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Sample records for ah gases materials

  1. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, cylinders containing Class 2...

  2. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, cylinders containing Class 2...

  3. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, cylinders containing Class 2...

  4. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, cylinders containing Class 2...

  5. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, cylinders containing Class 2...

  6. 30 CFR 18.25 - Combustible gases from insulating material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.25 Combustible gases from insulating material. (a) Insulating...

  7. 30 CFR 18.25 - Combustible gases from insulating material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.25 Combustible gases from insulating material. (a) Insulating...

  8. Method of producing pyrolysis gases from carbon-containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Mudge, Lyle K.; Brown, Michael D.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Baker, Eddie G.

    1989-01-01

    A gasification process of improved efficiency is disclosed. A dual bed reactor system is used in which carbon-containing feedstock materials are first treated in a gasification reactor to form pyrolysis gases. The pyrolysis gases are then directed into a catalytic reactor for the destruction of residual tars/oils in the gases. Temperatures are maintained within the catalytic reactor at a level sufficient to crack the tars/oils in the gases, while avoiding thermal breakdown of the catalysts. In order to minimize problems associated with the deposition of carbon-containing materials on the catalysts during cracking, a gaseous oxidizing agent preferably consisting of air, oxygen, steam, and/or mixtures thereof is introduced into the catalytic reactor at a high flow rate in a direction perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the reactor. This oxidizes any carbon deposits on the catalysts, which would normally cause catalyst deactivation.

  9. Nanostructured carbon materials for adsorption of methane and other gases

    DOEpatents

    Stadie, Nicholas P.; Fultz, Brent T.; Ahn, Channing; Murialdo, Maxwell

    2015-06-30

    Provided are methods for storing gases on porous adsorbents, methods for optimizing the storage of gases on porous adsorbents, methods of making porous adsorbents, and methods of gas storage of optimized compositions, as in systems containing porous adsorbents and gas adsorbed on the surface of the porous adsorbent. The disclosed methods and systems feature a constant or increasing isosteric enthalpy of adsorption as a function of uptake of the gas onto the exposed surface of a porous adsorbent. Adsorbents with a porous geometry and surface dimensions suited to a particular adsorbate are exposed to the gas at elevated pressures in the specific regime where n/V (density) is larger than predicted by the ideal gas law by more than several percent.

  10. a Study of Behavior of Inert Gases in Some Candidate Materials for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. H.; Chen, K. Q.; Wang, Y. S.; Sun, J. G.; Hu, B. F.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2003-06-01

    This paper gives a review of our study of inert gases (helium, argon) in several materials candidate to future fusion reactors. The study is focused on the agglomeration of gas atoms and formation of nanoscale cavities in several materials including stainless steels and silicon carbide under irradiation with ions with energy ranging from 10 keV to 100 MeV.

  11. Trapping ultracold gases near cryogenic materials with rapid reconfigurability

    SciTech Connect

    Naides, Matthew A.; Turner, Richard W.; Lai, Ruby A.; DiSciacca, Jack M.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2013-12-16

    We demonstrate an atom chip trapping system that allows the placement and high-resolution imaging of ultracold atoms within microns from any ≲100 μm-thin, UHV-compatible material, while also allowing sample exchange with minimal experimental downtime. The sample is not connected to the atom chip, allowing rapid exchange without perturbing the atom chip or laser cooling apparatus. Exchange of the sample and retrapping of atoms has been performed within a week turnaround, limited only by chamber baking. Moreover, the decoupling of sample and atom chip provides the ability to independently tune the sample temperature and its position with respect to the trapped ultracold gas, which itself may remain in the focus of a high-resolution imaging system. As a first demonstration of this system, we have confined a 700-nK cloud of 8 × 10{sup 4} {sup 87}Rb atoms within 100 μm of a gold-mirrored 100-μm-thick silicon substrate. The substrate was cooled to 35 K without use of a heat shield, while the atom chip, 120 μm away, remained at room temperature. Atoms may be imaged and retrapped every 16 s, allowing rapid data collection.

  12. 49 CFR 173.245 - Bulk packaging for extremely hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3). 173.245 Section 173.245 Transportation Other Regulations... hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3). When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that... provisions specified in column 7 of the § 172.101 table. (a) Tank car tanks and multi-unit tank car...

  13. 49 CFR 173.245 - Bulk packaging for extremely hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3). 173.245 Section 173.245 Transportation Other Regulations... hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3). When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that... provisions specified in column 7 of the § 172.101 table. (a) Tank car tanks and multi-unit tank car...

  14. 49 CFR 173.245 - Bulk packaging for extremely hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3). 173.245 Section 173.245 Transportation Other Regulations... hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3). When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that... provisions specified in column 7 of the § 172.101 table. (a) Tank car tanks and multi-unit tank car...

  15. 49 CFR 173.245 - Bulk packaging for extremely hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3). 173.245 Section 173.245 Transportation Other Regulations... hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3). When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that... provisions specified in column 7 of the § 172.101 table. (a) Tank car tanks and multi-unit tank car...

  16. 49 CFR 173.245 - Bulk packaging for extremely hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3). 173.245 Section 173.245 Transportation Other Regulations... hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3). When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that... provisions specified in column 7 of the § 172.101 table. (a) Tank car tanks and multi-unit tank car...

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Goodson, Boyd McLean

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  18. Carbonaceous material for production of hydrogen from low heating value fuel gases

    DOEpatents

    Koutsoukos, Elias P.

    1989-01-01

    A process for the catalytic production of hydrogen, from a wide variety of low heating value fuel gases containing carbon monoxide, comprises circulating a carbonaceous material between two reactors--a carbon deposition reactor and a steaming reactor. In the carbon deposition reactor, carbon monoxide is removed from a fuel gas and is deposited on the carbonaceous material as an active carbon. In the steaming reactor, the reactive carbon reacts with steam to give hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The carbonaceous material contains a metal component comprising from about 75% to about 95% cobalt, from about 5% to about 15% iron, and up to about 10% chromium, and is effective in suppressing the production of methane in the steaming reactor.

  19. Materials Data on GaSe (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on GaSe2NCl6 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-04

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Na3GaSe3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-04

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on V4GaSe8 (SG:216) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Ta4GaSe8 (SG:216) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Nb4GaSe8 (SG:216) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. An in-vitro comparative study for assessment of apical sealing ability of Epiphany/AH Plus sealer with Resilon/gutta-percha root canal filling materials

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Meraj; Musani, Mohammad A.; Ahmed, Iffat M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Endodontic treatment is directed to eliminate microbial challenges from the root canal system and to create a complete seal. The aim of this study was to assess the apical sealing ability of resin-based Epiphany-Resilon root canal filling system and to compare it with the sealing abilities of different combinations of AH Plus, gutta-percha, Epiphany, and Resilon. Materials and Methods: One hundred extracted human maxillary incisor roots were treated endodontically. The samples were divided into groups A, B, C, and D, with each group containing 25 samples. Group A: Canals obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer; Group B: Canals obturated with Resilon and Epiphany; Group C: Canals obturated with gutta-percha and Epiphany; Group D: Control group canals obturated with gutta-percha without a sealer. The sealing ability of each of the obturation techniques was tested using the dye penetration method followed by the clearing method using alcohol. Stereo microscope was used to measure the extent of dye penetration. Statistical data analysis was performed using analysis of variance and Tukey tests. Results: Microleakage was found in all the four groups. Apical extent of mean microleakage was maximum for gutta-percha, followed by Gutta-percha + AH-plus and Gutta-percha + Epiphany, and the least with Resilon + Epiphany. Statistically significant difference (P < 0.01) was seen in the apical leakage. Conclusion: All the samples tested showed microleakage. The “Epiphany soft resin endodontic obturation system” showed a superior result compared to other obturation materials. PMID:27583220

  6. Use of Less Reactive Materials and More Stable Gases to Reduce Corrosive Wear When Lubricating with Halogenated Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1960-01-01

    The gases CF2Cl-CF2Cl, CF2Cl2, and CF2Br-CF2Br were used to lubricate metals, cermets, and ceramics in this study. One of the criteria for determining the effectiveness of a reactive-gas-lubricated systems is the stability of the halogen-containing gas molecule. The carbon-to-halogen bond in the ethane molecule has extremely good thermal stability superior to the methane analogs (CF2Cl2 and CF2Br2) used in earlier research. For this reason, the ethane compounds CF2Cl-CF2Cl and CF2Br-CF2Br were considered as high-temperature lubricants. Friction and wear studies were made with a hemisphere (3/16-in. rad.) rider sliding in a circumferential path on the flat surface of a rotating disk (21/2-in. diam. ). The specimens of metal alloys, cermets, and ceramics were run In an atmosphere of the various gases with a load of 1200 grams, sliding velocities from 75 to 8000 feet per minute, and temperatures from 75 to 1400 F. The gas CF2Cl-CF2Cl was found to be an effective lubricant for the cermet LT-LB (59.0 Cr, 19.0 Al2O3, 20.0 Mo, 2.0 Ti) and the ceramic Al2O3 sliding on Stellite Star J (cobalt-base alloy) at temperatures to 1400 F. The bromine-containing gas CF2Br-CF2Br was found to give friction and wear values that can be considered to be in a region of effective boundary lubrication for the cermet K175D (nickel-bonded metal carbide) sliding on the metal Hastelloy R-235 (nickel-base alloy) at temperatures to 1200 F.

  7. Formation of Residual Gases from Source Materials in Closed Crystal Growth Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Different, non-constituent cases are present in crystal growth systems and may affect processes like growth rate in PVT or voids formation and detached solidification in melt growth systems. The presence of the gas may be detrimental or advantageous depending on its amount and composition, and on the process in question. The presence of the cases, their amount and composition, can be caused and changed by diffusion through and desorption from the growth container material. We have investigated these phenomena for silica glass ampoules. We also found, that residual cases can be generated by the source materials: even very high purity commercial elements and compounds may contain trace amounts of impurities, particularly oxides. The oxides may have low volatilities themselves but their reaction with other species, particularly carbon and hydrogen, may produce volatile compounds like water or carbon oxides. The amount of the gas and its composition is dependent on the original purity of the material (oxide contaminants) and the heat treatment of the source prior to sealing. In many cases. particularly at temperatures below about 900 C and in well-outgassed ampoules, this mechanism dominates. The problem is of a particular importance in sealed systems where the amount and composition of the gas cannot be directly controlled. Therefore, a reasonable knowledge and understanding of the origin, composition, magnitude, and change with time of gases present in sealed ampoules may be important for a meaningful control and interpretation of crystal growth processes. We have investigated this phenomenon in more details for a number of elements and compounds, primarily for II-VI and IV-VI materials. Different source pre-treatment and annealing procedures were applied, and subsequent consecutive annealings and measurements were done to determine the origin and development of the gas in the systems.

  8. Polymeric membrane materials: new aspects of empirical approaches to prediction of gas permeability parameters in relation to permanent gases, linear lower hydrocarbons and some toxic gases.

    PubMed

    Malykh, O V; Golub, A Yu; Teplyakov, V V

    2011-05-11

    Membrane gas separation technologies (air separation, hydrogen recovery from dehydrogenation processes, etc.) use traditionally the glassy polymer membranes with dominating permeability of "small" gas molecules. For this purposes the membranes based on the low free volume glassy polymers (e.g., polysulfone, tetrabromopolycarbonate and polyimides) are used. On the other hand, an application of membrane methods for VOCs and some toxic gas recovery from air, separation of the lower hydrocarbons containing mixtures (in petrochemistry and oil refining) needs the membranes with preferable penetration of components with relatively larger molecular sizes. In general, this kind of permeability is characterized for rubbers and for the high free volume glassy polymers. Data files accumulated (more than 1500 polymeric materials) represent the region of parameters "inside" of these "boundaries." Two main approaches to the prediction of gas permeability of polymers are considered in this paper: (1) the statistical treatment of published transport parameters of polymers and (2) the prediction using model of ≪diffusion jump≫ with consideration of the key properties of the diffusing molecule and polymeric matrix. In the frames of (1) the paper presents N-dimensional methods of the gas permeability estimation of polymers using the correlations "selectivity/permeability." It is found that the optimal accuracy of prediction is provided at n=4. In the frames of the solution-diffusion mechanism (2) the key properties include the effective molecular cross-section of penetrating species to be responsible for molecular transportation in polymeric matrix and the well known force constant (ε/k)(eff i) of {6-12} potential for gas-gas interaction. Set of corrected effective molecular cross-section of penetrant including noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), permanent gases (H(2), O(2), N(2), CO), ballast and toxic gases (CO(2), NO(,) NO(2), SO(2), H(2)S) and linear lower hydrocarbons (CH(4

  9. Trapped solar wind noble gases, kr81/kr exposure ages and k/ar ages in apollo 11 lunar material.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, P; Geiss, J; Graf, H; Grögler, N; Krähenbühl, U; Schwaller, H; Schwarzmüller, J; Stettler, A

    1970-01-30

    Grain size and etching experiments show that the fine lunar material contains large amounts of trapped solar wind particles. Elemental and isotopic compositions of the noble gases in solar material and in the terrestrial atmosphere are significantly different, except for the Ar(36)/ Ar(38) and the Kr isotope ratios. Exposure ages of two rocks and of the fine material are between 380 and 510 x 10(6) years. Feldspar concentrates give K/Ar ages of 3220 and 3300 x 10(6) years, significantly higher than the unseparated rock.

  10. Toxic gases.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the widespread use of gases and some volatile solvents in modern society is given. The usual circumstances in which undue exposure may occur are described. The most prominent symptoms and general principles of diagnosis and treatment are given and are followed by more specific information on the commoner, more toxic materials. While acute poisonings constitute the greater part of the paper, some indication of chronic disorders arising from repeated or prolonged exposure is also given. PMID:2687827

  11. Adsorption of molecular gases on porous materials in the SAFT-VR approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, M.; Martinez, R.; Martinez, A.; Rosu, H. C.

    2010-08-01

    A simple molecular thermodynamic approach is applied to the study of the adsorption of gases of chain molecules on solid surfaces. We use a model based on the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory for Variable Range (SAFT-VR) potentials [A. Gil-Villegas, A. Galindo, P.J. Whitehead, S.J. Mills, G. Jackson, A.N. Burgess, J. Chem. Phys. 106 (1997) 4168] that we extend by including quasi-two-dimensional approximation to describe the adsorption properties of these types of real gas [A. Martínez, M. Castro, C. McCabe, A. Gil-Villegas, J. Chem. Phys. 126 (2007) 074707]. The model is applied to ethane, ethylene, propane, and carbon dioxide adsorbed on activated carbon and silica gel, which are porous media of significant industrial interest. We show that the adsorption isotherms obtained by means of the present SAFT-VR modeling are in fair agreement with the experimental results provided in the literature.

  12. Relative toxicity of pyrolysis gases from materials - Effects of chemical composition and test conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    Relative toxicity test data on 270 materials are presented, based on test procedures developed at the University of San Francisco. The effects of chemical composition, using data on 13 types of synthetic polymers and eight types of fabrics, are discussed. Selected materials were evaluated using nine test conditions with the USF method, and using methods developed at the FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute, Douglas Aircraft Company and San Jose State University.

  13. Newspapers and newspaper ink contain agonists for the ah receptor.

    PubMed

    Bohonowych, Jessica E S; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T; Denison, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [(3)H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed.

  14. Newspapers and Newspaper Ink Contain Agonists for the Ah Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bohonowych, Jessica E. S.; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T.; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [3H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed. PMID:18203687

  15. Intracellular localization and trafficking of serine proteinase AhSub and cysteine proteinase AhCP of Acanthamoeba healyi.

    PubMed

    Moon, E-K; Lee, S-T; Chung, D-I; Kong, H-H

    2006-01-01

    Proteinases have been proposed to play important roles in pathogenesis and various biologic actions in Acanthamoeba. Although genetic characteristics of several proteases of Acanthamoeba have been reported, the intracellular localization and trafficking of these enzymes has yet to be studied. In the present study, we analyzed the intracellular localization and trafficking of two proteinases, AhSub and AhCP, of Acanthamoeba healyi by transient transfection. Full-length AhSub-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion protein was found in intracellular vesicle-like structures of transfected amoebae. Time-lapse photographs confirmed the secretion of the fluorescent material of the vesicle toward the extracellular space. The mutated AhSub, of which the pre or prepro region was deleted, was found to localize diffusely throughout the cytoplasm of the amoeba rather than concentrated in the secretory vesicle. Transfection of the construct containing the pre region only showed the same localization and trafficking of the full-length AhSub. A cysteine proteinase AhCP-EGFP fusion protein showed similar localization in the vesicle-like structure in the amoeba. However, using Lyso Tracker analysis, these vesicular structures of AhCP were confirmed to be lysosomes rather than secretory vesicles. The AhCP construct with a deletion of the prepro region showed a dispersed distribution of fluorescence in the cytoplasm of the cells. These results indicated that AhSub and AhCP would play different roles in Acanthameoba biology and that the pre region of AhSub and pro region of AhCP are important for proper intracellular localization and trafficking of each proteinase.

  16. Precursor systems analyses of automated highway systems. Activity Area A: Urban and rural ahs analysis. Resource materials. Final report, August 1993-November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, H.; Holstein, J.; Ottesen, J.; Hoffman, P.

    1995-11-01

    The identification of technical, operational, and safety issues was accomplished primarily through a comprehensive literature search and a series of expert workshops. The literature search included identification and review of a broad range of previous AHS, IVHS, and related topic research and findings. This work supported a preliminary identification and/or confirmation and detailed description of major technical features, for example, (1) geometric design characteristics such as interchange design, lane width, and median configuration and (2) vehicle characteristics such as braking and acceleration capabilities. Accident type and severity data were also obtained and analyzed for various roadway categories and roadway improvements. Considering improved safety as a primary driver for the implementation of AHSs, current accident statistics were examined carefully to assess their potential utility as an indicator of likely AHS benefits. A summary of freeway design and operating characteristic information was developed not only to guide the ongoing work in this activity area, but to serve as a key point of reference for the team`s other seven activity areas throughout the remainder of the program.

  17. Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podosek, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    Earth and the rest of the inner solar were made by collecting the solids, to the rather efficient exclusion of the gases. In this grand separation the noble gases, because they are noble, were partitioned strongly into the gas phase. The resultant generalization is that the noble gases are very scarce in the materials of the inner solar system, whence their common synonym "rare gases."This scarcity is probably the most important single feature to remember about noble-gas cosmochemistry. As illustration of the absolute quantities, for example, a meteorite that contains xenon at a concentration of order 10 -10 cm3STP g -1 (4×10-15 mol g-1) would be considered relatively rich in xenon. Yet this is only 0.6 ppt (part per trillion, fractional abundance 10-12) by mass. In most circumstances, an element would be considered efficiently excluded from some sample if its abundance, relative to cosmic proportions to some convenient reference element, were depleted by "several" orders of magnitude. But a noble gas would be considered to be present in quite high concentration if it were depleted by only four or five orders of magnitude (in the example above, 10-10 cm3STP g-1 of xenon corresponds to depletion by seven orders of magnitude), and one not uncommonly encounters noble-gas depletion of more than 10 orders of magnitude.The second most important feature to note about noble-gas cosmochemistry is that while a good deal of the attention given to noble gases really is about chemistry, traditionally a good deal of attention is also devoted to nuclear phenomena, much more so than for most other elements. This feature is a corollary of the first feature noted above, namely scarcity. A variety of nuclear transmutation processes - decay of natural radionuclides and energetic particle reactions - lead to the production of new nuclei that are often new elements. Most commonly, the quantity of new nuclei originating in nuclear transmutation is very small compared to the quantity already

  18. Locating Gases in Porous Materials: Cryogenic Loading of Fuel-Related Gases Into a Sc-based Metal-Organic Framework under Extreme Pressures.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Jorge; Woodall, Christopher H; Allan, Dave R; Gregoryanz, Eugene; Howie, Ross T; Kamenev, Konstantin V; Probert, Michael R; Wright, Paul A; Moggach, Stephen A

    2015-11-02

    An alternative approach to loading metal organic frameworks with gas molecules at high (kbar) pressures is reported. The technique, which uses liquefied gases as pressure transmitting media within a diamond anvil cell along with a single-crystal of a porous metal-organic framework, is demonstrated to have considerable advantages over other gas-loading methods when investigating host-guest interactions. Specifically, loading the metal-organic framework Sc2BDC3 with liquefied CO2 at 2 kbar reveals the presence of three adsorption sites, one previously unreported, and resolves previous inconsistencies between structural data and adsorption isotherms. A further study with supercritical CH4 at 3-25 kbar demonstrates hyperfilling of the Sc2 BDC3 and two high-pressure displacive and reversible phase transitions are induced as the filled MOF adapts to reduce the volume of the system.

  19. Irradiation History of Itokawa Regolith Material Deduced from Noble Gases in the Hayabusa Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Keisuke; Okazaki, Ryuji; Nakamura, Tomoki; Miura, Yayoi N.; Osawa, Takahito; Bajo, Ken-ichi; Matsuda, Shintaro; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ireland, Trevor R.; Kitajima, Fumio; Naraoka, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Takaaki; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Zolensky, Michael E.; Uesugi, Masayuki; Shirai, Kei; Abe, Masanao; Yada, Toru; Ishibashi, Yukihiro; Fujimura, Akio; Mukai, Toshifumi; Ueno, Munetaka; Okada, Tatsuaki; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    2011-08-01

    Noble gas isotopes were measured in three rocky grains from asteroid Itokawa to elucidate a history of irradiation from cosmic rays and solar wind on its surface. Large amounts of solar helium (He), neon (Ne), and argon (Ar) trapped in various depths in the grains were observed, which can be explained by multiple implantations of solar wind particles into the grains, combined with preferential He loss caused by frictional wear of space-weathered rims on the grains. Short residence time of less than 8 million years was implied for the grains by an estimate on cosmic-ray-produced 21Ne. Our results suggest that Itokawa is continuously losing its surface materials into space at a rate of tens of centimeters per million years. The lifetime of Itokawa should be much shorter than the age of our solar system.

  20. Trapping Planetary Noble Gases During the Fischer-Tropsch-Type Synthesis of Organic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, N. M.; Meshik, A.

    2010-01-01

    When hydrogen, nitrogen and CO arc exposed to amorphous iron silicate surfaces at temperatures between 500 - 900K, a carbonaceous coating forms via Fischer-Tropsch type reactions!, Under normal circumstances such a catalytic coating would impede or stop further reaction. However, we find that this coating is a better catalyst than the amorphous iron silicates that initiate these rcactions:u . The formation of a self-perpetuating catalytic coating on grain surfaces could explain the rich deposits of macromolecular carbon found in primitive meteorites and would imply that protostellar nebulae should be rich in organic materiaL Many more experiments are needed to understand this chemical system and its application to protostellar nebulae.

  1. The kinetics of reaction of the by-products of ablative materials at high temperatures and the rate of heat transfer between hot surfaces and reactive gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spokes, G. N.; Beadle, P. C.; Gac, N. A.; Golden, D. M.; King, K. D.; Benson, S. W.

    1971-01-01

    Research has been conducted by means of laboratory experiments to enhance understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions taking place during ablative processes that accompany the reentry or manned space vehicles into planetary atmospheres. Fundamental mechanisms of those chemical reactions believed to be important in the thermal degradation of ablative plastic heat shield materials, and the gases evolved, are described.

  2. 49 CFR 173.301 - General requirements for shipment of compressed gases and other hazardous materials in cylinders...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Toxic gases and mixtures. Cylinders containing toxic gases and toxic gas mixtures meeting the criteria... cylinder certified to ISO-11119-3 may not be used for a toxic gas or toxic gas mixture meeting the criteria... a DOT 39 cylinder or a cylinder used for acetylene in solution; or (iii) A cylinder containing...

  3. [?]Nonlinear Issues in the Aerothermochemistry of Gases and Materials and the Associated Physics and Dynamics of Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1996-01-01

    Our research and technology are focused on nonlinear issues in the aerothermochemistry of gases and materials and the associated physics and dynamics of interfaces. Our program is now organized to aggressively support the NASA Aeronautics Enterprise so as to: (a) develop a new generation of environmentally compatible, economic subsonic aircraft; (b) develop the technology base for an economically viable and environmentally compatible high-speed civil transport; (c) develop the technology options for new capabilities in high-performance aircraft; (d) develop hypersonic technologies for air-breathing flight; and (e) develop advanced concepts, understanding of physical phenomena, and theoretical, experimental, and computational tools for advanced aerospace systems. The implications from our research for aeronautical and aerospace technology have been both broad and deep. For example, using advanced computational techniques, we have determined exact solutions for the Schrodinger equation in electron-molecule scattering allowing us to evaluate atmospheric models important to reentry physics. We have also found a new class of exact solutions for the Navier Stokes equations. In experimental fluid dynamics, we have found explicit evidence of turbulence modification of droplet sizes in shock tube flow with condensation. We have developed a new diagnostic tool for the direct estimation of flow velocities at MHz sampling rates in quasi-one dimensional turbulent flow. This procedure suggests an unexpected confirmation of the possibility of 'natural' closure in Reynolds stresses with deep implications for the development of turbulent models. A transient increase is observed in both the spectral energy decay rate and the degree of chaotic complexity at the interface of a shock wave and a turbulent ionized gas. Even though the gas is apparently brought to rest by the shock wave, no evidence is found either of the expected relaminarization. A unique diamond-shaped nozzle has been

  4. 49 CFR 173.301 - General requirements for shipment of compressed gases and other hazardous materials in cylinders...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... authorized service life may be transported for reprocessing or disposal of the cylinder's contents. After... (except oxygen and oxidizing gases transported by aircraft, see §§ 173.302(f) and 173.304(f)), beginning... transported in accordance with paragraph (k) or (l) or this section. (g) Manifolding cylinders...

  5. Greenhouse Gases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Found Solar Thermal Power Plants Solar Thermal Collectors Solar Energy and the Environment Secondary Sources Electricity The Science ... the earth’s atmosphere act as greenhouse gases. When sunlight strikes the earth’s surface, some of it radiates ...

  6. Toxic gases from fires.

    PubMed

    Terrill, J B; Montgomery, R R; Reinhardt, C F

    1978-06-23

    The major lethal factors in uncontrolled fires are toxic gases, heat, and oxygen deficiency. The predominant toxic gas is carbon monoxide, which is readily generated from the combusion of wood and other cellulosic materials. Increasing use of a variety of synthetic polymers has stimulated interest in screening tests to evaluated the toxicity of polymeric materials when thermally decomposed. As yet, this country lacks a standardized fire toxicity test protocol.

  7. Simulation studies for wells AH-4bis/AH-17 and AH-18, Ahuachapan Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Monterrosa, Manuel Ernesto

    1996-01-24

    Well AH-4bis, at the Ahuachapan Geothermal Field is planned to be drilled on the same pad as the former AH-4. A simulation study was carried out for two casing dameters 13 5/8 and 9 5/8” in order to estimate its production and to know its economic feasibility. The simulation results indcate a high probability of production in the range of 7 Mwe, equivalent to 120 kg/s total mass flow rate, 1250 kJ/kg at 6 bar-a for the new well AH-4bis. Well AH- 17 is good producer, during 1991 after ten years of production, the well was shut-in due to silica scaling problems. A wellbore simulation was carried out in order to predict the new production conditions after the work-over, mainly to estimate the water flow rate in order to reduce the silica scaling. The results indicate a very low water flow rate. The match between the simulated and measured production curves after the work-over was successful. The well AH-18 is located at the southern part of the actual bore field. CEL is planning to expand the borefield at this area and it is neccessary to estimate the possible production condtions at that zone. The results indicate a high probabilty of production at that area. The power potential is estimated at 3.5 Mwe per well at WHP 6 bar-a and the wells will not require induction.

  8. Simulations studies for wells AH-4bis/AH-17 and AH-18, Ahuachapan Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Monterrosa, M.E.

    1996-12-31

    Well AH-4{sub bis} at the Ahuachapan Geothermal Field is planned to be drilled on the same pad as the former AH-4. A simulation study was carried out for two casing diameters 13 5/8 and 9 5/8 inches in order to estimate its production and to know its economic feasibility. The simulation results indicate a high probability of production in the range of 7 Mwe, equivalent to 120 kg/s total mass flow rate, 1250 kJ/kg at 6 bar-a for the new well AH-4b{sub bis}. Well AH-17 is good producer, during 1991 after ten years of production, the well was shut-in due to silica scaling problems. A wellbore simulation was carried out in order to predict the new production conditions after the work-over, mainly to estimate the water flow rate in order to reduce the silica scaling. The results indicate a very low water flow rate. The match between the simulated and measured production curves after the work-over was successful. The well AH-18 is located at the southern part of the actual bore field. CEL is planning to expand the borefield at this area and it is necessary to estimate the possible production conditions at that zone. The results indicate a high probability of production at that area. The power potential is estimated at 3.5 Mwe per well at WHP 6 bar-a and the wells will not require induction.

  9. 46 CFR 147.60 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compressed gases. 147.60 Section 147.60 Shipping COAST... Other Special Requirements for Particular Materials § 147.60 Compressed gases. (a) Cylinder requirements. Cylinders used for containing hazardous ships' stores that are compressed gases must be— (1) Authorized...

  10. 46 CFR 147.60 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compressed gases. 147.60 Section 147.60 Shipping COAST... Other Special Requirements for Particular Materials § 147.60 Compressed gases. (a) Cylinder requirements. Cylinders used for containing hazardous ships' stores that are compressed gases must be— (1) Authorized...

  11. 46 CFR 147.60 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compressed gases. 147.60 Section 147.60 Shipping COAST... Other Special Requirements for Particular Materials § 147.60 Compressed gases. (a) Cylinder requirements. Cylinders used for containing hazardous ships' stores that are compressed gases must be— (1) Authorized...

  12. Wax: A benign hydrogen-storage material that rapidly releases H2-rich gases through microwave-assisted catalytic decomposition.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Cortes, S; Slocombe, D R; Xiao, T; Aldawsari, A; Yao, B; Kuznetsov, V L; Liberti, E; Kirkland, A I; Alkinani, M S; Al-Megren, H A; Thomas, J M; Edwards, P P

    2016-10-19

    Hydrogen is often described as the fuel of the future, especially for application in hydrogen powered fuel-cell vehicles (HFCV's). However, its widespread implementation in this role has been thwarted by the lack of a lightweight, safe, on-board hydrogen storage material. Here we show that benign, readily-available hydrocarbon wax is capable of rapidly releasing large amounts of hydrogen through microwave-assisted catalytic decomposition. This discovery offers a new material and system for safe and efficient hydrogen storage and could facilitate its application in a HFCV. Importantly, hydrogen storage materials made of wax can be manufactured through completely sustainable processes utilizing biomass or other renewable feedstocks.

  13. Wax: A benign hydrogen-storage material that rapidly releases H2-rich gases through microwave-assisted catalytic decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Cortes, S.; Slocombe, D. R.; Xiao, T.; Aldawsari, A.; Yao, B.; Kuznetsov, V. L.; Liberti, E.; Kirkland, A. I.; Alkinani, M. S.; Al-Megren, H. A.; Thomas, J. M.; Edwards, P. P.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen is often described as the fuel of the future, especially for application in hydrogen powered fuel-cell vehicles (HFCV’s). However, its widespread implementation in this role has been thwarted by the lack of a lightweight, safe, on-board hydrogen storage material. Here we show that benign, readily-available hydrocarbon wax is capable of rapidly releasing large amounts of hydrogen through microwave-assisted catalytic decomposition. This discovery offers a new material and system for safe and efficient hydrogen storage and could facilitate its application in a HFCV. Importantly, hydrogen storage materials made of wax can be manufactured through completely sustainable processes utilizing biomass or other renewable feedstocks.

  14. Prospects of high-resolution resonant X-ray inelastic scattering studies on solid materials, liquids and gases at diffraction-limited storage rings

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thorsten; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Rubensson, Jan-Erik

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic technique of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) will particularly profit from immensely improved brilliance of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs). In RIXS one measures the intensities of excitations as a function of energy and momentum transfer. DLSRs will allow for pushing the achievable energy resolution, signal intensity and the sampled spot size to new limits. With RIXS one nowadays probes a broad range of electronic systems reaching from simple molecules to complex materials displaying phenomena like peculiar magnetism, two-dimensional electron gases, superconductivity, photovoltaic energy conversion and heterogeneous catalysis. In this article the types of improved RIXS studies that will become possible with X-ray beams from DLSRs are envisioned. PMID:25177995

  15. Wax: A benign hydrogen-storage material that rapidly releases H2-rich gases through microwave-assisted catalytic decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cortes, S.; Slocombe, D. R.; Xiao, T.; Aldawsari, A.; Yao, B.; Kuznetsov, V. L.; Liberti, E.; Kirkland, A. I.; Alkinani, M. S.; Al-Megren, H. A.; Thomas, J. M.; Edwards, P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen is often described as the fuel of the future, especially for application in hydrogen powered fuel-cell vehicles (HFCV’s). However, its widespread implementation in this role has been thwarted by the lack of a lightweight, safe, on-board hydrogen storage material. Here we show that benign, readily-available hydrocarbon wax is capable of rapidly releasing large amounts of hydrogen through microwave-assisted catalytic decomposition. This discovery offers a new material and system for safe and efficient hydrogen storage and could facilitate its application in a HFCV. Importantly, hydrogen storage materials made of wax can be manufactured through completely sustainable processes utilizing biomass or other renewable feedstocks. PMID:27759014

  16. 49 CFR 173.301 - General requirements for shipment of compressed gases and other hazardous materials in cylinders...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... burst pressure of a CG-1, CG-4, or CG-5 pressure relief device must be at test pressure with a tolerance... compressed gas must be arranged to discharge unobstructed to the open air. In addition, for Division 2.1... unobstructed to the open air. In addition, for Division 2.1 (flammable gas) material, the pressure...

  17. 49 CFR 173.301 - General requirements for shipment of compressed gases and other hazardous materials in cylinders...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... burst pressure of a CG-1, CG-4, or CG-5 pressure relief device must be at test pressure with a tolerance... compressed gas must be arranged to discharge unobstructed to the open air. In addition, for Division 2.1... unobstructed to the open air. In addition, for Division 2.1 (flammable gas) material, the pressure...

  18. Effect of SO2 on oxidation of metallic materials in CO2/H2O-rich gases relevant to oxyfuel environments

    SciTech Connect

    Huczkowski, P; Olszewski, T; Schiek, M; Lutz, B; Holcomb, G R; Shemet, V; Nowak, W; Meier, G H; Singheiser, L; Quadakkers, W J

    2014-01-01

    In an oxyfuel plant, heat exchanging metallic components will be exposed to a flue gas that contains substantially higher contents of CO2, water vapor, and SO2 than conventionalflue gases. In the present study, the oxidation behavior of the martensitic steel P92 was studied in CO2-and/or H2O-rich gas mixtures with and without addition of SO2. For this purpose, the corrosion of P92 at 550 8C up to 1000 h in Ar–H2O–SO2, Ar–CO2–SO2, Ar–CO2–O2–SO2 and simulated oxyfuel gas (Ar–CO2–H2O–O2–SO2) was compared with the behavior in selected SO2-free gases. The oxidation kinetics were estimated by a number of methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy and wave length dispersive X-ray analysis, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction as well as transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results revealed that the effect of SO2 addition on the materials behavior substantially differed, depending on the prevailing base gas atmosphere. The various types of corrosion attack affected by SO2 could not be explained by solely comparing equilibrium activities of the gas atmospheres with thermodynamic stabilities of possible corrosion products. The results were found to be strongly affected by relative rates of reactions of the various gas species occurring within the frequently porous corrosion scales as well as at the scale/gas-and scale/alloy interfaces.Whereas SO2 addition to Ar–CO2 resulted in formation of an external mixed oxide/sulflde layer, the presence of SO2 in oxyfuel gas and in Ar–H2O–SO2 resulted in Fe-sulflde formation near the interface between inner and outer oxide layer as well as Cr-sulflde formation in the alloy. In the latter gases, the presence of SO2 seemed to have no dramatic effect on oxide scale growth rates.

  19. Development and application of a hybrid inert/organic packing material for the biofiltration of composting off-gases mimics.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Jerónimo; Prado, Oscar J; Almarcha, Manuel; Lafuente, Javier; Gabriel, David

    2010-06-15

    The performance of three biofilters (BF1-BF3) packed with a new hybrid (inert/organic) packing material that consists of spherical argyle pellets covered with compost was examined in different operational scenarios and compared with a biofilter packed with pine bark (BF4). BF1, BF2 and BF4 were inoculated with an enriched microbial population, while BF3 was inoculated with sludge from a wastewater treatment plant. A gas mixture containing ammonia and six VOCs was fed to the reactors with N-NH(3) loads ranging from 0 to 10 g N/m(3)h and a VOCs load of around 10 g C/m(3)h. A profound analysis of the fate of nitrogen was performed in all four reactors. Results show that the biofilters packed with the hybrid packing material and inoculated with the microbial pre-adapted population (BF1 and BF2) achieved the highest nitrification rates and VOCs removal efficiencies. In BF3, nitratation was inhibited during most of the study, while only slight evidence of nitrification could be observed in BF4. All four reactors were able to treat the VOCs mixture with efficiencies greater than 80% during the entire experimental period, regardless of the inlet ammonia load.

  20. Use of impure inert gases in the controlled heating and cooling of mixed conducting metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Bernhart, John Charles [Fleetwood, PA

    2012-08-21

    Method for processing an article comprising mixed conducting metal oxide material. The method comprises contacting the article with an oxygen-containing gas and either reducing the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas during a cooling period or increasing the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas during a heating period; during the cooling period, reducing the oxygen activity in the oxygen-containing gas during at least a portion of the cooling period and increasing the rate at which the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas is reduced during at least a portion of the cooling period; and during the heating period, increasing the oxygen activity in the oxygen-containing gas during at least a portion of the heating period and decreasing the rate at which the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas is increased during at least a portion of the heating period.

  1. RESULTS FROM THE AHS PESTICIDE EXPOSURE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study/Pesticide Exposure Study (AHS/PES) measured exposures resulting from agricultural use of 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos for a subset of applicators in the AHS cohort. Through on-farm measurements and observations, data collected in the exposure study will...

  2. Effects of scorched food leachates with or without activated charcoal pretreatment on AhR activation in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Kinoshita, Makoto; Fujimori, Shin; Ishikawa, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor activated by xenobiotics, including dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although AhR is also activated by some dietary constituents, it has not been completely clarified in what circumstances AhR ligands are ingested in our daily life. Because PAHs are formed by the incomplete combustion of organic materials, we hypothesized that scorched foods might contain and leach out AhR ligands sufficient to stimulate AhR in vitro. To test this hypothesis, scorched foods (bread, cheese, etc.) were mixed vigorously with water, and the supernatants were retrieved as samples. The samples were added to HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was analyzed by RT-PCR in different cell lines treated with the samples. We further tested whether pretreatment of the samples with activated charcoal would alter their AhR-stimulating activity. All the supernatant samples tested induced AhR-dependent reporter gene activity and CYP1A1 mRNA expression. In some samples, these inductions were inhibited by pretreatment with activated charcoal. Our findings indicate that scorched food leachates stimulate AhR in cultured cells and that activated charcoal adsorbs the AhR-stimulating substances in some leachates. Thus, people who habitually eat scorched foods are exposed to AhR ligands on a regular basis. Further studies are needed to elucidate whether burnt foods actually exert biological effects on our health.

  3. 40 CFR 90.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and span gases. (1) Calibration gas values are to be derived from NIST “Standard Reference Materials... or FID the manufacturer may choose to use as a diluent span gas and the calibration gas either... choice of diluent (zero air or purified nitrogen) between the calibration and span gases. If...

  4. The Role of AhR in Breast Cancer Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    other cell types, galangin is a potent inhibitor of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), an environmental carcinogen-responsive transcription factor...constitutively active AhR. Constitutive and environmental chemical-inducible AhR activity was profoundly suppressed by galangin as was cell growth...However, the failure of a-naphthoflavone or FhAhRR transfection to block growth indicated that galangin -mediated AhR inhibition was either insufficient

  5. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, S.; Kulkarni, S.S.

    1986-08-26

    Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

  6. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.

    1986-01-01

    Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

  7. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi

    1986-01-01

    The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

  8. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, S.

    1986-08-19

    The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

  9. 49 CFR 173.307 - Exceptions for compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exceptions for compressed gases. 173.307 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.307 Exceptions for compressed gases. (a) The following materials are not subject to the requirements of this subchapter:...

  10. 49 CFR 173.307 - Exceptions for compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exceptions for compressed gases. 173.307 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.307 Exceptions for compressed gases. (a) The following materials are not subject to the requirements of this subchapter:...

  11. Learning the Critical Points for Addition in Matematika GASING

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siregar, Johannes Hamonangan; Wiyanti, Wiwik; Wakhyuningsih, Nur Safitri; Godjali, Ali

    2014-01-01

    We propose learning Matematika GASING to help students better understand the addition material. Matematika GASING is a way of learning mathematics in an easy, fun and enjoyable fashion. GASING is short for GAmpang, aSyIk, and menyenaNGkan (Bahasa Indonesia for easy, fun and enjoyable). It was originally developed by Prof. Yohanes Surya at the…

  12. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic... CARRIAGE BY RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.204 Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded...

  13. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic... CARRIAGE BY RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.204 Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded...

  14. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic... CARRIAGE BY RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.204 Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded...

  15. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic... CARRIAGE BY RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.204 Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded...

  16. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic... CARRIAGE BY RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.204 Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded...

  17. AH Draconis - a tale of two periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, D.

    2010-04-01

    Using BAA data from the past 37 years, the SRb variable star AH Dra is found to have two slightly variable periods of around 105 and 189 days and a range of magnitude 7.0 to 8.9. This is in contrast to the GCVS period of 158 days and range of 8.5-9.3.

  18. Isotopic Analysis and Evolved Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, Timothy D.; Boynton, William V.; Chutjian, Ara; Hoffman, John H.; Jordan, Jim L.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; McEntire, Richard W.; Nyquist, Larry

    1996-01-01

    Precise measurements of the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of planetary surface material and gases, and observed variations in these compositions, can contribute significantly to our knowledge of the source(s), ages, and evolution of solar system materials. The analyses discussed in this paper are mostly made by mass spectrometers or some other type of mass analyzer, and address three broad areas of interest: (1) atmospheric composition - isotopic, elemental, and molecular, (2) gases evolved from solids, and (3) solids. Current isotopic data on nine elements, mostly from in situ analysis, but also from meteorites and telescopic observations are summarized. Potential instruments for isotopic analysis of lunar, Martian, Venusian, Mercury, and Pluto surfaces, along with asteroid, cometary and icy satellites, surfaces are discussed.

  19. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17 Section 194.15-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Chemistry Laboratory...

  20. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17 Section 194.15-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Chemistry Laboratory...

  1. Trends in source gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehhalt, D. H.; Fraser, P. J.; Albritton, D.; Cicerone, R. J.; Khalil, M. A. K.; Legrand, M.; Makide, Y.; Rowland, F. S.; Steele, L. P.; Zander, R.

    1989-01-01

    Source gases are defined as those gases that, by their breakdown, introduce into the stratosphere halogen, hydrogen, and nitrogen compounds that are important in stratospheric ozone destruction. Given here is an update of the existing concentration time series for chlorocarbons, nitrous oxide, and methane. Also reviewed is information on halogen containing species and the use of these data for establishing trends. Also reviewed is evidence on trends in trace gases that influence tropospheric chemistry and thus the tropospheric lifetimes of source gases, such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or nitrogen oxides. Much of the information is given in tabular form.

  2. Long-Term Cytotoxicity, pH and Dissolution Rate of AH Plus and MTA Fillapex.

    PubMed

    Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal da; Accorsi-Mendonça, Thais; Pedrosa, Ana Carolina; Granjeiro, José Mauro; Zaia, Alexandre A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify the long-term cytotoxic effects of the MTA Fillapex and to compare them with AH Plus. Dissolution rate and pH were also evaluated. Human osteoblast cells were incubated with elutes of fresh specimens from AH Plus and MTA Fillapex, and with elutes of the same specimens for 4 successive weeks. Elute's pH was evaluated at each time point. A multiparametric cell viability assay was performed. For dissolution rate, ISO methodology was used. The results were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance, complemented with the Tukey post-test (p<0.05). No significant difference was found among the materials when fresh mixed (p>0.05). After 1 week, AH Plus became non-cytotoxic on all three evaluated parameters. Conversely, MTA Fillapex remained severely and mildly cytotoxic over the entire experimental period (p<0.05). The dissolution rate of AH Plus was significantly lower than MTA Fillapex at all time points (p>0.05). The pH of AH Plus was significantly lower than MTA Fillapex at the second and third week (p<0.05). In the other tested time points no statistical difference was observed. In conclusion, MTA Fillapex remained cytotoxic after 4 weeks and its cytotoxicity may be related to the high dissolution rate of this material.

  3. Analysis of Ah receptor pathway activation by brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Brown, David J; Van Overmeire, Ilse; Goeyens, Leo; Denison, Michael S; De Vito, Michael J; Clark, George C

    2004-06-01

    Brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) are used as additives in plastics to decrease the rate of combustion of these materials, leading to greater consumer safety. As the use of plastics has increased, the production and use of flame-retardants has also grown. Many BFRs are persistent and have been detected in environmental samples, raising concerns about the biological/toxicological risk associated with their use. Most BFRs appear to be non-toxic, however there is still some concern that these compounds, or possible contaminants in BFRs mixtures could interact with cellular receptors. In this study we have examined the interaction of decabromodiphenyl ether, Firemaster BP4A (tetrabromobisphenol A), Firemaster PHT4 (tetrabromophthalic anhydride), hexabromobenzene, pentabromotoluene, decabromobiphenyl, Firemaster BP-6 (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl) and possible contaminants of BFR mixtures with the Ah receptor. Receptor binding and activation was examined using the Gel Retardation Assay and increased expression of dioxin responsive genes was detected using the reporter gene based CALUX assay. The results demonstrate the ability of BFRs to activate the AhR signal transduction pathway at moderate to high concentrations as assessed using both assays. AhR-dependent activation by BFRs may be due in part to contaminants present in commercial/technical mixtures. This was suggested by our comparative analysis of Firemaster BP-6 versus its primary component 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl. Some technical mixtures of brominated flame-retardants contain brominated biphenyls, dioxins or dibenzofurans as contaminants. When tested in the CALUX assay these compounds were found to be equivalent to, or more active than their chlorinated analogues. Relative effective potency values were determined from dose response curves for these brominated HAHs.

