Science.gov

Sample records for ah gases materials

  1. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders...) materials being transported in a rail car must be: (1) Securely lashed in an upright position so as...

  2. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders...) materials being transported in a rail car must be: (1) Securely lashed in an upright position so as...

  3. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders...) materials being transported in a rail car must be: (1) Securely lashed in an upright position so as...

  4. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders...) materials being transported in a rail car must be: (1) Securely lashed in an upright position so as...

  5. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders...) materials being transported in a rail car must be: (1) Securely lashed in an upright position so as...

  6. 30 CFR 18.25 - Combustible gases from insulating material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Combustible gases from insulating material. 18... and Design Requirements § 18.25 Combustible gases from insulating material. (a) Insulating materials... impregnated with insulating materials shall be heat-treated to remove any combustible solvent(s)...

  7. 30 CFR 18.25 - Combustible gases from insulating material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Combustible gases from insulating material. 18... and Design Requirements § 18.25 Combustible gases from insulating material. (a) Insulating materials... impregnated with insulating materials shall be heat-treated to remove any combustible solvent(s)...

  8. 30 CFR 18.25 - Combustible gases from insulating material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Combustible gases from insulating material. 18... and Design Requirements § 18.25 Combustible gases from insulating material. (a) Insulating materials... impregnated with insulating materials shall be heat-treated to remove any combustible solvent(s)...

  9. 30 CFR 18.25 - Combustible gases from insulating material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Combustible gases from insulating material. 18... and Design Requirements § 18.25 Combustible gases from insulating material. (a) Insulating materials... impregnated with insulating materials shall be heat-treated to remove any combustible solvent(s)...

  10. 30 CFR 18.25 - Combustible gases from insulating material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Combustible gases from insulating material. 18... and Design Requirements § 18.25 Combustible gases from insulating material. (a) Insulating materials... impregnated with insulating materials shall be heat-treated to remove any combustible solvent(s)...

  11. Method of producing pyrolysis gases from carbon-containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Mudge, Lyle K.; Brown, Michael D.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Baker, Eddie G.

    1989-01-01

    A gasification process of improved efficiency is disclosed. A dual bed reactor system is used in which carbon-containing feedstock materials are first treated in a gasification reactor to form pyrolysis gases. The pyrolysis gases are then directed into a catalytic reactor for the destruction of residual tars/oils in the gases. Temperatures are maintained within the catalytic reactor at a level sufficient to crack the tars/oils in the gases, while avoiding thermal breakdown of the catalysts. In order to minimize problems associated with the deposition of carbon-containing materials on the catalysts during cracking, a gaseous oxidizing agent preferably consisting of air, oxygen, steam, and/or mixtures thereof is introduced into the catalytic reactor at a high flow rate in a direction perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the reactor. This oxidizes any carbon deposits on the catalysts, which would normally cause catalyst deactivation.

  12. Reactor for producing large particles of materials from gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flagan, Richard C. (Inventor); Alam, Mohammed K. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for producing large particles of material from gas, or gases, containing the material (e.g., silicon from silane) in a free-space reactor comprised of a tube (20) and controlled furnace (25). A hot gas is introduced in the center of the reactant gas through a nozzle (23) to heat a quantity of the reactant gas, or gases, to produce a controlled concentration of seed particles (24) which are entrained in the flow of reactant gas, or gases. The temperature profile (FIG. 4) of the furnace is controlled for such a slow, controlled rate of reaction that virtually all of the material released condenses on seed particles and new particles are not nucleated in the furnace. A separate reactor comprised of a tube (33) and furnace (30) may be used to form a seed aerosol which, after passing through a cooling section (34) is introduced in the main reactor tube (34) which includes a mixer (36) to mix the seed aerosol in a controlled concentration with the reactant gas or gases.

  13. Nanostructured carbon materials for adsorption of methane and other gases

    SciTech Connect

    Stadie, Nicholas P.; Fultz, Brent T.; Ahn, Channing; Murialdo, Maxwell

    2015-06-30

    Provided are methods for storing gases on porous adsorbents, methods for optimizing the storage of gases on porous adsorbents, methods of making porous adsorbents, and methods of gas storage of optimized compositions, as in systems containing porous adsorbents and gas adsorbed on the surface of the porous adsorbent. The disclosed methods and systems feature a constant or increasing isosteric enthalpy of adsorption as a function of uptake of the gas onto the exposed surface of a porous adsorbent. Adsorbents with a porous geometry and surface dimensions suited to a particular adsorbate are exposed to the gas at elevated pressures in the specific regime where n/V (density) is larger than predicted by the ideal gas law by more than several percent.

  14. The SQCRAMscope: Probing exotic materials with quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Shenglan; Turner, Richard; Disciacca, Jack; Lev, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    Microscopy techniques co-opted from nonlinear optics and high energy physics have complemented solid-state probes in elucidating exotic order manifest in condensed matter materials. Up until now, however, no attempts have been made to use modern techniques of ultracold atomic physics to directly explore properties of strongly correlated or topologically protected materials. Our talk will present the SQCRAMscope, a novel Scanning Quantum CRyogenic Atom Microscope technique for imaging magnetic and electric fields near cryogenically cooled materials. With our SQCRAMscope, we aim to image inhomogeneous transport and domain percolation in technologically relevant materials whose order has evaded elucidation. We are grateful to the Moore Foundation and the Department of Energy for their generous support.

  15. Trapping ultracold gases near cryogenic materials with rapid reconfigurability

    SciTech Connect

    Naides, Matthew A.; Turner, Richard W.; Lai, Ruby A.; DiSciacca, Jack M.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2013-12-16

    We demonstrate an atom chip trapping system that allows the placement and high-resolution imaging of ultracold atoms within microns from any ≲100 μm-thin, UHV-compatible material, while also allowing sample exchange with minimal experimental downtime. The sample is not connected to the atom chip, allowing rapid exchange without perturbing the atom chip or laser cooling apparatus. Exchange of the sample and retrapping of atoms has been performed within a week turnaround, limited only by chamber baking. Moreover, the decoupling of sample and atom chip provides the ability to independently tune the sample temperature and its position with respect to the trapped ultracold gas, which itself may remain in the focus of a high-resolution imaging system. As a first demonstration of this system, we have confined a 700-nK cloud of 8 × 10{sup 4} {sup 87}Rb atoms within 100 μm of a gold-mirrored 100-μm-thick silicon substrate. The substrate was cooled to 35 K without use of a heat shield, while the atom chip, 120 μm away, remained at room temperature. Atoms may be imaged and retrapped every 16 s, allowing rapid data collection.

  16. Residual Gas in Closed Systems. 2; Formation of Gases from the Source Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The amount and composition of residual gases formed in sealed ampoules loaded with different elements or binary II-VI or IV-VI compounds were investigated. The source materials underwent different thermal processings, annealing and/or resublimation conducted under different conditions. The results of these experiments are discussed in terms of the procedural, thermochemical, and kinetic limitations to the process.

  17. An in-vitro comparative study for assessment of apical sealing ability of Epiphany/AH Plus sealer with Resilon/gutta-percha root canal filling materials

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Meraj; Musani, Mohammad A.; Ahmed, Iffat M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Endodontic treatment is directed to eliminate microbial challenges from the root canal system and to create a complete seal. The aim of this study was to assess the apical sealing ability of resin-based Epiphany-Resilon root canal filling system and to compare it with the sealing abilities of different combinations of AH Plus, gutta-percha, Epiphany, and Resilon. Materials and Methods: One hundred extracted human maxillary incisor roots were treated endodontically. The samples were divided into groups A, B, C, and D, with each group containing 25 samples. Group A: Canals obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer; Group B: Canals obturated with Resilon and Epiphany; Group C: Canals obturated with gutta-percha and Epiphany; Group D: Control group canals obturated with gutta-percha without a sealer. The sealing ability of each of the obturation techniques was tested using the dye penetration method followed by the clearing method using alcohol. Stereo microscope was used to measure the extent of dye penetration. Statistical data analysis was performed using analysis of variance and Tukey tests. Results: Microleakage was found in all the four groups. Apical extent of mean microleakage was maximum for gutta-percha, followed by Gutta-percha + AH-plus and Gutta-percha + Epiphany, and the least with Resilon + Epiphany. Statistically significant difference (P < 0.01) was seen in the apical leakage. Conclusion: All the samples tested showed microleakage. The “Epiphany soft resin endodontic obturation system” showed a superior result compared to other obturation materials. PMID:27583220

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Goodson, Boyd M.

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  19. Carbonaceous material for production of hydrogen from low heating value fuel gases

    DOEpatents

    Koutsoukos, Elias P.

    1989-01-01

    A process for the catalytic production of hydrogen, from a wide variety of low heating value fuel gases containing carbon monoxide, comprises circulating a carbonaceous material between two reactors--a carbon deposition reactor and a steaming reactor. In the carbon deposition reactor, carbon monoxide is removed from a fuel gas and is deposited on the carbonaceous material as an active carbon. In the steaming reactor, the reactive carbon reacts with steam to give hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The carbonaceous material contains a metal component comprising from about 75% to about 95% cobalt, from about 5% to about 15% iron, and up to about 10% chromium, and is effective in suppressing the production of methane in the steaming reactor.

  20. Materials Data on GaSe (SG:186) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Na3GaSe3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-04

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on GaSe (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on GaSe (SG:187) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on GaSe (SG:160) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. 49 CFR 173.245 - Bulk packaging for extremely hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packaging for extremely hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3). 173.245 Section 173.245 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  6. 49 CFR 173.245 - Bulk packaging for extremely hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bulk packaging for extremely hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3). 173.245 Section 173.245 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  7. 49 CFR 173.245 - Bulk packaging for extremely hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bulk packaging for extremely hazardous materials such as poisonous gases (Division 2.3). 173.245 Section 173.245 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  8. Use of Less Reactive Materials and More Stable Gases to Reduce Corrosive Wear When Lubricating with Halogenated Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1960-01-01

    The gases CF2Cl-CF2Cl, CF2Cl2, and CF2Br-CF2Br were used to lubricate metals, cermets, and ceramics in this study. One of the criteria for determining the effectiveness of a reactive-gas-lubricated systems is the stability of the halogen-containing gas molecule. The carbon-to-halogen bond in the ethane molecule has extremely good thermal stability superior to the methane analogs (CF2Cl2 and CF2Br2) used in earlier research. For this reason, the ethane compounds CF2Cl-CF2Cl and CF2Br-CF2Br were considered as high-temperature lubricants. Friction and wear studies were made with a hemisphere (3/16-in. rad.) rider sliding in a circumferential path on the flat surface of a rotating disk (21/2-in. diam. ). The specimens of metal alloys, cermets, and ceramics were run In an atmosphere of the various gases with a load of 1200 grams, sliding velocities from 75 to 8000 feet per minute, and temperatures from 75 to 1400 F. The gas CF2Cl-CF2Cl was found to be an effective lubricant for the cermet LT-LB (59.0 Cr, 19.0 Al2O3, 20.0 Mo, 2.0 Ti) and the ceramic Al2O3 sliding on Stellite Star J (cobalt-base alloy) at temperatures to 1400 F. The bromine-containing gas CF2Br-CF2Br was found to give friction and wear values that can be considered to be in a region of effective boundary lubrication for the cermet K175D (nickel-bonded metal carbide) sliding on the metal Hastelloy R-235 (nickel-base alloy) at temperatures to 1200 F.

  9. "Jum'ah" syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kannai, Ruth

    2012-05-01

    This is my memoir as a sick child, hospitalized in the Pediatric ward of a large hospital, many years ago. The story tells about my friendship with another young patient, Jum'ah, a Bedouin child who suffered from Congenital Cyanotic Heart Disease, to whom the pediatric ward was Home. My Childish understanding of Jum'ah's loneliness, anxiety and struggle to be loved and belonged are described in this narrative. I describe how this experience still has an influence on my adult professional and personal concepts. PMID:21943791

  10. AH Her Observing Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-05-01

    Dr. Juan Echevarria (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México) and colleagues request AAVSO assistance in a campaign on the Z Cam-type cataclysmic variable AH Her being carried out 2013 May 29 - June 18. They will be making photometric and spectroscopic observations of AH Her using the 2.1m and 0.84m telescopes at San Pedro Martir Observatory (SPM). Their goal is to carry out a radial velocity study of the system components using modern detectors; no study of AH Her has been made since the one by Horne, Wade, and Szkody in 1980-1981 (1986MNRAS.219..791H). Photometry and spectroscopy are requested. AH Her, for decades a reasonably "regular" Z Cam system, began exhibiting significantly anomalous behavior in ~2007. Since then it has experienced brief periods of fairly typical behavior interspersed with more anomalous intervals, including some unprecedented behavior. Most recently, it has returned to a more normal pattern of outbursts shape-wise but it is not back to its normal amplitude or frequency. AAVSO data will be essential for correlation in order to determine the precise time(s) of minimum occurring during the campaign. Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  11. Formation of Residual Gases from Source Materials in Closed Crystal Growth Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Different, non-constituent cases are present in crystal growth systems and may affect processes like growth rate in PVT or voids formation and detached solidification in melt growth systems. The presence of the gas may be detrimental or advantageous depending on its amount and composition, and on the process in question. The presence of the cases, their amount and composition, can be caused and changed by diffusion through and desorption from the growth container material. We have investigated these phenomena for silica glass ampoules. We also found, that residual cases can be generated by the source materials: even very high purity commercial elements and compounds may contain trace amounts of impurities, particularly oxides. The oxides may have low volatilities themselves but their reaction with other species, particularly carbon and hydrogen, may produce volatile compounds like water or carbon oxides. The amount of the gas and its composition is dependent on the original purity of the material (oxide contaminants) and the heat treatment of the source prior to sealing. In many cases. particularly at temperatures below about 900 C and in well-outgassed ampoules, this mechanism dominates. The problem is of a particular importance in sealed systems where the amount and composition of the gas cannot be directly controlled. Therefore, a reasonable knowledge and understanding of the origin, composition, magnitude, and change with time of gases present in sealed ampoules may be important for a meaningful control and interpretation of crystal growth processes. We have investigated this phenomenon in more details for a number of elements and compounds, primarily for II-VI and IV-VI materials. Different source pre-treatment and annealing procedures were applied, and subsequent consecutive annealings and measurements were done to determine the origin and development of the gas in the systems.

  12. Newspapers and newspaper ink contain agonists for the ah receptor.

    PubMed

    Bohonowych, Jessica E S; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T; Denison, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [(3)H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed. PMID:18203687

  13. Residual Gas in Closed Systems. 2; Formation of Gases from the Source Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The amount and composition of residual gases formed in sealed ampoules loaded with different elements or binary II-VI or IV-VI compounds and subjected to various thermal processings, annealing and/or resublimation conducted under different conditions were investigated. The results of these experiments are discussed in terms of the procedural, thermochemical, and kinetic limitations to the process.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE AH RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rat liver cytosolic receptor protein containing the Ah-receptor protein was purified and studied using a photochemical assembly of 2,3,7,8-TCDD. The unbound receptor protein rapidly lost its capacity to bind 2,3,7,8-TCDD; however, the 2,3,7,8-TCDD bound Ah receptor did not re...

  15. Toxic gases.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the widespread use of gases and some volatile solvents in modern society is given. The usual circumstances in which undue exposure may occur are described. The most prominent symptoms and general principles of diagnosis and treatment are given and are followed by more specific information on the commoner, more toxic materials. While acute poisonings constitute the greater part of the paper, some indication of chronic disorders arising from repeated or prolonged exposure is also given. PMID:2687827

  16. Shock-implanted noble gases. II - Additional experimental studies and recognition in naturally shocked terrestrial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, D.; Horz, F.; Johnson, P.

    1989-06-01

    The process by which ambient gases can be implanted into silicates by shocks was investigated by analyzing the noble-gas content of several experimentally and naturally shocked silicate samples. The retentivity of shock-implanted gas during stepwise heating in the laboratory was defined in terms of two parameters, namely, the activation energy for diffusion and the extraction temperature at which 50 percent of the gas is released, both of which correlate with the shock pressure. The experiments indicate that, with increasing shock pressure, gas implantation occurs through an increasing production of microcracks/defects in the silicate lattice. The degree of annealing of these defects control the degree of diffusive loss of implanted gas.

  17. Regulations for the transportation of hazardous materials, including liquefied gases, by vessels: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    An overview covers the US domestic regulations enforced by the US Coast Guard and the international standards established by the Intergovernmental Maritime Consultative Organization regarding the safe maritime transport of hazardous materials; the organizations involved; the types of regulatory requirements imposed; and the interplay between domestic and international standards for the transport of hazardous materials.

  18. Relative toxicity of pyrolysis gases from materials - Effects of chemical composition and test conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    Relative toxicity test data on 270 materials are presented, based on test procedures developed at the University of San Francisco. The effects of chemical composition, using data on 13 types of synthetic polymers and eight types of fabrics, are discussed. Selected materials were evaluated using nine test conditions with the USF method, and using methods developed at the FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute, Douglas Aircraft Company and San Jose State University.

  19. Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podosek, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    Earth and the rest of the inner solar were made by collecting the solids, to the rather efficient exclusion of the gases. In this grand separation the noble gases, because they are noble, were partitioned strongly into the gas phase. The resultant generalization is that the noble gases are very scarce in the materials of the inner solar system, whence their common synonym "rare gases."This scarcity is probably the most important single feature to remember about noble-gas cosmochemistry. As illustration of the absolute quantities, for example, a meteorite that contains xenon at a concentration of order 10 -10 cm3STP g -1 (4×10-15 mol g-1) would be considered relatively rich in xenon. Yet this is only 0.6 ppt (part per trillion, fractional abundance 10-12) by mass. In most circumstances, an element would be considered efficiently excluded from some sample if its abundance, relative to cosmic proportions to some convenient reference element, were depleted by "several" orders of magnitude. But a noble gas would be considered to be present in quite high concentration if it were depleted by only four or five orders of magnitude (in the example above, 10-10 cm3STP g-1 of xenon corresponds to depletion by seven orders of magnitude), and one not uncommonly encounters noble-gas depletion of more than 10 orders of magnitude.The second most important feature to note about noble-gas cosmochemistry is that while a good deal of the attention given to noble gases really is about chemistry, traditionally a good deal of attention is also devoted to nuclear phenomena, much more so than for most other elements. This feature is a corollary of the first feature noted above, namely scarcity. A variety of nuclear transmutation processes - decay of natural radionuclides and energetic particle reactions - lead to the production of new nuclei that are often new elements. Most commonly, the quantity of new nuclei originating in nuclear transmutation is very small compared to the quantity already

  20. Influence of the physical properties of the material of nanoparticles on their diffusion in rarefied gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Krasnolutskii, S. L.; Ivashchenko, E. N.

    2008-05-01

    The influence of the physical properties of nanoparticle materials and the parameters of the molecule-particle-interaction potential on the diffusion of nanoparticles has been studied on the basis of kinetic theory. It has been established that unlike Brownian particles, the diffusion of fairly small nanoparticles is substantially dependent on their material. This effect becomes stronger with growth in the carrier-gas temperature. In all cases the use of the well-known Cunningham-Milliken-Davies correlation brings about considerable errors in determining the diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles.

  1. Materials compatibility with oxidizer-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of oxygen compatibility and resistance to ignition of candidate materials for use in a liquid rocket engine designed to incorporate an oxidizer rich preburner-LOX turbopump configuration was discussed. The program was divided into two basic tasks. The first task was to develop a preliminary design of an oxidizer turbopump preburner section complete with thermal and MS Parameter analyses and to develop a conceptual design of the main injector with a preliminary engine specification as the final product. The second task was directed totally at testing materials in oxygen-rich environments.

  2. Solubility selective membrane materials for carbon dioxide removal from mixtures with light gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Haiqing

    Membrane technology has attracted interest for the selective removal of carbon dioxide from mixtures with light gases such as H2, CH4 and N2. While conventional structure-property correlations have focused mainly on improving the separation performance by increasing polymer size sieving ability (i.e., diffusivity selectivity), this project explores the possibility of harnessing favorable interactions between CO 2 and polymers containing polar groups to improve permeability/selectivity properties. Ether oxide groups are discovered to be among the best moieties known to interact with CO2, leading to high CO2 solubility and CO2/light gas solubility selectivity, while still providing polymer chain flexibility, leading to high CO2 diffusivity and favorable CO2/H2 diffusivity selectivity. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) has a high concentration of ether oxygen groups and exhibits high CO2/light gas selectivities. However, gas permeability is low due to the high crystallinity in PEO. Crosslinking and introduction of short chain branching are efficient methods to inhibit crystallization. Three series of crosslinked poly(ethylene oxide) rubbers have been prepared using prepolymer solutions containing: (1) poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) and H2O, (2) PEGDA and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate (PEGMEA), and (3) PEGDA and poly(ethylene glycol) acrylate (PEGA). Independent of the prepolymer composition, all of these polymers have similar ethylene oxide (EO) content (approximately 82 wt.%). Crosslink density decreases with decreasing PEGDA content in the prepolymer solution, which is estimated from water swelling experiments and/or dynamic mechanical testing and has essentially no effect on gas transport properties. Increasing PEGMEA content increases the average size of free volume elements, resulting in a decreased glass transition temperature, and increased CO 2 permeability and CO2/H2 selectivity. In contrast, the presence of PEGA or water has a negligible

  3. NOBLE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Noble Gases symposium, on which this report is based, provided comprehensive coverage of the noble gases. The coverage included, but was not limited to, the properties, biokinetics, bioeffects, production and release to the environment, detection techniques, standards, and ap...

  4. Locating Gases in Porous Materials: Cryogenic Loading of Fuel-Related Gases Into a Sc-based Metal-Organic Framework under Extreme Pressures.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Jorge; Woodall, Christopher H; Allan, Dave R; Gregoryanz, Eugene; Howie, Ross T; Kamenev, Konstantin V; Probert, Michael R; Wright, Paul A; Moggach, Stephen A

    2015-11-01

    An alternative approach to loading metal organic frameworks with gas molecules at high (kbar) pressures is reported. The technique, which uses liquefied gases as pressure transmitting media within a diamond anvil cell along with a single-crystal of a porous metal-organic framework, is demonstrated to have considerable advantages over other gas-loading methods when investigating host-guest interactions. Specifically, loading the metal-organic framework Sc2BDC3 with liquefied CO2 at 2 kbar reveals the presence of three adsorption sites, one previously unreported, and resolves previous inconsistencies between structural data and adsorption isotherms. A further study with supercritical CH4 at 3-25 kbar demonstrates hyperfilling of the Sc2 BDC3 and two high-pressure displacive and reversible phase transitions are induced as the filled MOF adapts to reduce the volume of the system. PMID:26358845

  5. Irradiation History of Itokawa Regolith Material Deduced from Noble Gases in the Hayabusa Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Keisuke; Okazaki, Ryuji; Nakamura, Tomoki; Miura, Yayoi N.; Osawa, Takahito; Bajo, Ken-ichi; Matsuda, Shintaro; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ireland, Trevor R.; Kitajima, Fumio; Naraoka, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Takaaki; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Zolensky, Michael E.; Uesugi, Masayuki; Shirai, Kei; Abe, Masanao; Yada, Toru; Ishibashi, Yukihiro; Fujimura, Akio; Mukai, Toshifumi; Ueno, Munetaka; Okada, Tatsuaki; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    2011-08-01

    Noble gas isotopes were measured in three rocky grains from asteroid Itokawa to elucidate a history of irradiation from cosmic rays and solar wind on its surface. Large amounts of solar helium (He), neon (Ne), and argon (Ar) trapped in various depths in the grains were observed, which can be explained by multiple implantations of solar wind particles into the grains, combined with preferential He loss caused by frictional wear of space-weathered rims on the grains. Short residence time of less than 8 million years was implied for the grains by an estimate on cosmic-ray-produced 21Ne. Our results suggest that Itokawa is continuously losing its surface materials into space at a rate of tens of centimeters per million years. The lifetime of Itokawa should be much shorter than the age of our solar system.

  6. Trapping Planetary Noble Gases During the Fischer-Tropsch-Type Synthesis of Organic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, N. M.; Meshik, A.

    2010-01-01

    When hydrogen, nitrogen and CO arc exposed to amorphous iron silicate surfaces at temperatures between 500 - 900K, a carbonaceous coating forms via Fischer-Tropsch type reactions!, Under normal circumstances such a catalytic coating would impede or stop further reaction. However, we find that this coating is a better catalyst than the amorphous iron silicates that initiate these rcactions:u . The formation of a self-perpetuating catalytic coating on grain surfaces could explain the rich deposits of macromolecular carbon found in primitive meteorites and would imply that protostellar nebulae should be rich in organic materiaL Many more experiments are needed to understand this chemical system and its application to protostellar nebulae.

  7. [Removal of Mixed Waste Gases by a Biotrickling Filter Packed with a Novel Combined Packing Material].

    PubMed

    Mei, Yu; Cheng, Zhuo-wei; Wang, Jia-de; Lu, Yin

    2015-12-01

    A pilot biotrickling filter (BTF) was set up for removal of a mixed waste gas containing toluene and ethanol. The packing material was composed of polyhedral sphere and polyhedral hollow column previously designed by our group. The results showed this BTF could successfully start up within only 8 d and the average eliminate capacities for toluene and ethanol were 97.14 and 113.10 g · (m³ · h)⁻¹, respectively. Empty bed residence time (EBRT) and the inlet concentration had effects on the removal of toluene. The maximum elimination capacity of toluene and ethanol was 123.34 and 206.36 g (m³ · h)⁻¹ under EBRT of 21.11 s, respectively. However, the effect of spray liquid density was not obvious, and the optimal value of solution and gas ratio was 6.82 L · m⁻³. The influence of unstable processing condition on its performance was also investigated. NaOH solution could effectively reduce the plugging of the filler layer, and the removal capability of pollutant could be recovered within 3 days. After the running was stopped for 10 d, the removal performance of this BTF could be quickly recovered. PMID:27011972

  8. Simulation studies for wells AH-4bis/AH-17 and AH-18, Ahuachapan Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Monterrosa, Manuel Ernesto

    1996-01-24

    Well AH-4bis, at the Ahuachapan Geothermal Field is planned to be drilled on the same pad as the former AH-4. A simulation study was carried out for two casing dameters 13 5/8 and 9 5/8” in order to estimate its production and to know its economic feasibility. The simulation results indcate a high probability of production in the range of 7 Mwe, equivalent to 120 kg/s total mass flow rate, 1250 kJ/kg at 6 bar-a for the new well AH-4bis. Well AH- 17 is good producer, during 1991 after ten years of production, the well was shut-in due to silica scaling problems. A wellbore simulation was carried out in order to predict the new production conditions after the work-over, mainly to estimate the water flow rate in order to reduce the silica scaling. The results indicate a very low water flow rate. The match between the simulated and measured production curves after the work-over was successful. The well AH-18 is located at the southern part of the actual bore field. CEL is planning to expand the borefield at this area and it is neccessary to estimate the possible production condtions at that zone. The results indicate a high probabilty of production at that area. The power potential is estimated at 3.5 Mwe per well at WHP 6 bar-a and the wells will not require induction.

  9. The kinetics of reaction of the by-products of ablative materials at high temperatures and the rate of heat transfer between hot surfaces and reactive gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spokes, G. N.; Beadle, P. C.; Gac, N. A.; Golden, D. M.; King, K. D.; Benson, S. W.

    1971-01-01

    Research has been conducted by means of laboratory experiments to enhance understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions taking place during ablative processes that accompany the reentry or manned space vehicles into planetary atmospheres. Fundamental mechanisms of those chemical reactions believed to be important in the thermal degradation of ablative plastic heat shield materials, and the gases evolved, are described.

  10. NOAA 26.5 Ah LEO characterization test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, G. W.

    1986-01-01

    The General Electric (GE) 26.5 Ah NOAA-G flight nickel-cadmium cells were obtained from RCA-Astro Electronics to undergo performance characterization testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This lot of cells was manufactured with passivated positive plate, to control nickel structure attack duing active material impregnation, and less electrolyte than normal (less than 3cc/Ah). The cells were tested in a parametric low Earth orbit (LEO) cycling regime that was previously used to test and characterize standard 50 Ah cells. Life cycle testing at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC), in Crane, followed. The results of the test showed nominal performance in comparison with previous test data on the standard 50. Life cycle testing in the NOAA orbital regime is continuing at NWSC.

  11. [?]Nonlinear Issues in the Aerothermochemistry of Gases and Materials and the Associated Physics and Dynamics of Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1996-01-01

    Our research and technology are focused on nonlinear issues in the aerothermochemistry of gases and materials and the associated physics and dynamics of interfaces. Our program is now organized to aggressively support the NASA Aeronautics Enterprise so as to: (a) develop a new generation of environmentally compatible, economic subsonic aircraft; (b) develop the technology base for an economically viable and environmentally compatible high-speed civil transport; (c) develop the technology options for new capabilities in high-performance aircraft; (d) develop hypersonic technologies for air-breathing flight; and (e) develop advanced concepts, understanding of physical phenomena, and theoretical, experimental, and computational tools for advanced aerospace systems. The implications from our research for aeronautical and aerospace technology have been both broad and deep. For example, using advanced computational techniques, we have determined exact solutions for the Schrodinger equation in electron-molecule scattering allowing us to evaluate atmospheric models important to reentry physics. We have also found a new class of exact solutions for the Navier Stokes equations. In experimental fluid dynamics, we have found explicit evidence of turbulence modification of droplet sizes in shock tube flow with condensation. We have developed a new diagnostic tool for the direct estimation of flow velocities at MHz sampling rates in quasi-one dimensional turbulent flow. This procedure suggests an unexpected confirmation of the possibility of 'natural' closure in Reynolds stresses with deep implications for the development of turbulent models. A transient increase is observed in both the spectral energy decay rate and the degree of chaotic complexity at the interface of a shock wave and a turbulent ionized gas. Even though the gas is apparently brought to rest by the shock wave, no evidence is found either of the expected relaminarization. A unique diamond-shaped nozzle has been

  12. Greenhouse Gases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Greenhouse Gases Come From Outlook for Future Emissions Recycling and Energy Nonrenewable Sources Oil and Petroleum Products ... Power Wave Power Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Biomass Wood and Wood Waste Waste-to-Energy (MSW) Landfill ...

  13. A fiber optic sensor with a metal organic framework as a sensing material for trace levels of water in industrial gases.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Miki, Yusuke; Matsuzaki, Toru; Nakamura, Nao; Sato, Yu-ki; Hirose, Yasuo; Toda, Kei

    2015-07-30

    Industrial gases such as nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and helium are easily contaminated with water during production, transfer and use, because there is a high volume fraction of water in the atmosphere (approximately 1.2% estimated with the average annual atmospheric temperature and relative humidity). Even trace water (<1 parts per million by volume (ppmv) of H2O, dew point < -76 °C) in the industrial gases can cause quality problems in the process such as production of semiconductors. Therefore, it is important to monitor and to control trace water levels in industrial gases at each supplying step, and especially during their use. In the present study, a fiber optic gas sensor was investigated for monitoring trace water levels in industrial gases. The sensor consists of a film containing a metal organic framework (MOF). MOFs are made of metals coordinated to organic ligands, and have mesoscale pores that adsorb gas molecules. When the MOF, copper benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate (Cu-BTC), was used as a sensing material, we investigated the color of Cu-BTC with water adsorption changed both in depth and tone. Cu-BTC crystals appeared deep blue in dry gases, and then changed to light blue in wet gases. An optical gas sensor with the Cu-BTC film was developed using a light emitting diode as the light source and a photodiode as the light intensity detector. The sensor showed a reversible response to trace water, did not require heating to remove the adsorbed water molecules. The sample gas flow rate did not affect the sensitivity. The obtained limit of detection was 40 parts per billion by volume (ppbv). The response time for sample gas containing 2.5 ppmvH2O was 23 s. The standard deviation obtained for daily analysis of 1.0 ppmvH2O standard gas over 20 days was 9%. Furthermore, the type of industrial gas did not affect the sensitivity. These properties mean the sensor will be applicable to trace water detection in various industrial gases. PMID:26320652

  14. RESULTS FROM THE AHS PESTICIDE EXPOSURE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study/Pesticide Exposure Study (AHS/PES) measured exposures resulting from agricultural use of 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos for a subset of applicators in the AHS cohort. Through on-farm measurements and observations, data collected in the exposure study will...

