deposits on practical substrates{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, D.K.; Specht, E.D.; Goyal, A.

    1996-05-01

    Quantitative investigations of the crystal grain orientations and electrical transport properties of high temperature superconducting (HTS)TiBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 8+x} (Tl1223) deposits on polycrystalline substrates show that current flow comprises percolative networks of strongly-coupled material. Superconductive transport properties on different samples, on the same samples at different widths, and on samples with artificially-induced strong flux pinning defects confirm the nature of current flow, and suggest that these materials may be useful as a new class of HTS conductors.

  13. Nitrate fate and transport through current and former depressional wetlands in an agricultural landscape, Choptank Watershed, Maryland, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denver, J.M.; Ator, S.W.; Lang, M.W.; Fisher, T.R.; Gustafson, A.B.; Fox, R.; Clune, J.W.; McCarty, G.W.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding local groundwater hydrology and geochemistry is critical for evaluating the effectiveness of wetlands at mitigating agricultural impacts on surface waters. The effectiveness of depressional wetlands at mitigating nitrate (NO3) transport from fertilized row crops, through groundwater, to local streams was examined in the watershed of the upper Choptank River, a tributary of Chesapeake Bay on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Hydrologic, geochemical, and water quality data were collected from January of 2008 through December of 2009 from surface waters and networks of piezometers installed in and around current or former depressional wetlands of three major types along a gradient of anthropogenic alteration: (1) natural wetlands with native vegetation (i.e., forested); (2) prior-converted croplands, which are former wetlands located in cultivated fields; and (3) hydrologically restored wetlands, including one wetland restoration and one shallow water management area. These data were collected to estimate the orientation of groundwater flow paths and likely interactions of groundwater containing NO3 from agricultural sources with reducing conditions associated with wetlands of different types. Natural wetlands were found to have longer periods of soil saturation and reducing conditions conducive to denitrification compared to the other wetland types studied. Because natural wetlands are typically located in groundwater recharge areas along watershed divides, nitrogen (N) from nearby agriculture was not intercepted. However, these wetlands likely improve water quality in adjacent streams via dilution. Soil and geochemical conditions conducive to denitrification were also present in restored wetlands and prior-converted croplands, and substantial losses of agricultural NO3 were observed in groundwater flowing through these wetland sediments. However, delivery of NO3 from agricultural areas through groundwater to these wetlands resulting in opportunities for

  14. Engineering America's Current and Future Space Transportation Systems: 50 Years of Systems Engineering Innovation for Sustainable Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dmbacher, Daniel L.; Lyles, Garry M.; McConnaughey, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has delivered space transportation solutions for America's complex missions, ranging from scientific payloads that expand knowledge, such as the Hubble Space Telescope, to astronauts and lunar rovers destined for voyages to the Moon. Currently, the venerable Space Shuttle, which has been in service since 1981, provides the United States' (U.S.) capability for both crew and heavy cargo to low-Earth orbit to' construct the International Space Station, before the Shuttle is retired in 2010. In the next decade, NASA will replace this system with a duo of launch vehicles: the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle and the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle (Figure 1). The goals for this new system include increased safety and reliability coupled with lower operations costs that promote sustainable space exploration for decades to come. The Ares I will loft the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, while the heavy-lift Ares V will carry the Altair Lunar Lander and the equipment and supplies needed to construct a lunar outpost for a new generation of human and robotic space pioneers. This paper will provide details of the in-house systems engineering and vehicle integration work now being performed for the Ares I and planned for the Ares V. It will give an overview of the Ares I system-level test activities, such as the ground vibration testing that will be conducted in the Marshall Center's Dynamic Test Stand to verify the integrated vehicle stack's structural integrity and to validate computer modeling and simulation (Figure 2), as well as the main propulsion test article analysis to be conducted in the Static Test Stand. These activities also will help prove and refine mission concepts of operation, while supporting the spectrum of design and development work being performed by Marshall's Engineering Directorate, ranging from launch vehicles and lunar rovers to scientific spacecraft and associated experiments

  15. Numerical and theoretical evaluations of AC losses for single and infinite numbers of superconductor strips with direct and alternating transport currents in external AC magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, K.; Funaki, K.; Shikimachi, K.; Hirano, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2010-11-01

    AC losses in a superconductor strip are numerically evaluated by means of a finite element method formulated with a current vector potential. The expressions of AC losses in an infinite slab that corresponds to a simple model of infinitely stacked strips are also derived theoretically. It is assumed that the voltage-current characteristics of the superconductors are represented by Bean’s critical state model. The typical operation pattern of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil with direct and alternating transport currents in an external AC magnetic field is taken into account as the electromagnetic environment for both the single strip and the infinite slab. By using the obtained results of AC losses, the influences of the transport currents on the total losses are discussed quantitatively.

  16. Southward transport of radiocesium discharged directly from Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants across the Kuroshio Extension Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Murata, Akihiko; Kawano, Takeshi; Aoyama, Michio

    2013-04-01

    south of the Kuroshio Extension Current, which is boundary between the transition area and subtropical region, we found obvious maxima of radiocesium just below the mixing layer and deeper penetration depth of the Fukushima-derived radiocesium. Water density range of the subsurface and deeper layers in the subtropical stations where the Fukushima-derived radiocesium was observed agrees with those of the mixing layers in the transition area where the relative high concentration of Fukushima-derived radiocesium was measured. These results suggest that the radiocesium discharged directly into the transition area have been transported southwardly to the subtropical region across the Kuroshio Extension Current during the past one year.

  17. Novel free-boundary equilibrium and transport solver with theory-based models and its validation against ASDEX Upgrade current ramp scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fable, E.; Angioni, C.; Casson, F. J.; Told, D.; Ivanov, A. A.; Jenko, F.; McDermott, R. M.; Medvedev, S. Yu; Pereverzev, G. V.; Ryter, F.; Treutterer, W.; Viezzer, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2013-12-01

    Tokamak scenario development requires an understanding of the properties that determine the kinetic profiles in non-steady plasma phases and of the self-consistent evolution of the magnetic equilibrium. Current ramps are of particular interest since many transport-relevant parameters explore a large range of values and their impact on transport mechanisms has to be assessed. To this purpose, a novel full-discharge modelling tool has been developed, which couples the transport code ASTRA (Pereverzev et al 1991 IPP Report 5/42) and the free boundary equilibrium code SPIDER (Ivanov et al 2005 32nd EPS Conf. on Plasma Physics vol 29C (ECA) P-5.063 and http://epsppd.epfl.ch/Tarragona/pdf/P5_063.pdf), utilizing a specifically designed coupling scheme. The current ramp-up phase can be accurately and reliably simulated using this scheme, where a plasma shape, position and current controller is applied, which mimics the one of ASDEX Upgrade. Transport of energy is provided by theory-based models (e.g. TGLF (Staebler et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 055909)). A recipe based on edge-relevant parameters (Scott 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 1845) is proposed to resolve the low current phase of the current ramps, where the impact of the safety factor on micro-instabilities could make quasi-linear approaches questionable in the plasma outer region. Current ramp scenarios, selected from ASDEX Upgrade discharges, are then simulated to validate both the coupling with the free-boundary evolution and the prediction of profiles. Analysis of the underlying transport mechanisms is presented, to clarify the possible physics origin of the observed L-mode empirical energy confinement scaling. The role of toroidal micro-instabilities (ITG, TEM) and of non-linear effects is discussed.

  18. New direct estimates of Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water transport through the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone and its relationship to the North Atlantic Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Amy; Furey, Heather; Xu, Xiaobiao

    2015-04-01

    Detailed observations of the pathways, transports and water properties of dense overflows associated with the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) provide critical benchmarks for climate models and mixing parameterizations. A recent two-year time series from eight moorings offers the first long-term simultaneous observations of the hydrographic properties and transport of Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW) flowing westward through the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ), a major deep gap in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) connecting the eastern and western basins of the North Atlantic. In addition, current meters up to 500-m depth and satellite altimetry allow us to investigate the overlying North Atlantic Current (NAC) as a source of ISOW transport variability. Using the isohaline 34.94 to define the ISOW layer, the two year mean and standard deviation of ISOW transport was -1.7 ± 1.5 Sv, compared to -2.4 ± 3.0 Sv reported by Saunders for a 13-month period in 1988-1989 using the same isohaline. Differences in the two estimates are partly explained by limitations of the Saunders array, but more importantly reflect the strong low-frequency variability in ISOW transport through CGFZ (which includes complete reversals). Both the observations and output from a multi-decadal simulation of the North Atlantic using the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) forced with interannually varying wind and buoyancy fields indicate a strong positive correlation between ISOW transport and the strength of the NAC through the CGFZ. This result raises new questions regarding the interaction of the upper and lower limbs of the AMOC, downstream propagation of ISOW transport variability in the Deep Western Boundary Current and alternative pathways of ISOW across the MAR.

  19. Quantification of soil-to-plant transport of recombinant nucleopolyhedrovirus: effects of soil type and moisture, air currents, and precipitation.

    PubMed

    Fuxa, J R; Richter, A R

    2001-11-01

    Significantly more occlusion bodies (OB) of DuPont viral construct HzSNPV-LqhIT2, expressing a scorpion toxin, were transported by artificial rainfall to cotton plants from sandy soil (70:15:15 sand-silt-clay) than from silt (15:70:15) and significantly more from silt than from clay (15:15:70). The amounts transported by 5 versus 50 mm of precipitation were the same, and transport was zero when there was no precipitation. In treatments that included precipitation, the mean number of viable OB transported to entire, 25- to 35-cm-tall cotton plants ranged from 56 (clay soil, 5 mm of rain) to 226 (sandy soil, 50 mm of rain) OB/plant. In a second experiment, viral transport increased with increasing wind velocity (0, 16, and 31 km/h) and was greater in dry (-1.0 bar of matric potential) than in moist (-0.5 bar) soil. Wind transport was greater for virus in a clay soil than in silt or sand. Only 3.3 x 10(-7) (clay soil, 5 mm rain) to 1.3 x 10(-6) (sandy soil, 50 mm rain) of the OB in surrounding soil in experiment 1 or 1.1 x 10(-7) (-0.5 bar sandy soil, 16-km/h wind) to 1.3 x 10(-6) (-1.0 bar clay soil, 31-km/h wind) in experiment 2 were transported by rainfall or wind to cotton plants. This reduces the risk of environmental release of a recombinant nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV), because only a very small proportion of recombinant virus in the soil reservoir is transported to vegetation, where it can be ingested by and replicate in new host insects. PMID:11679341

  20. Transport mechanism of reverse surface leakage current in AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistor with SiN passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xue-Feng; Fan, Shuang; Chen, Yong-He; Kang, Di; Zhang, Jian-Kun; Wang, Chong; Mo, Jiang-Hui; Li, Liang; Ma, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Hao, Yue

    2015-02-01

    The transport mechanism of reverse surface leakage current in the AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT) becomes one of the most important reliability issues with the downscaling of feature size. In this paper, the research results show that the reverse surface leakage current in AlGaN/GaN HEMT with SiN passivation increases with the enhancement of temperature in the range from 298 K to 423 K. Three possible transport mechanisms are proposed and examined to explain the generation of reverse surface leakage current. By comparing the experimental data with the numerical transport models, it is found that neither Fowler-Nordheim tunneling nor Frenkel-Poole emission can describe the transport of reverse surface leakage current. However, good agreement is found between the experimental data and the two-dimensional variable range hopping (2D-VRH) model. Therefore, it is concluded that the reverse surface leakage current is dominated by the electron hopping through the surface states at the barrier layer. Moreover, the activation energy of surface leakage current is extracted, which is around 0.083 eV. Finally, the SiN passivated HEMT with a high Al composition and a thin AlGaN barrier layer is also studied. It is observed that 2D-VRH still dominates the reverse surface leakage current and the activation energy is around 0.10 eV, which demonstrates that the alteration of the AlGaN barrier layer does not affect the transport mechanism of reverse surface leakage current in this paper. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61334002, 61106106, and 61474091), the Opening Project of Science and Technology on Reliability Physics and Application Technology of Electronic Component Laboratory, China (Grant No. ZHD201206), the New Experiment Development Funds for Xidian University, China (Grant No. SY1213), the 111 Project, China (Grant No. B12026), the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars

  1. Analysis for Heat Transfer in a High Current-Passing Carbon Nanosphere Using Nontraditional Thermal Transport Model.

    PubMed

    Hol C Y; Chen, B C; Tsai, Y H; Ma, C; Wen, M Y

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the thermal transport in hollow microscale and nanoscale spheres subject to electrical heat source using nontraditional thermal transport model. Working as supercapacitor electrodes, carbon hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres needs excellent heat transfer characteristics to maintain high specific capacitance, long cycle life, and high power density. In the nanoscale regime, the prediction of heat transfer from the traditional heat conduction equation based on Fourier's law deviates from the measured data. Consequently, the electrical heat source-induced heat transfer characteristics in hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres are studied using nontraditional thermal transport model. The effects of parameters on heat transfer in the hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres are discussed in this study. The results reveal that the heat transferred into the spherical interior, temperature and heat flux in the hollow sphere decrease with the increasing Knudsen number when the radius of sphere is comparable to the mean free path of heat carriers. PMID:26726687

  2. Sediment transport on macrotidal flats in Garolim Bay, west coast of Korea: significance of wind waves and asymmetry of tidal currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee J.; Jo, Hyung R.; Chu, Yong S.; Bahk, Kyung S.

    2004-05-01

    A self-recording instrument, named Tidal Sediment Dynamics Observational System (TISDOS), was built to monitor transport characteristics of nearbed sediments on tidal flats. It was deployed on a tidal flat in the semi-enclosed Garolim Bay, west coast of Korea, over a 15-day period between 5 and 20 January 2002 to examine sediment-transport processes during winter seasons. The measurements involved brief durations of high waves allowing for observation of wave effects upon the sediment transport on the tidal flat. Time series of various hydrodynamic parameters (water depth, current velocities, wave height, suspended sediment concentration, and bed level) from point measurements show characteristic interrelationships between parameters on both temporal and spatial scales. The tidal flat is dominated by flooding currents up to 2 times stronger than ebb currents. The current speeds measured simultaneously at two stations along a cross-shore transect varied in harmony with water depth, reaching the maximum during spring tide that was steadily decreased onshore. The onshore decrease in current speed was compatible with a fining textural trend from sand on the lower flat to mud toward the upper flat. Both the maximum water depth and current speed during individual tidal cycles also show semi-diurnal asymmetry that was highlighted during spring tide. Waves were of critical importance in resuspending bed material and thus yielding higher suspended sediment concentrations. On the middle flat, the suspended sediment concentrations were highest, exceeding 400 mg/l at 0.5 m above the seabed during large waves (relative wave height, 0.33) under weakest neap currents. In this wavy climate, the suspended sediment concentration increased over time during ebb, in strong contrast with a gradual decrease through time after mid-flood peaks under tidal currents without waves. The daily vertical flux of suspended sediments trapped in a plastic bottle also indicates the significance of

  3. Pathways of PFOA to the Arctic: variabilities and contributions of oceanic currents and atmospheric transport and chemistry sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmler, I.; Lammel, G.

    2010-10-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and other perfluorinated compounds are industrial chemicals in use for decades which resist degradation in the environment and seem to accumulate in polar regions. Transport of PFOA was modeled using a spatially resolved global multicompartment model including fully coupled three-dimensional ocean and atmosphere general circulation models, and two-dimensional top soil, vegetation surfaces, and sea ice compartments. In addition to primary emissions, the formation of PFOA in the atmosphere from degradation of 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol was included as a PFOA source. Oceanic transport, delivered 14.8±5.0 (8-23) t a-1 to the Arctic, strongly influenced by changes in water transport, which determined its interannual variability. This pathway constituted the dominant source of PFOA to the Arctic. Formation of PFOA in the atmosphere led to episodic transport events (timescale of days) into the Arctic with small spatial extent. Deposition in the polar region was found to be dominated by wet deposition over land, and shows maxima in boreal winter. The total atmospheric deposition of PFOA in the Arctic in the 1990s was ≈1 t a-1, much higher than previously estimated, and is dominated by primary emissions rather than secondary formation.

  4. Pathways of PFOA to the Arctic: variabilities and contributions of oceanic currents and atmospheric transport and chemistry sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmler, I.; Lammel, G.

    2010-05-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and other perfluorinated compounds are industrial chemicals in use since decades which resist degradation in the environment and seem to accumulate in polar regions. Transport of PFOA was modeled using a spatially resolved global multicompartment model including fully coupled three-dimensional ocean and atmosphere general circulation models, and two-dimensional top soil, vegetation surfaces, and sea ice compartments. In addition to primary emissions, the formation of PFOA in the atmosphere from degradation of 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol was included as a PFOA source. Oceanic transport, delivered 14.8±5.0 (8-23) t a-1 to the Arctic, strongly influenced by changes in water transport, which determined its interannual variability. This pathway constituted the dominant source of PFOA to the Arctic. Formation of PFOA in the atmosphere lead to episodic transport events (timescale of days) into the Arctic with small spatial extent. Deposition in the polar region was found to be dominated by wet deposition over land, and shows maxima in boreal winter. The total atmospheric deposition of PFOA in the Arctic in the 1990s was ≍1 t a-1, much higher than previously estimated, and is dominated by primary emissions rather than secondarily formed.