  4. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  5. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  6. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  7. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  8. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  9. In-flight AHS MTF measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallefont-Robinet, Françoise; Fontanilles, Guillaume; de Miguel, Eduardo

    2008-10-01

    The disposal of couples of images of the same landscape acquired with two spatial resolutions gives the opportunity to assess the in-flight Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of the lower resolution sensor in the common spectral bands. For each couple, the higher resolution image stands for the landscape so that the ratio of the spectra obtained by FFT of the two images, gives the lower resolution sensor MTF. This paper begins with a brief recall of the method including the aliasing correction. The next step presents the data to be processed, provided by the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA). The model of the AHS MTF is described. The presentation of the corresponding AHS results naturally follows. Last part of the paper consists in a comparison with other measurements: measurements obtained with the edge method and laboratory measurements.

  10. Tested Demonstrations: Diffusion of Gases--Kinetic Molecular Theory of Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Provided are procedures and list of materials needed to demonstrate that the pressure inside a container with a porous surface can be changed due to the rate of diffusion of low molecular weight gases. Typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  11. Role of AhR/ARNT system in skin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Furue, Masutaka; Takahara, Masakazu; Nakahara, Takeshi; Uchi, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that binds to structurally diverse synthetic and naturally occurring chemicals including dioxins, flavonoids, tryptophan photoproducts, and Malassezia metabolites. Upon binding to its ligands, cytoplasmic AhR translocates to the nucleus, heterodimerizes with aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), and mediates numerous biological and toxicological effects by inducing the transcription of various AhR-responsive genes. AhR ligation controls oxidation/antioxidation, epidermal barrier function, photo-induced response, melanogenesis, and innate immunity. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of skin homeostasis mediated by the AhR/ARNT system.

  12. Physicochemical properties and surfaces morphologies evaluation of MTA FillApex and AH plus.

    PubMed

    Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Orçati Dorileo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales; Dalla Villa, Ricardo; Borba, Alexandre Meireles; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle Vedove; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Estrela, Cyntia Rodrigues Araújo; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho

    2014-01-01

    The solubility, pH, electrical conductivity, and radiopacity of AH Plus and MTA FillApex were evaluated. In addition, the surfaces morphologies of the sealers were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy. For pH test, the samples were immersed in distilled water at different periods of time. The same solution was used for electrical conductivity measurement. The solubility and radiopacity were evaluated according to ANSI/ADA. Statistical analyses were carried out at 5% level of significance. MTA FillApex presented higher mean value for solubility and electrical conductivity. No significant difference was observed in the mean values for pH reading. AH Plus presented higher radiopacity mean values. MTA FillApex presented an external surface with porosities and a wide range of sizes. In conclusion, the materials fulfill the ANSI/ADA requirements when considering the radiopacity and solubility. AH Plus revealed a compact and homogeneous surface with more regular aspects and equal particle sizes.

  13. The constitutively active Ah receptor (CA-AhR) mouse as a model for dioxin exposure - effects in reproductive organs.

    PubMed

    Brunnberg, Sara; Andersson, Patrik; Poellinger, Lorenz; Hanberg, Annika

    2011-12-01

    The dioxin/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates most toxic effects of dioxins. In utero/lactational exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) impairs fetal/neonatal development and the developing male reproductive tract are among the most sensitive tissues. TCDD causes antiestrogenic responses in rodent mammary gland and uterus and in human breast cancer cell lines in the presence of estrogen. Also, more recently an estrogen-like effect of TCDD/AhR has been suggested in the absence of estrogen. A transgenic mouse expressing a constitutively active AhR (CA-AhR) was developed as a model mimicking a situation of constant exposure to AhR agonists. Male and female reproductive tissues of CA-AhR mice were characterized for some of the effects commonly seen after dioxin exposure. Sexually mature CA-AhR female mice showed decreased uterus weight, while an uterotrophic assay in immature CA-AhR mice resulted in increased uterus weight. In immature mice, both TCDD-exposure and CA-AhR increased the expression of the estrogen receptor target gene Cathepsin D. When co-treated with 17β-estradiol no increase in Cathepsin D levels occurred in either TCDD-exposed or CA-AhR mice. In sexually mature male CA-AhR mice the weights of testis and ventral prostate were decreased and the epididymal sperm reserve was reduced. The results of the present study are in accordance with previous studies on dioxin-exposed rodents in that an activated AhR (here CA-AhR) leads to antiestrogenic effects in the presence of estrogen, but to estrogenic effects in the absence of estrogen. These results suggest the CA-AhR mouse model as a useful tool for studies of continuous low activity of the AhR from early development, resembling the human exposure situation.

  14. Photochemistry of biogenic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the biosphere and the atmosphere is examined, emphasizing the composition and photochemistry and chemistry of the troposphere and stratosphere. The reactions of oxygen, ozone, and hydroxyl are reviewed and the fate of the biogenic gases ammonia, methane, reduced sulfur species, reduced halogen species, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide are described. A list is given of the concentration and sources of the various gases.

  15. AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference, 34th and AIAA/ASME Adaptive Structures Forum, La Jolla, CA, Apr. 19-22, 1993, Technical Papers. Pts. 1-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topics addressed include the prediction of helicopter component loads using neural networks, spacecraft on-orbit coupled loads analysis, hypersonic flutter of a curved shallow panel with aerodynamic heating, thermal-acoustic fatigue of ceramic matrix composite materials, transition elements based on transfinite interpolation, damage progression in stiffened composite panels, a direct treatment of min-max dynamic response optimization problems, and sources of helicopter rotor hub inplane shears. Also discussed are dynamics of a layered elastic system, confidence bounds on structural reliability, mixed triangular space-time finite elements, advanced transparency development for USAF aircraft, a low-velocity impact on a graphite/PEEK, an automated mode-tracking strategy, transonic flutter suppression by a passive flap, a nonlinear response of composite panels to random excitation, an optimal placement of elastic supports on a simply supported plate, a probabilistic assessment of composite structures, a model for mode I failure of laminated composites, a residual flexibility approach to multibody dynamics,and multilayer piezoelectric actuators.

  16. AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference, 34th and AIAA/ASME Adaptive Structures Forum, La Jolla, CA, Apr. 19-22, 1993, Technical Papers. Pts. 1-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Topics addressed include the prediction of helicopter component loads using neural networks, spacecraft on-orbit coupled loads analysis, hypersonic flutter of a curved shallow panel with aerodynamic heating, thermal-acoustic fatigue of ceramic matrix composite materials, transition elements based on transfinite interpolation, damage progression in stiffened composite panels, a direct treatment of min-max dynamic response optimization problems, and sources of helicopter rotor hub inplane shears. Also discussed are dynamics of a layered elastic system, confidence bounds on structural reliability, mixed triangular space-time finite elements, advanced transparency development for USAF aircraft, a low-velocity impact on a graphite/PEEK, an automated mode-tracking strategy, transonic flutter suppression by a passive flap, a nonlinear response of composite panels to random excitation, an optimal placement of elastic supports on a simply supported plate, a probabilistic assessment of composite structures, a model for mode I failure of laminated composites, a residual flexibility approach to multibody dynamics,and multilayer piezoelectric actuators.

  17. [Rapid detection of influenza virus A (AH1, AH3) and B by nested-polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Watanabe, S; Imai, M

    1997-06-01

    We applied the Nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for laboratory diagnosis of influenza virus infection. We used three primer sets for detection of influenza virus A (AH1, AH3) and B. The primer sets for each type (AH1, AH3, B) was able to detect specifically each type of influenza. We measured the sensitivity for detection of vaccine strains. The PCR method was able to detect 0.9 PFU/assey of AH1 type, 1.0 PFU/assey of AH3 type and 1.8 PFU/assey of B type. Out of 46 isolation negative but antibody positive cases, 38 cases were positive for PCR (82.6%). This method is sensitive and useful for rapid diagnosis of influenza virus infection.

  18. Strongly correlated Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevy, F.; Salomon, C.

    2016-10-01

    The strongly interacting Bose gas is one of the most fundamental paradigms of quantum many-body physics and the subject of many experimental and theoretical investigations. We review recent progress on strongly correlated Bose gases, starting with a description of beyond mean-field corrections. We show that the Efimov effect leads to non universal phenomena and to a metastability of the low temperature Bose gas through three-body recombination to deeply bound molecular states. We outline differences and similarities with ultracold Fermi gases, discuss recent experiments on the unitary Bose gas, and finally present a few perspectives for future research.

  19. Effect of the geometric parameters and of the elastic characteristics of materials on the durability of valves in pumps for liquified gases

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    The authors determine the values of the angle and width of the valve seat for a specified pressure gradient delta-p and also to choose materials with such mechanical properties that plastic deformations do not occur at the place of contact. To improve the durability of valves of high-pressure pumps, the geometric parameters of the valves have to be determined with a view to the condition that the plastic deformations at the place of contact between the mushroom and the seat are impermissible. When the conditions of the expression presented are fulfilled, then the best hydraulic characteristics will be found in the valve in which the material of the mushroom is the titanium alloy VT5-1, and the material of the seat is steel 20Kh13.

  20. Evaluation of 20 Ah Li Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Huang, Charles K.; Surampudi, S.; Hill, Carole; Radzykewycz, Dan T.; Marsh, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Lithium ion cells of 20 Ah capacity were fabricated by Bluestar Advanced Technology Corporation, Canada under a developmental contract from US Air Force. In this paper, we report our studies on the evaluation of these cells under various test conditions. These include generic test conditions such as discharges and charges at different temperatures to understand the rate-limiting processes in the discharge/charge processes as a function of temperature, and cycle life under standard cycling conditions (100% DOD) at ambient temperature. In addition, tests are being done to ascertain the performance of the cells in the Mars 2001 Lander application, which includes pulse testing of the cells at 60 A and 40 A loads for 100 mS and 1 min., respectively at different states of charge and temperatures, and cycling at low temperature at partial depths of discharge.

  1. Residual Gases in Crystal Growth Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Residual gases present in closed ampoules may affect different crystal growth processes. That seems to be particularly true under microgravity conditions where, due to weightlessness of the melt, the gases may lead to detached solidification and/or formation of voids and bubbles, as observed in the past. For that reason a good understanding and control of formation of residual gases is important for an optimum design and meaningful interpretation of crystal growth experiments. Our extensive experimental and theoretical studies of the subject, summarized in this paper, include degassing of silica glass and generation of gases from different source materials. Different materials processing conditions, like outgassing under vacuum, annealing in hydrogen, resublimation, different material preparation procedures, multiple annealings, different processing times, and others were applied and their effect on the amount and composition of gas were analyzed. The experimental results were interpreted based on theoretical calculations on diffusion in silica glass and source materials and thermochemistry of the system. Procedures for a reduction of the amount of gas are also discussed.

  2. 29 CFR 1910.101 - Compressed gases (general requirements).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compressed gases (general requirements). 1910.101 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.101 Compressed gases (general requirements). (a) Inspection of compressed gas cylinders. Each employer shall determine...

  3. 29 CFR 1910.101 - Compressed gases (general requirements).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed gases (general requirements). 1910.101 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.101 Compressed gases (general requirements). (a) Inspection of compressed gas cylinders. Each employer shall determine...

  4. 29 CFR 1910.101 - Compressed gases (general requirements).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compressed gases (general requirements). 1910.101 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.101 Compressed gases (general requirements). (a) Inspection of compressed gas cylinders. Each employer shall determine...

  5. 29 CFR 1910.101 - Compressed gases (general requirements).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in § 1910.6. (b) Compressed gases. The in-plant handling, storage, and utilization of all compressed... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compressed gases (general requirements). 1910.101 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.101 Compressed...

  6. 29 CFR 1910.101 - Compressed gases (general requirements).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in § 1910.6. (b) Compressed gases. The in-plant handling, storage, and utilization of all compressed... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compressed gases (general requirements). 1910.101 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.101 Compressed...

  7. Induction of AhR-Mediated Gene Transcription by Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toshio; Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Okinaga, Hiroko; Teramoto, Tamio

    2014-01-01

    Background Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is classically known to be activated by xenobiotics such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although it has been reported that PAHs are contained in roasted coffee beans, in general coffee beverages are not considered to be AhR activators. We tested whether exposure to coffee would activate AhR in cultured cells. Methods HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene were treated with coffee samples. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was quantitated by RT-PCR and Western blotting in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells, after treatment with coffee. In order to obtain sensitive and reproducible results, all the experiments were performed with the cells placed in either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or pure serum, instead of routinely-used culture medium, whose intrinsic AhR-stimulating activity turned out to be so strong as to interfere with the analyses. Results All the coffee samples tested robustly stimulated AhR-mediated transcription in the reporter gene assays. Of note, to what extent coffee and other AhR agonists activated AhR was different, depending on whether the experiments were done in PBS or serum. CYP1A1 mRNA was induced by coffee, in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells placed in either PBS or serum. CYP1A1 protein expression, which was not detected in these cells incubated in PBS, was also increased by coffee in cells placed in serum. Conclusions By using culture medium-free experimental settings, we have shown that coffee is a strong AhR activator. Our observation may help elucidate as-yet-unrecognized effects of coffee on human health. PMID:25007155

  8. Fischer-Tropsch-Type Production of Organic Materials in the Solar Nebula: Studies Using Graphite Catalysts and Measuring the Trapping of Noble Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.; Lucas, Christopher; Kimura, Yuki; Hohenberg, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The formation of abundant carbonaceous material in meteorites is a long standing problem and an important factor in the debate on the potential for the origin of life in other stellar systems. The Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) catalytic reduction of CO by hydrogen was once the preferred model for production of organic materials in the primitive solar nebula. We have demonstrated that many grain surfaces can catalyze both FTT and HB-type reactions, including amorphous iron and magnesium silicates, pure silica smokes as well as several minerals. Graphite is not a particularly good FTT catalyst, especially compared to iron powder or to amorphous iron silicate. However, like other silicates that we have studied, it gets better with exposure to CO. N2 and H2 over time: e.g., after formation of a macromolecular carbonaceous layer on the surfaces of the underlying gains. While amorphous iron silicates required only 1 or 2 experimental runs to achieve steady state reaction rates, graphite only achieved steady state after 6 or more experiments. We will present results showing the catalytic action of graphite grains increasing with increasing number of experiments and will also discuss the nature of the final "graphite" grains aster completion of our experiments.

  9. Biocompatibility of RealSeal, its primer and AH Plus implanted in subcutaneous connective tissue of rats

    PubMed Central

    GRECCA, Fabiana Soares; KOPPER, Patrícia Maria Poli; dos SANTOS, Régis Burmeister; FOSSATI, Anna Christina; CARRARD, Vinicius Coelho; ACASIGUA, Gerson Arison Xavier; de FIGUEIREDO, José Antônio Poli

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study tested rat connective tissue response to RealSeal, RealSeal primer or AH Plus after 7, 15, 30, 60 and 90 days of implantation. Material and methods Thirty Wistar rats had subcutaneous sockets created on their back and received four implants each of polyethylene tubes containing one of the materials tested according to the groups: AH (AH Plus Sealer); RS (RealSeal Sealer); RP (RealSeal Primer); CG (control group – empty tube). After histological processing, sections were analyzed to identify the presence of neutrophils, lymphocytes and plasma cells, eosinophils, macrophages and giant cells, as well as fibrous capsule and abscesses, by an examiner using light microscope. Kruskal- Wallis and multiple-comparisons test were used for statistical analysis. Significance level was set at 5%. Results Lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate scores significantly higher than those of the control group were observed at 14 and 60 days in AH group, and at 90 days in RS group (p<0.05). There were no differences in terms of presence of macrophages, giant cells, eosinophils, neutrophils or fibrosis. AH Plus group scored higher for abscesses at 7 days than after any other period (p=0.031). RP group scored higher for lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate at 14 days than at 90 days (p=0.04). Conclusion The main contribution of this study was to demonstrate that issues involved with tissue tolerance of a Resilon-containing sealer, RealSeal Sealer, cannot be attributed to its primer content. PMID:21437470

  10. Kinetic Theory of Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The theory, developed in the nineteenth century, notably by Rudolf Clausius (1822-88) and James Clerk Maxwell (1831-79), that the properties of a gas (temperature, pressure, etc) could be described in terms of the motions (and kinetic energy) of the molecules comprising the gases. The theory has wide implications in astrophysics. In particular, the perfect gas law, which relates the pressure, vol...

  11. Sudden releases of gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaloupecká, Hana; Jaňour, Zbyněk; Jurčáková, Klára; Kukačka, Libor; Nosek, Štěpán

    2014-03-01

    Conurbations all over the world have enlarged for numberless years. The accidental or intentional releases of gases become more frequent. Therefore, these crises situations have to be studied. The aim of this paper is to describe experiments examining these processes that were carried out in the laboratory of Environmental Aerodynamics of the Institute of Thermomechanics AS CR in Nový Knín. Results show huge puff variability from replica to replica.

  12. A comparison of apical sealing ability between GuttaFlow and AH plus: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Prajakta; Rathore, Vishnu P. S.; Hotkar, Chetan; Savgave, Snehal S.; Raghavendra, K.; Ingale, Priya

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The present study aimed to compare apical sealing ability between GuttaFlow and AH Plus. Materials and Method: Eighty extracted human maxillary anterior teeth with fully formed apex and straight root were collected for this study. The root canals were cleaned and shaped using a standard step back preparation to size 60# master apical file at the established working length and divided into four groups: Group 1, GuttaFlow sealer with gutta-percha; Group 2, AH Plus sealer with gutta-percha; Group 3, positive control group (Teeth were instrumented and left without obturation); Group 4, negative control group (Teeth were totally coated with nail varnish) Dye leakage was carried out. Statistical analysis was done using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software and Student's unpaired t-test. Results: The GuttaFlow group had a mean leakage of 1.38 mm whereas AH Plus had a mean of 1.425 mm. The standard deviation of GuttaFlow and AH Plus were 0.3861 and 0.3226, respectively. Student's unpaired t-test disclosed no significant difference (P < 0.05) between the groups. Conclusion: None of the sealers used in the study could completely seal the apical foramen to have a fluid-tight seal. GuttaFlow and AH Plus showed no statistically significant difference in microleakage; the better result was shown by GuttaFlow. PMID:27583228

  13. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 14, Gases, The Gas Laws, and Absolute Temperature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the fourteenth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to gases, gas laws, and absolute temperature. The topics are concerned with the kinetic theory of gases, thermometric scales, Charles' law, ideal gases, Boyle's law, absolute zero, and gas pressures. The…

  14. AH-1S communication switch integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, Loran; Szoboszlay, Zoltan; Shively, Robert; Bick, Frank J.

    1989-01-01

    The C-6533/ARC communication system as installed on the test AH-1E Cobra helicopter was modified to allow discrete radio selection of all aircraft radios at the cyclic radio/intercommunication system switch. The current Cobra-fleet use of the C-6533 system is cumbersome, particularly during low-altitude operations. Operationally, the current system C-6533 configuration and design requires the pilot to estimate when he can safely remove his hand from an active flight control to select radios during low-altitude flight. The pilot must then physically remove his hand from the flight control, look inside the cockpit to select and verify the radio selection and then effect the selected radio transmission by activating the radio/ICS switch on the cyclic. This condition is potentially hazardous, especially during low-level flight at night in degraded weather. To improve pilot performance, communications effectiveness, and safety, manprint principles were utilized in the selection of a design modification. The modified C-6533 design was kept as basic as possible for potential Cobra-fleet modification. The communications system was modified and the design was subsequently flight-tested by the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate and NASA at the NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California. The design modification enables the Cobra pilot to maintain hands-on flight controls while selecting radios during nap-of-the-Earth (NOE) flight without looking inside the cockpit which resulted in reduced pilot workload ratings, better pilot handling quality ratings and increased flight safety for the NOE flight environment.

  15. Equilibration of quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrelly, Terry

    2016-07-01

    Finding equilibration times is a major unsolved problem in physics with few analytical results. Here we look at equilibration times for quantum gases of bosons and fermions in the regime of negligibly weak interactions, a setting which not only includes paradigmatic systems such as gases confined to boxes, but also Luttinger liquids and the free superfluid Hubbard model. To do this, we focus on two classes of measurements: (i) coarse-grained observables, such as the number of particles in a region of space, and (ii) few-mode measurements, such as phase correlators. We show that, in this setting, equilibration occurs quite generally despite the fact that the particles are not interacting. Furthermore, for coarse-grained measurements the timescale is generally at most polynomial in the number of particles N, which is much faster than previous general upper bounds, which were exponential in N. For local measurements on lattice systems, the timescale is typically linear in the number of lattice sites. In fact, for one-dimensional lattices, the scaling is generally linear in the length of the lattice, which is optimal. Additionally, we look at a few specific examples, one of which consists of N fermions initially confined on one side of a partition in a box. The partition is removed and the fermions equilibrate extremely quickly in time O(1/N).

  16. Shari’ah Compliant Finance: Toward Economic Jihad

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-12

    principles in the areas of capital adequacy, corporate governance, risk management and transparency. The goal of the IFSB is to promote the awareness of...as excessive risk . To ensure compliance, investment firms must rely on guidance from a Shari’ah council, paid to assert the financial products...for explaining Shari’ah Compliant Financing, what it is, how it is managed , and what, if any, links there are to jihad. This monograph strives to

  17. Modeling of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) ligand binding domain and its utility in virtual ligand screening to predict new AhR ligands

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, William; Koch, Daniel; O’Donnell, Edmond; Khalil, Sammy M.; Kerkvliet, Nancy; Tanguay, Robert; Abagyan, Ruben; Kolluri, Siva Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor; the AhR Per-AhR/Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain binds ligands. We developed homology models of the AhR PAS domain to characterize previously observed intra- and inter-species differences in ligand binding using Molecular Docking. In silico structure-based virtual ligand screening using our model resulted in the identification of pinocembrin and 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone, which promoted nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation of AhR and AhR-dependent induction of endogenous target genes. PMID:19719119

  18. Fatal intoxications associated with the designer opioid AH-7921.

    PubMed

    Kronstrand, R; Thelander, G; Lindstedt, D; Roman, M; Kugelberg, F C

    2014-10-01

    AH-7921 (3,4-dichloro-N-[(1-dimethylamino)cyclohexylmethyl]benzamide) is a designer opioid with ∼80% of morphine's µ-agonist activity. Over a 6-month period, we encountered nine deaths where AH-7921 was involved and detected in blood from the deceased. Shortly after the last death, on August 1 2013, AH-7921 was scheduled as a narcotic and largely disappeared from the illicit market in Sweden. AH-7921 was measured by a selective liquid chromatography-MS-MS method and the concentrations of AH-7921 ranged from 0.03 to 0.99 µg/g blood. Six of our cases had other drugs of abuse on board and most had other medications such as benzodiazepines, antidepressants and analgesics. However, the other medicinal drugs encountered were present in postmortem therapeutic concentrations and unlikely to have contributed to death. In addition to the parent compound, we identified six possible metabolites where two N-demethylated dominated and four mono-hydroxylated were found in trace amounts in the blood. In conclusion, deaths with AH-7921 seem to occur both at low and high concentrations, probably a result of different tolerance to the drug. Hence, it is reasonable to assume that no sharp dividing line exists between lethal and non-lethal concentrations. Further, poly-drug use did not seem to be a major contributing factor for the fatal outcome.

  19. Interaction of gases with lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, H. F.; Fuller, E. L., Jr.; Gammage, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Quantitative efforts to assess the surface properties of lunar fines, particularly water induced porosity are discussed. Data show that: (1) changes induced in lunar fines are not visible in high energy electron micrographs, (2) scanning micrographs show no change in particle size distribution as a result of reaction with water, (3) water induced changes are internal to the particles themselves, (4) normal laboratory atmosphere blocks alteration reaction with water, and (5) surface properties of mature lunar soils appear to be almost independent of chemical composition and mineralogy, but there are some variations in their reactivity toward water.

  20. Effect of SO2 on oxidation of metallic materials in CO2/H2O-rich gases relevant to oxyfuel environments

    SciTech Connect

    Huczkowski, P.; Olszewski, T.; Schiek, M.; Lutz, B.; Holcomb, G.; Shemet, V.; Meier, G. H.; Singheiser, L.; Quadakkers, W. J.

    2012-09-19

    This report is a description of research performed by the Jülich Research Centre. Their conclusions outline the effects of SO2 additions on oxide formations and the interaction of other gases in oxvyfuel environments.

  1. Jet flows of reacting gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Farkhadzhan; Zhumaev, Zair Sh.

    The book presents fundamentals of the aerodynamic theory and calculation of straight gas jets. The discussion focuses on the flow structure and turbulent combustion of unmixed gases and thermal characteristics of the jet. The following three types of problems are considered: motion of unmixed chemically active gases; gas motion under conditions of chemical equilibrium; and motion of gases under conditions of finite-rate chemical reactions.

  2. Toxicity of Pyrolysis Gases from Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, Carlos J.; Kosola, Kay L.; Solis, Alida N.; Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Parker, John A.

    1977-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from six elastomers was investigated. The elastomers were polyisoprene (natural rubber), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM), acrylonitrile rubber, chlorosulfonated polyethylene rubber, and polychloroprene. The rising temperature and fixed temperature programs produced exactly the same rank order of materials based on time to death. Acryltonitrile rubber exhibited the greatest toxicity under these test conditions; carbon monoxide was not found in sufficient concentrations to be the primary cause of death.

  3. Antibacterial efficacy of AH Plus and AH26 sealers mixed with amoxicillin, triple antibiotic paste and nanosilver

    PubMed Central

    Kangarlou, Ali; Neshandar, Rojin; Matini, Negin; Dianat, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Background. Elimination of bacteria from the root canal system is one of the aims of endodontic treatment; hence the incorporation of antibiotics into sealers can increase their antimicrobial efficacy. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial effects of AH26 and AH Plus sealers mixed with amoxicillin, triple antibiotic paste and nanosilver on Enterococcus faecalis. Methods. In this experiment, amoxicillin, triple antibiotic paste and nanosilver powder were added at 10% of the total sealer weight to AH26 and AH Plus sealers and then cultured freshly or after 1, 3, and 7 days with suspension of E. faecalis for 24 hours. The zones of growth inhibition for E. faecalis were evaluated in each group. Results. Incorporation of nanosilver did not increase antibacterial effects of the sealers. Sealers combined with amoxicillin exhibited the highest antibacterial efficacy in fresh condition. In the set specimens, the results demonstrated that the mixture of sealers and triple antibiotic pastes exhibited the greatest antibacterial efficacy. Conclusion. Amoxicillin and triple antibiotic paste significantly improved the antibacterial properties of AH Plus and AH26 sealers. Such properties decreased with time, but the use of sealer-amoxicillin/triple paste combination was still superior to using sealers alone or in combination with nanosilver. PMID:28096947

  4. Antibacterial efficacy of AH Plus and AH26 sealers mixed with amoxicillin, triple antibiotic paste and nanosilver.

    PubMed

    Kangarlou, Ali; Neshandar, Rojin; Matini, Negin; Dianat, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Background. Elimination of bacteria from the root canal system is one of the aims of endodontic treatment; hence the incorporation of antibiotics into sealers can increase their antimicrobial efficacy. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial effects of AH26 and AH Plus sealers mixed with amoxicillin, triple antibiotic paste and nanosilver on Enterococcus faecalis. Methods. In this experiment, amoxicillin, triple antibiotic paste and nanosilver powder were added at 10% of the total sealer weight to AH26 and AH Plus sealers and then cultured freshly or after 1, 3, and 7 days with suspension of E. faecalis for 24 hours. The zones of growth inhibition for E. faecalis were evaluated in each group. Results. Incorporation of nanosilver did not increase antibacterial effects of the sealers. Sealers combined with amoxicillin exhibited the highest antibacterial efficacy in fresh condition. In the set specimens, the results demonstrated that the mixture of sealers and triple antibiotic pastes exhibited the greatest antibacterial efficacy. Conclusion. Amoxicillin and triple antibiotic paste significantly improved the antibacterial properties of AH Plus and AH26 sealers. Such properties decreased with time, but the use of sealer-amoxicillin/triple paste combination was still superior to using sealers alone or in combination with nanosilver.

  5. Homogeneous Atomic Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Yan, Zhenjie; Patel, Parth B.; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Yefsah, Tarik; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the creation of homogeneous Fermi gases of ultracold atoms in a uniform potential. In the momentum distribution of a spin-polarized gas, we observe the emergence of the Fermi surface and the saturated occupation of one particle per momentum state: the striking consequence of Pauli blocking in momentum space for a degenerate gas. Cooling a spin-balanced Fermi gas at unitarity, we create homogeneous superfluids and observe spatially uniform pair condensates. For thermodynamic measurements, we introduce a hybrid potential that is harmonic in one dimension and uniform in the other two. The spatially resolved compressibility reveals the superfluid transition in a spin-balanced Fermi gas, saturation in a fully polarized Fermi gas, and strong attraction in the polaronic regime of a partially polarized Fermi gas.

  6. Identification of a novel mechanism of regulation of Ah (dioxin) receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Junsei; Ema, Masatsugu; Sogawa, Kazuhiro; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki

    1999-01-01

    Ah receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates pleiotropic effects of environmental pollutants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on host animals. In addition to induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes, the liganded AhR complex was found to activate gene expression of a factor designated AhR repressor (AhRR), which inhibits AhR function by competing with AhR for dimerizing with Arnt and binding to the XRE sequence. Thus, AhR and AhRR form a regulatory circuit in the xenobiotic signal transduction pathway and provide a novel mechanism of regulation of AhR function that may determine tissue-specific sensitivity to environmental pollutants. PMID:9887096

  7. Retreatability of two endodontic sealers, EndoSequence BC Sealer and AH Plus: a micro-computed tomographic comparison

    PubMed Central

    Oltra, Enrique; Cox, Timothy C.; LaCourse, Matthew R.; Johnson, James D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Recently, bioceramic sealers like EndoSequence BC Sealer (BC Sealer) have been introduced and are being used in endodontic practice. However, this sealer has limited research related to its retreatability. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the retreatability of two sealers, BC Sealer as compared with AH Plus using micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) analysis. Materials and Methods Fifty-six extracted human maxillary incisors were instrumented and randomly divided into 4 groups of 14 teeth: 1A, gutta-percha, AH Plus retreated with chloroform; 1B, gutta-percha, AH Plus retreated without chloroform; 2A, gutta-percha, EndoSequence BC Sealer retreated with chloroform; 2B, gutta-percha, EndoSequence BC Sealer retreated without chloroform. Micro-CT scans were taken before and after obturation and retreatment and analyzed for the volume of residual material. The specimens were longitudinally sectioned and digitized images were taken with the dental operating microscope. Data was analyzed using an ANOVA and a post-hoc Tukey test. Fisher exact tests were performed to analyze the ability to regain patency. Results There was significantly less residual root canal filling material in the AH Plus groups retreated with chloroform as compared to the others. The BC Sealer samples retreated with chloroform had better results than those retreated without chloroform. Furthermore, patency could be re-established in only 14% of teeth in the BC Sealer without chloroform group. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate that the BC Sealer group had significantly more residual filling material than the AH Plus group regardless of whether or not both sealers were retreated with chloroform. PMID:28194360

  8. Density functional theory for atomic Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ping Nang; Pilati, Sebastiano; Troyer, Matthias; Dai, Xi

    2012-08-01

    The interplay between interaction and inhomogeneity for electrons in solids generates many interesting phenomena, including insulating and metallic behaviour, magnetism, superconductivity, quantum criticality and more exotic phases. Many of the same phenomena appear in ultracold fermionic atoms in optical lattices, which provide clean, controlled and tunable `quantum simulators' to explore the intriguing physics of fermionic systems. Although density functional theory (DFT) is widely used to calculate material properties, it has not yet been applied to cold atomic gases in optical lattices. Here we present a new density functional for short-range interactions (as opposed to Coulomb interactions of electrons), which renders DFT suitable for atomic Fermi gases. This grants us access to an extensive toolset, previously developed for materials simulations, to calculate the static and dynamic properties of atomic Fermi gases in optical lattices and external potentials. Ultracold atom quantum simulators can in turn be used to explore limitations of DFT functionals, and to further improve hybrid functionals, thus forming a bridge between materials simulations and atomic physics.

  9. Physicochemical Properties and Surfaces Morphologies Evaluation of MTA FillApex and AH Plus

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Orçati Dorileo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales; Villa, Ricardo Dalla; Borba, Alexandre Meireles; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle Vedove; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Estrela, Cyntia Rodrigues Araújo; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho

    2014-01-01

    The solubility, pH, electrical conductivity, and radiopacity of AH Plus and MTA FillApex were evaluated. In addition, the surfaces morphologies of the sealers were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy. For pH test, the samples were immersed in distilled water at different periods of time. The same solution was used for electrical conductivity measurement. The solubility and radiopacity were evaluated according to ANSI/ADA. Statistical analyses were carried out at 5% level of significance. MTA FillApex presented higher mean value for solubility and electrical conductivity. No significant difference was observed in the mean values for pH reading. AH Plus presented higher radiopacity mean values. MTA FillApex presented an external surface with porosities and a wide range of sizes. In conclusion, the materials fulfill the ANSI/ADA requirements when considering the radiopacity and solubility. AH Plus revealed a compact and homogeneous surface with more regular aspects and equal particle sizes. PMID:24883413

  10. Evaluation of the apical sealing ability of bioceramic sealer, AH plus & epiphany: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Suprit Sudhir; Pujar, Madhu Ajay; Makandar, Saleem Dadapeer

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This in vitro study evaluated and compared the microleakage of three sealers; Endosequence bioceramic (BC) sealer, AH Plus and Epiphany. Materials and Methods: Study was done on 75 extracted human single rooted permanent teeth, which were decoronated and the root canals were instrumented. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 25) and obturated by continuous wave condensation technique. Group A: using Endosequence BC, Group B: using AH Plus sealer, Group C: using Resilon Epiphany system. Microleakage was evaluated using dye penetration method. Teeth were split longitudinally and then horizontally markings were made at 2, 4 and 6 mm from the apex. Dye penetration evaluation was done under stereomicroscope (30X magnification). Results: The dye penetration in Group B was more than in Group A and C in both vertical and horizontal directions, suggesting that newly introduced BC sealer and Epiphany sealer sealed the root canal better compared to AH Plus Sealer. Conclusion: Newer root canal sealers seal the root canal better but cannot totally eliminate leakage. PMID:25506149

  11. Selective Growth of Noble Gases at Metal/Oxide Interface.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Oka, Hiroshi; Ohnuki, Somei

    2016-02-17

    The locations and roles of noble gases at an oxide/metal interface in oxide dispersed metal are theoretically and experimentally investigated. Oxide dispersed metal consisting of FCC Fe and Y2Hf2O7 (Y2Ti2O7) is synthesized by mechanical alloying under a saturated Ar gas environment. Transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory observes the strain field at the interface of FCC Fe {111} and Y2Hf2O7 {111} whose physical origin emerges from surface reconstruction due to charge transfer. Noble gases are experimentally observed at the oxide (Y2Ti2O7) site and calculations reveal that the noble gases segregate the interface and grow toward the oxide site. In general, the interface is defined as the trapping site for noble gases; however, transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory found evidence which shows that noble gases grow toward the oxide, contrary to the generally held idea that the interface is the final trapping site for noble gases. Furthermore, calculations show that the inclusion of He/Ar hardens the oxide, suggesting that material fractures could begin from the noble gas bubble within the oxides. Thus, experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that noble gases grow from the interface toward the oxide and that oxides behave as a trapping site for noble gases.

  12. Gases in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, P. D.; Liss, P. S.

    2003-12-01

    The annual gross and net primary productivity of the surface oceans is similar in size to that on land (IPCC, 2001). Marine productivity drives the cycling of gases such as oxygen (O2), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methyl iodide (CH3I) which are of fundamental importance in studies of marine productivity, biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric chemistry, climate, and human health, respectively. For example, ˜30% of the world's population (1,570 million) is thought to be at risk of iodine-deficiency disorders that impair mental development (WHO, 1996). The main source of iodine to land is the supply of volatile iodine compounds produced in the ocean and then transferred to the atmosphere via the air-surface interface. The flux of these marine iodine species to the atmosphere is also thought to be important in the oxidation capacity of the troposphere by the production of the iodine oxide radical ( Alicke et al., 1999). A further example is that the net flux of CO2 from the atmosphere to the ocean, ˜1.7±0.5 Gt C yr-1, represents ˜30% of the annual release of anthropogenic CO2 to the atmosphere (IPCC, 2001). This net flux is superimposed on a huge annual flux (90 Gt C yr-1) of CO2 that is cycled "naturally" between the ocean and the atmosphere. The long-term sink for anthropogenic CO2 is recognized as transfer to the ocean from the atmosphere. A final example is the emission of volatile sulfur, in the form of DMS, from the oceans. Not only is an oceanic flux from the oceans needed to balance the loss of sulfur (a bioessential element) from the land via weathering, it has also been proposed as having a major control on climate due to the formation of cloud condensation nuclei (Charlson et al., 1987). Indeed, the existence of DMS and CH3I has been used as evidence in support of the Gaia hypothesis (Lovelock, 1979).There are at least four main processes that affect the concentration of gases in the water column: biological

  13. Post space preparation timing of root canals sealed with AH Plus sealer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae-Ri; Kim, Young Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the optimal timing for post space preparation of root canals sealed with epoxy resin-based AH Plus sealer in terms of its polymerization and influence on apical leakage. Materials and Methods The epoxy polymerization of AH Plus (Dentsply DeTrey) as a function of time after mixing (8, 24, and 72 hours, and 1 week) was evaluated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and microhardness measurements. The change in the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the material with time was also investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Fifty extracted human single-rooted premolars were filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus, and randomly separated into five groups (n = 10) based on post space preparation timing (immediately after root canal obturation and 8, 24, and 72 hours, and 1 week after root canal obturation). The extent of apical leakage (mm) of the five groups was compared using a dye leakage test. Each dataset was statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). Results Continuous epoxy polymerization of the material with time was observed. Although the Tg values of the material gradually increased with time, the specimens presented no clear Tg value at 1 week after mixing. When the post space was prepared 1 week after root canal obturation, the leakage was significantly higher than in the other groups (p < 0.05), among which there was no significant difference in leakage. Conclusions Poor apical seal was detected when post space preparation was delayed until 1 week after root canal obturation. PMID:28194361

  14. AhR-mediated and antiestrogenic activity of humic substances.

    PubMed

    Janosek, J; Bittner, M; Hilscherová, K; Bláha, L; Giesy, J P; Holoubek, I

    2007-04-01

    Humic substances (HS) were for decades regarded as inert in the ecosystems with respect to their possible toxicity. However, HS have been recently shown to elicit various adverse effects generally attributed to xenobiotics. In our study, we used MVLN and H4IIE-luc cell lines stably transfected with luciferase gene under control of estrogen receptor (ER) and Ah receptor (AhR; receptor connected with so-called dioxin-like toxicity) for assessment of anti/estrogenic and AhR-mediated effects of 12 commercially available humic substances. Out of those, five humic acids were shown to induce AhR-mediated activity with relative potencies related to TCDD 2.6 x 10(-8)-7.4 x 10(-8). Organic extracts of HS solutions also elicited high activities what means that lipophilic molecules are responsible for a great part of effect. However, relatively high activity remaining in extracted solution suggests also presence of polar AhR-agonists. Contribution of persistent organic compounds to the observed effects was ruled out by H(2)SO(4) treatment. Eight out of twelve HS elicited significant antiestrogenic effects with IC(50) ranging from 40 to 164 mg l(-1). The possible explanations of the antiestrogenic effect include sorption of 17-beta-estradiol (E2) on HS, changes in membrane permeability for E2 or another specific mechanism.

  15. Activation of AhR-mediated toxicity pathway by emerging ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides (PCDPSs) are a group of environmental pollutants for which limited toxicological information is available. This study tested the hypothesis that PCDPSs could activate the mammalian aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated toxicity pathways. Eighteen PCDPSs were tested in the H4IIE-luc transactivation assay, with 13/18 causing concentration-dependent AhR activation. Potencies of several congeners were similar to those of mono-ortho substituted polychlorinated biphenyls. A RNA sequencing (RNA-seq)-based transcriptomic analysis was performed on H4IIE cells treated with two PCDPS congeners, 2,2',3,3',4,5,6-hepta-CDPS, and 2,4,4',5-tetra-CDPS. Results of RNA-seq revealed a remarkable modulation on a relatively short gene list by exposure to the tested concentrations of PCDPSs, among which, Cyp1 responded with the greatest fold up-regulation. Both the identities of the modulated transcripts and the associated pathways were consistent with targets and pathways known to be modulated by other types of AhR agonists and there was little evidence for significant off-target effects within the cellular context of the H4IIE bioassay. The results suggest AhR activation as a toxicologically relevant mode of action for PCDPSs suggests the utility of AhR-related toxicity pathways for predicting potential hazards associated with PCDPS exposure in mammals and potentially other vertebrates. Polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides (PCDPSs) are a group of en

  16. Driven fragmentation of granular gases.

    PubMed

    Cruz Hidalgo, Raúl; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2008-06-01

    The dynamics of homogeneously heated granular gases which fragment due to particle collisions is analyzed. We introduce a kinetic model which accounts for correlations induced at the grain collisions and analyze both the kinetics and relevant distribution functions these systems develop. The work combines analytical and numerical studies based on direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. A broad family of fragmentation probabilities is considered, and its implications for the system kinetics are discussed. We show that generically these driven materials evolve asymptotically into a dynamical scaling regime. If the fragmentation probability tends to a constant, the grain number diverges at a finite time, leading to a shattering singularity. If the fragmentation probability vanishes, then the number of grains grows monotonously as a power law. We consider different homogeneous thermostats and show that the kinetics of these systems depends weakly on both the grain inelasticity and driving. We observe that fragmentation plays a relevant role in the shape of the velocity distribution of the particles. When the fragmentation is driven by local stochastic events, the long velocity tail is essentially exponential independently of the heating frequency and the breaking rule. However, for a Lowe-Andersen thermostat, numerical evidence strongly supports the conjecture that the scaled velocity distribution follows a generalized exponential behavior f(c) approximately exp(-cn) , with n approximately 1.2 , regarding less the fragmentation mechanisms.

  17. Determination the Usefulness of AhHMA4p1::AhHMA4 Expression in Biofortification Strategies.

    PubMed

    Weremczuk, Aleksandra; Barabasz, Anna; Ruszczyńska, Anna; Bulska, Ewa; Antosiewicz, Danuta Maria

    AhHMA4 from Arabidopsis thaliana encodes Zn/Cd export protein that controls Zn/Cd translocation to shoots. The focus of this manuscript is the evaluation of AhHMA4 expression in tomato for mineral biofortification (more Zn and less Cd in shoots and fruits). Hydroponic and soil-based experiments were performed. Transgenic and wild-type plants were grown on two dilution levels of Knop's medium (1/10, 1/2) with or without Cd, to determine if mineral composition affects the pattern of root/shoot partitioning of both metals due to AhHMA4 expression. Facilitation of Zn translocation to shoots of 19-day-old transgenic tomato was noted only when plants were grown in the more diluted medium. Moreover, the expression pattern of Zn-Cd-Fe cross-homeostasis genes (LeIRT1, LeChln, LeNRAMP1) was changed in transgenics in a medium composition-dependent fashion. In plants grown in soil (with/without Cd) up to maturity, expression of AhHMA4 resulted in more efficient translocation of Zn to shoots and restriction of Cd. These results indicate the usefulness of AhHMA4 expression to improve the growth of tomato on low-Zn soil, also contaminated with Cd.

  18. Transgenic Overexpression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor (AhRR) and AhR-Mediated Induction of CYP1A1, Cytokines, and Acute Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Christoph F.A.; Chang, W.L. William; Kado, Sarah; McCulloh, Kelly; Vogel, Helena; Wu, Dalei; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; Yang, GuoXiang; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Matsumura, Fumio; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR) is known to repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling, but very little is known regarding the role of the AhRR in vivo. Objective: This study tested the role of AhRR in vivo in AhRR overexpressing mice on molecular and toxic end points mediated through a prototypical AhR ligand. Methods: We generated AhRR-transgenic mice (AhRR Tg) based on the genetic background of C57BL/6J wild type (wt) mice. We tested the effect of the prototypical AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1 and cytokines in various tissues of mice. We next analyzed the infiltration of immune cells in adipose tissue of mice after treatment with TCDD using flow cytometry. Results: AhRR Tg mice express significantly higher levels of AhRR compared to wt mice. Activation of AhR by TCDD caused a significant increase of the inflammatory cytokines Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-10, and CXCL chemokines in white epididymal adipose tissue from both wt and AhRR Tg mice. However, the expression of IL-1β, CXCL2 and CXCL3 were significantly lower in AhRR Tg versus wt mice following TCDD treatment. Exposure to TCDD caused a rapid accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages in white adipose tissue of wt and AhRR Tg mice. Furthermore we found that male AhRR Tg mice were protected from high-dose TCDD-induced lethality associated with a reduced inflammatory response and liver damage as indicated by lower levels of TCDD-induced alanine aminotransferase and hepatic triglycerides. Females from both wt and AhRR Tg mice were less sensitive than male mice to acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Conclusion: In conclusion, the current study identifies AhRR as a previously uncharacterized regulator of specific inflammatory cytokines, which may protect from acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Citation: Vogel CF, Chang WL, Kado S, McCulloh K, Vogel H, Wu D, Haarmann-Stemmann T, Yang GX, Leung PS, Matsumura F

  19. Design and Performance Data for 81 Ah FNC Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, F.; Anderman, Menahem

    1997-01-01

    Design and performance data for 81 Ah FNC cells are given. The conclusions are: that a sealed Ni-Cd cells are not limited to 50 Ah with the FNC design; energy densities of 40 Wh/kg in a conservative high Cd, high electrolyte design have been demonstrated; uniform ATP data and LEO cycling performance is being demonstrated; internal cell pressures remain low under all conditions; and no conditioning is necessary under any LEO profile; accelerated LEO cycling exhibits performance well beyond traditional space Ni-Cd cells.

  20. Environmental implications of anesthetic gases.

    PubMed

    Yasny, Jeffrey S; White, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    For several decades, anesthetic gases have greatly enhanced the comfort and outcome for patients during surgery. The benefits of these agents have heavily outweighed the risks. In recent years, the attention towards their overall contribution to global climate change and the environment has increased. Anesthesia providers have a responsibility to minimize unnecessary atmospheric pollution by utilizing techniques that can lessen any adverse effects of these gases on the environment. Moreover, health care facilities that use anesthetic gases are accountable for ensuring that all anesthesia equipment, including the scavenging system, is effective and routinely maintained. Implementing preventive practices and simple strategies can promote the safest and most healthy environment.