  15. CCD Campaign to Observe AH Leonis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2006-04-01

    Dr. Pamela Gay, Harvard University, has requested optical observations of the RR Lyrae variable star AH Leonis in order to study the Blazhko cycle and other periodicities in this star. Coordinates, finding chart/sequence, observing instructions, and link to AAVSO Variable Star of the Season article on AH Leo (http://www.aavso.org/vstar/vsots/) are provided.

  16. Activation of the Ah receptor by extracts of dietary herbal supplements, vegetables, and fruits.

    PubMed

    Jeuken, Anoek; Keser, Bart J G; Khan, Elaine; Brouwer, Abraham; Koeman, Jan; Denison, Michael S

    2003-08-27

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that can be activated by a structurally diverse range of synthetic and natural chemicals, and it mediates the toxic and biological effects of environmental contaminants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The spectrum of chemicals that bind to and activate the AhR signal transduction pathway and the identity of materials containing AhR active chemicals is only now being defined. Utilizing AhR-dependent gel retardation and reporter gene bioassays, the screening of extracts of 22 dietary herbal supplements and 21 food products (vegetables and fruits) was performed to identify those containing AhR agonists. Several herbal extracts (ginseng, Fo-Ti, white oak bark, licorice, ginkgo biloba, and black cohosh) stimulated AhR DNA binding and gene expression to levels between 20 and 60% of that produced by TCDD. Although some food extracts (corn, jalapeño pepper, green bell pepper, apple, Brussels sprout, and potato) were relatively potent activators of AhR DNA binding (30-50% of TCDD), only corn and jalapeño pepper extracts induced AhR-dependent luciferase reporter gene expression. However, dilution of corn, jalapeño pepper, bell pepper, and potato extracts dramatically increased their ability to induce luciferase activity, suggesting that these extracts contained AhR antagonists whose effectiveness was overcome by dilution. Overall, these results demonstrate that dietary products can be a major source of naturally occurring AhR ligands to which animals and humans are chronically exposed. PMID:12926901

  17. AhR signalling and dioxin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sorg, Olivier

    2014-10-15

    Dioxins are a family of molecules associated to several industrial accidents such as Ludwigshafen in 1953 or Seveso in 1976, to the Agent Orange used during the war of Vietnam, and more recently to the poisoning of the former president of Ukraine, Victor Yushchenko. These persistent organic pollutants are by-products of industrial activity and bind to an intracellular receptor, AhR, with a high potency. In humans, exposure to dioxins, in particular 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces a cutaneous syndrome known as chloracne, consisting in the development of many small skin lesions (hamartoma), lasting for 2-5 years. Although TCDD has been classified by the WHO as a human carcinogen, its carcinogenic potential to humans is not clearly demonstrated. It was first believed that AhR activation accounted for most, if not all, biological properties of dioxins. However, certain AhR agonists found in vegetables do not induce chloracne, and other chemicals, in particular certain therapeutic agents, may induce a chloracne-like syndrome without activating AhR. It is time to rethink the mechanism of dioxin toxicity and analyse in more details the biological events following exposure to these compounds and other AhR agonists, some of which have a very different chemical structure than TCDD. In particular various food-containing AhR agonists are non-toxic and may on the contrary have beneficial properties to human health. PMID:24239782

  18. Method of concurrently filtering particles and collecting gases

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Mark A; Meike, Annemarie; Anderson, Brian L

    2015-04-28

    A system for concurrently filtering particles and collecting gases. Materials are be added (e.g., via coating the ceramic substrate, use of loose powder(s), or other means) to a HEPA filter (ceramic, metal, or otherwise) to collect gases (e.g., radioactive gases such as iodine). The gases could be radioactive, hazardous, or valuable gases.

  19. Prospects of high-resolution resonant X-ray inelastic scattering studies on solid materials, liquids and gases at diffraction-limited storage rings

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thorsten; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Rubensson, Jan-Erik

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic technique of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) will particularly profit from immensely improved brilliance of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs). In RIXS one measures the intensities of excitations as a function of energy and momentum transfer. DLSRs will allow for pushing the achievable energy resolution, signal intensity and the sampled spot size to new limits. With RIXS one nowadays probes a broad range of electronic systems reaching from simple molecules to complex materials displaying phenomena like peculiar magnetism, two-dimensional electron gases, superconductivity, photovoltaic energy conversion and heterogeneous catalysis. In this article the types of improved RIXS studies that will become possible with X-ray beams from DLSRs are envisioned. PMID:25177995

  20. MEASUREMENT OF POLYCYCLIC ORGANIC MATERIALS AND OTHER HAZARDOUS ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STACK GASES - STATE OF THE ART

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents and reviews state-of-the-art methods for the measurement of polycyclic organic matter (POM) and other hazardous organic materials which are present in industrial stack emissions. Measurement methods for many hazardous compounds, such as POM and nitrosamines,...

  1. Effect of SO2 on oxidation of metallic materials in CO2/H2O‐rich gases relevant to oxyfuel environments

    SciTech Connect

    Huczkowski, P; Olszewski, T; Schiek, M; Lutz, B; Holcomb, G R; Shemet, V; Nowak, W; Meier, G H; Singheiser, L; Quadakkers, W J

    2014-01-01

    In an oxyfuel plant, heat exchanging metallic components will be exposed to a flue gas that contains substantially higher contents of CO2, water vapor, and SO2 than conventionalflue gases. In the present study, the oxidation behavior of the martensitic steel P92 was studied in CO2‐and/or H2O‐rich gas mixtures with and without addition of SO2. For this purpose, the corrosion of P92 at 550 8C up to 1000 h in Ar–H2O–SO2, Ar–CO2–SO2, Ar–CO2–O2–SO2 and simulated oxyfuel gas (Ar–CO2–H2O–O2–SO2) was compared with the behavior in selected SO2‐free gases. The oxidation kinetics were estimated by a number of methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy and wave length dispersive X‐ray analysis, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy, X‐ray diffraction as well as transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results revealed that the effect of SO2 addition on the materials behavior substantially differed, depending on the prevailing base gas atmosphere. The various types of corrosion attack affected by SO2 could not be explained by solely comparing equilibrium activities of the gas atmospheres with thermodynamic stabilities of possible corrosion products. The results were found to be strongly affected by relative rates of reactions of the various gas species occurring within the frequently porous corrosion scales as well as at the scale/gas‐and scale/alloy interfaces.Whereas SO2 addition to Ar–CO2 resulted in formation of an external mixed oxide/sulfide layer, the presence of SO2 in oxyfuel gas and in Ar–H2O–SO2 resulted in Fe‐sulfide formation near the interface between inner and outer oxide layer as well as Cr‐sulfide formation in the alloy. In the latter gases, the presence of SO2 seemed to have no dramatic effect on oxide scale growth rates.

  2. Development and application of a hybrid inert/organic packing material for the biofiltration of composting off-gases mimics.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Jerónimo; Prado, Oscar J; Almarcha, Manuel; Lafuente, Javier; Gabriel, David

    2010-06-15

    The performance of three biofilters (BF1-BF3) packed with a new hybrid (inert/organic) packing material that consists of spherical argyle pellets covered with compost was examined in different operational scenarios and compared with a biofilter packed with pine bark (BF4). BF1, BF2 and BF4 were inoculated with an enriched microbial population, while BF3 was inoculated with sludge from a wastewater treatment plant. A gas mixture containing ammonia and six VOCs was fed to the reactors with N-NH(3) loads ranging from 0 to 10 g N/m(3)h and a VOCs load of around 10 g C/m(3)h. A profound analysis of the fate of nitrogen was performed in all four reactors. Results show that the biofilters packed with the hybrid packing material and inoculated with the microbial pre-adapted population (BF1 and BF2) achieved the highest nitrification rates and VOCs removal efficiencies. In BF3, nitratation was inhibited during most of the study, while only slight evidence of nitrification could be observed in BF4. All four reactors were able to treat the VOCs mixture with efficiencies greater than 80% during the entire experimental period, regardless of the inlet ammonia load. PMID:20188468

  3. Use of impure inert gases in the controlled heating and cooling of mixed conducting metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Bernhart, John Charles

    2012-08-21

    Method for processing an article comprising mixed conducting metal oxide material. The method comprises contacting the article with an oxygen-containing gas and either reducing the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas during a cooling period or increasing the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas during a heating period; during the cooling period, reducing the oxygen activity in the oxygen-containing gas during at least a portion of the cooling period and increasing the rate at which the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas is reduced during at least a portion of the cooling period; and during the heating period, increasing the oxygen activity in the oxygen-containing gas during at least a portion of the heating period and decreasing the rate at which the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas is increased during at least a portion of the heating period.

  4. In-flight AHS MTF measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallefont-Robinet, Françoise; Fontanilles, Guillaume; de Miguel, Eduardo

    2008-10-01

    The disposal of couples of images of the same landscape acquired with two spatial resolutions gives the opportunity to assess the in-flight Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of the lower resolution sensor in the common spectral bands. For each couple, the higher resolution image stands for the landscape so that the ratio of the spectra obtained by FFT of the two images, gives the lower resolution sensor MTF. This paper begins with a brief recall of the method including the aliasing correction. The next step presents the data to be processed, provided by the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA). The model of the AHS MTF is described. The presentation of the corresponding AHS results naturally follows. Last part of the paper consists in a comparison with other measurements: measurements obtained with the edge method and laboratory measurements.

  5. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  6. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  7. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  8. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  9. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  10. Precursor systems analyses of automated highway systems: Commercial vehicle and transit ahs analysis. Volume 6. Final report, September 1993-February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bottiger, F.; Chemnitz, H.D.; Doorman, J.; Franke, U.; Zimmerman, T.

    1995-03-01

    This document is the final report of the Automated Highway System (AHS). The activities of Commercial Vehicle and Transit AHS Analysis are reported on in this document. This document type is resource materials. This volume is the six in a series. There are nine other volumes in the series.

  11. 40 CFR 90.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and span gases. (1) Calibration gas values are to be derived from NIST “Standard Reference Materials... or FID the manufacturer may choose to use as a diluent span gas and the calibration gas either... choice of diluent (zero air or purified nitrogen) between the calibration and span gases. If...

  12. Testing Update on 20 and 25-Ah Lithium Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Gregg C.; Mardikian, Pamella; Edwards, Sherri; Bugga, Kumar; Chin, Keith; Smart, Marshall; Surampudi, Subbarao

    2003-01-01

    Eagle-Picher Energy Products has worked on lithium ion batteries for approximately 8 years. During that period EPEPC developed and delivered several cell sizes on a program funded by the USAF and Canadian DND. Designs are wound cylindrical cells from 7 to 40-Ah. Most cells delivered were approximately 25-Ah due to requirements of Mars missions. Several iterations of cells were manufactured and delivered for evaluation. The first design was 20-Ah, Design I, and the second was a 25-Ah, Design II.

  13. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, S.; Kulkarni, S.S.

    1986-08-26

    Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

  14. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.

    1986-01-01

    Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

  15. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, S.

    1986-08-19

    The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

  16. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi

    1986-01-01

    The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

  17. AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference, 34th and AIAA/ASME Adaptive Structures Forum, La Jolla, CA, Apr. 19-22, 1993, Technical Papers. Pts. 1-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Topics addressed include the prediction of helicopter component loads using neural networks, spacecraft on-orbit coupled loads analysis, hypersonic flutter of a curved shallow panel with aerodynamic heating, thermal-acoustic fatigue of ceramic matrix composite materials, transition elements based on transfinite interpolation, damage progression in stiffened composite panels, a direct treatment of min-max dynamic response optimization problems, and sources of helicopter rotor hub inplane shears. Also discussed are dynamics of a layered elastic system, confidence bounds on structural reliability, mixed triangular space-time finite elements, advanced transparency development for USAF aircraft, a low-velocity impact on a graphite/PEEK, an automated mode-tracking strategy, transonic flutter suppression by a passive flap, a nonlinear response of composite panels to random excitation, an optimal placement of elastic supports on a simply supported plate, a probabilistic assessment of composite structures, a model for mode I failure of laminated composites, a residual flexibility approach to multibody dynamics,and multilayer piezoelectric actuators.

  18. AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference, 34th and AIAA/ASME Adaptive Structures Forum, La Jolla, CA, Apr. 19-22, 1993, Technical Papers. Pts. 1-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topics addressed include the prediction of helicopter component loads using neural networks, spacecraft on-orbit coupled loads analysis, hypersonic flutter of a curved shallow panel with aerodynamic heating, thermal-acoustic fatigue of ceramic matrix composite materials, transition elements based on transfinite interpolation, damage progression in stiffened composite panels, a direct treatment of min-max dynamic response optimization problems, and sources of helicopter rotor hub inplane shears. Also discussed are dynamics of a layered elastic system, confidence bounds on structural reliability, mixed triangular space-time finite elements, advanced transparency development for USAF aircraft, a low-velocity impact on a graphite/PEEK, an automated mode-tracking strategy, transonic flutter suppression by a passive flap, a nonlinear response of composite panels to random excitation, an optimal placement of elastic supports on a simply supported plate, a probabilistic assessment of composite structures, a model for mode I failure of laminated composites, a residual flexibility approach to multibody dynamics,and multilayer piezoelectric actuators.

  19. AhR sensing of bacterial pigments regulates antibacterial defence.

    PubMed

    Moura-Alves, Pedro; Faé, Kellen; Houthuys, Erica; Dorhoi, Anca; Kreuchwig, Annika; Furkert, Jens; Barison, Nicola; Diehl, Anne; Munder, Antje; Constant, Patricia; Skrahina, Tatsiana; Guhlich-Bornhof, Ute; Klemm, Marion; Koehler, Anne-Britta; Bandermann, Silke; Goosmann, Christian; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Hurwitz, Robert; Brinkmann, Volker; Fillatreau, Simon; Daffe, Mamadou; Tümmler, Burkhard; Kolbe, Michael; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Krause, Gerd; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2014-08-28

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a highly conserved ligand-dependent transcription factor that senses environmental toxins and endogenous ligands, thereby inducing detoxifying enzymes and modulating immune cell differentiation and responses. We hypothesized that AhR evolved to sense not only environmental pollutants but also microbial insults. We characterized bacterial pigmented virulence factors, namely the phenazines from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the naphthoquinone phthiocol from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, as ligands of AhR. Upon ligand binding, AhR activation leads to virulence factor degradation and regulated cytokine and chemokine production. The relevance of AhR to host defence is underlined by heightened susceptibility of AhR-deficient mice to both P. aeruginosa and M. tuberculosis. Thus, we demonstrate that AhR senses distinct bacterial virulence factors and controls antibacterial responses, supporting a previously unidentified role for AhR as an intracellular pattern recognition receptor, and identify bacterial pigments as a new class of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. PMID:25119038

  20. Performance of AEA 80 Ah Battery under GEO Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russel, N.; Curzon, D.; Ng, K.; Lee, L.; Rao, G.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is divided into the following sections: 1) AEA Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) Life Testing; 2) AEA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 20 Ah Battery; 3) AEA/GSFC 80 Ah Battery; 4) Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) Life Test; 5) Test Results; 6) Correlation; 7) Conclusions.

  1. Induction of AhR-Mediated Gene Transcription by Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toshio; Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Okinaga, Hiroko; Teramoto, Tamio

    2014-01-01

    Background Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is classically known to be activated by xenobiotics such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although it has been reported that PAHs are contained in roasted coffee beans, in general coffee beverages are not considered to be AhR activators. We tested whether exposure to coffee would activate AhR in cultured cells. Methods HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene were treated with coffee samples. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was quantitated by RT-PCR and Western blotting in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells, after treatment with coffee. In order to obtain sensitive and reproducible results, all the experiments were performed with the cells placed in either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or pure serum, instead of routinely-used culture medium, whose intrinsic AhR-stimulating activity turned out to be so strong as to interfere with the analyses. Results All the coffee samples tested robustly stimulated AhR-mediated transcription in the reporter gene assays. Of note, to what extent coffee and other AhR agonists activated AhR was different, depending on whether the experiments were done in PBS or serum. CYP1A1 mRNA was induced by coffee, in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells placed in either PBS or serum. CYP1A1 protein expression, which was not detected in these cells incubated in PBS, was also increased by coffee in cells placed in serum. Conclusions By using culture medium-free experimental settings, we have shown that coffee is a strong AhR activator. Our observation may help elucidate as-yet-unrecognized effects of coffee on human health. PMID:25007155

  2. 49 CFR 173.307 - Exceptions for compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exceptions for compressed gases. 173.307 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.307 Exceptions for compressed gases. (a) The following materials are not subject to the requirements of this subchapter:...

  3. 49 CFR 173.307 - Exceptions for compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exceptions for compressed gases. 173.307 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.307 Exceptions for compressed gases. (a) The following materials are not subject to the requirements of this subchapter:...

  4. 49 CFR 173.307 - Exceptions for compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exceptions for compressed gases. 173.307 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.307 Exceptions for compressed gases. (a) The following materials are not subject to the requirements of this subchapter:...

  5. 49 CFR 173.307 - Exceptions for compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exceptions for compressed gases. 173.307 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.307 Exceptions for compressed gases. (a) The following materials are not subject to the requirements of this subchapter:...

  6. Learning the Critical Points for Addition in Matematika GASING

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siregar, Johannes Hamonangan; Wiyanti, Wiwik; Wakhyuningsih, Nur Safitri; Godjali, Ali

    2014-01-01

    We propose learning Matematika GASING to help students better understand the addition material. Matematika GASING is a way of learning mathematics in an easy, fun and enjoyable fashion. GASING is short for GAmpang, aSyIk, and menyenaNGkan (Bahasa Indonesia for easy, fun and enjoyable). It was originally developed by Prof. Yohanes Surya at the…

  7. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic... CARRIAGE BY RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.204 Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded...

  8. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic... CARRIAGE BY RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.204 Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded...

  9. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic... CARRIAGE BY RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials § 174.204 Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded...

  10. Isotopic Analysis and Evolved Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, Timothy D.; Boynton, William V.; Chutjian, Ara; Hoffman, John H.; Jordan, Jim L.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; McEntire, Richard W.; Nyquist, Larry

    1996-01-01

    Precise measurements of the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of planetary surface material and gases, and observed variations in these compositions, can contribute significantly to our knowledge of the source(s), ages, and evolution of solar system materials. The analyses discussed in this paper are mostly made by mass spectrometers or some other type of mass analyzer, and address three broad areas of interest: (1) atmospheric composition - isotopic, elemental, and molecular, (2) gases evolved from solids, and (3) solids. Current isotopic data on nine elements, mostly from in situ analysis, but also from meteorites and telescopic observations are summarized. Potential instruments for isotopic analysis of lunar, Martian, Venusian, Mercury, and Pluto surfaces, along with asteroid, cometary and icy satellites, surfaces are discussed.

  11. Noble gases in meteorites and terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Terrestrial planets and chondrites have noble gas platforms that are sufficiently alike, especially Ne/Ar, that they may have acquired their noble gases by similar processes. Meteorites presumably obtained their noble gases during formation in the solar nebula. Adsorption onto C - the major gas carrier in chondrites - is the likely mechanism for trapping noble gases; recent laboratory simulations support this hypothesis. The story is more complex for planets. An attractive possibility is that the planets acquired their noble gases in a late accreting veneer of chondritic material. In chondrites, noble gases correlate with C, N, H, and volatile metals; by Occam's Razor, we would expect a similar coupling in planets. Indeed, the Earth's crust and mantle contain chondritic like trace volatiles and PL group metals, respectively and the Earth's oceans resemble C chondrites in their enrichment of D (8X vs 8-10X of the galactic D/H ratio). Models have been proposed to explain some of the specific noble gas patterns in planets. These include: (1) noble gases may have been directly trapped by preplanetary material instead of arriving in a veneer; (2) for Venus, irradiation of preplanetary material, followed by diffusive loss of Ne, could explain the high concentration of AR-36; (3) the Earth and Venus may have initially had similar abundances of noble gases, but the Earth lost its share during the Moon forming event; (4) noble gases could have been captured by planetestimals, possibly leading to gravitational fractionation, particularly of Xe isotopes and (5) noble gases may have been dissolved in the hot outer portion of the Earth during contact with a primordial atmosphere.

  12. Transport of Trace Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.

    2005-01-01

    Trace gases measurements are used to diagnose both the chemistry and transport of the atmosphere. These lectures emphasize the interpretation of trace gases measurements and techniques used to untangle chemistry and transport effects. I will discuss PV transform, trajectory techniques, and age-of-air as far as the circulation of the stratosphere.

  13. AH-1S communication switch integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, Loran; Szoboszlay, Zoltan; Shively, Robert; Bick, Frank J.

    1989-01-01

    The C-6533/ARC communication system as installed on the test AH-1E Cobra helicopter was modified to allow discrete radio selection of all aircraft radios at the cyclic radio/intercommunication system switch. The current Cobra-fleet use of the C-6533 system is cumbersome, particularly during low-altitude operations. Operationally, the current system C-6533 configuration and design requires the pilot to estimate when he can safely remove his hand from an active flight control to select radios during low-altitude flight. The pilot must then physically remove his hand from the flight control, look inside the cockpit to select and verify the radio selection and then effect the selected radio transmission by activating the radio/ICS switch on the cyclic. This condition is potentially hazardous, especially during low-level flight at night in degraded weather. To improve pilot performance, communications effectiveness, and safety, manprint principles were utilized in the selection of a design modification. The modified C-6533 design was kept as basic as possible for potential Cobra-fleet modification. The communications system was modified and the design was subsequently flight-tested by the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate and NASA at the NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California. The design modification enables the Cobra pilot to maintain hands-on flight controls while selecting radios during nap-of-the-Earth (NOE) flight without looking inside the cockpit which resulted in reduced pilot workload ratings, better pilot handling quality ratings and increased flight safety for the NOE flight environment.

  14. Light Collection in Liquid Noble Gases

    SciTech Connect

    McKinsey, Dan

    2013-05-29

    Liquid noble gases are increasingly used as active detector materials in particle and nuclear physics. Applications include calorimeters and neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for neutrinoless double beta decay, direct dark matter, muon electron conversion, and the neutron electric dipole moment. One of the great advantages of liquid noble gases is their copious production of ultraviolet scintillation light, which contains information about event energy and particle type. I will review the scintillation properties of the various liquid noble gases and the means used to collect their scintillation light, including recent advances in photomultiplier technology and wavelength shifters.

  15. Rituximab therapy in nephrotic syndrome due to AH amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Nagaaki; Matsuda, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Daigo; Gono, Takahisa; Yazaki, Masahide; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient with AH amyloidosis associated with lymphoplasmacytic leukemia that has remained in a stable state with a nephrotic syndrome for 17 months since the commencement of cyclic rituximab therapy aimed at suppression of pathogenetic gamma heavy chains. Free light chains in serum and CD20-positive cells in peripheral blood were useful as hematological markers in the patient. Rituximab might be a potent therapeutic option for AH amyloidosis associated with a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:19590993

  16. A comparison of apical sealing ability between GuttaFlow and AH plus: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Prajakta; Rathore, Vishnu P. S.; Hotkar, Chetan; Savgave, Snehal S.; Raghavendra, K.; Ingale, Priya

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The present study aimed to compare apical sealing ability between GuttaFlow and AH Plus. Materials and Method: Eighty extracted human maxillary anterior teeth with fully formed apex and straight root were collected for this study. The root canals were cleaned and shaped using a standard step back preparation to size 60# master apical file at the established working length and divided into four groups: Group 1, GuttaFlow sealer with gutta-percha; Group 2, AH Plus sealer with gutta-percha; Group 3, positive control group (Teeth were instrumented and left without obturation); Group 4, negative control group (Teeth were totally coated with nail varnish) Dye leakage was carried out. Statistical analysis was done using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software and Student's unpaired t-test. Results: The GuttaFlow group had a mean leakage of 1.38 mm whereas AH Plus had a mean of 1.425 mm. The standard deviation of GuttaFlow and AH Plus were 0.3861 and 0.3226, respectively. Student's unpaired t-test disclosed no significant difference (P < 0.05) between the groups. Conclusion: None of the sealers used in the study could completely seal the apical foramen to have a fluid-tight seal. GuttaFlow and AH Plus showed no statistically significant difference in microleakage; the better result was shown by GuttaFlow. PMID:27583228

  17. Photochemistry of biogenic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the biosphere and the atmosphere is examined, emphasizing the composition and photochemistry and chemistry of the troposphere and stratosphere. The reactions of oxygen, ozone, and hydroxyl are reviewed and the fate of the biogenic gases ammonia, methane, reduced sulfur species, reduced halogen species, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide are described. A list is given of the concentration and sources of the various gases.

  18. Evaluation of the apical sealing ability of bioceramic sealer, AH plus & epiphany: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Suprit Sudhir; Pujar, Madhu Ajay; Makandar, Saleem Dadapeer

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This in vitro study evaluated and compared the microleakage of three sealers; Endosequence bioceramic (BC) sealer, AH Plus and Epiphany. Materials and Methods: Study was done on 75 extracted human single rooted permanent teeth, which were decoronated and the root canals were instrumented. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 25) and obturated by continuous wave condensation technique. Group A: using Endosequence BC, Group B: using AH Plus sealer, Group C: using Resilon Epiphany system. Microleakage was evaluated using dye penetration method. Teeth were split longitudinally and then horizontally markings were made at 2, 4 and 6 mm from the apex. Dye penetration evaluation was done under stereomicroscope (30X magnification). Results: The dye penetration in Group B was more than in Group A and C in both vertical and horizontal directions, suggesting that newly introduced BC sealer and Epiphany sealer sealed the root canal better compared to AH Plus Sealer. Conclusion: Newer root canal sealers seal the root canal better but cannot totally eliminate leakage. PMID:25506149

  19. Lethal poisonings with AH-7921 in combination with other substances.

    PubMed

    Karinen, Ritva; Tuv, Silja Skogstad; Rogde, Sidsel; Peres, Mariana Dadalto; Johansen, Unni; Frost, Joachim; Vindenes, Vigdis; Øiestad, Åse Marit Leere

    2014-11-01

    AH-7921 is a synthetic μ-opioid agonist, approximately equipotent with morphine. We report the death of two young individuals after ingestion of AH-7921 in combination with other psychoactive drugs. In the first case a young man died shortly after ingesting Internet drugs. Toxicological analysis of post mortem peripheral blood revealed AH-7921 (0.43 mg/L), 2-FMA (0.0069 mg/L) and 3-MMC (0.0021 mg/L) as well as codeine (0.42 mg/L), codeine-6-glucuronide (0.77 mg/L) and acetaminophen (18.7 mg/L). The second case involved a young female found dead at home. The only positive finding at medicolegal autopsy was needle marks. Toxicological analysis revealed AH-7921 (0.33 mg/L), methoxetamine (MXE) (0.064 mg/L), etizolam (0.27 mg/L), phenazepam (1.33 mg/L), 7-aminonitrazepam (0.043 mg/L), diazepam (0.046 mg/L), nordiazepam (0.073 mg/L), and oxazepam (0.018 mg/L) in blood. In both cases intoxication with AH-7921 in combination with other psychoactive drugs was considered to be the cause of death. PMID:25216892

  20. A Study to Analyze the Permeation of High Density Gases and Propellant Vapors Through Single Layer Teflon or Teflon Structure Materials and Laminations. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. L.; Young, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1967-01-01

    This report contains the results of a fifteen month analytical and experimental study of the leakage rate of the pressurant gases (N2, He) and the propellant vapors (N2O4,N2H4) through bladder structures consisting of two layers of Teflon separated by a metallic foil diffusion barrier containing microscopic or larger holes. Results were obtained for the steady state leakage rate through circular holes and long rectangular openings in the barrier for arbitrary thicknesses of the two Teflon layers. The effect of hole shape and relative hole position on the leakage rate were studied. The transient problem was analyzed and it was shown that steady state calculations are adequate for estimating the leakage rate. A computer program entitled "Diffusion Analyzer Program" was developed to calculate the leakage rate, both transient and steady state. Finally, the analytical results were compared to experimentally determined values of the leakage rate through a model laminated bladder structure. The results of the analysis are in good agreement with experiment. The experimental effort (Part II of the Bladder Permeation Program) measured the solubility, diffusion coefficient and permeability of helium, nitrogen and nitrogen tetroxide vapor through Teflon TFE and FEP membranes. Data were obtained in the temperature range of 25 to 100 C at pressures ranging from near vacuum to about 20 atmospheres. Results of the experimental effort were compared with the limited data previously reported. As a verification to the applicability of results to actual bladder systems, counter diffusion tests were performed with a laminated sample containing aluminum foil with a selected group of holes.

  1. Effect of the geometric parameters and of the elastic characteristics of materials on the durability of valves in pumps for liquified gases

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    The authors determine the values of the angle and width of the valve seat for a specified pressure gradient delta-p and also to choose materials with such mechanical properties that plastic deformations do not occur at the place of contact. To improve the durability of valves of high-pressure pumps, the geometric parameters of the valves have to be determined with a view to the condition that the plastic deformations at the place of contact between the mushroom and the seat are impermissible. When the conditions of the expression presented are fulfilled, then the best hydraulic characteristics will be found in the valve in which the material of the mushroom is the titanium alloy VT5-1, and the material of the seat is steel 20Kh13.

  2. Planetary noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the history and current status of research on planetary noble gases is presented. The discovery that neon and argon are vastly more abundant on Venus than on earth points to the solar wind rather than condensation as the fundamental process for placing noble gases in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets; however, solar wind implantation may not be able to fully reproduce the observed gradient, nor does it obviously account for similar planetary Ne/Ar ratios and dissimilar planetary Ar/Kr ratios. More recent studies have emphasized escape rather than accretion. Hydrodynamic escape, which is fractionating, readily accounts for the difference between atmospheric neon and isotopically light mantle neon. Atmospheric cratering, which is nearly nonfractionating, can account for the extreme scarcity of nonradiogenic noble gases (and other volatiles) on Mars.

  3. Transgenic Overexpression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor (AhRR) and AhR-Mediated Induction of CYP1A1, Cytokines, and Acute Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Christoph F.A.; Chang, W.L. William; Kado, Sarah; McCulloh, Kelly; Vogel, Helena; Wu, Dalei; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; Yang, GuoXiang; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Matsumura, Fumio; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR) is known to repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling, but very little is known regarding the role of the AhRR in vivo. Objective: This study tested the role of AhRR in vivo in AhRR overexpressing mice on molecular and toxic end points mediated through a prototypical AhR ligand. Methods: We generated AhRR-transgenic mice (AhRR Tg) based on the genetic background of C57BL/6J wild type (wt) mice. We tested the effect of the prototypical AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1 and cytokines in various tissues of mice. We next analyzed the infiltration of immune cells in adipose tissue of mice after treatment with TCDD using flow cytometry. Results: AhRR Tg mice express significantly higher levels of AhRR compared to wt mice. Activation of AhR by TCDD caused a significant increase of the inflammatory cytokines Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-10, and CXCL chemokines in white epididymal adipose tissue from both wt and AhRR Tg mice. However, the expression of IL-1β, CXCL2 and CXCL3 were significantly lower in AhRR Tg versus wt mice following TCDD treatment. Exposure to TCDD caused a rapid accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages in white adipose tissue of wt and AhRR Tg mice. Furthermore we found that male AhRR Tg mice were protected from high-dose TCDD-induced lethality associated with a reduced inflammatory response and liver damage as indicated by lower levels of TCDD-induced alanine aminotransferase and hepatic triglycerides. Females from both wt and AhRR Tg mice were less sensitive than male mice to acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Conclusion: In conclusion, the current study identifies AhRR as a previously uncharacterized regulator of specific inflammatory cytokines, which may protect from acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Citation: Vogel CF, Chang WL, Kado S, McCulloh K, Vogel H, Wu D, Haarmann-Stemmann T, Yang GX, Leung PS, Matsumura F

  4. Classification and generation of terrestrial rare gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, K.

    1978-01-01

    A Kr-84/Xe-130 versus Ne-20/Ar-36 diagram is a very useful format with which to study the elemental ratios of rare gases from terrestrial materials. It can separate not only the three types of rare gases which Ozima and Alexander (1976) classified but also the 'planetary' type rare gases from the other three types of rare gases. When all the available terrestrial rare gas data are plotted in a Kr-84/Xe-130 versus Ne-20/Ar-36 diagram, several observations can be made. First, most of the analyses of rare gases from shales yield Kr-84/Xe-130 ratios between the 'planetary' and atmospheric values. If, however, the atmosphere's high Kr-84/Xe-130 ratio was produced by the selective adsorption of xenon onto shales from an initially 'planetary' atmosphere, as is widely accepted, then the Kr-84/Xe-130 ratio in shales should be even lower than the 'planetary' value. Second, the rare gas pattern in the quenched rims of submarine basalts may be explained as fractionated samples of the rare gases in sea water.