  5. An overview of the current technology relevant to the design and development of the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Digendra K.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project was to review the latest literature relevant to the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). The search was focused on the following engine components: (1) gas generator; (2) hydrostatic/fluid bearings; (3) seals/clearances; (4) heat exchanges; (5) nozzles; (6) nozzle/main combustion chamber joint; (7) main injector face plate; and (8) rocket engine.

  6. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The current status of the Active Controls Technology (ACT) for the advanced subsonic transport project is investigated through analysis of the systems technical data. Control systems technologies under examination include computerized reliability analysis, pitch axis fly by wire actuator, flaperon actuation system design trade study, control law synthesis and analysis, flutter mode control and gust load alleviation analysis, and implementation of alternative ACT systems. Extensive analysis of the computer techniques involved in each system is included.

  7. Dependence of Bootstrap Current, Stability, and Transport on the Safety Factor Profile in DIII-D Steady-state Scenario Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, C. T.; Ferron, J. R.; Luce, T. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Deboo, J. C.; Petrie, T. W.; Petty, C. C.; La Haye, R. J.; White, A. E.; Turco, F.; Doyle, E. J.; Rhodes, T. L.; Zeng, L.

    2009-11-01

    A high beta, high gain steady state tokamak scenario with large bootstrap current fraction will have strong coupling between the current density and the pressure gradient through turbulent transport and the bootstrap current. To address this coupling experimentally, a scan of the safety factor minimum (qmin, from 1.1 to over 2) and edge value (q95, from 4.5 to 6.5) was performed. The bootstrap current fraction increases with qmin and q95 by virtue of increasing density gradients. Compared to lower qmin, qmin>2 has lower n=1 stability limits, enhanced drift wave growth rates, higher low-k density fluctuations, and lower confinement. At qmin>2 and q95=4.5 the unsustainable condition JBS> JTotal occurs near the axis. These considerations suggest intermediate q is the optimal operating point.

  8. Suppression of roll-off characteristics of organic light-emitting diodes by narrowing current injection/transport area to 50 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Kyohei Inoue, Munetomo; Yoshida, Kou; Nakanotani, Hajime; Mikhnenko, Oleksandr; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen E-mail: adachi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Adachi, Chihaya E-mail: adachi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2015-03-02

    Using e-beam nanolithography, the current injection/transport area in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) was confined into a narrow linear structure with a minimum width of 50 nm. This caused suppression of Joule heating and partial separation of polarons and excitons, so the charge density where the electroluminescent efficiency decays to the half of the initial value (J{sub 0}) was significantly improved. A device with a narrow current injection width of 50 nm exhibited a J{sub 0} that was almost two orders of magnitude higher compared with that of the unpatterned OLED.

  9. The effects of seasonal and interannual variability of oceanic structure in the western Pacific North Equatorial Current on larval transport of the Japanese eel Anguilla japonica.

    PubMed

    Zenimoto, K; Kitagawa, T; Miyazaki, S; Sasai, Y; Sasaki, H; Kimura, S

    2009-06-01

    As the North Equatorial Current (NEC)-bifurcation is known to be related to El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, the influence of the position of the NEC bifurcation on transport success of the larval Japanese eel Anguilla japonica was investigated. Using a Lagrangian modelling approach, larval transport was simulated and the relative influence of El Niño and La Niña events and the NEC-bifurcation position on the success of particle transport analysed. The number of particles transported from the NEC to the Kuroshio tended to be lowest during El Niño years, and differences between La Niña and regular years were small. The transport success observed in simulations showed some relationships to annual A. japonica glass eel recruitment to Tanegashima Island over 1993 to 2001, but not in 2002. The study shows that particle tracking simulations can be used to improve knowledge of the oceanic migration of A. japonica but further studies are required, including comparisons with the effects on larval survival of fluctuations in temperature and food availability. PMID:20735678

  10. Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stollar, Dewey H.

    The purpose of this NEFP satellite study is to provide an overview of pupil transportation. The first phase of the study discusses the early legal and financial bases for student transportation, the second the current status of student transportation, and the third the future status of student transportation needs and financing for 1980.…

  11. Influence of Florida Current, gyres and wind-driven circulation on transport of larvae and recruitment in the Florida Keys coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Thomas N.; Rooth, Claes; Williams, Elizabeth; McGowan, Michael; Szmant, Alina F.; Clarke, M. E.

    1992-07-01

    Physical processes with high potential influence on the transport and recruitment of fish, lobster and other larvae in the Florida Keys are discussed using current measurements from standard moored instrumentation, plus bottom mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profile observations, interdisciplinary surveys of water mass properties, nutrients and planktonic distributions, and satellite derived surface thermal patterns. A cold, cyclonic gyre forms over the Pourtales Terrace seaward of the middle and lower Keys where the Florida Current shifts from eastward to northward flow. Formation of the gyre appears to be related to offshore meander motion of the Florida Current and its cyclonic curvature. Prevailing easterly winds over the gyre circulation cause a convergence of Ekman transports into the coastal zone. The gyre circulation combined with the shoreward convergence of Ekman flow facilitates the transport of pelagic larvae from the Current to the fringing reefs. Duration of the gyre is approximately 1 month, which matches the planktonic stage of fish and slipper lobster larvae, and thus provides a mechanism for larvae retention and local recruitment. Abundant microzooplankton food supply for the larvae is available in the gyre interior due in part to concentration mechanisms and ecosystem response to gyre-induced upwelling of deeper, nutrient enriched waters. Gyre retention times are too short to be a factor in recruitment of locally spawned Florida spiny lobster larvae, which have a planktonic stage that may last up to 12 months. This indicates that Florida spiny lobster should recruit from remote upstream sources in the Caribbean or spend most of their long planktonic stage in Florida Bay of the southwest Florida shelf.

  12. Neutralization and transport of high-current proton beams in a two-stage linear induction accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkowski, Cz.; Kerslick, G. S.; Nation, J. A.; Ivers, J.

    1992-03-01

    Experimental results on the propagation and transport efficiency of a 1 MV, 5 kA, 50 ns annular proton beam through a two-stage linear induction accelerator are presented. The beam is generated in a magnetically insulated diode and propagates with high-efficiency along a 0.6 T axial magnetic field to a second accelerating gap located 30 cm downstream. The second accelerating gap increases the beam energy to 1.3 MeV. A full-cusp geometry provides the magnetic insulation in both the diode and the second gap. We report in this paper an 86% (±5%) transport efficiency and an increase of 1.6° in the beam divergence for propagation through the post acceleration gap.

  13. Impact of slowdown of Atlantic overturning circulation on heat and freshwater transports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Kathryn A.; Drushka, Kyla; Thompson, LuAnne; Le Bars, Dewi; McDonagh, Elaine L.

    2016-07-01

    Recent measurements of the strength of the Atlantic overturning circulation at 26°N show a 1 year drop and partial recovery amid a gradual weakening. To examine the extent and impact of the slowdown on basin wide heat and freshwater transports for 2004-2012, a box model that assimilates hydrographic and satellite observations is used to estimate heat transport and freshwater convergence as residuals of the heat and freshwater budgets. Using an independent transport estimate, convergences are converted to transports, which show a high level of spatial coherence. The similarity between Atlantic heat transport and the Agulhas Leakage suggests that it is the source of the surface heat transport anomalies. The freshwater budget in the North Atlantic is dominated by a decrease in freshwater flux. The increasing salinity during the slowdown supports modeling studies that show that heat, not freshwater, drives trends in the overturning circulation in a warming climate.

  14. Current and new developments in transport and regulatory issues concerning radioisotopes: managing change for minimum business impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Neil; Coppell, David; Rogers, David; Schrader, John

    2004-09-01

    Changes in the regulatory framework governing the Radiation Processing Industry have the potential to make a real business impact on day-to-day profitability. Many areas of the Radiation Processing Industry are affected by changes in the regulatory framework within which these areas are managed. When planning for such changes the transportation element in the shipment of sealed cobalt radiation sources is an area that is often neglected by some parts of the distribution chain. A balance must be struck between the cobalt supplier and the facility operator/customer that rests upon how much the customer needs to know about the intricacies of cobalt shipment. The objective of this paper is to highlight areas of possible business impact and reassure the users of sealed radiation sources that the global suppliers of these products are used to negotiating local variations in regulations governing the physical transportation of radiation sources, changes in regulations governing the design, manufacture and use of transportation containers and changes in the availability of commercial shippers and shipping routes. The major suppliers of industrial quantities of cobalt-60 are well placed to lead their customers through this complex process as a matter of routine.

  15. Big-Ass Holes in the Surfzone: Waves, Currents, and Sediment Transport in a Seafloor Perturbation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, M. R.; Elgar, S.; Raubenheimer, B.

    2010-12-01

    The evolution of 2-m deep, 10-m diameter holes excavated in the inner surfzone on an energetic beach was monitored with a downward-looking current profiler at the center of each hole, a surfboard-mounted GPS-sonar survey system, and tall divers with graduated poles, tape measures, marked lines, and long arms. Waves and currents were measured with up to 14 current meters and profilers over a 1600-sq-m area. The mean water depth surrounding the holes was 1.5 m and the tidal range was 1 m. Significant wave heights ranged from 0.2 to 1.2 m, and mean current speeds ranged from 0.1 to 1.2 m/s. The surfzone holes filled with sand in 2 to 6 days, in contrast to a previous study in which holes of the same size in the swashzone filled in a few hours. Preliminary results suggest that the rate of change of the sand level in the holes was correlated more strongly with wave heights (and thus with wave-orbital velocities) than with mean current speeds. In a hole dug in the trough between a sandbar and the shoreline, the sand level rose relatively slowly (1 m in 4.5 days) when wave heights were small (0.4 m) and mean currents were increasing (from 0.15 to 0.8 m/s), then filled rapidly (0.8 m in 6 hours) as wave heights increased (to 1.1 m) and mean currents increased (to 1.2 m/s). For a second hole dug in the same location, wave heights were moderate and variable (0.3 to 0.8 m), mean flow speeds were moderate and increasing (from 0.3 to 0.7 m/s), and the hole filled steadily (1.7 m in 2.5 days). In some instances, horizontal flow patterns were consistent with rip current circulation, with converging alongshore currents feeding an offshore jet centered at the depression. Here, volume changes in the hole will be compared with the observed waves, wave-orbital velocities, mean currents, and surrounding bathymetry. These data were collected in August 2010 at the US Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility in Duck, North Carolina. Funded by a National Security Science and

  16. Turbulence- and particle-resolving model of sediment transport and the formation of bedforms under waves and unidirectional currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeeckle, M. W.; Nelson, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Turbulence and bedload sediment transport over evolving bedforms are directly simulated by a coupled large eddy simulation (LES) of the fluid and the discrete element method (DEM) for every sediment grain. The LES and DEM models are fully coupled in momentum. Information from the LES is used to specify forces on the DEM particles, and those particle forces are given in an equal and opposite direction in the filtered and discretized Navier-Stokes equations at each grid cell in the finite volume LES. This modeling system directly calculates the motion of all grains by resolved turbulence structures. LES-DEM simulations of bedload transport of initially flat beds has shown that the penetration of the bed by smaller intense vortical structures within a broader sweep structure are largely responsible for sediment entrainment. To validate the model we compare our simulations with previous synchronous measurements of flow and transport in an oscillatory flow duct and downstream of a negative step. LES-DEM simulations in an oscillatory boundary layer of the formation of ripples from an initially flat bed will be presented. Unidirectional LES-DEM simulations over an initially rippled bed will also be presented, and simulations of the formation of bedforms from flat beds under unidirectional flow are ongoing. Flow separation over bedforms produces large scale structures with primarily a cross-stream orientation of the vorticity vector. Traveling downstream, these structures rapidly transform into structures with a random direction of vorticity. The point of reattachment is not stable, moving upstream and downstream. At, and downstream of, the point of reattachment many of the structures produced in the shear layer impinge on the bed. LES-DEM simulations over ripples show that the penetration of large scale structures downstream of flow reattachment bring high downstream momentum fluid into the bed and create localized, episodic bursts of entrainment. Particles entrained near

  17. NON-LINEAR VISCO-RESISTIVE COLLISIONAL TRANSPORT IN TOROIDAL ELLIPTICAL PLASMAS WITH TRIANGULARITY AND HOLE CURRENTS: A REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Pablo; Castro, Enrique; Puerta, Julio

    2009-07-26

    Non-linear plasma diffusion effects due to hole currents in tokamaks is analyzed in this work. Since the recent discovery of hole currents in tokamaks, this matter has become very important in confinement and instabilities in tokamaks plasmas. The analysis here presented includes non-linear flows as well as hole currents. In the case of low vorticity plasmas our treatment is performed using MHD equations, an it is more suitable for plasmas with very low levels of turbulence, as in the H-mode. The present treatment follows the lines of previous works, and some of the equations and results look like those obtained on these papers. However, the form of the family of the magnetic surfaces is very different to previous treatment, since the hole current modifies those families in a very important way. Elliptic plasmas with triangularity are considered. Pfirsch-Schlueter type currents are obtained for these generalized cases. Diffusion with and without holes are calculated and compared for several values of ellipticity and triangularity. Negative and positive triangularities are considered. In most of the calculations triangularity improves confinement, but the results are different for the positive than for the negative case.

  18. Information needs for siting new, and evaluating current, nuclear facilities: ecology, fate and transport, and human health.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Clarke, James; Gochfeld, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The USA is entering an era of energy diversity, and increasing nuclear capacity and concerns focus on accidents, security, waste, and pollution. Physical buffers that separate outsiders from nuclear facilities often support important natural ecosystems but may contain contaminants. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licenses nuclear reactors; the applicant provides environmental assessments that serve as the basis for Environmental Impact Statements developed by NRC. We provide a template for the types of information needed for safe siting of nuclear facilities with buffers in three categories: ecological, fate and transport, and human health information that can be used for risk evaluations. Each item on the lists is an indicator for evaluation, and individual indicators can be selected for specific region. Ecological information needs include biodiversity (species, populations, communities) and structure and functioning of ecosystems, habitats, and landscapes, in addition to common, abundant, and unique species and endangered and rare ones. The key variables of fate and transport are sources of release for radionuclides and other chemicals, nature of releases (atmospheric vapors, subsurface liquids), features, and properties of environmental media (wind speed, direction and atmospheric stability, hydraulic gradient, hydraulic conductivity, groundwater chemistry). Human health aspects include receptor populations (demography, density, dispersion, and distance), potential pathways (drinking water sources, gardening, fishing), and exposure opportunities (lifestyle activities). For each of the three types of information needs, we expect that only a few of the indicators will be applicable to a particular site and that stakeholders should agree on a site-specific suite. PMID:20140506

  19. A review of new and current-use contaminants in the Arctic environment: evidence of long-range transport and indications of bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Vorkamp, Katrin; Rigét, Frank F

    2014-09-01

    Systematic monitoring of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Arctic has been conducted for several years, in combination with assessments of POP levels in the Arctic, POP exposure and biological effects. Meanwhile, environmental research continues to detect new contaminants some of which could be potential new Arctic pollutants. This study summarizes the empirical evidence that is currently available of those compounds in the Arctic that are not commonly included in chemical monitoring programmes. The study has focused on novel flame retardants, e.g. alternatives to the banned polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), current-use pesticides and various other compounds, i.e. synthetic musk compounds, siloxanes, phthalic acid esters and halogenated compounds like hexachlorobutadiene, octachlorostyrene, pentachlorobenzene and polychlorinated naphthalenes. For a number of novel brominated flame retardants, e.g. 2,3-bibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE), bis(2-ethylhexyl)tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)-ethane (BTBPE), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB) and hexabromobenzene (HBBz), transport to the Arctic has been documented, but evidence of bioaccumulation is sparse and ambiguous. For short-chain chlorinated paraffins and dechlorane plus, however, increasing evidence shows both long-range transport and bioaccumulation. Ice cores have documented increasing concentrations of some current-use pesticides, e.g. chlorpyrifos, endosulfan and trifluralin, and bioaccumulation has been observed for pentachloroanisole, chorpyrifos, endosulfan and metoxychlor, however, the question of biomagnification remains unanswered. PMID:24997943

  20. Mathematical models to describe iontophoretic transport in vitro and in vivo and the effect of current application on the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Gratieri, Taís; Kalia, Yogeshvar N