  1. Noble gases in the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manuel, O. K.; Srinivasan, B.; Hennecke, E. W.; Sinclair, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The abundance and isotopic composition of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon which were released by stepwise heating of lunar fines (15601.64) and (15271.65) were measured spectrometrically. The results of a composition of noble gases released from the lunar fines with noble gases in meteorites and in the earth are presented along with the isotopic composition of noble gases in lunar fines, in meteorites, and in the atmosphere. A study of two isotopically distinct components of trapped xenon in carbonaceous chondrites is also included.

  2. PESTICIDE TRADE NAMES AND THEIR ACTIVE INGREDIENTS IN THE AHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The detailed information on the use of specific pesticides is a major strength of exposure assessment conducted for the Agricultural Health Study (AHS). During the enrollment interviews, a check list was used to collect information on the frequency and duration of use for 28 p...

  3. Mutagenicity of rubber vulcanization gases in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Hedenstedt, A; Ramel, C; Wachtmeister, C A

    1981-01-01

    Gases formed by rubber and rubber additives in the vulcanization process were collected with a laboratory-scale glass apparatus. Mutagenicity testing of the vulcanization gases by the Salmonella/microsome test was conducted with strains TA1535, TA1538, TA98, and TA100 in the absence and presence of a metabolizing system from rat liver homogenates. The mutagenicity of gases derived by heating chloroprene rubber and ethylene propylene rubber was established with both base substitution- and frameshift-sensitive strains and that of a styrene-butadiene rubber was established with the base substitution-sensitive stain TA100. Tests on pyrolysis gases from a butadiene acrylonitrile rubber revealed only toxic effects. Curing systems, additives, and filling materials from various sources were represented in the material. Gases were collected at temperature levels corresponding to both mixing and curing of these particular rubbers in the industrial operations. Attempts were made to correlate the mutagenicity of the gases to the presence of mutagenic components in the rubber mixtures.

  4. Comparative epidemiology of human infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) and A(H5N1) viruses in China

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Benjamin J.; Jin, Lianmei; Lau, Eric H. Y.; Liao, Qiaohong; Wu, Peng; Jiang, Hui; Tsang, Tim K.; Zheng, Jiandong; Fang, Vicky J.; Chang, Zhaorui; Ni, Michael Y.; Zhang, Qian; Ip, Dennis K. M.; Yu, Jianxing; Li, Yu; Wang, Liping; Tu, Wenxiao; Meng, Ling; Wu, Joseph T.; Luo, Huiming; Li, Qun; Shu, Yuelong; Li, Zhongjie; Feng, Zijian; Yang, Weizhong; Wang, Yu; Leung, Gabriel M.; Yu, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    Background The novel influenza A(H7N9) virus recently emerged, while influenza A(H5N1) virus has infected humans since 2003 in mainland China. Both infections are thought to be predominantly zoonotic. We compared the epidemiologic characteristics of the complete series of laboratory-confirmed cases of both viruses in mainland China to date. Methods An integrated database was constructed with information on demographic, epidemiological, and clinical variables of laboratory-confirmed A(H7N9) and A(H5N1) cases that were reported to the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention up to May 24, 2013. We described disease occurrence by age, sex and geography and estimated key epidemiologic parameters. Findings Among 130 and 43 patients with confirmed A(H7N9) and A(H5N1) respectively, the median ages were 62y and 26y. In urban areas, 74% of cases of both viruses were male whereas in rural areas the proportions were 62% for A(H7N9) and 33% for A(H5N1). Among cases of A(H7N9) and A(H5N1), 75% and 71% reported recent exposure to poultry. The mean incubation periods of A(H7N9) and A(H5N1) were 3.1 and 3.3 days, respectively. On average, 21 and 18 contacts were traced for each A(H7N9) case in urban and rural areas respectively; compared to 90 and 63 for A(H5N1). The hospitalization fatality risk was 35% (95% CI: 25%, 44%) for A(H7N9) and 70% (95% CI: 56%, 83%) for A(H5N1). Interpretation The sex ratios in urban compared to rural cases are consistent with poultry exposure driving the risk of infection. However the difference in susceptibility to serious illness with the two different viruses remains unexplained, given that most A(H7N9) cases were in older adults while most A(H5N1) cases were in younger individuals. Funding Ministry of Science and Technology, China; Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Disease and University Grants Committee, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China; and the US National Institutes of Health. PMID:23803488

  5. Sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Houseman, J.; Teixeira, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental study of several sampling tube and probe material compositions and designs aimed at preventing nitric oxide reduction when sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases. A 250,000 Btu/h furnace fired with technical grade methane was used for testing the sampling probes over a wide range of air-fuel mixtures. The results obtained include the finding that the use of stainless steel in probes creates inaccuracies in near-stoichiometric and fuel-rich sampling in hydrocarbon flames. For very fuel-rich flames, water cooling is needed even in quartz probes to prevent significant reduction of nitric oxide.-

  6. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from wood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Huttlinger, N. V.; Oneill, B. A.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from nine wood samples was investigated. The samples of hardwoods were aspen poplar, beech, yellow birch, and red oak. The samples of softwoods were western red cedar, Douglas fir, western hemlock, eastern white pine, and southern yellow pine. There was no significant difference between the wood samples under rising temperature conditions, which are intended to simulate a developing fire, or under fixed temperature conditions, which are intended to simulate a fully developed fire. This test method is used to determine whether a material is significantly more toxic than wood under the preflashover conditions of a developing fire.

  7. 40 CFR 1065.750 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Analytical gases. 1065.750 Section... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.750 Analytical gases. Analytical gases must meet the accuracy and purity specifications of...

  8. The inhibition of lung cancer cell migration by AhR-regulated autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chi-Hao; Li, Ching-Hao; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Lee, Chen-Chen; Liao, Po-Lin; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Shih-Hsuan; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2017-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is highly expressed in multiple organs and tissues. Whereas AhR mediates the metabolism of xenobiotic and endogenous compounds, its novel function in cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) remains controversial. Autophagy also participates in tumour progression through its functions in cell homeostasis and facilitates adaptation to EMT progression. In the present study, we found that AhR-regulated autophagy positively modulates EMT in non-small cell lung cancer cells. The motility of A549, H1299, and CL1-5 cells were correlated with different AhR expression levels. Invasive potential and cell morphology also changed when AhR protein expression was altered. Moreover, AhR levels exerted a contrasting effect on autophagy potential. Autophagy was higher in CL1-5 and H1299 cells with lower AhR levels than in A549 cells. Both AhR overexpression and autophagy inhibition decreased CL1-5 metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, AhR promoted BNIP3 ubiquitination for proteasomal degradation. AhR silencing in A549 cells also reduced BNIP3 ubiquitination. Taken together, these results provide a novel insight into the cross-linking between AhR and autophagy, we addressed the mechanistic BNIP3 modulation by endogenous AhR, which affect cancer cell EMT progression. PMID:28195146

  9. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-17 Compressed gases other than inert gases. (a) When, in consideration for a particular operation, compressed gases are needed within the laboratory, the cylinders may be...

  10. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-17 Compressed gases other than inert gases. (a) When, in consideration for a particular operation, compressed gases are needed within the laboratory, the cylinders may be...

  11. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-17 Compressed gases other than inert gases. (a) When, in consideration for a particular operation, compressed gases are needed within the laboratory, the cylinders may be...

  12. Comparing introduction to Europe of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses A(H5N8) in 2014 and A(H5N1) in 2005.

    PubMed

    Adlhoch, C; Gossner, C; Koch, G; Brown, I; Bouwstra, R; Verdonck, F; Penttinen, P; Harder, T

    2014-12-18

    Since the beginning of November 2014, nine outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) A(H5N8) in poultry have been detected in four European countries. In this report, similarities and differences between the modes of introduction of HPAIV A(H5N1) and A(H5N8) into Europe are described. Experiences from outbreaks of A(H5N1) in Europe demonstrated that early detection to control HPAIV in poultry has proven pivotal to minimise the risk of zoonotic transmission and prevention of human cases.

  13. LEO test data for 81 Ah FNC cells

    SciTech Connect

    Anderman, M.; Cohen, F.

    1997-12-01

    LEO test data for 81 Ah Fiber Nickel-Cadmium (FNC) battery packs are presented. Trends in pressure, charge acceptance, discharge voltage, capacity, and impedance during 7,800, 60% DOD cycles will be discussed. It will be shown that the FNC is capable of high rate discharge and fast charge to high DOD with stable performance. The relationship between cell design and battery pack performance will also be discussed.

  14. A.H. Cottrell at Harwell in the mid-1950s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Derek

    2013-09-01

    A.H. Cottrell led a large team of scientists and engineers as Deputy Director of the Metallurgy Division of the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell, between 1955 and 1958. The team sought to develop a fundamental understanding of the effect of aggressive operating conditions on the properties and behaviour of materials used in the construction of reactors, which provided important and critical insights into their design, operation and safety. The story is told through the experiences and research activities of one of Cottrell's junior research staff. It offers an insight into the contributions made by Cottrell to the science and technology regarding materials used in the early days of building reactors for the generation of nuclear energy.

  15. Method and apparatus for separating gases based on electrically and magnetically enhanced monolithic carbon fiber composite sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1999-07-20

    A method for separating gases or other fluids involves placing a magnetic field on a monolithic carbon fiber composite sorption material to more preferentially attract certain gases or other fluids to the sorption material to which a magnetic field is applied. This technique may be combined with the known pressure swing adsorption'' technique utilizing the same sorption material. 1 fig.

  16. Method and apparatus for separating gases based on electrically and magnetically enhanced monolithic carbon fiber composite sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1999-01-01

    A method for separating gases or other fluids involves placing a magnetic field on a monolithic carbon fiber composite sorption material to more preferentially attract certain gases or other fluids to the sorption material to which a magnetic field is applied. This technique may be combined with the known "pressure swing adsorption" technique utilizing the same sorption material.

  17. Antibacterial Activity of MTA Fillapex and AH 26 Root Canal Sealers at Different Time Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Farnaz; Samadi Kafil, Hossein; Jafari, Sanaz; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Momeni, Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The main goal of endodontic treatment is elimination of bacteria and their by-products from infected root canals. This study compared the antibacterial effect of two different sealers, AH 26 and MTA Fillapex, on 4 microorganisms 24, 48 and 72 h and 7 days after mixing. Methods and Materials: The microorganisms used in this study consisted of Lactobacillus acidophilus (ATCC 4356), Lactobacillus casei (ATCC 39392), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212). This test is based on the growth of bacteria and turbidity measurement technique using a spectrophotometer, and direct contact was conducted. Multiple comparisons were carried out using repeated-measures ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test and student’s t-test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The antibacterial activity in the indirect technique was more than the technique with both sealers. In the direct technique the antibacterial activity on all microorganisms were lower for MTA Fillapex sealer. In the indirect technique, both sealers exhibited similar antibacterial properties. Conclusion: The antibacterial effect of MTA Fillapex sealer was significantly less than that of AH 26 sealer in the direct technique. The antibacterial effects of both sealers were similar in the indirect technique. PMID:27471530

  18. Permeability of cork to gases.

    PubMed

    Faria, David P; Fonseca, Ana L; Pereira, Helen; Teodoro, Orlando M N D

    2011-04-27

    The permeability of gases through uncompressed cork was investigated. More than 100 samples were assessed from different plank qualities to provide a picture of the permeability distribution. A novel technique based on a mass spectrometer leak detector was used to directly measure the helium flow through the central area of small disks 10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick. The permeability for nitrogen, oxygen, and other gases was measured by the pressure rise technique. Boiled and nonboiled cork samples from different sections were evaluated. An asymmetric frequency distribution ranging 3 orders of magnitude (roughly from 1 to 1000 μmol/(cm·atm·day)) for selected samples without macroscopic defects was found, having a peak below 100 μmol/(cm·atm·day). Correlation was found between density and permeability: higher density samples tend to show lower permeability. However, boiled cork showed a mean lower permeability despite having a lower density. The transport mechanism of gases through cork was also examined. Calculations suggest that gases permeate uncompressed cork mainly through small channels between cells under a molecular flow regime. The diameter of such channels was estimated to be in the range of 100 nm, in agreement with the plasmodesmata size in the cork cell walls.

  19. Hydrophobic encapsulation of hydrocarbon gases.

    PubMed

    Leontiev, Alexander V; Saleh, Anas W; Rudkevich, Dmitry M

    2007-04-26

    [reaction: see text] Encapsulation data for hydrophobic hydrocarbon gases within a water-soluble hemicarcerand in aqueous solution are reported. It is concluded that hydrophobic interactions serve as the primary driving force for the encapsulation, which can be used for the design of gas-separating polymers with intrinsic inner cavities.

  20. Interaction quenches of Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, Goetz S.

    2009-12-15

    It is shown that the jump in the momentum distribution of Fermi gases evolves smoothly for small and intermediate times once an interaction between the fermions is suddenly switched on. The jump does not vanish abruptly. The loci in momentum space where the jumps occur are those of the noninteracting Fermi sea. No relaxation of the Fermi surface geometry takes place.

  1. Functional Conservation and Divergence of Four Ginger AP1/AGL9 MADS–Box Genes Revealed by Analysis of Their Expression and Protein–Protein Interaction, and Ectopic Expression of AhFUL Gene in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juanjuan; Sun, Wei; Xia, Kuaifei; Liao, Jingping; Zhang, Mingyong

    2014-01-01

    Alpinia genus are known generally as ginger–lilies for showy flowers in the ginger family, Zingiberaceae, and their floral morphology diverges from typical monocotyledon flowers. However, little is known about the functions of ginger MADS–box genes in floral identity. In this study, four AP1/AGL9 MADS–box genes were cloned from Alpinia hainanensis, and protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and roles of the four genes in floral homeotic conversion and in floral evolution are surveyed for the first time. AhFUL is clustered to the AP1lineage, AhSEP4 and AhSEP3b to the SEP lineage, and AhAGL6–like to the AGL6 lineage. The four genes showed conserved and divergent expression patterns, and their encoded proteins were localized in the nucleus. Seven combinations of PPI (AhFUL–AhSEP4, AhFUL–AhAGL6–like, AhFUL–AhSEP3b, AhSEP4–AhAGL6–like, AhSEP4–AhSEP3b, AhAGL6–like–AhSEP3b, and AhSEP3b–AhSEP3b) were detected, and the PPI patterns in the AP1/AGL9 lineage revealed that five of the 10 possible combinations are conserved and three are variable, while conclusions cannot yet be made regarding the other two. Ectopic expression of AhFUL in Arabidopsis thaliana led to early flowering and floral organ homeotic conversion to sepal–like or leaf–like. Therefore, we conclude that the four A. hainanensis AP1/AGL9 genes show functional conservation and divergence in the floral identity from other MADS–box genes. PMID:25461565

  2. Design of a multifunctional and portable detector for indoor gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liping; Wang, Yutian; Li, Taishan

    2003-09-01

    With the increase of the living standards of city dwellers, home decoration has been more and more popular these years. Different kinds of material have come into people's home, which brings about beauties to the house as well as some bad effect. Because of differences in manufacturing techniques and quality, much of the material will emit poisonous gases more or less. Even if you have selected the qualified product, the toal amount of gases in you houses may not be guaranteed because of the simple reason that more than one kind of material are applied. Living in the complex environment for a long time will eventually have a bad effect on one's health. In addition the fear of the harm to be done will exert great impact psychologically. In another aspect, the coal-gas in the house-hood for cooking is also explosive and poisonous. In conclusion, the research on the indoor hazardous gases measurement and alarm device is of much economic and practical importance. The device is portable and versatile. We use rechargeable battery as the power supply. The device can detect the density of gases at the ppb level for the emission of the material and the measured value can be shown on the display. As for coal gas it can detect the percentage of LEL and make sound of alarm. We use two kinds of gas-sensors in the device, with catalytic combustion principal for coal gas detection and the PID method for the gas emissions of the decoration material. UV will destroy harmful material (such as: ammonia, dimethylamine, methyl-sulfhydrate, benzene etc.) into positive or negative ions. The sensor detects the electric charges of ionized gases and converts them into electric current signals. It is then amplified and changed into digits by amplifier and A/D. The digit signal is processed by micro-controller system of the device.

  3. 46 CFR 194.20-17 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressed gases. 194.20-17 Section 194.20-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Chemical Stores and/or Storerooms §...

  4. Suppressors made from intermetallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Klett, James W; Muth, Thomas R; Cler, Dan L

    2014-11-04

    Disclosed are several examples of apparatuses for suppressing the blast and flash produced as a projectile is expelled by gases from a firearm. In some examples, gases are diverted away from the central chamber to an expansion chamber by baffles. The gases are absorbed by the expansion chamber and desorbed slowly, thus decreasing pressure and increasing residence time of the gases. In other examples, the gases impinge against a plurality of rods before expanding through passages between the rods to decrease the pressure and increase the residence time of the gases. These and other exemplary suppressors are made from an intermetallic material composition for enhanced strength and oxidation resistance at high operational temperatures.

  5. EDITORIAL: Cold Quantum GasesEditorial: Cold Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassen, W.; Hemmerich, A.; Arimondo, E.

    2003-04-01

    This Special Issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics brings together the contributions of various researchers working on theoretical and experimental aspects of cold quantum gases. Different aspects of atom optics, matter wave interferometry, laser manipulation of atoms and molecules, and production of very cold and degenerate gases are presented. The variety of subjects demonstrates the steadily expanding role associated with this research area. The topics discussed in this issue, extending from basic physics to applications of atom optics and of cold atomic samples, include: bulletBose--Einstein condensation bulletFermi degenerate gases bulletCharacterization and manipulation of quantum gases bulletCoherent and nonlinear cold matter wave optics bulletNew schemes for laser cooling bulletCoherent cold molecular gases bulletUltra-precise atomic clocks bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to metrology and spectroscopy bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to quantum computing bulletNanoprobes and nanolithography. This special issue is published in connection with the 7th International Workshop on Atom Optics and Interferometry, held in Lunteren, The Netherlands, from 28 September to 2 October 2002. This was the last in a series of Workshops organized with the support of the European Community that have greatly contributed to progress in this area. The scientific part of the Workshop was managed by A Hemmerich, W Hogervorst, W Vassen and J T M Walraven, with input from members of the International Programme Committee who are listed below. The practical aspects of the organization were ably handled by Petra de Gijsel from the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. The Workshop was funded by the European Science Foundation (programme BEC2000+), the European Networks 'Cold Quantum Gases (CQG)', coordinated by E Arimondo, and 'Cold Atoms and Ultraprecise Atomic Clocks (CAUAC)', coordinated by J Henningsen, by the German Physical Society (DFG), by

  6. 49 CFR 173.466 - Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional tests for Type A packagings designed...) Materials § 173.466 Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases. (a) In addition to the tests prescribed in § 173.465, Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases must...

  7. 46 CFR 194.20-15 - Chemical stores other than compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Chemical Stores and/or Storerooms § 194.20-15 Chemical stores other than compressed gases. (a) Flammable liquids are excluded from... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemical stores other than compressed gases....

  8. 46 CFR 194.05-15 - Compressed gases as chemical stores-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressed gases as chemical stores-Detail requirements...) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Stowage and Marking § 194.05-15 Compressed gases as chemical stores—Detail requirements. (a) Compressed...

  9. 46 CFR 194.20-15 - Chemical stores other than compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chemical stores other than compressed gases. 194.20-15... VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Chemical Stores and/or Storerooms § 194.20-15 Chemical stores other than compressed gases. (a) Flammable liquids are excluded...

  10. A study of the toxicology of pyrolysis gases from synthetic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W.; Hilado, C. J.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus and procedure for evaluating the toxicity of pyrolysis gases from synthetic polymers are described. In each test, four Swiss albino mice are exposed in a 5-liter chamber to the gases from materials pyrolyzed at 700 C. The apparatus is simple in design, easy to clean, inexpensive and gives reproducible results. Data on several fluorine-containing and polyamide polymers are presented.

  11. Dispersal of gases generated near a lunar outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Duric, Nebojsa; Sulkanen, Martin; Fernini, Ilias

    1990-01-01

    The dispersal of gases evolved by prospective lunar base operations is presently modeled analytically using continuous (mining and habitat-venting) and impulsive (primarily rocket exhaust) injections of gases. In the case of impulsive injection, the neutral atmosphere and associated ionosphere both decay on time-scales of about 20 min; in that of continuous injection, the atmosphere near the base grows and achieves a steady state after about 20 min. Both direct and diffusive transport mechanisms are considered, and it is concluded that for the injection rates and assumptions presently employed the artificial lunar atmospheres produced are not significantly detrimental to astronomical observations and high-vacuum materials processing operations.

  12. Fullerenes: A New Carrier Phase for Noble Gases in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann

    2004-01-01

    The major focus of our research effort has been to measure the noble gases encapsulated within fullerenes, a new carbon carrier phase and compare it to the myriad of components found in the bulk meteorite acid residues. We have concentrated on the carbonaceous chondrites (Allende, Murchison and Tagish Lake) since they have abundant noble gases, typically with a planetary signature that dominates the stepped-release of the meteorite bulk acid residue. They also contain an extractable fullerene component that can be isolated and purified from the same bulk material.

  13. The emerging roles of AhR in physiology and immunity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Whitelaw, Murray L

    2013-09-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is traditionally defined as a transcriptional regulator involved in adaptive xenobiotic response, however, emerging evidence supports physiological functions of AhR in normal cell development and immune response. The role of AhR in immunomodulation is multi-dimensional. On the one hand, activation of AhR by TCDD and other ligands leads to profound immunosuppression, potentially via skewed Th1/Th2 cell balance toward Th1 dominance, and boosted Treg cell differentiation. On the other hand, activation of AhR can also induce Th17 cell polarization and increase the severity of autoimmune disease. In addition to T lymphocytes, the AhR also appears to play a vital role in B cell maturation, and regulates the activity of macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils following lipopolysaccharide challenge or influenza virus infection. In these scenarios, activation of AhR is associated with decreased host response and reduced survival. Furthermore, gene knock out studies suggest that AhR is indispensable for the postnatal maintenance of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and skin-resident dendritic epidermal gamma delta T cells, providing a potential link between AhR and gut immunity and wound healing. It is well accepted that the magnitude and the type of immune response is dependent on the local cytokine milieu and the AhR appears to be one of the key factors involved in the fine turning of this cytokine balance.

  14. Assessing Antigenic Drift of Seasonal Influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tewawong, Nipaporn; Prachayangprecha, Slinporn; Vichiwattana, Preeyaporn; Korkong, Sumeth; Klinfueng, Sirapa; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Thongmee, Thanunrat; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Under selective pressure from the host immune system, antigenic epitopes of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) have continually evolved to escape antibody recognition, termed antigenic drift. We analyzed the genomes of influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 virus strains circulating in Thailand between 2010 and 2014 and assessed how well the yearly vaccine strains recommended for the southern hemisphere matched them. We amplified and sequenced the HA gene of 120 A(H3N2) and 81 A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus samples obtained from respiratory specimens and calculated the perfect-match vaccine efficacy using the pepitope model, which quantitated the antigenic drift in the dominant epitope of HA. Phylogenetic analysis of the A(H3N2) HA1 genes classified most strains into genetic clades 1, 3A, 3B, and 3C. The A(H3N2) strains from the 2013 and 2014 seasons showed very low to moderate vaccine efficacy and demonstrated antigenic drift from epitopes C and A to epitope B. Meanwhile, most A(H1N1)pdm09 strains from the 2012–2014 seasons belonged to genetic clades 6A, 6B, and 6C and displayed the dominant epitope mutations at epitopes B and E. Finally, the vaccine efficacy for A(H1N1)pdm09 (79.6–93.4%) was generally higher than that of A(H3N2). These findings further confirmed the accelerating antigenic drift of the circulating influenza A(H3N2) in recent years. PMID:26440103

  15. Characterization of Peanut Germin-Like Proteins, AhGLPs in Plant Development and Defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhu, Fanghe; Li, Haifen; Li, Ling; Yang, Qingli; Chi, Xiaoyuan; Yu, Shanlin; Liang, Xuanqiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Germin-like superfamily members are ubiquitously expressed in various plant species and play important roles in plant development and defense. Although several GLPs have been identified in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), their roles in development and defense remain unknown. In this research, we study the spatiotemporal expression of AhGLPs in peanut and their functions in plant defense. Results We have identified three new AhGLP members (AhGLP3b, AhGLP5b and AhGLP7b) that have distinct but very closely related DNA sequences. The spatial and temporal expression profiles revealed that each peanut GLP gene has its distinct expression pattern in various tissues and developmental stages. This suggests that these genes all have their distinct roles in peanut development. Subcellular location analysis demonstrated that AhGLP2 and 5 undergo a protein transport process after synthesis. The expression of all AhGLPs increased in responding to Aspergillus flavus infection, suggesting AhGLPs' ubiquitous roles in defense to A. flavus. Each AhGLP gene had its unique response to various abiotic stresses (including salt, H2O2 stress and wound), biotic stresses (including leaf spot, mosaic and rust) and plant hormone stimulations (including SA and ABA treatments). These results indicate that AhGLPs have their distinct roles in plant defense. Moreover, in vivo study of AhGLP transgenic Arabidopsis showed that both AhGLP2 and 3 had salt tolerance, which made transgenic Arabidopsis grow well under 100 mM NaCl stress. Conclusions For the first time, our study analyzes the AhGLP gene expression profiles in peanut and reveals their roles under various stresses. These results provide an insight into the developmental and defensive roles of GLP gene family in peanut. PMID:23626720

  16. An Invitro Evaluation of Antimicrobial Efficacy and Flow Characteristics for AH Plus, MTA Fillapex, CRCS and Gutta Flow 2 Root Canal Sealer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prashant; Tikku, Aseem P; Pathak, Anjani Kumar; Chandra, Anil; Yadav, Rakesh Kumar; Bharti, Ramesh; Singh, Rajeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cleaning and shaping of root canal does not guarantee complete disinfection of the canal, regardless of the systems and techniques used for this purpose. Therefore, it becomes mandatory for the endodontic filling materials to have a good antimicrobial potential especially against E. faecalis. This research was aimed therefore to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy and flow properties of different root canal sealers. Aim To study invitro antimicrobial activity and flow characteristics for Resin based (AH Plus), Mineral Trioxide Aggregate based (MTA Fillapex), Calcium hydroxide based (CRCS) and Flowable Gutta-Percha (Gutta Flow 2) endodontic sealers on Enterococcus faecalis. Materials and Methods Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 was used to test antibacterial potential of sealers by Agar diffusion test (ADT) and Direct Contact Test (DCT). ADT was performed by punching the sealers on a well of 4×6mm diameter on Muller Hinton agar plates. These plates were inoculated with standard suspension of E. faecalis and the zone of inhibition was measured at 24 hours and after 7 days. All the sealers were prepared in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations. Flow of sealers was measured according to ADA specification no. 57. Results All sealers showed antibacterial activity against E. faecalis except Gutta Flow 2. At 24 hours, zone of inhibition was highest in Calcibiotic Root Canal Sealer (CRCS) and lowest in AH Plus. After 7 days the zone of inhibition decreased in AH plus, CRCS and MTA Fillapex. DCT showed a significant lower number of organisms in AH Plus, CRCS and MTA than controls at both the time intervals. Gutta Flow 2 did not show any significant antimicrobial action. Maximum and minimum flow was shown by AH Plus and CRCS respectively. Conclusion Highest microbial inhibition was shown by (CRCS), followed by MTA Fillapex and AH Plus. Gutta Flow 2 did not show any inhibition of E. faecalis by ADT. Maximum reduction in antibacterial property with

  17. Extended thermodynamics of dense gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arima, T.; Taniguchi, S.; Ruggeri, T.; Sugiyama, M.

    2012-11-01

    We study extended thermodynamics of dense gases by adopting the system of field equations with a different hierarchy structure to that adopted in the previous works. It is the theory of 14 fields of mass density, velocity, temperature, viscous stress, dynamic pressure, and heat flux. As a result, most of the constitutive equations can be determined explicitly by the caloric and thermal equations of state. It is shown that the rarefied-gas limit of the theory is consistent with the kinetic theory of gases. We also analyze three physically important systems, that is, a gas with the virial equations of state, a hard-sphere system, and a van der Waals fluid, by using the general theory developed in the former part of the present work.

  18. Bibliography of AV Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedstein, Harriet, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Lists commercially available audiovisual materials by subject area. Includes title, producer (addresses given), catalog number, format (film, filmstrip, cassette, slides), and prices. Subject areas include: elements; equilibrium; gases; laboratory techniques and experiments; general chemistry; introductory materials (including mathematics); and…

  19. Annihilation in Gases and Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This publication contains most of the papers, both invited and contributed, that were presented at the Workshop of Annihilation in Gases and Galaxies. This was the fifth in a biennial series associated with the International Conference on the Physics of Electronic and Atomic Collisions. Subjects covered included the scattering and annihilation of positrons and positronium atoms in various media, including those of astrophysical interest. In addition, the topics of antimatter and dark matter were covered.

  20. Theoretical Insight into Shocked Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Leiding, Jeffery Allen

    2016-09-29

    I present the results of statistical mechanical calculations on shocked molecular gases. This work provides insight into the general behavior of shock Hugoniots of gas phase molecular targets with varying initial pressures. The dissociation behavior of the molecules is emphasized. Impedance matching calculations are performed to determine the maximum degree of dissociation accessible for a given flyer velocity as a function of initial gas pressure.

  1. 40 CFR 1065.750 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 1065.750 Section 1065.750 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... § 1065.750 Analytical gases. Analytical gases must meet the accuracy and purity specifications of...

  2. 40 CFR 1065.750 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Analytical gases. 1065.750 Section 1065.750 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... § 1065.750 Analytical gases. Analytical gases must meet the accuracy and purity specifications of...

  3. 40 CFR 1065.750 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 1065.750 Section 1065.750 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... § 1065.750 Analytical gases. Analytical gases must meet the accuracy and purity specifications of...

  4. 40 CFR 92.112 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Analytical gases. 92.112 Section 92.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.112 Analytical gases. (a) Gases...

  5. 40 CFR 89.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Analytical gases. 89.312 Section 89.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF....312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of all calibration gases must not be exceeded. The...

  6. 40 CFR 89.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 89.312 Section 89.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Provisions § 89.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of all calibration gases must not be exceeded....

  7. Greenhouse Gases Monitoring from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Takashi

    The role of greenhouse gases in global warming processes and an important element of the global carbon cycle is widely recognized. With the advent of the technical means to provide new monitoring and measurement of greenhouse gases (GHG) from space, JAXA has identified the coordination of these measurements and their application by cooperating with international space agencies. In order to foster the use of space-based GHG observations and consolidate data requirements for the next generation GHG monitoring mission from space, a synergetic strategy for easy access to GHG satellite observations, including GOSAT (Greenhouse Gases Monitoring Satellite, JAXA) and current observations should be developed, and also harmonizing the next generation of GHG satellite observations shoud be facilitated. The Paper describes the current status of international activities of GHG monitoring from space and relations with policy makers and stake holders. The long term GHG monitoring from space is also proposed by respecting the GEO Carbon Strategy which is published in March 2010. Also, GOSAT sample XCO2 and XCH4 global column amount datasets will be introduced with the avtivities of validation campaign.

  8. Novel MRI Applications of Laser-Polarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-04-01

    Gas-phase NMR has great potential as a probe for a variety of interesting physical and biomedical problems that are not amenable to study by water or similar liquid. However, NMR of gases was largely neglected due to the low signal obtained from the thermally-polarized gases with very low sample density. The advent of optical pumping techniques for enhancing the polarization of the noble gases 3He and 129Xe has bought new life to this field, especially in medical imaging where 3He lung inhalation imaging is approaching a clinical application. However, there are numerous applications in materials science that also benefit from the use of these gases. We review primarily non-medical applications of laser-polarized noble gases for both NMR imaging and spectroscopy, and highlight progress with examples from our laboratory including high-resolution imaging at mT applied field strength and velocity imaging of convective flow. Porous media microstucture has been probed with both thermal and laser-polarized xenon, as xenon is an ideal probe due to low surface interaction with the grains of the porous media.

  9. A 65 Ah rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, K.

    1986-01-01

    A rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide battery which has a number of superior performance characteristics which includes a high energy density, a high power density, and a long charge retention time was developed. The first cell sizes developed included a C size cell and an AA size cell. Over the last two years, a project to demonstrate the feasibility of the scale up to this technology to a BC size cell with 65 Ah capacity was undertaken. The objective was to develop, build, and test a .6 kWh storage battery consisting of 6 BC cells in series.

  10. Calorimetry of 25 Ah lithium/thionyl chloride cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. J.; Dawson, S.

    1991-01-01

    Heat flow measurements of 25-Ah lithium thionyl chloride cells provided a method to calculate an effective thermal potential, E(TP) of 3.907 V. The calculation is useful to determine specific heat generation of this cell chemistry and design. The E(TP) value includes heat generation by electrochemical cell reactions, competitive chemical reactions, and resistance heating at the tabs, connectors, and leads. Heat flow was measured while applying electrical loads to the cell in an isothermal calorimeter set at 0, 20, and 60 C.

  11. 180 Ah kg-1 specific capacity positive tubular electrodes for lead acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrade, J.; Impinnisi, P. R.; do Vale, D. L.

    2011-05-01

    Two disadvantages of lead acid batteries are poor power and energy densities and the necessity of relatively long recharging times. In this paper it is presented the results of ongoing work aimed at increasing both the positive active material (PAM) specific capacity and the positive plate charge acceptability. The experimental results show that adequate curing processes can be used to develop an interconnected structure among nanometric PbO2 particles to produce tubular electrodes with specific capacity higher than 180 Ah kg-1 and maintain this value for 130 cycles with deep discharges. These PbO2 positive plates are expected to exhibit higher charge acceptability due to their larger PAM surface area as compared to conventional ones, but the results indicate that the high internal ohmic resistance of the grid/PAM zone limits the fast charge efficiency.

  12. Materialism.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  13. Thickness dependence on the optoelectronic properties of multilayered GaSe based photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Pil Ju; Abderrahmane, Abdelkader; Takamura, Tsukasa; Kim, Nam-Hoon; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials exhibit unique optoelectronic properties at atomic thicknesses. In this paper, we fabricated metal-semiconductor-metal based photodetectors using layered gallium selenide (GaSe) with different thicknesses. The electrical and optoelectronic properties of the photodetectors were studied, and these devices showed good electrical characteristics down to GaSe flake thicknesses of 30 nm. A photograting effect was observed in the absence of a gate voltage, thereby implying a relatively high photoresponsivity. Higher values of the photoresponsivity occurred for thicker layers of GaSe with a maximum value 0.57 AW-1 and external quantum efficiency of of 132.8%, and decreased with decreasing GaSe flake thickness. The detectivity was 4.05 × 1010 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 532 nm laser wavelength, underscoring that GaSe is a promising p-type 2D material for photodetection applications in the visible spectrum.

  14. Inert gases in closed crystal growth systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palosz, Witold

    1997-07-01

    The effect of desorption from, and diffusion through the wall on inert gas pressure in sealed fused silica ampoules was investigated. It is shown, that desorption from the surface and the bulk of silica may lead to an accumulation of residual gas on the order of a few Torr or more upon annealing. A prior outgassing of the ampoules under vacuum at high temperature reduces the amount of gas released from the glass by at least one order of magnitude. Presence of oxide and other impurities in the source material was found to increase the residual gas pressure, affect its composition, and reduce the vapor transport rate in PVT systems. It is shown, that light gases (hydrogen, helium, and neon) diffuse through silica wall and may change the pressure inside the sealed ampoule considerably even at moderate temperatures.

  15. Single-bubble sonoluminescence from noble gases.

    PubMed

    Yasui, K

    2001-03-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from noble gases in water is studied theoretically in order to clarify the reason of the distinguished feature that the luminescence is strong for all noble gases, while the other systems of cavitation luminescence are greatly enhanced by the presence of the heavy noble gas(xenon). It is clarified that in spite of the larger thermal conductivity of lighter noble gases the maximum temperature in a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases is higher due both to the segregation of water vapor and noble gas inside a SBSL bubble and the stronger acoustic drive of a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases.

  16. Single-bubble sonoluminescence from noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    2001-03-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from noble gases in water is studied theoretically in order to clarify the reason of the distinguished feature that the luminescence is strong for all noble gases, while the other systems of cavitation luminescence are greatly enhanced by the presence of the heavy noble gas(xenon). It is clarified that in spite of the larger thermal conductivity of lighter noble gases the maximum temperature in a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases is higher due both to the segregation of water vapor and noble gas inside a SBSL bubble and the stronger acoustic drive of a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases.

  17. Prospecting by sampling and analysis of airborne particulates and gases

    DOEpatents

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-05-01

    A method is claimed for prospecting by sampling airborne particulates or gases at a ground position and recording wind direction values at the time of sampling. The samples are subsequently analyzed to determine the concentrations of a desired material or the ratios of the desired material to other identifiable materials in the collected samples. By comparing the measured concentrations or ratios to expected background data in the vicinity sampled, one can select recorded wind directions indicative of the upwind position of the land-based source of the desired material.

  18. Aeroelastic characteristics of the AH-64 bearingless tail rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, D.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a wind tunnel test program to determine the performance loads and dynamic characteristics of the Composite Flexbeam Tail Rotor (CFTR) for the AH-64 Advanced Attack Helicopter are reported. The CFTR uses an elastomeric shear attachment of the flexbeam to the hub to provide soft-inplane S-mode and stiff-inplane C-mode configuration. The properties of the elastomer were selected for proper frequency placement and scale damping of the inplane S-mode. Kinematic pitch-lag coupling was introduced to provide the first cyclic inplane C-mode damping at high collective pitch. The CFTR was tested in a wind tunnel over the full slideslip envelop of the AH-64. It is found that the rotor was aeroelastically stable throughout the complete collective pitch range and up to rotor speeds of 1403 rpm. The dynamic characteristics of the rotor were found to be satisfactory at all pitch angles and rotor speeds of the tunnel tests. The design characteristics of the rotor which permit the high performance characteristics are discussed. Several schematic drawings and photographs of the rotor are provided.

  19. AH-64 IHADSS aviator vision experiences in Operation Iraqi Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiatt, Keith L.; Rash, Clarence E.; Harris, Eric S.; McGilberry, William H.

    2004-09-01

    Forty AH-64 Apache aviators representing a total of 8564 flight hours and 2260 combat hours during Operation Iraqi Freedom and its aftermath were surveyed for their visual experiences with the AH-64's monocular Integrated Helmet and Display Sighting System (IHADSS) helmet-mounted display in a combat environment. A major objective of this study was to determine if the frequencies of reports of visual complaints and illusions reported in the previous studies, addressing mostly benign training environments, differ in the more stressful combat environments. The most frequently reported visual complaints, both while and after flying, were visual discomfort and headache, which is consistent with previous studies. Frequencies of complaints after flying in the current study were numerically lower for all complaint types, but differences from previous studies are statistically significant only for visual discomfort and disorientation (vertigo). With the exception of "brownout/whiteout," reports of degraded visual cues in the current study were numerically lower for all types, but statistically significant only for impaired depth perception, decreased field of view, and inadvertent instrumental meteorological conditions. This study also found statistically lower reports of all static and dynamic illusions (with one exception, disorientation). This important finding is attributed to the generally flat and featureless geography present in a large portion of the Iraqi theater and to the shift in the way that the aviators use the two disparate visual inputs presented by the IHADSS monocular design (i.e., greater use of both eyes as opposed to concentrating primarily on display imagery).

  20. Inert gases in Sea of Fertility regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Zadorozhnyy, I. K.

    1974-01-01

    The content and isotopic composition were studied of inert gases -- He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe -- in samples of lunar regolith returned by the Luna 16 automatic station. The samples were taken from depths of about 12 and 30 cm. The high concentrations of inert gases exceed by several orders their concentrations observed in ordinary stony meteorites. The gases in lunar regolith were a complex mixture of gases of different origins: Solar, cosmogenic, radiogenic, and so on. Solar wind gases predominated, distributed in the thin surficial layer of the regolith grains. The concentrations of these gases in the surficial layer is several cubic centimeters per gram. The isotopic composition of the inert gases of solar origin approaches their composition measured in gas-rich meteorites.

  1. Detecting Spread of Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Beyond China.

    PubMed

    Millman, Alexander J; Havers, Fiona; Iuliano, A Danielle; Davis, C Todd; Sar, Borann; Sovann, Ly; Chin, Savuth; Corwin, Andrew L; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Lindblade, Kim A; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Kaewthong, Viriya; Kile, James C; Nguyen, Hien T; Pham, Dong V; Donis, Ruben O; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2015-05-01

    During February 2013-March 2015, a total of 602 human cases of low pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) were reported; no autochthonous cases were reported outside mainland China. In contrast, since highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) reemerged during 2003 in China, 784 human cases in 16 countries and poultry outbreaks in 53 countries have been reported. Whether the absence of reported A(H7N9) outside mainland China represents lack of spread or lack of detection remains unclear. We compared epidemiologic and virologic features of A(H5N1) and A(H7N9) and used human and animal influenza surveillance data collected during April 2013-May 2014 from 4 Southeast Asia countries to assess the likelihood that A(H7N9) would have gone undetected during 2014. Surveillance in Vietnam and Cambodia detected human A(H5N1) cases; no A(H7N9) cases were detected in humans or poultry in Southeast Asia. Although we cannot rule out the possible spread of A(H7N9), substantial spread causing severe disease in humans is unlikely.

  2. Detecting Spread of Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Beyond China

    PubMed Central

    Havers, Fiona; Iuliano, A. Danielle; Davis, C. Todd; Sar, Borann; Sovann, Ly; Chin, Savuth; Corwin, Andrew L.; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Lindblade, Kim A.; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Kaewthong, Viriya; Kile, James C.; Nguyen, Hien T.; Pham, Dong V.; Donis, Ruben O.; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2015-01-01

    During February 2013–March 2015, a total of 602 human cases of low pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) were reported; no autochthonous cases were reported outside mainland China. In contrast, since highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) reemerged during 2003 in China, 784 human cases in 16 countries and poultry outbreaks in 53 countries have been reported. Whether the absence of reported A(H7N9) outside mainland China represents lack of spread or lack of detection remains unclear. We compared epidemiologic and virologic features of A(H5N1) and A(H7N9) and used human and animal influenza surveillance data collected during April 2013–May 2014 from 4 Southeast Asia countries to assess the likelihood that A(H7N9) would have gone undetected during 2014. Surveillance in Vietnam and Cambodia detected human A(H5N1) cases; no A(H7N9) cases were detected in humans or poultry in Southeast Asia. Although we cannot rule out the possible spread of A(H7N9), substantial spread causing severe disease in humans is unlikely. PMID:25897654

  3. Deciphering Dimerization Modes of PAS Domains: Computational and Experimental Analyses of the AhR:ARNT Complex Reveal New Insights Into the Mechanisms of AhR Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Corrada, Dario; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor that mediates the biochemical response to xenobiotics and the toxic effects of a number of environmental contaminants, including dioxins. Recently, endogenous regulatory roles for the AhR in normal physiology and development have also been reported, thus extending the interest in understanding its molecular mechanisms of activation. Since dimerization with the AhR Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) protein, occurring through the Helix-Loop-Helix (HLH) and PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domains, is needed to convert the AhR into its transcriptionally active form, deciphering the AhR:ARNT dimerization mode would provide insights into the mechanisms of AhR transformation. Here we present homology models of the murine AhR:ARNT PAS domain dimer developed using recently available X-ray structures of other bHLH-PAS protein dimers. Due to the different reciprocal orientation and interaction surfaces in the different template dimers, two alternative models were developed for both the PAS-A and PAS-B dimers and they were characterized by combining a number of computational evaluations. Both well-established hot spot prediction methods and new approaches to analyze individual residue and residue-pairwise contributions to the MM-GBSA binding free energies were adopted to predict residues critical for dimer stabilization. On this basis, a mutagenesis strategy for both the murine AhR and ARNT proteins was designed and ligand-dependent DNA binding ability of the AhR:ARNT heterodimer mutants was evaluated. While functional analysis disfavored the HIF2α:ARNT heterodimer-based PAS-B model, most mutants derived from the CLOCK:BMAL1-based AhR:ARNT dimer models of both the PAS-A and the PAS-B dramatically decreased the levels of DNA binding, suggesting this latter model as the most suitable for describing AhR:ARNT dimerization. These novel results open new research directions focused at elucidating basic molecular mechanisms underlying the

  4. Climate Change and Greenhouse Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledley, Tamara S.; Sundquist, Eric; Schwartz, Stephen; Hall, Dorothy K.; Fellows, Jack; Killeen, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU), as a scientific organization devoted to research on the Earth and space sciences, provides current scientific information to the public on issues pertinent to geophysics. The Council of the AGU approved a position statement on Climate Change and Greenhouse Gases in December 1998. The statement, together with a short summary of the procedures that were followed in its preparation, review, and adoption were published in the February 2, 1999 issue of Eos ([AGU, 1999]. The present article reviews scientific understanding of this issue as presented in peer-reviewed publications that serves as the underlying basis of the position statement.

  5. The activation mechanism of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by molecular chaperone HSP90

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Noriko; Fukuda, Kana; Nagata, Yuhtaroh; Okada, Hirotaka; Haga, Asami; Hatakeyama, Shiori; Yoshida, Shiho; Okamoto, Tomoya; Hosaka, Miki; Sekine, Kazuhiro; Ohtaka, Kei; Yamamoto, Soh; Otaka, Michiro; Grave, Ewa; Itoh, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that associates with the molecular chaperone HSP90 in the cytoplasm. The activation mechanism of the AhR is not yet fully understood. It has been proposed that after binding of ligands such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 3methylcholanthrene (3-MC), or β-naphthoflavone (β-NF), the AhR dissociates from HSP90 and translocates to the nucleus. It has also been hypothesized that the AhR translocates to the nucleus and forms a complex with HSP90 and other co-chaperones. There are a few reports about the direct association or dissociation of AhR and HSP90 due to difficulties in purifying AhR. We constructed and purified the PAS domain from AhR. Binding of the AhR-PAS domain to β-NF affinity resin suggested that it possesses ligand-binding affinity. We demonstrated that the AhR-PAS domain binds to HSP90 and the association is not affected by ligand binding. The ligand 17-DMAG inhibited binding of HSP90 to GST-PAS. In an immunoprecipitation assay, HSP90 was co-immunoprecipitated with AhR both in the presence or absence of ligand. Endogenous AhR decreased in the cytoplasm and increased in the nucleus of HeLa cells 15 min after treatment with ligand. These results suggested that the ligand-bound AhR is translocated to nucleus while in complex with HSP90. We used an in situ proximity ligation assay to confirm whether AhR was translocated to the nucleus alone or together with HSP90. HSP90 was co-localized with AhR after the nuclear translocation. It has been suggested that the ligand-bound AhR was translocated to the nucleus with HSP90. Activated AhR acts as a transcription factor, as shown by the transcription induction of the gene CYP1A1 8 h after treatment with β-NF. PMID:25349783

  6. Mechanical properties of monolayer GaS and GaSe crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagmurcukardes, M.; Senger, R. T.; Peeters, F. M.; Sahin, H.