  5. Filter for cleaning hot gases

    SciTech Connect

    Gresch, H.; Holter, H.; Hubner, K.; Igelbuscher, H.; Weber, E.

    1981-10-20

    In an apparatus for cleaning hot gases a filter housing has an inlet for unfiltered gas and an outlet for filtered gas. A plurality of filtered inserts are placed within the housing in a manner capable of filtering undesirable components from the gas feed stream. Each filter insert is made of a fibrous filter material. Silicic-acid glass fibers have a silicic acid content of at least 90%. Coated upon the fibers and absorbed into their pores is a metal oxide of aluminum, titanium, zirconium, cromium, nickle or cobalt. A honeycombed cage filled with high temperature resistant perlite is located within the housing between the gas inlet and the fiber inserts. The cage has an inlet and outlet external to the housing for replacing the perlite. A combustion chamber mounted in the housing has a discharge nozzle located so that the nozzle is directed at the filter inserts. Combusting materials in the chamber causes an explosive backflow of gases through the filter inserts.

  6. Effect of raw materials on emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans from the stack flue gases of secondary aluminum smelters.

    PubMed

    Li, Hsing-Wang; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Chang-Chien, Guo-Ping

    2007-08-25

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of raw materials on PCDD/F emission from secondary aluminum smelters (ALS). Four plants each of aluminum ingot smelters (over 50% ingot) and secondary ALS (over 70% waste or recycled aluminum) were selected and the results compared. The secondary ALS yield much higher PCDD/Fs than the aluminum ingot smelters, or 7.94-22.76ng/Nm(3) versus 0.57-2.67ng/Nm(3), due to the large percentage of waste or recycled aluminum used. As for air pollution control devices (APCDs), the wet scrubber system in one of the aluminum ingot smelters exhibits an adverse effect on PCDD/F removal, due to the continuous recycle of the contaminated water through the scrubber system. Another ingot plant equipped with cartridge filter, there is a significant reduction in PCDD/F TEQ (52%). The powdered activated carbon injection at 2kg/h (110mg/Nm(3)) in one ALS reduces 70% of the total PCDD/Fs. The average emission factor of four secondary ALS is much higher than that of aluminum ingot smelters, or 20-fold higher based on either raw materials or product. Consequently, more attention should be paid to the emission reduction of PCDD/Fs from the secondary ALS, including installation of a secondary burner, additional APCDs and the pre-cleaning of raw materials. PMID:17324506

  7. Gases in Tektite Bubbles.

    PubMed

    O'keefe, J A; Lowman, P D; Dunning, K L

    1962-07-20

    Spectroscopic analysis of light produced by electrodeless discharge in a tektite bubble showed the main gases in the bubble to be neon, helium, and oxygen. The neon and helium have probably diffused in from the atmosphere, while the oxygen may be atmospheric gas incorporated in the tektite during its formation. PMID:17801113

  8. CCD Photometric Study and Period Investigation of AH Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Fu-Yuan; Xiao, Ting-Yu; Yu, Yun-Xia

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we present new CCD photometric observations of AH Tauri in the R band observed in 2006 at the Yunnan Observatory. Two new times of light minima were derived from these observations. We modeled the light curves using the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney program. The results show that the variations of the light curves can be expained by a cool spot on the primary star. The fill-out factor is about 6.6%, indicating that AH Tauri is a shallow-contact system. The mass ratio was determined to be about 0.505. In addition, the orbital period variations of AH Tauri were investigated based on all of the photoelectric and CCD light minimum times, including our two new data. It was found that the orbital period exhibits a possible periodic variation with a period of {P}{mod}=54.62\\(+/- 0.20) years and a secular period decrease of {dP}/{dt}=-(1.823+/- 0.215)× {10}-7 {days} {{yr}}-1. Since AH Tauri is an overcontact solar-like system, we discuss three mechanisms of the mass transfer, the light-time effect of the third body, and magnetic activity responsible for the orbital period changes.

  9. PESTICIDE TRADE NAMES AND THEIR ACTIVE INGREDIENTS IN THE AHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The detailed information on the use of specific pesticides is a major strength of exposure assessment conducted for the Agricultural Health Study (AHS). During the enrollment interviews, a check list was used to collect information on the frequency and duration of use for 28 p...

  10. Teacher's Guide for Balloons and Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Joe H.; And Others

    This guide was developed to provide children with an opportunity to prepare and collect several common gases and to discover and work with some of their properties. The guide is divided into five major sections: (1) introduction, (2) materials, (3) activities, (4) balloons aloft, and (5) an appendix. The introduction provides information…

  11. Residual Gases in Crystal Growth Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Residual gases present in closed ampoules may affect different crystal growth processes. That seems to be particularly true under microgravity conditions where, due to weightlessness of the melt, the gases may lead to detached solidification and/or formation of voids and bubbles, as observed in the past. For that reason a good understanding and control of formation of residual gases is important for an optimum design and meaningful interpretation of crystal growth experiments. Our extensive experimental and theoretical studies of the subject, summarized in this paper, include degassing of silica glass and generation of gases from different source materials. Different materials processing conditions, like outgassing under vacuum, annealing in hydrogen, resublimation, different material preparation procedures, multiple annealings, different processing times, and others were applied and their effect on the amount and composition of gas were analyzed. The experimental results were interpreted based on theoretical calculations on diffusion in silica glass and source materials and thermochemistry of the system. Procedures for a reduction of the amount of gas are also discussed.

  12. Fischer-Tropsch-Type Production of Organic Materials in the Solar Nebula: Studies Using Graphite Catalysts and Measuring the Trapping of Noble Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.; Lucas, Christopher; Kimura, Yuki; Hohenberg, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The formation of abundant carbonaceous material in meteorites is a long standing problem and an important factor in the debate on the potential for the origin of life in other stellar systems. The Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) catalytic reduction of CO by hydrogen was once the preferred model for production of organic materials in the primitive solar nebula. We have demonstrated that many grain surfaces can catalyze both FTT and HB-type reactions, including amorphous iron and magnesium silicates, pure silica smokes as well as several minerals. Graphite is not a particularly good FTT catalyst, especially compared to iron powder or to amorphous iron silicate. However, like other silicates that we have studied, it gets better with exposure to CO. N2 and H2 over time: e.g., after formation of a macromolecular carbonaceous layer on the surfaces of the underlying gains. While amorphous iron silicates required only 1 or 2 experimental runs to achieve steady state reaction rates, graphite only achieved steady state after 6 or more experiments. We will present results showing the catalytic action of graphite grains increasing with increasing number of experiments and will also discuss the nature of the final "graphite" grains aster completion of our experiments.

  13. Comparative epidemiology of human infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) and A(H5N1) viruses in China

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Benjamin J.; Jin, Lianmei; Lau, Eric H. Y.; Liao, Qiaohong; Wu, Peng; Jiang, Hui; Tsang, Tim K.; Zheng, Jiandong; Fang, Vicky J.; Chang, Zhaorui; Ni, Michael Y.; Zhang, Qian; Ip, Dennis K. M.; Yu, Jianxing; Li, Yu; Wang, Liping; Tu, Wenxiao; Meng, Ling; Wu, Joseph T.; Luo, Huiming; Li, Qun; Shu, Yuelong; Li, Zhongjie; Feng, Zijian; Yang, Weizhong; Wang, Yu; Leung, Gabriel M.; Yu, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    Background The novel influenza A(H7N9) virus recently emerged, while influenza A(H5N1) virus has infected humans since 2003 in mainland China. Both infections are thought to be predominantly zoonotic. We compared the epidemiologic characteristics of the complete series of laboratory-confirmed cases of both viruses in mainland China to date. Methods An integrated database was constructed with information on demographic, epidemiological, and clinical variables of laboratory-confirmed A(H7N9) and A(H5N1) cases that were reported to the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention up to May 24, 2013. We described disease occurrence by age, sex and geography and estimated key epidemiologic parameters. Findings Among 130 and 43 patients with confirmed A(H7N9) and A(H5N1) respectively, the median ages were 62y and 26y. In urban areas, 74% of cases of both viruses were male whereas in rural areas the proportions were 62% for A(H7N9) and 33% for A(H5N1). Among cases of A(H7N9) and A(H5N1), 75% and 71% reported recent exposure to poultry. The mean incubation periods of A(H7N9) and A(H5N1) were 3.1 and 3.3 days, respectively. On average, 21 and 18 contacts were traced for each A(H7N9) case in urban and rural areas respectively; compared to 90 and 63 for A(H5N1). The hospitalization fatality risk was 35% (95% CI: 25%, 44%) for A(H7N9) and 70% (95% CI: 56%, 83%) for A(H5N1). Interpretation The sex ratios in urban compared to rural cases are consistent with poultry exposure driving the risk of infection. However the difference in susceptibility to serious illness with the two different viruses remains unexplained, given that most A(H7N9) cases were in older adults while most A(H5N1) cases were in younger individuals. Funding Ministry of Science and Technology, China; Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Disease and University Grants Committee, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China; and the US National Institutes of Health. PMID:23803488

  14. Changes in the period of the eclipsing system AH Virginis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, H. D.

    Guthnick and Prager (1929) discovered the variability of AH Virginis. On the basis of later observations, AH Virginis was classified as one of the few W UMa systems which display complete eclipses at an inclination likely to be closer to 90 deg than to 61 deg. Observations made in connection with the present study confirm constancy of light of 40 minutes duration during primary minimum. The present observations indicate curved as well as flat secondary minima. The variable was observed photoelectrically in yellow light with the 38-cm reflector during one night in April and five nights in May, 1981. A total of 73 observations defining primary minimum (ingress and egress), and 66 observations defining secondary minimum was obtained.

  15. Precursor systems analyses of automated highway systems. Activity area I. Impact of AHS on surrounding non-AHS roadways. Final report, September 1993-November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, P.; Wert, A.; Crowe, E.; O`Brien, S.; Roper, D.

    1995-05-01

    The study considers the influence which automated highway system (AHS) traffic would have on the conventional, non-automated freeway and street system as it approaches and departs from the automated roadway. The higher speeds and capacities possible with an AHS facility will attract traffic into the AHS lane from both the general purpose freeway lanes and the parallel arterials. The increased AHS traffic will have both positive and negative impacts on the surrounding street system. The analysis includes the modeling and evaluation of the operations of a freeway corridor with and without an AHS lane. Operations with and without an AHS lane on the surrounding roadways are then evaluated using traffic operations measures of effectiveness. The surrounding roadways include the general purpose freeway lanes, freeway ramps, parallel arterials, and cross streets. Additional modeling analyzes the impact of the AHS traffic on the cross streets. The Highway Capacity Software (HCS) program is used to evaluate the level-of-service on alternative configurations of the cross streets and parallel arterials. The physical requirements of the AHS lane and ramps are analyzed to determine the impact on the surrounding streets. The modeling results are also used as input to the Activity P analysis. Qualitative as well as quantitative impacts are addressed. AHS is reviewed from the perspective of an urban planner.

  16. A.H. Cottrell at Harwell in the mid-1950s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Derek

    2013-09-01

    A.H. Cottrell led a large team of scientists and engineers as Deputy Director of the Metallurgy Division of the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell, between 1955 and 1958. The team sought to develop a fundamental understanding of the effect of aggressive operating conditions on the properties and behaviour of materials used in the construction of reactors, which provided important and critical insights into their design, operation and safety. The story is told through the experiences and research activities of one of Cottrell's junior research staff. It offers an insight into the contributions made by Cottrell to the science and technology regarding materials used in the early days of building reactors for the generation of nuclear energy.

  17. Interaction of gases with lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, H. F.; Fuller, E. L., Jr.; Gammage, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Quantitative efforts to assess the surface properties of lunar fines, particularly water induced porosity are discussed. Data show that: (1) changes induced in lunar fines are not visible in high energy electron micrographs, (2) scanning micrographs show no change in particle size distribution as a result of reaction with water, (3) water induced changes are internal to the particles themselves, (4) normal laboratory atmosphere blocks alteration reaction with water, and (5) surface properties of mature lunar soils appear to be almost independent of chemical composition and mineralogy, but there are some variations in their reactivity toward water.

  18. Antibacterial Activity of MTA Fillapex and AH 26 Root Canal Sealers at Different Time Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Farnaz; Samadi Kafil, Hossein; Jafari, Sanaz; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Momeni, Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The main goal of endodontic treatment is elimination of bacteria and their by-products from infected root canals. This study compared the antibacterial effect of two different sealers, AH 26 and MTA Fillapex, on 4 microorganisms 24, 48 and 72 h and 7 days after mixing. Methods and Materials: The microorganisms used in this study consisted of Lactobacillus acidophilus (ATCC 4356), Lactobacillus casei (ATCC 39392), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212). This test is based on the growth of bacteria and turbidity measurement technique using a spectrophotometer, and direct contact was conducted. Multiple comparisons were carried out using repeated-measures ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test and student’s t-test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The antibacterial activity in the indirect technique was more than the technique with both sealers. In the direct technique the antibacterial activity on all microorganisms were lower for MTA Fillapex sealer. In the indirect technique, both sealers exhibited similar antibacterial properties. Conclusion: The antibacterial effect of MTA Fillapex sealer was significantly less than that of AH 26 sealer in the direct technique. The antibacterial effects of both sealers were similar in the indirect technique. PMID:27471530

  19. Equilibration of quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrelly, Terry

    2016-07-01

    Finding equilibration times is a major unsolved problem in physics with few analytical results. Here we look at equilibration times for quantum gases of bosons and fermions in the regime of negligibly weak interactions, a setting which not only includes paradigmatic systems such as gases confined to boxes, but also Luttinger liquids and the free superfluid Hubbard model. To do this, we focus on two classes of measurements: (i) coarse-grained observables, such as the number of particles in a region of space, and (ii) few-mode measurements, such as phase correlators. We show that, in this setting, equilibration occurs quite generally despite the fact that the particles are not interacting. Furthermore, for coarse-grained measurements the timescale is generally at most polynomial in the number of particles N, which is much faster than previous general upper bounds, which were exponential in N. For local measurements on lattice systems, the timescale is typically linear in the number of lattice sites. In fact, for one-dimensional lattices, the scaling is generally linear in the length of the lattice, which is optimal. Additionally, we look at a few specific examples, one of which consists of N fermions initially confined on one side of a partition in a box. The partition is removed and the fermions equilibrate extremely quickly in time O(1/N).

  20. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 14, Gases, The Gas Laws, and Absolute Temperature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the fourteenth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to gases, gas laws, and absolute temperature. The topics are concerned with the kinetic theory of gases, thermometric scales, Charles' law, ideal gases, Boyle's law, absolute zero, and gas pressures. The…

  1. Effect of SO2 on oxidation of metallic materials in CO2/H2O-rich gases relevant to oxyfuel environments

    SciTech Connect

    Huczkowski, P.; Olszewski, T.; Schiek, M.; Lutz, B.; Holcomb, G.; Shemet, V.; Meier, G. H.; Singheiser, L.; Quadakkers, W. J.

    2012-09-19

    This report is a description of research performed by the Jülich Research Centre. Their conclusions outline the effects of SO2 additions on oxide formations and the interaction of other gases in oxvyfuel environments.

  2. Functional Conservation and Divergence of Four Ginger AP1/AGL9 MADS–Box Genes Revealed by Analysis of Their Expression and Protein–Protein Interaction, and Ectopic Expression of AhFUL Gene in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juanjuan; Sun, Wei; Xia, Kuaifei; Liao, Jingping; Zhang, Mingyong

    2014-01-01

    Alpinia genus are known generally as ginger–lilies for showy flowers in the ginger family, Zingiberaceae, and their floral morphology diverges from typical monocotyledon flowers. However, little is known about the functions of ginger MADS–box genes in floral identity. In this study, four AP1/AGL9 MADS–box genes were cloned from Alpinia hainanensis, and protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and roles of the four genes in floral homeotic conversion and in floral evolution are surveyed for the first time. AhFUL is clustered to the AP1lineage, AhSEP4 and AhSEP3b to the SEP lineage, and AhAGL6–like to the AGL6 lineage. The four genes showed conserved and divergent expression patterns, and their encoded proteins were localized in the nucleus. Seven combinations of PPI (AhFUL–AhSEP4, AhFUL–AhAGL6–like, AhFUL–AhSEP3b, AhSEP4–AhAGL6–like, AhSEP4–AhSEP3b, AhAGL6–like–AhSEP3b, and AhSEP3b–AhSEP3b) were detected, and the PPI patterns in the AP1/AGL9 lineage revealed that five of the 10 possible combinations are conserved and three are variable, while conclusions cannot yet be made regarding the other two. Ectopic expression of AhFUL in Arabidopsis thaliana led to early flowering and floral organ homeotic conversion to sepal–like or leaf–like. Therefore, we conclude that the four A. hainanensis AP1/AGL9 genes show functional conservation and divergence in the floral identity from other MADS–box genes. PMID:25461565

  3. Toxicity of Pyrolysis Gases from Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, Carlos J.; Kosola, Kay L.; Solis, Alida N.; Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Parker, John A.

    1977-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from six elastomers was investigated. The elastomers were polyisoprene (natural rubber), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM), acrylonitrile rubber, chlorosulfonated polyethylene rubber, and polychloroprene. The rising temperature and fixed temperature programs produced exactly the same rank order of materials based on time to death. Acryltonitrile rubber exhibited the greatest toxicity under these test conditions; carbon monoxide was not found in sufficient concentrations to be the primary cause of death.

  4. Characterization of Peanut Germin-Like Proteins, AhGLPs in Plant Development and Defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhu, Fanghe; Li, Haifen; Li, Ling; Yang, Qingli; Chi, Xiaoyuan; Yu, Shanlin; Liang, Xuanqiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Germin-like superfamily members are ubiquitously expressed in various plant species and play important roles in plant development and defense. Although several GLPs have been identified in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), their roles in development and defense remain unknown. In this research, we study the spatiotemporal expression of AhGLPs in peanut and their functions in plant defense. Results We have identified three new AhGLP members (AhGLP3b, AhGLP5b and AhGLP7b) that have distinct but very closely related DNA sequences. The spatial and temporal expression profiles revealed that each peanut GLP gene has its distinct expression pattern in various tissues and developmental stages. This suggests that these genes all have their distinct roles in peanut development. Subcellular location analysis demonstrated that AhGLP2 and 5 undergo a protein transport process after synthesis. The expression of all AhGLPs increased in responding to Aspergillus flavus infection, suggesting AhGLPs' ubiquitous roles in defense to A. flavus. Each AhGLP gene had its unique response to various abiotic stresses (including salt, H2O2 stress and wound), biotic stresses (including leaf spot, mosaic and rust) and plant hormone stimulations (including SA and ABA treatments). These results indicate that AhGLPs have their distinct roles in plant defense. Moreover, in vivo study of AhGLP transgenic Arabidopsis showed that both AhGLP2 and 3 had salt tolerance, which made transgenic Arabidopsis grow well under 100 mM NaCl stress. Conclusions For the first time, our study analyzes the AhGLP gene expression profiles in peanut and reveals their roles under various stresses. These results provide an insight into the developmental and defensive roles of GLP gene family in peanut. PMID:23626720

  5. Calorimetry of 25 Ah lithium/thionyl chloride cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. J.; Dawson, S.

    1991-01-01

    Heat flow measurements of 25-Ah lithium thionyl chloride cells provided a method to calculate an effective thermal potential, E(TP) of 3.907 V. The calculation is useful to determine specific heat generation of this cell chemistry and design. The E(TP) value includes heat generation by electrochemical cell reactions, competitive chemical reactions, and resistance heating at the tabs, connectors, and leads. Heat flow was measured while applying electrical loads to the cell in an isothermal calorimeter set at 0, 20, and 60 C.

  6. A 65 Ah rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, K.

    1986-01-01

    A rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide battery which has a number of superior performance characteristics which includes a high energy density, a high power density, and a long charge retention time was developed. The first cell sizes developed included a C size cell and an AA size cell. Over the last two years, a project to demonstrate the feasibility of the scale up to this technology to a BC size cell with 65 Ah capacity was undertaken. The objective was to develop, build, and test a .6 kWh storage battery consisting of 6 BC cells in series.

  7. Selective Growth of Noble Gases at Metal/Oxide Interface.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Oka, Hiroshi; Ohnuki, Somei

    2016-02-17

    The locations and roles of noble gases at an oxide/metal interface in oxide dispersed metal are theoretically and experimentally investigated. Oxide dispersed metal consisting of FCC Fe and Y2Hf2O7 (Y2Ti2O7) is synthesized by mechanical alloying under a saturated Ar gas environment. Transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory observes the strain field at the interface of FCC Fe {111} and Y2Hf2O7 {111} whose physical origin emerges from surface reconstruction due to charge transfer. Noble gases are experimentally observed at the oxide (Y2Ti2O7) site and calculations reveal that the noble gases segregate the interface and grow toward the oxide site. In general, the interface is defined as the trapping site for noble gases; however, transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory found evidence which shows that noble gases grow toward the oxide, contrary to the generally held idea that the interface is the final trapping site for noble gases. Furthermore, calculations show that the inclusion of He/Ar hardens the oxide, suggesting that material fractures could begin from the noble gas bubble within the oxides. Thus, experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that noble gases grow from the interface toward the oxide and that oxides behave as a trapping site for noble gases. PMID:26840881

  8. Root canal filling in primary molars without successors: Mineral trioxide aggregate versus gutta-percha/AH-Plus.

    PubMed

    Bezgin, Tugba; Ozgul, Betul Memiş; Arikan, Volkan; Sari, Saziye

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and radiographical success of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and gutta-percha/AH-Plus used as a root canal filling material in primary second molars without successors. A total of 16 patients (9 girls, 7 boys) aged 6-13 years (mean: 10.5) were selected and randomly distributed into the treatment groups. Children were recalled for clinical and radiographic examination at 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months. Differences in treatment outcomes were analysed using chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests. Clinically, there was no significant difference in the success rates between the groups at the end of a 3-year follow-up period (MTA: 100%; Gutta-percha/AH-Plus: 70%) (P > 0.05). However, radiographically, there was a significant difference between the groups (MTA: 80%; gutta-percha/AH-Plus: 30%) (P < 0.05). The present study showed that MTA can be recommended for use in root canal treatment of primary molars without successors based on better radiographic success. PMID:26534871

  9. Gases in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, P. D.; Liss, P. S.

    2003-12-01

    The annual gross and net primary productivity of the surface oceans is similar in size to that on land (IPCC, 2001). Marine productivity drives the cycling of gases such as oxygen (O2), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methyl iodide (CH3I) which are of fundamental importance in studies of marine productivity, biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric chemistry, climate, and human health, respectively. For example, ˜30% of the world's population (1,570 million) is thought to be at risk of iodine-deficiency disorders that impair mental development (WHO, 1996). The main source of iodine to land is the supply of volatile iodine compounds produced in the ocean and then transferred to the atmosphere via the air-surface interface. The flux of these marine iodine species to the atmosphere is also thought to be important in the oxidation capacity of the troposphere by the production of the iodine oxide radical ( Alicke et al., 1999). A further example is that the net flux of CO2 from the atmosphere to the ocean, ˜1.7±0.5 Gt C yr-1, represents ˜30% of the annual release of anthropogenic CO2 to the atmosphere (IPCC, 2001). This net flux is superimposed on a huge annual flux (90 Gt C yr-1) of CO2 that is cycled "naturally" between the ocean and the atmosphere. The long-term sink for anthropogenic CO2 is recognized as transfer to the ocean from the atmosphere. A final example is the emission of volatile sulfur, in the form of DMS, from the oceans. Not only is an oceanic flux from the oceans needed to balance the loss of sulfur (a bioessential element) from the land via weathering, it has also been proposed as having a major control on climate due to the formation of cloud condensation nuclei (Charlson et al., 1987). Indeed, the existence of DMS and CH3I has been used as evidence in support of the Gaia hypothesis (Lovelock, 1979).There are at least four main processes that affect the concentration of gases in the water column: biological

  10. AhNRAMP1 iron transporter is involved in iron acquisition in peanut.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hongchun; Kobayashi, Takanori; Kakei, Yusuke; Senoura, Takeshi; Nakazono, Mikio; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Shen, Hongyun; Duan, Penggen; Guo, Xiaotong; Nishizawa, Naoko K; Zuo, Yuanmei

    2012-07-01

    Peanut/maize intercropping is a sustainable and effective agroecosystem to alleviate iron-deficiency chlorosis. Using suppression subtractive hybridization from the roots of intercropped and monocropped peanut which show different iron nutrition levels, a peanut gene, AhNRAMP1, which belongs to divalent metal transporters of the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (NRAMP) gene family was isolated. Yeast complementation assays suggested that AhNRAMP1 encodes a functional iron transporter. Moreover, the mRNA level of AhNRAMP1 was obviously induced by iron deficiency in both roots and leaves. Transient expression, laser microdissection, and in situ hybridization analyses revealed that AhNRAMP1 was mainly localized on the plasma membrane of the epidermis of peanut roots. Induced expression of AhNRAMP1 in tobacco conferred enhanced tolerance to iron deprivation. These results suggest that the AhNRAMP1 is possibly involved in iron acquisition in peanut plants. PMID:22611231

  11. AH-64 IHADSS aviator vision experiences in Operation Iraqi Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiatt, Keith L.; Rash, Clarence E.; Harris, Eric S.; McGilberry, William H.

    2004-09-01

    Forty AH-64 Apache aviators representing a total of 8564 flight hours and 2260 combat hours during Operation Iraqi Freedom and its aftermath were surveyed for their visual experiences with the AH-64's monocular Integrated Helmet and Display Sighting System (IHADSS) helmet-mounted display in a combat environment. A major objective of this study was to determine if the frequencies of reports of visual complaints and illusions reported in the previous studies, addressing mostly benign training environments, differ in the more stressful combat environments. The most frequently reported visual complaints, both while and after flying, were visual discomfort and headache, which is consistent with previous studies. Frequencies of complaints after flying in the current study were numerically lower for all complaint types, but differences from previous studies are statistically significant only for visual discomfort and disorientation (vertigo). With the exception of "brownout/whiteout," reports of degraded visual cues in the current study were numerically lower for all types, but statistically significant only for impaired depth perception, decreased field of view, and inadvertent instrumental meteorological conditions. This study also found statistically lower reports of all static and dynamic illusions (with one exception, disorientation). This important finding is attributed to the generally flat and featureless geography present in a large portion of the Iraqi theater and to the shift in the way that the aviators use the two disparate visual inputs presented by the IHADSS monocular design (i.e., greater use of both eyes as opposed to concentrating primarily on display imagery).

  12. Aeroelastic characteristics of the AH-64 bearingless tail rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, D.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a wind tunnel test program to determine the performance loads and dynamic characteristics of the Composite Flexbeam Tail Rotor (CFTR) for the AH-64 Advanced Attack Helicopter are reported. The CFTR uses an elastomeric shear attachment of the flexbeam to the hub to provide soft-inplane S-mode and stiff-inplane C-mode configuration. The properties of the elastomer were selected for proper frequency placement and scale damping of the inplane S-mode. Kinematic pitch-lag coupling was introduced to provide the first cyclic inplane C-mode damping at high collective pitch. The CFTR was tested in a wind tunnel over the full slideslip envelop of the AH-64. It is found that the rotor was aeroelastically stable throughout the complete collective pitch range and up to rotor speeds of 1403 rpm. The dynamic characteristics of the rotor were found to be satisfactory at all pitch angles and rotor speeds of the tunnel tests. The design characteristics of the rotor which permit the high performance characteristics are discussed. Several schematic drawings and photographs of the rotor are provided.

  13. Characterization of naturally acquired multiple-drug resistance of Yoshida rat ascites hepatoma AH66 cell line.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Wakabayashi, D; Minamino, T; Nomura, M; Wakusawa, S; Nakamura, S

    1996-01-01

    Characteristics of multiple-drug resistance of rat ascites hepatoma AH66, a cell line induced by dimethylaminoazobenzene and established as a transplantable tumor, were compared with those of AH66F, a drug sensitive line obtained from AH66. The AH66 cell line was resistant to vinblastine, adriamycin, SN-38 an active form of camptothesine, etoposide, and clorambucil by 10-fold or more than the AH66F cell line. The resistance of AH66 cells to vinblastine, adriamycin, and SN-38 was closely related to P-glycoprotein overexpression in the plasma membrane, because the resistance was significantly inhibited by verapamil. AH66 cells contained much glutahione and had a high activity of glutathione S-transferase P-form (GST-P), compared with AH66F cells, and resistance to clorambucil was decreased by treatment with buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis. AH66 cells have a similar topoisomerase I activity, but about 6 times lower topoisomerase II activity than AH66F cells. Therefore, the resistance to etoposide and a part of the resistance to adriamycin of AH66 cells seems to depend upon this low topoisomerase II activity. These results, show that the AH66 cell line has high multiple-drug resistance compared with the AH66F cell line, by several mechanisms. Consequently, the AH66 and AH66F cell lines are useful to study naturally acquired multiple-drug resistance of hepatomas. PMID:8702243

  14. Fe distribution in GaSe and InSe

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalyuk, Z.D.; Feichuk, P.I.; Shcherbak, L.P.; Zbykovskaya, N.I.

    1985-06-01

    In this paper, the authors use tagged atoms to determine the effective coefficients of Fe distribution in GaSe and InSe during crystallization of a doped melt by the Bridgman method. The distribution of Fe in GaSe and InSe was studied with the aid of Fe tagged with the radiosotopes VVFe + VZFe. Doping of the material was combined with the processes of synthesis and crystallization. Equations are presented for the calculation of the real impurity distribution in GaSe and InSe crystals.