    2013-02-01

    The architecture and composition of the stratum corneum make it a particularly effective barrier against the topical and transdermal delivery of hydrophilic molecules and ions. As a result, different strategies have been explored in order to expand the range of therapeutic agents that can be administered by this route. Iontophoresis involves the application of a small electric potential to increase transport into and across the skin. Since current flow is preferentially via transport pathways with at least some aqueous character, it is ideal for hydrosoluble molecules containing ionisable groups. Hence, the physicochemical properties that limit partitioning and passive diffusion through the intercellular lipid matrix are beneficial for electrically-assisted delivery. The presence of fixed ionisable groups in the skin (pI 4-4.5) means that application of the electric field results in a convective solvent flow (i.e., electroosmosis) in the direction of ion motion so as to neutralise membrane charge. Hence, under physiological conditions, cation electrotransport is due to both electromigration and electroosmosis-their relative contribution depends on the formulation conditions and the physicochemical properties of the permeant. Different mathematical models have been developed to provide a theoretical framework in order to explain iontophoretic transport kinetics. They usually involve solutions of the Nernst-Planck equation - using either the constant field (Goldman) or electroneutrality (Nernst) approximations - with or without terms for the convective solvent flow component. Investigations have also attempted to elucidate the nature of ion transport pathways and to explain the effect of current application on the electrical properties of the skin-more specifically, the stratum corneum. These studies have led to the development of different equivalent circuit models. These range from simple parallel arrangements of a resistor and a capacitor to the inclusion of the

  1. Current-voltage relations of sodium-coupled sugar transport across the apical membrane of Necturus small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, J Y; Hudson, R L; Schultz, S G

    1986-01-01

    The current-voltage (I-V) relations of the rheogenic Na-sugar cotransport mechanism at the apical membrane of Necturus small intestine were determined from the relations between the electrical potential difference across the apical membrane, psi mc, and that across the entire epithelium, psi ms, when the latter was varied over the range +/- 200 mV, under steady conditions in the presence of galactose and after the current across the apical membrane carried by the cotransporter, ImSNa, is blocked by the addition of phloridzin to the mucosal solution. ImSNa was found to be strongly dependent upon psi mc over the range -50 mV less than psi mc less than EmSNa where EmSNa is the "zero current" or "reversal" potential. Over the range of values of psi mc encountered under physiological conditions the cotransporter may be modeled as a conductance in series with an electromotive force so that ImSNa = gmSNa (EmSNa - psi mc) where gmSNa is the contribution of this mechanism to the conductance of the apical membrane and is "near constant." In several instances ImSNa "saturated" at large hyperpolarizing or depolarizing values of psi mc. The values of EmSNa determined in the presence of 1, 5, and 15 mM galactose strongly suggest that if the Na-galactose cotransporters are kinetically homogeneous, the stoichiometry of this coupled process is unity. Finally, the shapes of the observed I-V relations are consistent with the predictions of a simple kinetic model which conforms with current notions regarding the mechanico-kinetic properties of this cotransport process. PMID:3820278

  2. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: current and advanced act control system definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The Current and Advanced Technology ACT control system definition tasks of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program are summarized. The systems mechanize six active control functions: (1) pitch augmented stability (2) angle of attack limiting (3) lateral/directional augmented stability (4) gust load alleviation (5) maneuver load control and (6) flutter mode control. The redundant digital control systems meet all function requirements with required reliability and declining weight and cost as advanced technology is introduced.

  3. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Current and Advanced Technology ACT control system definition tasks of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program are summarized. The systems mechanize six active control functions: (1) pitch augmented stability; (2) angle of attack limiting; (3) lateral/directional augmented stability; (4) gust load alleviation; (5) maneuver load control; and (6) flutter mode control. The redundant digital control systems meet all function requirements with required reliability and declining weight and cost as advanced technology is introduced.

  4. Current status, research needs, and opportunities in applications of surface processing to transportation and utilities technologies. Proceedings of a December 1991 workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Czanderna, A.W.; Landgrebe, A.R.

    1992-09-01

    Goal of surface processing is to develop innovative methods of surface modification and characterization for optimum performance and environmental protection for cost-effective operational lifetimes of systems, materials, and components used in transportation and utilities. These proceedings document the principal discussions and conclusions reached at the workshop; they document chapters about the current status of surface characterization with focus on composition, structure, bonding, and atomic-scale topography of surfaces. Also documented are chapters on the current status of surface modification techniques: electrochemical, plasma-aided, reactive and nonreactive physical vapor deposition, sol-gel coatings, high-energy ion implantation, ion-assisted deposition, organized molecular assemblies, solar energy. Brief chapters in the appendices document basic research in surface science by NSF, Air Force, and DOE. Participants at the workshop were invited to serve on 10 working groups. Separate abstracts were prepared for the data base where appropriate.

  5. Observations of sediment transport on the continental shelf off the mouth of the Waiapu River, New Zealand: Evidence for current-supported gravity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yanxia; Wright, L. Donelson; Friedrichs, Carl T.

    2008-03-01

    Instrumented tripods deployed at depths of 40 and 60 m on the shelf off the mouth of the Waiapu River on the east coast of New Zealand's North Island recorded data on waves, currents, and sediment fluxes from May 22 to August 10, 2004. Three major flood events and several wave events occurred during the deployment. Data from acoustic Doppler velocimeters and profilers revealed that downslope sediment fluxes accompanied a flood event of late June, during which near-bed downslope current speeds approached 0.5 m s -1. The most pronounced downslope transport within the benthic layer occurred the day after peak flood but coincided with strong isobath-parallel currents. Suspended sediment concentrations about 1 m above the bed were on the order of 2-4 g l -1 at times of maximum seaward flow. Suspension of freshly discharged sediment within the hyperpycnal layer over much of the profile was maintained by the high bed stresses associated with the strong benthic currents, in contrast to the wave-supported sediment gravity flows recently reported on other river-nourished shelf systems. Nonetheless, observed concentrations and velocities were largely consistent with the dynamics of critically stratified sediment gravity flows based on equations previously applied elsewhere to wave-supported cases. Despite lower concentrations in current-supported gravity currents, the greater thickness results in similar total loads. In further contrast to earlier results, our data suggest that as sediment off the Waiapu flowed into deeper water across the seaward steepening bottom profile, auto-suspension may have aided in thickening and accelerating the gravity current.

  6. Application of acoustic-Doppler current profiler and expendable bathythermograph measurements to the study of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Dunworth, J. A.; Schubert, D. M.; Stalcup, M. C.; Barbour, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The degree to which Acoustic-Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data can provide quantitative measurements of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream is addressed. An algorithm is used to generate salinity from temperature and depth using an historical Temperature/Salinity relation for the NW Atlantic. Results have been simulated using CTD data and comparing real and pseudo salinity files. Errors are typically less than 2 dynamic cm for the upper 800 m out of a total signal of 80 cm (across the Gulf Stream). When combined with ADCP data for a near-surface reference velocity, transport errors in isopycnal layers are less than about 1 Sv (10 to the 6th power cu m/s), as is the difference in total transport for the upper 800 m between real and pseudo data. The method is capable of measuring the real variability of the Gulf Stream, and when combined with altimeter data, can provide estimates of the geoid slope with oceanic errors of a few parts in 10 to the 8th power over horizontal scales of 500 km.

  7. Interpretation of current-voltage relationships for "active" ion transport systems: I. Steady-state reaction-kinetic analysis of class-I mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hansen, U P; Gradmann, D; Sanders, D; Slayman, C L

    1981-01-01

    This paper develops a simple reaction-kinetic model to describe electrogenic pumping and co- (or counter-) transport of ions. It uses the standard steady-state approach for cyclic enzyme- or carrier-mediated transport, but does not assume rate-limitation by any particular reaction step. Voltage-dependence is introduced, after the suggestion of Läuger and Stark (Biochim. Biophys. Acta 211:458-466, 1970), via a symmetric Eyring barrier, in which the charge-transit reaction constants are written as k12 = ko12 exp(zF delta psi/2RT) and k21 = ko21 exp(-zF delta psi/2RT). For interpretation of current-voltage relationships, all voltage-independent reaction steps are lumped together, so the model in its simplest form can be described as a pseudo-2-state model. It is characterized by the two voltage-dependent reaction constants, two lumped voltage-independent reaction constants (k12, k21), and two reserve factors (ri, ro) which formally take account of carrier states that are indistinguishable in the current-voltage (I-V) analysis. The model generates a wide range of I-V relationships, depending on the relative magnitudes of the four reaction constants, sufficient to describe essentially all I-V datas now available on "active" ion-transport systems. Algebraic and numerical analysis of the reserve factors, by means of expanded pseudo-3-, 4-, and 5-state models, shows them to be bounded and not large for most combinations of reaction constants in the lumped pathway. The most important exception to this rule occurs when carrier decharging immediately follows charge transit of the membrane and is very fast relative to other constituent voltage-independent reactions. Such a circumstance generates kinetic equivalence of chemical and electrical gradients, thus providing a consistent definition of ion-motive forces (e.g., proton-motive force, PMF). With appropriate restrictions, it also yields both linear and log-linear relationships between net transport velocity and either

  8. Transport through an Anderson impurity: Current ringing, nonlinear magnetization, and a direct comparison of continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo and hierarchical quantum master equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härtle, R.; Cohen, G.; Reichman, D. R.; Millis, A. J.

    2015-08-01

    We give a detailed comparison of the hierarchical quantum master equation (HQME) method to a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo (CT-QMC) approach, assessing the usability of these numerically exact schemes as impurity solvers in practical nonequilibrium calculations. We review the main characteristics of the methods and discuss the scaling of the associated numerical effort. We substantiate our discussion with explicit numerical results for the nonequilibrium transport properties of a single-site Anderson impurity. The numerical effort of the HQME scheme scales linearly with the simulation time but increases (at worst exponentially) with decreasing temperature. In contrast, CT-QMC is less restricted by temperature at short times, but in general the cost of going to longer times is also exponential. After establishing the numerical exactness of the HQME scheme, we use it to elucidate the influence of different ways to induce transport through the impurity on the initial dynamics, discuss the phenomenon of coherent current oscillations, known as current ringing, and explain the nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the steady-state magnetization as a result of competing broadening effects. We also elucidate the pronounced nonlinear magnetization dynamics, which appears on intermediate time scales in the presence of an asymmetric coupling to the electrodes.

  9. Application of the loop method for correcting acoustic doppler current profiler discharge measurements biased by sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2006-01-01

    A systematic bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) is attributed to the movement of sediment near the streambed-an issue widely acknowledged by the scientific community. This systematic bias leads to an underestimation of measured velocity and discharge. The integration of a differentially corrected Global Positioning System (DGPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic bias associated with a moving bed. DGPS systems, however, cannot provide consistently accurate positions because of multipath errors and satellite signal reception problems on waterways with dense tree canopy along the banks, in deep valleys or canyons, and near bridges. An alternative method of correcting for the moving-bed bias was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  10. Imaging interfacial electrical transport in graphene–MoS{sub 2} heterostructures with electron-beam-induced-currents

    SciTech Connect

    White, E. R. Kerelsky, Alexander; Hubbard, William A.; Regan, B. C.; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B.; Mecklenburg, Matthew

    2015-11-30

    Heterostructure devices with specific and extraordinary properties can be fabricated by stacking two-dimensional crystals. Cleanliness at the inter-crystal interfaces within a heterostructure is crucial for maximizing device performance. However, because these interfaces are buried, characterizing their impact on device function is challenging. Here, we show that electron-beam induced current (EBIC) mapping can be used to image interfacial contamination and to characterize the quality of buried heterostructure interfaces with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. We applied EBIC and photocurrent imaging to map photo-sensitive graphene-MoS{sub 2} heterostructures. The EBIC maps, together with concurrently acquired scanning transmission electron microscopy images, reveal how a device's photocurrent collection efficiency is adversely affected by nanoscale debris invisible to optical-resolution photocurrent mapping.

  11. Imaging interfacial electrical transport in graphene-MoS2 heterostructures with electron-beam-induced-currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, E. R.; Kerelsky, Alexander; Hubbard, William A.; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B.; Mecklenburg, Matthew; Regan, B. C.

    2015-11-01

    Heterostructure devices with specific and extraordinary properties can be fabricated by stacking two-dimensional crystals. Cleanliness at the inter-crystal interfaces within a heterostructure is crucial for maximizing device performance. However, because these interfaces are buried, characterizing their impact on device function is challenging. Here, we show that electron-beam induced current (EBIC) mapping can be used to image interfacial contamination and to characterize the quality of buried heterostructure interfaces with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. We applied EBIC and photocurrent imaging to map photo-sensitive graphene-MoS2 heterostructures. The EBIC maps, together with concurrently acquired scanning transmission electron microscopy images, reveal how a device's photocurrent collection efficiency is adversely affected by nanoscale debris invisible to optical-resolution photocurrent mapping.

  12. Understanding the role of electron and hole trions on current transport in aluminium tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) using organic magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sijie; Gillin, W. P.; Willis, M.; Gotto, R.; Roy, K. A.; Kreouzis, T.; Rolfe, N. J.

    2014-01-27

    The change in current through an organic light emitting diode (OLED) when it is placed in a magnetic field has been dubbed organic magnetoresistance and provides a means to understand the spin interactions that are occurring in working devices. Whilst there are a wide range of interactions that have been proposed to be the cause of the measured effects, there is still a need to identify their individual roles and in particular how they respond to an applied magnetic field. In this work, we investigate the effect of changing the balance of electron and hole injection in a simple aluminium tris(8-hydroxyqinoline) based OLED and demonstrate that the triplet polaron interaction appears to be much stronger for electrons than for holes in this material.

  13. Flow structure and transport characteristics of feeding and exchange currents generated by upside-down Cassiopea jellyfish.

    PubMed

    Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Dollinger, Makani; Hamlet, Christina L; Colin, Sean P; Miller, Laura A

    2012-07-15

    Quantifying the flows generated by the pulsations of jellyfish bells is crucial for understanding the mechanics and efficiency of their swimming and feeding. Recent experimental and theoretical work has focused on the dynamics of vortices in the wakes of swimming jellyfish with relatively simple oral arms and tentacles. The significance of bell pulsations for generating feeding currents through elaborate oral arms and the consequences for particle capture are not as well understood. To isolate the generation of feeding currents from swimming, the pulsing kinematics and fluid flow around the benthic jellyfish Cassiopea spp. were investigated using a combination of videography, digital particle image velocimetry and direct numerical simulation. During the rapid contraction phase of the bell, fluid is pulled into a starting vortex ring that translates through the oral arms with peak velocities that can be of the order of 10 cm s(-1). Strong shear flows are also generated across the top of the oral arms throughout the entire pulse cycle. A coherent train of vortex rings is not observed, unlike in the case of swimming oblate medusae such as Aurelia aurita. The phase-averaged flow generated by bell pulsations is similar to a vertical jet, with induced flow velocities averaged over the cycle of the order of 1-10 mm s(-1). This introduces a strong near-horizontal entrainment of the fluid along the substrate and towards the oral arms. Continual flow along the substrate towards the jellyfish is reproduced by numerical simulations that model the oral arms as a porous Brinkman layer of finite thickness. This two-dimensional numerical model does not, however, capture the far-field flow above the medusa, suggesting that either the three-dimensionality or the complex structure of the oral arms helps to direct flow towards the central axis and up and away from the animal. PMID:22723475

  14. Spatial wildlife-vehicle collision models: a review of current work and its application to transportation mitigation projects.