    2016-12-01

    The mechanical properties of monolayer GaS and GaSe crystals are investigated in terms of their elastic constants: in-plane stiffness (C), Poisson ratio (ν ), and ultimate strength (σU) by means of first-principles calculations. The calculated elastic constants are compared with those of graphene and monolayer MoS2. Our results indicate that monolayer GaS is a stiffer material than monolayer GaSe crystals due to the more ionic character of the Ga-S bonds than the Ga-Se bonds. Although their Poisson ratio values are very close to each other, 0.26 and 0.25 for GaS and GaSe, respectively, monolayer GaS is a stronger material than monolayer GaSe due to its slightly higher σU value. However, GaS and GaSe crystals are found to be more ductile and flexible materials than graphene and MoS2. We have also analyzed the band-gap response of GaS and GaSe monolayers to biaxial tensile strain and predicted a semiconductor-metal crossover after 17 % and 14 % applied strain, respectively, for monolayer GaS and GaSe. In addition, we investigated how the mechanical properties are affected by charging. We found that the flexibility of single layer GaS and GaSe displays a sharp increase under 0.1 e /cell charging due to the repulsive interactions between extra charges located on chalcogen atoms. These charging-controllable mechanical properties of single layers of GaS and GaSe can be of potential use for electromechanical applications.

  7. Effects of traces of molecular gases (hydrogen, nitrogen) in glow discharges in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steers, E. B. M.; Smid, P.; Hoffmann, V.

    2008-07-01

    The "Grimm" type of low pressure glow discharge source, introduced some forty years ago, has proved to be a versatile analytical source. A flat sample is used as the cathode and placed about 0.2mm away from the end of a hollow tubular anode leading to an obstructed discharge. When the source was first developed, it was used for the direct analysis of solid metallic samples by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), normally with argon as the plasma gas; it was soon found that, using suitable electrical parameters, the cathode material was sputtered uniformly from a circular crater of diameter equal to that of the tubular anode, so that the technique could be used for compositional depth profile analysis (CDPA). Over the years the capability and applications of the technique have steadily increased. The use of rf powered discharges now permits the analysis of non-conducting layers and samples; improved instrumental design now allows CDPA of ever thinner layers (e.g. resolution of layers 5 nm thick in multilayer stacks is possible). For the original bulk material application, pre-sputtering could be used to remove any surface contamination but for CDPA, analysis must start immediately the discharge is ignited, so that any surface contamination can introduce molecular gases into the plasma gas and have significant analytical consequences, especially for very thin layers; in addition, many types of samples now analysed contain molecular gases as components (either as occluded gas, or e.g. as a nitride or oxide), and this gas enters the discharge when the sample is sputtered. It is therefore important to investigate the effect of such foreign gases on the discharge, in particular on the spectral intensities and hence the analytical results. The presentation will concentrate mainly on the effect of hydrogen in argon discharges, in the concentration range 0-2 % v/v but other gas mixtures (e.g. Ar/N_2, Ne/H_2) will be considered for comparison. In general, the introduction of

  8. Bacterial contamination of anaesthetic gases.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, H; Vasegaard, M; Stokke, D B

    1978-08-01

    The bacterial content of oxygen and nitrous oxide immediately before and after passing through clean and used breathing systems (circuits) was measured using a specially constructed agar chamber (Bourdillon's slit sampler). The content per litre of oxygen from the outlet of the anaesthetic machine was 4.0 X 10-2, and 2.9 X 10-2 for nitrous oxide, corresponding to 3.5 X 10-2 for a 50% mixture of the gases. After passing through cleaned circuits, the bacterial pollution of the gas mixture had increased by 30%, but more than elevenfold after passing through used circuits. The content from cleaned circuits was less than that measured previously in the air of hospital wards and operating theatres, whereas gases from used circuits were polluted to approximately the same extent. It is concluded that used circuits may increase the risk of cross-infection. The cleaning method employed by us (dish-washer--hot airy drying) appeared to be acceptable.

  9. Atmospheric trace gases in antarctica.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, R A; Khalil, M A; Dalluge, R W

    1981-01-16

    Trace gases have been measured, by electron-capture gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques, at the South Pole (SP) in Antarctica and in the U.S. Pacific Northwest (PNW) ( approximately 45 degrees N) during January of each year from 1975 to 1980. These measurements show that the concentrations of CCl(3)F, CCl(2)F(2), and CH(3)CCl(3) have increased exponentially at substantial rates. The concentration of CCl(3)F increased at 12 percent per year at the SP and at 8 percent per year in the PNW; CCl(2)F(2) increased at about 9 percent per year at both locations, and CH(3)CCl(3) increased at 17 percent per year at the SP and 11.6 percent per year at the PNW site. There is some evidence that CCl(4) ( approximately 3 percent per year) and N(2)O (0.1 to 0.5 percent per year) may also have increased. Concentrations of nine other trace gases of importance in atmospheric chemistry are also being measured at these two locations. Results of the measurements of CHClF(2)(F-22), C(2)Cl(3)F(3)(F-113), SF(6), C(2)-hydrocarbons, and CH(3)Cl are reported here.

  10. Predicting Flows of Rarefied Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBeau, Gerald J.; Wilmoth, Richard G.

    2005-01-01

    DSMC Analysis Code (DAC) is a flexible, highly automated, easy-to-use computer program for predicting flows of rarefied gases -- especially flows of upper-atmospheric, propulsion, and vented gases impinging on spacecraft surfaces. DAC implements the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, which is widely recognized as standard for simulating flows at densities so low that the continuum-based equations of computational fluid dynamics are invalid. DAC enables users to model complex surface shapes and boundary conditions quickly and easily. The discretization of a flow field into computational grids is automated, thereby relieving the user of a traditionally time-consuming task while ensuring (1) appropriate refinement of grids throughout the computational domain, (2) determination of optimal settings for temporal discretization and other simulation parameters, and (3) satisfaction of the fundamental constraints of the method. In so doing, DAC ensures an accurate and efficient simulation. In addition, DAC can utilize parallel processing to reduce computation time. The domain decomposition needed for parallel processing is completely automated, and the software employs a dynamic load-balancing mechanism to ensure optimal parallel efficiency throughout the simulation.

  11. Capturing Gases in Carbon Honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainyukova, Nina V.

    2016-12-01

    In our recent paper (Krainyukova and Zubarev in Phys Rev Lett 116:055501, 2016. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.055501) we reported the observation of an exceptionally stable honeycomb carbon allotrope obtained by deposition of vacuum-sublimated graphite. A family of structures can be built from absolutely dominant {sp}2 -bonded carbon atoms, and may be considered as three-dimensional graphene. Such structures demonstrate high absorption capacity for gases and liquids. In this work we show that the formation of honeycomb structures is highly sensitive to the carbon evaporation temperature and deposition rates. Both parameters are controlled by the electric current flowing through thin carbon rods. Two distinctly different regimes were found. At lower electric currents almost pure honeycomb structures form owing to sublimation. At higher currents the surface-to-bulk rod melting is observed. In the latter case densification of the carbon structures and a large contribution of glassy graphite emerge. The experimental diffraction patterns from honeycomb structures filled with absorbed gases and analyzed by the advanced method are consistent with the proposed models for composites which are different for Ar, Kr and Xe atoms in carbon matrices.

  12. Capturing Gases in Carbon Honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainyukova, Nina V.

    2017-04-01

    In our recent paper (Krainyukova and Zubarev in Phys Rev Lett 116:055501, 2016. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.055501) we reported the observation of an exceptionally stable honeycomb carbon allotrope obtained by deposition of vacuum-sublimated graphite. A family of structures can be built from absolutely dominant {sp}2-bonded carbon atoms, and may be considered as three-dimensional graphene. Such structures demonstrate high absorption capacity for gases and liquids. In this work we show that the formation of honeycomb structures is highly sensitive to the carbon evaporation temperature and deposition rates. Both parameters are controlled by the electric current flowing through thin carbon rods. Two distinctly different regimes were found. At lower electric currents almost pure honeycomb structures form owing to sublimation. At higher currents the surface-to-bulk rod melting is observed. In the latter case densification of the carbon structures and a large contribution of glassy graphite emerge. The experimental diffraction patterns from honeycomb structures filled with absorbed gases and analyzed by the advanced method are consistent with the proposed models for composites which are different for Ar, Kr and Xe atoms in carbon matrices.

  13. A Modified Delphi Study to Define "Ah Ha" Moments in Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilcher, Jobeth

    2015-01-01

    Ah ha moments are often mentioned in education literature. These moments are suggested to be a powerful aspect of learning, yet limited research is present regarding this topic. Ah ha learning moments have also not been defined in the education literature, resulting in the likelihood that each educator and learner may have differing definitions.…

  14. Novel avian influenza A(H7N9) virus in tree sparrow, Shanghai, China, 2013.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baihui; Zhang, Xi; Zhu, Wenfei; Teng, Zheng; Yu, Xuelian; Gao, Ye; Wu, Di; Pei, Enle; Yuan, Zhengan; Yang, Lei; Wang, Dayan; Shu, Yuelong; Wu, Fan

    2014-05-01

    In spring 2013, influenza A(H7N9) virus was isolated from an apparently healthy tree sparrow in Chongming Dongping National Forest Park, Shanghai City, China. The entire gene constellation of the virus is similar to that of isolates from humans, highlighting the need to monitor influenza A(H7N9) viruses in different species.

  15. Subclinical avian influenza A(H5N1) virus infection in human, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Le, Mai Quynh; Horby, Peter; Fox, Annette; Nguyen, Hien Tran; Le Nguyen, Hang Khanh; Hoang, Phuong Mai Vu; Nguyen, Khanh Cong; de Jong, Menno D; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Rogier van Doorn, H; Farrar, Jeremy; Wertheim, Heiman F L

    2013-10-01

    Laboratory-confirmed cases of subclinical infection with avian influenza A(H5N1) virus in humans are rare, and the true number of these cases is unknown. We describe the identification of a laboratory-confirmed subclinical case in a woman during an influenza A(H5N1) contact investigation in northern Vietnam.

  16. Human Infection with Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus - China

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduction Human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus – China Disease outbreak news 18 January 2017 On ... confirmed human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus and on 12 January 2017, the Health Bureau, ...

  17. Pityriazepin and other potent AhR ligands isolated from Malassezia furfur yeast.

    PubMed

    Mexia, Nikitia; Gaitanis, Georgios; Velegraki, Aristea; Soshilov, Anatoly; Denison, Michael S; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2015-04-01

    Malassezia furfur yeast strains isolated from diseased human skin preferentially biosynthesize indole alkaloids which can be detected in the human skin and are highly potent activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR-dependent gene expression. Chemical analysis of an EtOAc extract of a M. furfur strain obtained from diseased human skin and grown on l-tryptophan agar revealed several known AhR active tryptophan metabolites along with a previously unidentified compound, pityriazepin. While its structure resembled that of the known alkaloid pityriacitrin, the comprised pyridine ring had been transformed into an azepinone. The indoloazepinone scaffold of pityriazepin is extremely rare in nature and has only been reported once previously. Pityriazepin, like the other isolated compounds, was found to be a potent activator of the AhR-dependent reporter gene assay in recombinant cell lines derived from four different species, although significant species differences in relative potency were observed. The ability of pityriazepin to competitively bind to the AhR and directly stimulate AhR DNA binding classified it as a new naturally-occurring potent AhR agonist. M. furfur produces an expanded collection of extremely potent naturally occurring AhR agonists, which produce their biological effects in a species-specific manner.

  18. AhR-mediated Gene Expression in the Developing Mouse Telencephalon

    PubMed Central

    Gohlke, Julia M; Stockton, Pat S; Sieber, Stella; Foley, Julie; Portier, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesize that TCDD induced developmental neurotoxicity is modulated through an AhR dependent interaction with key regulatory neuronal differentiation pathways during telencephalon development. To test this hypothesis we examined global gene expression in both dorsal and ventral telencephalon tissues in E13.5 AhR -/- and wildtype mice exposed to TCDD or vehicle. Consistent with previous biochemical, pathological and behavioral studies, our results suggest TCDD initiated changes in gene expression in the developing telencephalon are primarily AhR dependent, as no statistically significant gene expression changes are evident after TCDD exposure in AhR -/- mice. Based on a gene regulatory network for neuronal specification in the developing telencephalon, the present analysis suggests differentiation of GABAergic neurons in the ventral telencephalon is compromised in TCDD exposed and AhR-/- mice. In addition, our analysis suggests Sox11 may be directly regulated by AhR based on gene expression and comparative genomics analyses. In conclusion, this analysis supports the hypothesis that AhR has a specific role in the normal development of the telencephalon and provides a mechanistic framework for neurodevelopmental toxicity of chemicals that perturb AhR signaling. PMID:19465110

  19. Decontamination of combustion gases in fluidized bed incinerators

    DOEpatents

    Leon, Albert M.

    1982-01-01

    Sulfur-containing atmospheric pollutants are effectively removed from exit gas streams produced in a fluidized bed combustion system by providing a fluidized bed of particulate material, i.e. limestone and/or dolomite wherein a concentration gradient is maintained in the vertical direction. Countercurrent contacting between upwardly directed sulfur containing combustion gases and descending sorbent particulate material creates a concentration gradient across the vertical extent of the bed characterized in progressively decreasing concentration of sulfur, sulfur dioxide and like contaminants upwardly and decreasing concentration of e.g. calcium oxide, downwardly. In this manner, gases having progressively decreasing sulfur contents contact correspondingly atmospheres having progressively increasing concentrations of calcium oxide thus assuring optimum sulfur removal.

  20. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  1. Mixing of relativistic ideal gases with relative relativistic velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Narvaez, R. E.; Ares de Parga, A. M.; Ares de Parga, G.

    2017-01-01

    The Redefined Relativistic Thermodynamics is tested by means of mixing two ideal gases at different temperatures and distinct velocities. The conservation of the 4-vector energy-momentum leads to a tremendous increment of the temperature. This phenomenon can be used in order to describe the heating of a cold clump with shocked jets material. A prediction for improving the ignition of a Tokamak is proposed. The compatibility of the Redefined Relativistic Thermodynamics with the Thermodynamical Field Theory is analyzed.

  2. APPARATUS FOR CATALYTICALLY COMBINING GASES

    DOEpatents

    Busey, H.M.

    1958-08-12

    A convection type recombiner is described for catalytically recombining hydrogen and oxygen which have been radiolytically decomposed in an aqueous homogeneous nuclear reactor. The device is so designed that the energy of recombination is used to circulate the gas mixture over the catalyst. The device consists of a vertical cylinder having baffles at its lower enda above these coarse screens having platinum and alumina pellets cemented thereon, and an annular passage for the return of recombined, condensed water to the reactor moderator system. This devicea having no moving parts, provides a simple and efficient means of removing the danger of accumulated hot radioactive, explosive gases, and restoring them to the moderator system for reuse.

  3. Cooling Atomic Gases With Disorder.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Yang, Shuxiang; Rousseau, Valéry; Jarrell, Mark; Moreno, Juana; Hulet, Randall G; Scalettar, Richard T

    2015-12-11

    Cold atomic gases have proven capable of emulating a number of fundamental condensed matter phenomena including Bose-Einstein condensation, the Mott transition, Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov pairing, and the quantum Hall effect. Cooling to a low enough temperature to explore magnetism and exotic superconductivity in lattices of fermionic atoms remains a challenge. We propose a method to produce a low temperature gas by preparing it in a disordered potential and following a constant entropy trajectory to deliver the gas into a nondisordered state which exhibits these incompletely understood phases. We show, using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that we can approach the Néel temperature of the three-dimensional Hubbard model for experimentally achievable parameters. Recent experimental estimates suggest the randomness required lies in a regime where atom transport and equilibration are still robust.

  4. Electron clusters in inert gases.

    PubMed

    Nazin, S; Shikin, V

    2008-10-17

    This Letter addresses the counterintuitive behavior of electrons injected into dense cryogenic media with negative scattering length L. Instead of strongly reduced mobility at all but the lowest densities due to the polaronic effect involving the formation of density enhancement clusters (expected in the theory with a simple gas-electron interaction successfully applied earlier to electrons in helium where L>0) which should substantially decrease the electron mobility, an opposite picture is observed: with increasing |L| (the trend taking place for inert gases with the growth of atomic number) and the gas density, the electrons remain practically free. An explanation of this behavior is provided based on consistent accounting for the nonlinearity of the electron interaction with the gaseous medium in the gas atom number density.

  5. Forskolin inhibits the Gs-stimulated adenylate cyclase in rat ascites hepatoma AH66F cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R; Matsunaga, T; Hasegawa, T; Takagi, K; Satake, T

    1989-09-01

    Forskolin increased intracellular cyclic AMP and augmented cyclic AMP formation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) in normal rat hepatocytes and ascites hepatoma AH66 cells. However, in AH66F cells which were derived from the AH66 cell line, the diterpene only slightly increased the cyclic AMP level, and dose-dependently inhibited the accumulation caused by PGE1. Forskolin dose-dependently activated adenylate cyclase in these membranes, and the magnitude of activation by forskolin was largest in the following order: hepatocytes, AH66 cells, and AH66F cells. This difference may be based on the number of forskolin-binding sites. The binding affinity of forskolin for each cell membrane was similar. The number and affinity of forskolin-binding sites in these cells were not influenced by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p]. In hepatocytes and AH66 cells, forskolin and other adenylate cyclase activators such as PGE1, GTP, Gpp(NH)p, F-, and Mn2+ synergistically increased the enzyme activity. In AH66F cells, the forskolin-stimulated activity was hardly influenced by the GTP analog, and forskolin diminished the activities induced by the GTP analog in a manner similar to that of diterpene alone. Forskolin (10 microM) also significantly inhibited the activities induced by PGE1, GTP, and F-. The effect of forskolin with Mn2+ was additive in AH66F cells. The data suggest that forskolin promotes the interaction between the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and the catalytic unit in the membrane of normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, but it interferes with the coupling in AH66F cells.

  6. AH6809, a prostaglandin DP-receptor blocking drug on human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Keery, R. J.; Lumley, P.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of AH6809 (6-isopropoxy-9-oxoxanthene-2-carboxylic acid) has been studied upon the anti-aggregatory and aggregatory actions of various agents on human platelets in whole blood. 2. Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), BW245C, 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2, PGI2 and 5'-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) all inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood. The anti-aggregatory activity of PGD2, BW245C and 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 but not PGI2 or NECA was antagonized by AH6809. NECA was antagonized by AH6809. 3. The antagonism of the anti-aggregatory activity of PGD2 by AH6809 was concentration-related and could be overcome by increasing the concentration of PGD2. Analysis of the data yielded an apparent pA2 for AH6809 of 5.35. 4. At approximately 10 fold higher concentrations than those required to antagonize the action of PGD2, AH6809 also antagonized the aggregatory effect of U-46619 in whole blood (pA2 = 4.45). However, concentrations of AH6809 up to 300 microM were without effect upon either ADP- or platelet activating factor (Paf)-induced aggregation (pA2 less than 3.5). 5. The potency of AH6809 against PGD2 and U-46619 was increased in a resuspended platelet preparation suggesting that the drug is extensively bound to plasma proteins. However, in resuspended platelets the specificity of AH6809 relative to that seen in whole blood was reduced since aggregation by ADP and Paf was also slightly antagonized. 6. In conclusion, AH6809 appears to be a weak but specific DP-receptor blocking drug on human platelets and should prove to be a useful drug tool for defining the involvement of endogenous PGD2 in platelet aggregation and classifying the mode of action of anti-aggregatory prostanoids. PMID:2460179

  7. Continuous Processing with Mars Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde; Jennings, Paul; Delgado, Hugo (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Current Martian missions call for the production of oxygen for breathing, and fuel and oxygen for propulsion to be produced from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Adsorption and freezing are the two methods considered for capturing CO, from the atmosphere. However, the nitrogen (N2) and argon (Ar), which make up less than 5 percent of the atmosphere, cause difficulties with both of these processes by blocking the CO2, This results in the capture process rapidly changing from a pressure driven process to a diffusion controlled process. To increase the CO, capture rates, some type of mechanical pump is usually proposed to remove the N2 and Ar. The N2 and Ar are useful and have been proposed for blanketing and pressurizing fuel tanks and as buffer gas for breathing air for manned missions. Separation of the Martian gases with the required purity can be accomplished with a combination of membranes. These membrane systems do not require a high feed pressure and provide suitable separation. Therefore, by use of the appropriate membrane combination with the Martian atmosphere supplied by a compressor a continuous supply of CO2 for fuel and oxygen production can be supplied. This phase of our program has focused on the selection of the membrane system. Since permeation data for membranes did not exist for Martian atmospheric pressures and temperatures, this information had to be compiled. The general trend as the temperature was lowered was for the membranes to become more selective. In addition, the relative permeation rates between the three gases changed with temperature. The end result was to provide design parameters that could be used to separate CO2 from N2 and Ar. This paper will present the membrane data, provide the design requirements for a compressor, and compare the results with adsorption and freezer methods.

  8. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR links atopic dermatitis and air pollution via induction of the neurotrophic factor artemin.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Takanori; Ogawa, Eisaku; Kobayashi, Eri H; Suzuki, Takafumi; Funayama, Ryo; Nagashima, Takeshi; Fujimura, Taku; Aiba, Setsuya; Nakayama, Keiko; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is increasing worldwide in correlation with air pollution. Various organic components of pollutants activate the transcription factor AhR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor). Through the use of AhR-CA mice, whose keratinocytes express constitutively active AhR and that develop atopic-dermatitis-like phenotypes, we identified Artn as a keratinocyte-specific AhR target gene whose product (the neurotrophic factor artemin) was responsible for epidermal hyper-innervation that led to hypersensitivity to pruritus. The activation of AhR via air pollutants induced expression of artemin, alloknesis, epidermal hyper-innervation and inflammation. AhR activation and ARTN expression were positively correlated in the epidermis of patients with atopic dermatitis. Thus, AhR in keratinocytes senses environmental stimuli and elicits an atopic-dermatitis pathology. We propose a mechanism of air-pollution-induced atopic dermatitis via activation of AhR.

  9. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  10. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  11. Ultracold Quantum Gases in Hexagonal Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengstock, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Hexagonal structures occur in a vast variety of systems, ranging from honeycombs of bees in life sciences to carbon nanotubes in material sciences. The latter, in particular its unfolded two-dimensional layer -- Graphene -- has rapidly grown to one of the most discussed topics in condensed-matter physics. Not only does it show proximity to various carbon-based materials but also exceptional properties owing to its unusual energy spectrum. In quantum optics, ultracold quantum gases confined in periodic light fields have shown to be very general and versatile instruments to mimic solid state systems. However, so far nearly all experiments were performed in cubic lattice geometries only. Here we report on the first experimental realization of ultracold quantum gases in a state-dependent, two-dimensional, Graphene-like optical lattice with hexagonal symmetry. The lattice is realized via a spin-dependent optical lattice structure with alternating σ^+ and σ^- -sites and thus constitutes a so called `magnetic'-lattice with `antiferromagnetic'-structure. Atoms with different spin orientation can be loaded to specific lattice sites or -- depending on the parameters -- to the whole lattice. As a consequence e.g. superpositions of a superfluid spin component with a different spin component in the Mott-insulating phase can be realized as well as spin-dependent transport properties, disorder etc. After preparing an antiferromagnetically ordered state we e.g. measure sustainable changes of the transport properties of the atoms. This manifests in a significant reduction of the tunneling as compared to a single-component system. We attribute this observation to a partial tunneling blockade for one spin component induced by population in another spin component localized at alternating lattice sites. Within a Gutzwiller-Ansatz we calculate the phase diagrams for the mixed spin-states and find very good agreement with our experimental results. Moreover, by state-resolved recording

  12. 40 CFR 91.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 91.312 Section 91.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. Record the expiration...

  13. 40 CFR 90.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Analytical gases. 90.312 Section 90.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF... § 90.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. The...

  14. 40 CFR 90.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 90.312 Section 90.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Provisions § 90.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded....

  15. 40 CFR 91.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) (Oxygen content between 18-21 percent vol.) (c) Calibration and span gases. (1) Calibration gas values are... purified nitrogen. Note: For the HFID or FID, the manufacturer may choose to use as a diluent span gas and... calibration and span gases. If a manufacturer chooses to use C3 H8 and purified nitrogen for the...

  16. Facilitating Conceptual Change in Gases Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Pinar Seda; Kaya, Ebru; Geban, Omer

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of conceptual change oriented instruction (CCOI) over traditionally designed chemistry instruction (TDCI) on overcoming 10th grade students' misconceptions on gases concepts. In addition, the effect of gender difference on students' understanding of gases concepts was investigated. The…

  17. Kinetic Theory of Reactive Molecular Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    quantities as local averages of various properties of elementary particles (molecules, atoms, ions ,…) and by taking into account their interactions...GASES 4.1 (WNE)V+(SNE)C Case We consider dissociating polyatomic gases; as generally the characteristic chemical times are larger than vibrational

  18. Analyzing Gases From Decomposing Electrical Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffett, Gary; Shelley, Timothy J.; Morelli, John J.

    1995-01-01

    Test fixture holds insulated wire and traps gases emitted by heating of wire. Used with gas chromatograph and/or mass spectrometer, to analyze gases emitted by insulation on wire when wire heated with controlled current in controlled atmosphere to simulate pyrolysis, combustion, and arc tracking. Small, inexpensive, easily maintained, and relatively nonreactive to organic compounds produced during breakdown of insulation.

  19. Predict thermal conductivities of pure gases

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The programs presented for the TI-59 programmable calculator can determine the thermal conductivity of pure gases and gases at low pressures as well as the effect of pressure on conductivity. They are based on correlations by Eucken, Stiel-Thodos, Misic-Thodos, Roy-Thodos, and Redlich-Kwong.

  20. Research of medical gases in Poland

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Research of medical gases is well established in Poland and has been marked with the foundation of several professional societies. Numerous academic centers including those dealing with hyperbaric and diving medicine conduct studies of medical gases, in vast majority supported with intramural funds. In general, Polish research of medical gases is very much clinical in nature, covering new applications and safety of medical gases in medicine; on the other hand there are several academic centers pursuing preclinical studies, and elaborating basic theories of gas physiology and mathematical modeling of gas exchange. What dominates is research dealing with oxygen and ozone as well as studies of anesthetic gases and their applications. Finally, several research directions involving noble gas, hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide for cell protection, only begin to gain recognition of basic scientists and clinicians. However, further developments require more monetary spending on research and clinical testing as well as formation of new collective bodies for coordinating efforts in this matter. PMID:23916016

  1. Isotopic analysis of rare gases from stepwise heating of lunar fines and rocks.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, J H; Hohenberg, C M; Lewis, R S; Davis, P K; Kaiser, W A

    1970-01-30

    Highlights of a first effort in sorting out rare gases in lunar material are solar wind rare gases in abundance; variable (20)Ne/(22)Ne but constant (21)Ne/ (22)Ne ratios in fractions of the trapped neon; cosmogenic rare gases similar to those found in meteorites, except for copious (131)Xe in one rock but not in another; at Tranquillity Base a rock 4.1 x 10(9) years old which reached the surface 35 to 65 million years ago, amid soil whose particles have typically been within a meter of the surface for 10(9) years or more.

  2. Retinoids repress Ah receptor CYP1A1 induction pathway through the SMRT corepressor.

    PubMed

    Fallone, Frédérique; Villard, Pierre-Henri; Sérée, Eric; Rimet, Odile; Nguyen, Quock Binh; Bourgarel-Rey, Véronique; Fouchier, Francis; Barra, Yves; Durand, Alain; Lacarelle, Bruno

    2004-09-17

    CYP1A1 isoform is mainly regulated by the transcription factor AhR and to a lesser extent by the nuclear receptor RAR. The effect of a coexposure with 3MC, a AhR ligand, and RA, a RAR ligand, which are, respectively, strong and weak CYP1A1 inducers, is poorly known. We showed in Caco-2 cells that addition of RA significantly decreased 3MC-induced CYP1A1 expression by -55% for mRNA level and -30% for promoter and enzymatic activities. We further showed that RA decreased AhR protein level. Moreover, a physical interaction between AhR and the RAR-corepressor SMRT has been described in vitro. Using the corepressor inhibitor TSA, transfected-cells with SMRT cDNA, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, we demonstrated that RA addition repressed AhR function through a marked AhR/SMRT physical interaction. This interaction explains the decrease of 3MC-induced CYP1A1 expression. This new mechanism involving the repression of AhR-induced CYP1A1 expression by retinoids allows better knowledge of the CYP1A1 regulation.

  3. Dentin wettability enhancement for three irrigating solutions and their effect on push out bond strength of gutta percha / AH Plus

    PubMed Central

    El Gendy, Abeer-Abdel-Hakim; El Ashry, Salma-Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of wettability enhancement for 17% EDTA, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and 7% maleic acid solutions on push out bond strength of gutta percha /AH Plus to root dentin. Material and Methods One hundred and eight extracted single rooted human lower premolars were instrumented up to Protaper Universal F5 then irrigated with 3ml of 2.5% NaOCl after each file. Irrigants were prepared and a pilot study for determination of Tween 80 concentration yielding the lowest surface tension value in every solution was conducted. Samples were randomly divided into a control group and two experimental groups (17% EDTA and 7% Maleate), further split into eight subgroups (n=12), according to Tween 80 implementation sequence. Roots were obturated using gutta percha and AH plus by lateral condensation. Bond strength was measured by push out test. Mode of failure was then evaluated quantitatively by stereomicroscopy. Data were statistically analyzed using one way ANOVA followed by Tukey-Kramer for multiple comparisons. Results Control group showed the lowest values. Maleic acid subgroups showed significantly higher overall values than EDTA subgroups (P<0.05). Protocols implementing surfactant containing NaOCl showed significantly lower values than plain counterparts. Failure pattern was predominantly cohesive for plain regimens and the ones implementing Tween 80 in maleic acid solutions with plain NaOCl. Conclusions Tween 80 addition to demineralizing irrigants increased the bond strength values. Surfactant containing NaOCl solutions yielded lower bond strength than plain ones. Key words:Wettability enhancement for three irrigants vs. corresponding gutta percha/AH Plus bonding. PMID:26155339

  4. Characterization of Drug-Resistant Influenza Virus A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) Variants Selected In Vitro with Laninamivir

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Mélanie; Abed, Yacine; Desrochers, François-Marc; Hamilton, Stephanie; Luttick, Angela; Tucker, Simon P.; Pryor, Melinda J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) play a major role for managing influenza virus infections. The widespread oseltamivir resistance among 2007-2008 seasonal A(H1N1) viruses and community outbreaks of oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 strains highlights the need for additional anti-influenza virus agents. Laninamivir is a novel long-lasting NAI that has demonstrated in vitro activity against influenza A and B viruses, and its prodrug (laninamivir octanoate) is in phase II clinical trials in the United States and other countries. Currently, little information is available on the mechanisms of resistance to laninamivir. In this study, we first performed neuraminidase (NA) inhibition assays to determine the activity of laninamivir against a set of influenza A viruses containing NA mutations conferring resistance to one or many other NAIs. We also generated drug-resistant A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) viruses under in vitro laninamivir pressure. Laninamivir demonstrated a profile of susceptibility that was similar to that of zanamivir. More specifically, it retained activity against oseltamivir-resistant H275Y and N295S A(H1N1) variants and the E119V A(H3N2) variant. In vitro, laninamivir pressure selected the E119A NA substitution in the A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 A(H1N1) background, whereas E119K and G147E NA changes along with a K133E hemagglutinin (HA) substitution were selected in the A/Quebec/144147/2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 strain. In the A/Brisbane/10/2007 A(H3N2) background, a large NA deletion accompanied by S138A/P194L HA substitutions was selected. This H3N2 variant had altered receptor-binding properties and was highly resistant to laninamivir in plaque reduction assays. Overall, we confirmed the similarity between zanamivir and laninamivir susceptibility profiles and demonstrated that both NA and HA changes can contribute to laninamivir resistance in vitro. PMID:24957832

  5. Bond strength to root dentin and fluid filtration test of AH Plus/gutta-percha, EndoREZ and RealSeal systems

    PubMed Central

    MAHDI, Alaa Abdul; BOLAÑOS-CARMONA, Victoria; GONZALEZ-LOPEZ, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the bond strength and seal ability produced by AH Plus/gutta-percha, EndoREZ and RealSeal systems to root canal dentin. Material and Methods Sixty extracted single-root human teeth, instrumented manually to size 40, were divided into three groups (n=20) according to the sealer used; G1: AH Plus, G2: EndoREZ, and G3: RealSeal sealers. After filling using the lateral condensation technique, each sealer group was randomly divided into two subgroups according to the tests applied (n=10 for µPush-out test and n=10 for fluid filtration test). A fluid filtration method was used for quantitative evaluation of apical leakage. Four 1-mm-thick slices (cervical and medium level) were obtained from each root sample and a µPush-out test was performed. Failure modes were examined under microscopy at 40x, and a one-way ANOVA was applied to analyze the permeability. Non-parametrical statistics for related (Friedman's and Wilcoxon's rank tests) or unrelated samples (Kruskal-Wallis' and Mann-Whitney's tests) allowed for comparisons of µPush-out strength values among materials at the different levels. Statistical significance was accepted for p values <.05. Results There are no significant differences among fluid filtration of the three sealers. The sealer/core material does not significantly influence the µPush-out bond strength values (F=2.49; p=0.10), although statistically significant differences were detected with regard to root level (Chi2=23.93; p<0.001). AH Plus and RealSeal obtained higher bond strength to intraradicular dentin in the medium root slices. Conclusions There are no significant differences between the permeability and global µPush-out bond strength to root canal dentin achieved by AH Plus/gutta-percha, EndoREZ and RealSeal systems. PMID:24037078

  6. Noble gases and the early history of the Earth: Inappropriate paradigms and assumptions inhibit research and communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, G. R.; Alexander, E. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The development of models as tracers of nobel gases through the Earth's evolution is discussed. A new set of paradigms embodying present knowledge was developed. Several important areas for future research are: (1) measurement of the elemental and isotopic compositions of the five noble gases in a large number of terrestrial materials, thus better defining the composition and distribution of terrestrial noble gases; (2) determinations of relative diffusive behavior, chemical behavior, and the distribution between solid and melt of noble gases under mantle conditions are urgently needed; (3) disequilibrium behavior in the nebula needs investigation, and the behavior of plasmas and possible cryotrapping on cold nebular solids are considered.

  7. Cooling Atomic Gases With Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalettar, Richard

    Cold atomic gases have proven capable of emulating a number of fundamental condensed matter phenomena including Bose-Einstein condensation, the Mott transition, Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov pairing and the quantum Hall effect. Cooling to a low enough temperature to explore magnetism and exotic superconductivity in lattices of fermionic atoms remains a challenge. We propose a method to produce a low temperature gas by preparing it in a disordered potential and following a constant entropy trajectory to deliver the gas into a non-disordered state which exhibits these incompletely understood phases. We show, using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that we can approach the Neél temperature of the three-dimensional Hubbard model for experimentally achievable parameters. Recent experimental estimates suggest the randomness required lies in a regime where atom transport and equilibration are still robust. Thereza Paiva, Ehsan Khatami, Shuxiang Yang, Valery Rousseau, Mark Jarrell, Juana Moreno, Randall G. Hulet, and Richard T. Scalettar, arXiv:1508.02613 This work was supported by the NNSA SSAA program.

  8. Greenhouse Trace Gases in Deadwood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, Kristofer; Bueno de Mesquita, Cliff; Oberle, Brad; Maynard, Dan; Bettigole, Charles; Crowther, Thomas; Duguid, Marlyse; Steven, Blaire; Zanne, Amy; Lapin, Marc; Ashton, Mark; Oliver, Chad; Lee, Xuhui; Bradford, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Deadwood, long recognized as playing an important role in carbon cycling in forest ecosystems, is more recently drawing attention for its potential role in the cycling of other greenhouse trace gases. We report data from four independent studies measuring internal gas concentrations in deadwood in in three Quercus dominated upland forest systems in the Northeastern and Central United States. Mean methane concentrations in deadwood were 23 times atmospheric levels, indicating a lower bound, mean radial wood surface area flux of ~6 x 10-4 μmol CH4 m-2 s-1. Site, decay class, diameter, and species were all highly significant predictors of methane abundance in deadwood, and log diameter and decay stage interacted as important controls limiting methane concentrations in the smallest and most decayed logs. Nitrous oxide concentrations were negatively correlated with methane and on average ~25% lower than ambient, indicating net consumption of nitrous oxide. These data suggest nonstructural carbohydrates fuel archaeal methanogens and confirm the potential for widespread in situ methanogenesis in both living and deadwood. Applying this understanding to estimate methane emissions from microbial activity in living trees implies a potential global flux of 65.6±12.0 Tg CH4 yr-1, more than 20 times greater than currently considered.

  9. Atomtronics with Ultracold Bose Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Herwig

    Neutral atom systems can exhibit similar transport properties like solid state devices. For instance, a neutral atom current is induced by a difference in chemical potential very much in the same way as a voltage drives an electric current. Employing Bose-Einstein condensed atomic gases allows observing superfluid transport phenomena, thus drawing connections to superconductivity. With help of light fields, the atomic current can additionally be guided in engineered potential landscapes in which one can also incorporate tunneling junctions. Eventually, the different components and elements can be integrated in atomtronic circuits which shed light on fundamental transport properties of many-body quantum systems. In this talk, I will present two fundamental atomtronic devices. The first is the observation of negative differential conductivity, which occurs at a multimode tunneling junction for ultracold atoms. The second is the appearance of a DC Josephson current in a biased tunneling junction, which features bistable transport characteristics. I will discuss the prospects of these basic elements for more complex atomtronic circuits.

  10. Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  11. Testing of heat exchanger systems for reheating flue gases from wet scrubbing desulfurization plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Than, K.

    1982-09-01

    Two heat exchanger systems: the cyclic process of GEA and, the plate heat exchanger of Kablitz/Thyssen, for reheating flue gases, which have been cooled to about 50 to 55 C due to wet scrubbing, to the required temperature at the outlet of the stack by extracting the sensible heat of the hot flue gases were tested. The problem of building materials and on keeping clean the heat exchanger surface are emphasized.

  12. Measuring non-condensable gases in steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Doornmalen, J. P. C. M.; Kopinga, K.

    2013-11-01

    In surgery, medical devices that are used should be sterilized. To obtain surface steam sterilization conditions, not only in the sterilizer chamber itself but also in the loads to be sterilized, the amount of non-condensable gases (NCGs), for instance air, should be very low. Even rather small fractions of NCGs (below 1 %) seriously hamper steam penetration in porous materials or devices with hollow channels (e.g., endoscopes). A recently developed instrument which might detect the presence of residual NCGs in a reliable and reproducible way is the 3MTM Electronic Test System (ETS). In this paper, a physical model is presented that describes the behavior of this instrument. This model has been validated by experiments in which known fractions of NCGs were introduced in a sterilizer chamber in which an ETS was placed. Despite several approximations made in the model, a good agreement is found between the model predictions and the experimental results. The basic principle of the ETS, measuring the heat transfer by condensation on a cooled surface, permits a very sensitive detection of NCGs in harsh environments like water vapor at high temperatures and pressures. Our model may serve to develop adapted and optimized versions of this instrument for use outside the field of sterilization, e.g., in heat exchangers based on steam condensation.

  13. Measuring non-condensable gases in steam

    SciTech Connect

    Doornmalen, J. P. C. M. van; Kopinga, K.

    2013-11-15

    In surgery, medical devices that are used should be sterilized. To obtain surface steam sterilization conditions, not only in the sterilizer chamber itself but also in the loads to be sterilized, the amount of non-condensable gases (NCGs), for instance air, should be very low. Even rather small fractions of NCGs (below 1 %) seriously hamper steam penetration in porous materials or devices with hollow channels (e.g., endoscopes). A recently developed instrument which might detect the presence of residual NCGs in a reliable and reproducible way is the 3M{sup TM} Electronic Test System (ETS). In this paper, a physical model is presented that describes the behavior of this instrument. This model has been validated by experiments in which known fractions of NCGs were introduced in a sterilizer chamber in which an ETS was placed. Despite several approximations made in the model, a good agreement is found between the model predictions and the experimental results. The basic principle of the ETS, measuring the heat transfer by condensation on a cooled surface, permits a very sensitive detection of NCGs in harsh environments like water vapor at high temperatures and pressures. Our model may serve to develop adapted and optimized versions of this instrument for use outside the field of sterilization, e.g., in heat exchangers based on steam condensation.

  14. Fullerenes: an extraterrestrial carbon carrier phase for noble gases.

    PubMed

    Becker, L; Poreda, R J; Bunch, T E

    2000-03-28

    In this work, we report on the discovery of naturally occurring fullerenes (C60 to C400) in the Allende and Murchison meteorites and some sediment samples from the 65 million-year-old Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary layer (KTB). Unlike the other pure forms of carbon (diamond and graphite), fullerenes are extractable in an organic solvent (e.g., toluene or 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene). The recognition of this unique property led to the detection and isolation of the higher fullerenes in the Kratschmer/Huffmann arc evaporated graphite soot and in the carbon material in the meteorite and impact deposits. By further exploiting the unique ability of the fullerene cage structure to encapsulate and retain noble gases, we have determined that both the Allende and Murchison fullerenes and the KTB fullerenes contain trapped noble gases with ratios that can only be described as extraterrestrial in origin.

  15. Apparatus for hot-gas desulfurization of fuel gases

    DOEpatents

    Bissett, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for removing sulfur values from a hot fuel gas stream in a fdized bed contactor containing particulate sorbent material by employing a riser tube regeneration arrangement. Sulfur-laden sorbent is continuously removed from the fluidized bed through a stand pipe to the riser tube and is rapidly regenerated in the riser tube during transport of the sorbent therethrough by employing an oxygen-containing sorbent regenerating gas stream. The riser tube extends from a location below the fluidized bed to an elevation above the fluidized bed where a gas-solid separating mechanism is utilized to separate the regenerated particulate sorbent from the regeneration gases and reaction gases so that the regenerated sorbent can be returned to the fluidized bed for reuse.

  16. Fullerenes: An extraterrestrial carbon carrier phase for noble gases

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Luann; Poreda, Robert J.; Bunch, Ted E.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, we report on the discovery of naturally occurring fullerenes (C60 to C400) in the Allende and Murchison meteorites and some sediment samples from the 65 million-year-old Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary layer (KTB). Unlike the other pure forms of carbon (diamond and graphite), fullerenes are extractable in an organic solvent (e.g., toluene or 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene). The recognition of this unique property led to the detection and isolation of the higher fullerenes in the Kratschmer/Huffmann arc evaporated graphite soot and in the carbon material in the meteorite and impact deposits. By further exploiting the unique ability of the fullerene cage structure to encapsulate and retain noble gases, we have determined that both the Allende and Murchison fullerenes and the KTB fullerenes contain trapped noble gases with ratios that can only be described as extraterrestrial in origin. PMID:10725367

  17. 46 CFR 194.20-17 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Compressed gases. (a) Nonflammable compressed gases (excluding oxygen) may be securely stowed in the... chemical storeroom. (b) Flammable compressed gases and oxygen shall be stowed in accordance with 49...

  18. Residual Gases in Crystal Growth Systems: Their Origin, Magnitude, and Dependence on the Processing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Residual gases present in closed ampoules may affect different crystal growth processes. Their presence may affect techniques requiring low pressures and affect the crystal quality in different ways. For that reason a good understanding and control of formation of residual gases may be important for an optimum design and meaningful interpretation of crystal growth experiments. Our extensive experimental and theoretical study includes degassing of silica glass and generation of gases from various source materials. Different materials processing conditions, like outgassing under vacuum, annealing in hydrogen, resublimation, different material preparation procedures, multiple annealings, different processing times, and others were applied and their effect on the amount and composition of gas were analyzed. The experimental results were interpreted based on theoretical calculations on diffusion in silica glass and source materials and thermochemistry of the system. Procedures for a reduction of the amount of gas are also discussed.

  19. Thermocamera studies of gases and vapours.

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, P; Ljungqvist, B; Neikter, K

    1982-01-01

    Most gases and vapours with a bipolar molecular structure absorb infrared energy. If such a gas is interposed between an object emitting infrared radiation and a thermocamera the gas will absorb some of the infrared radiation and thus cast a shadow on the thermocamera picture. In this assay it is possible to visualise the gas. This method had been used to study pollution with anaesthetic gases and vapours in operating theatres. The vapours of other chemicals used in hospitals and other places of work also have been studied. The method permits the study of dispersion and flow patterns of polluting gases and vapours during work. Images PMID:7093159

  20. Molecular mechanism of transcriptional repression of AhR repressor involving ANKRA2, HDAC4, and HDAC5

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, Motohiko; Mimura, Junsei; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki

    2007-12-14

    The Aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR) has been proposed to inhibit Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activity by competing with AhR for forming a heterodimer with AhR nuclear translocator (Arnt) and subsequently binding to the xenobiotic responsive elements (XRE). However, the precise mechanism of AhRR inhibitory activity remains unknown. Analysis of the inhibitory activity of AhRR on the expression of a TK promoter-driven reporter has localized a core repressor domain in the sequence of amino acid residue 555-701. The inhibitory activity of AhRR is sensitive to a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, trichostatin A. By using the yeast two-hybrid screening method with the C-terminal sequence of AhRR as bait, we identified a binding partner, Ankyrin-repeat protein2 (ANKRA2), a protein known to interact with HDAC4 and HDAC5. RNA interference experiments using ANKRA2 and AhRR siRNAs indicate that ANKRA2 is important for transcriptional repression by AhRR. We have found that under normal conditions, CYP1A1 gene is kept silent in MEF cells by AhRR/Arnt heterodimer, which binds to the XRE sequence in its promoter and recruits ANKRA2, HDAC4, and HDAC5 as co-repressors.