  15. Detecting Spread of Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Beyond China

    PubMed Central

    Havers, Fiona; Iuliano, A. Danielle; Davis, C. Todd; Sar, Borann; Sovann, Ly; Chin, Savuth; Corwin, Andrew L.; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Lindblade, Kim A.; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Kaewthong, Viriya; Kile, James C.; Nguyen, Hien T.; Pham, Dong V.; Donis, Ruben O.; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2015-01-01

    During February 2013–March 2015, a total of 602 human cases of low pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) were reported; no autochthonous cases were reported outside mainland China. In contrast, since highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) reemerged during 2003 in China, 784 human cases in 16 countries and poultry outbreaks in 53 countries have been reported. Whether the absence of reported A(H7N9) outside mainland China represents lack of spread or lack of detection remains unclear. We compared epidemiologic and virologic features of A(H5N1) and A(H7N9) and used human and animal influenza surveillance data collected during April 2013–May 2014 from 4 Southeast Asia countries to assess the likelihood that A(H7N9) would have gone undetected during 2014. Surveillance in Vietnam and Cambodia detected human A(H5N1) cases; no A(H7N9) cases were detected in humans or poultry in Southeast Asia. Although we cannot rule out the possible spread of A(H7N9), substantial spread causing severe disease in humans is unlikely. PMID:25897654

  16. Deciphering Dimerization Modes of PAS Domains: Computational and Experimental Analyses of the AhR:ARNT Complex Reveal New Insights Into the Mechanisms of AhR Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Corrada, Dario; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor that mediates the biochemical response to xenobiotics and the toxic effects of a number of environmental contaminants, including dioxins. Recently, endogenous regulatory roles for the AhR in normal physiology and development have also been reported, thus extending the interest in understanding its molecular mechanisms of activation. Since dimerization with the AhR Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) protein, occurring through the Helix-Loop-Helix (HLH) and PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domains, is needed to convert the AhR into its transcriptionally active form, deciphering the AhR:ARNT dimerization mode would provide insights into the mechanisms of AhR transformation. Here we present homology models of the murine AhR:ARNT PAS domain dimer developed using recently available X-ray structures of other bHLH-PAS protein dimers. Due to the different reciprocal orientation and interaction surfaces in the different template dimers, two alternative models were developed for both the PAS-A and PAS-B dimers and they were characterized by combining a number of computational evaluations. Both well-established hot spot prediction methods and new approaches to analyze individual residue and residue-pairwise contributions to the MM-GBSA binding free energies were adopted to predict residues critical for dimer stabilization. On this basis, a mutagenesis strategy for both the murine AhR and ARNT proteins was designed and ligand-dependent DNA binding ability of the AhR:ARNT heterodimer mutants was evaluated. While functional analysis disfavored the HIF2α:ARNT heterodimer-based PAS-B model, most mutants derived from the CLOCK:BMAL1-based AhR:ARNT dimer models of both the PAS-A and the PAS-B dramatically decreased the levels of DNA binding, suggesting this latter model as the most suitable for describing AhR:ARNT dimerization. These novel results open new research directions focused at elucidating basic molecular mechanisms underlying the

  17. Treatment of flue gas containing noxious gases

    SciTech Connect

    Dvirka, M.; Psihos, G.J.; Cosulich, J.J.

    1987-07-21

    A method is described of reducing the noxious gases such as chlorides including hydrogen chloride and chlorine from the flue gases derived from the incineration of solid waste materials in a furnace with a combustion chamber and a combustion zone to substantially reduce the formation of dioxins for a cleaner effluent gas to the atmosphere, comprising: introducing sodium bicarbonate into the flue gas of a furnace incinerating the waste materials, positioning introduction of sodium bicarbonate for at least one location along the path of the flue gas at a temperature below about 1564/sup 0/F but not below about 518/sup 0/F, heating the sodium bicarbonate in the flue gas for a time sufficient to drive off the water and carbon dioxide from the sodium bicarbonate, forming sodium carbonate particle during the heating of the sodium bicarbonate, the sodium carbonate having a higher porosity to produce a greater reaction area on the surface of the particles, contacting the porous sodium carbonate with chlorides in the flue gases for a sufficient time and temperature to react and produce sodium chloride and prevent their formation of dioxins; and separating the sodium chloride from the flue gas to produce a cleaner gas for exit to the atmosphere.

  18. In Situ Imaging of Atomic Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chen-Lung; Chin, Cheng

    2015-09-01

    One exciting progress in recent cold atom experiments is the development of high resolution, in situ imaging techniques for atomic quantum gases.1-3 These new powerful tools provide detailed information on the distribution of atoms in a trap with resolution approaching the level of single atom and even single lattice site, and complement the welldeveloped time-of-flight method that probes the system in momentum space. In a condensed matter analogy, this technique is equivalent to locating electrons of a material in a snap shot. In situ imaging has offered a new powerful tool to study atomic gases and inspired many new research directions and ideas. In this chapter, we will describe the experimental setup of in situ absorption imaging, observables that can be extracted from the images, and new physics that can be explored with this technique.

  19. Physics of Hyperpolarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Happer, William

    1999-11-01

    The production of highly spin-polarized (hyperpolarized) gases by optical pumping with lasers involves spin-dependent interactions of atoms in gases, liquids, solids and on surfaces. Although enough is understood about these interactions to allow large quantities of hyperpolarized gas to be prepared, some of the basic physics is still mysterious. A better understanding of the physics would lead to worthwhile improvements in the performance of polarization systems. The most important physics involved in the production of hyperpolarized gases will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on areas where the physics is still not understood.

  20. Environmental implications of anesthetic gases.

    PubMed

    Yasny, Jeffrey S; White, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    For several decades, anesthetic gases have greatly enhanced the comfort and outcome for patients during surgery. The benefits of these agents have heavily outweighed the risks. In recent years, the attention towards their overall contribution to global climate change and the environment has increased. Anesthesia providers have a responsibility to minimize unnecessary atmospheric pollution by utilizing techniques that can lessen any adverse effects of these gases on the environment. Moreover, health care facilities that use anesthetic gases are accountable for ensuring that all anesthesia equipment, including the scavenging system, is effective and routinely maintained. Implementing preventive practices and simple strategies can promote the safest and most healthy environment. PMID:23241038

  1. Feshbach resonances in ultracold gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chin Cheng; Grimm, Rudolf; Julienne, Paul; Tiesinga, Eite

    2010-04-15

    Feshbach resonances are the essential tool to control the interaction between atoms in ultracold quantum gases. They have found numerous experimental applications, opening up the way to important breakthroughs. This review broadly covers the phenomenon of Feshbach resonances in ultracold gases and their main applications. This includes the theoretical background and models for the description of Feshbach resonances, the experimental methods to find and characterize the resonances, a discussion of the main properties of resonances in various atomic species and mixed atomic species systems, and an overview of key experiments with atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, degenerate Fermi gases, and ultracold molecules.

  2. Noble gases in the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manuel, O. K.; Srinivasan, B.; Hennecke, E. W.; Sinclair, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The abundance and isotopic composition of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon which were released by stepwise heating of lunar fines (15601.64) and (15271.65) were measured spectrometrically. The results of a composition of noble gases released from the lunar fines with noble gases in meteorites and in the earth are presented along with the isotopic composition of noble gases in lunar fines, in meteorites, and in the atmosphere. A study of two isotopically distinct components of trapped xenon in carbonaceous chondrites is also included.

  3. Evaluation of immediate and delayed post space preparation on sealing ability of Resilon–Epiphany and Gutta percha-AH plus sealer

    PubMed Central

    Dhaded, Neha; Uppin, Veerendra M.; Dhaded, Sunil; Patil, Chetan

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the influence of immediate and delayed post space preparation on sealing ability of Resilon-Epiphany and Gutta percha-AH plus. Materials and Methods: Eighty extracted permanent maxillary central and lateral incisors were decoronated. Roots canals were prepared and obturated. Samples were divided into four groups depending on the time of post space preparation and obturated material. Group I and II: Immediate and delayed post space preparation respectively with Gutta percha/AH plus as obturating material. Group III and IV: Immediate and delayed post space preparation with Resilon/Epiphany as the obturating material. The samples were kept in methylene blue dye, sectioned and then measured under stereomicroscope and studied under SEM. Statistical Analysis: The data was subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired t-test. Results: There was significant difference found between immediate and delayed post space preparation in Resilon-Epiphany group (P = 0.0109) as well as in AH plus-GP group (<0.0001). Difference in the sealing ability of the two materials was seen in delayed group (P = 0.0202). No statistically significant result was found between the two obturating materials when post space was prepared immediately (P = 0.0875). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, there was significantly less leakage when post space is prepared immediately in both the groups. Resilon-Epiphany shows better results when post space is delayed amongst the two whereas in immediate post space preparation there is no significant difference. PMID:24347884

  4. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates resistance to apoptosis induced in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bekki, Kanae; Vogel, Helena; Li, Wen; Ito, Tomohiro; Sweeney, Colleen; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; Matsumura, Fumio; Vogel, Christoph F A

    2015-05-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is well known as a ligand binding transcription factor regulating various biological effects. Previously we have shown that long-term exposure to estrogen in breast cancer cells caused not only down regulation of estrogen receptor (ER) but also overexpression of AhR. The AhR interacts with several cell signaling pathways associated with induction of tyrosine kinases, cytokines and growth factors which may support the survival roles of AhR escaping from apoptosis elicited by a variety of apoptosis inducing agents in breast cancer. In this study, we studied the anti-apoptotic role of AhR in different breast cancer cells when apoptosis was induced by exposure to UV light and chemotherapeutic agents. Activation of AhR by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in AhR overexpressing breast cancer cells effectively suppressed the apoptotic response induced by UV-irradiation, doxorubicin, lapatinib and paclitaxel. The anti-apoptotic response of TCDD was uniformly antagonized by the treatment with 3'methoxy-4'nitroflavone (MNF), a specific antagonist of AhR. TCDD's survival action of apoptosis was accompanied with the induction of well-known inflammatory genes, such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and NF-κB subunit RelB. Moreover, TCDD increased the activity of the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO), which metabolizes tryptophan to kynurenine (Kyn) and mediates tumor immunity. Kyn also acts as an AhR ligand like TCDD, and kyn induced an anti-apoptotic response in breast cancer cells. Accordingly, our present study suggests that AhR plays a pivotal role in the development of breast cancer via the suppression of apoptosis, and provides an idea that the use of AhR antagonists with chemotherapeutic agents may effectively synergize the elimination of breast cancer cells. PMID:25987214

  5. The NASA/AHS Rotorcraft Noise Reduction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childress, Otis S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Research of the NASA/AHS noise reduction program is discussed, stressing work in four areas: noise prediction, testing and data base, noise reduction, and criteria development. A program called ROTONET has been developed, using a code structure divided into four main parts; main- and tail-rotor blade geometry, rotor performance, noise calculations, and noise propagation. Wind tunnel tests on individual rotors, and flight tests on a helicopter built specifically to generate a broadband main rotor noise data base have been conducted. In the field of noise reduction, researchers have performed analytical evaluations of low noise rotor concepts, and small-scale wind tunnel evaluations of noise reduction concepts. Under the supervision of the FAA, the program in conducting tests to develop criteria for helicopters and heliports.

  6. 29 CFR 1910.101 - Compressed gases (general requirements).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Materials Regulations of the Department of Transportation (49 CFR parts 171-179 and 14 CFR part 103). Where... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed gases (general requirements). 1910.101 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.101 Compressed...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.101 - Compressed gases (general requirements).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Materials Regulations of the Department of Transportation (49 CFR parts 171-179 and 14 CFR part 103). Where... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compressed gases (general requirements). 1910.101 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.101 Compressed...

  8. 29 CFR 1910.101 - Compressed gases (general requirements).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Materials Regulations of the Department of Transportation (49 CFR parts 171-179 and 14 CFR part 103). Where... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compressed gases (general requirements). 1910.101 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.101 Compressed...

  9. The tertiary structures of porcine AhR and ARNT proteins and molecular interactions within the TCDD/AhR/ARNT complex.

    PubMed

    Orlowska, Karina; Molcan, Tomasz; Swigonska, Sylwia; Sadowska, Agnieszka; Jablonska, Monika; Nynca, Anna; Jastrzebski, Jan P; Ciereszko, Renata E

    2016-06-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that can be activated by structurally diverse synthetic and natural chemicals, including toxic environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). In the present study, homology models of the porcine AhR-ligand binding domain (LBD) and the porcine aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-ligand binding domain (ARNT-LBD) were created on the basis of structures of closely related respective proteins i.e., human Hif-2α and ARNT. Molecular docking of TCDD to the porcine AhR-LBD model revealed high binding affinity (-8.8kcal/mol) between TCDD and the receptor. Moreover, formation of the TCDD/AhR-LBD complex was confirmed experimentally with the use of electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). It was found that TCDD (10nM, 2h of incubation) not only bound to the AhR in the porcine granulosa cells but also activated the receptor. The current study provides a framework for examining the key events involved in the ligand-dependent activation of the AhR. PMID:27288759

  10. Annealing helicase 2 (AH2), a DNA-rewinding motor with an HNH motif

    PubMed Central

    Yusufzai, Timur; Kadonaga, James T.

    2010-01-01

    The structure and integrity of DNA is of considerable biological and biomedical importance, and it is therefore critical to identify and to characterize enzymes that alter DNA structure. DNA helicases are ATP-driven motor proteins that unwind DNA. Conversely, HepA-related protein (HARP) protein (also known as SMARCAL1 and DNA-dependent ATPase A) is an annealing helicase that rewinds DNA in an ATP-dependent manner. To date, HARP is the only known annealing helicase. Here we report the identification of a second annealing helicase, which we term AH2, for annealing helicase 2. Like HARP, AH2 catalyzes the ATP-dependent rewinding of replication protein A (RPA)-bound complementary single-stranded DNA, but does not exhibit any detectable helicase activity. Unlike HARP, however, AH2 lacks a conserved RPA-binding domain and does not interact with RPA. In addition, AH2 contains an HNH motif, which is commonly found in bacteria and fungi and is often associated with nuclease activity. AH2 appears to be the only vertebrate protein with an HNH motif. Contrary to expectations, purified AH2 does not exhibit nuclease activity, but it remains possible that AH2 contains a latent nuclease that is activated under specific conditions. These structural and functional differences between AH2 and HARP suggest that different annealing helicases have distinct functions in the cell. PMID:21078962

  11. Equine Influenza A(H3N8) Virus Infection in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shuo; Wang, Lifang; Fu, Xinliang; He, Shuyi; Hong, Malin; Zhou, Pei; Gray, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Interspecies transmission of equine influenza A(H3N8) virus has resulted in establishment of a canine influenza virus. To determine if something similar could happen with cats, we experimentally infected 14 cats with the equine influenza A(H3N8) virus. All showed clinical signs, shed virus, and transmitted the virus to a contact cohort. PMID:25417790

  12. Characterization of CYP76AH4 clarifies phenolic diterpenoid biosynthesis in the Lamiaceae

    PubMed Central

    Zi, Jiachen; Peters, Reuben J.

    2013-01-01

    Miltiradiene (1), is the precursor of phenolic diterpenoids such as ferruginol (2), requiring aromatization and hydroxylation. While this has been attributed to a single cytochrome P450 (CYP76AH1), characterization of the rosemary ortholog CYP76AH4 led to the discovery that these CYPs simply hydroxylate the facilely oxidized aromatic intermediate abietatriene (3). PMID:24108414

  13. Use of natural AhR ligands as potential therapeutic modalities against inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Busbee, Philip B; Rouse, Michael; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss research involving ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and their role in immunomodulation. While activation of the AhR is well known for its ability to regulate the biochemical and toxic effects of environmental chemicals, more recently an exciting discovery has been made indicating that AhR ligation can also regulate T-cell differentiation, specifically through activation of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and downregulation of the proinflammatory Th17 cells. Such findings have opened new avenues of research on the possibility of targeting the AhR to treat inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Specifically, this review will discuss the current research involving natural and dietary AhR ligands. In addition, evidence indicating the potential use of these ligands in regulating inflammation in various diseases will be highlighted. The importance of the AhR in immunological processes can be illustrated by expression of this receptor on a majority of immune cell types. In addition, AhR signaling pathways have been reported to influence a number of genes responsible for mediating inflammation and other immune responses. As interest in the AhR and its ligands increases, it seems prudent to consolidate current research on the contributions of these ligands to immune regulation during the course of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23731446

  14. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL DOUBLE-STAINING FOR AH RECEPTOR AND ARNT IN HUMAN EMBRYONIC PALATAL SHELVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and the AhR nuclear translocation protein (ARNT) are helix-loop-helix (HLH) proteins involved in transcriptional regulation. olycyclic aromatic halogenated chemicals, of which 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is the most potent, bind ...

  15. Use of natural AhR ligands as potential therapeutic modalities against inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Busbee, Philip B; Rouse, Michael; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss research involving ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and their role in immunomodulation. While activation of the AhR is well known for its ability to regulate the biochemical and toxic effects of environmental chemicals, more recently an exciting discovery has been made indicating that AhR ligation can also regulate T-cell differentiation, specifically through activation of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and downregulation of the proinflammatory Th17 cells. Such findings have opened new avenues of research on the possibility of targeting the AhR to treat inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Specifically, this review will discuss the current research involving natural and dietary AhR ligands. In addition, evidence indicating the potential use of these ligands in regulating inflammation in various diseases will be highlighted. The importance of the AhR in immunological processes can be illustrated by expression of this receptor on a majority of immune cell types. In addition, AhR signaling pathways have been reported to influence a number of genes responsible for mediating inflammation and other immune responses. As interest in the AhR and its ligands increases, it seems prudent to consolidate current research on the contributions of these ligands to immune regulation during the course of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23731446

  16. A Modified Delphi Study to Define "Ah Ha" Moments in Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilcher, Jobeth

    2015-01-01

    Ah ha moments are often mentioned in education literature. These moments are suggested to be a powerful aspect of learning, yet limited research is present regarding this topic. Ah ha learning moments have also not been defined in the education literature, resulting in the likelihood that each educator and learner may have differing definitions.…

  17. Human Infection with Highly Pathogenic A(H7N7) Avian Influenza Virus, Italy, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Rossini, Giada; Facchini, Marzia; Vaccari, Gabriele; Di Trani, Livia; Di Martino, Angela; Gaibani, Paolo; Vocale, Caterina; Cattoli, Giovanni; Bennett, Michael; McCauley, John W.; Rezza, Giovanni; Moro, Maria Luisa; Rangoni, Roberto; Finarelli, Alba Carola; Landini, Maria Paola; Castrucci, Maria Rita; Donatelli, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    During an influenza A(H7N7) virus outbreak among poultry in Italy during August–September 2013, infection with a highly pathogenic A(H7N7) avian influenza virus was diagnosed for 3 poultry workers with conjunctivitis. Genetic analyses revealed that the viruses from the humans were closely related to those from chickens on affected farms. PMID:25271444

  18. Pityriazepin and other potent AhR ligands isolated from Malassezia furfur yeast.

    PubMed

    Mexia, Nikitia; Gaitanis, Georgios; Velegraki, Aristea; Soshilov, Anatoly; Denison, Michael S; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2015-04-01

    Malassezia furfur yeast strains isolated from diseased human skin preferentially biosynthesize indole alkaloids which can be detected in the human skin and are highly potent activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR-dependent gene expression. Chemical analysis of an EtOAc extract of a M. furfur strain obtained from diseased human skin and grown on l-tryptophan agar revealed several known AhR active tryptophan metabolites along with a previously unidentified compound, pityriazepin. While its structure resembled that of the known alkaloid pityriacitrin, the comprised pyridine ring had been transformed into an azepinone. The indoloazepinone scaffold of pityriazepin is extremely rare in nature and has only been reported once previously. Pityriazepin, like the other isolated compounds, was found to be a potent activator of the AhR-dependent reporter gene assay in recombinant cell lines derived from four different species, although significant species differences in relative potency were observed. The ability of pityriazepin to competitively bind to the AhR and directly stimulate AhR DNA binding classified it as a new naturally-occurring potent AhR agonist. M. furfur produces an expanded collection of extremely potent naturally occurring AhR agonists, which produce their biological effects in a species-specific manner. PMID:25721496

  19. Pityriazepin and other potent AhR ligands isolated from Malassezia furfur yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mexia, Nikitia; Gaitanis, George; Velegraki, Aristea; Soshilov, Anatoly; Denison, Michael S.; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2015-01-01

    Malassezia furfur yeast strains isolated from diseased human skin preferentially biosynthesize indole alkaloids which can be detected in human skin and are highly potent activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR-dependent gene expression. Chemical analysis of an EtOAc extract of a M. furfur strain obtained from diseased human skin and grown on L-tryptophan agar revealed several known AhR active tryptophan metabolites along with a previously unidentified compound, pityriazepin. While its structure resembled that of the known alkaloid pityriacitrin, the comprised pyridine ring had been transformed into an azepinone. The indoloazepinone scaffold of pityriazepin is extremely rare in nature and has only been reported once previously. Pityriazepin, like the other isolated compounds, was found to be a potent activator of the AhR-dependent reporter gene assays in recombinant cell lines derived from four different species, although significant species differences in relative potency was observed. The ability of pityriazepin to competitively bind to the AhR and directly stimulate AhR DNA binding classified it as a new naturally-occurring potent AhR agonist. Malassezia furfur produces an expanded collection of extremely potent naturally occurring AhR agonists, which produce their biological effects in a species-specific manner.1 PMID:25721496

  20. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., including cryogenic liquids. (a) A tank car containing Class 2 (gases) material may not be unloaded unless... Division 2.1 (flammable gas) material that is a cryogenic liquid; or (ii) A tank car, except for a DOT-106A... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tank car delivery of gases, including...

  1. TCDD and omeprazole prime platelets through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) non-genomic pathway.

    PubMed

    Pombo, Mónica; Lamé, Michael W; Walker, Naomi J; Huynh, Danh H; Tablin, Fern

    2015-05-19

    The role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in hemostasis has recently gained increased attention. Here, we demonstrate, by qRT-PCR and western blot, that human platelets express both AhR mRNA and AhR protein. AhR protein levels increase in a dose dependent manner when incubated with either 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or omeprazole. Treatment of platelets with puromycin blocks increased AhR protein synthesis in the presence of AhR activators. Additionally, treatment of platelets with either activator results in phosphorylation of p38MAPK and cPLA2, two key signaling molecules in platelet activation pathways. Using the AhR competitive inhibitors alpha naphthoflavone and CH-223191, we show that phosphorylation of p38MAPK is AhR dependent. Further, inhibition of p38MAPK blocks downstream cPLA2 phosphorylation induced by TCDD or omeprazole. Treatment with AhR activators results in platelet priming, as demonstrated by increased platelet aggregation, which is inhibited by AhR antagonists. Our data support a model of the platelet AhR non-genomic pathway in which treatment with AhR activators results in increased expression of the AhR, phosphorylation of p38MAPK and cPLA2, leading to platelet priming in response to agonist. PMID:25797602

  2. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) Regulates Silica-Induced Inflammation But Not Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Beamer, Celine A.; Seaver, Benjamin P.; Shepherd, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, is responsible for mediating a variety of pharmacological and toxicological effects caused by halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, recent evidence has revealed that the AhR also has numerous physiological roles aside from xenobiotic metabolism, including regulation of immune and inflammatory signaling as well as normal development and homeostasis of several organs. To investigate the role of the AhR in crystalline silica (SiO2)–induced inflammation and fibrosis, C57Bl/6 and AhR−/− mice were exposed to SiO2 or vehicle. Similarly, C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to SiO2 and TCDD either simultaneously or sequentially to assess whether AhR activation alters inflammation and fibrosis. SiO2-induced acute lung inflammation was more severe in AhR−/− mice; however, the fibrotic response of AhR−/− mice was attenuated compared with C57Bl/6 mice. In a model of chronic SiO2 exposure, AhR activation by TCDD in C57Bl/6 mice resulted in reduced inflammation; however, the fibrotic response was not affected. Bone marrow–derived macrophages (BMM) from AhR−/− mice also produced higher levels of cytokines and chemokines in response to SiO2. Analysis of gene expression revealed that BMM derived from AhR−/− mice exhibit increased levels of pro-interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and Bcl-2, yet decreased levels of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)2, STAT5a, and serpin B2 (Pai-2) in response to SiO2. PMID:22273745

  3. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from wood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Huttlinger, N. V.; Oneill, B. A.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from nine wood samples was investigated. The samples of hardwoods were aspen poplar, beech, yellow birch, and red oak. The samples of softwoods were western red cedar, Douglas fir, western hemlock, eastern white pine, and southern yellow pine. There was no significant difference between the wood samples under rising temperature conditions, which are intended to simulate a developing fire, or under fixed temperature conditions, which are intended to simulate a fully developed fire. This test method is used to determine whether a material is significantly more toxic than wood under the preflashover conditions of a developing fire.

  4. Sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Houseman, J.; Teixeira, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental study of several sampling tube and probe material compositions and designs aimed at preventing nitric oxide reduction when sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases. A 250,000 Btu/h furnace fired with technical grade methane was used for testing the sampling probes over a wide range of air-fuel mixtures. The results obtained include the finding that the use of stainless steel in probes creates inaccuracies in near-stoichiometric and fuel-rich sampling in hydrocarbon flames. For very fuel-rich flames, water cooling is needed even in quartz probes to prevent significant reduction of nitric oxide.-

  5. Aminoflavone, a ligand of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR), inhibits HIF-1α expression in an AhR-independent fashion

    PubMed Central

    Terzuoli, Erika; Puppo, Maura; Rapisarda, Annamaria; Uranchimeg, Badarch; Cao, Liang; Burger, Angelika M.; Ziche, Marina; Melillo, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Aminoflavone (AF), the active component of a novel anticancer agent (AFP464) in phase I clinical trials, is a ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). AhR dimerizes with HIF-1β/ARNT, which is shared with HIF-1α, a transcription factor critical for the response of cells to oxygen deprivation. To address whether pharmacological activation of the AhR pathway might be a potential mechanism for inhibition of HIF-1, we tested the effects of AF on HIF-1 expression. AF inhibited HIF-1α transcriptional activity and protein accumulation in MCF-7 cells. However, inhibition of HIF-1α by AF was independent from a functional AhR pathway. Indeed, AF inhibited HIF-1α expression in AhR100 cells, in which the AhR pathway is functionally impaired, yet did not induce cytotoxicity, providing evidence that these effects are mediated by distinct signaling pathways. Moreover, AF was inactive in MDA-MB-231 cells, yet inhibited HIF-1α in MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with the SULT1A1 gene. AF inhibited HIF-1α mRNA expression by approximately 50%. Notably, actinomycin-D completely abrogated the ability of AF to down-regulate HIF-1α mRNA, indicating that active transcription was required for the inhibition of HIF-1α expression. Finally, AF inhibited HIF-1α protein accumulation and the expression of HIF-1-target genes in MCF-7 xenografts. These results demonstrate that AF inhibits HIF-1α in an AhR-independent fashion and they unveil additional activities of AF that may be relevant for its further clinical development. PMID:20736373

  6. Characterization of drug-resistant influenza virus A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) variants selected in vitro with laninamivir.

    PubMed

    Samson, Mélanie; Abed, Yacine; Desrochers, François-Marc; Hamilton, Stephanie; Luttick, Angela; Tucker, Simon P; Pryor, Melinda J; Boivin, Guy

    2014-09-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) play a major role for managing influenza virus infections. The widespread oseltamivir resistance among 2007-2008 seasonal A(H1N1) viruses and community outbreaks of oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 strains highlights the need for additional anti-influenza virus agents. Laninamivir is a novel long-lasting NAI that has demonstrated in vitro activity against influenza A and B viruses, and its prodrug (laninamivir octanoate) is in phase II clinical trials in the United States and other countries. Currently, little information is available on the mechanisms of resistance to laninamivir. In this study, we first performed neuraminidase (NA) inhibition assays to determine the activity of laninamivir against a set of influenza A viruses containing NA mutations conferring resistance to one or many other NAIs. We also generated drug-resistant A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) viruses under in vitro laninamivir pressure. Laninamivir demonstrated a profile of susceptibility that was similar to that of zanamivir. More specifically, it retained activity against oseltamivir-resistant H275Y and N295S A(H1N1) variants and the E119V A(H3N2) variant. In vitro, laninamivir pressure selected the E119A NA substitution in the A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 A(H1N1) background, whereas E119K and G147E NA changes along with a K133E hemagglutinin (HA) substitution were selected in the A/Quebec/144147/2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 strain. In the A/Brisbane/10/2007 A(H3N2) background, a large NA deletion accompanied by S138A/P194L HA substitutions was selected. This H3N2 variant had altered receptor-binding properties and was highly resistant to laninamivir in plaque reduction assays. Overall, we confirmed the similarity between zanamivir and laninamivir susceptibility profiles and demonstrated that both NA and HA changes can contribute to laninamivir resistance in vitro. PMID:24957832

  7. The 50 Ah NiH2 CPV qualification tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, J. C.; Barnes, Wilbert L.; Hickman, Gary L.

    1995-01-01

    In 1992, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) started a program to qualify a large diameter common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) batteries for use on future Navy/NRL spacecraft electrical power subsystems. NRL's involvement with the qualification of CPV NiH2 batteries dates back to 1988 when COMSAT and Johnson Controls, Inc. initiated a joint effort to fly the first ever NiH2 CPV in space. A later NRL-JCI cooperative research and development agreement led to the launch of a space experiment in 1993 and to the use of a single NiH2 CPV battery on the BMDO Clementine spacecraft in 1994. NRL initiated procurement of two, 50 Ah CPV NiH2 batteries in the Fall of 1992. The two batteries were delivered to NRL in June 1994. NiH2 CPV batteries have almost 2x the specific energy (Wh/kg) of nickel cadium batteries and 2x the energy density (Wh/l) of individual pressure vessel NiH2 CPV's. This presentation discusses the results of electrical and mechanical qualification tests conducted at NRL. The tests included electrical characterization, standard capacity, random vibration, peak load, and thermal vacuum. The last slides of the presentation show initial results from the life cycle tests of the second NiH2 CPV battery at 40% depth of discharge and a temperature of 10 C.

  8. Nodulisporiviridins A-H, Bioactive Viridins from Nodulisporium sp.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin; Chen, Guo-Dong; Feng, Xiao-Lin; Yu, Yang; He, Rong-Rong; Li, Xiao-Xia; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Wen-Xia; Guo, Liang-Dong; Zheng, Yi-Zhi; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Gao, Hao

    2015-06-26

    Eight new viridins, nodulisporiviridins A-H (1-8), were isolated from the extract of an endolichenic fungal strain Nodulisporium sp. (No. 65-17-2-1) that was fermented with potato-dextrose broth. The structures were determined using spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic analysis. Nodulisporiviridins A-D (1-4) are unique viridins with an opened ring A. The Aβ42 aggregation inhibitory activities of 1-8 were evaluated using a thioflavin T (ThT) assay with epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) as the positive control (EGCG IC50 of 0.5 μM). Nodulisporiviridin G (7) displayed potent inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 1.2 μM, and the preliminary trend of activity of these viridins as Aβ42 aggregation inhibitors was proposed. The short-term memory assay on an Aβ transgenic drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease showed that all eight compounds improved the short-term memory capacity, with potencies close to that of the positive control (memantine). PMID:25978520

  9. Abating environmentally harmful waste gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, S.; Sichen, Du; Pal, U. B.; Seetharaman, S.

    2002-05-01

    A gas-purification method, based on the condensation of nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon-containing environmentally hazardous gases produced from industrial processes, is proposed in this article. The method, which utilizes the cooling capacity of waste nitrogen in the oxygen plant to condense the hazardous gases, is capable of removing hazardous impurities up to 99.98%. Theoretical calculations underlying the condensation process are presented employing gases produced in a blast furnace and coke oven in an integrated steel plant. The cooling power required for the condensation process is calculated using the waste nitrogen generated from an oxygen plant that generates captive oxygen for the steel plant. Design modifications that need to be made to the oxygen plant in order to utilize the cooling power of the waste nitrogen gas are also presented. As a case study, the advantages of the method are illustrated with purification of coke-oven gas. The economic impact and the investment aspects are also discussed.

  10. Isothermal compressors for process gases

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederuh, E.; Meinhart, D. )

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports on isothermal compressors which are more efficient for all gases. The study of several representative gases considered stage efficiencies, pressure ratios and pressure losses of the intercoolers. Generally there are two ways to reduce power consumption of a gas compression process: minimize losses of the compressor or improve the thermodynamics of the process. But there are some new ways to reduce losses of turbocompressors. Losses of the impeller labyrinth seals and the balance piston labyrinth seal can be reduced by optimizing the labyrinth geometry and minimizing labyrinth clearances. Therefore, conventional labyrinth seals are still being studied and will be improved.