    PubMed

    Gunson, Kari E; Mountrakis, Giorgos; Quackenbush, Lindi J

    2011-04-01

    In addition to posing a serious risk to motorist safety, vehicle collisions with wildlife are a significant threat for many species. Previous spatial modeling has concluded that wildlife-vehicle collisions (WVCs) exhibit clustering on roads, which is attributed to specific landscape and road-related factors. We reviewed twenty-four published manuscripts that used generalized linear models to statistically determine the influence that numerous explanatory predictors have on the location of WVCs. Our motivation was to summarize empirical WVC findings to facilitate application of this knowledge to planning, and design of mitigation strategies on roads. In addition, commonalities between studies were discussed and recommendations for future model design were made. We summarized the type and measurement of each significant predictor and whether they potentially increased or decreased the occurrence of collisions with ungulates, carnivores, small-medium vertebrates, birds, and amphibians and reptiles. WVCs commonly occurred when roads bisect favorable cover, foraging, or breeding habitat for specific species or groups of species. WVCs were generally highest on road sections with high traffic volumes, or low motorist visibility, and when roads cut through drainage movement corridors, or level terrain. Ungulates, birds, small-medium vertebrates, and carnivore collision locations were associated with road-side vegetation and other features such as salt pools. In several cases, results were spurious due to confounding and interacting predictors within the same model. For example, WVCs were less likely to occur when a road bisected steep slopes; however, steep slopes may be located along specific road-types and habitat that also influence the occurrence of WVCs. In conclusion, this review showed that much of the current literature has gleaned the obvious, broad-scale relationships between WVCs and predictors from available data sets, and localized studies can provide unique

  15. Limitations of Current GABA Agonists in Neonatal Seizures: Toward GABA Modulation Via the Targeting of Neuronal Cl− Transport

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Arjun; Walcott, Brian Patrick; Kahle, Kristopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care has advanced rapidly in the last 40 years, with dramatic decreases in mortality and morbidity; however, for neonatal seizures, neither therapies nor outcomes have changed significantly. Basic and clinical studies indicate that seizures in neonates have long-term neurodevelopmental and psychiatric consequences, highlighting the need for novel pharmacotherapeutics. First-line treatments targeting GABAA receptors, like barbiturates and benzodiazepines, are limited in their efficacy and carry significant risks to the developing brain. Here, we review the use of current GABA agonist therapies for neonatal seizures and suggest other treatment strategies given recent developments in the understanding of disease pathogenesis. One promising avenue is the indirect manipulation of the GABAergic system, via the modulation of neuronal Cl− gradients, by targeting the cation-Cl− cotransporters (NKCC1 and KCC2) or their regulatory signaling molecules. This strategy might yield a novel class of more efficacious anti-epileptics with fewer side effects by specifically addressing disease pathophysiology. Moreover, this strategy may have ramifications for other adult seizure syndromes in which GABA receptor-mediated depolarizations play a pathogenic role, such as temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:23805124

  16. Salinification and warming of the South Atlantic due to the Indonesian Throughflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bars, D.; Dijkstra, H. A.; de Ruijter, W. P. M.

    2012-04-01

    Experiments on the influence of the Indonesian Throughflow on the structure and water properties of the Southern Hemisphere supergyre is presented. In a strongly eddying global ocean model, we compare an upper ocean flow for a closed Indonesian Seaway experiment with that of a control simulation. Most of the volume transport from the Indonesian Throughflow flows through the Mozambique Channel into the Agulhas Current. Import of warm and fresh water from the Pacific leads to increasing temperature of the upper Indian Ocean and decreasing salinity of the Agulhas Current. Agulhas Leakage is strengthened and, even though its salinity decreases, brings extra salt and heat from the Indian into the Atlantic Ocean. This causes a warming and salinification of the South Atlantic. The dynamical relation between Indonesian Throughflow transport and Agulhas leakage is analyzed using a regional idealized model at high resolution. This allows us to derive a non-linear relation between these two quantities and to identify the important physical mechanisms involved.

  17. Application of acoustic doppler current profilers for measuring three-dimensional flow fields and as a surrogate measurement of bedload transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conaway, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) have been in use in the riverine environment for nearly 20 years. Their application primarily has been focused on the measurement of streamflow discharge. ADCPs emit high-frequency sound pulses and receive reflected sound echoes from sediment particles in the water column. The Doppler shift between transmitted and return signals is resolved into a velocity component that is measured in three dimensions by simultaneously transmitting four independent acoustical pulses. To measure the absolute velocity magnitude and direction in the water column, the velocity magnitude and direction of the instrument must also be computed. Typically this is accomplished by ensonifying the streambed with an acoustical pulse that also provides a depth measurement for each of the four acoustic beams. Sediment transport on or near the streambed will bias these measurements and requires external positioning such as a differentially corrected Global Positioning Systems (GPS). Although the influence of hydraulic structures such as spur dikes and bridge piers is typically only measured and described in one or two dimensions, the use of differentially corrected GPS with ADCPs provides a fully three-dimensional measurement of the magnitude and direction of the water column at such structures. The measurement of these flow disturbances in a field setting also captures the natural pulsations of river flow that cannot be easily quantified or modeled by numerical simulations or flumes. Several examples of measured three-dimensional flow conditions at bridge sites throughout Alaska are presented. The bias introduced to the bottom-track measurement is being investigated as a surrogate measurement of bedload transport. By fixing the position of the ADCP for a known period of time the apparent velocity of the streambed at that position can be determined. Initial results and comparison to traditionally measured bedload values are presented. These initial

  18. Reversible effect of strain on transport critical current in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 + x superconducting wires: a modified descriptive strain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheggour, N.; Lu, X. F.; Holesinger, T. G.; Stauffer, T. C.; Jiang, J.; Goodrich, L. F.

    2012-01-01

    A reversible strain effect on transport critical current Ic was found in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 + x (Bi-2212) high-temperature superconducting round wires. Ic showed unambiguous reversibility at 4 K and 16 T up to an irreversible strain limit of about 0.3 % in longitudinal tension, prompting hope that the Bi-2212 conductor has the potential to sustain mechanical strains generated in high-field magnets. However, Ic was not reversible under longitudinal compression and buckling of Bi-2212 grain colonies was identified as the main reason. A two-component model was proposed, which suggests the presence of mechanically weak and strong Bi-2212 components within the wire filaments. Porosity embedded in the weak component renders it structurally unsupported and, therefore, makes it prone to cracking under strain ɛ. Ic(ɛ) is irreversible in tension if the weak component contributes to the transport critical current but becomes reversible once connectivity of the weak component is broken through strain increase or cycling. A modified descriptive strain model was also developed, which illustrates the effect of strain in the Bi-2212 conductor and supersedes the existing descriptive model. Unlike the latter, the new model suggests that higher pre-compressive strains should improve Ic if buckling of Bi-2212 grains does not occur, and should result in a wider Ic(ɛ) plateau in the applied tensile regime without degradation of the initial Ic. The new model postulates that a reversible strain effect should exist even in the applied compressive strain regime if buckling of Bi-2212 grains could be prevented through elimination of porosity and mechanical reinforcement of the wire. Contribution of NIST, an agency of the US government, not subjected to copyright.

  19. Comparing modeled and observed changes in mineral dust transport and deposition to Antarctica between the Last Glacial Maximum and current climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, Samuel; Mahowald, Natalie M.; Delmonte, Barbara; Maggi, Valter; Winckler, Gisela

    2012-05-01

    Mineral dust aerosols represent an active component of the Earth's climate system, by interacting with radiation directly, and by modifying clouds and biogeochemistry. Mineral dust from polar ice cores over the last million years can be used as paleoclimate proxy, and provide unique information about climate variability, as changes in dust deposition at the core sites can be due to changes in sources, transport and/or deposition locally. Here we present results from a study based on climate model simulations using the Community Climate System Model. The focus of this work is to analyze simulated differences in the dust concentration, size distribution and sources in current climate conditions and during the Last Glacial Maximum at specific ice core locations in Antarctica, and compare with available paleodata. Model results suggest that South America is the most important source for dust deposited in Antarctica in current climate, but Australia is also a major contributor and there is spatial variability in the relative importance of the major dust sources. During the Last Glacial Maximum the dominant source in the model was South America, because of the increased activity of glaciogenic dust sources in Southern Patagonia-Tierra del Fuego and the Southernmost Pampas regions, as well as an increase in transport efficiency southward. Dust emitted from the Southern Hemisphere dust source areas usually follow zonal patterns, but southward flow towards Antarctica is located in specific areas characterized by southward displacement of air masses. Observations and model results consistently suggest a spatially variable shift in dust particle sizes. This is due to a combination of relatively reduced en route wet removal favouring a generalized shift towards smaller particles, and on the other hand to an enhanced relative contribution of dry coarse particle deposition in the Last Glacial Maximum.

  20. MESSENGER and Venus Express Observations of the Near-tail of Venus: Magnetic Flux Transport, Current Sheet Structure, and Flux Rope Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Sarantos, M.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Barabash, S.; Benna, M.; Fraenz, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Gold, R. E.; Ho, G. C.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Raines, J. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Zhang, T.-L.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    At 23:08 UT on 5 June 2007 the MESSENGER spacecraft reached its closest approach altitude (338 km) during its second flyby of Venus en route to its 2011 orbit insertion at Mercury. Whereas no measurements were collected during MESSENGER'S first Venus flyby in October 2006, the Magnetometer (MAG) and the Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) operated successfully throughout this second encounter. Venus provides the solar system's best example to date of a solar wind - ionosphere planetary interaction. We present MESSENGER observations of the near-tail of Venus with emphasis on determining the time scales for magnetic flux transport, the structure of the cross-tail current sheet at very low altitudes (approx. 300 to 1000 km), and the nature and origin of a magnetic flux rope observed in the current sheet. The availability of the simultaneous Venus Express upstream measurements provides a unique opportunity to examine the influence of solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field conditions on this planet's solar wind interaction at solar minimum.

  1. Bond length and electric current oscillation of long linear carbon chains: Density functional theory, MpB model, and quantum spin transport studies

    SciTech Connect

    Oeiras, R. Y.; Silva, E. Z. da

    2014-04-07

    Carbon linear atomic chains attached to graphene have experimentally been produced. Motivated by these results, we study the nature of the carbon bonds in these nanowires and how it affects their electrical properties. In the present study we investigate chains with different numbers of atoms and we observe that nanowires with odd number of atoms present a distinct behavior than the ones with even numbers. Using graphene nanoribbons as leads, we identify differences in the quantum transport of the chains with the consequence that even and odd numbered chains have low and high electrical conduction, respectively. We also noted a dependence of current with the wire size. We study this unexpected behavior using a combination of first principles calculations and simple models based on chemical bond theory. From our studies, the electrons of carbon nanowires present a quasi-free electron behavior and this explains qualitatively the high electrical conduction and the bond lengths with unexpected values for the case of odd nanowires. Our study also allows the understanding of the electric conduction dependence with the number of atoms and their parity in the chain. In the case of odd number chains a proposed π-bond (MpB) model describes unsaturated carbons that introduce a mobile π-bond that changes dramatically the structure and transport properties of these wires. Our results indicate that the nature of bonds plays the main role in the oscillation of quantum electrical conduction for chains with even and odd number of atoms and also that nanowires bonded to graphene nanoribbons behave as a quasi-free electron system, suggesting that this behavior is general and it could also remain if the chains are bonded to other materials.

  2. Bond length and electric current oscillation of long linear carbon chains: Density functional theory, MpB model, and quantum spin transport studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oeiras, R. Y.; da Silva, E. Z.

    2014-04-01

    Carbon linear atomic chains attached to graphene have experimentally been produced. Motivated by these results, we study the nature of the carbon bonds in these nanowires and how it affects their electrical properties. In the present study we investigate chains with different numbers of atoms and we observe that nanowires with odd number of atoms present a distinct behavior than the ones with even numbers. Using graphene nanoribbons as leads, we identify differences in the quantum transport of the chains with the consequence that even and odd numbered chains have low and high electrical conduction, respectively. We also noted a dependence of current with the wire size. We study this unexpected behavior using a combination of first principles calculations and simple models based on chemical bond theory. From our studies, the electrons of carbon nanowires present a quasi-free electron behavior and this explains qualitatively the high electrical conduction and the bond lengths with unexpected values for the case of odd nanowires. Our study also allows the understanding of the electric conduction dependence with the number of atoms and their parity in the chain. In the case of odd number chains a proposed π-bond (MpB) model describes unsaturated carbons that introduce a mobile π-bond that changes dramatically the structure and transport properties of these wires. Our results indicate that the nature of bonds plays the main role in the oscillation of quantum electrical conduction for chains with even and odd number of atoms and also that nanowires bonded to graphene nanoribbons behave as a quasi-free electron system, suggesting that this behavior is general and it could also remain if the chains are bonded to other materials.

  3. Multiple dating approach (14C, U/Th and 36Cl) of tsunami-transported reef-top megaclasts on Bonaire (Leeward Antilles) - potential and current limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixhon, Gilles; May, Simon Matthias; Engel, Max; Mechernich, Silke; Keulertz, Rebecca; Schroeder-Ritzrau, Andrea; Fohlmeister, Jens; Frank, Norbert; Dunai, Tibor; Brueckner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Coastal hazard assessment depends on reliable information on the magnitude and frequency of past high-energy wave events (EWE: tsunamis, storms). For this purpose onshore sedimentary records represent promising geo-archives for the mid- and late-Holocene EWE history. In comparison to fine-grained sediments which have been extensively studied in the recent past, supralittoral megaclasts are less investigated, essentially due to the difficulties related to the dating of corresponding depositional events, and thus their limited value for inferring the timing of major events. On Bonaire (Leeward Antilles, Caribbean), supratidal coarse-clast deposits form prominent landforms all around the island. Fields of large boulders (up to 150 t) are among the best-studied reef-top megaclasts worldwide. Transport by Holocene tsunamis is assumed at least for the largest boulders (Engel and May, 2012). Although a large dataset of 14C and electron spin resonance (ESR) ages is available for major coral rubble ridges and ramparts, showing some age clusters during the Late Holocene, it is still debated whether these data reflect the timing of major depositional/transport event(s), and how these data sets are biased by reworking of coral fragments. In addition, different processes may be responsible for the deposition of the coral rubble ridges and ramparts (storm) and the solitary megaclasts (tsunami). As an attempt to overcome the current challenges for dating the dislocation of the megaclasts, three distinct dating methods were implemented: (i) 14C dating of boring bivalves (Lithophaga) attached to the boulders; (ii) uranium-series (U/Th) dating of post-depositional, secondary calcitic flowstone at the underside of the boulders; and (iii) surface exposure dating of overturned boulders via 36Cl concentration measurements in corals. The three 14C datings yield age estimates >37 ka, i.e. most probably beyond the applicability of the method, which sheds doubt on the usefulness of this

  4. Late Pleistocene temperature and productivity variations in the Benguela Current System (ODP Leg 175, Site 1082)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, C.; Rullkötter, J.

    2003-04-01

    Site 1082 (Walvis Basin) is located close to the major upwelling cells along the Southwest African coast with a year-round upwelling activity. Sediment samples spanning the last 770 kyr were investigated to reconstruct the paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic conditions in the Benguela upwelling system off Namibia. Alkenone-derived paleo-sea surface temperatures (calculated from the Uk'37index) roughly follow the 18O variations of planktonic foraminifera. The core shows warmer SST values (18-20°C) during interglacial stages and colder SST values (14-16°C) during glacial stages. Two long-term trends were observed: a decrease in SST values by 1°C from 770 kyr to 450 kyr and an increase in SST values by 2°C for the last 450 kyr. SST values in the northern Benguela System confirm the onset of the dominant 100 ka cycles associated with Northern Hemisphere glaciation over the past 650 kyr. One important result is the observed warming trend in the Benguela Current region over the last 450 kyr. In this period, the trend to warmer sea surface temperatures is more evident during glacials, suggesting a southward migration of the polar and subpolar frontal systems and an intensification of the influence of the warm Agulhas Current on the Benguela Current System during glacial stages 10, 8, 6 and 4. Another possible mechanism that could be responsible for such a warming trend of the eastern South Atlantic is a weakening of the cross-equatorial heat transport from the South to the North Atlantic as a result of a weakening of the thermohaline circulation. The accumulation profile of the alkenones indicates an elevated marine surface productivity may have fluctuated over time due to the upwelling activity in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean. The fluctuations in marine productivity are not related to the glacial-interglacial cycles which exhibit increased productivity during glacials at other locations. The marine biomarker distributions indicate that periods of higher

  5. Late Holocene distal mud deposits off the Nakdong delta, SE Korea: evidence for shore-parallel sediment transport in a current-dominated setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Jong-Hwa; Kim, Yuri; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Kim, Young Jun; Kang, Dong-Hyo; Kim, Yong Hoon; Kim, Gil Young; Ryu, Byong-Jae

    2015-12-01

    The distal mud deposits (DMDs) off the Nakdong delta represent a subaqueous delta on the inner continental shelf aligned parallel to the southeast coast of Korea and displaying a clinoform geometry. Hydrographically, the coast is characterized by a micro-tidal regime, the strong Korean Coastal Current (KCC) and the East Korean Warm Current (EKWC). Age models and sedimentary facies related to the clinoform geometries are based on high-resolution chirp subbottom profile data and have provided information on shore-parallel sediment transport and accumulation during the late Holocene sea-level highstand. The highest sedimentation rates (6.19-9.17 cm/year) produced steep foresets in the central DMDs at water depths of 35-50 m. Here, vertical burrows are repeatedly truncated by laminated mud packages displaying erosional surfaces. This region represents the main depocenter of the Nakdong subaqueous delta. The topset sediments of the southern DMD at ~40 m water depth closer to the river mouth show relatively low sedimentation rates (0.01-0.12 cm/year). Here, the muds have a predominantly mottled character. Similarly, the foreset sediments of the northern DMD at ~71-80 m water depth with sedimentation rates of 0.10-2.03 cm/year are also predominantly characterized by mottled muds. The spatial dispersal pattern of the DMDs is consistent with the coast-parallel front between the KCC and EKWC along the southeast Korean coast. In addition, the depocenter of the Nakdong subaqueous delta clinoform is affected by the near-bed turbulence generated by episodic storm events.