  1. Identification and expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhR1 and AhR2) provide insight in an evolutionary context regarding sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Sturgeons are ancient fishes, which are endangered in many parts of the world. Due to their benthic nature and longevity, sturgeon are at great risk of exposure to bioaccumulative contaminants such as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Despite their endangered status, little research has been conducted to characterize the relative sensitivity of sturgeons to DLCs. Proper assessment of risk of DLCs posed to these fishes therefore, requires a better understanding of this sensitivity and the factors that are driving it. Adverse effects associated with exposure to DLCs are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). This study identified and characterized two distinct AhRs, AhR1 and AhR2, in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) for the first time as a first step in studying the relative sensitivities of sturgeons to DLCs. Furthermore, tissue-specific expression of both AhRs under basal conditions and in response to exposure to the model DLC, β-naphthoflavone (βNF), was determined. The sequence of amino acids of AhR1 of white sturgeon had greater similarity to AhRs of tetrapods, including amphibians, birds, and mammals, than to AhR1s of other fishes. The sequence of amino acids in the ligand binding domain of the AhR1 had greater than 80% similarity to AhRs known to bind DLCs and was less similar to AhRs not known to bind DLCs. AhR2 of white sturgeon had greatest similarity to AhR2 of other fishes. Profiles of expression of AhR1 and AhR2 in white sturgeon were distinct from those known in other fishes and appear more similar to profiles observed in birds. Expressions of both AhR1 and AhR2 of white sturgeon were greatest in liver and heart, which are target organs for DLCs. Furthermore, abundances of transcripts of AhR1 and AhR2 in all tissues from white sturgeon were greater than controls (up to 35-fold) following exposure to βNF. Based upon both AhRs having similar abundances of transcript in target organs of DLC toxicity, both AhRs being up-regulated following

  2. The 50Ah NiH2 cell life test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamin, Thierry; Puig, Olivier

    1992-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form for the 50 AhNiH2 cell life test results. Information is given on pressure vessel design, electrochemical/stack design, cell electrical characteristics, and cell life test results.

  3. AHS and CASI Processing for the REFLEX Remote Sensing Campaign: Methods and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Miguel, Eduardo; Jiménez, Marcos; Pérez, Irene; de la Cámara, Óscar G.; Muñoz, Félix; Gómez-Sánchez, José A.

    2015-12-01

    The airborne spectroradiometers AHS and CASI were used as a source of hyperspectral and thermal remote sensing data during the REFLEX campaign. Data geolocation and a first simple atmospheric correction was performed by INTA in near-real time with a specific on-site setup and distributed to all campaign participants. In this paper we present briefly the AHS and CASI REFLEX flight campaign followed by a detailed description of the methodology used for image processing and finally the results obtained in terms of image quality. As a conclusion, near-real time processing for AHS and CASI level 1 geolocated products was successful as most of CASI level 2 results but further work is needed for achieving accurate AHS level 2 products.

  4. Activation of AhR-mediated toxicity pathway by emerging pollutants polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides (PCDPSs) are a group of environmental pollutants for which limited toxicological information is available. This study tested the hypothesis that PCDPSs could activate the mammalian aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated toxicity pathways. Eight...

  5. Performance of a 100Ah common vessel monoblock nickel-cadmium battery

    SciTech Connect

    Anderman, M.; Tsenter, B.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the electrical test results of the Common Vessel Monoblock (CVM) 12V 100Ah Ni-Cd battery. The operation logic, temperature characteristics, gas and heat exchange between cells and regulator are discussed.

  6. Comparative Resistance of AH26 and a New Sealer Prototype to a Bacterial Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Derek; Zhong, Sheng; Rivera, Eric; Arnold, Roland; Simmons, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This study compared the leakage resistance of a New Sealer Prototype (NSP) with a traditional sealer (AH 26) in Resilon-filled roots subjected to a bacterial challenge. Study Design. 41 roots were instrumented to ISO size 50 apically. Group 1 (n = 20) contained Resilon and AH 26 sealer and roots in group 2 (n = 21) contained Resilon and NSP. Roots were embedded in a dual-chamber model with the upper chamber containing Streptococcus mutans inoculum. Evidence of bacterial penetration was observed for 1 month. Fisher's Test was used to analyze the data. Results. 8 of 20 roots (40%) in the AH 26 group demonstrated leakage whereas 3 of 21 roots (14%) in the NSP group leaked. The difference in leakage rates was not statistically significant (P = 0.053). Conclusion. The traditional sealer (AH 26) demonstrated increased leakage rates compared to the New Sealer Prototype (NSP), but the difference did not reach statistical significance in this study. PMID:22505898

  7. Electrochemistry of layered GaSe and GeS: applications to ORR, OER and HER.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shu Min; Chua, Chun Kiang; Sedmidubský, David; Sofer, Zdene Combining Breve K; Pumera, Martin

    2016-01-21

    Though many studies examined the properties of the class of IIIA-VIA and IVA-VIA layered materials, few have delved into the electrochemical aspect of such materials. In light of the burgeoning interest in layered structures towards various electrocatalytic applications, we endeavored to study the inherent electrochemical properties of representative layered materials of this class, GaSe and GeS, and their impact towards electrochemical sensing of redox probes as well as catalysis of oxygen reduction, oxygen evolution and hydrogen evolution reactions. In contrast to the typical sandwich structure of MoS2 layered materials, GeS is isoelectronic to black phosphorus with the same structure; GaSe is a layered material consisting of GaSe sheets bonded in the sequence Se-Ga-Ga-Se. We characterized GaSe and GeS by employing scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy complemented by electronic structure calculations. It was found that the encompassing surface oxide layers on GaSe and GeS greatly influenced their electrochemical properties, especially their electrocatalytic capabilities towards hydrogen evolution reaction. These findings provide fresh insight into the electrochemical properties of these IIIA-VIA and IVA-VIA layered structures which enables development for future applications.

  8. Modeling the selectivity of indoor pollution gases over N2 on covalent organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenliang; Pang, Yujia; Zhang, Jingping

    2014-07-01

    The selectivity of indoor pollution gases (including formaldehyde, benzene, and toluene) over N2 on a set of 37 covalent organic frameworks (COFs) was modeled by combining classical grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) methods and periodic density functional theory with dispersion correction (DFT-D2). The pore volume, pore size, and the isosteric heat (Q st) of gases on COFs were investigated to explore the origin of the high selectivity of pollution gases over N2. We found that the size match between the pore of the COFs and the corresponding pollution gases is the key factor for high selectivity. Additionally, the Q st for the investigated four gases follows the order of toluene > benzene > formaldehyde > N2, which is consistent with the order of selectivity. Furthermore, the favorite sites and interaction energies of pollution gases on COFs were calculated by the periodic DFT-D2 method. Our simulation procedure offers an alternative approach with which to evaluate or design the best candidate porous materials in capture pollution gases.

  9. Coactivator Recruitment of AhR/ARNT1

    PubMed Central

    Endler, Alexander; Chen, Li; Shibasaki, Futoshi

    2014-01-01

    A common feature of nuclear receptors (NRs) is the transformation of external cell signals into specific transcriptions of the signal molecule. Signal molecules function as ligands for NRs and, after their uptake, activated NRs form homo- or heterodimers at promoter recognition sequences of the specific genes in the nucleus. Another common feature of NRs is their dependence on coactivators, which bridge the basic transcriptional machinery and other cofactors to the target genes, in order to initiate transcription and to unwind histone-bound DNA for exposing additional promoter recognition sites via their histone acetyltransferase (HAT) function. In this review, we focus on our recent findings related to the recruitment of steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC1/NCoA1) by the estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and by the arylhydrocarbon receptor/arylhydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator 1 (AhR/ARNT1) complex. We also describe the extension of our previously published findings regarding the binding between ARNT1.1 exon16 and SRC1e exon 21, via in silico analyses of androgen receptor (AR) NH2-carboxyl-terminal interactions, the results of which were verified by in vitro experiments. Based on these data, we suggest a newly derived tentative binding site of nuclear coactivator 2/glucocorticoid receptor interacting protein-1/transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (NCOA-2/ GRIP-1/TIF-2) for ARNT1.1 exon 16. Furthermore, results obtained by immunoprecipitation have revealed a second leucine-rich binding site for hARNT1.1 exon 16 in SRC1e exon 21 (LSSTDLL). Finally, we discuss the role of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) as an endocrine disruptor for estrogen related transcription. PMID:24950180

  10. Assessment of the Human Factors Characteristics of the AH-64D Apache Longbow Crew Stations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    other Army aviation systems; and • Validation of AH-64D system performance. To address validation of AH-64D system performance, the following operational...military, civil, and commercial aviation communities for pilot workload estimation (Roscoe & Ellis, 1990). It requires pilots to rate the level of...that could be applied to other Army aviation programs. During the survey and interviews, pilots were asked to identify any problems they have

  11. Altered adrenergic response and specificity of the receptors in rat ascites hepatoma AH130.

    PubMed

    Sanae, F; Miyamoto, K; Koshiura, R

    1989-11-15

    Adenylate cyclase activation through adrenergic receptors in rat ascites hepatoma (AH) 130 cells in response to adrenergic drugs was studied, and receptor binding and displacement were compared with those of normal rat hepatocytes. Epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) activated AH130 adenylate cyclase about half as much as isoproterenol (IPN) but equaled IPN after treatment with the alpha-antagonist phentolamine or islet-activating protein (IAP). The three catecholamines in hepatocytes were similar regardless of phentolamine or IAP. These catecholamines activated adenylate cyclase in order of IPN greater than NE greater than Epi in AH130 cells but IPN greater than Epi greater than NE in hepatocytes. We then used the alpha 1-selective ligand [3H]prazosin, the alpha 2-selective ligand [3H]clonidine, and the beta-ligand [125I]iodocyanopindolol [( 125I]ICYP), and found that AH130 cells had few prazosin-binding sites, about eight times as many clonidine-binding sites with high affinity, and many more ICYP-binding sites than in hepatocytes. The dissociation constant (Ki) of the beta 1-selective drug metoprolol by Hofstee plots for AH130 cells was lower than that for hepatocytes. The inhibition of specific ICYP binding by the beta 2-selective agonist salbutamol for AH130 cells gave only one Ki value which was much higher than both high and low Ki values of the drug for hepatocytes. These findings indicate that the alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors in hepatocytes are predominantly alpha 1-type and beta 2-type, but that those in AH130 cells are predominantly alpha 2-type and beta 1-type, and the low adrenergic response of AH130 cells is due to the dominant appearance of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, linked with the inhibitory guanine-nucleotide binding regulatory protein, instead of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors, and beta 1-adrenergic receptors with low affinity for the hormone.

  12. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in pigs, Réunion Island.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Eric; Pascalis, Hervé; Temmam, Sarah; Hervé, Séverine; Saulnier, Aure; Turpin, Magali; Barbier, Nicolas; Hoarau, Johny; Quéguiner, Stéphane; Gorin, Stéphane; Foray, Coralie; Roger, Matthieu; Porphyre, Vincent; André, Paul; Thomas, Thierry; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Dellagi, Koussay; Simon, Gaëlle

    2012-10-01

    During 2009, pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus affected humans on Réunion Island. Since then, the virus has sustained circulation among local swine herds, raising concerns about the potential for genetic evolution of the virus and possible retransmission back to humans of variants with increased virulence. Continuous surveillance of A(H1N1)pdm09 infection in pigs is recommended.

  13. Nanoindentation of GaSe thin films

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The structural and nanomechanical properties of GaSe thin films were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nanoindentation techniques. The GaSe thin films were deposited on Si(111) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. XRD patterns reveal only the pure (000 l)-oriented reflections originating from the hexagonal GaSe phase and no trace of any impurity or additional phases. Nanoindentation results exhibit discontinuities (so-called multiple ‘pop-in’ events) in the loading segments of the load–displacement curves, and the continuous stiffness measurements indicate that the hardness and Young’s modulus of the hexagonal GaSe films are 1.8 ± 0.2 and 65.8 ± 5.6 GPa, respectively. PMID:22804961

  14. Denitrification of combustion gases. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Yang, R.T.

    1980-10-09

    A method for treating waste combustion gas to remove the nitrogen oxygen gases therefrom is disclosed wherein the waste gas is first contacted with calcium oxide which absorbs and chemically reacts with the nitrogen oxide gases therein at a temperature from about 100/sup 0/ to 430/sup 0/C. The thus reacted calcium oxide (now calcium nitrate) is then heated at a temperature range between about 430/sup 0/ and 900/sup 0/C, resulting in regeneration of the calcium oxide and production of the decomposition gas composed of nitrogen and nitrogen oxide gas. The decomposition gases can be recycled to the calcium oxide contacting step to minimize the amount of nitrogen oxide gases in the final product gas.

  15. Thermal Properties of Degenerate Relativistic Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homorodean, Laurean

    We present the concentration-temperature phase diagram, characteristic functions, thermal equation of state and heat capacity at constant volume for degenerate ideal gases of relativistic fermions and bosons. The nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic limits of these laws are also discussed.

  16. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The Voluntary Reporting Program for greenhouse gases is part of an attempt by the U.S. Government to develop innovative, low-cost, and nonregulatory approaches to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. It is one element in an array of such programs introduced in recent years as part of the effort being made by the United States to comply with its national commitment to stabilize emissions of greenhouse gases under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions of greenhouse gases.

  17. Ultrasonic propagation in gases at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, C.; Carnevale, E. H.; Lynworth, L. C.; Uva, S.

    1970-01-01

    Ultrasonic pulse method /1 to 3 MHz/ measures both sound speed and absorption in monatomic and polyatomic gases in a temperature range of 300 to 20000 degrees K at atmospheric pressure. Helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon are investigated.

  18. Generation of (F+2)_AH Centres in Sodium Ion Doped KCl:CO^{2-3}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaf, M.; Chihi, I.; Hamaïdia, A.; Akrmi, El.

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate that (F+2)AH centres of KCl may be obtained from crystals doped with K{2}CO{3} and NaCl, grown by the Czochralski method in open atmosphere. The optical properties of (F+2)AH centres thus produced are exactly the same as those of (F+2)AH centres prepared by the usual technique, which involves superoxide doping and a controlled atmosphere. Nous montrons que les centres (F+2)AH de KCl peuvent être obtenus à partir de cristaux dopés par K{2}CO{3} et NaCl, fabriqués par la méthode de Czochralski à l'air libre. Les propriétés optiques des centres (F+2)AH ainsi produits sont exactement les mêmes que celles des centres (F+2)AH préparés par la technique habituelle, qui comporte le dopage par un superoxyde et l'emploi d'une atmosphère contrôlée.

  19. The Effect of Time of Post Space Preparation on the Seal and Adaptation of Resilon-Epiphany Se & Gutta-percha-AH Plus Sealer- An Sem Study

    PubMed Central

    Dhaded, Neha; Dhaded, Sunil; Patil, Chetan; Patil, Roopa; Roshan, Joan Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background: The field of endodontics is dynamic & ever expanding. With the availability of a wide array of products in the dental market it’s an absolute necessity to evaluate their efficiency before including them into routine clinical practice.Hence, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of immediate & delayed post space preparation & sealing ability of new root canal filling material & sealers. Aim: The effect of time of post space preparation on the seal and adaptation of Resilon-Epiphany Se & Gutta-percha-AH Plus Sealer - An SEM study. Settings and design: Eighty extracted permanent maxillary central and lateral incisors selected for the study were decoronated. Roots canals were prepared and obturated. Materials and Methods: Samples were divided into four groups depending on the time of post, space, preparation and obturated material.GROUP I & II: Immediate and Delayed post space preparation respectively with Gutta-percha / AH Plus as obturating material. GROUP III & IV Immediate and Delayed post space preparation with Resilon / Epiphany as the obturating material. The samples were sectioned, then measured and studied by Scanning Electron Microscope. Results: There was a significant difference found between immediate and delayed post space preparation in resilon –epiphany group (p<0.001). Similarly significant difference was seen between immediate and delayed post space preparation in AH Plus-GP group (p<0.001). Difference in the adaptation of the two materials was seen in the delayed group (p = 0.030) but the immediate group showed no signifcant difference (p =0.971). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, immediate post space preparation shows less leakage in both the groups. Resilon–Epiphany shows better results when post space is delayed amongst the two whereas in immediate post space preparation there is no significant difference. PMID:24596779

  20. Instabilities in Inductive Discharges with Electronegative Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-20

    electronegative gases P. Chabert, H . Abada , and J.-P. Booth LPTP, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau cedex, France A.J. Lichtenberg, M.A. Lieberman, A. M...can exist in two inductive discharge modes: the capacitive (E) mode, for low power, and the g00 inductive ( H ) mode, for high power. As the power is -1...increased, transitions from capacitive to inductive modes D00 (E- H transitions) are observed [7,8]. When operating with Q. electropositive gases the

  1. Flux Jacobian Matrices For Equilibrium Real Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel

    1990-01-01

    Improved formulation includes generalized Roe average and extension to three dimensions. Flux Jacobian matrices derived for use in numerical solutions of conservation-law differential equations of inviscid flows of ideal gases extended to real gases. Real-gas formulation of these matrices retains simplifying assumptions of thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium, but adds effects of vibrational excitation, dissociation, and ionization of gas molecules via general equation of state.

  2. Quantum Polarization Spectroscopy of Ultracold Spinor Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, K.; Zawitkowski, L.; Sanpera, A.; Lewenstein, M.; Polzik, E. S.

    2007-03-09

    We propose a method for the detection of ground state quantum phases of spinor gases through a series of two quantum nondemolition measurements performed by sending off-resonant, polarized light pulses through the gas. Signatures of various mean-field as well as strongly correlated phases of F=1 and F=2 spinor gases obtained by detecting quantum fluctuations and mean values of polarization of transmitted light are identified.

  3. Biological production of products from waste gases

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.

    2002-01-22

    A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

  4. Source gases: Concentrations, emissions, and trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, Paul J.; Harriss, Robert; Penkett, Stuart A.; Makide, Yoshihiro; Sanhueza, Eugenio; Alyea, Fred N.; Rowland, F. Sherwood; Blake, Don; Sasaki, Toru; Cunnold, Derek M.

    1991-01-01

    Source gases are defined as those gases that influence levels of stratospheric ozone (O3) by transporting species containing halogen, hydrogen, and nitrogen to the stratosphere. Examples are the CFC's, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Other source gases that also come under consideration in an atmospheric O3 context are those that are involved in the O3 or hydroxyl (OH) radical chemistry of the troposphere. Examples are CH4, carbon monoxide (CO), and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC's). Most of the source gases, along with carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O), are climatically significant and thus affect stratospheric O3 levels by their influence on stratospheric temperatures. Carbonyl sulphide (COS) could affect stratospheric O3 through maintenance of the stratospheric sulphate aerosol layer, which may be involved in heterogeneous chlorine-catalyzed O3 destruction. The previous reviews of trends and emissions of source gases, either from the context of their influence on atmospheric O3 or global climate change, are updated. The current global abundances and concentration trends of the trace gases are given in tabular format.

  5. Biological sweetening of energy gases mimics in biotrickling filters.

    PubMed

    Fortuny, Marc; Baeza, Juan A; Gamisans, Xavier; Casas, Carles; Lafuente, Javier; Deshusses, Marc A; Gabriel, David

    2008-03-01

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide from waste and energy-rich gases is required, not only because of environmental health and safety reasons, but also because of operational reasons if such gases have to be used for energy generation. A biotrickling filter for the removal of ultra-high concentrations of H2S from oxygen-poor gases is proposed and studied in this work. Two laboratory-scale biotrickling filters were used to study the startup period and to determine the long-term performance of the gas sweetening process. The inlet H2S concentration ranged from 900 to 12000ppmv and two different packing materials were investigated. There was no toxicity effect observed even at a the highest H2S concentration, and maximum elimination capacities of 280 and 250g H2Sm(-3)h(-1) were obtained at gas contact times of 167 and 180s, respectively. Elemental sulfur and sulfate were found to be the most abundant end-products of the biological oxidation of sulfide when operated under microaerophilic conditions. The biotrickling filter was able to quickly recover its nominal performance after different load increases and system shutdowns simulating field operation. The results reported here show that biotreatment can be an interesting alternative to conventional gas sweetening systems normally used for such applications.

  6. Structure of Inert Gases Adsorbed in MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Dylan; Sokol, Paul

    One-dimensional quantum liquids of 3He or 4He have generated recent interest for investigation in the Luttinger liquid model. Unfortunately, current studies lack a clear demonstration of definitively one-dimensional behavior. We propose using the templated, porous material, MCM-41, as a host for an atomic Luttinger liquid. In general, the pores of MCM-41 are too wide to provide a strictly one-dimensional environment, so we investigate preplating these pores with inert gases to effectively reduce their diameter. We present the results of studies of the structure of inert gases in MCM-41. Nitrogen sorption isotherms were used to characterize the sample. Then, using inert gases as adsorbates, we determined the minimum effective pore diameter that can be achieved in our sample before capillary condensation takes over. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was performed on the ideally preplated sample to investigate the structure of the adsorbates in the nanopores. The XRD measurements are compared to simulations of core-shell cylinder model scattering, and the validity of the model is assessed. The prospects for creating a definitively one-dimensional channel for the application of studying the structure and dynamics of helium confined in one dimension are discussed. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant DGE-1069091.

  7. Solar Noble Gases from ACFER 111 Metal Etched in Vacuo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedroni, A.; Begemann, F.

    1992-07-01

    Regolith grains dissolved by stepwise etching release a mixture of near-surface implanted Solar Wind gases (SW) and a deeper- sited, isotopically heavier component attributed to Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) (1,2,3). In all regolith materials examined so far the elemental abundance ratios in both components are distinctly different from the canonical solar values (4). The differences are generally explained to be owing to diffusive elemental fractionation although there is no strong evidence that upon their implantation the composition of the gases was indeed solar. In contrast, the solar noble gases present in the H3-H6 chondritic regolith breccia Acfer 111 appear to be nearly unfractionated and thus offer a unique chance for more accurate analyses. A magnetic fraction of Acfer 111 matrix, consisting of approx. 80% metal and 20% silicates, was etched with a 60 g/mol aqueous solution of HNO3 in a high-vacuum extraction line similar to that in (1). The gases released were drawn off in steps and analyzed; the experiment was stopped when ~97% of the metal and ~50% of the silicates were dissolved. As etching proceeds, the isotopic composition of the released gases changes in a pattern similar to that observed previously in other regolithic materials. The isotopic composition of solar neon decreases from ^20Ne/^22Ne=13.1 in the first step to ^20Ne/^22Ne=11.6, which can be interpreted as a change of the mixing ratio of SW (^20Ne/^22Ne=13.7) and SEP (^20Ne/^22Ne=11.3) neon. The isotopic compositions of solar He, Ar, and Kr are consistent with their also being mixtures of SW and SEP having compositions reported previously (2,3), although our data are compromised to some extent by the presence of planetary gases extracted from the silicates and, in the first steps, by atmospheric contamination probably present in terrestrial weathering products (mostly rust). The elemental composition of noble gases released from Acfer 111 was distinct from previous experiments: The (^4He

  8. Predicting Radiation Induced Performance Decrements of AH-1 Helicopter Crews. Volume 1. Predicted Versus Actual Performance of AH-1 Crews Induced with Symptons Simulating Radiation Sickness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    principal method under study was the Performance Decrement Questionnaire, developed as part of DNA’s Intermediate Dose Program. A secondary aspect of...3) Develop MicroSAINT models of AH-1 crew performance based on simulation data and PDQ estimates, and (4) Evaluate the relationship between Walter...48 5.2 Approach ...................................................................................................... 49 5.3 Model Development

  9. Transmission potential of influenza A/H7N9, February to May 2013, China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background On 31 March 2013, the first human infections with the novel influenza A/H7N9 virus were reported in Eastern China. The outbreak expanded rapidly in geographic scope and size, with a total of 132 laboratory-confirmed cases reported by 3 June 2013, in 10 Chinese provinces and Taiwan. The incidence of A/H7N9 cases has stalled in recent weeks, presumably as a consequence of live bird market closures in the most heavily affected areas. Here we compare the transmission potential of influenza A/H7N9 with that of other emerging pathogens and evaluate the impact of intervention measures in an effort to guide pandemic preparedness. Methods We used a Bayesian approach combined with a SEIR (Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Removed) transmission model fitted to daily case data to assess the reproduction number (R) of A/H7N9 by province and to evaluate the impact of live bird market closures in April and May 2013. Simulation studies helped quantify the performance of our approach in the context of an emerging pathogen, where human-to-human transmission is limited and most cases arise from spillover events. We also used alternative approaches to estimate R based on individual-level information on prior exposure and compared the transmission potential of influenza A/H7N9 with that of other recent zoonoses. Results Estimates of R for the A/H7N9 outbreak were below the epidemic threshold required for sustained human-to-human transmission and remained near 0.1 throughout the study period, with broad 95% credible intervals by the Bayesian method (0.01 to 0.49). The Bayesian estimation approach was dominated by the prior distribution, however, due to relatively little information contained in the case data. We observe a statistically significant deceleration in growth rate after 6 April 2013, which is consistent with a reduction in A/H7N9 transmission associated with the preemptive closure of live bird markets. Although confidence intervals are broad, the estimated

  10. Biological role of Trichoderma harzianum-derived platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) on stress response and antagonism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanjin; Fan, Lili; Wu, Qiong; Fu, Kehe; Gao, Shigang; Wang, Meng; Gao, Jinxin; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the properties of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) derived from Trichoderma harzianum. The enzyme, comprised of 572 amino acids, shares high homology with PAF-AH proteins from T. koningii and other microbial species. The optimum enzymatic activity of PAF-AH occurred at pH 6 in the absence of Ca2+ and it localized in the cytoplasm, and we observed the upregulation of PAF-AH expression in response to carbon starvation and strong heat shock. Furthermore, PAF-AH knockout transformant growth occurred more slowly than wild type cells and over-expression strains grown in SM medium at 37°C and 42°C. In addition, PAF-AH expression significantly increased under a series of maize root induction assay. Eicosanoic acid and ergosterol levels decreased in the PAF-AH knockouts compared to wild type cells, as revealed by GC/MS analysis. We also determined stress responses mediated by PAF-AH were related to proteins HEX1, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, and cytochrome c. Finally, PAF-AH exhibited antagonistic activity against Rhizoctonia solani in plate confrontation assays. Our results indicate PAF-AH may play an important role in T. harzianum stress response and antagonism under diverse environmental conditions.

  11. A microleakage study of gutta-percha/AH Plus and Resilon/Real self-etch systems after different irrigation protocols

    PubMed Central

    PRADO, Maíra; SIMÃO, Renata Antoun; GOMES, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    The development and maintenance of the sealing of the root canal system is the key to the success of root canal treatment. The resin-based adhesive material has the potential to reduce the microleakage of the root canal because of its adhesive properties and penetration into dentinal walls. Moreover, the irrigation protocols may have an influence on the adhesiveness of resin-based sealers to root dentin. Objective The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different irrigant protocols on coronal bacterial microleakage of gutta-percha/AH Plus and Resilon/Real Seal Self-etch systems. Material and Methods One hundred ninety pre-molars were used. The teeth were divided into 18 experimental groups according to the irrigation protocols and filling materials used. The protocols used were: distilled water; sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)+eDTA; NaOCl+H3PO4; NaOCl+eDTA+chlorhexidine (CHX); NaOCl+H3PO4+CHX; CHX+eDTA; CHX+ H3PO4; CHX+eDTA+CHX and CHX+H3PO4+CHX. Gutta-percha/AH Plus or Resilon/Real Seal Se were used as root-filling materials. The coronal microleakage was evaluated for 90 days against Enterococcus faecalis. Data were statistically analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival test, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Results No significant difference was verified in the groups using chlorhexidine or sodium hypochlorite during the chemo-mechanical preparation followed by eDTA or phosphoric acid for smear layer removal. The same results were found for filling materials. However, the statistical analyses revealed that a final flush with 2% chlorhexidine reduced significantly the coronal microleakage. Conclusion A final flush with 2% chlorhexidine after smear layer removal reduces coronal microleakage of teeth filled with gutta-percha/AH Plus or Resilon/Real Seal SE. PMID:25025557

  12. Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin exposure alters radial arm maze performance and hippocampal morphology in female AhR mice.

    PubMed

    Powers, B E; Lin, T-M; Vanka, A; Peterson, R E; Juraska, J M; Schantz, S L

    2005-02-01

    Perinatal exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been reported to alter spatial learning in rats tested on a radial arm maze (RAM). TCDD is believed to exert most of its effects through binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). To determine whether the AhR mediates TCDD-induced alterations in spatial learning, we tested male and female AhR-knockout (AhR-/-), heterozygous (AhR+/-) and wild-type (AhR+/+) mice on the RAM. AhR+/- male and female mice were time mated, and treated dams were dosed with 5 microg TCDD/kg body weight on day 13 of gestation. When offspring reached adulthood, male and female AhR+/+, AhR+/- and AhR-/- mice from TCDD-exposed and unexposed litters were tested on the eight-arm RAM. After testing, we examined hippocampal morphology as visualized by the Timm's silver sulfide stain. TCDD-exposed female AhR+/- mice made more errors than their respective controls on the RAM and exhibited a decrease in the size of the intra- and infrapyramidal mossy fiber (IIP-MF) field of the hippocampus. None of the other TCDD-exposed groups differed from their respective control groups with regard to maze performance or hippocampal morphology. The reduction of IIP-MF field indicates a possible morphological basis for the learning deficit that was observed in the female AhR+/- mice. It is hypothesized that the effect of TCDD exposure is AhR dependent and that TCDD may alter GABAergic activity in the hippocampus of female mice during development.

  13. Emergence in China of human disease due to avian influenza A(H10N8)--cause for concern?

    PubMed

    To, Kelvin K W; Tsang, Alan K L; Chan, Jasper F W; Cheng, Vincent C C; Chen, Honglin; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-03-01

    In December 2013, China reported the first human case of avian influenza A(H10N8). A 73-year-old female with chronic diseases who had visited a live poultry market succumbed with community-acquired pneumonia. While human infections with avian influenza viruses are usually associated with subtypes prevalent in poultries, A(H10N8) isolates were mostly found in migratory birds and only recently in poultries. Although not possible to predict whether this single intrusion by A(H10N8) is an accident or the start of another epidemic like the preceding A(H7N9) and A(H5N1), several features suggest that A(H10N8) is a potential threat to humans. Recombinant H10 could attach to human respiratory epithelium, and A(H10N4) virus could cause severe infections in minks and chickens. A(H10N8) viruses contain genetic markers for mammalian adaptation and virulence in the haemagglutinin (A135T, S138A[H3 numbering]), M1(N30D, T215A), NS1(P42S) and PB2(E627K) protein. Studies on this human A(H10N8) isolate will reveal its adaptability to humans. Clinicians should alert the laboratory to test for A(H5,6,7,9,10) viruses in patients with epidemiological exposure in endemic geographical areas especially when human influenza A(H1,3) and B are negative. Vigilant virological and serological surveillance for A(H10N8) in human, poultry and wild bird is important for following the trajectory of this emerging influenza virus.

  14. MAGNETIC METHOD FOR PRODUCING HIGH VELOCITY SHOCK WAVES IN GASES

    DOEpatents

    Josephson, V.

    1960-01-26

    A device is described for producing high-energy plasmas comprising a tapered shock tube of dielectric material and having a closed small end, an exceedingly low-inductance coll supported about and axially aligned with the small end of the tapered tube. an elongated multiturn coil supported upon the remninder of the exterior wall of the shock tube. a potential source and switch connected in series with the low-inductance coil, a potential source and switch connected in series with the elongated coil, means for hermetically sealing the large end of the tube, means for purging the tube of gases, and means for admitting a selected gas into the shock tube.

  15. Summary of AH-1G flight vibration data for validation of coupled rotor-fuselage analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, R. V.; Cronkhite, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Under a NASA research program designated DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS), four U. S. helicopter industry participants (Bell Helicopter, Boeing Vertol, McDonnell Douglas Helicopter, and Sikorsky Aircraft) are to apply existing analytical methods for calculating coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations of the AH-1G helicopter for correlation with flight test data from an AH-1G Operational Load Survey (OLS) test program. Bell Helicopter, as the manufacturer of the AH-1G, was asked to provide pertinent rotor data and to collect the OLS flight vibration data needed to perform the correlations. The analytical representation of the fuselage structure is based on a NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) developed by Bell which has been extensively documented and correlated with ground vibration tests.The AH-1G FEM was provided to each of the participants for use in their coupled rotor-fuselage analyses. This report describes the AH-1G OLS flight test program and provides the flight conditions and measured vibration data to be used by each participant in their correlation effort. In addition, the mechanical, structural, inertial and aerodynamic data for the AH-1G two-bladed teetering main rotor system are presented. Furthermore, modifications to the NASTRAN FEM of the fuselage structure that are necessary to make it compatible with the OLS test article are described. The AH-1G OLS flight test data was found to be well documented and provide a sound basis for evaluating currently existing analysis methods used for calculation of coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations.

  16. In vitro generation of neuraminidase inhibitor resistance in A(H5N1) influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Holien, Jessica K; Barr, Ian G

    2009-10-01

    To identify mutations that can arise in highly pathogenic A(H5N1) viruses under neuraminidase inhibitor selective pressure, two antigenically different strains were serially passaged with increasing levels of either oseltamivir or zanamivir. Under oseltamivir pressure, both A(H5N1) viruses developed a H274Y neuraminidase mutation, although in one strain the mutation occurred in combination with an I222M neuraminidase mutation. The H274Y neuraminidase mutation reduced oseltamivir susceptibility significantly (900- to 2,500-fold compared to the wild type). However the dual H274Y/I222M neuraminidase mutation had an even greater impact on resistance, with oseltamivir susceptibility reduced significantly further (8,000-fold compared to the wild type). A similar affect on oseltamivir susceptibility was observed when the dual H274Y/I222M mutations were introduced, by reverse genetics, into a recombinant seasonal human A(H1N1) virus and also when an alternative I222 substitution (I222V) was generated in combination with H274Y in A(H5N1) and A(H1N1) viruses. These viruses remained fully susceptible to zanamivir but demonstrated reduced susceptibility to peramivir. Following passage of the A(H5N1) viruses in the presence of zanamivir, the strains developed a D198G neuraminidase mutation, which reduced susceptibility to both zanamivir and oseltamivir, and also an E119G neuraminidase mutation, which demonstrated significantly reduced zanamivir susceptibility (1,400-fold compared to the wild type). Mutations in hemagglutinin residues implicated in receptor binding were also detected in many of the resistant strains. This study identified the mutations that can arise in A(H5N1) under either oseltamivir or zanamivir selective pressure and the potential for dual neuraminidase mutations to result in dramatically reduced drug susceptibility.

  17. 41 CFR 50-204.70 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compressed gases. 50-204... Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists § 50-204.70 Compressed gases. The in-plant handling, storage, and utilization of all compressed gases in cylinders, portable tanks, rail tankcars, or motor vehicle cargo...

  18. 41 CFR 50-204.70 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Compressed gases. 50-204... Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists § 50-204.70 Compressed gases. The in-plant handling, storage, and utilization of all compressed gases in cylinders, portable tanks, rail tankcars, or motor vehicle cargo...

  19. 46 CFR 194.20-17 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compressed gases. 194.20-17 Section 194.20-17 Shipping... Compressed gases. (a) Nonflammable compressed gases (excluding oxygen) may be securely stowed in the... chemical storeroom. (b) Flammable compressed gases and oxygen shall be stowed in accordance with 49...

  20. 41 CFR 50-204.70 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Compressed gases. 50-204... Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists § 50-204.70 Compressed gases. The in-plant handling, storage, and utilization of all compressed gases in cylinders, portable tanks, rail tankcars, or motor vehicle cargo...

  1. 46 CFR 194.20-17 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compressed gases. 194.20-17 Section 194.20-17 Shipping... Compressed gases. (a) Nonflammable compressed gases (excluding oxygen) may be securely stowed in the... chemical storeroom. (b) Flammable compressed gases and oxygen shall be stowed in accordance with 49...

  2. 41 CFR 50-204.70 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Compressed gases. 50-204... Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists § 50-204.70 Compressed gases. The in-plant handling, storage, and utilization of all compressed gases in cylinders, portable tanks, rail tankcars, or motor vehicle cargo...

  3. 46 CFR 194.20-17 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compressed gases. 194.20-17 Section 194.20-17 Shipping... Compressed gases. (a) Nonflammable compressed gases (excluding oxygen) may be securely stowed in the... chemical storeroom. (b) Flammable compressed gases and oxygen shall be stowed in accordance with 49...

  4. 40 CFR 86.1214-85 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emission Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1214-85 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases for the... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.1214-85...

  5. 40 CFR 86.1214-85 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1214-85 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases for the... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.1214-85...

  6. 40 CFR 86.1214-85 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Emission Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1214-85 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases for the... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.1214-85...

  7. 40 CFR 86.514-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.514-78 Section 86.514-78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.514-78 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases...

  8. 40 CFR 86.514-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.514-78 Section 86.514-78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.514-78 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases...

  9. 40 CFR 86.514-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.514-78 Section 86.514-78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.514-78 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases...

  10. 40 CFR 86.514-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.514-78 Section 86.514-78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.514-78 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases...

  11. 40 CFR 86.514-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.514-78 Section 86.514-78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.514-78 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases...

  12. Socioeconomic Factors Influencing Hospitalized Patients with Pneumonia Due to Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Toshie; Higuera Iglesias, Anjarath Lorena; Vazquez Manriquez, Maria Eugenia; Martinez Valadez, Eduarda Leticia; Ramos, Leticia Alfaro; Izumi, Shinyu; Takasaki, Jin; Kudo, Koichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background In addition to clinical aspects and pathogen characteristics, people's health-related behavior and socioeconomic conditions can affect the occurrence and severity of diseases including influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. Methodology and Principal Findings A face-to-face interview survey was conducted in a hospital in Mexico City at the time of follow-up consultation for hospitalized patients with pneumonia due to influenza virus infection. In all, 302 subjects were enrolled and divided into two groups based on the period of hospitalization. Among them, 211 tested positive for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus by real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction during the pandemic period (Group-pdm) and 91 tested positive for influenza A virus in the post-pandemic period (Group-post). All subjects were treated with oseltamivir. Data on the demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, living environment, and information relating to A(H1N1)pdm09, and related clinical data were compared between subjects in Group-pdm and those in Group-post. The ability of household income to pay for utilities, food, and health care services as well as housing quality in terms of construction materials and number of rooms revealed a significant difference: Group-post had lower socioeconomic status than Group-pdm. Group-post had lower availability of information regarding H1N1 influenza than Group-pdm. These results indicate that subjects in Group-post had difficulty receiving necessary information relating to influenza and were more likely to be impoverished than those in Group-pdm. Possible factors influencing time to seeking health care were number of household rooms, having received information on the necessity of quick access to health care, and house construction materials. Conclusions Health-care-seeking behavior, poverty level, and the distribution of information affect the occurrence and severity of pneumonia due to H1N1 virus from a socioeconomic point of view. These

  13. Qualification Testing of General Electric 50 Ah Nickel-Cadmium Cells with New Separator and New Positive Plate Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, G. W.

    1986-01-01

    Forty-two 50 Ah aerospace nickel-cadmium cells were delivered to Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) by General Electric (GE) in February, 1985, for the purpose of evaluating and qualifying a new nylon separator material Pellon 2536, and the new GE Positive Plate Nickel Attack Control Passivation process. Testing began in May, 1985, at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC) in Crane, Indiana with standard initial evaluation tests. Life cycling in both Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) began in July, 1985, with approximately 1200 LEO cycles complete at this writting. Early test results show that cells with positive plate passivation exhibit higher than normal charge voltage characteristics. Other aspects of performance were nominal.

  14. Qualification testing of General Electric 50 Ah nickel-cadmium cells with Pellon 2536 separator and passivated positive plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, George W.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two 50 Ah nickel-cadmium cells were delivered to the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) by General Electric (GE) in February, 1985 for the purpose of evaluating and qualifying a nonwoven nylon separator material, Pellon 2536, and the GE positive plate nickel attack control gas passivation process. Testing began May, 1985 at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC) in Crane, Indiana with GSFC standard initial evaluation tests. Life cycling in both Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) began in July, 1985 with approximately 6500 LEO cycles and three GEO eclipse seasons completed. After early problems in maintaining test pack temperature control, all packs are performing well but are exhibiting higher than normal charge voltage characteristics.

  15. El Chichon - Composition of plume gases and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotra, J. P.; Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Hart, M. A.; Moyers, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Aircraft measurements were made of trace gases, atmospheric particles, and condensed acid volatiles in the plume of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico, in November 1982. Hydrogen sulfide was the primary gaseous sulfur species in the plume at the time of collection. Concentrations of 28 elements were determined by neutron activation analysis of particulate material from the plume. The volatile elements sulfur, chlorine, arsenic, selenium, bromine, antimony, iodine, tungsten, and mercury were enriched relative to bulk pyroclastic material by factors of 60 to 20,000. Arsenic, antimony, and selenium were associated predominantly with small (not greater than 3 micrometer) particles. Calcium and sodium were present almost exclusively on larger particles and aluminum and manganese were bimodally distributed. Ashladen particulate material injected into the stratosphere during the early violent eruptions was enriched by factors of 10 to 30 relative to ash in some of the same elements observed in the quiescent plume.

  16. El Chichon - Composition of plume gases and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotra, J. P.; Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Hart, M. A.; Moyers, J. L.

    1983-12-01

    Aircraft measurements were made of trace gases, atmospheric particles, and condensed acid volatiles in the plume of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico, in November 1982. Hydrogen sulfide was the primary gaseous sulfur species in the plume at the time of collection. Concentrations of 28 elements were determined by neutron activation analysis of particulate material from the plume. The volatile elements sulfur, chlorine, arsenic, selenium, bromine, antimony, iodine, tungsten, and mercury were enriched relative to bulk pyroclastic material by factors of 60 to 20,000. Arsenic, antimony, and selenium were associated predominantly with small (not greater than 3 micrometer) particles. Calcium and sodium were present almost exclusively on larger particles and aluminum and manganese were bimodally distributed. Ashladen particulate material injected into the stratosphere during the early violent eruptions was enriched by factors of 10 to 30 relative to ash in some of the same elements observed in the quiescent plume.

  17. Genome-Wide Analysis of Evolutionary Markers of Human Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) Viruses May Guide Selection of Vaccine Strain Candidates.

    PubMed

    Belanov, Sergei S; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Benner, Christian; Ripatti, Samuli; Ojala, Teija; Kankainen, Matti; Kai Lee, Hong; Wei-Tze Tang, Julian; Kainov, Denis E

    2015-11-27

    Here we analyzed whole-genome sequences of 3,969 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 4,774 A(H3N2) strains that circulated during 2009-2015 in the world. The analysis revealed changes at 481 and 533 amino acid sites in proteins of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively. Many of these changes were introduced as a result of random drift. However, there were 61 and 68 changes that were present in relatively large number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively, that circulated during relatively long time. We named these amino acid substitutions evolutionary markers, as they seemed to contain valuable information regarding the viral evolution. Interestingly, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses acquired non-overlapping sets of evolutionary markers. We next analyzed these characteristic markers in vaccine strains recommended by the World Health Organization for the past five years. Our analysis revealed that vaccine strains carried only few evolutionary markers at antigenic sites of viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The absence of these markers at antigenic sites could affect the recognition of HA and NA by human antibodies generated in response to vaccinations. This could, in part, explain moderate efficacy of influenza vaccines during 2009-2014. Finally, we identified influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, which contain all the evolutionary markers of influenza A strains circulated in 2015, and which could be used as vaccine candidates for the 2015/2016 season. Thus, genome-wide analysis of evolutionary markers of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses may guide selection of vaccine strain candidates.

  18. Benzimidazoisoquinolines: A New Class of Rapidly Metabolized Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) Ligands that Induce AhR-Dependent Tregs and Prevent Murine Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Punj, Sumit; Kopparapu, Prasad; Jang, Hyo Sang; Phillips, Jessica L.; Pennington, Jamie; Rohlman, Diana; O’Donnell, Edmond; Iversen, Patrick L.; Kolluri, Siva Kumar; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays multiple roles in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses. The ability of certain AhR ligands to induce regulatory T cells (Tregs) has generated interest in developing AhR ligands for therapeutic treatment of immune-mediated diseases. To this end, we designed a screen for novel Treg-inducing compounds based on our understanding of the mechanisms of Treg induction by the well-characterized immunosuppressive AhR ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). We screened a ChemBridge small molecule library and identified 10-chloro-7H-benzimidazo[2,1-a]benzo[de]Iso-quinolin-7-one (10-Cl-BBQ) as a potent AhR ligand that was rapidly metabolized and not cytotoxic to proliferating T cells. Like TCDD,10-Cl-BBQ altered donor CD4+ T cell differentiation during the early stages of a graft versus host (GVH) response resulting in expression of high levels of CD25, CTLA-4 and ICOS, as well as several genes associated with Treg function. The Treg phenotype required AhR expression in the donor CD4+ T cells. Foxp3 was not expressed in the AhR-induced Tregs implicating AhR as an independent transcription factor for Treg induction. Structure-activity studies showed that unsubstituted BBQ as well as 4, 11-dichloro-BBQ were capable of inducing AhR-Tregs. Other substitutions reduced activation of AhR. Daily treatment with 10-Cl-BBQ during the GVH response prevented development of GVH disease in an AhR-dependent manner with no overt toxicity. Together, our data provide strong support for development of select BBQs that activate the AhR to induce Tregs for treatment of immune-mediated diseases. PMID:24586378

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of Evolutionary Markers of Human Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) Viruses May Guide Selection of Vaccine Strain Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Belanov, Sergei S.; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Benner, Christian; Ripatti, Samuli; Ojala, Teija; Kankainen, Matti; Kai Lee, Hong; Wei-Tze Tang, Julian; Kainov, Denis E.

    2015-01-01

    Here we analyzed whole-genome sequences of 3,969 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 4,774 A(H3N2) strains that circulated during 2009–2015 in the world. The analysis revealed changes at 481 and 533 amino acid sites in proteins of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively. Many of these changes were introduced as a result of random drift. However, there were 61 and 68 changes that were present in relatively large number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively, that circulated during relatively long time. We named these amino acid substitutions evolutionary markers, as they seemed to contain valuable information regarding the viral evolution. Interestingly, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses acquired non-overlapping sets of evolutionary markers. We next analyzed these characteristic markers in vaccine strains recommended by the World Health Organization for the past five years. Our analysis revealed that vaccine strains carried only few evolutionary markers at antigenic sites of viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The absence of these markers at antigenic sites could affect the recognition of HA and NA by human antibodies generated in response to vaccinations. This could, in part, explain moderate efficacy of influenza vaccines during 2009–2014. Finally, we identified influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, which contain all the evolutionary markers of influenza A strains circulated in 2015, and which could be used as vaccine candidates for the 2015/2016 season. Thus, genome-wide analysis of evolutionary markers of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses may guide selection of vaccine strain candidates. PMID:26615216

  20. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... limited to private and contract carriage and to direct movement from point of origin to destination. (b..., the qualified person attending the unloading operation must remain within 45.72 meters (150 feet) of the cargo tank and 7.62 meters (25 feet) of the delivery hose and must observe both the cargo tank...