  11. Conduction of Electricity through Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, J. J.; Thomson, G. P.

    2013-06-01

    1. Electrical conductivity of gases in a normal state; 2. Properties of a gas when in a conducting state; 3. Mobility of ions; 4. Mathematical theory of the conduction of electricity through a gas containing ions; 5. Effect produced by a magnetic field on the motion of the ions; 6. Determination of the ratio of the charge to the mass of an ion; 7. Determination of the charge carried by the negative ion; 8. On some physical properties of gaseous ions; 9. Ionisation by incandescent solids; 10. Ionisation in gases from flames; 11. Ionisation by light. Photo-electric effects; Name index; Subject index.

  12. Quantum Gases in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmettler, Peter; Kollath, Corinna

    2015-09-01

    The experimental realization of correlated quantum phases with ultracold gases in optical lattices and their theoretical understanding has witnessed remarkable progress during the last decade. In this review we introduce basic concepts and tools to describe the many-body physics of quantum gases in optical lattices. This includes the derivation of effective lattice Hamiltonians from first principles and an overview of the emerging quantum phases. Additionally, state-of-the-art numerical tools to quantitatively treat bosons or fermions on different lattices are introduced.

  13. Dentin wettability enhancement for three irrigating solutions and their effect on push out bond strength of gutta percha / AH Plus

    PubMed Central

    El Gendy, Abeer-Abdel-Hakim; El Ashry, Salma-Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of wettability enhancement for 17% EDTA, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and 7% maleic acid solutions on push out bond strength of gutta percha /AH Plus to root dentin. Material and Methods One hundred and eight extracted single rooted human lower premolars were instrumented up to Protaper Universal F5 then irrigated with 3ml of 2.5% NaOCl after each file. Irrigants were prepared and a pilot study for determination of Tween 80 concentration yielding the lowest surface tension value in every solution was conducted. Samples were randomly divided into a control group and two experimental groups (17% EDTA and 7% Maleate), further split into eight subgroups (n=12), according to Tween 80 implementation sequence. Roots were obturated using gutta percha and AH plus by lateral condensation. Bond strength was measured by push out test. Mode of failure was then evaluated quantitatively by stereomicroscopy. Data were statistically analyzed using one way ANOVA followed by Tukey-Kramer for multiple comparisons. Results Control group showed the lowest values. Maleic acid subgroups showed significantly higher overall values than EDTA subgroups (P<0.05). Protocols implementing surfactant containing NaOCl showed significantly lower values than plain counterparts. Failure pattern was predominantly cohesive for plain regimens and the ones implementing Tween 80 in maleic acid solutions with plain NaOCl. Conclusions Tween 80 addition to demineralizing irrigants increased the bond strength values. Surfactant containing NaOCl solutions yielded lower bond strength than plain ones. Key words:Wettability enhancement for three irrigants vs. corresponding gutta percha/AH Plus bonding. PMID:26155339

  14. Species-Specific Differential AhR Expression Protects Human Neural Progenitor Cells against Developmental Neurotoxicity of PAHs

    PubMed Central

    Gassmann, Kathrin; Abel, Josef; Bothe, Hanno; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; Merk, Hans F.; Quasthoff, Kim N.; Rockel, Thomas Dino; Schreiber, Timm; Fritsche, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Background Because of their lipophilicity, persistent organic pollutants (POPs) cross the human placenta, possibly affecting central nervous system development. Most POPs are known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands and activators of AhR signaling. Therefore, AhR activation has been suggested to cause developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). Objective We studied the effects of AhR ligands on basic processes of brain development in two comparative in vitro systems to determine whether AhR-activation is the underlying mechanism for reported DNT of POPs in humans. Methods We employed neurosphere cultures based on human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) and wild-type and AhR-deficient mouse NPCs (mNPCs) and studied the effects of different AhR agonists [3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC), benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P], and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)] and an antagonist [3′-methoxy-4′-nitroflavone (MNF)] on neurosphere development. Moreover, we analyzed expression of AhR and genes involved in AhR signaling. Results In contrast to wild-type mNPCs, hNPCs and AhR-deficient mNPCs were insensitive to AhR agonism or antagonism. Although AhR modulation attenuated wild-type mNPC proliferation and migration, hNPCs and AhR-deficient mNPCs remained unaffected. Results also suggest that species-specific differences resulted from nonfunctional AhR signaling in hNPCs. Conclusion Our findings suggest that in contrast to wild-type mNPCs, hNPCs were protected against polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon–induced DNT because of an absence of AhR. This difference may contribute to species-specific differences in sensitivity to POPs. PMID:20570779

  15. Avian Influenza A(H5N1) and A(H9N2) Seroprevalence and Risk Factors for Infection Among Egyptians: A Prospective, Controlled Seroepidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomaa, Mokhtar R.; Kayed, Ahmed S.; Elabd, Mona A.; Zeid, Dina Abu; Zaki, Shaimaa A.; El Rifay, Amira S.; Sherif, Lobna S.; McKenzie, Pamela P.; Webster, Robert G.; Webby, Richard J.; Ali, Mohamed A.; Kayali, Ghazi

    2015-01-01

    Background. A(H5N1) and A(H9N2) avian influenza viruses are enzootic in Egyptian poultry, and most A(H5N1) human cases since 2009 have occurred in Egypt. Our understanding of the epidemiology of avian viruses in humans remains limited. Questions about the frequency of infection, the proportion of infections that are mild or subclinical, and the case-fatality rate remain largely unanswered. Methods. We conducted a 3-year, prospective, controlled, seroepidemiological study that enrolled 750 poultry-exposed and 250 unexposed individuals in Egypt. Results. At baseline, the seroprevalence of anti-A(H5N1) antibodies (titer, ≥80) among exposed individuals was 2% significantly higher than that among the controls (0%). Having chronic lung disease was a significant risk factor for infection. Antibodies against A(H9N2) were not detected at baseline when A(H9N2) was not circulating in poultry. At follow-up, A(H9N2) was detected in poultry, and consequently, the seroprevalence among exposed humans was between 5.6% and 7.5%. Vaccination of poultry, older age, and exposure to ducks were risk factors for A(H9N2) infection. Conclusions. Results of this study indicate that the number of humans infected with avian influenza viruses is much larger than the number of reported confirmed cases. In an area where these viruses are enzootic in the poultry, human exposure to and infection with avian influenza becomes more common. PMID:25355942

  16. Method and apparatus for separating gases based on electrically and magnetically enhanced monolithic carbon fiber composite sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1999-07-20

    A method for separating gases or other fluids involves placing a magnetic field on a monolithic carbon fiber composite sorption material to more preferentially attract certain gases or other fluids to the sorption material to which a magnetic field is applied. This technique may be combined with the known pressure swing adsorption'' technique utilizing the same sorption material. 1 fig.

  17. Method and apparatus for separating gases based on electrically and magnetically enhanced monolithic carbon fiber composite sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1999-01-01

    A method for separating gases or other fluids involves placing a magnetic field on a monolithic carbon fiber composite sorption material to more preferentially attract certain gases or other fluids to the sorption material to which a magnetic field is applied. This technique may be combined with the known "pressure swing adsorption" technique utilizing the same sorption material.

  18. Interaction quenches of Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, Goetz S.

    2009-12-15

    It is shown that the jump in the momentum distribution of Fermi gases evolves smoothly for small and intermediate times once an interaction between the fermions is suddenly switched on. The jump does not vanish abruptly. The loci in momentum space where the jumps occur are those of the noninteracting Fermi sea. No relaxation of the Fermi surface geometry takes place.

  19. Bond strength to root dentin and fluid filtration test of AH Plus/gutta-percha, EndoREZ and RealSeal systems

    PubMed Central

    MAHDI, Alaa Abdul; BOLAÑOS-CARMONA, Victoria; GONZALEZ-LOPEZ, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the bond strength and seal ability produced by AH Plus/gutta-percha, EndoREZ and RealSeal systems to root canal dentin. Material and Methods Sixty extracted single-root human teeth, instrumented manually to size 40, were divided into three groups (n=20) according to the sealer used; G1: AH Plus, G2: EndoREZ, and G3: RealSeal sealers. After filling using the lateral condensation technique, each sealer group was randomly divided into two subgroups according to the tests applied (n=10 for µPush-out test and n=10 for fluid filtration test). A fluid filtration method was used for quantitative evaluation of apical leakage. Four 1-mm-thick slices (cervical and medium level) were obtained from each root sample and a µPush-out test was performed. Failure modes were examined under microscopy at 40x, and a one-way ANOVA was applied to analyze the permeability. Non-parametrical statistics for related (Friedman's and Wilcoxon's rank tests) or unrelated samples (Kruskal-Wallis' and Mann-Whitney's tests) allowed for comparisons of µPush-out strength values among materials at the different levels. Statistical significance was accepted for p values <.05. Results There are no significant differences among fluid filtration of the three sealers. The sealer/core material does not significantly influence the µPush-out bond strength values (F=2.49; p=0.10), although statistically significant differences were detected with regard to root level (Chi2=23.93; p<0.001). AH Plus and RealSeal obtained higher bond strength to intraradicular dentin in the medium root slices. Conclusions There are no significant differences between the permeability and global µPush-out bond strength to root canal dentin achieved by AH Plus/gutta-percha, EndoREZ and RealSeal systems. PMID:24037078

  20. Results of investigating gases from inclusions in lunar glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgov, Y. A.; Shugurova, N. A.

    1974-01-01

    Common gases from inclusions in glass fragments and spherules of lunar surface material returned by the Luna 16 automatic station were investigated by the adsorption volumometric method. Inclusions from eight particles were analyzed. A gas mixture from the inclusions had two- (CO2 and H2), three- (CO2, H2 and N2 + inert gases), and (H2S, SO2, and NH3), H2,N2 + inert gases, and four component (H2S, SO2, and NH3), CO2, H2, and N2 + inert gases, compositions. Hydrogen in all analyses was 10 to 95 volume percent. Diffusional exchange with the terrestrial atmosphere was absent. An unexpectedly high density of gases in the vacuoles was obtained. The initial volume of the bubbles when the vacuoles were breached even rose 2.5 times and decreased in the limits of 2.3 to 54.5 times. Various possibilities for the formation in the lunar surface material of glass fragments and spherules are discussed.

  1. Suppressors made from intermetallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W; Muth, Thomas R; Cler, Dan L

    2014-11-04

    Disclosed are several examples of apparatuses for suppressing the blast and flash produced as a projectile is expelled by gases from a firearm. In some examples, gases are diverted away from the central chamber to an expansion chamber by baffles. The gases are absorbed by the expansion chamber and desorbed slowly, thus decreasing pressure and increasing residence time of the gases. In other examples, the gases impinge against a plurality of rods before expanding through passages between the rods to decrease the pressure and increase the residence time of the gases. These and other exemplary suppressors are made from an intermetallic material composition for enhanced strength and oxidation resistance at high operational temperatures.

  2. Coactivator recruitment of AhR/ARNT1.

    PubMed

    Endler, Alexander; Chen, Li; Shibasaki, Futoshi

    2014-01-01

    A common feature of nuclear receptors (NRs) is the transformation of external cell signals into specific transcriptions of the signal molecule. Signal molecules function as ligands for NRs and, after their uptake, activated NRs form homo- or heterodimers at promoter recognition sequences of the specific genes in the nucleus. Another common feature of NRs is their dependence on coactivators, which bridge the basic transcriptional machinery and other cofactors to the target genes, in order to initiate transcription and to unwind histone-bound DNA for exposing additional promoter recognition sites via their histone acetyltransferase (HAT) function. In this review, we focus on our recent findings related to the recruitment of steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC1/NCoA1) by the estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and by the arylhydrocarbon receptor/arylhydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator 1 (AhR/ARNT1) complex. We also describe the extension of our previously published findings regarding the binding between ARNT1.1 exon16 and SRC1e exon 21, via in silico analyses of androgen receptor (AR) NH2-carboxyl-terminal interactions, the results of which were verified by in vitro experiments. Based on these data, we suggest a newly derived tentative binding site of nuclear coactivator 2/glucocorticoid receptor interacting protein-1/transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (NCOA-2/ GRIP-1/TIF-2) for ARNT1.1 exon 16. Furthermore, results obtained by immunoprecipitation have revealed a second leucine-rich binding site for hARNT1.1 exon 16 in SRC1e exon 21 (LSSTDLL). Finally, we discuss the role of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) as an endocrine disruptor for estrogen related transcription. PMID:24950180

  3. AHS and CASI Processing for the REFLEX Remote Sensing Campaign: Methods and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Miguel, Eduardo; Jiménez, Marcos; Pérez, Irene; de la Cámara, Óscar G.

    2015-12-01

    The airborne spectroradiometers AHS and CASI were used as a source of hyperspectral and thermal remote sensing data during the REFLEX campaign. Data geolocation and a first simple atmospheric correction was performed by INTA in near-real time with a specific on-site setup and distributed to all campaign participants. In this paper we present briefly the AHS and CASI REFLEX flight campaign followed by a detailed description of the methodology used for image processing and finally the results obtained in terms of image quality. As a conclusion, near-real time processing for AHS and CASI level 1 geolocated products was successful as most of CASI level 2 results but further work is needed for achieving accurate AHS level 2 products.

  4. The 50Ah NiH2 cell life test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamin, Thierry; Puig, Olivier

    1992-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form for the 50 AhNiH2 cell life test results. Information is given on pressure vessel design, electrochemical/stack design, cell electrical characteristics, and cell life test results.

  5. Cloning of a factor required for activity of the Ah (dioxin) receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.C.; Reyes, H.; Chu, Fongfong; Sander, F.; Conley, L.H.; Brooks, B.A.; Hankinson, O. )

    1991-05-17

    The aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor binds various environmental pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic amines, and polychlorinated aromatic compounds (dioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls), and mediates the carcinogenic effects of these agents. The complementary DNA and part of the gene for an 87-kilodalton human protein that is necessary for Ah receptor function have been cloned. The protein is not the ligand-binding subunit of the receptor but is a factor that is required for the ligand-binding subunit to translocate from the cytosol to the nucleus after binding ligand. The requirement for this factor distinguishes the Ah receptor from the glucocorticoid receptor, to which the Ah receptor has been presumed to be similar. Two portions of the 87-kilodalton protein share sequence similarities with two Drosophila proteins, Per and Sim. Another segment of the protein shows conformity to the consensus sequence for the basic helix-loop-helix motif found in proteins that bind DNA as homodimers or heterodimers.

  6. Activation of AhR-mediated toxicity pathway by emerging pollutants polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides (PCDPSs) are a group of environmental pollutants for which limited toxicological information is available. This study tested the hypothesis that PCDPSs could activate the mammalian aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated toxicity pathways. Eight...

  7. Design of a multifunctional and portable detector for indoor gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liping; Wang, Yutian; Li, Taishan

    2003-09-01

    With the increase of the living standards of city dwellers, home decoration has been more and more popular these years. Different kinds of material have come into people's home, which brings about beauties to the house as well as some bad effect. Because of differences in manufacturing techniques and quality, much of the material will emit poisonous gases more or less. Even if you have selected the qualified product, the toal amount of gases in you houses may not be guaranteed because of the simple reason that more than one kind of material are applied. Living in the complex environment for a long time will eventually have a bad effect on one's health. In addition the fear of the harm to be done will exert great impact psychologically. In another aspect, the coal-gas in the house-hood for cooking is also explosive and poisonous. In conclusion, the research on the indoor hazardous gases measurement and alarm device is of much economic and practical importance. The device is portable and versatile. We use rechargeable battery as the power supply. The device can detect the density of gases at the ppb level for the emission of the material and the measured value can be shown on the display. As for coal gas it can detect the percentage of LEL and make sound of alarm. We use two kinds of gas-sensors in the device, with catalytic combustion principal for coal gas detection and the PID method for the gas emissions of the decoration material. UV will destroy harmful material (such as: ammonia, dimethylamine, methyl-sulfhydrate, benzene etc.) into positive or negative ions. The sensor detects the electric charges of ionized gases and converts them into electric current signals. It is then amplified and changed into digits by amplifier and A/D. The digit signal is processed by micro-controller system of the device.

  8. Rapid Dry Etching Of Photoresists Without Toxic Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, Narcinda R.; Wydeven, Theodore

    1991-01-01

    Experimental dry etching technique strips photoresists from semiconductor wafers without damaging semiconductor materials. Makes use of afterglow existing downstream from plasma generated by radio-frequency electric field. Constituents of afterglow react with sacrificial polymer to make reactive gases that quickly etch-away photoresist. Strips quickly at room temperature; not necessary to heat substrates. No hazardous or toxic chemicals used.

  9. 46 CFR 151.50-30 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-30 Compressed gases. (a) All tank inlet and outlet connections, except safety relief valves, liquid level gauging devices, and pressure gauges shall be marked to designate whether they terminate in the vapor or liquid space. Labels,...

  10. 46 CFR 151.50-30 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-30 Compressed gases. (a) All tank inlet and outlet connections, except safety relief valves, liquid level gauging devices, and pressure gauges shall be marked to designate whether they terminate in the vapor or liquid space. Labels,...

  11. 46 CFR 151.50-30 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-30 Compressed gases. (a) All tank inlet and outlet connections, except safety relief valves, liquid level gauging devices, and pressure gauges shall be marked to designate whether they terminate in the vapor or liquid space. Labels,...

  12. 46 CFR 151.50-30 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-30 Compressed gases. (a) All tank inlet and outlet connections, except safety relief valves, liquid level gauging devices, and pressure gauges shall be marked to designate whether they terminate in the vapor or liquid space. Labels,...

  13. 46 CFR 151.50-30 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-30 Compressed gases. (a) All tank inlet and outlet connections, except safety relief valves, liquid level gauging devices, and pressure gauges shall be marked to designate whether they terminate in the vapor or liquid space. Labels,...

  14. Identification and expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhR1 and AhR2) provide insight in an evolutionary context regarding sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Sturgeons are ancient fishes, which are endangered in many parts of the world. Due to their benthic nature and longevity, sturgeon are at great risk of exposure to bioaccumulative contaminants such as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Despite their endangered status, little research has been conducted to characterize the relative sensitivity of sturgeons to DLCs. Proper assessment of risk of DLCs posed to these fishes therefore, requires a better understanding of this sensitivity and the factors that are driving it. Adverse effects associated with exposure to DLCs are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). This study identified and characterized two distinct AhRs, AhR1 and AhR2, in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) for the first time as a first step in studying the relative sensitivities of sturgeons to DLCs. Furthermore, tissue-specific expression of both AhRs under basal conditions and in response to exposure to the model DLC, β-naphthoflavone (βNF), was determined. The sequence of amino acids of AhR1 of white sturgeon had greater similarity to AhRs of tetrapods, including amphibians, birds, and mammals, than to AhR1s of other fishes. The sequence of amino acids in the ligand binding domain of the AhR1 had greater than 80% similarity to AhRs known to bind DLCs and was less similar to AhRs not known to bind DLCs. AhR2 of white sturgeon had greatest similarity to AhR2 of other fishes. Profiles of expression of AhR1 and AhR2 in white sturgeon were distinct from those known in other fishes and appear more similar to profiles observed in birds. Expressions of both AhR1 and AhR2 of white sturgeon were greatest in liver and heart, which are target organs for DLCs. Furthermore, abundances of transcripts of AhR1 and AhR2 in all tissues from white sturgeon were greater than controls (up to 35-fold) following exposure to βNF. Based upon both AhRs having similar abundances of transcript in target organs of DLC toxicity, both AhRs being up-regulated following

  15. Materialism.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26301463

  16. EDITORIAL: Cold Quantum GasesEditorial: Cold Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassen, W.; Hemmerich, A.; Arimondo, E.

    2003-04-01

    This Special Issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics brings together the contributions of various researchers working on theoretical and experimental aspects of cold quantum gases. Different aspects of atom optics, matter wave interferometry, laser manipulation of atoms and molecules, and production of very cold and degenerate gases are presented. The variety of subjects demonstrates the steadily expanding role associated with this research area. The topics discussed in this issue, extending from basic physics to applications of atom optics and of cold atomic samples, include: bulletBose--Einstein condensation bulletFermi degenerate gases bulletCharacterization and manipulation of quantum gases bulletCoherent and nonlinear cold matter wave optics bulletNew schemes for laser cooling bulletCoherent cold molecular gases bulletUltra-precise atomic clocks bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to metrology and spectroscopy bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to quantum computing bulletNanoprobes and nanolithography. This special issue is published in connection with the 7th International Workshop on Atom Optics and Interferometry, held in Lunteren, The Netherlands, from 28 September to 2 October 2002. This was the last in a series of Workshops organized with the support of the European Community that have greatly contributed to progress in this area. The scientific part of the Workshop was managed by A Hemmerich, W Hogervorst, W Vassen and J T M Walraven, with input from members of the International Programme Committee who are listed below. The practical aspects of the organization were ably handled by Petra de Gijsel from the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. The Workshop was funded by the European Science Foundation (programme BEC2000+), the European Networks 'Cold Quantum Gases (CQG)', coordinated by E Arimondo, and 'Cold Atoms and Ultraprecise Atomic Clocks (CAUAC)', coordinated by J Henningsen, by the German Physical Society (DFG), by

  17. Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of health professionals in relation to A/H1N1 influenza and its vaccine

    PubMed Central

    López-Picado, Amanda; Apiñaniz, Antxon; Ramos, Amaia Latorre; Miranda-Serrano, Erika; Cobos, Raquel; Parraza-Díez, Naiara; Amezua, Patricia; Martinez-Cengotitabengoa, Mónica; Aizpuru, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the intention of health professionals, doctors and nurses, concerning whether or not to be vaccinated against A/H1N1 influenza virus, and their perception of the severity of this pandemic compared with seasonal flu. Material and Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out based on an questionnaire e-mailed to health professionals in public healthcare centres in Vitoria between 6 and 16 November 2009; the percentage of respondents who wanted to be vaccinated and who perceived the pandemic flu to carry a high risk of death were calculated. Results A total of 115 people completed the questionnaire of whom 61.7% (n=71) were doctors and 38.3% (n=44) were nurses. Of these, 33.3% (n=23) of doctors and 13.6% (n=6) of nurses intended to be vaccinated (p=0.019). Even among those who considered themselves to be at a high risk, 70.6% (n=48) of doctors and 31.7% (n=13) of nurses participating in the study (p=0.001) planned to have the vaccination. Conclusions Most health professionals, and in particular nurses, had no intention to be vaccinated against A/H1N1 influenza virus at the beginning of the vaccination campaign. PMID:22461846

  18. Estrogenic and AhR activities in dissolved phase and suspended solids from wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Dagnino, Sonia; Gomez, Elena; Picot, Bernadette; Cavaillès, Vincent; Casellas, Claude; Balaguer, Patrick; Fenet, Hélène

    2010-05-15

    The distribution of estrogen receptor (ERalpha) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) activities between the dissolved phase and suspended solids were investigated during wastewater treatment. Three wastewater treatment plants with different treatment technologies (waste stabilization ponds (WSPs), trickling filters (TFs) and activated sludge supplemented with a biofilter system (ASB)) were sampled. Estrogenic and AhR activities were detected in both phases in influents and effluents. Estrogenic and AhR activities in wastewater influents ranged from 41.8 to 79 ng/L E(2) Eq. and from 37.9 to 115.5 ng/L TCDD Eq. in the dissolved phase and from 5.5 to 88.6 ng/g E(2) Eq. and from 15 to 700 ng/g TCDD Eq. in the suspended solids. For both activities, WSP showed greater or similar removal efficiency than ASB and both were much more efficient than TF which had the lowest removal efficiency. Moreover, our data indicate that the efficiency of removal of ER and AhR activities from the suspended solid phase was mainly due to removal of suspended solids. Indeed, ER and AhR activities were detected in the effluent suspended solid phase indicating that suspended solids, which are usually not considered in these types of studies, contribute to environmental contamination by endocrine disrupting compounds and should therefore be routinely assessed for a better estimation of the ER and AhR activities released in the environment. PMID:20303573

  19. Lithium-Ion-Battery Anode Materials with Improved Capacity from a Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao-Ming; Niu, Ji-Liang; Lin, Jia; Wei, Lei-Ming; Hu, Lei; Zhang, Gang; Cai, Yue-Peng

    2016-09-01

    We present a porous metal-organic framework (MOF) with remarkable thermal stability that exhibits a discharge capacity of 300 mAh g(-1) as an anode material for a lithium-ion battery. Pyrolysis of the obtained MOF gives an anode material with improved capacity (741 mAh g(-1)) and superior cyclic stability. PMID:27548622

  20. Bibliography of AV Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedstein, Harriet, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Lists commercially available audiovisual materials by subject area. Includes title, producer (addresses given), catalog number, format (film, filmstrip, cassette, slides), and prices. Subject areas include: elements; equilibrium; gases; laboratory techniques and experiments; general chemistry; introductory materials (including mathematics); and…

  1. A study of the toxicology of pyrolysis gases from synthetic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W.; Hilado, C. J.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus and procedure for evaluating the toxicity of pyrolysis gases from synthetic polymers are described. In each test, four Swiss albino mice are exposed in a 5-liter chamber to the gases from materials pyrolyzed at 700 C. The apparatus is simple in design, easy to clean, inexpensive and gives reproducible results. Data on several fluorine-containing and polyamide polymers are presented.

  2. Fullerenes: A New Carrier Phase for Noble Gases in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann

    2004-01-01

    The major focus of our research effort has been to measure the noble gases encapsulated within fullerenes, a new carbon carrier phase and compare it to the myriad of components found in the bulk meteorite acid residues. We have concentrated on the carbonaceous chondrites (Allende, Murchison and Tagish Lake) since they have abundant noble gases, typically with a planetary signature that dominates the stepped-release of the meteorite bulk acid residue. They also contain an extractable fullerene component that can be isolated and purified from the same bulk material.

  3. Laser driven electron acceleration in vacuum, gases and plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Krall, J.

    1996-04-19

    This paper discusses some of the important issues pertaining to laser acceleration in vacuum, neutral gases and plasmas. The limitations of laser vacuum acceleration as they relate to electron slippage, laser diffraction, material damage and electron aperture effects, are discussed. An inverse Cherenkov laser acceleration configuration is presented in which a laser beam is self guided in a partially ionized gas. Optical self guiding is the result of a balance between the nonlinear self focusing properties of neutral gases and the diffraction effects of ionization. The stability of self guided beams is analyzed and discussed. In addition, aspects of the laser wakefield accelerator are presented and laser driven accelerator experiments are briefly discussed.

  4. Strongly Interacting Homogeneous Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Patel, Parth; Yan, Zhenjie; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    We present a homogeneous box potential for strongly interacting Fermi gases. The local density approximation (LDA) allows measurements on traditional inhomogeneous traps to observe a continuous distribution of Fermi gases in a single shot, but also suffer from a broadened response due to line-of-sight averaging over varying densities. We trap ultracold Fermionic (6 Li) in an optical homogeneous potential and characterize its flatness through in-situ tomography. A hybrid approach combining a cylindrical optical potential with a harmonic magnetic trap allows us to exploit the LDA and measure local RF spectra without requiring significant image reconstruction. We extract various quantities from the RF spectra such as the Tan's contact, and discuss further measurements of homogeneous Fermi systems under spin imbalance and finite temperature.

  5. Annihilation in Gases and Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This publication contains most of the papers, both invited and contributed, that were presented at the Workshop of Annihilation in Gases and Galaxies. This was the fifth in a biennial series associated with the International Conference on the Physics of Electronic and Atomic Collisions. Subjects covered included the scattering and annihilation of positrons and positronium atoms in various media, including those of astrophysical interest. In addition, the topics of antimatter and dark matter were covered.

  6. Atmospheric Chemistry and Greenhouse Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Ehhalt, D.; Prather, M.; Dentener, F.; Derwent, R.; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Holland, E.; Isaksen, I.; Katima, J.; Kirchhoff, V.; Matson, P.; Midgley, P.; Wang, M.; Berntsen, T.; Bey, I.; Brasseur, G.; Buja, L.; Collins, W. J.; Daniel, J. S.; DeMore, W. B.; Derek, N.; Dickerson, R.; Etheridge, D.; Feichter, J.; Fraser, P.; Friedl, R.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Gauss, M.; Grenfell, L.; Grubler, Arnulf; Harris, N.; Hauglustaine, D.; Horowitz, L.; Jackman, C.; Jacob, D.; Jaegle, L.; Jain, Atul K.; Kanakidou, M.; Karlsdottir, S.; Ko, M.; Kurylo, M.; Lawrence, M.; Logan, J. A.; Manning, M.; Mauzerall, D.; McConnell, J.; Mickley, L. J.; Montzka, S.; Muller, J. F.; Olivier, J.; Pickering, K.; Pitari, G.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rogers, H.; Rognerud, B.; Smith, Steven J.; Solomon, S.; Staehelin, J.; Steele, P.; Stevenson, D. S.; Sundet, J.; Thompson, A.; van Weele, M.; von Kuhlmann, R.; Wang, Y.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Wigley, T. M.; Wild, O.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Yantosca, R.; Joos, Fortunat; McFarland, M.

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 4 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 2414.1 Introduction 2434.2 Trace Gases: Current Observations, Trends and Budgets 2484.3 Projections of Future Emissions 2664.4 Projections of Atmospheric Composition for the 21st Century 2674.5 Open Questions 2774.6 Overall Impact of Global Atmospheric Chemistry Change 279

  7. 40 CFR 92.112 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 92.112 Section 92...) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.112 Analytical gases. (a) Gases for the CO and CO2 analyzers shall be single blends of CO and CO2, respectively, using...

  8. [Prospects for Application of Gases and Gas Hydrates to Cryopreservation].