  6. Meridional overturning transports at 30°S in the Indian and Pacific Oceans in 2002-2003 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Guerra, Alonso; Talley, Lynne D.

    2016-08-01

    The meridional circulation and transports at 30°S in the Pacific and Indian Oceans for the years 2002-2003 and 2009 are compared, using GO-SHIP hydrographic section data with an inverse box model and several choices of constraints. Southward heat transport across the combined Indian-Pacific sections, reflecting net heating north of these sections, doubled from -0.7 ± 0.2 PW in 2002-2003 to -1.4 ± 0.1 PW in 2009 (negative sign is southward), with the increase concentrated in the Indian Ocean (∼0.6 PW compared with ∼0.2 PW in the Pacific), and was insensitive to model choices for the Indonesian Throughflow. Diagnosed net evaporation also more than doubled in the Indian Ocean, from 0.21-0.27 Sv in 2002-2003 to 0.51-0.58 in 2009, with a smaller but significant increase in net evaporation in the Pacific, from 0.06-0.08 Sv to 0.16-0.32 Sv. These increased heat and freshwater exports coincided with Indian Ocean warming, a shift in the Indian's shallow gyre overturning transport to lower densities, and an increase in southward Agulhas Current transport from 75 Sv in 2002 to 92 Sv in 2009. The Indian's deep overturn weakened from about 11 Sv in 2002 to 7 Sv in 2009. In contrast, the Pacific Ocean overturning circulation was nearly unchanged from 2003 to 2009, independent of model within the uncertainties. The East Australian Current transport decreased only slightly, from -52 Sv to -46 Sv. The southward Pacific Deep Water transport was at a higher density than the southward Indian Deep Water transport in both years and all models, similar to prior results. Estimated diapycnal diffusivity and velocity are strongly enhanced near the ocean bottom and are higher farther up in the water column in the Indian than in the Pacific, likely extending the reach of Indian Ocean overturning up to shallower depths than in the Pacific. The horizontal distribution of transports in the Pacific at all depths changed notably from 2003 to 2009, despite the stability of its meridional

  7. Effect of cytosolic pH on inward currents reveals structural characteristics of the proton transport cycle in the influenza A protein M2 in cell-free membrane patches of Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    DiFrancesco, Mattia L; Hansen, Ulf-Peter; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna; Schroeder, Indra

    2014-01-01

    Transport activity through the mutant D44A of the M2 proton channel from influenza virus A was measured in excised inside-out macro-patches of Xenopus laevis oocytes at cytosolic pH values of 5.5, 7.5 and 8.2. The current-voltage relationships reveal some peculiarities: 1. "Transinhibition", i.e., instead of an increase of unidirectional outward current with increasing cytosolic H(+) concentration, a decrease of unidirectional inward current was found. 2. Strong inward rectification. 3. Exponential rise of current with negative potentials. In order to interpret these findings in molecular terms, different kinetic models have been tested. The transinhibition basically results from a strong binding of H(+) to a site in the pore, presumably His37. This assumption alone already provides inward rectification and exponential rise of the IV curves. However, it results in poor global fits of the IV curves, i.e., good fits were only obtained for cytosolic pH of 8.2, but not for 7.5. Assuming an additional transport step as e.g. caused by a constriction zone at Val27 resulted in a negligible improvement. In contrast, good global fits for cytosolic pH of 7.5 and 8.2 were immediately obtained with a cyclic model. A "recycling step" implies that the protein undergoes conformational changes (assigned to Trp41 and Val27) during transport which have to be reset before the next proton can be transported. The global fit failed at the low currents at pHcyt = 5.5, as expected from the interference of putative transport of other ions besides H(+). Alternatively, a regulatory effect of acidic cytosolic pH may be assumed which strongly modifies the rate constants of the transport cycle. PMID:25211283

  8. Downslope Eulerian mean flow associated with high-frequency current fluctuations observed on the outer continental shelf and upper slope along the northeastern United States continental margin: implications for sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, B.

    1988-01-01

    Eulerian current measurements made 5-7 m above bottom at six stations along the United States east coast continental margin show a net downslope flow of 1-5 cm s-1. Although the scalar current speed decreases with water depth and toward the bottom, fluctuations in the cross-isobath flow were stronger and increasingly asymmetric near the bottom. Maximum downslope flow exceeded maximum upslope flow by a factor of two to three. The strength of the low-passed downslope flow was proportional to the upslope Reynolds flux of density as well as to the amplitude of the current fluctuations that have periods shorter than 30 h. These flow characteristics may be caused by differential vertical mixing in the bottom boundary layer where a stratified fluid flows upslope (unstable) and downslope (stable). The asymmetry in current strength clearly favors net downslope transport of sediments that move as bedload. ?? 1988.

  9. Specific features of light current-voltage characteristics of p-i-n structures based on amorphous silicon in the case of the tunnel-drift mechanism of dark current transport

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A. A.

    2008-11-15

    Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of p-i-n structures based on amorphous silicon ({alpha}-Si:H) with small hole diffusion lengths (shorter than the thickness of the i-layer of a p-i-n structure) have been experimentally studied with and without illumination. It is shown that forward I-V characteristics of structures of this kind can be described by a dependence inherent in diodes, with a diode ideality factor two-three times the maximum value of 2, theoretically predicted for generation-recombination currents in p-n junctions. The dark current is always substantially lower than the photocurrent in a cell biased with a voltage approximately equal to the opencircuit voltage of the photocell. Dark currents cannot contribute to the I-V characteristic under illumination. The photocurrent decreases with increasing photovoltage at a bias lower than the open-circuit voltage because of a decrease in the collection coefficient and the increasingly important role of back diffusion of electrons into the p-contact, rather than as a result of the dark injection. In the case of biases exceeding the open-circuit voltage, back diffusion becomes the predominant component of the current.

  10. Sequential fragmentation/transport theory, pyroclast size-density relationships, and the emplacement dynamics of pyroclastic density currents — A case study on the Mt. St. Helens (USA) 1980 eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackaman-Lofland, Chelsea; Brand, Brittany D.; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Wohletz, Kenneth

    2014-04-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are the most dangerous hazard associated with explosive volcanic eruptions. Despite recent advancements in the general understanding of PDC dynamics, limited direct observation and/or outcrop scarcity often hinder the interpretation of specific transport and depositional processes at many volcanoes. This study explores the potential of sequential fragmentation/transport theory (SFT; cf. Wohletz et al., 1989), a modeling method capable of predicting particle mass distributions based on the physical principles of fragmentation and transport, to retrieve the transport and depositional dynamics of well-characterized PDCs from the size and density distributions of individual components within the deposits. The extensive vertical and lateral exposures through the May 18th, 1980 PDC deposits at Mt. St. Helens (MSH) provide constraints on PDC regimes and flow boundary conditions at specific locations across the depositional area. Application to MSH deposits suggests that SFT parameter distributions can be effectively used to characterize flow boundary conditions and emplacement processes for a variety of PDC lithofacies and deposit locations. Results demonstrate that (1) the SFT approach reflects particle fragmentation and transport mechanisms regardless of variations in initial component distributions, consistent with results from previous studies; (2) SFT analysis reveals changes in particle characteristics that are not directly observable in grain size and fabric data; and (3) SFT parameters are more sensitive to regional transport conditions than local (outcrop-scale) depositional processes. The particle processing trends produced using SFT analysis are consistent with the degree of particle processing inferred from lithofacies architectures: for all lithofacies examined in this study, suspension sedimentation products exhibit much better processing than concentrated current deposits. Integrated field observations and SFT results

  11. A description of eddy-mean flow feedbacks in equatorial and boundary current systems of the South Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar-González, Borja; Ponsoni, Leandro; Maas, Leo R. M.; Ridderinkhof, Herman; van Aken, Hendrik

    2015-04-01

    While many observational and modeling efforts have addressed eddy-mean flow interactions acting over nearly idealized zonal jets, little is know about whether findings in those studies can be extended to current systems with different configurations in the real ocean. This topic is of special interest for ocean-climate models where eddy interactions with the mean flow may be unresolved, demanding further insight on the mechanism by which the eddy field and the mean circulation should feed back in a realistic representation of future climate change scenarios. Following this motivation, we investigate local exchange of momentum and kinetic energy operating in a variety of eddy-mean flow systems of the South Indian Ocean (SIO). To this aim we use 21 years (1993-2013) of newly processed satellite altimetry observations, and adopt a definition of the mean flow as a seasonally-dependent temporal mean where the eddy field encompasses the daily instantaneous deviation from the altimeter-derived velocities. This approach allows time-varying feedbacks to evolve throughout the year. We find that the eddy field feeds back on the mean circulation, contributing importantly to the overall seasonal strengthening and weakening of all current systems involved in the tropical and subtropical gyre of the SIO. Although significant contributions to the momentum and energy balances were also obtained along the Agulhas (Return) Current and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), they exhibit a weak/absent seasonal cycle, suggesting that the strength of these dynamical processes is mostly persistent throughout the year. Spatial distribution of the eddy kinetic energy conversion rates and the convergence of horizontal eddy momentum fluxes indicate that over regions where the eddy field draws energy from the mean flow through barotropic instabilities, the current is importantly decelerated by alongstream eddy forces on its upstream side, while further downstream the situation reverses with

  12. Joint measurement of current-phase relations and transport properties of hybrid junctions using a three junctions superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Basset, J.; Delagrange, R.; Weil, R.; Kasumov, A.; Bouchiat, H.; Deblock, R.

    2014-07-14

    We propose a scheme to measure both the current-phase relation and differential conductance dI/dV of a superconducting junction, in the normal and the superconducting states. This is done using a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device with two Josephson junctions in parallel with the device under investigation and three contacts. As a demonstration, we measure the current-phase relation and dI/dV of a small Josephson junction and a carbon nanotube junction. In this latter case, in a regime where the nanotube is well conducting, we show that the non-sinusoidal current phase relation we find is consistent with the theory for a weak link, using the transmission extracted from the differential conductance in the normal state. This method holds great promise for future investigations of the current-phase relation of more exotic junctions.

  13. Transportation of high-current ion and electron beams in the accelerator drift gap in the presence of an additional electron background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas', V. I.; Kornilov, E. A.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Fedorovskaya, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of a high-current ion beam propagating in the drift gap of a linear induction accelerator with collective focusing is studied using 3D numerical simulations in the framework of the full system of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations (code KARAT). The ion beam is neutralized by a comoving electron beam in the current density and, partially, in space charge, since the velocities of electrons and ions differ substantially. The dynamics of the high-current ion beam is investigated for different versions of additional neutralization of its space charge. It is established that, for a given configuration of the magnetic field and in the presence of a specially programmed injection of additional electrons from the boundary opposite to the ion injection boundary, the angular divergence of the ion beam almost vanishes, whereas the current of the ion beam at the exit from the accelerator drift gap changes insignificantly and the beam remains almost monoenergetic.

  14. Transportation of high-current ion and electron beams in the accelerator drift gap in the presence of an additional electron background

    SciTech Connect

    Karas’, V. I. Kornilov, E. A.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Fedorovskaya, O. V.

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of a high-current ion beam propagating in the drift gap of a linear induction accelerator with collective focusing is studied using 3D numerical simulations in the framework of the full system of the Vlasov–Maxwell equations (code KARAT). The ion beam is neutralized by a comoving electron beam in the current density and, partially, in space charge, since the velocities of electrons and ions differ substantially. The dynamics of the high-current ion beam is investigated for different versions of additional neutralization of its space charge. It is established that, for a given configuration of the magnetic field and in the presence of a specially programmed injection of additional electrons from the boundary opposite to the ion injection boundary, the angular divergence of the ion beam almost vanishes, whereas the current of the ion beam at the exit from the accelerator drift gap changes insignificantly and the beam remains almost monoenergetic.

  15. Current transport mechanism of heterojunction diodes based on the reduced graphene oxide-based polymer composite and n-type Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian-Huang; Zeng, Jian-Jhou; Su, Yu-Chao; Lin, Yow-Jon

    2012-04-01

    The present work reports the fabrication and detailed electrical properties of heterojunction diodes based on n-type Si and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) having the reduced graphene oxide (RGO). This heterojunction diode showed a good rectifying behavior with an ideality factor of 1.2. A photocurrent decay model is presented that addresses the charge trapping effect and doping mechanisms for composite PEDOT:PSS films having RGO sheets. The enhanced dark conductivity was observed by incorporating RGO into PEDOT:PSS. For heterojunction diodes, the high photocurrent density originates from efficient hole transport combined with electron trapping with long-second lifetime.

  16. Characterizing transport current defects in 1-cm-wide YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7-delta] coated conductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G. W.; Hawley, M. E.; Peterson, E. J.; Coulter, J. Y.; Dowden, P. C.; Arendt, P. N.; Foltyn, S. R.; Mueller, F. M.

    2001-01-01

    We have used a low temperature magnetic imaging system to determine current pathways in 5 cm long 'good' and 'bad' regions of a 1-cm-wide YBa2Cu3O7-{delta} coated conductor. The good and bad regions were identified with 4 point probe measurements taken at 1 cm intervals along the tape length. The current density map from the good region showed the expected edge peaked structure, similar to that seen in previous work on high quality test samples grown on single crystal substrates. The structure was also consistent with theoretical understanding of thin film superconductors where demagnetizing effects are strong. The maps from the bad region showed that the current was primarily confined to the right half of the sample. The left half carried only a small current that reached saturation quickly. Effectively halving the sample width quantitatively explains the critical current measured in that section. Spatially resolved xray analysis with 1 mm resolution was used to further characterize the bad section and suggested an abnormally large amount of a-axis YBCO present. This may be the result of non-uniform heating leading to a low deposition temperature in that area.

  17. Effect of cold isostatic pressing on the transport current of filamentary MgB2 wire made by the IMD process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, P.; Hušek, I.; Pachla, W.; Melišek, T.; Kulich, M.; Rosová, A.; Kopera, L.

    2016-07-01

    This work describes the effect of cold isostatic pressing applied to as-drawn filamentary wires in a GlidCop and/or Cu sheath made by the internal magnesium diffusion process. Critical currents of as-drawn and isostatically pressed wires at high pressures up to 2.0 GPa followed by heat treatment at 640 °C for 40 min were measured. The obtained results show an improvement in boron powder density resulting in an increase of the critical current of MgB2 layers. The engineering current density increases by 4–13 times after the high-pressure treatment, and is influenced by the density of the boron powder and by the mechanical strength of the outer sheath.

  18. Critical current densities and transport in superconducting YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7//sub -//sub delta/ films made by electron beam coevaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, B.; Naito, M.; Arnason, S.; Rosenthal, P.; Barton, R.; Beasley, M.R.; Geballe, T.H.; Hammond, R.H.; Kapitulnik, A.

    1987-09-14

    Thin films of the high T/sub c/ superconductor YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7//sub -//sub delta/ were prepared and characterized. The films made on SrTiO/sub 3/ showed epitaxial growth and high critical current densities in excess of 9 x 10/sup 4/ at 78 K and 2 x 10/sup 6/ at 4.2 K. Also, surface pinning in the parallel direction was found to be very high. The measurements put a lower limit on the depairing critical current density of 5 x 10/sup 7/ A/cm/sup 2/.

  19. Transport in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As superlattices with narrow forbidden minibands: Low-frequency negative differential conductivity and current oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Andronov, A. A. Dodin, E. P.; Zinchenko, D. I.; Nozdrin, Yu. N.

    2009-02-15

    Current-voltage characteristics have been measured and low-frequency current instabilities have been studied for GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As superlattices with narrow forbidden minibands. At relatively low electric fields, a saw-like structure for current-voltage characteristics with alternating portions of positive and negative differential conductivity and spontaneous generation of low-frequency current oscillations with a complex frequency spectrum (varying from discrete to continuous) are observed. It is shown that the observed specific features of electron transport are caused by the spatial-temporal dynamics of electric-field domains (dipoles and monopoles). The effects of the bifurcation, hysteresis, and multistability of current-voltage characteristics are also observed. At high fields, regular features are observed and identified in the current-voltage characteristics; these features are caused by resonance tunneling of electrons between the levels of the Wannier-Stark ladders belonging to quantum wells separated by several periods.

  20. Subsurface flow and transport of organic chemicals: an assessment of current modeling capability and priority directions for future research (1987-1995)

    SciTech Connect

    Streile, G.P.; Simmons, C.S.

    1986-09-01

    Theoretical and computer modeling capability for assessing the subsurface movement and fate of organic contaminants in groundwater was examined. Hence, this study is particularly concerned with energy-related, organic compounds that could enter a subsurface environment and move as components of a liquid phase separate from groundwater. The migration of organic chemicals that exist in an aqueous dissolved state is certainly a part of this more general scenario. However, modeling of the transport of chemicals in aqueous solution has already been the subject of several reviews. Hence, this study emphasizes the multiphase scenario. This study was initiated to focus on the important physicochemical processes that control the behavior of organic substances in groundwater systems, to evaluate the theory describing these processes, and to search for and evaluate computer codes that implement models that correctly conceptualize the problem situation. This study is not a code inventory, and no effort was made to identify every available code capable of representing a particular process.