  1. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... record of the cargo tank pressure and ambient (outside) temperature: (1) At the start of each trip, (2... temperature and pressure of the liquid must be reduced by a manually controlled release of vapor; and (2) The... unloading to assure that they are of sound quality, without obvious defects detectable through...

  2. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... record of the cargo tank pressure and ambient (outside) temperature: (1) At the start of each trip, (2... temperature and pressure of the liquid must be reduced by a manually controlled release of vapor; and (2) The... unloading to assure that they are of sound quality, without obvious defects detectable through...

  3. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... record of the cargo tank pressure and ambient (outside) temperature: (1) At the start of each trip, (2... temperature and pressure of the liquid must be reduced by a manually controlled release of vapor; and (2) The... unloading to assure that they are of sound quality, without obvious defects detectable through...

  4. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., the driver shall make a written record of the cargo tank pressure and ambient (outside) temperature... performed and verified as follows: (1) The temperature and pressure of the liquid must be reduced by a... sound quality, without obvious defects detectable through visual observation and audio awareness,...

  5. Transmission of Infrared Materials and Condensed Gases at Cryogenic Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    0.70 0.60 - 0.50cQ) u ~ Q) 0. 0.40 r::~ 0.;:n 0.30VI E 0 DataVIc : - Theoryro 0.20 ~-1-- n = 1. 414 0.10 k = 0.0156 0...g. A = 12.500 Jim 0.70 0.60 "E 0.50 Q) u ~ Q) 0. 0.40 r::~ 0 ’j;; 0.30VI E 0 DataVIc : ro 0.20 - Theory ~-1-- n • 1. 468 0.10 k = 0.00948 O...7.519 Jlm O. 70 0.60 C 0.50 Q) u ~ Q) c.. 0.40 c:~ .~ VI 0.30VI E 0 DataVIc : ro 0.20 - Theory ~- ~- n = 1. 395 0.10 k =0.0444 0~+_____4_

  6. Broader perspectives for comparing different greenhouse gases.

    PubMed

    Manning, Martin; Reisinger, Andy

    2011-05-28

    Over the last 20 years, different greenhouse gases have been compared, in the context of climate change, primarily through the concept of global warming potentials (GWPs). This considers the climate forcing caused by pulse emissions and integrated over a fixed time horizon. Recent studies have shown that uncertainties in GWP values are significantly larger than previously thought and, while past literature in this area has raised alternative means of comparison, there is not yet any clear alternative. We propose that a broader framework for comparing greenhouse gases has become necessary and that this cannot be addressed by using simple fixed exchange rates. From a policy perspective, the framework needs to be clearly aligned with the goal of climate stabilization, and we show that comparisons between gases can be better addressed in this context by the forcing equivalence index (FEI). From a science perspective, a framework for comparing greenhouse gases should also consider the full range of processes that affect atmospheric composition and how these may alter for climate stabilization at different levels. We cover a basis for a broader approach to comparing greenhouse gases by summarizing the uncertainties in GWPs, linking those to uncertainties in the FEIs consistent with stabilization, and then to a framework for addressing uncertainties in the corresponding biogeochemical processes.

  7. Sealing properties of Ketac-Endo glass ionomer cement and AH26 root canal sealers.

    PubMed

    De Gee, A J; Wu, M K; Wesselink, P R

    1994-09-01

    Sealing capacity, setting shrinkage and setting time of a recently introduced glass ionomer cement Ketac-Endo were compared with that of a conventional sealer AH26. Sixty half-cylinders, 8 mm long, 4 mm in diameter, made from fresh bovine root dentine, had their smear layer removed before being cemented together while separated by 1-mm spacers. This resulted in a group of 15 cylinders cemented with Ketac-Endo and a similar group with AH26. After coating the lateral surface with nail varnish, one end of each cylinder was connected with a tube filled with water under 120 kPa (1.2 atm) pressure. At the other end the fluid leaking through the cemented interface of the cylinders was measured by displacement of an air bubble in an attached standard glass capillary. In this particular set-up where the sealers were used in bulk between two opposing dentine surfaces, Ketac-Endo leaked significantly more than AH26. After shear loading the cemented specimens, it was found that the area of adhesive failure was 88% for Ketac-Endo, and 15% for AH26. The leakage pathways were most probably at the dentine-sealer interface for Ketac-Endo and through cohesive fractures in the sealer for AH26.

  8. Studies on the role of the Ah receptor in hexachloro-benzene-induced porphyria

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Many of the effects of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) resemble those of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), whose effects are initiated by its binding to the AH receptor, the regulatory gene product of the Ah locus. I investigated the ability of HCB to interact with the AH receptor and the involvement of this protein in HCB-induced porphyria. The induction of two cytochrome P450 isozymes regulated by the Ah locus was also examined in light of their possible role in the pathogenesis of HCB- and TCDD-induced porphyria. HCB competitively inhibited the in vitro specific binding of ({sup 3}H)-TCDD to the rat hepatic Ah receptor (K{sub I} = 2.1 {mu}M) without affecting the solubility of ({sup 3}H)TCDD. Following the administration of HCB to rats, the number of ({sup 3}H)TCDD specific binding sites was reduced by up to 40%. HCB induced cytochromes P450b, P450e, P450c, and P450d, confirming that it is a mixed-type P450 inducer. The presence of porphyria in mice was assessed by measuring urinary and hepatic porphyrins and hepatic uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity.

  9. Human Infections with Novel Reassortant Influenza A(H3N2)v Viruses, United States, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom, Stephen; Garten, Rebecca; Balish, Amanda; Shu, Bo; Emery, Shannon; Berman, LaShondra; Barnes, Nathelia; Sleeman, Katrina; Gubareva, Larisa; Villanueva, Julie

    2012-01-01

    During July–December 2011, a variant virus, influenza A(H3N2)v, caused 12 human cases of influenza. The virus contained genes originating from swine, avian, and human viruses, including the M gene from influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Influenza A(H3N2)v viruses were antigenically distinct from seasonal influenza viruses and similar to proposed vaccine virus A/Minnesota/11/2010. PMID:22516540

  10. Tissue specificity of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated responses and relative sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to an AhR agonist.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Tendler, Brett J; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2012-06-15

    Sturgeons are endangered in some parts of the world. Due to their benthic nature and longevity sturgeon are at greater risk of exposure to bioaccumulative contaminants such as dioxin-like compounds that are associated with sediments. Despite their endangered status, little research has been conducted to characterize the relative responsiveness of sturgeon to dioxin-like compounds. In an attempt to study the biological effects and possible associated risks of exposure to dioxin-like compounds in sturgeon, the molecular and biochemical responses of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to a model aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist, β-naphthoflavone (βNF) were investigated. White sturgeon were injected intraperitoneally with one of three doses of βNF (0, 50, or 500mg/kg, bw). Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were used as a reference species since their responses have been well characterized in the past. Three days following injection with βNF, fish were euthanized and livers, gills, and intestines collected for biochemical and molecular analyses. White sturgeon exposed to βNF had significantly greater ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity in liver (up to 37-fold), gill (up to 41-fold), and intestine (up to 36-fold) than did unexposed controls. Rainbow trout injected with βNF exhibited EROD activity that was significantly greater in liver (88-fold), than that of controls, but was undetectable in gills or intestine. Abundance of CYP1A transcript displayed a comparable pattern of tissue-specific induction with intestine (up to 189-fold), gills (up to 53-fold), and liver (up to 21-fold). Methoxyresorufin O-deethylase (MROD) and pentoxyresorufin O-deethylase (PROD) activities were undetectable in unexposed white sturgeon tissues while exposed tissues displayed MROD activity that was only moderately greater than the activity that could be detected. Differential inducibility among liver, gill, and intestine following exposure to an AhR agonist is

  11. Rare gases in cyclosilicates and cogenetic minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, K.; Alexander, E. C., Jr.; Dragon, J. C.; Zashu, S.

    1984-01-01

    The cyclosilicate minerals, beryl, tourmaline, and cordierite, typically contain large amounts of He-4 and Ar-40 which are not in situ radiogenic products. In the study of excess rare gases in cyclosilicates, one of the most enigmatic observations is the age effect, a qualitative tendency for geologically older samples to contain more excess He-4 and Ar-40 than younger samples. The present investigation is concerned with measurements regarding the abundance and isotopic composition of all five rare gases in a number of cyclosilicates as well as in their cogenetic minerals. The significance of the obtained data is discussed. The data indicate that cyclosilicates sample the rare gases present in the environment in which they crystallize. This 'sampling' involves major elemental fractionations which are variable but mineral specific. Cyclosilicates can, therefore, be used to probe the isotopic ratios and elemental compositions.

  12. Where do California's greenhouse gases come from?

    ScienceCinema

    Fischer, Marc

    2016-07-12

    Last March, more than two years after California passed legislation to slash greenhouse gas emissions 25 percent by 2020, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist Marc Fischer boarded a Cessna loaded with air monitoring equipment and crisscrossed the skies above Sacramento and the Bay Area. Instruments aboard the aircraft measured a cocktail of greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide from fossil fuel use, methane from livestock and landfills, CO2 from refineries and power plants, traces of nitrous oxide from agriculture and fuel use, and industrially produced other gases like refrigerants. The flight was part of the Airborne Greenhouse Gas Emissions Survey, a collaboration between Berkeley Lab, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the University of California, and UC Davis to pinpoint the sources of greenhouse gases in central California. The survey is intended to improve inventories of the states greenhouse gas emissions, which in turn will help scientists verify the emission reductions mandated by AB-32, the legislation enacted by California in 2006.

  13. Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    2001-01-01

    AGAGE comprises continuous high frequency in-situ gas chromatographic FID/ECD measurements of two biogenic/anthropogenic gases (CH4, N2O) and five anthropogenic gases (CFCl3, CF2Cl2, CH3CCl3, CF2ClCFCl2, CCl4) which are carried out at five globally distributed sites (Ireland, California, Barbados, Samoa, Tasmania). Also, high frequency in-situ gas-chromatographic mass spectrometric measurements of about 30 species including chlorofluorocarbon replacements and many natural halocarbons are made at two sites (Ireland, Tasmania), and will soon begin at the other three sites. Finally, high frequency in-situ gas chromatographic HgO-RD measurements of CO and H2 are performed at two sites (Ireland, Tasmania). The goal is quantitative determination of the sources, sinks, and circulation of these environmentally important gases.

  14. Methanol production from fermentor off-gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, B. E.; Moreira, A. R.

    The off gases from an acetone butanol fermentation facility are composed mainly of CO2 and H2. Such a gas stream is an ideal candidate as a feed to a methanol synthesis plant utilizing modern technology recently developed and known as the CDH-methanol process. A detailed economic analysis for the incremental cost of a methanol synthesis plant utilizing the off gases from an acetone butanol fermentation indicates a profitable rate of return of 25 to 30% under the most likely production conditions. Bench scale studies at different fermentor mixing rates indicate that the volume of gases released during the fermentation is a strong function of the agitation rate and point to a potential interaction between the volume of H2 evolved and the levels of butanol present in the final fermented broth. Such interaction may require establishing optimum operating conditions for an integrated butanol fermentation methanol synthesis plant.

  15. NMR studies and applications of perfluorocarbon gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yulin

    Hyperpolarized 3He has been very successful in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lungs. It provides ways to study the physiological properties of the lungs and lung function. However, the high costs of the polarizing apparatus and the complicated polarizing procedure are preventing this technique from being clinically used routinely. Recent developments have shown that several fluorinated gases have the potential to replace 3He in some of its applications. This thesis presents some preliminary results of human excised lung imaging using C2F6 and C3F8. These two fluorinated gases were able to yield images with good signal-to-noise ratio and reasonable resolutions in a 1.5 T magnet. Using diffusion MRI of these two gases can distinguish emphysematous lungs from healthy ones. An important application of these gases would be to determine local lung surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio in vivo, which requires the unrestricted (free) diffusivity in each pixel to be known. We present data in this thesis which allow free diffusivities to be calculated from the relaxation time T1. Samples of pure C 2F6 and C3F8 at different pressures and in mixtures with oxygen at different concentrations were made. Measurements were done at two different magnetic fields and temperature was regulated to study the temperature dependence over a small range. These two gases were also used in studies of carbon-block filters, where the strong adsorption of the gases to the high surface-area carbon is beneficial. A brief review of our work on mouse lung imaging using hyperpolarized 3He is presented in Appendix A; Appendix B is a study of the longitudinal spin magnetization in the presence of a strong magnetic field gradient; the construction of the pulsed field gradient waveform measurement coils and some experimental results using these coils are contained in Appendix C.

  16. The future of energy gases

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, D.G.

    1995-04-01

    Natural gas, mainly methane, produces lower CO {sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x}, SO {sub 2} and particulate emissions than either oil or coal; thus further substitutions of methane for these fuels could help mitigate air pollution. Methane is, however, a potent greenhouse gas and the domestication of ruminants, cultivation of rice, mining of coal, drilling for oil, and transportation of natural gas have all contributed to a doubling of the amount of atmospheric methane since 1800. Today nearly 300,000 wells yearly produce each 21 trillion cubic feet of methane. Known reserves suggest about a 10 year supply at the above rates of recovery; and the potential for undiscovered resources is obscured by uncertainty involving price, new technologies, and environmental restrictions stemming from the need to drill an enormous number of wells, many in ecologically sensitive areas. The atomic simplicity of methane, composed of one carbon and four hydrogen atoms, may mask the complexity of this, the most basic of organic molecules. Within the Earth, methane is produced through thermochemical alteration of organic materials, and by biochemical reactions mediated by metabolic processes of archaebacteria; some methane may even be primordial, a residue of planetary accretion. Methane is known to exist in the mantle and lower crust. Near the Earth`s surface, methane occurs in enormous oil and/or gas reservoirs in rock, and is absorbed in coal, dissolved in water, and trapped in a latticework of ice-like material called gas hydrate. Methane also occurs in smaller volumes in landfills, rice paddies, termite complexes, ruminants, and even many humans. As an energy source, methane accounts for roughly 25 percent of current U.S. consumption, but its full energy potential is controversial. Methane is touted by some as a viable bridge to future energy systems, fueled by the sun and uranium and carried by electricity and hydrogen.

  17. Origins of geothermal gases at Yellowstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Bergfeld, Deborah; Evans, William C.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-09-01

    Gas emissions at the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF) reflect open-system mixing of gas species originating from diverse rock types, magmas, and crustal fluids, all combined in varying proportions at different thermal areas. Gases are not necessarily in chemical equilibrium with the waters through which they vent, especially in acid sulfate terrain where bubbles stream through stagnant acid water. Gases in adjacent thermal areas often can be differentiated by isotopic and gas ratios, and cannot be tied to one another solely by shallow processes such as boiling-induced fractionation of a parent liquid. Instead, they inherit unique gas ratios (e.g., CH4/He) from the dominant rock reservoirs where they originate, some of which underlie the Quaternary volcanic rocks. Steam/gas ratios (essentially H2O/CO2) of Yellowstone fumaroles correlate with Ar/He and N2/CO2, strongly suggesting that H2O/CO2 is controlled by addition of steam boiled from water rich in atmospheric gases. Moreover, H2O/CO2 varies systematically with geographic location, such that boiling is more enhanced in some areas than others. The δ13C and 3He/CO2 of gases reflect a dominant mantle origin for CO2 in Yellowstone gas. The mantle signature is most evident at Mud Volcano, which hosts gases with the lowest H2O/CO2, lowest CH4 concentrations and highest He isotope ratios (~ 16Ra), consistent with either a young subsurface intrusion or less input of crustal and meteoric gas than any other location at Yellowstone. Across the YPVF, He isotope ratios (3He/4He) inversely vary with He concentrations, and reflect varied amounts of long-stored, radiogenic He added to the magmatic endmember within the crust. Similarly, addition of CH4 from organic-rich sediments is common in the eastern thermal areas at Yellowstone. Overall, Yellowstone gases reflect addition of deep, high-temperature magmatic gas (CO2-rich), lower-temperatures crustal gases (4He- and CH4-bearing), and those gases (N2, Ne, Ar) added

  18. Measuring Viscosities of Gases at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Hoshang, Chegini

    1987-01-01

    Variant of general capillary method for measuring viscosities of unknown gases based on use of thermal mass-flowmeter section for direct measurement of pressure drops. In technique, flowmeter serves dual role, providing data for determining volume flow rates and serving as well-characterized capillary-tube section for measurement of differential pressures across it. New method simple, sensitive, and adaptable for absolute or relative viscosity measurements of low-pressure gases. Suited for very complex hydrocarbon mixtures where limitations of classical theory and compositional errors make theoretical calculations less reliable.

  19. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    SciTech Connect

    Beechem, Thomas E. Brumbach, Michael T.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Howell, Stephen W.; Ohta, Taisuke; Kowalski, Brian M.; Pask, Jesse A.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Spataru, Catalin D.

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga{sub 2}Se{sub 3} and amorphous Se. Photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  20. Stationary light in cold-atomic gases

    SciTech Connect

    Nikoghosyan, Gor; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2009-07-15

    We discuss stationary light created by a pair of counterpropagating control fields in {lambda}-type atomic gases with electromagnetically induced transparency for the case of negligible Doppler broadening. In this case, the secular approximation used in the discussion of stationary light in hot vapors is no longer valid. We discuss the quality of the effective light-trapping system and show that in contrast to previous claims it is finite even for vanishing ground-state dephasing. The dynamics of the photon loss is in general nonexponential and can be faster or slower than in hot gases.

  1. Basic Studies of Gases for Fast Switches.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    measured the electron attachment and ionization coeffi- cients and electron drift velocities in 02, CH4, CF4, C2F6 , C3F8 , and n-C4Flo gases using a new...method of data analysis. The pressure depen- dence of the electron attachment coefficient in 02, C3F8 , and n-C4F10 and of the electron drift velocity...in C3F8 and n-C4F10 have been analyzed and explained. A paper describing this technique and the measurements we have performed in these gases has

  2. Greenhouse gases and the metallurgical process industry

    SciTech Connect

    Lupis, C.H.P.

    1999-10-01

    The present lecture offers a brief review of the greenhouse effect, the sources of greenhouse gases, the potential effect of these gases on global warming, the response of the international community, and the probable cost of national compliance. The specific emissions of the metallurgical process industry, particularly those of the steel and aluminum sectors, are then examined. The potential applications of life-cycle assessments and of an input-output model in programs of emissions' abatement are investigated, and, finally, a few remarks on some implications for education are presented.

  3. Global Distribution of Organo-Bromine Gases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawardena, Rohith

    Both man-made and natural trace organo-bromine gases are present in the atmosphere in minute quantities --in the order of a few parts per trillion by volume. The man-made species CBrF_3 and CBrClF _2 are believed to be an important source of bromine to the stratosphere where they act as catalysts in the chlorofluorocarbon-ozone-depletion hypothesis. A high resolution capillary column EC-GC method with and O_2 doped detector was developed, System V, to measure these and related organo -bromine gases in the atmosphere. It was developed from a packed column EC-GC method, System I, that was used to measure CH_3I at sub pptv levels but could measure only one organo-bromine gas, CBrClF _2. The development work to improve upon System I involved testing and matching different types of columns, carrier gases, make-up gases to the detector and detector temperatures to obtain operating conditions with optimum resolution, very high sensitivity and sufficiently stable baseline to measure atmospheric organo-bromine gases. During this development work, nine organo-bromine gases were identified in clean background air. The precision of analysis of each system used was sufficient to determine the distributions and time course behavior of the species studied. During the course of this study, samples collected weekly at 11 remote stations around the world spanning latitudes from 82^circN down to 42^circS were analyzed for these organo-bromine gases. In addition, samples collected for 10 years at Cape Meares - Oregon, Cape Matatula - American Samoa, Cape Grim - Tasmania and at the South Pole during the austral summer months were analyzed for long term trends of CBrF_3 and CBrClF_2 . Significant altitudinal differences, interhemispheric gradients and seasonal cycles were observed for certain gases. Long-term trends were observed for CBrF _3 and CBrClF_2. CBrF _3 showed an exponential increase. From 1979 to 1987, its northern and southern hemispheric concentrations have increased at

  4. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Ohta, Taisuke; ...

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga2Se3 and amorphous Se. Furthermore, photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  5. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Ohta, Taisuke; Howell, Stephen W.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kowalski, Brian M.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Spataru, Catalin D.; Pask, Jesse A.

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga2Se3 and amorphous Se. Furthermore, photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  6. Origins of geothermal gases at Yellowstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Bergfeld, Deborah; Evans, William C.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Gas emissions at the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF) reflect open-system mixing of gas species originating from diverse rock types, magmas, and crustal fluids, all combined in varying proportions at different thermal areas. Gases are not necessarily in chemical equilibrium with the waters through which they vent, especially in acid sulfate terrain where bubbles stream through stagnant acid water. Gases in adjacent thermal areas often can be differentiated by isotopic and gas ratios, and cannot be tied to one another solely by shallow processes such as boiling-induced fractionation of a parent liquid. Instead, they inherit unique gas ratios (e.g., CH4/He) from the dominant rock reservoirs where they originate, some of which underlie the Quaternary volcanic rocks. Steam/gas ratios (essentially H2O/CO2) of Yellowstone fumaroles correlate with Ar/He and N2/CO2, strongly suggesting that H2O/CO2 is controlled by addition of steam boiled from water rich in atmospheric gases. Moreover, H2O/CO2 varies systematically with geographic location, such that boiling is more enhanced in some areas than others. The δ13C and 3He/CO2 of gases reflect a dominant mantle origin for CO2 in Yellowstone gas. The mantle signature is most evident at Mud Volcano, which hosts gases with the lowest H2O/CO2, lowest CH4 concentrations and highest He isotope ratios (~16Ra), consistent with either a young subsurface intrusion or less input of crustal and meteoric gas than any other location at Yellowstone. Across the YPVF, He isotope ratios (3He/4He) inversely vary with He concentrations, and reflect varied amounts of long- stored, radiogenic He added to the magmatic endmember within the crust. Similarly, addition of CH4 from organic-rich sediments is common in the eastern thermal areas at Yellowstone. Overall, Yellowstone gases reflect addition of deep, high-temperature magmatic gas (CO2-rich), lower-temperatures crustal gases (4He- and CH4-bearing), and those gases (N2, Ne, Ar) added

  7. Squishy Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habdas, Piotr; Weeks, Eric R.; Lynn, David G.

    2006-05-01

    Most people do not realize that many substances they use in the kitchen and the bathroom are not simple liquids or solids. Everyone is familiar with three states of matter: solids, liquids, and gases. However, creams, shampoo, toothpaste, and ketchup all have properties of both liquids and solids. This paper describes demonstrations and laboratory exercises1 that show intriguing properties of squishy substances, defined as materials that are not unambiguously solid, liquid, or gas. Unlike some areas of physics, the concepts behind squishy materials are understandable even by beginning students. Squishy physics can be used to show physics questions arising from everyday life and to convey the excitement of current research.

  8. Identification and simulation evaluation of an AH-64 helicopter hover math model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. A.; Watson, D. C.; Tischler, M. B.; Eshow, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    Frequency-domain parameter-identification techniques were used to develop a hover mathematical model of the AH-64 Apache helicopter from flight data. The unstable AH-64 bare-airframe characteristics without a stability-augmentation system were parameterized in the convectional stability-derivative form. To improve the model's vertical response, a simple transfer-function model approximating the effects of dynamic inflow was developed. Additional subcomponents of the vehicle were also modeled and simulated, such as a basic engine response for hover and the vehicle stick dynamic characteristics. The model, with and without stability augmentation, was then evaluated by AH-64 pilots in a moving-base simulation. It was the opinion of the pilots that the simulation was a satisfactory representation of the aircraft for the tasks of interest. The principal negative comment was that height control was more difficult in the simulation than in the aircraft.

  9. Environmental Isotope Characteristics of Landfill Leachates and Gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Keith C.; Liu, Chao-Li; Coleman, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    The isotopic characteristics of municipal landfill leachate and gases (carbon dioxide and methane) are unique relative to the aqueous and gaseous media in most other natural geologic environments. The ??13 C of the CO2 in landfills is significantly enriched in 13C, with values as high as +20??? reported. The ?? 13C and ??D values of the methane fall within a range of values representative of microbial methane produced primarily by the acetate-fermentation process. The ??D of landfill leachate is strongly enriched in deuterium, by approximately 30??? to nearly 60??? relative to local average precipitation values. This deuterium enrichment is undoubtedly due to the extensive production of microbial methane within the limited reservoir of a landfill. The concentration of the radiogenic isotopes, 14C and 3H, are significantly elevated in both landfill leachate and methane. The 14C values range between approximately 120 and 170 pMC and can be explained by the input of organic material that was affected by the increased 14C content of atmospheric CO2 caused by atmospheric testing of nuclear devices. The tritium measured in leachate, however, is often too high to be explained by previous atmospheric levels and must come from material buried within the landfill. The unique isotopic characteristics observed in landfill leachates and gases provide a very useful technique for confirming whether contamination is from a municipal landfill or some other local source.

  10. Solution structure of the isolated histone H2A-H2B heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Yoshihito; Yamane, Tsutomu; Ohtomo, Hideaki; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Kurita, Jun-ichi; Sato, Masahiko; Nagadoi, Aritaka; Shimojo, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    During chromatin-regulated processes, the histone H2A-H2B heterodimer functions dynamically in and out of the nucleosome. Although detailed crystal structures of nucleosomes have been established, that of the isolated full-length H2A-H2B heterodimer has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the solution structure of human H2A-H2B by NMR coupled with CS-Rosetta. H2A and H2B each contain a histone fold, comprising four α-helices and two β-strands (α1–β1–α2–β2–α3–αC), together with the long disordered N- and C-terminal H2A tails and the long N-terminal H2B tail. The N-terminal αN helix, C-terminal β3 strand, and 310 helix of H2A observed in the H2A-H2B nucleosome structure are disordered in isolated H2A-H2B. In addition, the H2A α1 and H2B αC helices are not well fixed in the heterodimer, and the H2A and H2B tails are not completely random coils. Comparison of hydrogen-deuterium exchange, fast hydrogen exchange, and {1H}-15N hetero-nuclear NOE data with the CS-Rosetta structure indicates that there is some conformation in the H2A 310 helical and H2B Lys11 regions, while the repression domain of H2B (residues 27–34) exhibits an extended string-like structure. This first structure of the isolated H2A-H2B heterodimer provides insight into its dynamic functions in chromatin. PMID:27181506

  11. Influenza A/H1N1 Severe Pneumonia: Novel Morphocytological Findings in Bronchoalveolar Lavage

    PubMed Central

    Faverio, Paola; Messinesi, Grazia; Brenna, Ambrogio; Pesci, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed in three patients with severe influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Light microscopy analysis of BAL cytocentrifugates showed the presence of characteristic large, mononuclear, plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like cells never described before. Via transmission electron microscopy, these cells were classified as atypical type II pneumocytes and some of them showed cytoplasmic vesicles and inclusions. We concluded that plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like type II pneumocytes might represent a morphologic marker of A/H1N1 influenza virus infection as well as reparative cellular activation after diffuse alveolar damage. PMID:25383078

  12. Influenza A/H1N1 Severe Pneumonia: Novel Morphocytological Findings in Bronchoalveolar Lavage.

    PubMed

    Faverio, Paola; Aliberti, Stefano; Ezekiel, Clinton; Messinesi, Grazia; Brenna, Ambrogio; Pesci, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed in three patients with severe influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Light microscopy analysis of BAL cytocentrifugates showed the presence of characteristic large, mononuclear, plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like cells never described before. Via transmission electron microscopy, these cells were classified as atypical type II pneumocytes and some of them showed cytoplasmic vesicles and inclusions. We concluded that plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like type II pneumocytes might represent a morphologic marker of A/H1N1 influenza virus infection as well as reparative cellular activation after diffuse alveolar damage.

  13. Experimental Evidence for Hydrogen Tunneling when the Isotopic Arrhenius Prefactor (AH/AD) is Unity

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sudhir C.; Klinman, Judith P.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is one of the major tools used for the investigation of hydrogen tunneling in condensed phase. Hydrogen transfer reactions displaying isotopic Arrhenius prefactor ratios (AH/AD) of unity are generally ascribed to a semi-classical mechanism. Here, we have identified a double mutant of soybean lipoxygenase (SLO-1, an enzyme previously shown to follow quantum mechanical hydrogen tunneling), that displays an AH/AD of unity and highly elevated (non-classical) KIEs. This observation highlights the shortcoming of assigning a hydrogen transfer reaction to a semi-classical model based solely on an Arrhenius prefactor ratio. PMID:19061319

  14. Evaluation of push-out bond strength of AH26 sealer using MTAD and combination of NaOCl and EDTA as final irrigation

    PubMed Central

    Mozayeni, Mohammad Ali; Zadeh, Yashar Mohammad; Paymanpour, Payam; Ashraf, Hengameh; Mozayani, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background: During endodontic procedures, the smear layer is formed as a result of mechanical instrumentation of the canal. Combination of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) is widely used for removal of the smear layer. Application of Mixture of tetracycline, acid, and detergent (MTAD) as final irrigant subsequent to initial irrigation of 1.35% NaOCl has been proposed to increase clinical efficiency, biocompatibility and prolonged intra-canal antibacterial activity. Considering the importance of adhesion of endodontic sealers to the dentin walls of a prepared root canal, the present study evaluated push-out bond strength of AH26 sealer using final irrigation of MTAD and EDTA + NaOCl. Materials and Methods: Sixty five single-rooted teeth were prepared endodontically with the same chemomechanical technique and were randomly divided into three groups based on their final irrigation regimen: 17% EDTA + 5.25% NaOCl group (n =30), MTAD group (n =30) and control group (n =5). Obturation of the canals was performed with gutta-percha and AH26 sealer. All teeth were sectioned in order that two specimens of 1 mm thickness were obtained from the coronal and the middle one third of each root resulting in 60 specimens for each experimental group and 10 specimens for control group. For push-out test, universal-testing machine was used to exert a constant compressive apico-coronal load at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Minimum amount of compressive load caused dislodgement was measured and converted into megapascal (MPa) scale. One-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Tukey test were used for statistical analysis of the data (α = 0.05). Results: In MTAD group, mean micro-push-out bond strength of AH26 sealer to dentin walls was obtained 2.23 MPa compared to 2.0 MPa for EDTA + NaOCl group. The mean bond strength of AH26 sealer to dentin walls was significantly greater using MTAD compared with combination of EDTA and NaOCl or saline. Conclusion

  15. Managing biogeochemical cycles to reduce greenhouse gases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special issue focuses on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and their roles in determining current continental-scale budgets and future trends in biogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) for North America. Understanding the current magnitude and forecasting future trajectories of atmospheric GHG concent...

  16. Molecular Dynamics of Propellant Gases. Part 2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    motion of nitrogen gas molecules can be described using the laws of classical mechanics. Lennard - Jones and exponential-6 potentials are used to...of state and perturbation theory. It is found that the Lennard - Jones potential works well at 3000K and that the Hansen perturbation theory could become an effective method for calculating the pressure for real gases.

  17. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Methanol-Fueled Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.1514 Section...

  18. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Methanol-Fueled Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.1514 Section...

  19. 40 CFR 91.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Analytical gases. 91.312 Section 91.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 91.312 Analytical...

  20. 40 CFR 92.112 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 92.112 Section 92.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.112 Analytical...

  1. 40 CFR 92.112 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 92.112 Section 92.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.112 Analytical...

  2. Elimination of gases and contamination from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, A. P.

    1970-01-01

    Filtration system with membrane type hydrophilic and hydrophobic filters gives absolute filtration with automatic venting of freed gases, and prevents backward transmission of contamination with no bacterial growth through the filters. Filter aids in degassing industrial solutions and in removing oxygen from sea water.

  3. 40 CFR 1065.750 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 1065.750 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... the following gas specifications: (1) Use purified gases to zero measurement instruments and to blend... to the flow-weighted mean concentration expected at the standard. For example, if you would expect...

  4. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  5. Refractive Indices of Gases at Microwave Frequencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhead, D. T.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple microwave interferometer capable of measuring small phase shifts. Proposes laboratory exercises involving the use of the interferometer in the determination of refractive indices of gases and the analysis of the reflection in a test chamber. (Author/CP)

  6. Collective modes in cold paramagnetic gases

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, T L; Rubin, P L

    2014-02-28

    We have obtained a condition for the emergence of spin waves in paramagnetic gases Re >> ImÂ, which is fulfilled only at temperatures of the order of 1 μK. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  7. Removing Sulphur Dioxide From Stack Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    Process types, process concepts, claims and counterclaims, cost factors, and the level of developed technology for sulfur dioxide control in stack gases are focused upon and evaluated. Wet and dry processes as well as recovery and throwaway processes are compared. (BL)

  8. Soda pulp and fuel gases synthesis from Hesperaloe funifera.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Rafael; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Requejo, Ana; Ferrer, Ana; Navarro, Enrique

    2010-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to evaluate the suitability of Hesperaloe funifera which is an alternative raw material, for pulping with soda-anthraquinone to produce pulp and paper. It was studied the influence of operational variables (temperature (155-185 degrees C), cooking time (20-60 min) and soda concentration (5-15%), with a constant addition of 1% of anthraquinone and a liquid/solid ratio of 8, in soda-anthraquinone cooking of H. funifera on pulps and paper sheets properties obtained. Finally, the cooking liquors were acidified to separate solid fractions that were subjected to pyrolysis and gasification in order to obtain synthesis and fuel gases. H. funifera contains little lignin and abundant alpha-cellulose; this, together with the morphological characteristics of its fibers, makes it a potentially highly useful papermaking raw material.

  9. Oseltamivir-resistant seasonal A(H1N1) and A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza viruses from the 2007/2008 to 2012/2013 season in Nara Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Masaki; Okayama, Akiko; Kitahori, Yoshiteru

    2014-01-01

    We examined the incidence of oseltamivir-resistant seasonal A(H1N1) and A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza viruses from the 2007/2008 to 2012/2013 season in Nara Prefecture, Japan. To detect the oseltamivir resistance marker in neuraminidase (NA), 365 influenza viruses (60 seasonal A(H1N1) and 305 A(H1N1)pdm09) were sequenced. The H275Y mutation in the NA gene, which confers resistance to oseltamivir, was identified in 93.8% (30/32) of seasonal A(H1N1) viruses that were circulating during the 2008/2009 season. Moreover, the detection rate of oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses was 4.1% (3/74) and 2.8% (5/180) in the 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 season, respectively. Four cases of oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection occurred in the same hematology ward during the 2010/2011 season. Our data show a low frequency of oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in Nara Prefecture but suggested the possibility of human-to-human transmission of this virus.

  10. AH-Questionnaire: An Adaptive Hierarchical Questionnaire for Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortigosa, Alvaro; Paredes, Pedro; Rodriguez, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    One of the main concerns when providing learning style adaptation in Adaptive Educational Hypermedia Systems is the number of questions the students have to answer. Most of the times, adaptive material available will discriminate among a few categories for each learning style dimension. Consequently, it is only needed to take into account the…

  11. Evaluation of Emission of Greenhouse Gases from Soils Amended with Sewage Sludge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increase in concentrations of various greenhouse gases originated by various human activities, including agricultural origin, could contribute to climate change. Anthropogenic activities such as cultivation of flooded rice and application of waste materials, such as sewage sludge which are rich in ...

  12. Effect of foam age on toxicity of pyrolysis gases from polyurethane flexible foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Murphy, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from some samples of polyurethane flexible foams appears to have decreased with age, while other samples seem to exhibit no significant change with age in this respect. The changes observed were greater than could be accounted for by variations in the material, or test variations or artifacts.

  13. 29 CFR 1910.110 - Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gases. 1910.110 Section 1910.110 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.110 Storage and handling of liquefied...

  14. 29 CFR 1910.110 - Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gases. 1910.110 Section 1910.110 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.110 Storage and handling of liquefied...

  15. 29 CFR 1910.110 - Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gases. 1910.110 Section 1910.110 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.110 Storage and handling of liquefied...

  16. 29 CFR 1910.110 - Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gases. 1910.110 Section 1910.110 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.110 Storage and handling of liquefied...

  17. Noble Gases in Nakhla and Three Nakhlites Miller Range 090030, 090032, and 090136

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, K.; Haba, M. K.; Park, J.; Choi, J.; Baek, J. M.; Park, C.; Lee, J. I.; Lee, M. J.; Mikouchi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.; Herzog, G. F.; Turrin, B. D.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III

    2016-08-01

    Noble gas compositions of the Miller Range nakhlites release Kr and Xe with low 84Kr/132Xe of ≤1 and high 129Xe/132Xe of 1.95-2.13 at low heating temperature (300-400°C). The gases would be heavily fractionated martian atmosphere trapped in aqueously altered materials.

  18. 46 CFR 194.15-15 - Chemicals other than compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemicals other than compressed gases. 194.15-15 Section 194.15-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Chemistry Laboratory...

  19. 46 CFR 194.15-15 - Chemicals other than compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chemicals other than compressed gases. 194.15-15 Section 194.15-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Chemistry Laboratory...

  20. Oseltamivir-zanamivir combination therapy is not superior to zanamivir monotherapy in mice infected with influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses.

    PubMed

    Pizzorno, Andrés; Abed, Yacine; Rhéaume, Chantal; Boivin, Guy

    2014-05-01

    The efficacy of oseltamivir-zanamivir combination therapy compared to that of monotherapy was evaluated in mice infected with influenza A(H3N2) or A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. For A(H3N2) virus, zanamivir monotherapy and oseltamivir-zanamivir combination showed significant reduction of mean weight loss compared to oseltamivir. Zanamivir monotherapy also conferred decreased mortality, weight loss and lung viral titers (LVT) compared to oseltamivir for A(H1N1)pdm09 wild-type virus. Intermediate benefits were observed for the oseltamivir-zanamivir combination. For the oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 H275Y virus, the efficacy of oseltamivir-zanamivir was comparable to that of zanamivir and significantly higher than that of oseltamivir in terms of survival, weight loss and LVT.

  1. A Comparison of AH6 AG Scores and GCE Examinations Taken after an Interval of One Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heim, A. W.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    GCE O-and A-level examinations were correlated with the AH6 AG test scores obtained a year earlier. Results suggest that the predictive value of AH6 for success in individual subjects is almost as high as when the examinations and testing were taken within a few weeks of each other. (Authors/CB)

  2. Third Wave of Influenza A(H7N9) Virus from Poultry, Guangdong Province, China, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shumin; Jia, Weixin; Lin, Yicun; Xing, Kaixiang; Ren, Xingxing; Qi, Wenbao; Liao, Ming

    2015-09-01

    Fourteen influenza A(H7N9) viruses were isolated from poultry or the environment in live poultry markets in Guangdong Province, China during 2014-2015. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all viruses were descended from viruses of the second wave of influenza A(H7N9) virus infections during 2013. These viruses can be divided into 2 branches.

  3. Third Wave of Influenza A(H7N9) Virus from Poultry, Guangdong Province, China, 2014–2015

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shumin; Jia, Weixin; Lin, Yicun; Xing, Kaixiang; Ren, Xingxing; Qi, Wenbao

    2015-01-01

    Fourteen influenza A(H7N9) viruses were isolated from poultry or the environment in live poultry markets in Guangdong Province, China during 2014−2015. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all viruses were descended from viruses of the second wave of influenza A(H7N9) virus infections during 2013. These viruses can be divided into 2 branches. PMID:26291620

  4. Human infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant virus in the United States, 2011-2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND. During August 2011-April 2012, 13 human infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant (H3N2v) virus were identified in the United States; 8 occurred in the prior 2 years. This virus differs from previous variant influenza viruses in that it contains the matrix (M) gene from the Influenza A(H...

  5. Two alleles of ahFAD2B control the high oleic acid trait in cultivated peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high oleic:linoleic acid ratio (O/L) in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) seeds is controlled primarily by two recessive genes, ahFAD2A and ahFAD2B (ol1 and ol2). Marker-assisted breeding for high O/L could become routine provided that user-friendly and economical markers could be developed that would...

  6. Negative feedback regulation of ABA biosynthesis in peanut (Arachis hypogaea): a transcription factor complex inhibits AhNCED1 expression during water stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Li, Meijuan; Su, Liangchen; Ge, Kui; Li, Limei; Li, Xiaoyun; Liu, Xu; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a key plant stress-signaling hormone, is produced in response to drought and counteracts the effects of this stress. The accumulation of ABA is controlled by the enzyme 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). In Arabidopsis, NCED3 is regulated by a positive feedback mechanism by ABA. In this study in peanut (Arachis hypogaea), we demonstrate that ABA biosynthesis is also controlled by negative feedback regulation, mediated by the inhibitory effect on AhNCED1 transcription of a protein complex between transcription factors AhNAC2 and AhAREB1. AhNCED1 was significantly down-regulated after PEG treatment for 10 h, at which time ABA content reached a peak. A ChIP-qPCR assay confirmed AhAREB1 and AhNAC2 binding to the AhNCED1 promoter in response to ABA. Moreover, the interaction between AhAREB1 and AhNAC2, and a transient expression assay showed that the protein complex could negatively regulate the expression of AhNCED1. The results also demonstrated that AhAREB1 was the key factor in AhNCED1 feedback regulation, while AhNAC2 played a subsidiary role. ABA reduced the rate of AhAREB1 degradation and enhanced both the synthesis and degradation rate of the AhNAC2 protein. In summary, the AhAREB1/AhNAC2 protein complex functions as a negative feedback regulator of drought-induced ABA biosynthesis in peanut. PMID:27892506

  7. Stress analysis of 27% scale model of AH-64 main rotor hub

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    Stress analysis of an AH-64 27% scale model rotor hub was performed. Component loads and stresses were calculated based upon blade root loads and motions. The static and fatigue analysis indicates positive margins of safety in all components checked. Using the format developed here, the hub can be stress checked for future application.

  8. Influenza A(H10N7) Virus in Dead Harbor Seals, Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Mette S.; Holm, Elisabeth; Hjulsager, Charlotte K.; Chriél, Mariann; Pedersen, Karl; Andresen, Lars O.; Abildstrøm, Morten; Jensen, Trine H.; Larsen, Lars E.

    2015-01-01

    Since April 2014, an outbreak of influenza in harbor seals has been ongoing in northern Europe. In Denmark during June–August, 152 harbor seals on the island of Anholt were found dead from severe pneumonia. We detected influenza A(H10N7) virus in 2 of 4 seals examined. PMID:25811098

  9. Human influenza A(H7N9) virus infection associated with poultry farm, Northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ming; Huang, Biao; Wang, Ao; Deng, Liquan; Wu, Donglin; Lu, Xinrong; Zhao, Qinglong; Xu, Shuang; Havers, Fiona; Wang, Yanhui; Wu, Jing; Yin, Yuan; Sun, Bingxin; Yao, Jianyi; Xiang, Nijuan

    2014-11-01

    We report on a case of human infection with influenza A(H7N9) virus in Jilin Province in northeastern China. This case was associated with a poultry farm rather than a live bird market, which may point to a new focus for public health surveillance and interventions in this evolving outbreak.

  10. Whole-Genome Sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila Strain AH-1 (Serotype O11)

    PubMed Central

    Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Tomás, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is an emerging pathogen of aquatic and terrestrial animals, including humans. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of the septicemic A. hydrophila AH-1 strain, belonging to the serotype O11, and the first mesophilic Aeromonas with surface layer (S-layer) to be sequenced. PMID:27587829

  11. IEEE 802.11ah: A Technology to Face the IoT Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Baños-Gonzalez, Victor; Afaqui, M. Shahwaiz; Lopez-Aguilera, Elena; Garcia-Villegas, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Since the conception of the Internet of things (IoT), a large number of promising applications and technologies have been developed, which will change different aspects in our daily life. This paper explores the key characteristics of the forthcoming IEEE 802.11ah specification. This future IEEE 802.11 standard aims to amend the IEEE 802.11 legacy specification to support IoT requirements. We present a thorough evaluation of the foregoing amendment in comparison to the most notable IEEE 802.11 standards. In addition, we expose the capabilities of future IEEE 802.11ah in supporting different IoT applications. Also, we provide a brief overview of the technology contenders that are competing to cover the IoT communications framework. Numerical results are presented showing how the future IEEE 802.11ah specification offers the features required by IoT communications, thus putting forward IEEE 802.11ah as a technology to cater the needs of the Internet of Things paradigm. PMID:27879688

  12. Symbology display unit: night vision symbology for the AH-64, increasing mission effectiveness and safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, Michael; McIntire, Dennis

    2006-05-01

    An important capability has been developed for the AH-64 that provides increased mission effectiveness and improved flight safety. First introduced for the Integrated Helmet and Display Sighting Subsystem (IHADSS) on the Agusta A-129, the Symbology Display Unit (SDU) provides IHADSS symbology to the aviator through the Aviator's Night Vision Imaging System (ANVIS) (Night Vision Goggles). Specifically designed for compatibility with the AH-64 and the Legacy IHADSS display and head tracking system, the SDU provides seamless integration of this critical capability into the cockpit. The SDU has been adapted to the IHADSS on the AH-64 and is currently in early fielding within both the US and UK fleets. Although the use of ANVIS on the AH-64 is not a new concept, the ability to display IHADSS symbology integrated with the head tracker is. With the display of IHADSS symbology within the ANVIS field of view, additional capabilities and benefits are realized, including sighting and weapons control, mission performance during poor FLIR conditions, increased target recognition, and improved safety realized by the availability of heads-up pilotage information.