    PubMed

    Shishova, N V; Fesenko, E E

    2015-01-01

    In the present review, we tried to evaluate the known properties of gas hydrates and gases participating in the formation of gas hydrates from the point of view of the mechanisms of cryoinjury and cryoprotection, to consider the papers on freezing biological materials in the presence of inert gases, and to analyze the perspectives for the development of this direction. For the purpose, we searched for the information on the physical properties of gases and gas hydrates, compared processes occured during the formation of gas hydrates and water ice, analyzed the influence of the formation and growth of gas hydrates on the structure of biological objects. We prepared a short review on the biological effects of xenon, krypton, argon, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon monoxide especially on hypothermal conditions and probable application of these properties in cryopreservation technologies. The description of the existing experiments on cryopreservation of biological objects with the use of gases was analyzed. On the basis of the information we found, the most perspective directions of work in the field of cryopreservation of biological objects with the use of gases were outlined. An attempt was made to forecast the potential problems in this field. PMID:26591607

  9. The Effect of Time of Post Space Preparation on the Seal and Adaptation of Resilon-Epiphany Se & Gutta-percha-AH Plus Sealer- An Sem Study

    PubMed Central

    Dhaded, Neha; Dhaded, Sunil; Patil, Chetan; Patil, Roopa; Roshan, Joan Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background: The field of endodontics is dynamic & ever expanding. With the availability of a wide array of products in the dental market it’s an absolute necessity to evaluate their efficiency before including them into routine clinical practice.Hence, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of immediate & delayed post space preparation & sealing ability of new root canal filling material & sealers. Aim: The effect of time of post space preparation on the seal and adaptation of Resilon-Epiphany Se & Gutta-percha-AH Plus Sealer - An SEM study. Settings and design: Eighty extracted permanent maxillary central and lateral incisors selected for the study were decoronated. Roots canals were prepared and obturated. Materials and Methods: Samples were divided into four groups depending on the time of post, space, preparation and obturated material.GROUP I & II: Immediate and Delayed post space preparation respectively with Gutta-percha / AH Plus as obturating material. GROUP III & IV Immediate and Delayed post space preparation with Resilon / Epiphany as the obturating material. The samples were sectioned, then measured and studied by Scanning Electron Microscope. Results: There was a significant difference found between immediate and delayed post space preparation in resilon –epiphany group (p<0.001). Similarly significant difference was seen between immediate and delayed post space preparation in AH Plus-GP group (p<0.001). Difference in the adaptation of the two materials was seen in the delayed group (p = 0.030) but the immediate group showed no signifcant difference (p =0.971). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, immediate post space preparation shows less leakage in both the groups. Resilon–Epiphany shows better results when post space is delayed amongst the two whereas in immediate post space preparation there is no significant difference. PMID:24596779

  10. Biological Role of Trichoderma harzianum-Derived Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) on Stress Response and Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chuanjin; Fan, Lili; Wu, Qiong; Fu, Kehe; Gao, Shigang; Wang, Meng; Gao, Jinxin; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the properties of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) derived from Trichoderma harzianum. The enzyme, comprised of 572 amino acids, shares high homology with PAF-AH proteins from T. koningii and other microbial species. The optimum enzymatic activity of PAF-AH occurred at pH 6 in the absence of Ca2+ and it localized in the cytoplasm, and we observed the upregulation of PAF-AH expression in response to carbon starvation and strong heat shock. Furthermore, PAF-AH knockout transformant growth occurred more slowly than wild type cells and over-expression strains grown in SM medium at 37°C and 42°C. In addition, PAF-AH expression significantly increased under a series of maize root induction assay. Eicosanoic acid and ergosterol levels decreased in the PAF-AH knockouts compared to wild type cells, as revealed by GC/MS analysis. We also determined stress responses mediated by PAF-AH were related to proteins HEX1, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, and cytochrome c. Finally, PAF-AH exhibited antagonistic activity against Rhizoctonia solani in plate confrontation assays. Our results indicate PAF-AH may play an important role in T. harzianum stress response and antagonism under diverse environmental conditions. PMID:24964161

  11. Tryptamine serves as a proligand of the AhR transcriptional pathway whose activation is dependent of monoamine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Vikström Bergander, Linda; Cai, Wen; Klocke, Bernward; Seifert, Martin; Pongratz, Ingemar

    2012-09-01

    The function of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in mediating the biological effect to environmental pollutants is well established. However, accumulated evidence indicates a wide range of physiological and pathological functions mediated by the AhR, suggesting the existence of endogenous AhR ligand(s). The nature of an AhR ligand remain elusive; however, it is known that the AhR is activated by several compounds, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or the tryptophan photoproduct 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole. In this study, we show that physiological concentrations of tryptamine (TA) lead to induction of cytochrome P4501A1 transcription through an AhR-dependent mechanism. In addition, we show that activation of the AhR by TA requires a functional monoamino oxidase system, suggesting that TA acts as an AhR proligand possibly by converting to a high-affinity AhR ligand. Taken together, we show a possible mechanism, through which AhR signaling is activated by endogenous conversion of TA involving monoamine oxidases. PMID:22865928

  12. Emergence in China of human disease due to avian influenza A(H10N8)--cause for concern?

    PubMed

    To, Kelvin K W; Tsang, Alan K L; Chan, Jasper F W; Cheng, Vincent C C; Chen, Honglin; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-03-01

    In December 2013, China reported the first human case of avian influenza A(H10N8). A 73-year-old female with chronic diseases who had visited a live poultry market succumbed with community-acquired pneumonia. While human infections with avian influenza viruses are usually associated with subtypes prevalent in poultries, A(H10N8) isolates were mostly found in migratory birds and only recently in poultries. Although not possible to predict whether this single intrusion by A(H10N8) is an accident or the start of another epidemic like the preceding A(H7N9) and A(H5N1), several features suggest that A(H10N8) is a potential threat to humans. Recombinant H10 could attach to human respiratory epithelium, and A(H10N4) virus could cause severe infections in minks and chickens. A(H10N8) viruses contain genetic markers for mammalian adaptation and virulence in the haemagglutinin (A135T, S138A[H3 numbering]), M1(N30D, T215A), NS1(P42S) and PB2(E627K) protein. Studies on this human A(H10N8) isolate will reveal its adaptability to humans. Clinicians should alert the laboratory to test for A(H5,6,7,9,10) viruses in patients with epidemiological exposure in endemic geographical areas especially when human influenza A(H1,3) and B are negative. Vigilant virological and serological surveillance for A(H10N8) in human, poultry and wild bird is important for following the trajectory of this emerging influenza virus. PMID:24406432

  13. The AhR agonist VAF347 augments retinoic acid-induced differentiation in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ibabao, Christopher N; Bunaciu, Rodica P; Schaefer, Deanna M W; Yen, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In binary cell-fate decisions, driving one lineage and suppressing the other are conjoined. We have previously reported that aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) promotes retinoic acid (RA)-induced granulocytic differentiation of lineage bipotent HL-60 myeloblastic leukemia cells. VAF347, an AhR agonist, impairs the development of CD14(+)CD11b(+) monocytes from granulo-monocytic (GM) stage precursors. We thus hypothesized that VAF347 propels RA-induced granulocytic differentiation and impairs D3-induced monocytic differentiation of HL-60 cells. Our results show that VAF347 enhanced RA-induced cell cycle arrest, CD11b integrin expression and neutrophil respiratory burst. Granulocytic differentiation is known to be driven by MAPK signaling events regulated by Fgr and Lyn Src-family kinases, the CD38 cell membrane receptor, the Vav1 GEF, the c-Cbl adaptor, as well as AhR, all of which are embodied in a putative signalsome. We found that the VAF347 AhR ligand regulates the signalsome. VAF347 augments RA-induced expression of AhR, Lyn, Vav1, and c-Cbl as well as p47(phox). Several interactions of partners in the signalsome appear to be enhanced: Fgr interaction with c-Cbl, CD38, and with pS259c-Raf and AhR interaction with c-Cbl and Lyn. Thus, we report that, while VAF347 impedes monocytic differentiation induced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, VAF347 promotes RA-induced differentiation. This effect seems to involve but not to be limited to Lyn, Vav1, c-Cbl, AhR, and Fgr. PMID:25941627

  14. Phylodynamics of influenza A(H3N2) in South America, 1999-2012.

    PubMed

    Born, Priscila Silva; Siqueira, Marilda Mendonça; Faria, Nuno Rodrigues; Resende, Paola Cristina; Motta, Fernando Couto; Bello, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    The limited influenza A(H3N2) genetic data available from the Southern Hemisphere (particularly from Africa and Latin America), constrains the accurate reconstruction of viral dissemination dynamics within those regions. Our objective was to describe the spatial dissemination dynamics of influenza A(H3N2) within South America. A total of 469 sequences of the HA1 portion of the hemagglutinin gene (HA) from influenza A(H3N2) viruses sampled in temperate and tropical South American countries between 1999 and 2012 were combined with available contemporary sequences from Australia, Hong Kong, United Kingdom and the United States. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that influenza A(H3N2) sequences from South America were highly intermixed with sequences from other geographical regions, although a clear geographic virus population structure was detected globally. We identified 14 clades mostly (≥80%) composed of influenza sequences from South American countries. Bayesian phylogeographic analyses of those clades support a significant role of both temperate and tropical regions in the introduction and dissemination of new influenza A(H3N2) strains within South America and identify an intensive bidirectional viral exchange between different geographical areas. These findings indicate that seasonal influenza A(H3N2) epidemics in South America are seeded by both the continuous importation of viral variants from other geographic regions and the short-term persistence of local lineages. This study also supports a complex metapopulation model of influenza A(H3N2) dissemination in South America, with no preferential direction in viral movement between temperate and tropical regions. PMID:27275847

  15. Summary of AH-1G flight vibration data for validation of coupled rotor-fuselage analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, R. V.; Cronkhite, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Under a NASA research program designated DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS), four U. S. helicopter industry participants (Bell Helicopter, Boeing Vertol, McDonnell Douglas Helicopter, and Sikorsky Aircraft) are to apply existing analytical methods for calculating coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations of the AH-1G helicopter for correlation with flight test data from an AH-1G Operational Load Survey (OLS) test program. Bell Helicopter, as the manufacturer of the AH-1G, was asked to provide pertinent rotor data and to collect the OLS flight vibration data needed to perform the correlations. The analytical representation of the fuselage structure is based on a NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) developed by Bell which has been extensively documented and correlated with ground vibration tests.The AH-1G FEM was provided to each of the participants for use in their coupled rotor-fuselage analyses. This report describes the AH-1G OLS flight test program and provides the flight conditions and measured vibration data to be used by each participant in their correlation effort. In addition, the mechanical, structural, inertial and aerodynamic data for the AH-1G two-bladed teetering main rotor system are presented. Furthermore, modifications to the NASTRAN FEM of the fuselage structure that are necessary to make it compatible with the OLS test article are described. The AH-1G OLS flight test data was found to be well documented and provide a sound basis for evaluating currently existing analysis methods used for calculation of coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations.

  16. Anode wire aging tests with selected gases

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyk, J.; Wise, J.; Hess, D.; Williams, M. )

    1990-04-01

    As a continuation of earlier wire aging investigations, additional candidates for wire chamber gas and wire have been tested. These include the gases: argon/ethane, HRS gas, dimethyl ether, carbon dioxide/ethane, and carbon tetrafluoride/isobutane. Wires used were: gold- plated tungsten, Stablohm, Nicotin, and Stainless Steel. Measurements were made of the effects upon wire aging of impurities from plumbing materials or contamination from various types of oil. Attempts were made to induce wire aging by adding measured amounts of oxygen and halogen (methyl chloride) with negative results. In this paper, the possible role of electronegativity in the wire aging process is discussed, and measurements of electronegativity are made with several single carbon Freons, using both an electron capture detector and a wire chamber operating with dimethyl ether.

  17. Release of radiogenic gases from the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of escape of Ar-40 from the moon is calculated from mass-spectrometer data obtained at the Apollo-17 landing site. It is shown that the rate of loss of Ar from the moon varies significantly over periods the order of one lunation and that the average loss rate is about 3 t/a, corresponding to about 6% of the present rate of Ar production by K decay within the moon. These features of the Ar loss-rate data are interpreted as evidence that this gas originates in the partially molten asthenosphere, which in turn requires that early differentiation only affected the outer 600 to 1,000 km of the moon, trapping significant amounts of radioactive materials in the present asthenosphere. The relationship between the venting of Ar and other radiogenic gases in the lunar atmosphere is discussed.

  18. Thickness dependence on the optoelectronic properties of multilayered GaSe based photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Pil Ju; Abderrahmane, Abdelkader; Takamura, Tsukasa; Kim, Nam-Hoon; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials exhibit unique optoelectronic properties at atomic thicknesses. In this paper, we fabricated metal–semiconductor–metal based photodetectors using layered gallium selenide (GaSe) with different thicknesses. The electrical and optoelectronic properties of the photodetectors were studied, and these devices showed good electrical characteristics down to GaSe flake thicknesses of 30 nm. A photograting effect was observed in the absence of a gate voltage, thereby implying a relatively high photoresponsivity. Higher values of the photoresponsivity occurred for thicker layers of GaSe with a maximum value 0.57 AW‑1 and external quantum efficiency of of 132.8%, and decreased with decreasing GaSe flake thickness. The detectivity was 4.05 × 1010 cm Hz1/2 W‑1 at 532 nm laser wavelength, underscoring that GaSe is a promising p-type 2D material for photodetection applications in the visible spectrum.

  19. Prospecting by sampling and analysis of airborne particulates and gases

    DOEpatents

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-05-01

    A method is claimed for prospecting by sampling airborne particulates or gases at a ground position and recording wind direction values at the time of sampling. The samples are subsequently analyzed to determine the concentrations of a desired material or the ratios of the desired material to other identifiable materials in the collected samples. By comparing the measured concentrations or ratios to expected background data in the vicinity sampled, one can select recorded wind directions indicative of the upwind position of the land-based source of the desired material.

  20. International Laboratory Comparison of Influenza Microneutralization Assays for A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), and A(H5N1) Influenza Viruses by CONSISE.

    PubMed

    Laurie, Karen L; Engelhardt, Othmar G; Wood, John; Heath, Alan; Katz, Jacqueline M; Peiris, Malik; Hoschler, Katja; Hungnes, Olav; Zhang, Wenqing; Van Kerkhove, Maria D

    2015-08-01

    The microneutralization assay is commonly used to detect antibodies to influenza virus, and multiple protocols are used worldwide. These protocols differ in the incubation time of the assay as well as in the order of specific steps, and even within protocols there are often further adjustments in individual laboratories. The impact these protocol variations have on influenza serology data is unclear. Thus, a laboratory comparison of the 2-day enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and 3-day hemagglutination (HA) microneutralization (MN) protocols, using A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), and A(H5N1) viruses, was performed by the CONSISE Laboratory Working Group. Individual laboratories performed both assay protocols, on multiple occasions, using different serum panels. Thirteen laboratories from around the world participated. Within each laboratory, serum sample titers for the different assay protocols were compared between assays to determine the sensitivity of each assay and were compared between replicates to assess the reproducibility of each protocol for each laboratory. There was good correlation of the results obtained using the two assay protocols in most laboratories, indicating that these assays may be interchangeable for detecting antibodies to the influenza A viruses included in this study. Importantly, participating laboratories have aligned their methodologies to the CONSISE consensus 2-day ELISA and 3-day HA MN assay protocols to enable better correlation of these assays in the future. PMID:26108286

  1. International Laboratory Comparison of Influenza Microneutralization Assays for A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), and A(H5N1) Influenza Viruses by CONSISE

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, Othmar G.; Wood, John; Heath, Alan; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Peiris, Malik; Hoschler, Katja; Hungnes, Olav; Zhang, Wenqing; Van Kerkhove, Maria D.

    2015-01-01

    The microneutralization assay is commonly used to detect antibodies to influenza virus, and multiple protocols are used worldwide. These protocols differ in the incubation time of the assay as well as in the order of specific steps, and even within protocols there are often further adjustments in individual laboratories. The impact these protocol variations have on influenza serology data is unclear. Thus, a laboratory comparison of the 2-day enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and 3-day hemagglutination (HA) microneutralization (MN) protocols, using A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), and A(H5N1) viruses, was performed by the CONSISE Laboratory Working Group. Individual laboratories performed both assay protocols, on multiple occasions, using different serum panels. Thirteen laboratories from around the world participated. Within each laboratory, serum sample titers for the different assay protocols were compared between assays to determine the sensitivity of each assay and were compared between replicates to assess the reproducibility of each protocol for each laboratory. There was good correlation of the results obtained using the two assay protocols in most laboratories, indicating that these assays may be interchangeable for detecting antibodies to the influenza A viruses included in this study. Importantly, participating laboratories have aligned their methodologies to the CONSISE consensus 2-day ELISA and 3-day HA MN assay protocols to enable better correlation of these assays in the future. PMID:26108286

  2. Precursor systems analyses of automated highway systems. Commercial and transit AHS analysis. Volume 7. Final report, 9 September 1993-30 October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The program described by the eight-volume report, a resource materials document type, identified the issues and risks associated with the potential design, development, and operation of an Automated Highway System (AHS), a highway system that utilizes limited access roadways and provides `hands off` driving. The AHS effort was conducted by a team formed and directed by the Calspan Advanced Technology Center. Primary Team members included Calspan, Parsons Brinckerhoff, Dunn Engineering Associates, and Princeton University. Supporting members of the team were BMW, New York Thruway Authority, New York State Department of Transportation, Massachusetts Department of Transportation, the New Jersey Department of Transportation, Boston Research, Vitro Corporation, and Michael P. Walsh of Walsh Associates. The 17 task reports (A through P plus Representative Systems Configurations) are organized into 8 volumes. This volume describes Commercial and Transit AHS Analysis (Task F.) This task was performed as two independent and parallel efforts. Parsons Brinckerhoff performed the work reported in the main body of the report and Appendix A. That work was supervised by Marvin Gersten and supported by Jeanine Jankowski, both of Parsons Brinckerhoff. A separate and parallel analysis, performed by Prinecton University, appears as Appendix B (with its own Executive Summary). The work was developed by Alain Kornhauser.

  3. Thermodynamics of Trapping Gases for Underwater Superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Patankar, Neelesh A

    2016-07-12

    Rough surfaces submerged in a liquid can remain almost dry if the liquid does not fully wet the roughness, and gases are sustained in roughness grooves. Such partially dry surfaces can help reduce drag, enhance boiling, and reduce biofouling. Gases sustained in roughness grooves would be composed of air and the vapor phase of the liquid itself. In this work, the thermodynamics of sustaining gases (e.g., air) is considered. Governing equations are presented along with a solution methodology to determine a critical condition to sustain gases. The critical roughness scale to sustain gases is estimated for different degrees of saturation of gases dissolved in the liquid. It is shown that roughness spacings of less than a micron are essential to sustain gases on surfaces submerged in water at atmospheric pressure. This is consistent with prior empirical data. PMID:27276525

  4. A microleakage study of gutta-percha/AH Plus and Resilon/Real self-etch systems after different irrigation protocols

    PubMed Central

    PRADO, Maíra; SIMÃO, Renata Antoun; GOMES, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    The development and maintenance of the sealing of the root canal system is the key to the success of root canal treatment. The resin-based adhesive material has the potential to reduce the microleakage of the root canal because of its adhesive properties and penetration into dentinal walls. Moreover, the irrigation protocols may have an influence on the adhesiveness of resin-based sealers to root dentin. Objective The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different irrigant protocols on coronal bacterial microleakage of gutta-percha/AH Plus and Resilon/Real Seal Self-etch systems. Material and Methods One hundred ninety pre-molars were used. The teeth were divided into 18 experimental groups according to the irrigation protocols and filling materials used. The protocols used were: distilled water; sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)+eDTA; NaOCl+H3PO4; NaOCl+eDTA+chlorhexidine (CHX); NaOCl+H3PO4+CHX; CHX+eDTA; CHX+ H3PO4; CHX+eDTA+CHX and CHX+H3PO4+CHX. Gutta-percha/AH Plus or Resilon/Real Seal Se were used as root-filling materials. The coronal microleakage was evaluated for 90 days against Enterococcus faecalis. Data were statistically analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival test, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Results No significant difference was verified in the groups using chlorhexidine or sodium hypochlorite during the chemo-mechanical preparation followed by eDTA or phosphoric acid for smear layer removal. The same results were found for filling materials. However, the statistical analyses revealed that a final flush with 2% chlorhexidine reduced significantly the coronal microleakage. Conclusion A final flush with 2% chlorhexidine after smear layer removal reduces coronal microleakage of teeth filled with gutta-percha/AH Plus or Resilon/Real Seal SE. PMID:25025557

  5. Socioeconomic Factors Influencing Hospitalized Patients with Pneumonia Due to Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Toshie; Higuera Iglesias, Anjarath Lorena; Vazquez Manriquez, Maria Eugenia; Martinez Valadez, Eduarda Leticia; Ramos, Leticia Alfaro; Izumi, Shinyu; Takasaki, Jin; Kudo, Koichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background In addition to clinical aspects and pathogen characteristics, people's health-related behavior and socioeconomic conditions can affect the occurrence and severity of diseases including influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. Methodology and Principal Findings A face-to-face interview survey was conducted in a hospital in Mexico City at the time of follow-up consultation for hospitalized patients with pneumonia due to influenza virus infection. In all, 302 subjects were enrolled and divided into two groups based on the period of hospitalization. Among them, 211 tested positive for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus by real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction during the pandemic period (Group-pdm) and 91 tested positive for influenza A virus in the post-pandemic period (Group-post). All subjects were treated with oseltamivir. Data on the demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, living environment, and information relating to A(H1N1)pdm09, and related clinical data were compared between subjects in Group-pdm and those in Group-post. The ability of household income to pay for utilities, food, and health care services as well as housing quality in terms of construction materials and number of rooms revealed a significant difference: Group-post had lower socioeconomic status than Group-pdm. Group-post had lower availability of information regarding H1N1 influenza than Group-pdm. These results indicate that subjects in Group-post had difficulty receiving necessary information relating to influenza and were more likely to be impoverished than those in Group-pdm. Possible factors influencing time to seeking health care were number of household rooms, having received information on the necessity of quick access to health care, and house construction materials. Conclusions Health-care-seeking behavior, poverty level, and the distribution of information affect the occurrence and severity of pneumonia due to H1N1 virus from a socioeconomic point of view. These

  6. An in vitro study of apical and coronal microleakage of laterally condensed gutta percha with Ketac-Endo and AH-26.

    PubMed

    Oliver, C M; Abbott, P V

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare both apical and coronal dye penetration when Ketac-Endo and AH-26 sealers were used with laterally condensed gutta percha. Crowns were removed from 28 teeth and the root canals were biomechanically prepared. The teeth were divided into two groups of 12-teeth each and a control group of 4 teeth. Root canals in the two experimental groups were filled with laterally condensed gutta percha and either Ketac-Endo or AH-26 sealer. The Ketac-Endo group had the coronal 3 mm of gutta percha and sealer removed and the resultant cavity was filled with Ketac-Endo alone. After the sealers had set, the root surfaces were coated with nail varnish except at the apex and at the coronal end. Positive controls had no root fillings and were coated with nail varnish in the same manner while the negative controls were sealed apically and coronally with Cavit prior to sealing the entire external root surface with nail varnish. Specimens were placed in 2% methylene blue dye in a vacuum of 660 mm of mercury for five minutes and then left immersed for a further two days. The roots were vertically sectioned to determine the following mean levels of dye penetration: Ketac-Endo, 1.08 mm apically and 6.29 mm coronally; AH-26, 0.75 mm apically and 6.67 mm coronally. Positive controls had total leakage and negative controls had no leakage. This study demonstrated that the apical and coronal seals obtained with Ketac-Endo and AH-26 were not significantly different although the apical seal obtained with each material was significantly better than the corresponding coronal seal. PMID:9775474

  7. A human intervention study with foods containing natural Ah-receptor agonists does not significantly show AhR-mediated effects as measured in blood cells and urine.

    PubMed

    de Waard, Pim W J; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Baykus, Hakan; Aarts, Jac M M J G; Hoogenboom, Ron L A P; van Schooten, Frederik J; de Kok, Theo M C M

    2008-10-22

    Binding and activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is thought to be an essential step in the toxicity of the environmental pollutants dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs. However, also a number of natural compounds, referred to as NAhRAs (natural Ah-receptor agonists), which are present in, for example, fruits and vegetables, can bind and activate this receptor. To study their potential effects in humans, we first investigated the effect of the prototypical AhR agonist 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on gene expression in ex vivo exposed freshly isolated human lymphocytes, and compared the resulting gene expression profile with those caused by the well-known NAhRA indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ), originating from cruciferous vegetables, and by a hexane extract of NAhRA-containing grapefruit juice (GJE). Only ICZ induced a gene expression profile similar to TCDD in the lymphocytes, and both significantly up-regulated CYP1B1 and TIPARP (TCDD-inducible poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase) mRNA. Next, we performed a human intervention study with NAhRA-containing cruciferous vegetables and grapefruit juice. The expression of the prototypical AhR-responsive genes CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and NQO1 in whole blood cells and in freshly isolated lymphocytes was not significantly affected. Also enzyme activities of CYP1A2, CYP2A6, N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) and xanthine oxidase (XO), as judged by caffeine metabolites in urine, were unaffected, except for a small down-regulation of NAT2 activity by grapefruit juice. Examination of blood plasma with DR CALUX showed a 12% increased AhR agonist activity 3 and 24 h after consumption of cruciferous vegetables, but did not show a significant effect of grapefruit juice consumption. We conclude that intake of NAhRAs from food may result in minor AhR-related effects measurable in human blood and urine. PMID:18762178

  8. [Infection of pigs with influenza A/H4 and A/H5 viruses isolated from wild birds on the territory of Russia].

    PubMed

    Iamnikova, S S; Kurinov, G V; Lomakina, N F; Kurinov, V V; Fediakina, I T; Zaberezhnyĭ, A D; L'vov, D K

    2008-01-01

    Pigs were intranasally infected with avian influenza A/H5 (H5N1, H5N3) and A/H4 (H4N6, H4N8) viruses in mono- and coinfection. Infection with both apathogenic and pathogenic strains caused no clinical manifestations. A virus and/or fragments of its genome retained in nasopharyngeal fluid as long as 6-8 days after infection. During monoinfection, the structure of the hemagglutinin (HA) receptor site of isolates from the pigs infected with A/H5N1 strains (A/chicken/Kurgan/3/2005, A/duck/Russia/5354-vac/2005) and A/H5N3 (A/duck/Primorje/2633/01) remained unchanged during 6-7 days. When two animals infected with avirulent A/H5N3 viruses (A/duck/Primorje/2633/01, A/duck/Altai/1285/91) that differed in immunogenic properties were kept together, the A/duck/Altai/1285/91 virus that induced a later IgG generation was prevalent in the nasopharyngeal fluid of both animals. Moreover, 4 significant nucleotide replacements were detected in the HA gene on days 7-8. Infection of pigs with avian influenza A/H4 viruses yielded the similar results. The joint keeping of animals infected with Algarganey teal/Astrakhan/309/102 (H4N8) strain and A/ musk beaver/Buryatia/944/00 (H4N6) isolated from musk beaver exhibited fragments of "a variant" of the identical structure in the nasal swabs of both animals on days 7-8. A nucleotide sequence from 37 nucleotide replacements differing from both baseline sequences was revealed in the HA 364-1045 gene region. The amino acid sequence of the variant was similar to Algarganey teal/Astrakhan/3091/02, other than one position 264 < Lys > (numeration by H3), which coincided with the A/ musk beaver/Buryatia/1944/00 strain. The latter induced the antibody generation on day 5 after infection while the A/garganey teal/Astrakhan/3091/02 strain did only on day 14. It is possible that under co-circulation of two different influenza A viruses, the virus causing a slower development of an immune response showed a higher probability of transiting to another host

  9. Toward elucidation of dioxin-mediated chloracne and Ah receptor functions.

    PubMed

    Bock, Karl Walter

    2016-07-15

    Target cells and molecular targets responsible for dioxin-mediated chloracne, the hallmark of dioxin toxicity, are reviewed. The dioxin TCDD accumulates in sebum, and thereby persistently activates the Ah receptor (AhR), expressed in bipotential stem/progenitor cells of the sebaceous gland. AhR operates in cooperation with other transcription factors including c-Myc, Blimp1 and ß-Catenin/TCF: c-Myc stimulates exit of stem cells from quiescence to proliferating sebocyte progenitors; Blimp1 is a major c-Myc repressor, and ß-Catenin/TCF represses sebaceous gland differentiation and stimulates differentiation to interfollicular epidermis. TCDD has been demonstrated to induce Blimp1 expression in the sebocyte stem/progenitor cell line SZ95, leading to sebocyte apoptosis and proliferation of interfollicular epidermis cells. These findings explain observations in TCDD-poisoned individuals, and identify target cells and molecular targets of dioxin-mediated chloracne. They clearly demonstrate that the AhR operates in a cell context-dependent manner, and provide hints to homeostatic functions of AhR in stem/progenitor cells. PMID:26801687

  10. Sealing properties of Ketac-Endo glass ionomer cement and AH26 root canal sealers.

    PubMed

    De Gee, A J; Wu, M K; Wesselink, P R

    1994-09-01

    Sealing capacity, setting shrinkage and setting time of a recently introduced glass ionomer cement Ketac-Endo were compared with that of a conventional sealer AH26. Sixty half-cylinders, 8 mm long, 4 mm in diameter, made from fresh bovine root dentine, had their smear layer removed before being cemented together while separated by 1-mm spacers. This resulted in a group of 15 cylinders cemented with Ketac-Endo and a similar group with AH26. After coating the lateral surface with nail varnish, one end of each cylinder was connected with a tube filled with water under 120 kPa (1.2 atm) pressure. At the other end the fluid leaking through the cemented interface of the cylinders was measured by displacement of an air bubble in an attached standard glass capillary. In this particular set-up where the sealers were used in bulk between two opposing dentine surfaces, Ketac-Endo leaked significantly more than AH26. After shear loading the cemented specimens, it was found that the area of adhesive failure was 88% for Ketac-Endo, and 15% for AH26. The leakage pathways were most probably at the dentine-sealer interface for Ketac-Endo and through cohesive fractures in the sealer for AH26. PMID:7814135

  11. Qualification Testing of General Electric 50 Ah Nickel-Cadmium Cells with New Separator and New Positive Plate Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, G. W.

    1986-01-01

    Forty-two 50 Ah aerospace nickel-cadmium cells were delivered to Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) by General Electric (GE) in February, 1985, for the purpose of evaluating and qualifying a new nylon separator material Pellon 2536, and the new GE Positive Plate Nickel Attack Control Passivation process. Testing began in May, 1985, at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC) in Crane, Indiana with standard initial evaluation tests. Life cycling in both Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) began in July, 1985, with approximately 1200 LEO cycles complete at this writting. Early test results show that cells with positive plate passivation exhibit higher than normal charge voltage characteristics. Other aspects of performance were nominal.

  12. Qualification testing of General Electric 50 Ah nickel-cadmium cells with Pellon 2536 separator and passivated positive plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, George W.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two 50 Ah nickel-cadmium cells were delivered to the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) by General Electric (GE) in February, 1985 for the purpose of evaluating and qualifying a nonwoven nylon separator material, Pellon 2536, and the GE positive plate nickel attack control gas passivation process. Testing began May, 1985 at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC) in Crane, Indiana with GSFC standard initial evaluation tests. Life cycling in both Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) began in July, 1985 with approximately 6500 LEO cycles and three GEO eclipse seasons completed. After early problems in maintaining test pack temperature control, all packs are performing well but are exhibiting higher than normal charge voltage characteristics.

  13. Tunneling in degenerate atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraoanu, Gheorghe-Sorin

    The experimental achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation in cold alkali atomic gases in 1995 has started a period of fertile research at the intersection of atomic physics, quantum optics, and condensed matter. In this thesis, various tunneling effects in both bosonic and fermionic gases are investigated. The first part of this work deals with bosons in different Josephson-type experimental setups. After a brief general introduction we establish, in Chapter 2, a mapping between the phase and the Bogoliubov representation for the Josephson oscillations; in Chapter 3 we calculate the Josephson coupling constant for the condensate in the external Josephson effect. Chapter 4 deals with Josephson effects at the level of depletion: we describe in detail the oscillatory dynamics of the virtual quasiparticles. The next Chapter is a stability analysis for the formation of vortices in the Kibble Zurek scenario. Finally, Chapter 6 contains a discussion on the time-evolution of the many-body states in the absence of tunneling. The second part of the thesis (Chapter 7--Chapter 9) deals with fermionic systems below the BCS critical temperature. The first two of these Chapters explore the possibility of driving transitions between hyperfine states with lasers. In Chapter 7 we show that these transitions could be used to investigate the coherence of the Cooper pairs. In Chapter 8 we imagine an internal Josephson experiment which uses a pair of lasers to drive transitions between two superfluids. Finally, in Chapter 9 we examine the properties of vortices formed in trapped Cooper-paired fermionic gases.

  14. Climate Change and Greenhouse Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledley, Tamara S.; Sundquist, Eric; Schwartz, Stephen; Hall, Dorothy K.; Fellows, Jack; Killeen, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU), as a scientific organization devoted to research on the Earth and space sciences, provides current scientific information to the public on issues pertinent to geophysics. The Council of the AGU approved a position statement on Climate Change and Greenhouse Gases in December 1998. The statement, together with a short summary of the procedures that were followed in its preparation, review, and adoption were published in the February 2, 1999 issue of Eos ([AGU, 1999]. The present article reviews scientific understanding of this issue as presented in peer-reviewed publications that serves as the underlying basis of the position statement.

  15. Spark ignition of flowing gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swett, Clyde C , Jr

    1956-01-01

    Research conducted at the NACA Lewis Laboratory on ignition of flowing gases by means of long-duration discharges is summarized and analyzed. Data showing the effect of a flowing combustible mixture on the physical and electrical characteristics of spark discharges and data showing the effects of variables on the spark energy required for ignition that has been developed to predict the effect of many of the gas-stream and spark variables is described and applied to a limited amount of experimental data.