  1. Large scale groundwater flow and hexavalent chromium transport modeling under current and future climatic conditions: the case of Asopos River Basin.

    PubMed

    Dokou, Zoi; Karagiorgi, Vasiliki; Karatzas, George P; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos P; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, high concentrations of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), have been observed in the groundwater system of the Asopos River Basin, raising public concern regarding the quality of drinking and irrigation water. The work described herein focuses on the development of a groundwater flow and Cr(VI) transport model using hydrologic, geologic, and water quality data collected from various sources. An important dataset for this goal comprised an extensive time series of Cr(VI) concentrations at various locations that provided an indication of areas of high concentration and also served as model calibration locations. Two main sources of Cr(VI) contamination were considered in the area: anthropogenic contamination originating from Cr-rich industrial wastes buried or injected into the aquifer and geogenic contamination from the leaching process of ophiolitic rocks. The aquifer's response under climatic change scenario A2 was also investigated for the next two decades. Under this scenario, it is expected that rainfall, and thus infiltration, will decrease by 7.7 % during the winter and 15 % during the summer periods. The results for two sub-scenarios (linear and variable precipitation reduction) that were implemented based on A2 show that the impact on the study aquifer is moderate, resulting in a mean level decrease less than 1 m in both cases. The drier climatic conditions resulted in higher Cr(VI) concentrations, especially around the industrial areas. PMID:26564185

  2. Case study of quasi-steady reconnection in Saturn's magnetotail, and update on our current understanding of mass transport and loss in Saturn's nightside magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackman, C. M.; Thomsen, M. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Sergis, N.; Arridge, C. S.; Felici, M.; Badman, S. V.; Paranicas, C.; Jia, X.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Andriopoulou, M.; Khurana, K. K.; Smith, A. W.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present a case study of an event from August20th (day 232) of 2006, as viewed by magnetic field, plasma, energetic particle and plasma wave sensors (MAG/CAPS/MIMI/RPWS) when the Cassini spacecraft was sampling the region near 32 Rs and 22 hours LT in Saturn's magnetotail. Cassini observed a strong northward-to-southward turning of the magnetic field, which is interpreted as the signature of dipolarization of the field as seen by the spacecraft planetward of the reconnection x-line. This event was accompanied by very rapid (up to ~1500 km s-1) thermal plasma flow toward the planet. At energies above 28 keV, energetic hydrogen and oxygen ion flow bursts were observed to stream planetward from a reconnection site downtail of the spacecraft. Meanwhile a strong field-aligned beam of energetic hydrogen was also observed to stream tailward, likely from an ionospheric source. Saturn Kilometric Radiation emissions were stimulated shortly after the observation of the dipolarization. We discuss the field, plasma, energetic particle and radio observations in the context of the impact this reconnection event had on global magnetospheric dynamics.We also discuss this event in terms of other recent studies of reconnection in Saturn's tail and update on the emerging picture concerning our understanding of how mass is transported and lost within Saturn's magnetosphere.

  3. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    An active controls technology (ACT) system architecture was selected based on current technology system elements and optimal control theory was evaluated for use in analyzing and synthesizing ACT multiple control laws. The system selected employs three redundant computers to implement all of the ACT functions, four redundant smaller computers to implement the crucial pitch-augmented stability function, and a separate maintenance and display computer. The reliability objective of probability of crucial function failure of less than 1 x 10 to the -9th power per flight of 1 hr can be met with current technology system components, if the software is assumed fault free and coverage approaching 1.0 can be provided. The optimal control theory approach to ACT control law synthesis yielded comparable control law performance much more systematically and directly than the classical s-domain approach. The ACT control law performance, although somewhat degraded by the inclusion of representative nonlinearities, remained quite effective. Certain high-frequency gust-load alleviation functions may require increased surface rate capability.

  4. Transport and Destruction Dynamics of Lethal Pyroclastic Density Currents at Gunung Merapi on 26 Oct and 5 Nov 2010 Generated by Flow Collision and Deflection off Topographic Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, S. J.; Lube, G.; Sumarti, S.; Sayudi, D.; Subandriyo, S.; Surono, S.

    2011-12-01

    On October 25th 2010 an extremely powerful and three-months long eruption phase started at Merapi and produced a voluminous series of deadly pyroclastic density currents that caused at least 382 casualties along with large-scale infrastructural damage and 130 injuries. We here present an overview of a detailed field-based study of the pristinely preserved 2010 PDC deposits. The data set includes the eruption chronology of PDC events based on the detailed proximal stratigraphy of PDC and fall deposits; spatial data of surge and flow bedform geometry and thickness, granulometry and particle density along with corresponding spatially resolved data of flow directionality and flow energy based on measurements of infrastructural damage. The volume of PDC deposits produced in 2010 exceeded that of the 2006 eruption period at Merapi by an order of magnitude. Valley-confined block-and-ash flows repeatedly exceeded runout lengths of 10 km in the Kali Gendol valley with at least two flow units reaching as far as 16.1 km from the summit dome - at the upper scale of well-documented runout distances of block-and-ash flows. The three largest valley-confined currents from November 3 and 5 avulsed from Gendol channel over most of their runout length where they spread laterally up to 800 m onto interfluves to inundate and completely devastate populated areas. However, the by far largest proportion of casualties and infrastructural devastation of the 2010 eruption period was caused by turbulent pyroclastic surges on October 26 and November 5. Blast-like damage to trees and buildings by PDCs of the 26/10 and 5/11 eruptions show that the flows were little affected by topography. The currents skipped laterally across several drainage divides partially 100 m deep and >300 m across. Forest and topsoil stripping from stoss-faces of valleys, along with tree-fall orientations, show that the flows did not radiate directly from the summit dome. Instead they descended the upper Gendol valley

  5. Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors combination therapy in type 2 diabetes: A systematic review of current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    As type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic and progressive disease with multiple pathophysiologic defects, no single anti-diabetic agent can tackle all these multi-factorial pathways. Consequently, multiple agents working through the different mechanisms will be required for the optimal glycemic control. Moreover, the combination therapies of different anti-diabetic agents may complement their actions and possibly act synergistic. Furthermore, these combinations could possess the additional properties to counter their undesired physiological compensatory response. Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT-2I) are newly emerging class of drugs, with a great potential to reduce glucose effectively with an additional quality of lowering cardiovascular events as demonstrated very recently by one of the agents of this class. However, increase in endogenous glucose production (EGP) from the liver, either due to the increase in glucagon or compensatory response to glucosuria can offset the glucose-lowering potential of SGLT-2I. Interestingly, another class of drugs such as dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4I) effectively decrease glucagon and reduce EGP. In light of these findings, combination therapies with SGLT-2I and DPP-4I are particularly appealing and are expected to produce a synergistic effect. Preclinical studies of combination therapies with DPP-4I and SGLT-2I have already demonstrated a significant lowering of hemoglobin A1c potential and human studies also find no drug-drug interaction between these agents. This article aims to systematically review the efficacy and safety of combination therapy of SGLT-2I and DPP-4I in T2DM. PMID:27042423

  6. Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors combination therapy in type 2 diabetes: A systematic review of current evidence.

    PubMed

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    As type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic and progressive disease with multiple pathophysiologic defects, no single anti-diabetic agent can tackle all these multi-factorial pathways. Consequently, multiple agents working through the different mechanisms will be required for the optimal glycemic control. Moreover, the combination therapies of different anti-diabetic agents may complement their actions and possibly act synergistic. Furthermore, these combinations could possess the additional properties to counter their undesired physiological compensatory response. Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT-2I) are newly emerging class of drugs, with a great potential to reduce glucose effectively with an additional quality of lowering cardiovascular events as demonstrated very recently by one of the agents of this class. However, increase in endogenous glucose production (EGP) from the liver, either due to the increase in glucagon or compensatory response to glucosuria can offset the glucose-lowering potential of SGLT-2I. Interestingly, another class of drugs such as dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4I) effectively decrease glucagon and reduce EGP. In light of these findings, combination therapies with SGLT-2I and DPP-4I are particularly appealing and are expected to produce a synergistic effect. Preclinical studies of combination therapies with DPP-4I and SGLT-2I have already demonstrated a significant lowering of hemoglobin A1c potential and human studies also find no drug-drug interaction between these agents. This article aims to systematically review the efficacy and safety of combination therapy of SGLT-2I and DPP-4I in T2DM. PMID:27042423

  7. The influence of heat treatment on the formation and transport current density of DyBa2Cu3O7-δ ceramics superconductor synthesized from nano-coprecipitated powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamadneh, Imad

    2014-05-01

    DyBa2Cu3O7-δ superconducting ceramic has been prepared from nano metal oxalate precursors with average grain size <30 nm using the coprecipitation method. Four sintering temperatures were applied for the same time period. XRD showed a single phase of an orthorhombic structure for all samples with small amount of 211 phase which was detected for samples sintered above 930°C. The sintered samples also exhibited metallic behaviour with T C( R=0) = 89 K-90 K and the transport critical current density ( J C ) values enhanced from 4.35 A/cm2 to 12.9 A/cm2 as the sintering temperature increased. The SEM micrographs showed grains of large size that are randomly distributed and have irregular structure. The compaction between the grains was improved as sintering temperature increased and thus resulted in reducing the weak links effect. In conclusion, Reducing the gaps between the grain and the formation of 211 phase as pinning centers might be explain the enhancement in the transport current properties of Dy123 in a way to be used in the HTSC device applications.

  8. 49 CFR 236.735 - Current, leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Current, leakage. 236.735 Section 236.735 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Current, leakage. A stray electric current of relatively small value which flows through or across...

  9. 49 CFR 236.735 - Current, leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Current, leakage. 236.735 Section 236.735 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Current, leakage. A stray electric current of relatively small value which flows through or across...

  10. 49 CFR 236.733 - Current, foreign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Current, foreign. 236.733 Section 236.733 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Current, foreign. A term applied to stray electric currents which may affect a signaling system, but...

  11. 49 CFR 236.733 - Current, foreign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Current, foreign. 236.733 Section 236.733 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Current, foreign. A term applied to stray electric currents which may affect a signaling system, but...

  12. 49 CFR 236.735 - Current, leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Current, leakage. 236.735 Section 236.735 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Current, leakage. A stray electric current of relatively small value which flows through or across...

  13. 49 CFR 236.733 - Current, foreign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Current, foreign. 236.733 Section 236.733 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Current, foreign. A term applied to stray electric currents which may affect a signaling system, but...

  14. 49 CFR 236.733 - Current, foreign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Current, foreign. 236.733 Section 236.733 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Current, foreign. A term applied to stray electric currents which may affect a signaling system, but...

  15. 49 CFR 236.735 - Current, leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Current, leakage. 236.735 Section 236.735 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Current, leakage. A stray electric current of relatively small value which flows through or across...

  16. 49 CFR 236.735 - Current, leakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Current, leakage. 236.735 Section 236.735 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Current, leakage. A stray electric current of relatively small value which flows through or across...

  17. 49 CFR 236.733 - Current, foreign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Current, foreign. 236.733 Section 236.733 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Current, foreign. A term applied to stray electric currents which may affect a signaling system, but...

  18. Evidence for current-controlled sedimentation along the southern Mozambique continental margin since Early Miocene times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preu, Benedict; Spieß, Volkhard; Schwenk, Tilmann; Schneider, Ralph

    2011-12-01

    Major plastered drift sequences were imaged using high-resolution multichannel seismics during R/V Meteor cruises M63/1 and M75/3 south of the Mozambique Channel along the continental margin of Mozambique off the Limpopo River. Detailed seismic-stratigraphic analyses enabled the reconstruction of the onset and development of the modern, discontinuous, eddy-dominated Mozambique Current. Major drift sequences can first be identified during the Early Miocene. Consistent with earlier findings, a progressive northward shift of the depocenter indicates that, on a geological timescale, a steady but variable Mozambique Current existed from this time onward. It can furthermore be shown that, during the Early/Middle Miocene, a coast-parallel current was established off the Limpopo River as part of a lee eddy system driven by the Mozambique Current. Modern sedimentation is controlled by the interplay between slope morphology and the lee eddy system, resulting in upwelling of Antarctic Intermediate Water. Drift accumulations at larger depths are related to the reworking of sediment by deep-reaching eddies that migrate southward, forming the Mozambique Current and eventually merging with the Agulhas Current.

  19. Transport critical current density of (Bi1.6Pb0.4)Sr2Ca2Cu3O10/Ag superconductor tapes with addition of nanosized CoFe2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, M.; Abd-Shukor, R.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of nanosized CoFe2O4 (60 nm) addition on the transport critical current density, J c, of (Bi1.6Pb0.4)Sr2Ca2Cu3O10(CoFe2O4) x ( x = 0-0.05 wt%) superconductor prepared by the co-precipitation method was investigated. The optimal J c (measured using the four-point probe method) was observed in the x = 0.01 wt% pellets. Using this optimal wt%, Ag-sheathed (Bi1.6Pb0.4)Sr2Ca2Cu3O10(CoFe2O4)0.01 superconductor tapes were fabricated using the powder-in-tube method. The tapes were sintered for 50 and 100 h at 845 °C. The phase and microstructure of the samples were determined using the powder X-ray diffraction method and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The temperature dependence of J c for the tapes in various applied magnetic fields was also measured. J c of (Bi1.6Pb0.4)Sr2Ca2Cu3O10(CoFe2O4)0.01/Ag tapes sintered for 100 h was 22,420 A/cm2 at 30 K. The non-added tapes sintered for 100 h showed a much lower J c (8280 A/cm2 at 30 K). This study showed that addition of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles enhanced the transport critical current density in the (Bi1.6Pb0.4)Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 superconductor tapes. This result is consistent with the previous calculations on frozen flux superconductor in a nanomagnet-superconductor hybrid system.

  20. Thermodynamics of nuclear transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Hao; Mehta, Pankaj; Elbaum, Michael

    Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope is important for eukaryotes for gene expression and signaling. Experimental studies have revealed that nuclear transport is inherently a nonequilibrium process and actively consumes energy. In this work we present a thermodynamics theory of nuclear transport for a major class of nuclear transporters that are mediated by the small GTPase Ran. We identify the molecular elements responsible for powering nuclear transport, which we term the ``Ran battery'' and find that the efficiency of transport, measured by the cargo nuclear localization ratio, is limited by competition between cargo molecules and RanGTP to bind transport receptors, as well as the amount of NTF2 (i.e. RanGDP carrier) available to circulate the energy flow. This picture complements our current understanding of nuclear transport by providing a comprehensive thermodynamics framework to decipher the underlying biochemical machinery. Pm and CHW were supported by a Simons Investigator in the Mathematical Modeling in Living Systems grant (to PM).

  1. Current sensor

    DOEpatents

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2007-01-16

    A current sensor is described that uses a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. The sensor can be hinged to allow clamping to a conductor. The current sensor provides high measurement accuracy for both DC and AC currents, and is substantially immune to the effects of temperature, conductor position, nearby current carrying conductors and aging.

  2. Residual currents and long-term transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.

    1990-01-01

    Estuaries, bays, and contiguous coastal seas of the world are the most valuable and yet most vulnerable marine ecosystems. For centuries, society has placed enormous value on coastal areas for living, working, and recreation. In nearly all regions of the world, the largest population is distributed along the coastlines. The marine ecosystems provide food, shelter, and spawning grounds for fisheries, and refuge and sanctuary for wildlife. Dramatic increases in the population living in coastal regions have changed the pattern of land use and the movement of sediments. Obviously, these changes have not come without a price. Accompanying the coastal population increase is competition for the use of estuarine and coastal resources: the diversion of fresh water for irrigation and the discharge of waste water into these systems. The changing patterns of water use have resulted in deterioration of water quality, and in irreversible impacts on many marine ecosystems. All of these alterations directly affect the economic development and the quality of life in adjacent regions.

  3. Current topics in membranes and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinzeller, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Expression of the Oxytocin and Vasopressin Genes; Steroid Effects on Excitable Membranes: The Secretory Vesicle in Processing and Secretion of Neuropeptides: and Steroid Hormone Influences on Cyclic AMP-Generating Systems.

  4. Rossby rip currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, David P.; Vogel, Bendix; Zhai, Xiaoming

    2013-08-01

    Oceanic Rossby waves and eddies flux energy and fluid westward, the latter through the Stokes drift or bolus transport. While the wave energy is largely dissipated at the western boundary, mass conservation requires that the fluid be returned offshore through Rossby rip currents. The form and magnitude of these rip currents are investigated through linear Rossby wave theory, a nonlinear numerical model, and analysis of sea surface height satellite observations. The net eastward volume transport by Rossby rip currents over the global ocean is estimated to be of order 10 Sv (1 Sv ≡106 m3 s-1). In an eddying ocean, both the westward Stokes drift and eastward rip currents can assume the form of banded quasi-zonal jets.