  13. Narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination

    PubMed Central

    van der Most, Robbert; Van Mechelen, Marcelle; Destexhe, Eric; Wettendorff, Martine; Hanon, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological data from several European countries suggested an increased risk of the chronic sleep disorder narcolepsy following vaccination with Pandemrix™, an AS03-adjuvanted, pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine. Further research to investigate potential associations between Pandemrix™ vaccination, A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection and narcolepsy is required. Narcolepsy is most commonly caused by a reduction or absence of hypocretin produced by hypocretin-secreting neurons in the hypothalamus, and is tightly associated with HLA-II DQB1*06:02. Consequently, research focusing on CD4+ T-cell responses, building on the hypothesis that for disease development, T cells specific for antigen(s) from hypocretin neurons must be activated or reactivated, is considered essential. Therefore, the following key areas of research can be identified, (1) characterization of hypothetical narcolepsy-specific auto-immune CD4+ T cells, (2) mapping epitopes of such T cells, and (3) evaluating potential mechanisms that would enable such cells to gain access to the hypothalamus. Addressing these questions could further our understanding of the potential links between narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and/or infection. Of particular interest is that any evidence of a mimicry-based mechanism could also explain the association between narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection. PMID:24342916

  14. Transmission Potential of Influenza A(H7N9) Virus, China, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Kucharski, Adam J; Mills, Harriet L; Donnelly, Christl A; Riley, Steven

    2015-05-01

    To determine transmission potential of influenza A(H7N9) virus, we used symptom onset data to compare 2 waves of infection in China during 2013-2014. We found evidence of increased transmission potential in the second wave and showed that live bird market closure was significantly less effective in Guangdong than in other regions.

  15. Potentially-toxic and essential elements profile of AH1N1 patients in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Mireya; Bautista, Edgar G.; Velázquez-González, Antonio; Vázquez-Gutiérrez, Felipe; Tzintzun, Guadalupe; García-Arreola, María Elena; Castillejos, Manuel; Hernández, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    During spring of 2009, a new influenza virus AH1N1 spread in the world causing acute respiratory illness and death, resulting in the first influenza pandemic since 1968. Blood levels of potentially-toxic and essential elements of 40 pneumonia and confirmed AH1N1 were evaluated against two different groups of controls, both not infected with the pandemic strain. Significant concentrations of potentially-toxic elements (lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, arsenic) along with deficiency of selenium or increased Zn/Cu ratios characterized AH1N1 cases under study when evaluated versus controlled cases. Deficiency of selenium is progressively observed from controls I (influenza like illness) through controls II (pneumonia) and finally pneumonia -AH1N1 infected patients. Cases with blood Se levels greater than the recommended for an optimal cut-off to activate glutathione peroxidase (12.5 μg/dL) recovered from illness and survived. Evaluation of this essential element in critical pneumonia patients at the National Institutes is under evaluation as a clinical trial. PMID:23422930

  16. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus Infection in Giant Pandas, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Desheng; Zhu, Ling; Cui, Hengmin; Ling, Shanshan; Fan, Shengtao; Yu, Zhijun; Zhou, Yuancheng; Wang, Tiecheng; Qian, Jun; Xia, Xianzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Wang, Chengdong

    2014-01-01

    We confirmed infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in giant pandas in China during 2009 by using virus isolation and serologic analysis methods. This finding extends the host range of influenza viruses and indicates a need for increased surveillance for and control of influenza viruses among giant pandas. PMID:24565026

  17. Human Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infection Associated with Poultry Farm, Northeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ming; Huang, Biao; Wang, Ao; Deng, Liquan; Wu, Donglin; Lu, Xinrong; Zhao, Qinglong; Xu, Shuang; Havers, Fiona; Wang, Yanhui; Wu, Jing; Yin, Yuan; Sun, Bingxin; Yao, Jianyi

    2014-01-01

    We report on a case of human infection with influenza A(H7N9) virus in Jilin Province in northeastern China. This case was associated with a poultry farm rather than a live bird market, which may point to a new focus for public health surveillance and interventions in this evolving outbreak. PMID:25340624

  18. Transmission Potential of Influenza A(H7N9) Virus, China, 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Harriet L.; Donnelly, Christl A.; Riley, Steven

    2015-01-01

    To determine transmission potential of influenza A(H7N9) virus, we used symptom onset data to compare 2 waves of infection in China during 2013–2014. We found evidence of increased transmission potential in the second wave and showed that live bird market closure was significantly less effective in Guangdong than in other regions. PMID:25897624

  19. IEEE 802.11ah: A Technology to Face the IoT Challenge.

    PubMed

    Baños-Gonzalez, Victor; Afaqui, M Shahwaiz; Lopez-Aguilera, Elena; Garcia-Villegas, Eduard

    2016-11-22

    Since the conception of the Internet of things (IoT), a large number of promising applications and technologies have been developed, which will change different aspects in our daily life. This paper explores the key characteristics of the forthcoming IEEE 802.11ah specification. This future IEEE 802.11 standard aims to amend the IEEE 802.11 legacy specification to support IoT requirements. We present a thorough evaluation of the foregoing amendment in comparison to the most notable IEEE 802.11 standards. In addition, we expose the capabilities of future IEEE 802.11ah in supporting different IoT applications. Also, we provide a brief overview of the technology contenders that are competing to cover the IoT communications framework. Numerical results are presented showing how the future IEEE 802.11ah specification offers the features required by IoT communications, thus putting forward IEEE 802.11ah as a technology to cater the needs of the Internet of Things paradigm.

  20. Development, documentation and correlation of a NASTRAN vibration model of the AH-1G helicopter airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronkhite, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    NASTRAN was evaluated for vibration analysis of the helicopter airframe. The first effort involved development of a NASTRAN model of the AH-1G helicopter airframe and comprehensive documentation of the model. The next effort was to assess the validity of the NASTRAN model by comparisons with static and vibration tests.

  1. Research Updates: Experimental Evaluation of 2009 Pandemic A/H1N1 in Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: In March 2009, a novel pandemic A/H1N1 emerged in the human population in North America (2). The gene constellation of the emerging virus was demonstrated to be a combination of genes from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages that had never before be...

  2. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection in giant pandas, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Desheng; Zhu, Ling; Cui, Hengmin; Ling, Shanshan; Fan, Shengtao; Yu, Zhijun; Zhou, Yuancheng; Wang, Tiecheng; Qian, Jun; Xia, Xianzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Gao, Yuwei; Wang, Chengdong

    2014-03-01

    We confirmed infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in giant pandas in China during 2009 by using virus isolation and serologic analysis methods. This finding extends the host range of influenza viruses and indicates a need for increased surveillance for and control of influenza viruses among giant pandas.

  3. Genome Sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila Strain AH-3 (Serotype O34)

    PubMed Central

    Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Tomás, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is an emerging pathogen of poikilothermic animals, from fish to mammals, including humans. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of the A. hydrophila AH-3 strain, isolated from a fish farm goldfish septicemia outbreak in Spain, with a characterized polar and lateral flagellum glycosylation pattern. PMID:27587828

  4. Development of a 10 Ah, Prismatic, Lithium-Ion Cell for NASA/GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Brian; Baker, John W.; George, Douglas S.; Isaacs, Nathan D.; Shah, Pinakin M.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    MSA's 10 Ah Li-ion cell is a rugged design suitable for the stringent requirements of aerospace applications. Eighteen cells demonstrate consistent cycling performance over a wide range of rates and temperatures. The cell passes qualification requirements for vibration survivability technology improvements at MSA continue to enhance cell performance.

  5. Adhesion of Epiphany and AH Plus sealers to human root dentin treated with different solutions.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Vinicius Humberto; Silva, Ricardo Gariba; Alfredo, Edson; Sousa-Neto, Manoel D; Silva-Sousa, Yara T C

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated comparatively the adhesion of Epiphany and AH Plus endodontic sealers to human root dentin treated with 1% NaOCl and 1% NaOCl+17% EDTA, using the push-out test. Sixty root cylinders obtained from maxillary canines had the canals prepared and were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=20), according to root dentin treatment: GI - distilled water (control), GII - 1% NaOCl and GIII - 1% NaOCl+17% EDTA. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups (n=10) filled with either Epiphany or AH Plus. Bond strength push-out test data (kN) were obtained and analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. There was statistically significant difference between sealers (AH Plus: 0.78 +/- 0.13; Epiphany: 0.61 +/- 0.19; p<0.01) and among root dentin treatments (distilled water: 0.58 +/- 0.19; 1% NaOCl: 0.71 +/- 0.12; 1% NaOCl+17% EDTA: 0.80 +/- 0.17; p<0.05). In conclusion, AH Plus sealer presented greater adhesion to dentin than Epiphany, regardless of the treatment of root canal walls.

  6. A Challenge for Social Studies Educators: Teaching about Islam, "Jihad," and "Shari'ah" Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, James R.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author investigates the controversial curricular and instructional aspects of teaching about Islam in social studies courses. Specifically, the author discusses pedagogically sound approaches to teaching about "jihad" and "Shari'ah" law, two of the most important and controversial concepts in Islam that often generate intense…

  7. Precursor systems analyses of automated highway systems. Activity area H: AHS roadway deployment analysis. Final report, September 1993-November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, R.; Lima, P.; Crowe, E.; O`Brien, S.

    1995-05-01

    The activity addresses highway infrastructure topics that will be encouraged when an automated highway system (AHS) is deployed. AHS right-of-way requirements were analyzed, based on the following criteria: width of AHS vehicle, ability of the system to keep the vehicle on the desired path, barrier width (for dedicated systems), presence or absence of shoulder (breakdown lane), and width of the shoulder. AHS capacity was established by utilizing traffic densities based on platoon sizes, inter-platoon spacings, and intra-platoon spacing. Inter-platoon spacing considered several failure assumptions and the requirement that inter-platoon spacing provide safe braking distances based on the failure assumptions. Based on this analysis, it is concluded that AHS capacities as high as 6,000 vehicles per lane per hour would be feasible. This established the range of capcity used in further Precursor Systems Analyses.

  8. Possible pandemic threat from new reassortment of influenza A(H7N9) virus in China.

    PubMed

    Meng, Z; Han, R; Hu, Y; Yuan, Z; Jiang, S; Zhang, X; Xu, J

    2014-02-13

    Avian influenza A(H7N9) virus re-emerged in China in December 2013, after a decrease in the number of new cases during the preceding six months. Reassortment between influenza A(H7N9) and local H9N2 strains has spread from China's south-east coast to other regions. Three new reassortments of A(H7N9) virus were identified by phylogenetic analysis: between A(H7N9) and Zhejiang-derived strains, Guangdong/Hong Kong-derived strains or Hunan-derived A(H9N2) strains. Our findings suggest there is a possible risk that a pandemic could develop.

  9. Mercury transformation and speciation in flue gases from anthropogenic emission sources: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Shuxiao; Wu, Qingru; Wang, Fengyang; Lin, Che-Jen; Zhang, Leiming; Hui, Mulin; Yang, Mei; Su, Haitao; Hao, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Mercury transformation mechanisms and speciation profiles are reviewed for mercury formed in and released from flue gases of coal-fired boilers, non-ferrous metal smelters, cement plants, iron and steel plants, waste incinerators, biomass burning and so on. Mercury in coal, ores, and other raw materials is released to flue gases in the form of Hg0 during combustion or smelting in boilers, kilns or furnaces. Decreasing temperature from over 800 °C to below 300 °C in flue gases leaving boilers, kilns or furnaces promotes homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation of Hg0 to gaseous divalent mercury (Hg2+), with a portion of Hg2+ adsorbed onto fly ash to form particulate-bound mercury (Hgp). Halogen is the primary oxidizer for Hg0 in flue gases, and active components (e.g., TiO2, Fe2O3, etc.) on fly ash promote heterogeneous oxidation and adsorption processes. In addition to mercury removal, mercury transformation also occurs when passing through air pollution control devices (APCDs), affecting the mercury speciation in flue gases. In coal-fired power plants, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system promotes mercury oxidation by 34-85 %, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and fabric filter (FF) remove over 99 % of Hgp, and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFGD) captures 60-95 % of Hg2+. In non-ferrous metal smelters, most Hg0 is converted to Hg2+ and removed in acid plants (APs). For cement clinker production, mercury cycling and operational conditions promote heterogeneous mercury oxidation and adsorption. The mercury speciation profiles in flue gases emitted to the atmosphere are determined by transformation mechanisms and mercury removal efficiencies by various APCDs. For all the sectors reviewed in this study, Hgp accounts for less than 5 % in flue gases. In China, mercury emission has a higher Hg0 fraction (66-82 % of total mercury) in flue gases from coal combustion, in contrast to a greater Hg2+ fraction (29-90 %) from non-ferrous metal smelting, cement and

  10. Mercury transformation and speciation in flue gases from anthropogenic emission sources: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Wang, S. X.; Wu, Q. R.; Wang, F. Y.; Lin, C.-J.; Zhang, L. M.; Hui, M. L.; Hao, J. M.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury transformation mechanisms and speciation profiles are reviewed for mercury formed in and released from flue gases of coal-fired boilers, non-ferrous metal smelters, cement plants, iron and steel plants, municipal solid waste incinerators, and biomass burning. Mercury in coal, ores and other raw materials is released to flue gases in the form of Hg0 during combustion or smelting in boilers, kilns or furnaces. Decreasing temperature from over 800 °C to below 300 °C in flue gases leaving boilers, kilns or furnaces promotes homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0) to gaseous divalent mercury (Hg2+), with a portion of Hg2+ adsorbed onto fly ash to form particulate-bound mercury (Hgp). Halogen is the primary oxidizer for Hg0 in flue gases, and active components (e.g.,TiO2, Fe2O3, etc.) on fly ash promote heterogeneous oxidation and adsorption processes. In addition to mercury removal, mercury transformation also occurs when passing through air pollution control devices (APCDs), affecting the mercury speciation in flue gases. In coal-fired power plants, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system promotes mercury oxidation by 34-85 %, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and fabric filter (FF) remove over 99 % of Hgp, and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFGD) captures 60-95 % of Hg2+. In non-ferrous metal smelters, most Hg0 is converted to Hg2+ and removed in acid plants (APs). For cement clinker production, mercury cycling and operational conditions promote heterogeneous mercury oxidation and adsorption. The mercury speciation profiles in flue gases emitted to the atmosphere are determined by transformation mechanisms and mercury removal efficiencies by various APCDs. For all the sectors reviewed in this study, Hgp accounts for less than 5 % in flue gases. In China, mercury emission has a higher fraction (66-82 % of total mercury) in flue gases from coal combustion, in contrast to a greater Hg2+ fraction (29-90 %) from non

  11. Clinical severity of human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongjie; Cowling, Benjamin J.; Feng, Luzhao; Lau, Eric H. Y.; Liao, Qiaohong; Tsang, Tim K.; Peng, Zhibin; Wu, Peng; Liu, Fengfeng; Fang, Vicky J.; Zhang, Honglong; Li, Ming; Zeng, Lingjia; Xu, Zhen; Li, Zhongjie; Luo, Huiming; Li, Qun; Feng, Zijian; Cao, Bin; Yang, Weizhong; Wu, Joseph T.; Wang, Yu; Leung, Gabriel M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Characterizing the severity profile of human infections with influenza viruses of animal origin is a part of pandemic risk assessment, and an important part of the assessment of disease epidemiology. Our objective was to assess the clinical severity of human infections with the avian influenza A(H7N9) virus that has recently emerged in China. Methods Among laboratory-confirmed cases of A(H7N9) who were hospitalised, we estimated the risk of fatality, mechanical ventilation, and admission to the intensive care unit based on censored data during the currently ongoing outbreak. We also used information on laboratory-confirmed cases detected through sentinel influenza-like illness (ILI) surveillance to estimate the number of symptomatic A(H7N9) virus infections to date and the symptomatic case fatality risk. Findings Among 123 hospitalised cases, 37 cases had died and 69 had recovered by May 28, 2013. Hospitalised cases had high risks of mortality (36%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 26%–45%), mechanical ventilation or mortality (69%; 95% CI: 60%–77%), and ICU admission or mechanical ventilation or mortality (83%; 95% CI: 76%–90%), and the risk of these severe outcomes increased with age. Depending on assumptions about the coverage of the sentinel ILI network and health-care seeking behavior for cases of ILI associated with A(H7N9) virus infection, we estimated that the symptomatic case fatality risk could be between 160 and 2,800 per 100,000 symptomatic cases. Interpretation We estimated that the severity of A(H7N9) is somewhat lower than A(H5N1) but higher than seasonal influenza viruses and influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. The estimated risks of fatality among hospitalised cases and symptomatic cases are measures of severity that should not be affected by shifts over time in the probability of laboratory-confirmation of mild cases and should inform risk assessment. Funding Ministry of Science and Technology, China; Research Fund for the Control of

  12. 40 CFR 600.108-08 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 600.108-08 Analytical gases. The analytical gases for all fuel economy...

  13. 40 CFR 600.108-08 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 600.108-08 Analytical gases. The analytical gases for all fuel economy...

  14. Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases: International Emissions and Projections

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA August 2011 report on global non-CO2 emissions projections (1990-2030) for emissions of non-CO2 greenhouse gases (methane, nitrous oxide, and fluorinated greenhouse gases) from more than twenty emissions sources.

  15. EVALUATION OF SIGNIFICANT ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES OF RADIATIVELY IMPORTANT TRACE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an initial evaluation of significant anthropogenic sources of radiatively important trace gases. missions of greenhouse gases from human activities--including fossil fuel combustion, industrial/agricultural activities, and transportation--contribute to the increasin...

  16. 40 CFR 600.108-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1978 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Test Procedures § 600.108-78 Analytical gases. The analytical gases for all...

  17. Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Turick, C.E.

    1997-06-10

    A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases. 3 figs.

  18. Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Turick, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases.

  19. AH Cam: A metal-rich RR Lyrae star with the shortest known Blazhko period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Horace A.; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Lee, Kevin M.; Williams, Jeffrey; Silbermann, N. A.; Bolte, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of 746 new V-band observations of the RR Lyrae star AH Cam obtained during 1989 - 1992 clearly show that its light curve cannot be described by a single period. In fact, at first glance, the Fourier spectrum of the photometry resembles that of a double-mode pulsator, with peaks at a fundamental period of 0.3686 d and an apparent secondary period of 0.2628 d. Nevertheless, the dual-mode solution is a poor fit to the data. Rather, we believe that AH Cam is a single-mode RR Lyrae star undergoing the Blazhko effect: periodic modulation of the amplitude and shape of its light curve. What was originally taken to be the period of the second mode is instead the 1-cycle/d alias of a modulation sidelobe in the Fourier spectrum. The data are well described by a modulation period of just under 11 d, which is the shortest Blazhko period reported to date in the literature and confirms the earlier suggestion by Goranskii. A low-resolution spectrum of AH Cam indicates that it is relatively metal rich, with delta-S less than or = 2. Its high metallicity and short modulation period may provide a critical test of at least one theory for the Blazhko effect. Moskalik's internal resonance model makes specific predictions of the growth rate of the fundamental model vs fundamental period. AH Cam falls outside the regime of other known Blazhko variables and resonance model predictions, but these are appropriate for metal-poor RR Lyrae stars. If the theory matches the behavior of AH Cam for a metal-rich stellar model, this would bolster the resonance hypothesis.

  20. PPARalpha activation potentiates AhR-induced CYP1A1 expression.

    PubMed

    Fallone, Frédérique; Villard, Pierre-Henri; Decome, Laetitia; Sérée, Eric; Méo, Michel de; Chacon, Christine; Durand, Alain; Barra, Yves; Lacarelle, Bruno

    2005-12-15

    CYP1A1 is an extrahepatic enzyme largely involved in the bioactivation of various procarcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and arylamines. CYP1A1 expression is mainly regulated by AhR. Our laboratory has recently shown a new CYP1A1 regulation pathway involving PPARalpha. The aim of this study was to evaluate, in a Caco-2 cell line, the effect of a coexposure to 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC, AhR ligand) and WY-14643 (WY, PPARalpha ligand) on CYP1A1 expression (enzymatic activity, mRNA level and promoter activity). An additive effect on CYP1A1 expression was shown in cells coexposed with 3MC (0.1 or 1 microM) and a low WY concentration (30 microM) whereas a potentiating effect was observed after coexposure with 3MC (0.1 or 1 microM) and a high WY concentration (200 microM). Furthermore, 200 microM WY, alone or with 3MC, was able to increase the AhR protein level (two-fold). In conclusion, coexposure with 3MC and the PPARalpha agonist WY leads to an additive or potentiating effect on CYP1A1 inducibility, depending on the WY concentration. Furthermore, at high concentration (200 microM), WY induced AhR expression, which could explain the potentiating effect on CYP1A1 inducibility observed after addition of an AhR ligand (3MC). This phenomenon should be taken into account for risk assessment involving CYP1A1 induction.

  1. Properties and Bibliography of GaSe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    covered by (Nitsche 1961), (Boelsterli 1962), (Terhell 1972,1975), (van Egmond 1974) and (Wiedemeier 1992). Crystals grown by the Bridgman method have...8217 ± 10’ 9(•.=5.31gm) = 10010’ ± 20’ e(0(=10.6gm) = 12040’ ± 20’. Also for SHG of 10.61m, they measured d22(GaSe)/d 3l ( CdSe ) = 3 ± 0.6, taking d31( CdSe ...proustite) = 4.9 ± 0.7 which yields d22(GaSe) = 180 x 10-9 esu when taking d-(proustite) = 37 x 10-9 esu and d31 ( CdSe ) = 53 x 10-9 esu. Also, they summed YAG

  2. Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.; Kurylo, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    We seek funding from NASA for the third year (2005) of the four-year period January 1, 2003 - December 31, 2006 for continued support of the MIT contributions to the multi-national global atmospheric trace species measurement program entitled Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE). The case for real-time high-frequency measurement networks like AGAGE is very strong and the observations and their interpretation are widely recognized for their importance to ozone depletion and climate change studies and to verification issues arising from the Montreal Protocol (ozone) and Kyoto Protocol (climate). The proposed AGAGE program is distinguished by its capability to measure over the globe at high frequency almost all of the important species in the Montreal Protocol and almost all of the significant non-CO2 gases in the Kyoto Protocol.

  3. Cooling and thermometry of atomic Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofrio, R.

    2016-11-01

    We review the status of cooling techniques aimed at achieving the deepest quantum degeneracy for atomic Fermi gases. We first discuss some physics motivations, providing a quantitative assessment of the need for deep quantum degeneracy in relevant physics cases, such as the search for unconventional superfluid states. Attention is then focused on the most widespread technique to reach deep quantum degeneracy for Fermi systems, sympathetic cooling of Bose - Fermi mixtures, organizing the discussion according to the specific species involved. Various proposals to circumvent some of the limitations on achieving the deepest Fermi degeneracy, and their experimental realizations, are then reviewed. Finally, we discuss the extension of these techniques to optical lattices and the implementation of precision thermometry crucial to the understanding of the phase diagram of classical and quantum phase transitions in Fermi gases.

  4. Factors affecting cleanup of exhaust gases from a pressurized, fluidized-bed coal combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollbuhler, R. J.; Kobak, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The cleanup of effluent gases from the fluidized-bed combustion of coal is examined. Testing conditions include the type and feed rate of the coal and the sulfur sorbent, the coal-sorbent ratio, the coal-combustion air ratio, the depth of the reactor fluidizing bed, and the technique used to physically remove fly ash from the reactor effluent gases. Tests reveal that the particulate loading matter in the effluent gases is a function not only of the reactor-bed surface gas velocity, but also of the type of coal being burnt and the time the bed is operating. At least 95 percent of the fly ash particules in the effluent gas are removed by using a gas-solids separator under controlled operating conditions. Gaseous pollutants in the effluent (nitrogen and sulfur oxides) are held within the proposed Federal limits by controlling the reactor operating conditions and the type and quantity of sorbent material.

  5. Distribution of inert gases in fines from the Cayley-Descartes region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J. R.; Lakatos, S.; Heymann, D.

    1973-01-01

    The inert gases in 14 different fines and in one sample of 2 to 4 mm fines from Apollo 16 were measured by mass spectroscopy with respect to trapped solar wind gases, cosmogenic gases, and 'parentless' Ar-40. Such studies are helpful for the understanding of regolith evolution, of transport of regolith fines, and of the lunar atmosphere. The Apollo 16 soils are unique because they represent, after Luna 20, the second and much more extensive record from the lunar highlands. The landing site presents the problem of materials from the Cayley Formation vs those from the Descartes Formation. There are two large, relatively fresh craters in the area, North Ray and South Ray, whose ejecta patterns may be recognized in the inert-gas record.

  6. Glass Membrane For Controlled Diffusion Of Gases

    DOEpatents

    Shelby, James E.; Kenyon, Brian E.

    2001-05-15

    A glass structure for controlled permeability of gases includes a glass vessel. The glass vessel has walls and a hollow center for receiving a gas. The glass vessel contains a metal oxide dopant formed with at least one metal selected from the group consisting of transition metals and rare earth metals for controlling diffusion of the gas through the walls of the glass vessel. The vessel releases the gas through its walls upon exposure to a radiation source.

  7. Splitting of inviscid fluxes for real gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Vanleer, Bram; Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1988-01-01

    Flux-vector and flux-difference splittings for the inviscid terms of the compressible flow equations are derived under the assumption of a general equation of state for a real gas in equilibrium. No necessary assumptions, approximations or auxiliary quantities are introduced. The formulas derived include several particular cases known for ideal gases and readily apply to curvilinear coordinates. Applications of the formulas in a TVD algorithm to one-dimensional shock-tube and nozzle problems show their quality and robustness.

  8. The Osher scheme for real gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, Ambady; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1990-01-01

    An extension of Osher's approximate Riemann solver to include gases with an arbitrary equation of state is presented. By a judicious choice of thermodynamic variables, the Riemann invariats are reduced to quadratures which are then approximated numerically. The extension is rigorous and does not involve any further assumptions or approximations over the ideal gas case. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the proposed method.

  9. Splitting of inviscid fluxes for real gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Van Leer, Bram; Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1990-01-01

    Flux-vector and flux-difference splittings for the inviscid terms of the compressible flow equations are derived under the assumption of a general equation of state for a real gas in equilibrium. No necessary assumptions, approximations for auxiliary quantities are introduced. The formulas derived include several particular cases known for ideal gases and readily apply to curvilinear coordinates. Applications of the formulas in a TVD algorithm to one-dimensional shock-tube and nozzle problems show their quality and robustness.

  10. Thermodynamics of dilute gases in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, D.; Criado-Sancho, M.

    2001-03-01

    We consider the effect of shear and normal viscous pressures on the non-equilibrium entropy of ideal gases in Couette flow. These results extend the previous ones (Bidar et al., Physica A 233 (1996) 163), where normal pressure effects were ignored. Furthermore, we analyze the non-equilibrium contributions to the chemical potential, which may be useful in the analysis of shear-induced effects on colligative properties and chemical equilibrium.

  11. Gases in Sea Ice 1975 - 1979.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    understanding the magnitude and rate of exchange of CO, CH4 , and N20 in the I arctic. These trace gases are crucial to many important tropospheric...These factors are of prime importance in producing low sea surface temperatures through water stirring, reduced isolation, and increased sensible and...air. Open water during the winter in the form of leads and polyni may amount to as much as 11 percent in area and are important in the air-sea

  12. Method for introduction of gases into microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.; Koo, Jackson C.; Rosencwaig, Allan

    1981-01-01

    A method for producing small hollow glass spheres filled with a gas by introduction of the gas during formation of the hollow glass spheres. Hollow glass microspheres having a diameter up to about 500.mu. with both thin walls (0.5 to 4.mu.) and thick walls (5 to 20.mu.) that contain various fill gases, such as Ar, Kr, Xe, Br, DT, H.sub.2, D.sub.2, He, N.sub.2, Ne, CO.sub.2, etc. in the interior thereof, can be produced by the diffusion of the fill gas or gases into the microsphere during the formation thereof from a liquid droplet of glass-forming solution. This is accomplished by filling at least a portion of the multiple-zone drop-furnace used in producing hollow microspheres with the gas or gases of interest, and then taking advantage of the high rate of gaseous diffusion of the fill gas through the wall of the gel membrane before it transforms into a glass microsphere as it is processed in the multiple-zone furnace. Almost any gas can be introduced into the inner cavity of a glass microsphere by this method during the formation of the microsphere provided that the gas is diffused into the gel membrane or microsphere prior to its transformation into glass. The process of this invention provides a significant savings of time and related expense of filling glass microspheres with various gases. For example, the time for filling a glass microballoon with 1 atmosphere of DT is reduced from about two hours to a few seconds.

  13. Global Reactive Gases in the MACC project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, M. G.

    2012-04-01

    In preparation for the planned atmospheric service component of the European Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) initiative, the EU FP7 project Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) developed a preoperational data assimilation and modelling system for monitoring and forecasting of reactive gases, greenhouse gases and aerosols. The project is coordinated by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and the system is built on ECMWF's Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) which has been coupled to the chemistry transport models MOZART-3 and TM5. In order to provide daily forecasts of up to 96 hours for global reactive gases, various satellite retrieval products for ozone (total column and profile data), CO, NO2, CH2O and SO2 are either actively assimilated or passively monitored. The MACC system is routinely evaluated with in-situ data from ground-based stations, ozone sondes and aircraft measurements, and with independent satellite retrievals. Global MACC reactive gases forecasts are used in the planning and analysis of large international field campaigns and to provide dynamical chemical boundary conditions to regional air quality models worldwide. Several case studies of outstanding air pollution events have been performed, and they demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of chemical data assimilation based on current satellite data products. Besides the regular analyses and forecasts of the tropospheric chemical composition, the MACC system is also used to monitor the evolution of stratospheric ozone. A comprehensive reanalysis simulation from 2003 to 2010 provides new insights into the interannual variability of the atmospheric chemical composition.

  14. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2015-12-30

    A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, have been observed in the higher-pressure region.

  15. Noble Gases in the Chelyabinsk Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haba, Makiko K.; Sumino, Hirochika; Nagao, Keisuke; Mikouchi, Takashi; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite fell in Russia on February 15, 2013 and was classified as LL5 chondrite. The diameter before it entered the atmosphere has been estimated to be about 20 m [1]. Up to now, numerous fragments weighing much greater than 100 kg in total have been collected. In this study, all noble gases were measured for 13 fragments to investigate the exposure history of the Chelyabinsk meteorite and the thermal history of its parent asteroid.

  16. Thermodynamics of Quantum Gases for the Entire Range of Temperature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biswas, Shyamal; Jana, Debnarayan

    2012-01-01

    We have analytically explored the thermodynamics of free Bose and Fermi gases for the entire range of temperature, and have extended the same for harmonically trapped cases. We have obtained approximate chemical potentials for the quantum gases in closed forms of temperature so that the thermodynamic properties of the quantum gases become…

  17. Heat transfer during quenching of gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambraziavichius, A.

    Results of theoretical and experimental investigations of gas-side heat transfer of subsonic laminar or turbulent flows of diatomic gases (air or nitrogen) heated to 5000 K in cold-wall pipes are presented. While determining the mixing length, physical parameters which consider local temperatures of the boundary layer were adopted. Thus, the generalized fields of velocities and temperatures in the turbulent region of the boundary layer are identical for both moderate and high gas temperature ranges, and Pr-sub-t may be considered constant and approximately equal to 0.9. The temperature level of gases in turblent flow is shown to insignificantly affect heat transfer equations, provided the physical parameters in the similarity numbers are chosen according to the bulk flow temperature. A calculation technique is developed for heat transfer of dissociated diatomic gases in annular and rectangular channels, in slots, and over bundles of square tubes in cross flow. Also, a relation is shown between the heat transfer coefficient, quenching velocity, and nitrogen oxide concentration in the air exhaust of a nitrogen oxide quenching apparatus.

  18. Method for introduction of gases into microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.; Koo, J.C.; Rosencwaig, A.

    A method is described for producing small hollow glass spheres filled with a gas by introduction of the gas during formation of the hollow glass spheres. Hollow glass microspheres having a diameter up to about 500..mu.. with both thin walls (0.5 to 4/sub ..mu../) and thick walls (5 to 20/sub ..mu../) that contain various fill gases, such as Ar, Kr, Xe, Br, D, H/sub 2/, DT, He, N/sub 2/, Ne, CO/sub 2/, etc., in the interior thereof, can be produced by the diffusion of the fill gas or gases into the microsphere during the formation thereof from a liquid droplet of glass-form-forming solution. This is accomplished by filling at least a portion of the multiple-zone drop-furnace used in producing hollow microspheres with the gas or gases of interest, and then taking advantage of the high rate of gaseous diffusion of the fill gas through the wall of the gel membrane before it transforms into a glass microsphere as it is processed in the multiple-zone furnace.

  19. 76 FR 52044 - In the Matter of the Designation of; Mumtaz Dughmush, aka About Abir, aka Mumtaz Muhammad Jum'ah...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE In the Matter of the Designation of; Mumtaz Dughmush, aka About Abir, aka Mumtaz Muhammad Jum'ah Dughmush, aka Mumtaz Muhammad Jum'ah Daghmash, aka Mumtaz Muhammad Jum'ah Dughmish, aka Mumtaz Daghmash, as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist Pursuant...

  20. 78 FR 60726 - Hazardous Materials Regulations: Penalty Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ...; Offeror Requirements for specific hazardous materials: Cigarette lighters, Explosives, Radioactive Materials, Compressed Gases in cylinders; Packaging Manufacturers, Drum Manufacturers and Reconditioners..., Hazardous materials transportation, Packaging and containers, Penalties, Reporting and...

  1. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent regulation of pulmonary miRNA by chronic cigarette smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sarah; de Souza, Angela Rico; Zago, Michela; Iu, Matthew; Guerrina, Necola; Gomez, Alvin; Matthews, Jason; Baglole, Carolyn J

    2017-01-12

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor historically known for its toxic responses to man-made pollutants such as dioxin. More recently, the AhR has emerged as a suppressor of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis from cigarette smoke by mechanisms that may involve the regulation of microRNA. However, little is known about the AhR regulation of miRNA expression in the lung in response to inhaled toxicants. Therefore, we exposed Ahr(-/-) and Ahr(+/-) mice to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks and evaluated lung miRNA expression by PCR array. There was a dramatic regulation of lung miRNA by the AhR in the absence of exogenous ligand. In response to cigarette smoke, there were more up-regulated miRNA in Ahr(-/-) mice compared to Ahr(+/-) mice, including the cancer-associated miRNA miR-96. There was no significant change in the expression of the AhR regulated proteins HuR and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). There were significant increases in the anti-oxidant gene sulfiredoxin 1 (Srxn1) and FOXO3a- predicted targets of miR-96. Collectively, these data support a prominent role for the AhR in regulating lung miRNA expression. Further studies to elucidate a role for these miRNA may further uncover novel biological function for the AhR in respiratory health and disease.

  2. AhV_aPA-induced vasoconstriction involves the IP₃Rs-mediated Ca²⁺ releasing.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fuxing; Zou, Zhisong; Niu, Liwen; Li, Xu; Teng, Maikun

    2013-08-01

    AhV_aPA, the acidic PLA₂ purified from Agkistrodon halys pallas venom, was previously reported to possess a strong enzymatic activity and can remarkably induce a further contractile response on the 60 mM K⁺-induced contraction with an EC₅₀ in 369 nM on mouse thoracic aorta rings. In the present study, we found that the p-bromo-phenacyl-bromide (pBPB), which can completely inhibit the enzymatic activity of AhV_aPA, did not significantly reduce the contractile response on vessel rings induced by AhV_aPA, indicating that the vasoconstrictor effects of AhV_aPA are independent of the enzymatic activity. The inhibitor experiments showed that the contractile response induced by AhV_aPA is mainly attributed to the Ca²⁺ releasing from Ca²⁺ store, especially sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Detailed studies showed that the Ca²⁺ release from SR is related to the activation of inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP₃Rs) rather than ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Furthermore, the vasoconstrictor effect could be strongly reduced by pre-incubation with heparin, indicating that the basic amino acid residues on the surface of AhV_aPA may be involved in the interaction between AhV_aPA and the molecular receptors. These findings offer new insights into the functions of snake PLA₂ and provide a novel pathogenesis of A. halys pallas venom.

  3. Ablating the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in CD11c+ cells perturbs intestinal epithelium development and intestinal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chng, Song Hui; Kundu, Parag; Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Teo, Wei Ling; Kawajiri, Kaname; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Mak, Tak Wah; Pettersson, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Diet and microbiome derived indole derivatives are known to activate the ligand induced transcription factor, the Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR). While the current understanding of AhR biology has confirmed its role in mucosal lymphocytes, its function in intestinal antigen presenting cells (APCs) is poorly understood. Here, we report that Cre-mediated deletion of AhR in CD11c-expressing cells in C57/BL6 mice is associated with altered intestinal epithelial morphogenesis in vivo. Moreover, when co-cultured with AhR-deficient DCs ex vivo, intestinal organoids showed reduced SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 and increased Mucin 2 expression, which correlates with reduced Paneth cells and increased goblet cell differentiation, similar to the data obtained in vivo. Further, characterization of intestinal APC subsets, devoid of AhR, revealed an expression pattern associated with aberrant intrinsic Wnt pathway regulation. At a functional level, the loss of AhR in APCs resulted in a dysfunctional epithelial barrier, associated with a more aggressive chemically induced colitis compared to wild type animals. Our results are consistent with a model whereby the AhR signalling pathway may participate in the regulation of innate immunity through intestinal epithelium development and mucosal immunity. PMID:27068235

  4. Ablating the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in CD11c+ cells perturbs intestinal epithelium development and intestinal immunity.

    PubMed

    Chng, Song Hui; Kundu, Parag; Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Teo, Wei Ling; Kawajiri, Kaname; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Mak, Tak Wah; Pettersson, Sven

    2016-04-12

    Diet and microbiome derived indole derivatives are known to activate the ligand induced transcription factor, the Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR). While the current understanding of AhR biology has confirmed its role in mucosal lymphocytes, its function in intestinal antigen presenting cells (APCs) is poorly understood. Here, we report that Cre-mediated deletion of AhR in CD11c-expressing cells in C57/BL6 mice is associated with altered intestinal epithelial morphogenesis in vivo. Moreover, when co-cultured with AhR-deficient DCs ex vivo, intestinal organoids showed reduced SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 and increased Mucin 2 expression, which correlates with reduced Paneth cells and increased goblet cell differentiation, similar to the data obtained in vivo. Further, characterization of intestinal APC subsets, devoid of AhR, revealed an expression pattern associated with aberrant intrinsic Wnt pathway regulation. At a functional level, the loss of AhR in APCs resulted in a dysfunctional epithelial barrier, associated with a more aggressive chemically induced colitis compared to wild type animals. Our results are consistent with a model whereby the AhR signalling pathway may participate in the regulation of innate immunity through intestinal epithelium development and mucosal immunity.

  5. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway as a regulatory pathway for cell adhesion and matrix metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Tiffany; Murphy, K.A.; White, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an orphan receptor in the basic-helix-loop-helix PAS family of transcriptional regulators. Although the endogenous regulator of this pathway has not been identified, the AhR is known to bind and be activated by a variety of compounds ranging from environmental contaminants to flavanoids. The function of this receptor is still unclear; however, animal models indicate that the AhR is important for normal development. One hypothesis is that the AhR senses cellular stress and initiates the cellular response by altering gene expression and inhibiting cell cycle progression and that activation of the AhR by exogenous environmental chemicals results in the dysregulation of this normal function. In this review we will examine the role of the AhR in the regulation of genes and proteins involved in cell adhesion and matrix remodeling, and discuss the implications of these changes in development and disease. In addition, we will discuss evidence suggesting that the AhR pathway is responsive to changes in matrix composition as well as cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:18940186

  6. Novel avian-origin human influenza A(H7N9) can be transmitted between ferrets via respiratory droplets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lili; Bao, Linlin; Deng, Wei; Dong, Libo; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Ting; Lv, Qi; Li, Fengdi; Yuan, Jing; Xiang, Zhiguang; Gao, Kai; Xu, Yanfeng; Huang, Lan; Li, Yanhong; Liu, Jiangning; Yao, Yanfeng; Yu, Pin; Li, Xiyan; Huang, Weijuan; Zhao, Xiang; Lan, Yu; Guo, Junfeng; Yong, Weidong; Wei, Qiang; Chen, Honglin; Zhang, Lianfeng; Qin, Chuan

    2014-02-15

    The outbreak of human infections caused by novel avian-origin influenza A(H7N9) in China since March 2013 underscores the need to better understand the pathogenicity and transmissibility of these viruses in mammals. In a ferret model, the pathogenicity of influenza A(H7N9) was found to be less than that of an influenza A(H5N1) strain but comparable to that of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1), based on the clinical signs, mortality, virus dissemination, and results of histopathologic analyses. Influenza A(H7N9) could replicate in the upper and lower respiratory tract, the heart, the liver, and the olfactory bulb. It is worth noting that influenza A(H7N9) exhibited a low level of transmission between ferrets via respiratory droplets. There were 4 mutations in the virus isolated from the contact ferret: D678Y in the gene encoding PB2, R157K in the gene encoding hemagglutinin (H3 numbering), I109T in the gene encoding nucleoprotein, and T10I in the gene encoding neuraminidase. These data emphasized that avian-origin influenza A(H7N9) can be transmitted between mammals, highlighting its potential for human-to-human transmissibility.

  7. Development of Species-Specific Ah Receptor-Responsive Third Generation CALUX Cell Lines with Increased Sensitivity and Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Jennifer C.; He, Guochun; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Zhao, Jing; Wirth, Ed; Fulton, Michael H.; Denison, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The Ah receptor (AhR)-responsive CALUX (chemically-activated luciferase expression) cell bioassay is commonly used for rapid screening of samples for the presence of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin), dioxin-like compounds, and AhR agonists/antagonists. By increasing the number of AhR DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements), we previously generated a novel third generation (G3) recombinant AhR-responsive mouse CALUX cell line (H1L7.5c3) with significantly enhanced sensitivity and response to DLCs compared to existing AhR-CALUX cell bioassays. However, the elevated background luciferase activity of these cells and the absence of comparable G3 cell lines derived from other species have limited their utility for screening purposes. Here, we describe the development and characterization of species-specific G3 recombinant AhR-responsive CALUX cell lines (rat, human, and guinea pig) that exhibit significantly improved sensitivity and dramatically increased TCDD induction response. The low background luciferase activity, low minimal detection limit (0.1 pM TCDD) and enhanced induction response of the rat G3 cell line (H4L7.5c2) over the H1L7.5c3 mouse G3 cells, identifies them as a more optimal cell line for screening purposes. The utility of the new G3 CALUX cell lines were demonstrated by screening sediment extracts and a small chemical compound library for the presence of AhR agonists. The increased sensitivity and response of these new G3 CALUX cell lines will facilitate species-specific analysis of DLCs and AhR agonists in samples with low levels of contamination and/or in small sample volumes. PMID:26366531

  8. DDE and PCB 153 independently induce aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Gaspar-Ramírez, Octavio; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Salgado-Bustamante, Mariana; González-Amaro, Roberto; Hernandez-Castro, Berenice; Pérez-Maldonado, Ivan N

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that compounds inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines enhance AhR expression. The aim of this study was 2-fold: (1) to determine if two pro-inflammatory compounds, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexa-chlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), independently affect AhR gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC); and (2) if affected, to determine whether the mechanism involved was due to AhR activation or to a pro-inflammatory effect of the chemicals. PBMC isolated from healthy individuals were incubated in the presence of DDE (10 µg/ml) and PCB 153 (20 ng/ml) over time and AhR and CYP1A1 expression was assessed with a real-time PCR technique. The results indicated there was over-expression of the AhR mRNA in PBMC when the cells were treated with DDE and PCB 153. No changes in expression levels of CYP1A1 mRNA were found. Importantly, when the cells were exposed to DDE and PCB 153 in the presence of an antagonist of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, the over-expression of AhR was abolished; as expected, the expression of CYP1A1 was unaffected. In conclusion, these studies demonstrated for the first time an increment of AhR expression "in vitro" in PBMC treated with two pro-inflammatory environmental pollutants, DDE and PCB153. Moreover, the over-expression of AhR was dependent of TNFα induced by DDE and PCB 153 and was independent of AhR activation.

  9. AIP mutations impair AhR signaling in pituitary adenoma patients fibroblasts and in GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Viengchareun, Say; Hage, Mirella; Bouligand, Jérôme; Young, Jacques; Boutron, Audrey; Zizzari, Philippe; Lombès, Marc; Chanson, Philippe; Kamenický, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene predispose humans to pituitary adenomas through unknown molecular mechanisms. The best-known interacting partner of AIP is the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a transcription factor that mediates the effects of xenobiotics implicated in carcinogenesis. As 75% of AIP mutations disrupt the physical and/or functional interaction with AhR, we postulated that the tumorigenic potential of AIP mutations might result from altered AhR signaling. We evaluated the impact of AIP mutations on the AhR signaling pathway, first in fibroblasts from AIP-mutated patients with pituitary adenomas, by comparison with fibroblasts from healthy subjects, then in transfected pituitary GH3 cells. The AIP protein level in mutated fibroblasts was about half of that in cells from healthy subjects, but AhR expression was unaffected. Gene expression analyses showed significant modifications in the expression of the AhR target genes CYP1B1 and AHRR in AIP-mutated fibroblasts, both before and after stimulation with the endogenous AhR ligand kynurenine. Kynurenine increased Cyp1b1 expression to a greater extent in GH3 cells overexpressing wild type compared with cells expressing mutant AIP Knockdown of endogenous Aip in these cells attenuated Cyp1b1 induction by the AhR ligand. Both mutant AIP expression and knockdown of endogenous Aip affected the kynurenine-dependent GH secretion of GH3 cells. This study of human fibroblasts bearing endogenous heterozygous AIP mutations and transfected pituitary GH3 cells shows that AIP mutations affect the AIP protein level and alter AhR transcriptional activity in a gene- and tissue-dependent manner.

  10. Interaction of nanodiamonds materials with influenza viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, V. T.; Ivanova, M. V.; Spitsyn, B. V.; Garina, K. O.; Trushakova, S. V.; Manykin, A. A.; Korzhenevsky, A. P.; Burseva, E. I.

    2012-02-01

    The perspectives of the application of modern materials contained nanodiamonds (ND) are considered in this study. The interaction between detonation paniculate ND, soot and influenza A and B viruses, fragments of cDNA were analyzed at the normal conditions. It was shown that these sorbents can interact with the following viruses: reference epidemic strains of influenza A(H1N1), A(H1N1)v, A(H3N2) and B viruses circulated in the word in 2000-2010. The allantoises, concentrated viruses, cDNA can be absorbed by ND sorbents and getting removed from water solutions within 20 min. ND sorbents can be used for the preparation of antivirus filters for water solution and for future diagnostic systems in virology.