  16. Magnetism in ultracold quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmaljohann, H.; Erhard, M.; Kronjäger, J.; Kottke, M.; van Staa, S.; Arlt, J. J.; Bongs, K.; Sengstock, K.

    2004-12-01

    We study the static and dynamic magnetic properties of ultracold quantum gases, in particular the spinor physics of F = 1 and F = 2 Bose-Einstein condensates of 87Rb atoms. Our data lead to the conclusion, that the F = 2 ground state of 87Rb is polar, while we find the F = 1 ground state to be ferromagnetic. The dynamics of spinor systems is linked to an interplay between coherent mean-field interactions, losses and interactions with atoms in the thermal cloud. Within this rich parameter space we observe indications for coherent spinor dynamics and novel thermalization regimes.

  17. Age-specific and sex-specific morbidity and mortality from avian influenza A(H7N9).

    PubMed

    Dudley, Joseph P; Mackay, Ian M

    2013-11-01

    We used data on age and sex for 136 laboratory confirmed human A(H7N9) cases reported as of 11 August 2013 to compare age-specific and sex-specific patterns of morbidity and mortality from the avian influenza A(H7N9) virus with those of the avian influenza A(H5N1) virus. Human A(H7N9) cases exhibit high degrees of age and sex bias: mortality is heavily biased toward males >50 years, no deaths have been reported among individuals <25 years old, and relatively few cases documented among children or adolescents. The proportion of fatal cases (PFC) for human A(H7N9) cases as of 11 August 2013 was 32%, compared to a cumulative PFC for A(H5N1) of 83% in Indonesia and 36% in Egypt. Approximately 75% of cases of all A(H7N9) cases occurred among individuals >45 years old. Morbidity and mortality from A(H7N9) are lowest among individuals between 10 and 29 years, the age group which exhibits the highest cumulative morbidity and case fatality rates from A(H5N1). Although individuals <20 years old comprise nearly 50% of all human A(H5N1) cases, only 7% of all reported A(H7N9) cases and no deaths have been reported among individuals in this age group. Only 4% of A(H7N9) cases occurred among children<5 years old, and only one case from the 10 to 20 year age group. Age- and sex-related differences in morbidity and mortality from emerging zoonotic diseases can provide insights into ecological, economic, and cultural factors that may contribute to the emergence and proliferation of novel zoonotic diseases in human populations. PMID:24091087

  18. Laser driven acceleration in vacuum and gases

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Hafizi, B.; Hubbard, R.; Krall, J.; Ting, A.

    1997-03-01

    Several important issues pertaining to particle acceleration in vacuum and gases are discussed. The limitations of laser vacuum acceleration as they relate to electron slippage, laser diffraction, material damage, and electron aperture effects are presented. Limitations on the laser intensity and particle self-fields due to material breakdown are quantified. In addition, the reflection of the self-fields associated with the accelerated particles places a limit on the number of particles. Two configurations for the inverse Cherenkov accelerator (ICA) are considered, in which the electromagnetic driver is propagated in a waveguide that is (i) lined with a dielectric material or (ii) filled with a neutral gas. The acceleration gradient in the ICA is limited by tunneling and collisional ionization in the dielectric liner or gas. Ionization can lead to significant modification of the optical properties of the waveguide, altering the phase velocity and causing particle slippage, thus disrupting the acceleration process. Maximum accelerating gradients and pulse durations are presented for a 10 {mu}m and a 1 mm wavelength driver. We show that the use of an unguided Bessel (axicon) beam can enhance the energy gain compared to a higher order Gaussian beam. The enhancement factor is N{sup 1/2}, where N is the number of lobes in the Bessel beam. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Twin Peaks: A/H1N1 Pandemic Influenza Virus Infection and Vaccination in Norway, 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Van Effelterre, Thierry; Dos Santos, Gaël; Shinde, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background Vaccination campaigns against A/H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus (A/H1N1p) began in autumn 2009 in Europe, after the declaration of the pandemic at a global level. This study aimed to estimate the proportion of individuals vaccinated against A/H1N1p in Norway who were already infected (asymptomatically or symptomatically) by A/H1N1p before vaccination, using a mathematical model. Methods A dynamic, mechanistic, mathematical model of A/H1N1p transmission was developed for the Norwegian population. The model parameters were estimated by calibrating the model-projected number of symptomatic A/H1N1p cases to the number of laboratory-confirmed A/H1N1p cases reported to the surveillance system, accounting for potential under-reporting. It was assumed in the base case that the likelihood of vaccination was independent of infection/disease state. A sensitivity analysis explored the effects of four scenarios in which current or previous symptomatic A/H1N1p infection would influence the likelihood of being vaccinated. Results The number of model-projected symptomatic A/H1N1p cases by week during the epidemic, accounting for under-reporting and timing, closely matched that of the laboratory-confirmed A/H1N1p cases reported to the surveillance system. The model-projected incidence of symptomatic A/H1N1p infection was 27% overall, 55% in people <10 years old and 41% in people 10–20 years old. The model-projected percentage of individuals vaccinated against A/H1N1p who were already infected with A/H1N1p before being vaccinated was 56% overall, 62% in people <10 years old and 66% in people 10–20 years old. The results were sensitive to assumptions about the independence of vaccination and infection; however, even when current or previous symptomatic A/H1N1p infection was assumed to reduce the likelihood of vaccination, the estimated percentage of individuals who were infected before vaccination remained at least 32% in all age groups. Conclusion This analysis

  20. Identification and simulation evaluation of an AH-64 helicopter hover math model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. A.; Watson, D. C.; Tischler, M. B.; Eshow, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    Frequency-domain parameter-identification techniques were used to develop a hover mathematical model of the AH-64 Apache helicopter from flight data. The unstable AH-64 bare-airframe characteristics without a stability-augmentation system were parameterized in the convectional stability-derivative form. To improve the model's vertical response, a simple transfer-function model approximating the effects of dynamic inflow was developed. Additional subcomponents of the vehicle were also modeled and simulated, such as a basic engine response for hover and the vehicle stick dynamic characteristics. The model, with and without stability augmentation, was then evaluated by AH-64 pilots in a moving-base simulation. It was the opinion of the pilots that the simulation was a satisfactory representation of the aircraft for the tasks of interest. The principal negative comment was that height control was more difficult in the simulation than in the aircraft.

  1. Orbital Period Investigations of Two W UMa-type Binaries: AH Aur and V728 Her

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yun-Xia; Xiang, Fu-Yuan; Hu, Ke

    2016-04-01

    The orbital period changes of two W UMa-type binaries, AH Aur and V728 Her, are investigated based on all available times of the light minimum taken from the databases and literature. It is revealed that the orbital period of AH Aur shows a long-term decrease at a rate of {dP}/{dt}=-2.491× {10}-7 days yr-1. For V728 Her, we find that the orbital period exhibits a secular increase at a rate of {dP}/{dt}=3.793× {10}-7 days yr-1. The secular period changes suggest that AH Aur and V728 Her are undergoing rapid mass transfer between the primary star and the secondary companion.

  2. Pandemic influenza A/H1N1 and organ donation.

    PubMed

    Lattes, R; Jacob, N; de la Fuente, J; Fragale, G; Massari, P

    2010-04-01

    One of the concerns regarding the pandemic of novel influenza A/H1N1 virus is its potential to hamper transplant programs if the decision is made that organs from donors with influenza A/H1N1 should not be used. Evidence of transmissibility through organ transplantation is speculative at best. We report the outcome of 2 kidney transplant recipients who received kidneys from the same deceased donor, in whom the diagnosis of infection by the novel virus became available only after engraftment. The donor also had received a complete course of antiviral treatment before donation. The recipients were transplanted at 2 different facilities and were managed differently. Neither recipient developed flu syndrome, and both had an uneventful outcome. It is possible to speculate that kidneys from donors who have had confirmed influenza A/H1N1 and who have received antiviral treatment can be safely used in transplantation. PMID:20180928

  3. Predicting Flows of Rarefied Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBeau, Gerald J.; Wilmoth, Richard G.

    2005-01-01

    DSMC Analysis Code (DAC) is a flexible, highly automated, easy-to-use computer program for predicting flows of rarefied gases -- especially flows of upper-atmospheric, propulsion, and vented gases impinging on spacecraft surfaces. DAC implements the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, which is widely recognized as standard for simulating flows at densities so low that the continuum-based equations of computational fluid dynamics are invalid. DAC enables users to model complex surface shapes and boundary conditions quickly and easily. The discretization of a flow field into computational grids is automated, thereby relieving the user of a traditionally time-consuming task while ensuring (1) appropriate refinement of grids throughout the computational domain, (2) determination of optimal settings for temporal discretization and other simulation parameters, and (3) satisfaction of the fundamental constraints of the method. In so doing, DAC ensures an accurate and efficient simulation. In addition, DAC can utilize parallel processing to reduce computation time. The domain decomposition needed for parallel processing is completely automated, and the software employs a dynamic load-balancing mechanism to ensure optimal parallel efficiency throughout the simulation.

  4. Effects of traces of molecular gases (hydrogen, nitrogen) in glow discharges in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steers, E. B. M.; Smid, P.; Hoffmann, V.

    2008-07-01

    The "Grimm" type of low pressure glow discharge source, introduced some forty years ago, has proved to be a versatile analytical source. A flat sample is used as the cathode and placed about 0.2mm away from the end of a hollow tubular anode leading to an obstructed discharge. When the source was first developed, it was used for the direct analysis of solid metallic samples by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), normally with argon as the plasma gas; it was soon found that, using suitable electrical parameters, the cathode material was sputtered uniformly from a circular crater of diameter equal to that of the tubular anode, so that the technique could be used for compositional depth profile analysis (CDPA). Over the years the capability and applications of the technique have steadily increased. The use of rf powered discharges now permits the analysis of non-conducting layers and samples; improved instrumental design now allows CDPA of ever thinner layers (e.g. resolution of layers 5 nm thick in multilayer stacks is possible). For the original bulk material application, pre-sputtering could be used to remove any surface contamination but for CDPA, analysis must start immediately the discharge is ignited, so that any surface contamination can introduce molecular gases into the plasma gas and have significant analytical consequences, especially for very thin layers; in addition, many types of samples now analysed contain molecular gases as components (either as occluded gas, or e.g. as a nitride or oxide), and this gas enters the discharge when the sample is sputtered. It is therefore important to investigate the effect of such foreign gases on the discharge, in particular on the spectral intensities and hence the analytical results. The presentation will concentrate mainly on the effect of hydrogen in argon discharges, in the concentration range 0-2 % v/v but other gas mixtures (e.g. Ar/N_2, Ne/H_2) will be considered for comparison. In general, the introduction of

  5. Ah-receptor controlled luciferase expression: A novel species-specific bioassay for Ah-receptor active compounds in environmental matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Murk, A.J.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Koeman, J.H.; Brouwer, A.; Denison, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    Polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent lipophilic compounds that accumulate especially in sediments and in top predators of the aquatic foodchain. PHAHs elicit a number of common toxic responses, which are highly species-specific. The most toxic, planar, PHAHs share a common mechanism of action mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Based on this mechanism, the toxic equivalency factor (TEF) concept has been developed, allowing hazard and risk assessment for mixtures of PHAHs. The TEF-approach assumes additive responses, but also synergistic and antagonistic interactions have been observed. In addition, the often large number of compounds in a mixture, low levels of individual congeners, possible presence of unknown AhR-active substances, and species differences in inducibility, ask for an comprehensive approach in hazard assessment. A number of recombinant cell lines, including Hepa1c1c7 mouse and H411E rat hepatoma cell lines, were developed, showing AhR-mediated firefly (Photinuspyralis) luciferase gene expression. The response by 2,3,7,8-TCDD in the CALUX (chemical activated luciferase expression) assay with these cell lines is dose-dependent, and not subjected to substrate inhibition at higher ligand concentrations. The detection limit for 2,3,7,8-TCDD is below 1 pM (0.2 fmol). The luciferase assay has been successfully applied for monitoring the amount of AhR-active compounds in small aliquots of blood plasma and in both sediment and pore-water samples, of which examples will be presented.

  6. Solution structure of the isolated histone H2A-H2B heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Yoshihito; Yamane, Tsutomu; Ohtomo, Hideaki; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Kurita, Jun-ichi; Sato, Masahiko; Nagadoi, Aritaka; Shimojo, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    During chromatin-regulated processes, the histone H2A-H2B heterodimer functions dynamically in and out of the nucleosome. Although detailed crystal structures of nucleosomes have been established, that of the isolated full-length H2A-H2B heterodimer has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the solution structure of human H2A-H2B by NMR coupled with CS-Rosetta. H2A and H2B each contain a histone fold, comprising four α-helices and two β-strands (α1–β1–α2–β2–α3–αC), together with the long disordered N- and C-terminal H2A tails and the long N-terminal H2B tail. The N-terminal αN helix, C-terminal β3 strand, and 310 helix of H2A observed in the H2A-H2B nucleosome structure are disordered in isolated H2A-H2B. In addition, the H2A α1 and H2B αC helices are not well fixed in the heterodimer, and the H2A and H2B tails are not completely random coils. Comparison of hydrogen-deuterium exchange, fast hydrogen exchange, and {1H}-15N hetero-nuclear NOE data with the CS-Rosetta structure indicates that there is some conformation in the H2A 310 helical and H2B Lys11 regions, while the repression domain of H2B (residues 27–34) exhibits an extended string-like structure. This first structure of the isolated H2A-H2B heterodimer provides insight into its dynamic functions in chromatin. PMID:27181506

  7. Solution structure of the isolated histone H2A-H2B heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Yoshihito; Yamane, Tsutomu; Ohtomo, Hideaki; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Kurita, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Masahiko; Nagadoi, Aritaka; Shimojo, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    During chromatin-regulated processes, the histone H2A-H2B heterodimer functions dynamically in and out of the nucleosome. Although detailed crystal structures of nucleosomes have been established, that of the isolated full-length H2A-H2B heterodimer has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the solution structure of human H2A-H2B by NMR coupled with CS-Rosetta. H2A and H2B each contain a histone fold, comprising four α-helices and two β-strands (α1-β1-α2-β2-α3-αC), together with the long disordered N- and C-terminal H2A tails and the long N-terminal H2B tail. The N-terminal αN helix, C-terminal β3 strand, and 310 helix of H2A observed in the H2A-H2B nucleosome structure are disordered in isolated H2A-H2B. In addition, the H2A α1 and H2B αC helices are not well fixed in the heterodimer, and the H2A and H2B tails are not completely random coils. Comparison of hydrogen-deuterium exchange, fast hydrogen exchange, and {(1)H}-(15)N hetero-nuclear NOE data with the CS-Rosetta structure indicates that there is some conformation in the H2A 310 helical and H2B Lys11 regions, while the repression domain of H2B (residues 27-34) exhibits an extended string-like structure. This first structure of the isolated H2A-H2B heterodimer provides insight into its dynamic functions in chromatin. PMID:27181506

  8. AH7, a non-polyenic antifungal antibiotic produced by a new strain of Streptosporangium roseum.

    PubMed

    Hacène, H; Boudjellal, F; Lefebvre, G

    1998-01-01

    An antibiotic (AH7) produced by Streptosporangium roseum strain 214 was investigated. This compound was extracted with chloroform from the filtrate culture and purified using thin-layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography procedures. The antibiotic strongly inhibited the growth of several strains of fungi and bacteria known to be plant and human pathogens. This compound differed from all other antibiotics known to be synthesized by Streptosporangium spp. Some of its chemical and physical properties resembled those of maytansines produced by Nocardia but the antibiotic AH7 has only antibacterial and antitumoral activities. PMID:10093231

  9. AH17, a new non-polyenic antifungal antibiotic produced by a strain of Spirillospora.

    PubMed

    Hacène, H; Lefebvre, G

    1995-01-01

    An antibiotic (AH17) was produced by Spirillospora strain 719. This substance was obtained only from the broth filtrate after precipitation with acetic acid followed by extraction with n-butanol. Its purification was carried out by thin layer chromatography on silica gel followed by HPLC procedures. It showed activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. The spectroscopic and chemical properties were examined and indicated that AH17 was a quinone. It seems that this is a new antibiotic from Spirillospora. PMID:8559083

  10. AH-Questionnaire: An Adaptive Hierarchical Questionnaire for Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortigosa, Alvaro; Paredes, Pedro; Rodriguez, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    One of the main concerns when providing learning style adaptation in Adaptive Educational Hypermedia Systems is the number of questions the students have to answer. Most of the times, adaptive material available will discriminate among a few categories for each learning style dimension. Consequently, it is only needed to take into account the…

  11. Decontamination of combustion gases in fluidized bed incinerators

    DOEpatents

    Leon, Albert M.

    1982-01-01

    Sulfur-containing atmospheric pollutants are effectively removed from exit gas streams produced in a fluidized bed combustion system by providing a fluidized bed of particulate material, i.e. limestone and/or dolomite wherein a concentration gradient is maintained in the vertical direction. Countercurrent contacting between upwardly directed sulfur containing combustion gases and descending sorbent particulate material creates a concentration gradient across the vertical extent of the bed characterized in progressively decreasing concentration of sulfur, sulfur dioxide and like contaminants upwardly and decreasing concentration of e.g. calcium oxide, downwardly. In this manner, gases having progressively decreasing sulfur contents contact correspondingly atmospheres having progressively increasing concentrations of calcium oxide thus assuring optimum sulfur removal.

  12. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  13. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  14. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  15. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of gases, liquids, and solids.

    PubMed

    Theuer, Michael; Harsha, Srikantaiah Sree; Molter, Daniel; Torosyan, Garik; Beigang, René

    2011-10-24

    The techniques and methods employed in the spectroscopic characterization of gases, liquids, and solids in the terahertz frequency range are reviewed. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is applied to address a broadband frequency range between 100 GHz and 5 THz with a sub-10 GHz frequency resolution. The unique spectral absorption features measured can be efficiently used in material identification and sensing. Possibilities and limitations of fundamental and industrial applications are discussed. PMID:21735510

  16. Cooling Atomic Gases With Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Yang, Shuxiang; Rousseau, Valéry; Jarrell, Mark; Moreno, Juana; Hulet, Randall G.; Scalettar, Richard T.

    2015-12-01

    Cold atomic gases have proven capable of emulating a number of fundamental condensed matter phenomena including Bose-Einstein condensation, the Mott transition, Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov pairing, and the quantum Hall effect. Cooling to a low enough temperature to explore magnetism and exotic superconductivity in lattices of fermionic atoms remains a challenge. We propose a method to produce a low temperature gas by preparing it in a disordered potential and following a constant entropy trajectory to deliver the gas into a nondisordered state which exhibits these incompletely understood phases. We show, using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that we can approach the Néel temperature of the three-dimensional Hubbard model for experimentally achievable parameters. Recent experimental estimates suggest the randomness required lies in a regime where atom transport and equilibration are still robust.

  17. Modeling photoelectron currents through gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, A. F. G.

    2007-06-01

    We reexamine the processes involved in a current flowing from a photocathode, through a gas, to a collector at a positive voltage. The current is determined by the electrons being scattered back to the photocathode as well as by the transport through the gas. We find that the current, as a function of gas pressure and applied electric field, is reasonably well described by Thomson’s equation if the velocities of the electrons are correctly defined and the measured scattering cross sections are used. At low pressures, the relevant electron energy is the emitted energy from the photocathode, as suggested by Loeb [The Kinetic Theory of Gases (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1934), p. 625]. At high pressures, the electrons that return to the photocathode are thermalized; while in the gas, the electrons have an extra energy from the electric field.

  18. Cooling Atomic Gases With Disorder.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Yang, Shuxiang; Rousseau, Valéry; Jarrell, Mark; Moreno, Juana; Hulet, Randall G; Scalettar, Richard T

    2015-12-11

    Cold atomic gases have proven capable of emulating a number of fundamental condensed matter phenomena including Bose-Einstein condensation, the Mott transition, Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov pairing, and the quantum Hall effect. Cooling to a low enough temperature to explore magnetism and exotic superconductivity in lattices of fermionic atoms remains a challenge. We propose a method to produce a low temperature gas by preparing it in a disordered potential and following a constant entropy trajectory to deliver the gas into a nondisordered state which exhibits these incompletely understood phases. We show, using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that we can approach the Néel temperature of the three-dimensional Hubbard model for experimentally achievable parameters. Recent experimental estimates suggest the randomness required lies in a regime where atom transport and equilibration are still robust. PMID:26705614

  19. APPARATUS FOR CATALYTICALLY COMBINING GASES

    DOEpatents

    Busey, H.M.

    1958-08-12

    A convection type recombiner is described for catalytically recombining hydrogen and oxygen which have been radiolytically decomposed in an aqueous homogeneous nuclear reactor. The device is so designed that the energy of recombination is used to circulate the gas mixture over the catalyst. The device consists of a vertical cylinder having baffles at its lower enda above these coarse screens having platinum and alumina pellets cemented thereon, and an annular passage for the return of recombined, condensed water to the reactor moderator system. This devicea having no moving parts, provides a simple and efficient means of removing the danger of accumulated hot radioactive, explosive gases, and restoring them to the moderator system for reuse.

  20. Continuous Processing With Mars Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde; Jennings, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Current Martian missions call for the production of oxygen for breathing, and fuel and oxygen for propulsion to be produced from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Adsorption and freezing are the two methods considered for capturing CO2 from the atmosphere. However, the nitrogen (N2) and argon (Ar), which make up less than 5 percent of the atmosphere, cause difficulties with both of these processes by blocking the CO2. This results in the capture process rapidly changing from a pressure driven process to a diffusion controlled process. To increase the CO2 capture rates, some type of mechanical pump is usually proposed to remove the N2 and Ar. The N2 and Ar are useful and have been proposed for blanketing and pressurizing fuel tanks and as buffer gas for breathing air for manned missions. Separation of the Martian gases with the required purity can be accomplished with a combination of membranes. These membrane systems do not require a high feed pressure and provide suitable separation. Therefore, by use of the appropriate membrane combination with the Martian atmosphere supplied by a compressor a continuous Supply Of CO2 for fuel and oxygen production can be supplied. This phase of our program has focused on the selection of the membrane system. Since permeation data for membranes did not exist for Martian atmospheric pressures and temperatures, this information had to be compiled. The general trend as the temperature was lowered was for the membranes to become more selective. In addition, the relative permeation rates between the three gases changed with temperature. The end result was to provide design parameters that could be used to separate CO2 from N2 and Ar. This paper will present the membrane data, provide the design requirements for a compressor, and compare the results with adsorption and freezer methods.

  1. Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  2. Bacterial clearance is improved in septic mice by platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) administration.

    PubMed

    Teixeira-da-Cunha, Mariana G A; Gomes, Rachel N; Roehrs, Nathassia; Bozza, Fernando A; Prescott, Stephen M; Stafforini, Diana; Zimmerman, Guy A; Bozza, Patricia T; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C

    2013-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that dysregulation of the host inflammatory response to infectious agents is central to the mortality of patients with sepsis. Strategies to block inflammatory mediators such as PAF have been investigated as adjuvant therapies for sepsis. PAF-AH, the enzyme responsible for PAF degradation, showed positive results in pre-clinical studies and phase II clinical trials, but the results of a phase III study were disappointing. In this study, we investigated the potential protective mechanism of PAF-AH in sepsis using the murine model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Treatment with rPAF-AH increased peritoneal fluid levels of the anti-inflammatory mediators MCP-1/CCL2 after CLP. The numbers of bacteria (CFU) in the peritoneal cavity were decreased in the rPAF-AH-treated group, indicating more efficient bacterial clearance after rPAF-AH treatment. Interestingly, we observed increased levels of nitric oxide (NO) after PAF-AH administration, and rPAF-AH treatment did not decrease CFU numbers either in iNOS-deficient mice or in CCR2-deficient mice. We concluded that administration of exogenous rPAF-AH reduced inflammatory injury, altered cytokine levels and favored bacterial clearance with a clear impact on mortality through modulation of MCP-1/CCL2 and NO levels in a clinically relevant sepsis model. PMID:24069320

  3. Arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation in airway epithelial cells induces MUC5AC via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Takahito; Uchi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Gaku; Gondo, Hisaki; Moroi, Yoichi; Furue, Masutaka

    2011-02-01

    The dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in cigarette smoke regulate various immunological responses via the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR). These environmental toxicants are known to cause bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung cancer. Recent studies have demonstrated that AhR activation upregulates the expression of mucin 5AC, oligomeric mucus/gel-forming (MUC5AC) in the airway epithelial cell line. However, the mechanism for the production of mucin has not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the role and pathway of AhR in airway epithelial cells by using selective agonists and antagonists. After stimulation with or without benzopyrene (B[a]P), an AhR agonist, MUC5AC expression was measured by real-time RT-PCR. The mechanism of AhR-induced MUC5AC expression in airway epithelial cells was studied in terms of the production of cytokine and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment with B[a]P increased ROS generation in NCI-H₂₉₂ cells. Furthermore, B[a]P-induced MUC5AC upregulation and mucin production were inhibited by AhR siRNA or the use of an antioxidative agent. These results suggest that the AhR-induced increase of mucin production is partially mediated by ROS generation. An antioxidant therapy approach may help to cure AhR-induced mucus hypersecretory diseases. PMID:20709182

  4. Structural evidence for Nap1-dependent H2A-H2B deposition and nucleosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Gurrieri, Carmen; Larabi, Amédé; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Patel, Nisha A; Yen, Kuangyu; Reja, Rohit; Ebong, Ima-O; Schoehn, Guy; Robinson, Carol V; Pugh, B Franklin; Panne, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Nap1 is a histone chaperone involved in the nuclear import of H2A-H2B and nucleosome assembly. Here, we report the crystal structure of Nap1 bound to H2A-H2B together with in vitro and in vivo functional studies that elucidate the principles underlying Nap1-mediated H2A-H2B chaperoning and nucleosome assembly. A Nap1 dimer provides an acidic binding surface and asymmetrically engages a single H2A-H2B heterodimer. Oligomerization of the Nap1-H2A-H2B complex results in burial of surfaces required for deposition of H2A-H2B into nucleosomes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-exonuclease (ChIP-exo) analysis shows that Nap1 is required for H2A-H2B deposition across the genome. Mutants that interfere with Nap1 oligomerization exhibit severe nucleosome assembly defects showing that oligomerization is essential for the chaperone function. These findings establish the molecular basis for Nap1-mediated H2A-H2B deposition and nucleosome assembly. PMID:27225933

  5. A Comparison of AH6 AG Scores and GCE Examinations Taken after an Interval of One Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heim, A. W.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    GCE O-and A-level examinations were correlated with the AH6 AG test scores obtained a year earlier. Results suggest that the predictive value of AH6 for success in individual subjects is almost as high as when the examinations and testing were taken within a few weeks of each other. (Authors/CB)

  6. Role of the Ah locus in suppression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity by halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PCBs and TCDD): Structure-activity relationships and effects in C57Bl/6 mice congenic at the Ah locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kerkvliet, N.I.; Baecher-Steppan, L.; Smith, B.B.; Youngberg, J.A.; Henderson, M.C.; Buhler, D.R. )

    1990-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) following allogeneic tumor challenge is suppressed in Ah-responsive C57Bl/6 mice treated with a single oral dose of the toxic, Ah receptor-binding 3,4,5,3',4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (HxCB). The present studies have examined the specific role of the Ah receptor in this immunotoxic response by utilizing HxCB isomers of known, varied affinity for the Ah receptor as well as by comparing effects of high-affinity Ah receptor ligands (3,4,5,3',4',5'-HxCB and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)) on the CTL response of mice that differ only at the Ah locus, that is, Ah-responsive (Ahbb) and Ah-nonresponsive (Ahdd) congenic C57Bl/6 mice. Correlative changes in thymic weight, serum corticosterone (CS) levels, and spleen cellularity were also measured. The potency of HxCB congeners (3,4,5,3',4',5'-; 2,3,4,5,3',4'-; 2,4,5,2',4',5'-) and 2,3,7,8-TCDD to suppress the CTL response, to reduce spleen cellularity, to cause thymic atrophy, and to elevate serum CS levels was directly correlated with the binding affinity of the congener for the Ah receptor. Furthermore, these parameters of immunotoxicity in Ahdd C57Bl/6 mice were significantly more resistant to alterations induced by either 3,4,5,3',4',5'-HxCB or 2,3,7,8-TCDD as compared to Ahbb C57Bl/6 mice. These results strongly support an Ah receptor-dependent immunotoxic mechanism in suppression of the CTL response following acute exposure to halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons.

  7. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection in giant pandas, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Desheng; Zhu, Ling; Cui, Hengmin; Ling, Shanshan; Fan, Shengtao; Yu, Zhijun; Zhou, Yuancheng; Wang, Tiecheng; Qian, Jun; Xia, Xianzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Gao, Yuwei; Wang, Chengdong

    2014-03-01

    We confirmed infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in giant pandas in China during 2009 by using virus isolation and serologic analysis methods. This finding extends the host range of influenza viruses and indicates a need for increased surveillance for and control of influenza viruses among giant pandas. PMID:24565026

  8. Molecular and Chemical Analysis of the Lipopolysaccharide from Aeromonas hydrophila Strain AH-1 (Serotype O11)

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Canals, Rocío; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Tomás, Juan M.

    2015-01-01

    A group of virulent Aeromonas hydrophila, A. sobria, and A. veronii biovar sobria strains isolated from humans and fish have been described; these strains classified to serotype O11 are serologically related by their lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen (O-polysaccharide), and the presence of an S-layer consisting of multiple copies of a crystalline surface array protein with a molecular weight of 52 kDa in the form of a crystalline surface array which lies peripheral to the cell wall. A. hydrophila strain AH-1 is one of them. We isolated the LPS from this strain and determined the structure of the O-polysaccharide, which was similar to that previously described for another strain of serotype O11. The genetics of the O11-antigen showed the genes (wbO11 cluster) in two sections separated by genes involved in biosynthesis and assembly of the S-layer. The O11-antigen LPS is an example of an ABC-2-transporter-dependent pathway for O-antigen heteropolysaccharide (disaccharide) assembly. The genes involved in the biosynthesis of the LPS core (waaO11 cluster) were also identified in three different chromosome regions being nearly identical to the ones described for A. hydrophila AH-3 (serotype O34). The genetic data and preliminary chemical analysis indicated that the LPS core for strain AH-1 is identical to the one for strain AH-3. PMID:25874921

  9. Stress analysis of 27% scale model of AH-64 main rotor hub

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    Stress analysis of an AH-64 27% scale model rotor hub was performed. Component loads and stresses were calculated based upon blade root loads and motions. The static and fatigue analysis indicates positive margins of safety in all components checked. Using the format developed here, the hub can be stress checked for future application.

  10. An in vitro rainbow trout cell bioassay for AhR-mediated toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, C.A.; Giesy, J.P.; Denison, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicity of PCBs, dioxins, and other halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHS) at environmentally relevant concentrations is in large part mediated through the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Bioassays which measure the activity of genes regulated by the receptor provide an integrative measure of the total AhR-mediated toxicity of a sample. The authors have recently developed and characterized a bioassay using recombinant rainbow trout hepatoma cells containing the firefly luciferase reporter gene under the regulation of the AhR. The cell line is designated Remodulated Lightning Trout (RLT). The RLT bioassay is relevant to fish, and is useful as a rapid screening device, a guide for chemical analysis, and a tool for studies of the AhR mechanism. The responses of the RLT cell line to various PCB congeners are similar to responses of in vivo fish bioassays. The authors now report on the responses of the bioassay to dioxins, dibenzofurans, and other related compounds as compared to in vivo fish bioassays. The authors will also report on the utility of the RLT bioassay in measuring the total TEQ of complex mixtures.