  5. Public transportation 1995: Current research in operations. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    ;Contents: Metromover Extensions and Downtown Bus Service in Miami; Electric Bus Operation and Evaluation in California; Assessment of Alternative Structures for Privately Operated Bus Systems; Bus Priority at Traffic Signals in Portland: The Powell Boulevard Pilot Project; Transit Vehicle-Type Scheduling Problem; Optimal Mixed Bus Fleet for Urban Operations; Operational Characteristics of Paratransit in Developing Countries of Asia; Economics of Electric Trolley Coach Operation; Evaluation of Visual Impacts of Trolleybus Overhead Caternary System Intersections; Electric and Magnetic Fields and Electric Transit Systems; Diverting Automobile Users to Transit: Early Lessons from the Chicago Transit Authority`s Orange Line; Street-Running Rail Transit: A Historical Perspective; Diesel or Electric Power for Commuter Rail; It Depends; Generic Objectives for Evaluation of Intermodal Passenger Transfer Facilities; Airport Ground Access: Rail Transit Alternatives; Retrofit Techniques for Floating Slab Track; Calgary Light Rail Transit Surface Operations and Grade-Level Crossings; and Cost of Light Rail Collision Accidents.

  6. 49 CFR 229.77 - Current collectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Current collectors. 229.77 Section 229.77 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....77 Current collectors. (a) Pantographs shall be so arranged that they can be operated from...

  7. 49 CFR 229.77 - Current collectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Current collectors. 229.77 Section 229.77 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....77 Current collectors. (a) Pantographs shall be so arranged that they can be operated from...

  8. 49 CFR 229.77 - Current collectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Current collectors. 229.77 Section 229.77 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....77 Current collectors. (a) Pantographs shall be so arranged that they can be operated from...

  9. 49 CFR 229.77 - Current collectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Current collectors. 229.77 Section 229.77 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....77 Current collectors. (a) Pantographs shall be so arranged that they can be operated from...

  10. 49 CFR 229.77 - Current collectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Current collectors. 229.77 Section 229.77 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....77 Current collectors. (a) Pantographs shall be so arranged that they can be operated from...

  11. Heme transport and erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaojing; Fleming, Mark D.; Hamza, Iqbal

    2013-01-01

    In humans, systemic heme homeostasis is achieved via coordinated regulation of heme synthesis, transport and degradation. Although the heme biosynthesis and degradation pathways have been well characterized, the pathways for heme trafficking and incorporation into hemoproteins remains poorly understood. In the past few years, researchers have exploited genetic, cellular and biochemical tools, to identify heme transporters and, in the process, reveal unexpected functions for this elusive group of proteins. However, given the complexity of heme trafficking pathways, current knowledge of heme transporters is fragmented and sometimes contradictory. This review seeks to focus on recent studies on heme transporters with specific emphasis on their functions during erythropoiesis. PMID:23415705

  12. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  13. Fluorine plasma treatment induced deep level traps and their effect on current transportation in Al0.83In0.17N/AlN/GaN Schottky barrier diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yong; Yu, Tongjun; Ji, Cheng; Cheng, Yutian; Yang, Xuelin; Kang, Xiangning; Shen, Bo; Zhang, Guoyi

    2016-08-01

    The deep level traps and the electrical properties of fluorine plasma treated (F-treated) and non-treated Al0.83In0.17N/AlN/GaN Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) were investigated by the temperature-dependent current–voltage (I–V) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements. Three deep level traps were detected in the SBD after F-treatment at ~E c  ‑  0.17 eV, ~E c  ‑  0.27 eV and ~E c  ‑  1.14 eV. One of the deep level traps at ~E c  ‑  1.14 eV is mainly located in the Al0.83In0.17N barrier layer with a captured cross section (σ) of ~6.50  ×  10‑18 cm2. This F-related deep level trap has 3–4 orders of magnitude of the larger σ and ~0.46 eV greater active energy than that of the dislocation-related one at ~E c  ‑  0.68 eV with σ of ~1.92  ×  10‑21 cm2. Meanwhile, the leakage current of F-treated SBD at  ‑5 V is reduced by ~2 orders of magnitude compared with that of the non-treated one. This leakage current reduction is mainly attributed to the increase of the Poole–Frenkel emission barrier height from ~0.09 eV in non-treated SBD to ~0.46 eV in the F-treated one. It is believed that the main reverse current transportation is the Poole–Frenkel emission from the F-related deep level trap states into the continuum states of the dislocations in F-treated Al0.83In0.17N/AlN/GaN SBD.

  14. Fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  15. Feedback cooling of currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Sean

    1989-02-01

    Just as feedback can be used to correct errors in the output voltages of amplifiers, it can also be used to remove noise from the current through a resistor. Such a feedback amplifier behaves as a refrigerator cooling the electrons in a resistor connnected to it. This principle has been recognized since the 1940s but has been largely ignored because the cooling power available from such refrigerators is miniscule. It is pointed out here that the method might be practical for cooling the currents in the microscopic circuits that are typical of modern electrical engineering and recent studies in transport physics.

  16. Current limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Loescher, D.H.; Noren, K.

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  17. Current in wave driven plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Karney, C.F.F.; Fisch, N.J.

    1985-06-01

    A theory for the generation of current in a toroidal plasma by radio-frequency waves is presented. The effect of an opposing electric field is included, allowing the case of time varying currents to be studied. The key quantities that characterize this regime are identified and numerically calculated. Circuit equations suitable for use in ray-tracing and transport codes are given.

  18. Transport: Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, William; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1992-01-01

    Space transportation requirements for the NASA baseline scenario for future space missions are discussed. Spacecraft/propulsion technologies required for surface-to-orbit, orbit-to-orbit, and surface (lunar) transportation are addressed.

  19. School Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Executive Educator, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This special section on student transportation offers a case study of a school system that recycles buses for safety drills; articles on fuel-saving strategies, the pros and cons of contracting for transportation services or operating a publicly owned bus fleet, and advice on full cost accounting for transportation costs; and a transportation…

  20. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  1. Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, John E.

    1997-03-01

    This book comprehensively describes all aspects of gravity flow, a physical process in the environment that is covered by many disciplines including meteorology, oceanography, the earth sciences and industrial processes. The first edition was very well received, and the author has brought the new edition completely up to date, with much new material. Simpson describes gravity currents with a variety of laboratory experiments, many from his own work. Gravity Currents is a valuable supplementary textbook for undergraduates and a reference work for research workers. The general reader will also find much of interest, since the author clearly describes the physics of flows involved without advanced mathematics, and with numerous photographs and illustrations.

  2. Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, John E.

    1999-11-01

    This book comprehensively describes all aspects of gravity flow, a physical process in the environment that is covered by many disciplines including meteorology, oceanography, the earth sciences and industrial processes. The first edition was very well received, and the author has brought the new edition completely up to date, with much new material. Simpson describes gravity currents with a variety of laboratory experiments, many from his own work. Gravity Currents is a valuable supplementary textbook for undergraduates and a reference work for research workers. The general reader will also find much of interest, since the author clearly describes the physics of flows involved without advanced mathematics, and with numerous photographs and illustrations.

  3. FAA Smoke Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Domino, Stefan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay; Gallegos, Carlos

    2006-10-27

    FAA Smoke Transport Code, a physics-based Computational Fluid Dynamics tool, which couples heat, mass, and momentum transfer, has been developed to provide information on smoke transport in cargo compartments with various geometries and flight conditions. The software package contains a graphical user interface for specification of geometry and boundary conditions, analysis module for solving the governing equations, and a post-processing tool. The current code was produced by making substantial improvements and additions to a code obtained from a university. The original code was able to compute steady, uniform, isothermal turbulent pressurization. In addition, a preprocessor and postprocessor were added to arrive at the current software package.

  4. 49 CFR 236.562 - Minimum rail current required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minimum rail current required. 236.562 Section 236.562 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... rail current required. The minimum rail current required to restore the locomotive equipment...

  5. 49 CFR 236.562 - Minimum rail current required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minimum rail current required. 236.562 Section 236.562 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... rail current required. The minimum rail current required to restore the locomotive equipment...

  6. 49 CFR 236.562 - Minimum rail current required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum rail current required. 236.562 Section 236.562 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... rail current required. The minimum rail current required to restore the locomotive equipment...

  7. 49 CFR 236.562 - Minimum rail current required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minimum rail current required. 236.562 Section 236.562 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... rail current required. The minimum rail current required to restore the locomotive equipment...

  8. 49 CFR 236.562 - Minimum rail current required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum rail current required. 236.562 Section 236.562 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... rail current required. The minimum rail current required to restore the locomotive equipment...

  9. Current Titles

    SciTech Connect

    Various

    2006-06-01

    This booklet is published for those interested in current research being conducted at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. The NCEM is a DOE-designated national user facility and is available at no charge to qualified researchers. Access is controlled by an external steering committee. Interested researchers may contact Jane Cavlina, Administrator, at 510/486-6036.

  10. 75 FR 28100 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Notice of Request for Extension of Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ...: Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship Program. OMB Control #: 2125-0617. Background: The Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship Program is comprised of two programs, the Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship and the National Highway Institute (NHI). The Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship is currently authorized...

  11. The Transport of Substances in Nerve Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, James H.

    1980-01-01

    Historically described are research studies which led to the current explanation of the two kinds of intracellular transport-axoplasmic flow and axoral transport. Models explaining their fundamental mechanism and the kinds of materials they convey are presented. (BT)

  12. Current titles

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This booklet is published for those interested in current research being conducted at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. The NCEM is a DOE-designated national user facility and is available at no charge to qualified researchers. Access is controlled by an external steering committee. Interested researchers may contact Gretchen Hermes at (510) 486-5006 or address below for a User`s Guide. Copies of available papers can be ordered from: Theda Crawford National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, One Cyclotron Rd., MS72, Berkeley, California, USA 94720.

  13. Transportation Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kramer, George Leroy Jr.

    1999-12-01

    The National Transportation Program 1999 Transportation Baseline Report presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste and materials transportation. In addition, this Report provides a summary overview of DOE’s projected quantities of waste and materials for transportation. Data presented in this report were gathered as a part of the IPABS Spring 1999 update of the EM Corporate Database and are current as of July 30, 1999. These data were input and compiled using the Analysis and Visualization System (AVS) which is used to update all stream-level components of the EM Corporate Database, as well as TSD System and programmatic risk (disposition barrier) information. Project (PBS) and site-level IPABS data are being collected through the Interim Data Management System (IDMS). The data are presented in appendices to this report.

  14. Transportation Network Topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    The existing U.S. hub-and-spoke air transportation system is reaching saturation. Major aspects of the current system, such as capacity, safety, mobility, customer satisfaction, security, communications, and ecological effects, require improvements. The changing dynamics - increased presence of general aviation, unmanned autonomous vehicles, military aircraft in civil airspace as part of homeland defense - contributes to growing complexity of airspace. The system has proven remarkably resistant to change. NASA Langley Research Center and the National Institute of Aerospace conducted a workshop on Transportation Network Topologies on 9-10 December 2003 in Williamsburg, Virginia. The workshop aimed to examine the feasibility of traditional methods for complex system analysis and design as well as potential novel alternatives in application to transportation systems, identify state-of-the-art models and methods, conduct gap analysis, and thus to lay a foundation for establishing a focused research program in complex systems applied to air transportation.

  15. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  16. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of macromolecules.

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, A H; Silver, P A

    1997-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is a complex process that consists of the movement of numerous macromolecules back and forth across the nuclear envelope. All macromolecules that move in and out of the nucleus do so via nuclear pore complexes that form large proteinaceous channels in the nuclear envelope. In addition to nuclear pores, nuclear transport of macromolecules requires a number of soluble factors that are found both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. A combination of biochemical, genetic, and cell biological approaches have been used to identify and characterize the various components of the nuclear transport machinery. Recent studies have shown that both import to and export from the nucleus are mediated by signals found within the transport substrates. Several studies have demonstrated that these signals are recognized by soluble factors that target these substrates to the nuclear pore. Once substrates have been directed to the pore, most transport events depend on a cycle of GTP hydrolysis mediated by the small Ras-like GTPase, Ran, as well as other proteins that regulate the guanine nucleotide-bound state of Ran. Many of the essential factors have been identified, and the challenge that remains is to determine the exact mechanism by which transport occurs. This review attempts to present an integrated view of our current understanding of nuclear transport while highlighting the contributions that have been made through studies with genetic organisms such as the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:9184010

  17. Spin Currents in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2011-03-01

    I will discuss the results of our recent spin injection experiments using long-distance non-degenerate undoped (and n-type doped) Si devices. We have a unique capability to recover the details of electron transport on a sub-ns timescale through a ``Larmor clock'' transformation of spin precession data, despite using only quasistatic current measurements. I suggest that this is potentially a new tool for probing non-equilibrium phenomena in semiconductors, revealing both intrinsic and extrinsic materials properties through sensitivity to subtleties of the bandstructure and impurity spectrum. Supported by ONR and NSF.

  18. Eddy surface properties and propagation at Southern Hemisphere western boundary current systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, G. S.; Mata, M. M.; Azevedo, J. L. L.

    2015-08-01

    Oceanic eddies exist throughout the world oceans, but are more energetic when associated with western boundary currents (WBC) systems. In these regions, eddies play an important role in mixing and energy exchange. Therefore, it is important to quantify and qualify eddies associated with these systems. This is particularly true for the Southern Hemisphere WBC system where only few eddy censuses have been performed to date. In these systems, important aspects of the local eddy population are still unknown, like their spatial distribution and propagation patterns. Moreover, the understanding of these patterns helps to establish monitoring programs and to gain insight in how eddies would affect local mixing. Here, we use a global eddy data set to qualify eddies based on their surface characteristics in the Agulhas Current (AC), the Brazil Current (BC) and the East Australian Current (EAC) systems. The analyses reveal that eddy propagation within each system is highly forced by the local mean flow and bathymetry. Large values of eddy amplitude and temporal variability are associated with the BC and EAC retroflections, while small values occur in the centre of the Argentine Basin and in the Tasman Sea. In the AC system, eddy polarity dictates the propagation distance. BC system eddies do not propagate beyond the Argentine Basin, and are advected by the local ocean circulation. EAC system eddies from both polarities cross south of Tasmania but only the anticyclonic ones reach the Great Australian Bight. For all three WBC systems, both cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies present a geographical segregation according to radius size and amplitude. Regions of high eddy kinetic energy are associated with the eddies' mean amplitudes, and not with their densities.

  19. Current awareness

    PubMed

    Green; Feher; Catalan

    2000-07-01

    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, John Wiley & Sons are providing a current awareness service in each issue of the journal. The bibliography contains newly published material in the field of diabetes/metabolism. Each bibliography is divided into 17 sections: 1 Books, Reviews & Symposia; 2 General; 3 Genetics; 4 Epidemiology; 5 Immunology; 6 Prediction; 7 Prevention; 8 Intervention: a&rpar General; b&rpar Pharmacology; 9 Pathology: a&rpar General; b&rpar Cardiovascular; c&rpar Neurological; d&rpar Renal; 10 Endocrinology & Metabolism; 11 Nutrition; 12 Animal Studies; 13 Techniques. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author (8 Weeks journals - Search completed at 19th Apr. 2000) PMID:10934459

  20. Urban public transportation research, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.A.; Barnum, D.T.; Gleason, J.M.; Mundle, S.R.; Kraus, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    The 30 papers in the Record provide a good cross section of current research in public transportation. They have been grouped into six topics--management, finance, planning, bus operations, rail transit operations, and new technology.

  1. Transportation. The Neglected Related Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Mary; And Others

    This monograph presents a five-module staff training program used to improve the related service of transportation of children with disabilities in Union County, North Carolina. Each module takes from 4 to more than 8 hours of training and bus drivers and transportation safety assistants with current certificates in all five modules receive a…

  2. Infants, Toddlers and Preschool Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    Providing transportation to children younger than kindergarten age has become more common for public school districts, and school personnel are unsure as to the rules, guidelines, and best practices that apply to the youngest school bus passengers. This document outlines the current Illinois requirements regarding the transportation of very young…

  3. School Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Executive Educator, 1989

    1989-01-01

    A special report on school transportation covers the following topics: (1) a school bus safety update; (2) equipping school buses with motion detectors; (3) state training requirements for school bus drivers; (4) recruiting and retaining drivers; (5) regulations covering underground fuel-storage tanks; and (6) a transportation directory. (MLF)

  4. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  5. Panel 4 - applications to transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.; Au, J.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhushan, B.; Blunier, D.; Boardman, B.; Brombolich, L.; Davidson, J.; Graham, M.; Hakim, N.; Harris, K.; Hay, R.; Herk, L.; Hojnacki, H.; Rourk, D.; Kamo, R.; Nieman, B.; O`Neill, D.; Peterson, M.B.; Pfaffenberger, G.; Pryor, R.W.; Russell, J.; Syniuta, W.; Tamor, M.; Vojnovich, T.; Yarbrough, W.; Yust, C.S.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this group was to compile a listing of current and anticipated future problem areas in the transportation industry where the properties of diamond and DLC films make them especially attractive and where the panel could strongly endorse the establishment of DOE/Transportation Industry cooperative research efforts. This section identifies the problem areas for possible applications of diamond/DLC technology and presents indications of current approaches to these problems.