  11. Evaluation of emission of greenhouse gases from soils amended with sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Paramasivam, S; Fortenberry, Gamola Z; Julius, Afolabi; Sajwan, Kenneth S; Alva, A K

    2008-02-01

    Increase in concentrations of various greenhouse gases and their possible contributions to the global warming are becoming a serious concern. Anthropogenic activities such as cultivation of flooded rice and application of waste materials, such as sewage sludge which are rich in C and N, as soil amendments could contribute to the increase in emission of greenhouse gases such as methane (CH(4)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) into the atmosphere. Therefore, evaluation of flux of various greenhouse gases from soils amended with sewage sludge is essential to quantify their release into the atmosphere. Two soils with contrasting properties (Candler fine sand [CFS] from Florida, and Ogeechee loamy sand [OLS] from Savannah, GA) were amended with varying rates (0, 24.7, 49.4, 98.8, and 148.3 Mg ha(-1)) of 2 types of sewage sludge (industrial [ISS] and domestic [DSS] origin. The amended soil samples were incubated in anaerobic condition at field capacity soil water content in static chamber (Qopak bottles). Gas samples were extracted immediately after amending soils and subsequently on a daily basis to evaluate the emission of CH(4), CO(2) and N(2)O. The results showed that emission rates and cumulative emission of all three gases increased with increasing rates of amendments. Cumulative emission of gases during 25-d incubation of soils amended with different types of sewage sludge decreased in the order: CO(2) > N(2)O > CH(4). The emission of gases was greater from the soils amended with DSS as compared to that with ISS. This may indicate the presence of either low C and N content or possible harmful chemicals in the ISS. The emission of gases was greater from the CFS as compared to that from the OLS. Furthermore, the results clearly depicted the inhibitory effect of acetylene in both soils by producing more N(2)O and CH(4) emission compared to the soils that did not receive acetylene at the rate of 1 mL g(-1) soil. Enumeration of microbial population by fluorescein diacetate

  12. 40 CFR 70.12 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). 70.12 Section 70.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases... six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons,...

  13. 40 CFR 70.12 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). 70.12 Section 70.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases... six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons,...

  14. 40 CFR 70.12 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). 70.12 Section 70.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases... six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons,...

  15. 40 CFR 70.12 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). 70.12 Section 70.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases... six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons,...

  16. 40 CFR 70.12 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). 70.12 Section 70.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases... six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons,...

  17. [A(H5N1) and A(H7N9) avian influenza: the H7N9 avian influenza outbreak of 2013].

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Yao, Kai-Hu

    2013-06-01

    influenza virus can infect humans and cause disease. The clinical presentation of human infection is usually mild, but the infection caused by A(H5N1) avian influenza virus occurring initially in Hongkong in 1997 or the A(H7N9) virus isolated first at the beginning of this year in China is severe and characterized by high mortality. The mortality rate of adolescents and children caused by H5N1 avian influenza is lower than that of adults and the younger the child the lower the mortality rate. A few pediatric H7N9 avian influenza cases recovered soon after treatment. A child was determined to be a H7N9 avian influenza virus carrier. These findings suggested that the pediatric H7N9 avian influenza infection was mild. It is very important to start anti-virus treatment with oseltamivir as early as possible in cases of avian influenza infection is considered. Combined therapy, including respiratory and circulatory support and inhibiting immunological reaction, is emphasized in the treatment of severe cases.

  18. Cancer-promoting and Inhibiting Effects of Dietary Compounds: Role of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR)

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Joann B.; Ghotbaddini, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic aromatic amines and dioxin-like compounds are environmental carcinogens shown to initiate cancer in a number of tissue types including prostate and breast. These environmental carcinogens elicit their effects through interacting with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand activated transcription factor. Naturally occurring compounds found in fruits and vegetables shown to have anti-carcinogenic effects also interact with the AhR. This review explores dietary and environmental exposure to chemical carcinogens and beneficial natural compounds whose effects are elicited by the AhR. PMID:25258701

  19. Preserving noble gases in a convecting mantle.

    PubMed

    Gonnermann, Helge M; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

    2009-05-28

    High (3)He/(4)He ratios sampled at many ocean islands are usually attributed to an essentially undegassed lower-mantle reservoir with high (3)He concentrations. A large and mostly undegassed mantle reservoir is also required to balance the Earth's (40)Ar budget, because only half of the (40)Ar produced from the radioactive decay of (40)K is accounted for by the atmosphere and upper mantle. However, geophysical and geochemical observations suggest slab subduction into the lower mantle, implying that most or all of Earth's mantle should have been processed by partial melting beneath mid-ocean ridges and hotspot volcanoes. This should have left noble gases in both the upper and the lower mantle extensively outgassed, contrary to expectations from (3)He/(4)He ratios and the Earth's (40)Ar budget. Here we suggest a simple solution: recycling and mixing of noble-gas-depleted slabs dilutes the concentrations of noble gases in the mantle, thereby decreasing the rate of mantle degassing and leaving significant amounts of noble gases in the processed mantle. As a result, even when the mass flux across the 660-km seismic discontinuity is equivalent to approximately one lower-mantle mass over the Earth's history, high (3)He contents, high (3)He/(4)He ratios and (40)Ar concentrations high enough to satisfy the (40)Ar mass balance of the Earth can be preserved in the lower mantle. The differences in (3)He/(4)He ratios between mid-ocean-ridge basalts and ocean island basalts, as well as high concentrations of (3)He and (40)Ar in the mantle source of ocean island basalts, can be explained within the framework of different processing rates for the upper and the lower mantle. Hence, to preserve primitive noble gas signatures, we find no need for hidden reservoirs or convective isolation of the lower mantle for any length of time.

  20. Rare gases systematics and mantle structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allegre, C. J.; Staudacher, T.

    1994-01-01

    The following points are emphasized: one of the most important ones is certainly the first set of experimental data on the solubility of noble gases in metal phases at intermediate pressures, since the core was certainly not formed at ultra high pressures, as emphasized by Ahrens and confirmed by trace elements systematics Wanke. The experimental data clearly show that the core can not be a major reservoir for terrestrial rare gases; the second point is a more elaborate reconsideration of the (40)K-(40)Ar budget of the Earth. This shows that (40)Ar contained in continental crust plus upper mantle plus atmosphere is at maximum half of the (40)Ar inventory of the whole earth. This implies the existence of a two layered mantle; the third point is the discovery by the Australian noble gases group of the existence of high (20)Ne/(22)Ne and low (21)Ne/(22)Ne isotopic ratios in Loihi seamount samples. This results which are different to the MORB ratios confirm the idea of a two layered model, but suggest the existence of a primordial solar type Ne reservoir. Several possibilities about the origin of this (20)Ne excess in the mantle will be discussed; The high (40)Ar/(36)Ar, (129)Xe/(130)Xe and (134) Xe/(130)Xe, (136)Xe/(130)Xe are confirmed by new data. The corresponding ratios for the lower mantle will be discussed. (40)Ar/(36)Ar ratios up to 6000 can be accepted and will not modify the general model of the mantle. They confirm the atmosphere chronology, about 85 percent of the atmosphere was formed in the first 50 My and 15 percent later on.

  1. Sensory Detection and Responses to Toxic Gases

    PubMed Central

    Bessac, Bret F.; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    The inhalation of reactive gases and vapors can lead to severe damage of the airways and lung, compromising the function of the respiratory system. Exposures to oxidizing, electrophilic, acidic, or basic gases frequently occur in occupational and ambient environments. Corrosive gases and vapors such as chlorine, phosgene, and chloropicrin were used as warfare agents and in terrorist acts. Chemical airway exposures are detected by the olfactory, gustatory, and nociceptive sensory systems that initiate protective physiological and behavioral responses. This review focuses on the role of airway nociceptive sensory neurons in chemical sensing and discusses the recent discovery of neuronal receptors for reactive chemicals. Using physiological, imaging, and genetic approaches, Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels in sensory neurons were shown to respond to a wide range of noxious chemical stimuli, initiating pain, respiratory depression, cough, glandular secretions, and other protective responses. TRPA1, a TRP ion channel expressed in chemosensory C-fibers, is activated by almost all oxidizing and electrophilic chemicals, including chlorine, acrolein, tear gas agents, and methyl isocyanate, the highly noxious chemical released in the Bhopal disaster. Chemicals likely activate TRPA1 through covalent protein modification. Animal studies using TRPA1 antagonists or TRPA1-deficient mice confirmed the role of TRPA1 in chemically induced respiratory reflexes, pain, and inflammation in vivo. New research shows that sensory neurons are not merely passive sensors of chemical exposures. Sensory channels such as TRPA1 are essential for maintenance of airway inflammation in asthma and may contribute to the progression of airway injury following high-level chemical exposures. PMID:20601631

  2. Adsorption of Gases on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbaye, Mamadou Thiao

    2014-01-01

    This research focus in studying the interaction between various classical and quantum gases with novel carbon nanostructures, mainly carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Since their discovery by the Japanese physicist Sumio Iijima [1] carbon nanotubes have, experimentally and theoretically, been subjected to many scientific investigation. Studies of adsorption on CNTs are particularly directed toward their better usage in gas storage, gas separation, catalyst, drug delivery, and water purification. We explore the adsorption of different gases entrapped in a single, double, or multi-bundles of CNTs using computer simulations. The first system we investigate consists of Ar and Kr films adsorbed on zigzag or armchair nanotubes. Our simulations revealed that Kr atoms on intermediate size zigzag NTs undergo two phase transitions: A liquid-vapor (L→V), and liquid-commensurate (L→CS) with a fractional coverage of one Kr atoms adsorbed for every four carbon atoms. For Ar on zigzag and armchair NTs, the only transition observed is a L→V. In the second problem, we explore the adsorption of CO2 molecules in a nanotube bundle and calculate the isosteric heat of adsorption of the entrapped molecules within the groove. We observed that the lower the temperature, the higher the isosteric of adsorption. Last, we investigate the adsorption of hydrogen, Helium, and Neon gases on the groove site of two parallel nanotubes. At low temperature, the transverse motion on the plane perpendicular to the tubes' axis is frozen out and as a consequence, the heat capacity is reduced to 1/2. At high temperature, the atoms gain more degree of freedom and as a consequence the heat capacity is 5/2.

  3. The toxicological properties of petroleum gases.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; Herron, Deborah; Saperstein, Mark; Podhasky, Paula; Hoffman, Gary M; Roberts, Linda

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the toxicological hazards of petroleum gases, 90-day inhalation toxicity (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development [OECD] 413) and developmental toxicity (OECD 414) tests were conducted with liquefied propane gas (LPG) at concentrations of 1000, 5000, or 10,000 ppm. A micronucleus test (OECD 474) of LPG was also conducted. No systemic or developmental effects were observed; the overall no observed adverse effect concentration (NOAEC) was 10,000 ppm. Further, there was no effect of LPG exposure at levels up to 10,000 ppm on micronucleus induction and no evidence of bone marrow toxicity. Other alkane gases (ethane, propane, n-butane, and isobutane) were then evaluated in combined repeated exposure studies with reproduction/development toxicity screening tests (OECD 422). There were no toxicologically important changes in parameters relating to systemic toxicity or neurotoxicity for any of these gases at concentrations ranging from 9000 to 16,000 ppm. There was no evidence of effects on developmental or reproductive toxicity in the studies of ethane, propane, or n-butane at the highest concentrations tested. However, there was a reduction in mating in the high-exposure group (9000 ppm) of the isobutane study, which although not significantly different was outside the range previously observed in the testing laboratory. Assuming the reduction in mating to have been toxicologically significant, the NOAEC for the isobutane reproductive toxicity screening test was 3000 ppm (7125 mg/m(3)). A method is proposed by which the toxicity of any of the 106 complex petroleum gas streams can be estimated from its composition.

  4. Hyperascyrones A-H, polyprenylated spirocyclic acylphloroglucinol derivatives from Hypericum ascyron Linn.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hucheng; Chen, Chunmei; Liu, Junjun; Sun, Bin; Wei, Guangzheng; Li, Yan; Zhang, Jinwen; Yao, Guangmin; Luo, Zengwei; Xue, Yongbo; Zhang, Yonghui

    2015-07-01

    Eight polyprenylated spirocyclic acylphloroglucinol derivatives (PSAPs), hyperascyrones A-H, were isolated from the aerial parts of Hypericum ascyron Linn., together with six known analogs. Their structures were established by spectroscopic analyses including HRESIMS, 1D and 2D NMR, and their absolute configurations were determined by electronic circular dichroism calculations (ECD, Gaussian 09). Structures of previously reported tomoeones C, D, G, and H were revised. Hyperascyrones A-H were evaluated for their cytotoxic and anti-HIV-1 activities, with hyperascyrones C and G exhibiting significant cytotoxicities against HL-60 cell lines with IC50 values of 4.22 and 8.36 μM, respectively. In addition, the chemotaxonomic significance of these compounds was also discussed.

  5. Influenza A(H3N2) outbreak at Transit Center at Manas, Kyrgyzstan, 2014.

    PubMed

    Parms, Tiffany A; Zorich, Shauna C; Kramer, Karen P

    2015-01-01

    In February 2014, the U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Epidemiology Consult Service provided support in response to a moderate outbreak of influenza at the Transit Center at Manas (Kyrgyzstan). A total of 215 individuals presented with influenza-like illness symptoms from 3 December 2013 through 28 February 2014. There were 85 specimens positive for influenza (18 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, 65 influenza A(H3N2), one influenza A/not subtyped, and one influenza B); six specimens were positive for other respiratory viruses (one human metapneumovirus, two parainfluenza, and three rhinovirus/enterovirus) and eight specimens were negative. Twenty-two of the specimens that were positive for influenza were sequenced and were not remarkably different from the strains seen during routine surveillance for the 2013-2014 season or from specimens collected at other deployed sites.

  6. Current Fluctuations in Stochastic Lattice Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertini, L.; de Sole, A.; Gabrielli, D.; Jona-Lasinio, G.; Landim, C.

    2005-01-01

    We study current fluctuations in lattice gases in the macroscopic limit extending the dynamic approach for density fluctuations developed in previous articles. More precisely, we establish a large deviation theory for the space-time fluctuations of the empirical current which include the previous results. We then estimate the probability of a fluctuation of the average current over a large time interval. It turns out that recent results by Bodineau and Derrida [Phys. Rev. Lett.922004180601] in certain cases underestimate this probability due to the occurrence of dynamical phase transitions.

  7. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, have been observed in the higher-pressure region. PMID:26729101

  8. Optical remote measurement of toxic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.; Kagann, R. H.; McClenny, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    Enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 has resulted in increased ambient air monitoring needs for industry, some of which may be met efficiently using open-path optical remote sensing techniques. These techniques include Fourier transform spectroscopy, differential optical absorption spectroscopy, laser long-path absorption, differential absorption lidar, and gas cell correlation spectroscopy. With this regulatory impetus, it is an opportune time to consider applying these technologies to the remote and/or path-averaged measurement and monitoring of toxic gases covered by the CAAA. This article reviews the optical remote sensing technology and literature for that application.

  9. Bragg spectroscopy of strongly interacting Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingham, M. G.; Fenech, K.; Peppler, T.; Hoinka, S.; Dyke, P.; Hannaford, P.; Vale, C. J.

    2016-10-01

    This article provides an overview of recent developments and emerging topics in the study of two-component Fermi gases using Bragg spectroscopy. Bragg scattering is achieved by exposing a gas to two intersecting laser beams with a slight frequency difference and measuring the momentum transferred to the atoms. By varying the Bragg laser detuning, it is possible to measure either the density or spin response functions which characterize the basic excitations present in the gas. Specifically, one can measure properties such as the dynamic and static structure factors, Tan's universal contact parameter and observe signatures for the onset of pair condensation locally within a gas.

  10. Catalytic Generation of Lift Gases for Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert; Berggren, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A lift-gas cracker (LGC) is an apparatus that generates a low-molecular-weight gas (mostly hydrogen with smaller amounts of carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide) at low gauge pressure by methanol reforming. LGCs are undergoing development for use as sources of buoyant gases for filling zero-gauge-pressure meteorological and scientific balloons in remote locations where heavy, high-pressure helium cylinders are not readily available. LGCs could also be used aboard large, zero-gauge-pressure, stratospheric research balloons to extend the duration of flight.

  11. Exciton spin dynamics in GaSe

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yanhao; Xie, Wei; McGuire, John A. Lai, Chih Wei; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2015-09-21

    We analyze exciton spin dynamics in GaSe under nonresonant circularly polarized optical pumping with an exciton spin-flip rate-equation model. The model reproduces polarized time-dependent photoluminescence measurements in which the initial circular polarization approaches unity even when pumping with 0.15 eV excess energy. At T = 10 K, the exciton spin relaxation exhibits a biexponential decay with sub-20 ps and >500 ps time constants, which are also reproduced by the rate-equation model assuming distinct spin-relaxation rates for hot (nonequilibrium) and cold band-edge excitons.

  12. Handbook of infrared radiation from combustion gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, C. B.; Malkmus, W.; Reardon, J. E.; Thomson, J. A. L.; Goulard, R. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The treatment of radiant emission and absorption by combustion gases are discussed. Typical applications include: (1) rocket combustion chambers and exhausts, (2) turbojet engines and exhausts, and (3) industrial furnaces. Some mention is made of radiant heat transfer problems in planetary atmospheres, in stellar atmospheres, and in reentry plasmas. Particular consideration is given to the temperature range from 500K to 3000K and the pressure range from 0.001 atmosphere to 30 atmospheres. Strong emphasis is given to the combustion products of hydrocarbon fuels with oxygen, specifically to carbon dioxide, water vapor, and carbon monoxide. In addition, species such as HF, HC1, CN, OH, and NO are treated.

  13. Method for detecting trace impurities in gases

    DOEpatents

    Freund, Samuel M.; Maier, II, William B.; Holland, Redus F.; Beattie, Willard H.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for considerably improving the sensitivity and specificity of infrared spectrometry as applied to quantitative determination of trace impurities in various carrier or solvent gases is presented. A gas to be examined for impurities is liquefied and infrared absorption spectra of the liquid are obtained. Spectral simplification and number densities of impurities in the optical path are substantially higher than are obtainable in similar gas-phase analyses. Carbon dioxide impurity (.about.2 ppm) present in commercial Xe and ppm levels of Freon 12 and vinyl chloride added to liquefied air are used to illustrate the method.

  14. Method for detecting trace impurities in gases

    DOEpatents

    Freund, S.M.; Maier, W.B. II; Holland, R.F.; Beattie, W.H.

    A technique for considerably improving the sensitivity and specificity of infrared spectrometry as applied to quantitative determination of trace impurities in various carrier or solvent gases is presented. A gas to be examined for impurities is liquefied and infrared absorption spectra of the liquid are obtained. Spectral simplification and number densities of impurities in the optical path are substantially higher than are obtainable in similar gas-phase analyses. Carbon dioxide impurity (approx. 2 ppM) present in commercial Xe and ppM levels of Freon 12 and vinyl chloride added to liquefied air are used to illustrate the method.

  15. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Single Low Dose or High Dose of Clade 2 Influenza A(H5N1) Inactivated Vaccine in Adults Previously Primed With Clade 1 Influenza A(H5N1) Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Winokur, Patricia L; Patel, Shital M; Brady, Rebecca; Chen, Wilbur H; El-Kamary, Samer S; Edwards, Kathryn; Creech, C Buddy; Frey, Sharon; Keitel, Wendy A; Belshe, Robert; Walter, Emmanuel; Bellamy, Abbie; Hill, Heather

    2015-08-15

    Influenza A(H5N1) vaccination strategies that improve the speed of the immunological response and cross-clade protection are desired. We compared the immunogenicity of a single 15-μg or 90-μg dose of A/H5N1/Indonesia/05/05 (clade 2) vaccine in adults who were previously primed with A/H5N1/Vietnam/1203/2004 (clade 1) vaccine. High-dose vaccine resulted in significantly higher titers to both clade 1 and 2 antigens. Clade 2 titers were unaffected by the previous dose of clade 1 vaccine. Low-dose priming with a mismatched pandemic influenza A(H5N1) vaccine would improve the rapidity, magnitude, and cross-reactivity of the immunological response following a single high-dose, unadjuvanted, pandemic vaccine.

  16. Pathobiological features of a novel, highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N8) virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Il; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Lim, Gyo-Jin; Kim, Eun-Ha; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Se Mi; Choi, Eun-Ji; Si, Young-Jae; Lee, Ok-Jun; Shim, Woo-Sub; Kim, Si-Wook; Mo, In-Pil; Bae, Yeonji; Lim, Yong Taik; Sung, Moon Hee; Kim, Chul-Joong; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G; Choi, Young Ki

    2014-10-01

    The endemicity of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N1) viruses in Asia has led to the generation of reassortant H5 strains with novel gene constellations. A newly emerged HPAI A(H5N8) virus caused poultry outbreaks in the Republic of Korea in 2014. Because newly emerging high-pathogenicity H5 viruses continue to pose public health risks, it is imperative that their pathobiological properties be examined. Here, we characterized A/mallard duck/Korea/W452/2014 (MDk/W452(H5N8)), a representative virus, and evaluated its pathogenic and pandemic potential in various animal models. We found that MDk/W452(H5N8), which originated from the reassortment of wild bird viruses harbored by migratory waterfowl in eastern China, replicated systemically and was lethal in chickens, but appeared to be attenuated, albeit efficiently transmitted, in ducks. Despite predominant attachment to avian-like virus receptors, MDk/W452(H5N8) also exhibited detectable human virus-like receptor binding and replicated in human respiratory tract tissues. In mice, MDk/W452(H5N8) was moderately pathogenic and had limited tissue tropism relative to previous HPAI A(H5N1) viruses. It also induced moderate nasal wash titers in inoculated ferrets; additionally, it was recovered in extrapulmonary tissues and one of three direct-contact ferrets seroconverted without shedding. Moreover, domesticated cats appeared to be more susceptible than dogs to virus infection. With their potential to become established in ducks, continued circulation of A(H5N8) viruses could alter the genetic evolution of pre-existing avian poultry strains. Overall, detailed virological investigation remains a necessity given the capacity of H5 viruses to evolve to cause human illness with few changes in the viral genome.

  17. Plan, formulate, and discuss a NASTRAN finite element model of the AH-64A helicopter airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christ, Richard A.; Ferg, Douglas A.; Kilroy, Kevin A.; Toossi, Mostafa; Weisenburger, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    A discussion of modeling plan objectives, followed by a description of the AH-64A aircraft including all general features, major components, and primary and structure definitions are presented. Following the aircraft description, a discussion of the modeling guidelines and model checkout procedure are provided. The NASTRAN finite element analysis is set up to be suitable to predict both static internal loads and vibrations. Finally, the results, schedule, and planned versus actual manhours for this work are presented.

  18. LEO life tests on a 75 Ah bipolar nickel-hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenhart, S.; Koehler, C.; Applewhite, A.

    1988-01-01

    The design, building, and testing of an actively cooled 10-cell 75-Ah bipolar nickel/hydrogen battery are discussed. During the last 1000 cycles, the battery has shown some evidence of elecrical performance degradation. In particular, EOC and EOD voltages have increased and decreased by several millivolts, respectively, and deep discharge capacities to a 1.0 V/cell average cutoff voltage have decreased.

  19. Characterization of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus A(H5N6), Japan, November 2016

    PubMed Central

    Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Ozawa, Makoto; Soda, Kosuke; Takakuwa, Hiroki; Haga, Atsushi; Hiono, Takahiro; Matsuu, Aya; Uchida, Yuko; Iwata, Ritsuko; Matsuno, Keita; Kuwahara, Masakazu; Yabuta, Toshiyo; Usui, Tatsufumi; Ito, Hiroshi; Onuma, Manabu; Saito, Takehiko; Otsuki, Koichi; Ito, Toshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) A(H5N6) were concurrently introduced into several distant regions of Japan in November 2016. These viruses were classified into the genetic clade 2.3.4.4c and were genetically closely related to H5N6 HPAIVs recently isolated in South Korea and China. In addition, these HPAIVs showed further antigenic drift. PMID:28322695

  20. Cycle life testing of a 24-V, 15-Ah sealed lead-acid aircraft battery

    SciTech Connect

    Vutetakis, D.G.; Viswanathan, V.V.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents the results of cycle life testing of 24-V, 15-Ah sealed lead-acid batteries intended for use in the B-1B aircraft. Test samples were procured from two different manufacturers and subjected to cycle testing at 33% and 100% depth-of-discharge (DOD). The cycle life at 33% DOD ranged from 500 to 750 cycles. The cycle life at 100% DOD ranged from 160 to 260 cycles.

  1. Lot 4 AH-64E Apache Attack Helicopter Follow-on Operational Test and Evaluation Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    electronics architecture identified during the IOT &E in 2012 had been corrected, but identified new cybersecurity vulnerabilities on the Lot 4 AH-64E and...vulnerability of the Apache electronics architecture identified during the IOT &E in 2012 has been corrected, but identified new cybersecurity vulnerabilities...increments. The first capability increment (Lot 1) completed Initial Operational Test and Evaluation ( IOT &E) in 2012. DOT&E reported the results of

  2. Influenza A(H5N8) virus isolation in Russia, 2014.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, Vasiliy Y; Susloparov, Ivan M; Kolosova, Nataliya P; Goncharova, Nataliya I; Shipovalov, Andrey V; Durymanov, Alexander G; Ilyicheva, Tatyana N; Budatsirenova, Lubov V; Ivanova, Valentina K; Ignatyev, Georgy A; Ershova, Svetlana N; Tulyahova, Valeriya S; Mikheev, Valeriy N; Ryzhikov, Alexander B

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we report the isolation of influenza A(H5N8) virus from a Eurasian wigeon (Anas penelope) in Sakha Republic of the Russian Far East. The strain A/wigeon/Sakha/1/2014 (H5N8) has been shown to be pathogenic for mammals. It is similar to the strains that caused outbreaks in wild birds and poultry in Southeast Asia and Europe in 2014.

  3. Highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N3) virus in poultry workers, Mexico, 2012.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Martinez, Irma; Balish, Amanda; Barrera-Badillo, Gisela; Jones, Joyce; Nuñez-García, Tatiana E; Jang, Yunho; Aparicio-Antonio, Rodrigo; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Belser, Jessica A; Ramirez-Gonzalez, José E; Pedersen, Janice C; Ortiz-Alcantara, Joanna; Gonzalez-Duran, Elizabeth; Shu, Bo; Emery, Shannon L; Poh, Mee K; Reyes-Teran, Gustavo; Vazquez-Perez, Joel A; Avila-Rios, Santiago; Uyeki, Timothy; Lindstrom, Stephen; Villanueva, Julie; Tokars, Jerome; Ruiz-Matus, Cuitláhuac; Gonzalez-Roldan, Jesus F; Schmitt, Beverly; Klimov, Alexander; Cox, Nancy; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Davis, C Todd; Diaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto

    2013-01-01

    We identified 2 poultry workers with conjunctivitis caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N3) viruses in Jalisco, Mexico. Genomic and antigenic analyses of 1 isolate indicated relatedness to poultry and wild bird subtype H7N3 viruses from North America. This isolate had a multibasic cleavage site that might have been derived from recombination with host rRNA.

  4. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and postpandemic influenza in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Ambrozaitis, Arvydas; Radzišauskienė, Daiva; Kuprevičienė, Nerija; Gravenstein, Stefan; Jančorienė, Ligita

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study is to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients hospitalized in Lithuania who are infected with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and to compare pandemic A(H1N1) pdm09 infection with postpandemic. In total, 146 subjects hospitalized with influenza A(H1N1) pdm09 were identified from 2009–2011. There were 53 during the initial pandemic wave in the summer of 2009, 69 during the peak pandemic period, and 24 during the “postpandemic” period that we included in this study. There were 22 subjects who died after laboratory confirmation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. No deaths were documented during the first wave. Subjects presenting during the peak of pandemic influenza had a greater incidence of fever (100% vs 77.4%; p<0.001), dry cough (95.7% vs 82.7%; p=0.01), and vomiting (26.1% vs 1.9%, p<0.001) as compared with patients infected during the first wave. The rate of bacterial pneumonia was 18.8% (13/69) during the peak pandemic period and 12.5% (3/24, p=0.754) during the postpandemic period. None of the postpandemic influenza subjects’ intensive care unit stays were due to pneumonia. The hospitalized early 2009 H1N1 pandemic cases and postpandemic cases were milder compared with those at the peak of pandemic activity. PMID:28352819

  5. Lithium-Ion Performance and Abuse Evaluation Using Lithium Technologies 9Ah cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Albert Daniel; Jeevarajan, Judith A.

    2006-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries in a pouch form offer high energy density and safety in their designs and more recently they are offering performance at higher rates. Lithium Technologies 9Ah high-power pouch cells were studied at different rates, thermal environments, under vacuum and several different conditions of abuse including overcharge, over-discharge and external short circuit. Results of this study will be presented.

  6. The Origin and Time Dependence of the Amount and Composition of Non-Constituent Gases Present in Crystal Growth Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, Witold

    1998-01-01

    Presence of different, non-constituent gases may be a critical factor in crystal growth systems. In Physical Vapor Transport processes the cras(es) can be used intentionally (to prevent excessively high, unstable growth conditions), or can evolve unintentionally during the course of the process (which may lead to undesired reduction in the -rowth rate). In melt growth, particularly under low gravity conditions (reduced hydrostatic pressure) the gas present in the system may contribute to formation of voids in the growing crystals and even to a separation of the crystal and the liquid phase [1]. On the other hand, some amount of gas may facilitate 'contactless' crystal growth particularly under reduced gravity conditions [2 - 6]. Different non-constituent gases may be present in growth ampoules, and their amount and composition may change during the crystallization process. Some gases can appear even in empty ampoules sealed originally under high vacuum: they may diffuse in from the outside, and/or desorb from the ampoule walls. Residual gases can also be generated by the source materials: even very high purity commercial elements and compounds may contain trace amounts of impurities, particularly oxides. The oxides may have low volatilities themselves but their reaction with other species, particularly carbon and hydrogen, may produce volatile compounds like water or carbon oxides. The non-constituent gases, either added initially to the system or evolved during the material processing, may diffuse out of the ampoule during the course of the experiment. Gases present outside (e.g. as a protective atmosphere or thermal conductor) may diffuse into the ampoule. In either case the growth conditions and the quality of the crystals may be affected. The problem is of a particular importance in sealed systems where the amount of the gases cannot be directly controlled. Therefore a reasonable knowledge and understanding of the origin, composition, magnitude, and change with

  7. El Chichon: Composition of Plume Gases and Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan Kotra, Janet; Finnegan, David L.; Zoller, William H.; Hart, Mark A.; Moyers, Jarvis L.

    1983-12-01

    Aircraft measurements were made of trace gases, atmospheric particles, and condensed acid volatiles in the plume of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico, in November 1982. Hydrogen sulfide was the primary gaseous sulfur species in the plume at the time of collection. Concentrations of 28 elements were determined by neutron activation analysis of particulate material from the plume. Rates of trace element emission to the atmosphere for each species were estimated by normalization to the simultaneously determined total sulfur emission rate. The volatile elements sulfur, chlorine, arsenic, selenium, bromine, antimony, iodine, tungsten, and mercury were enriched relative to bulk pyroclastic material by factors of 60 to 20,000. Arsenic, antimony, and selenium were associated predominantly with small (<= 3 micrometer) particles. Calcium and sodium were present almost exclusively on larger particles and aluminum and manganese were bimodally distributed. Ashladen particulate material injected into the stratosphere during the early violent eruptions was enriched by factors of 10 to 30 relative to ash in some of the same elements observed in the quiescent plume.

  8. A novel AhR ligand, 2AI, protects the retina from environmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Mark A.; Davis, Sonnet S.; Rosko, Andrew; Nguyen, Steven M.; Mitchell, Kylie P.; Mateen, Samiha; Neves, Joana; Garcia, Thelma Y.; Mooney, Shaun; Perdew, Gary H.; Hubbard, Troy D.; Lamba, Deepak A.; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Various retinal degenerative diseases including dry and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy are associated with the degeneration of the retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer of the retina. This consequently results in the death of rod and cone photoreceptors that they support, structurally and functionally leading to legal or complete blindness. Therefore, developing therapeutic strategies to preserve cellular homeostasis in the RPE would be a favorable asset in the clinic. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a conserved, environmental ligand-dependent, per ARNT-sim (PAS) domain containing bHLH transcription factor that mediates adaptive response to stress via its downstream transcriptional targets. Using in silico, in vitro and in vivo assays, we identified 2,2′-aminophenyl indole (2AI) as a potent synthetic ligand of AhR that protects RPE cells in vitro from lipid peroxidation cytotoxicity mediated by 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) as well as the retina in vivo from light-damage. Additionally, metabolic characterization of this molecule by LC-MS suggests that 2AI alters the lipid metabolism of RPE cells, enhancing the intracellular levels of palmitoleic acid. Finally, we show that, as a downstream effector of 2AI-mediated AhR activation, palmitoleic acid protects RPE cells from 4HNE-mediated stress, and light mediated retinal degeneration in mice. PMID:27364765

  9. Long life 80Ah standard IPV NiH2 battery cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armantrout, Jon D.; Waller, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    A standard Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) battery cell is needed to meet future low cost, high performance mission requirements for NASA, military, and civil space programs. A common or standard cell design has evolved from the heritage of HST, Milstar, and other Air Force Mantech cell designs with substantial flight experience, while incorporating some of the historical COMSAT cell design features described in a previous NASA publication. Key features include slurry process nickel electrodes having high strength, long life and high yield (lower cost), and dual layer zircar separators for improved KOH retention, uniformality, and longer life. The cell design will have a zirconium oxide wall wick inside the pressure vessel to redistribute electrolyte and extend life. The slurry electrode will be 35 mils thick to take advantage of qualified cell mechanical configurations and proven assembly and activation techniques developed by Eagle Picher Industries (EPI) for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) RNH-90-3 and 'Generic HST' RNH-90-5 cell designs with back-to-back nickel electrodes produced by the dry sinter process. The 80Ah common cell design can be scaled to meet capacity requirements from 60Ah to 100Ah. Producibility, commonality, and long life performance will be enhanced with the robust cell design described herein.

  10. Adaptation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in experimental mouse models.

    PubMed

    Prokopyeva, E A; Sobolev, I A; Prokopyev, M V; Shestopalov, A M

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, three mouse-adapted variants of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were obtained by lung-to-lung passages of BALB/c, C57BL/6z and CD1 mice. The significantly increased virulence and pathogenicity of all of the mouse-adapted variants induced 100% mortality in the adapted mice. Genetic analysis indicated that the increased virulence of all of the mouse-adapted variants reflected the incremental acquisition of several mutations in PB2, PB1, HA, NP, NA, and NS2 proteins. Identical amino acid substitutions were also detected in all of the mouse-adapted variants of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, including PB2 (K251R), PB1 (V652A), NP (I353V), NA (I106V, N248D) and NS1 (G159E). Apparently, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus easily adapted to the host after serial passages in the lungs, inducing 100% lethality in the last experimental group. However, cross-challenge revealed that not all adapted variants are pathogenic for different laboratory mice. Such important results should be considered when using the influenza mice model.

  11. A generalized dynamic balancing procedure for the AH-64 tail rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Donald L.; Newkirk, Mark C.

    2009-09-01

    The tail rotors on the AH-64A Apache and AH-64D Longbow Apache incorporate a unique design, which includes two, two-bladed teetering rotors that have an azimuth spacing of 55°, instead of the more usual 90°. Maintainers have observed that some Apache tail rotors can be extraordinarily difficult to balance dynamically. This investigation uses RCAS (Rotorcraft Comprehensive Analysis System) numerical simulations of tail rotor response when mass is added to the tips of single and adjacent blades to investigate possible causes for this balancing difficulty. The simulations show that the 1/rev, vertical, vibratory force response due to added tip mass varies as a function of the mass distribution between two adjacent blades, and the azimuth spacing between the two blades. As a result, the tail rotor balance sensitivity coefficients, if used as for a single blade, will be inaccurate; and may be a prime contributor to the problems observed while balancing tail rotors. An analytical model of the AH-64D tail rotor, with characteristics similar to the RCAS model, and which incorporates the influence of structural impedance through the balance sensitivity coefficients and phase angles, is used to develop a method for accurately determining the amount of tip mass required to reduce the 1/rev vibrations to acceptable levels.

  12. The Life of Jorjani: One of the Persian Pioneers of Medical Encyclopedia Compiling: On the Occasion of His 1000th Birthday Anniversary (434, A.H. - 1434, A.H.)

    PubMed Central

    Moattar, Fariborz; Shams Ardekani, Mohammad Reza; Ghannadi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Background Seyyed Esmaeil Jorjani is one of the most prominent pioneers and scientists of Islamic and Iranian traditional medicine in the 11th and 12th centuries (4th and 5th centuries A.H.). The number of his books is not certainly clear, but it is signified that he has written a couple of great books concerning medicine for Persians and too many treatises in such fields as philosophy, theology, medical ethics, human anatomy, chemistry, pharmacy and other sciences. His most famous and important book is “Zakhireh Khwarazmshahi” or “The Treasure of King Khwarazm”, which is really a complete and valuable medical encyclopedia in Persian language. Materials and Methods In the present study, authors have attempted to state the life and time of Jorjani and his views by studying the history, old medical sources, and other provided recent medical literature in these fields. Results The biography of Hakim Jorjani has been well reviewed and described precisely. Conclusions Based on our findings, it is clear that Jorjani described and explained the symptoms, signs and treatments of several diseases, introduced the activities of various medicinal plants, and compound formulations. He achieved all of this during his continuous visits to prestigious medical centers and famous people of his time. PMID:24616781

  13. Halogen-Containing Gases as Boundary Lubricants for Corrosion-Resistant Alloys at 1200 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1959-01-01

    The extreme temperatures anticipated for lubricated parts in advanced flight powerplants dictate the consideration of unconventional methods of lubrication such as solid lubricants and the reactive gases described in the present research. These halogen-containing "reactive" gases such as dichlorodifluoromethane, CF2Cl2, are among the most stable of organic molecules. The high "flash" temperatures generated at the contacting asperities as a result of frictional heat are sufficient to cause local decomposition of the halogen-containing gases. The active atoms thus released (e.g., chlorine) then react with the metal to be lubricated to form halides capable of effective lubrication. The presence of small amounts of a sulfur-containing gas (e.g., 1 percent sulfur hexafluoride, SF6) was found to catalyze the formation of metal halides. Friction and wear studies were made with a hemisphere (3/16-in. rad.) rider sliding in a circumferential path on the flat surface of a rotating disk (2 1/2-in. diam.). The specimens of corrosion-resistant 2 alloys were run in an atmosphere of the various gases with a load of 1200 grams, a sliding velocity of 120 feet per minute, and temperature from 75 to 1200 F. An effective lubricant for ferritic materials (M-1 tool steel) was CF2Cl2, but significant corrosion occurred above 600 F. Corrosion evaluation in CF2Cl2 suggested a number of nickel- and cobalt-base alloys for additional lubrication study. Several combinations of gases and these metals were found to lubricate to 1200 F without excessive corrosion. The gases were CF2Cl2 Plus 1 percent SF6, monobromotrifluoromethane CF3Br plus 1 percent SF6, dibromodifluoromethane CF2Br2, iodotrifluoromethane, CF3I, and I2. Careful selection of metals and gas are necessary for successful lubrication over specific temperature ranges. Optimum combinations give friction coefficients as low as 0.05 without

  14. Detection of Extensive Cross-Neutralization between Pandemic and Seasonal A/H1N1 Influenza Viruses Using a Pseudotype Neutralization Assay

    PubMed Central

    Labrosse, Béatrice; Tourdjman, Mathieu; Porcher, Raphaël; LeGoff, Jérôme; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Simon, François; Molina, Jean-Michel; Clavel, François

    2010-01-01

    Background Cross-immunity between seasonal and pandemic A/H1N1 influenza viruses remains uncertain. In particular, the extent that previous infection or vaccination by seasonal A/H1N1 viruses can elicit protective immunity against pandemic A/H1N1 is unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Neutralizing titers against seasonal A/H1N1 (A/Brisbane/59/2007) and against pandemic A/H1N1 (A/California/04/2009) were measured using an HIV-1-based pseudovirus neutralization assay. Using this highly sensitive assay, we found that a large fraction of subjects who had never been exposed to pandemic A/H1N1 express high levels of pandemic A/H1N1 neutralizing titers. A significant correlation was seen between neutralization of pandemic A/H1N1 and neutralization of a standard seasonal A/H1N1 strain. Significantly higher pandemic A/H1N1 neutralizing titers were measured in subjects who had received vaccination against seasonal influenza in 2008–2009. Higher pandemic neutralizing titers were also measured in subjects over 60 years of age. Conclusions/Significance Our findings reveal that the extent of protective cross-immunity between seasonal and pandemic A/H1N1 influenza viruses may be more important than previously estimated. This cross-immunity could provide a possible explanation of the relatively mild profile of the recent influenza pandemic. PMID:20543954

  15. The Nuclear Receptor AhR Controls Bone Homeostasis by Regulating Osteoclast Differentiation via the RANK/c-Fos Signaling Axis

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, Takashi; Arakaki, Rieko; Mori, Hiroki; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Kudo, Yasusei; Tanaka, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway plays a key role in receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)–mediated osteoclastogenesis. However, the mechanism underlying the regulation of AhR expression in osteoclasts and the signaling pathway through which AhR controls osteoclastogenesis remain unclear. We found that the expression of AhR in bone marrow–derived osteoclasts was upregulated by RANKL at an earlier stage than was the expression of signature osteoclast genes such as those encoding cathepsin K and NFAT, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1. In response to RANKL, bone marrow macrophages isolated from AhR−/− mice exhibited impaired phosphorylation of Akt and MAPK as well as NF-κB, whereas their response to M-CSF remained unchanged. Osteoclast differentiation mediated by the AhR signaling pathway was also regulated in an RANKL/c-Fos–dependent manner. Furthermore, ligand activation of AhR by the smoke toxin benzo[a]pyrene accelerated osteoclast differentiation in a receptor-dependent manner, and AhR-dependent regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in osteoclasts was observed. Moreover, AhR−/− mice exhibited impaired bone healing with delayed endochondral ossification. Taken together, the present results suggest that the RANKL/AhR/c-Fos signaling axis plays a critical role in osteoclastogenesis, thereby identifying the potential of AhR in treating pathological, inflammatory, or metabolic disorders of the bone. PMID:27849171

  16. The strange gases of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith S.

    1990-12-01

    The various gases found in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are discussed. A history of scientific investigation of these planets is outlined and results of these discoveries are considered. The molecular species found in these two planets are classified into several groups. The first group consists of H2, He, CH4, NH3, and H2O while the second group contains gases formed as the chemical byproducts of solar radiation, including simple hydrocarbons such as C2H2 and C2H6 and charged particles such as H3(+). The last group contains compounds which are chemically unstable in parts of Jupiter's atmosphere that have been probed and include Ge and As; two elements usually found in minerals on earth. An investigation of origin of these elements which are currently part of the upper reaches of the atmosphere of Jupiter and Saturn has led to discoveries about much deeper and hotter parts of atmospheres that can never be observed directly. A number of hypotheses are presented to account for the presence of various unexpected compounds, such as carbon monoxide.

  17. Gases released by surface flashover of insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.C.; Ney, R.J.

    1988-02-01

    The gases released by surface flashovers on alumina ceramics, glass, and quartz, using 20-..mu..s voltage pulses, were investigated using an ion-pumped metal vacuum system. Appreciable quantities of gas were measured (approximately 10/sup -6/ Torr liter or 10/sup 13/ molecules). The composition of this gas differed significantly from the background gas. The dominant species in the surface flashover gases were CO/sub 2/, CO, and H/sub 2/; a modest amount of CH/sub 4/ was observed, along with lesser quantities of N/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O. The dominant gas in the system background was nitrogen, accompanied by (in decreasing amounts) H/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O, CO/CO/sub 2/, Ar, CH/sub 4/, and He. We concluded that the gas released by flashovers on the surface of the insulators was not adsorbed system background gas, but was gas adsorbed during the handling and processing of the insulator.

  18. Gases released by surface flashover of insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.C.; Ney, R.J.

    1987-07-20

    The gases released by surface flashovers on alumina ceramics, Pyrex glass, and quartz, using 20-..mu..s voltage pulses were investigated using an ion pumped metal vacuum system. Appreciable quantities of gas were measured (approximately 10/sup -6/ torr-liters or 10/sup 13/ molecules). The composition of this gas differed significantly from the background gas. The dominant species in the surface flashover gases were CO/sub 2/, CO, and H/sub 2/; a modest amount of CH/sub 4/ was observed, along with lesser quantities of N/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O. The dominant gas in the system background was nitrogen, accompanied by (in decreasing amounts) H/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O, CO/CO/sub 2/, Ar, CH/sub 4/, and He. We concluded that the gas released by flashovers on the surface of the insulators was not absorbed system background gas, but was gas adsorbed during the handling and processing of the insulator.

  19. Process for desulfurizing combustion exhaust gases

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, T.; Matsuda, S.; Mori, T.; Nishimura, T.; Nishimura, Y.

    1982-05-04

    An improved process for desulfurizing combustion exhaust gases of mainly coal containing sulfur oxides, Hf and dust containing Al is provided, which process consists of four steps; a first step of contacting the gases with calcium carbonate or hydroxide in the form of slurry to convert the sulfur oxides into caso3; a second step of contacting O2 with the resulting slurry to convert CaSo3 into caso4; a third step of separating caso4 and mother liquor from the resulting slurry; and a fourth step of preparing a slurry of calcium carbonate or hydroxide to be employed in the first step, from the mother liquor, the pHs of the slurry and the mother liquor in the first and fourth steps being adjusted to 5 or higher by adding alkali such as sodium carbonate. According to the present process, it is possible to prevent hindrance of hf and al contained in dust to the reaction of so2absorbent (CaCO3 or Ca(OH)2) with SO2 gas, and thereby improve percentage desulfurization and also obtain a high quality gypsum.

  20. Emissions of sulfur gases from wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    Data on the emissions of sulfur gases from marine and freshwater wetlands are summarized with respect to wetland vegetation type and possible formation mechanisms. The current data base is largest for salt marshes inhabited by Spartina alterniflora. Both dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) dominate emissions from salt marshes, with lesser quantities of methyl mercaptan (MeSH), carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon disulfide (CS2) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) being emitted. High emission rates of DMS are associated with vegetation that produces the DMS precursor dimethylsulfonionpropionate (DMSP). Although large quantities of H2S are produced in marshes, only a small percentage escapes to the atmosphere. High latitude marshes emit less sulfur gases than temperate ones, but DMS still dominates. Mangrove-inhabited wetlands also emit less sulfur than temperate S. alterniflora marshes. Few data are available on sulfur gas emissions from freshwater wetlands. In most instances, sulfur emissions from temperate freshwater sites are low. However, some temperate and subtropical freshwater sites are similar in magnitude to those from marine wetlands which do not contain vegetation that produces DMSP. Emissions are low in Alaskan tundra but may be considerably higher in some bogs and fens.