  6. Ohmic currents and predecoupling magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo; Nguyen Quynh Lan

    2009-07-15

    Ohmic currents induced prior to decoupling are investigated in a standard transport model accounting both for the expansion of the background geometry as well as of its relativistic inhomogeneities. The relative balance of the Ohmic electric fields in comparison with the Hall and thermoelectric contributions is specifically addressed. The impact of the Ohmic currents on the evolution of curvature perturbations is discussed numerically and it is shown to depend explicitly upon the evolution of the conductivity.

  7. Adenosine transporters.

    PubMed

    Thorn, J A; Jarvis, S M

    1996-06-01

    1. In mammals, nucleoside transport is an important determinant of the pharmacokinetics, plasma and tissue concentration, disposition and in vivo biological activity of adenosine as well as nucleoside analogues used in antiviral and anticancer therapies. 2. Two broad types of adenosine transporter exist, facilitated-diffusion carriers and active processes driven by the transmembrane sodium gradient. 3. Facilitated-diffusion adenosine carriers may be sensitive (es) or insensitive (ei) to nanomolar concentrations of the transport inhibitor nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR). Dipyridamole, dilazep and lidoflazine analogues are also more potent inhibitors of the es carrier than the ei transporter in cells other than those derived from rat tissues. 4. The es transporter has a broad substrate specificity (apparent Km for adenosine approximately 25 microM in many cells at 25 degrees C), is a glycoprotein with an average apparent Mr of 57,000 in human erythrocytes that has been purified to near homogeneity and may exist in situ as a dimer. However, there is increasing evidence to suggest the presence of isoforms of the es transporter in different cells and species, based on kinetic and molecular properties. 5. The ei transporter also has a broad substrate specificity with a lower affinity for some nucleoside permeants than the es carrier, is genetically distinct from es but little information exists as to the molecular properties of the protein. 6. Sodium-dependent adenosine transport is present in many cell types and catalysed by four distinct systems, N1-N4, distinguished by substrate specificity, sodium coupling and tissue distribution. 7. Two genes have been identified which encode sodium-dependent adenosine transport proteins, SNST1 from the sodium/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) gene family and the rat intestinal N2 transporter (cNT1) from a novel gene family including a bacterial nucleoside carrier (NupC). Transcripts of cNT1, which encodes a 648-residue protein, are

  8. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  9. 49 CFR 236.734 - Current of traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Current of traffic. 236.734 Section 236.734 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Current of traffic. The movement of trains on a specified track in a designated direction....

  10. 49 CFR 236.734 - Current of traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Current of traffic. 236.734 Section 236.734 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Current of traffic. The movement of trains on a specified track in a designated direction....

  11. 49 CFR 236.734 - Current of traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Current of traffic. 236.734 Section 236.734 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Current of traffic. The movement of trains on a specified track in a designated direction....

  12. 49 CFR 236.734 - Current of traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Current of traffic. 236.734 Section 236.734 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Current of traffic. The movement of trains on a specified track in a designated direction....

  13. 49 CFR 236.734 - Current of traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Current of traffic. 236.734 Section 236.734 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Current of traffic. The movement of trains on a specified track in a designated direction....

  14. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section 193.2633...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section 193.2633...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section 193.2633...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section 193.2633...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section 193.2633...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize...

  19. In-line beam current monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekdahl, C. A., Jr.; Frost, C. A.

    1984-11-01

    An intense relativistic electron beam current monitor for a gas neutralized beam transport line includes a first foil for conducting plasma current to the wall where it is measured as it traverses an inductive loop formed by a cavity in the wall. An insulator foil separates the first foil from a second conducting foil which returns the current to the plasma environment.

  20. In-line beam current monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Jr., Carl A.; Frost, Charles A.

    1986-01-01

    An intense relativistic electron beam current monitor for a gas neutralized beam transport line includes a first foil for conducting plasma current to the wall where it is measured as it traverses an inductive loop formed by a cavity in the wall. An insulator foil separates the first foil from a second conducting foil which returns the current to the plasma environment.

  1. In-line beam current monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A. Jr.; Frost, C.A.

    1984-11-13

    An intense relativistic electron beam current monitor for a gas neutralized beam transport line includes a first foil for conducting plasma current to the wall where it is measured as it traverses an inductive loop formed by a cavity in the wall. An insulator foil separates the first foil from a second conducting foil which returns the current to the plasma environment.

  2. Inductance due to spin current

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei

    2014-03-21

    The inductance of spintronic devices that transport charge neutral spin currents is discussed. It is known that in a media that contains charge neutral spins, a time-varying electric field induces a spin current. We show that since the spin current itself produces an electric field, this implies existence of inductance and electromotive force when the spin current changes with time. The relations between the electromotive force and the corresponding flux, which is a vector calculated by the cross product of electric field and the trajectory of the device, are clarified. The relativistic origin generally renders an extremely small inductance, which indicates the advantage of spin current in building low inductance devices. The same argument also explains the inductance due to electric dipole current and applies to physical dipoles consist of polarized bound charges.

  3. A transportable optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Stefan; Häfner, Sebastian; Grotti, Jacopo; Koller, Silvio; Al-Masoudi, Ali; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We present the experimental setup and first results of PTB's transportable 87Sr clock. It consists of a physics package, several compact laser breadboards, and a transportable high finesse cavity for the clock laser. A comparison of the transportable system with our stationary optical lattice clock yields an instability of 2.2 x 10-15 √s/τ for the transportable clock. The current fractional uncertainty of 1 × 10-15 is still limited by the not yet fully evaluated light shift from the free running optical lattice laser operated near the magic wavelength. We are currently improving our transportable system to reach an uncertainty at or below the 10-17 level, which will finaly be limited by the uncertainty in blackbody radiation shift correction.

  4. Bacterial multidrug efflux transporters.

    PubMed

    Delmar, Jared A; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by bacteria are a leading cause of death worldwide. Although antibiotics remain a key clinical therapy, their effectiveness has been severely compromised by the development of drug resistance in bacterial pathogens. Multidrug efflux transporters--a common and powerful resistance mechanism--are capable of extruding a number of structurally unrelated antimicrobials from the bacterial cell, including antibiotics and toxic heavy metal ions, facilitating their survival in noxious environments. Transporters of the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) superfamily typically assemble as tripartite efflux complexes spanning the inner and outer membranes of the cell envelope. In Escherichia coli, the CusCFBA complex, which mediates resistance to copper(I) and silver(I) ions, is the only known RND transporter specific to heavy metals. Here, we describe the current knowledge of individual pump components of the Cus system, a paradigm for efflux machinery, and speculate on how RND pumps assemble to fight diverse antimicrobials. PMID:24702006

  5. Absolute geostrophic currents in global tropical oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Yuan, Dongliang

    2016-03-01

    A set of absolute geostrophic current (AGC) data for the period January 2004 to December 2012 are calculated using the P-vector method based on monthly gridded Argo profiles in the world tropical oceans. The AGCs agree well with altimeter geostrophic currents, Ocean Surface Current Analysis-Real time currents, and moored current-meter measurements at 10-m depth, based on which the classical Sverdrup circulation theory is evaluated. Calculations have shown that errors of wind stress calculation, AGC transport, and depth ranges of vertical integration cannot explain non-Sverdrup transport, which is mainly in the subtropical western ocean basins and equatorial currents near the Equator in each ocean basin (except the North Indian Ocean, where the circulation is dominated by monsoons). The identified non-Sverdrup transport is thereby robust and attributed to the joint effect of baroclinicity and relief of the bottom (JEBAR) and mesoscale eddy nonlinearity.

  6. Using Cooperatives to Transport Rural Passengers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stommes, Eileen S.; Byrne, Robert J.

    A study of two rural New York counties--Cortland and Otsego--was undertaken to identify innovative ways to provide public passenger transportation services in rural areas by using transportation cooperatives. Information about current transportation services was obtained from staff members of the human service agencies and county government…

  7. Electrofuels: Versatile Transportation Energy Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: ARPA-E’s Electrofuels Project is using microorganisms to create liquid transportation fuels in a new and different way that could be up to 10 times more energy efficient than current biofuel production methods. ARPA-E is the only U.S. government agency currently funding research on Electrofuels.

  8. FAA Smoke Transport Code

    2006-10-27

    FAA Smoke Transport Code, a physics-based Computational Fluid Dynamics tool, which couples heat, mass, and momentum transfer, has been developed to provide information on smoke transport in cargo compartments with various geometries and flight conditions. The software package contains a graphical user interface for specification of geometry and boundary conditions, analysis module for solving the governing equations, and a post-processing tool. The current code was produced by making substantial improvements and additions to a codemore » obtained from a university. The original code was able to compute steady, uniform, isothermal turbulent pressurization. In addition, a preprocessor and postprocessor were added to arrive at the current software package.« less

  9. Nonlinear chiral transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Ishii, Takeaki; Pu, Shi; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    We study the nonlinear responses of relativistic chiral matter to the external fields such as the electric field E , gradients of temperature and chemical potential, ∇T and ∇μ . Using the kinetic theory with Berry curvature corrections under the relaxation time approximation, we compute the transport coefficients of possible new electric currents that are forbidden in usual chirally symmetric matter but are allowed in chirally asymmetric matter by parity. In particular, we find a new type of electric current proportional to ∇μ ×E due to the interplay between the effects of the Berry curvature and collisions. We also derive an analog of the "Wiedemann-Franz" law specific for anomalous nonlinear transport in relativistic chiral matter.

  10. Transportation: Destination Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eoff, Bill

    1998-01-01

    As the agency space transportation lead center, Marshall Space Flight Center has been conducting transportation assessments for future robotic and human Mars missions to identify critical technologies. Five human Mars options are currently under assessment with each option including all transportation requirements from Earth to Mars and return. The primary difference for each option is the propulsion source from Earth to Mars. In case any of the options require heavy launch capability that is not currently projected as available, an in-house study has been initiated to determine the most cost effective means of providing such launch capability. This assessment is only considering launch architectures that support the overall human Mars mission cost goal of $25B. The guidelines for the launch capability study included delivery of 80 metric ton (176 KLB) payloads, 25 feet diameter x 92 feet long, to 220 nmi orbits at 28.5 degrees. The launch vehicle concept of the study was designated "Magnum" to differentiate from prior heavy launch vehicle assessments. This assessment along with the assessment of options for all transportation phases of a Mars mission are on-going.

  11. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the design and marketability of a next generation supersonic transport. Apogee Aeronautics Corporation has designated its High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT): Supercruiser HS-8. Since the beginning of the Concorde era, the general consensus has been that the proper time for the introduction of a next generation Supersonic Transport (SST) would depend upon the technical advances made in the areas of propulsion (reduction in emissions) and material composites (stronger, lighter materials). It is believed by many in the aerospace industry that these beforementioned technical advances lie on the horizon. With this being the case, this is the proper time to begin the design phase for the next generation HSCT. The design objective for a HSCT was to develop an aircraft that would be capable of transporting at least 250 passengers with baggage at a distance of 5500 nmi. The supersonic Mach number is currently unspecified. In addition, the design had to be marketable, cost effective, and certifiable. To achieve this goal, technical advances in the current SST's must be made, especially in the areas of aerodynamics and propulsion. As a result of these required aerodynamic advances, several different supersonic design concepts were reviewed.

  12. MOST CURRENT WATER QUALITY STANDARDS - LINEAR EVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Designated uses (from State Water Quality Standards) for river segments, lakes, and estuaries. Most current Water Quality Standards Waterbodies coded onto route.rch (Transport and Coastline Reach) feature of the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) to create Linear Events.

  13. Transportation Systems Center

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, G.S.

    1992-07-01

    The Transportation Systems Center at Sandia Laboratory performs research, development, and implementation of technologies that enhance the safe movement of people, goods, and information. Our focus is on systems engineering. However, we realize that to understand the puzzle, you must also understand the pieces. This brochure describes some of the activities currently underway at the Center and presents the breadth and depth of our capabilities. Please contact the noted, individuals for more, information.

  14. The Transporter Classification Database

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.; Reddy, Vamsee S.; Tamang, Dorjee G.; Västermark, Åke

    2014-01-01

    The Transporter Classification Database (TCDB; http://www.tcdb.org) serves as a common reference point for transport protein research. The database contains more than 10 000 non-redundant proteins that represent all currently recognized families of transmembrane molecular transport systems. Proteins in TCDB are organized in a five level hierarchical system, where the first two levels are the class and subclass, the second two are the family and subfamily, and the last one is the transport system. Superfamilies that contain multiple families are included as hyperlinks to the five tier TC hierarchy. TCDB includes proteins from all types of living organisms and is the only transporter classification system that is both universal and recognized by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. It has been expanded by manual curation, contains extensive text descriptions providing structural, functional, mechanistic and evolutionary information, is supported by unique software and is interconnected to many other relevant databases. TCDB is of increasing usefulness to the international scientific community and can serve as a model for the expansion of database technologies. This manuscript describes an update of the database descriptions previously featured in NAR database issues. PMID:24225317

  15. A National MagLev Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The case for a national high-speed magnetic-levitation (MagLev) transportation system is presented. Focus is on current issues facing the country, such as national security, the economy, transportation, technology, and the environment. NASA s research into MagLev technology for launch assist is also highlighted. Further, current socio-cultural norms regarding motor-vehicle-based transportation systems are questioned in light of the problems currently facing the U.S. The multidisciplinary benefits of a long-distance MagLev system support the idea that such a system would be an important element of a truly multimodal U.S. transportation infrastructure.

  16. Transport in gyrokinetic tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.; Parker, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    A comprehensive study of transport in full-volume gyrokinetic (gk) simulations of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence in core tokamak plasmas is presented. Though this ``gyrokinetic tokamak`` is much simpler than experimental tokamaks, such simplicity is an asset, because a dependable nonlinear transport theory for such systems should be more attainable. Toward this end, we pursue two related lines of inquiry. (1) We study the scalings of gk tokamaks with respect to important system parameters. In contrast to real machines, the scalings of larger gk systems (a/{rho}{sub s} {approx_gt} 64) with minor radius, with current, and with a/{rho}{sub s} are roughly consistent with the approximate theoretical expectations for electrostatic turbulent transport which exist as yet. Smaller systems manifest quite different scalings, which aids in interpreting differing mass-scaling results in other work. (2) With the goal of developing a first-principles theory of gk transport, we use the gk data to infer the underlying transport physics. The data indicate that, of the many modes k present in the simulation, only a modest number (N{sub k} {approximately} 10) of k dominate the transport, and for each, only a handful (N{sub p} {approximately} 5) of couplings to other modes p appear to be significant, implying that the essential transport physics may be described by a far simpler system than would have been expected on the basis of earlier nonlinear theory alone. Part of this analysis is the inference of the coupling coefficients M{sub kpq} governing the nonlinear mode interactions, whose measurement from tokamak simulation data is presented here for the first time.

  17. Advanced high efficient liquid transport garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkins, W.; Williams, W.

    1973-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics, design, fabrication, and current and anticipated applications of a new liquid transport garment (LTG) are discussed. The new LTG is being constructed from highly efficient liquid transport modules which have been developed to replace the current tygon tubing networks for applications in Apollo and other liquid cooling garment designs.

  18. Functional insights of nucleocytoplasmic transport in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Kentaro; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    Plant nucleocytoplasmic transport beyond the nuclear envelope is important not only for basic cellular functions but also for growth, development, hormonal signaling, and responses to environmental stimuli. Key components of this transport system include nuclear transport receptors and nucleoporins. The functional and physical interactions between receptors and the nuclear pore in the nuclear membrane are indispensable for nucleocytoplasmic transport. Recently, several groups have reported various plant mutants that are deficient in factors involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Here, we summarize the current state of knowledge about nucleocytoplasmic transport in plants, and we review the plant-specific regulation and roles of this process in plants. PMID:24765097

  19. Membrane Transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The selective movement and redistribution of ions and small organic molecules is essential for plant growth and cellular homeostasis. Because of this, plants have evolved numerous proteins that facilitate the transport of minerals, sugars, metabolites, and other compounds through the limiting membra...

  20. Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the opinions of four transportation experts on issues related to school buses. The experts respond to the following questions: will advertisements placed on buses be used to generate district revenue; will compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas become standard fuel for school buses; and will school bus seat belts be mandatory and…