  11. PRODUCTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES DIRECTED AGAINST THE AH RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies that are specific for the N-terminal peptide sequence of the murine Ah receptor were isolated. hese antibodies bind with high specificity to the Al receptor on protein blots of Hepa 1c1c7 cytosol. hree IgG1 antibodies (Rpt1, 2, and 3...

  12. Hemagglutinin Receptor Binding of a Human Isolate of Influenza A(H10N8) Virus

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Mena; Wohlbold, Teddy J.; Ermler, Megan E.; Hirsh, Ariana; Runstadler, Jonathan A.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Three cases of influenza A(H10N8) virus infection in humans have been reported; 2 of these infected persons died. Characterization of the receptor binding pattern of H10 hemagglutinin from avian and human isolates showed that both interact weakly with human-like receptors and maintain strong affinity for avian-like receptors. PMID:26079843

  13. Human Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infection Associated with Poultry Farm, Northeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ming; Huang, Biao; Wang, Ao; Deng, Liquan; Wu, Donglin; Lu, Xinrong; Zhao, Qinglong; Xu, Shuang; Havers, Fiona; Wang, Yanhui; Wu, Jing; Yin, Yuan; Sun, Bingxin; Yao, Jianyi

    2014-01-01

    We report on a case of human infection with influenza A(H7N9) virus in Jilin Province in northeastern China. This case was associated with a poultry farm rather than a live bird market, which may point to a new focus for public health surveillance and interventions in this evolving outbreak. PMID:25340624

  14. Genome Sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila Strain AH-3 (Serotype O34).

    PubMed

    Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Tomás, Juan M; Merino, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is an emerging pathogen of poikilothermic animals, from fish to mammals, including humans. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of the A. hydrophila AH-3 strain, isolated from a fish farm goldfish septicemia outbreak in Spain, with a characterized polar and lateral flagellum glycosylation pattern. PMID:27587828

  15. Whole-Genome Sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila Strain AH-1 (Serotype O11).

    PubMed

    Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Tomás, Juan M; Merino, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is an emerging pathogen of aquatic and terrestrial animals, including humans. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of the septicemic A. hydrophila AH-1 strain, belonging to the serotype O11, and the first mesophilic Aeromonas with surface layer (S-layer) to be sequenced. PMID:27587829

  16. Genome Sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila Strain AH-3 (Serotype O34)

    PubMed Central

    Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Tomás, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is an emerging pathogen of poikilothermic animals, from fish to mammals, including humans. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of the A. hydrophila AH-3 strain, isolated from a fish farm goldfish septicemia outbreak in Spain, with a characterized polar and lateral flagellum glycosylation pattern. PMID:27587828

  17. Binding of the Ah receptor to receptor binding factors in chromatin.

    PubMed

    Dunn, R T; Ruh, T S; Ruh, M F

    1993-03-01

    Dioxin induces biological responses through interaction with a specific intracellular receptor, the Ah receptor, and the subsequent interaction of the Ah receptor with chromatin. We report the binding of the Ah receptor, partially purified from rabbit liver, to receptor binding factors in chromatin. Rabbit liver chromatin proteins (CP) were isolated by adsorption of chromatin to hydroxylapatite followed by sequential extraction with 1-8 M GdnHCl. To assay for receptor binding a portion of each CP fraction was reconstituted to rabbit double-stranded DNA using a reverse gradient dialysis of 7.5 to 0 M GdnHCl. These reconstituted nucleoacidic proteins were then examined for binding to [3H]-2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin ([3H]TCDD)-receptor complexes by the streptomycin filter assay. Prior to the binding assay, [3H]TCDD-receptor complexes were partially purified by step elution from DEAE-cellulose columns. CP fractions 2, 5, and 7 were found to bind to the Ah receptor with high affinity. Scatchard analysis yielded Kd values in the nanomolar range. Competition with 2-fold excess unlabeled TCDD-receptor complexes was demonstrated, and binding was reduced markedly when the receptor was prepared in the presence of 10 mM molybdate. Such chromatin receptor binding factors (RBFs) may participate in the interaction of receptor with specific DNA sequences resulting in modulation of specific gene expression. PMID:8384852

  18. Influenza A(H10N7) Virus in Dead Harbor Seals, Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Mette S.; Holm, Elisabeth; Hjulsager, Charlotte K.; Chriél, Mariann; Pedersen, Karl; Andresen, Lars O.; Abildstrøm, Morten; Jensen, Trine H.; Larsen, Lars E.

    2015-01-01

    Since April 2014, an outbreak of influenza in harbor seals has been ongoing in northern Europe. In Denmark during June–August, 152 harbor seals on the island of Anholt were found dead from severe pneumonia. We detected influenza A(H10N7) virus in 2 of 4 seals examined. PMID:25811098

  19. Alpneumines A-H, new anti-melanogenic indole alkaloids from Alstonia pneumatophora.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Koichiro; Hirasawa, Yusuke; Hosoya, Takahiro; Hoe, Teh Chin; Chan, Kit-Lam; Morita, Hiroshi

    2010-06-15

    Eight new indole alkaloids, alpneumines A-H (1-8) were isolated from the Malaysian Alstonia pneumatophora (Apocynaceae) and their structures were determined by MS and 2D NMR spectroscopic methods. Alpneumines E and G (5 and 7), vincamine, and apovincamine showed anti-melanogenesis in B16 mouse melanoma cells. PMID:20576577

  20. Research Updates: Experimental Evaluation of 2009 Pandemic A/H1N1 in Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: In March 2009, a novel pandemic A/H1N1 emerged in the human population in North America (2). The gene constellation of the emerging virus was demonstrated to be a combination of genes from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages that had never before be...

  1. AH-64 monocular HMD visual assessment during urban combat in operation Iraqi freedom (OIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rash, Clarence E.; Heinecke, J. Kevin; Hiatt, Keith L.

    2007-04-01

    In the first two decades of the fielding of the monocular helmet-mounted display (HMD) flown in the U.S. Army's AH-64 Apache attack helicopter, a number of studies reported a significant incidence of physical visual symptoms and illusions. In 2004, a similar study looked at the presence of these complaints during the first combat phase of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). The study found a general trend of a reduced frequency of complaints associated with the AH-64's HMD. A follow-up study has been conducted to validate this downward trend and to investigate the impact the shift in mission role of the AH-64 from one of open-field tank hunter to one of close-quarter urban combat. Thirty-eight AH-64D pilots were asked to complete a survey questionnaire that solicited data about the presence and frequency of the visual complaints reported in previous studies. Data for physical visual symptoms and static and dynamic illusions were found not to be significantly different from frequencies reported in the previous OIF study. Both OIF studies reported headache as the prominent physical complaint with height judgment and slope estimation as the most frequently reported static illusions and with undetected drift and faulty closure judgment as the two most frequently reported dynamic illusions.

  2. Hemagglutinin Receptor Binding of a Human Isolate of Influenza A(H10N8) Virus.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Irene; Mansour, Mena; Wohlbold, Teddy J; Ermler, Megan E; Hirsh, Ariana; Runstadler, Jonathan A; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Krammer, Florian

    2015-07-01

    Three cases of influenza A(H10N8) virus infection in humans have been reported; 2 of these infected persons died. Characterization of the receptor binding pattern of H10 hemagglutinin from avian and human isolates showed that both interact weakly with human-like receptors and maintain strong affinity for avian-like receptors. PMID:26079843

  3. A Challenge for Social Studies Educators: Teaching about Islam, "Jihad," and "Shari'ah" Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, James R.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author investigates the controversial curricular and instructional aspects of teaching about Islam in social studies courses. Specifically, the author discusses pedagogically sound approaches to teaching about "jihad" and "Shari'ah" law, two of the most important and controversial concepts in Islam that often generate intense…

  4. Whole-Genome Sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila Strain AH-1 (Serotype O11)

    PubMed Central

    Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Tomás, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is an emerging pathogen of aquatic and terrestrial animals, including humans. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of the septicemic A. hydrophila AH-1 strain, belonging to the serotype O11, and the first mesophilic Aeromonas with surface layer (S-layer) to be sequenced. PMID:27587829

  5. Screening a mouse liver gene expression compendium identifies modulators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).

    PubMed

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Thomas, Russell S; Applegate, Dawn; Gonzalez, Frank J; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Klaassen, Curtis D; Corton, J Christopher

    2015-10-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), dioxin-like compounds (DLC) as well as some drugs and endogenous tryptophan metabolites. Short-term activation of AhR can lead to hepatocellular steatosis, and chronic activation can lead to liver cancer in mice and rats. Analytical approaches were developed to identify biosets in a genomic database in which AhR activity was altered. A set of 63 genes was identified (the AhR gene expression biomarker) that was dependent on AhR for regulation after exposure to TCDD or benzo[a]pyrene and includes the known AhR targets Cyp1a1 and Cyp1b1. A fold-change rank-based test (Running Fisher's test; p-value ≤ 10(-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the AhR biomarker and a test set of 37 and 41 biosets positive or negative, respectively for AhR activation. The test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 95%. The rank-based test was used to identify factors that activate or suppress AhR in an annotated mouse liver/mouse primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ∼ 1850 comparisons. In addition to the expected activation of AhR by TCDD and DLC, AhR was activated by AP20189 and phenformin. AhR was suppressed by phenobarbital and 1,4-Bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) in a constitutive activated receptor (CAR)-dependent manner and pregnenolone-16α-carbonitrile in a pregnane X receptor (PXR)-dependent manner. Inactivation of individual genes in nullizygous models led to AhR activation (Pxr, Ghrhr, Taf10) or suppression (Ahr, Ilst6st, Hnf1a). This study describes a novel screening strategy for identifying factors in mouse liver that perturb AhR in a gene expression compendium. PMID:26215100

  6. High Rate of A(H1N1)pdm09 Infections among Rural Thai Villagers, 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Khuntirat, Benjawan; Yoon, In-Kyu; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Krueger, Whitney S.; Supawat, Krongkaew; Blair, Patrick J.; Putnam, Shannon D.; Gibbons, Robert V.; Buddhari, Darunee; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Heil, Gary L.; Friary, John A.; Gray, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 emerged in Thailand in 2009. A prospective longitudinal adult cohort and household transmission study of influenza-like illness (ILI) was ongoing in rural Thailand at the time of emergence. Symptomatic and subclinical A(H1N1)pdm09 infection rates in the cohort and among household members were evaluated. Methods A cohort of 800 Thai adults underwent active community-based surveillance for ILI from 2008–2010. Acute respiratory samples from ILI episodes were tested for A(H1N1)pdm09 by qRT-PCR; acute and 60-day convalescent blood samples were tested by A(H1N1)pdm09 hemagglutination inhibition assay (HI). Enrollment, 12-month and 24-month follow-up blood samples were tested for A(H1N1)pdm09 seroconversion by HI. Household members of influenza A-infected cohort subjects with ILI were enrolled in household transmission investigations in which day 0 and 60 blood samples and acute respiratory samples were tested by either qRT-PCR or HI for A(H1N1)pdm09. Seroconversion between annual blood samples without A(H1N1)pdm09-positive ILI was considered as subclinical infection. Results The 2-yr cumulative incidence of A(H1N1)pdm09 infection in the cohort in 2009/2010 was 10.8% (84/781) with an annual incidence of 1.2% in 2009 and 9.7% in 2010; 83.3% of infections were subclinical (50% in 2009 and 85.9% in 2010). The 2-yr cumulative incidence was lowest (5%) in adults born ≤1957. The A(H1N1)pdm09 secondary attack rate among household contacts was 47.2% (17/36); 47.1% of these infections were subclinical. The highest A(H1N1)pdm09 secondary attack rate among household contacts (70.6%, 12/17) occurred among children born between 1990 and 2003. Conclusion Subclinical A(H1N1)pdm09 infections in Thai adults occurred frequently and accounted for a greater proportion of all A(H1N1)pdm09 infections than previously estimated. The role of subclinical infections in A(H1N1)pdm09 transmission has important implications in formulating strategies to

  7. Ultracold Quantum Gases in Hexagonal Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengstock, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Hexagonal structures occur in a vast variety of systems, ranging from honeycombs of bees in life sciences to carbon nanotubes in material sciences. The latter, in particular its unfolded two-dimensional layer -- Graphene -- has rapidly grown to one of the most discussed topics in condensed-matter physics. Not only does it show proximity to various carbon-based materials but also exceptional properties owing to its unusual energy spectrum. In quantum optics, ultracold quantum gases confined in periodic light fields have shown to be very general and versatile instruments to mimic solid state systems. However, so far nearly all experiments were performed in cubic lattice geometries only. Here we report on the first experimental realization of ultracold quantum gases in a state-dependent, two-dimensional, Graphene-like optical lattice with hexagonal symmetry. The lattice is realized via a spin-dependent optical lattice structure with alternating σ^+ and σ^- -sites and thus constitutes a so called `magnetic'-lattice with `antiferromagnetic'-structure. Atoms with different spin orientation can be loaded to specific lattice sites or -- depending on the parameters -- to the whole lattice. As a consequence e.g. superpositions of a superfluid spin component with a different spin component in the Mott-insulating phase can be realized as well as spin-dependent transport properties, disorder etc. After preparing an antiferromagnetically ordered state we e.g. measure sustainable changes of the transport properties of the atoms. This manifests in a significant reduction of the tunneling as compared to a single-component system. We attribute this observation to a partial tunneling blockade for one spin component induced by population in another spin component localized at alternating lattice sites. Within a Gutzwiller-Ansatz we calculate the phase diagrams for the mixed spin-states and find very good agreement with our experimental results. Moreover, by state-resolved recording

  8. AH Cam: A metal-rich RR Lyrae star with the shortest known Blazhko period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Horace A.; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Lee, Kevin M.; Williams, Jeffrey; Silbermann, N. A.; Bolte, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of 746 new V-band observations of the RR Lyrae star AH Cam obtained during 1989 - 1992 clearly show that its light curve cannot be described by a single period. In fact, at first glance, the Fourier spectrum of the photometry resembles that of a double-mode pulsator, with peaks at a fundamental period of 0.3686 d and an apparent secondary period of 0.2628 d. Nevertheless, the dual-mode solution is a poor fit to the data. Rather, we believe that AH Cam is a single-mode RR Lyrae star undergoing the Blazhko effect: periodic modulation of the amplitude and shape of its light curve. What was originally taken to be the period of the second mode is instead the 1-cycle/d alias of a modulation sidelobe in the Fourier spectrum. The data are well described by a modulation period of just under 11 d, which is the shortest Blazhko period reported to date in the literature and confirms the earlier suggestion by Goranskii. A low-resolution spectrum of AH Cam indicates that it is relatively metal rich, with delta-S less than or = 2. Its high metallicity and short modulation period may provide a critical test of at least one theory for the Blazhko effect. Moskalik's internal resonance model makes specific predictions of the growth rate of the fundamental model vs fundamental period. AH Cam falls outside the regime of other known Blazhko variables and resonance model predictions, but these are appropriate for metal-poor RR Lyrae stars. If the theory matches the behavior of AH Cam for a metal-rich stellar model, this would bolster the resonance hypothesis.

  9. Facilitating Conceptual Change in Gases Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Pinar Seda; Kaya, Ebru; Geban, Omer

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of conceptual change oriented instruction (CCOI) over traditionally designed chemistry instruction (TDCI) on overcoming 10th grade students' misconceptions on gases concepts. In addition, the effect of gender difference on students' understanding of gases concepts was investigated. The…

  10. 40 CFR 1065.750 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 1065.750 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... with calibration gases. Use gases with contamination no higher than the highest of the following values in the gas cylinder or at the outlet of a zero-gas generator: (i) 2% contamination, measured...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.750 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 1065.750 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... with calibration gases. Use gases with contamination no higher than the highest of the following values in the gas cylinder or at the outlet of a zero-gas generator: (i) 2% contamination, measured...

  12. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  13. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  14. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  15. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  16. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  17. 40 CFR 90.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 90.312 Section 90.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.312 Analytical gases. (a)...

  18. 40 CFR 89.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of all calibration gases must not be exceeded. The expiration... ≤ 31 ppm C, ≤ 400 ppm CO) (4) Purified synthetic air (Contamination ≤ 1 ppm C, ≤ 1 ppm CO, ≤ 400 ppm... having the following chemical compositions shall be available: (i) C3H8 and purified synthetic air ;...

  19. 40 CFR 89.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Provisions § 89.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of all calibration gases must not be exceeded. The...) (Contamination ≤ 31 ppm C, ≤ 400 ppm CO) (4) Purified synthetic air (Contamination ≤ 1 ppm C, ≤ 1 ppm CO, ≤ 400... having the following chemical compositions shall be available: (i) C3H8 and purified synthetic air ;...

  20. 40 CFR 89.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Provisions § 89.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of all calibration gases must not be exceeded. The...) (Contamination ≤ 31 ppm C, ≤ 400 ppm CO) (4) Purified synthetic air (Contamination ≤ 1 ppm C, ≤ 1 ppm CO, ≤ 400... having the following chemical compositions shall be available: (i) C3H8 and purified synthetic air ;...

  1. 40 CFR 91.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 91.312 Section 91.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 91.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a...

  2. 40 CFR 91.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) (Oxygen content between 18-21 percent vol.) (c) Calibration and span gases. (1) Calibration gas values are... purified nitrogen. Note: For the HFID or FID, the manufacturer may choose to use as a diluent span gas and... calibration and span gases. If a manufacturer chooses to use C3 H8 and purified nitrogen for the...

  3. Analyzing Gases From Decomposing Electrical Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffett, Gary; Shelley, Timothy J.; Morelli, John J.

    1995-01-01

    Test fixture holds insulated wire and traps gases emitted by heating of wire. Used with gas chromatograph and/or mass spectrometer, to analyze gases emitted by insulation on wire when wire heated with controlled current in controlled atmosphere to simulate pyrolysis, combustion, and arc tracking. Small, inexpensive, easily maintained, and relatively nonreactive to organic compounds produced during breakdown of insulation.

  4. Codes and regulations governing handling, storage, use and release of toxic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolmen, Richard A.

    1988-07-01

    To control the hazards associated with the handling, storage, use and release of toxic gases in the manufacturing process, a number of codes and regulations have been promulgated. At the forefront of these regulations are the Uniform Fire Code (UFC), Article 51, ``Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities Using Hazardous Production Materials,'' 1985 Edition; UFC Article 80, ``Hazardous Materials,'' 1987 Revision; and the Toxic Gas Model Ordinance, California Assembly Bill 1021. Article 51 of the UFC is specific for semiconductor wafer fabrication facilities and regulates the storage, handling and use of hazardous production materials. Article 80 of the UFC has a much broader scope and incorporates requirements for prevention, control and mitigation of dangerous conditions related to hazardous materials. As it applies to toxic gases, Article 80 incorporates Article 51 requirements and in addition requires treatment systems to reduce discharge concentrations and mitigate unauthorized releases of toxic gases. The Toxic Gas Model Ordinance is specific to toxic gases and regulates storage, handling and use of toxic gases at new and existing facilities incorporating monitoring and treatment systems should an unauthorized release occur. This paper will focus on these regulations as they apply to toxic gases used by the semiconductor and photovoltaics industries.

  5. Facilitating Conceptual Change in Gases Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetin, Pinar Seda; Kaya, Ebru; Geban, Ömer

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of conceptual change oriented instruction (CCOI) over traditionally designed chemistry instruction (TDCI) on overcoming 10th grade students' misconceptions on gases concepts. In addition, the effect of gender difference on students' understanding of gases concepts was investigated. The subjects of this study consisted of 74 10th grade students from two chemistry classes. One of the classes was assigned as experimental group and the other group was assigned as control group. The experimental group was instructed with CCOI and the control group was instructed by TDCI. Gases Concept Test (GCT) was administered to both groups as pre- and post-tests to measure the students' conceptual understanding. The results showed that students in the experimental group got higher average scores from Gases Concept Test. Also, a significant difference was found between the performance of females and that of males in terms of understanding gases concepts in favor of males.

  6. Research of medical gases in Poland

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Research of medical gases is well established in Poland and has been marked with the foundation of several professional societies. Numerous academic centers including those dealing with hyperbaric and diving medicine conduct studies of medical gases, in vast majority supported with intramural funds. In general, Polish research of medical gases is very much clinical in nature, covering new applications and safety of medical gases in medicine; on the other hand there are several academic centers pursuing preclinical studies, and elaborating basic theories of gas physiology and mathematical modeling of gas exchange. What dominates is research dealing with oxygen and ozone as well as studies of anesthetic gases and their applications. Finally, several research directions involving noble gas, hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide for cell protection, only begin to gain recognition of basic scientists and clinicians. However, further developments require more monetary spending on research and clinical testing as well as formation of new collective bodies for coordinating efforts in this matter. PMID:23916016

  7. Isotopic composition of gases from mud volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Valysaev, B.M.; Erokhin, V.E.; Grinchenko, Y.I.; Prokhorov, V.S.; Titkov, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    A study has been made of the isotopic composition of the carbon in methane and carbon dioxide, as well as hydrogen in the methane, in the gases of mud volcanoes, for all main mud volcano areas in the USSR. The isotopic composition of carbon and hydrogen in methane shows that the gases resemble those of oil and gas deposits, while carbon dioxide of these volcanoes has a heavier isotopic composition with a greater presence of ''ultraheavy'' carbon dioxide. By the chemical and isotopic composition of gases, Azerbaidzhan and South Sakhalin types of mud volcano gases have been identified, as well as Bulganak subtypes and Akhtala and Kobystan varieties. Correlations are seen between the isotopic composition of gases and the geological build of mud volcano areas.

  8. 40 CFR 86.514-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.514-78 Section 86... Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.514-78 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases for... diluent. (2) Gases for the THC analyzer shall be: (i) Single blends of propane using air as the...

  9. 40 CFR 86.514-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.514-78 Section 86... Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.514-78 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases for... diluent. (2) Gases for the THC analyzer shall be: (i) Single blends of propane using air as the...

  10. 40 CFR 86.514-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.514-78 Section 86... Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.514-78 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases for... diluent. (2) Gases for the THC analyzer shall be: (i) Single blends of propane using air as the...

  11. Study of transient jet gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, Aaron Jaan

    1988-03-01

    This work involves the use of flash lamp schlieren and the development of flash lamp light slicing (planar imaging) and their employment in visualization of transient gas jets discharging into the atmosphere and the mixing that ensues. Details of the flash lamp light slicing system design are provided. Visualization of flows from a pulsed valve discharge system and a shock tube open at the downstream end of the driven section are used to simulate real discharges. Gas flow Mach numbers for discharges of air into the atmosphere range to about 0.4. Axial light slicing images show development of the starting jets, including the formation of the starting vortex and coherent structures that form along the jet shaft. Transverse light slicing images reveal the development of scallops and cusps inside the head of the jet. Voids in the jet were observed at about 4 to 6 diameters from the exit plane. This may imply that ambient and jet gases differentiate at some points downstream. These features suggest cyclic development of jet features. The results can also be used to validate and calibrate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) computer codes used to predict the behavior of fluids under varying initial and boundary conditions.

  12. Cooling Atomic Gases With Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalettar, Richard

    Cold atomic gases have proven capable of emulating a number of fundamental condensed matter phenomena including Bose-Einstein condensation, the Mott transition, Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov pairing and the quantum Hall effect. Cooling to a low enough temperature to explore magnetism and exotic superconductivity in lattices of fermionic atoms remains a challenge. We propose a method to produce a low temperature gas by preparing it in a disordered potential and following a constant entropy trajectory to deliver the gas into a non-disordered state which exhibits these incompletely understood phases. We show, using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that we can approach the Neél temperature of the three-dimensional Hubbard model for experimentally achievable parameters. Recent experimental estimates suggest the randomness required lies in a regime where atom transport and equilibration are still robust. Thereza Paiva, Ehsan Khatami, Shuxiang Yang, Valery Rousseau, Mark Jarrell, Juana Moreno, Randall G. Hulet, and Richard T. Scalettar, arXiv:1508.02613 This work was supported by the NNSA SSAA program.

  13. Atomtronics with Ultracold Bose Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Herwig

    Neutral atom systems can exhibit similar transport properties like solid state devices. For instance, a neutral atom current is induced by a difference in chemical potential very much in the same way as a voltage drives an electric current. Employing Bose-Einstein condensed atomic gases allows observing superfluid transport phenomena, thus drawing connections to superconductivity. With help of light fields, the atomic current can additionally be guided in engineered potential landscapes in which one can also incorporate tunneling junctions. Eventually, the different components and elements can be integrated in atomtronic circuits which shed light on fundamental transport properties of many-body quantum systems. In this talk, I will present two fundamental atomtronic devices. The first is the observation of negative differential conductivity, which occurs at a multimode tunneling junction for ultracold atoms. The second is the appearance of a DC Josephson current in a biased tunneling junction, which features bistable transport characteristics. I will discuss the prospects of these basic elements for more complex atomtronic circuits.

  14. Greenhouse Trace Gases in Deadwood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, Kristofer; Bueno de Mesquita, Cliff; Oberle, Brad; Maynard, Dan; Bettigole, Charles; Crowther, Thomas; Duguid, Marlyse; Steven, Blaire; Zanne, Amy; Lapin, Marc; Ashton, Mark; Oliver, Chad; Lee, Xuhui; Bradford, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Deadwood, long recognized as playing an important role in carbon cycling in forest ecosystems, is more recently drawing attention for its potential role in the cycling of other greenhouse trace gases. We report data from four independent studies measuring internal gas concentrations in deadwood in in three Quercus dominated upland forest systems in the Northeastern and Central United States. Mean methane concentrations in deadwood were 23 times atmospheric levels, indicating a lower bound, mean radial wood surface area flux of ~6 x 10-4 μmol CH4 m-2 s-1. Site, decay class, diameter, and species were all highly significant predictors of methane abundance in deadwood, and log diameter and decay stage interacted as important controls limiting methane concentrations in the smallest and most decayed logs. Nitrous oxide concentrations were negatively correlated with methane and on average ~25% lower than ambient, indicating net consumption of nitrous oxide. These data suggest nonstructural carbohydrates fuel archaeal methanogens and confirm the potential for widespread in situ methanogenesis in both living and deadwood. Applying this understanding to estimate methane emissions from microbial activity in living trees implies a potential global flux of 65.6±12.0 Tg CH4 yr-1, more than 20 times greater than currently considered.

  15. Noble gases and the early history of the Earth: Inappropriate paradigms and assumptions inhibit research and communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, G. R.; Alexander, E. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The development of models as tracers of nobel gases through the Earth's evolution is discussed. A new set of paradigms embodying present knowledge was developed. Several important areas for future research are: (1) measurement of the elemental and isotopic compositions of the five noble gases in a large number of terrestrial materials, thus better defining the composition and distribution of terrestrial noble gases; (2) determinations of relative diffusive behavior, chemical behavior, and the distribution between solid and melt of noble gases under mantle conditions are urgently needed; (3) disequilibrium behavior in the nebula needs investigation, and the behavior of plasmas and possible cryotrapping on cold nebular solids are considered.

  16. Measuring non-condensable gases in steam

    SciTech Connect

    Doornmalen, J. P. C. M. van; Kopinga, K.

    2013-11-15

    In surgery, medical devices that are used should be sterilized. To obtain surface steam sterilization conditions, not only in the sterilizer chamber itself but also in the loads to be sterilized, the amount of non-condensable gases (NCGs), for instance air, should be very low. Even rather small fractions of NCGs (below 1 %) seriously hamper steam penetration in porous materials or devices with hollow channels (e.g., endoscopes). A recently developed instrument which might detect the presence of residual NCGs in a reliable and reproducible way is the 3M{sup TM} Electronic Test System (ETS). In this paper, a physical model is presented that describes the behavior of this instrument. This model has been validated by experiments in which known fractions of NCGs were introduced in a sterilizer chamber in which an ETS was placed. Despite several approximations made in the model, a good agreement is found between the model predictions and the experimental results. The basic principle of the ETS, measuring the heat transfer by condensation on a cooled surface, permits a very sensitive detection of NCGs in harsh environments like water vapor at high temperatures and pressures. Our model may serve to develop adapted and optimized versions of this instrument for use outside the field of sterilization, e.g., in heat exchangers based on steam condensation.

  17. Measuring non-condensable gases in steam.

    PubMed

    van Doornmalen, J P C M; Kopinga, K

    2013-11-01

    In surgery, medical devices that are used should be sterilized. To obtain surface steam sterilization conditions, not only in the sterilizer chamber itself but also in the loads to be sterilized, the amount of non-condensable gases (NCGs), for instance air, should be very low. Even rather small fractions of NCGs (below 1%) seriously hamper steam penetration in porous materials or devices with hollow channels (e.g., endoscopes). A recently developed instrument which might detect the presence of residual NCGs in a reliable and reproducible way is the 3M(TM) Electronic Test System (ETS). In this paper, a physical model is presented that describes the behavior of this instrument. This model has been validated by experiments in which known fractions of NCGs were introduced in a sterilizer chamber in which an ETS was placed. Despite several approximations made in the model, a good agreement is found between the model predictions and the experimental results. The basic principle of the ETS, measuring the heat transfer by condensation on a cooled surface, permits a very sensitive detection of NCGs in harsh environments like water vapor at high temperatures and pressures. Our model may serve to develop adapted and optimized versions of this instrument for use outside the field of sterilization, e.g., in heat exchangers based on steam condensation. PMID:24289436

  18. Measuring non-condensable gases in steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Doornmalen, J. P. C. M.; Kopinga, K.

    2013-11-01

    In surgery, medical devices that are used should be sterilized. To obtain surface steam sterilization conditions, not only in the sterilizer chamber itself but also in the loads to be sterilized, the amount of non-condensable gases (NCGs), for instance air, should be very low. Even rather small fractions of NCGs (below 1 %) seriously hamper steam penetration in porous materials or devices with hollow channels (e.g., endoscopes). A recently developed instrument which might detect the presence of residual NCGs in a reliable and reproducible way is the 3MTM Electronic Test System (ETS). In this paper, a physical model is presented that describes the behavior of this instrument. This model has been validated by experiments in which known fractions of NCGs were introduced in a sterilizer chamber in which an ETS was placed. Despite several approximations made in the model, a good agreement is found between the model predictions and the experimental results. The basic principle of the ETS, measuring the heat transfer by condensation on a cooled surface, permits a very sensitive detection of NCGs in harsh environments like water vapor at high temperatures and pressures. Our model may serve to develop adapted and optimized versions of this instrument for use outside the field of sterilization, e.g., in heat exchangers based on steam condensation.

  19. Apparatus for hot-gas desulfurization of fuel gases

    DOEpatents

    Bissett, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for removing sulfur values from a hot fuel gas stream in a fdized bed contactor containing particulate sorbent material by employing a riser tube regeneration arrangement. Sulfur-laden sorbent is continuously removed from the fluidized bed through a stand pipe to the riser tube and is rapidly regenerated in the riser tube during transport of the sorbent therethrough by employing an oxygen-containing sorbent regenerating gas stream. The riser tube extends from a location below the fluidized bed to an elevation above the fluidized bed where a gas-solid separating mechanism is utilized to separate the regenerated particulate sorbent from the regeneration gases and reaction gases so that the regenerated sorbent can be returned to the fluidized bed for reuse.

  20. Ablating the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in CD11c+ cells perturbs intestinal epithelium development and intestinal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chng, Song Hui; Kundu, Parag; Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Teo, Wei Ling; Kawajiri, Kaname; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Mak, Tak Wah; Pettersson, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Diet and microbiome derived indole derivatives are known to activate the ligand induced transcription factor, the Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR). While the current understanding of AhR biology has confirmed its role in mucosal lymphocytes, its function in intestinal antigen presenting cells (APCs) is poorly understood. Here, we report that Cre-mediated deletion of AhR in CD11c-expressing cells in C57/BL6 mice is associated with altered intestinal epithelial morphogenesis in vivo. Moreover, when co-cultured with AhR-deficient DCs ex vivo, intestinal organoids showed reduced SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 and increased Mucin 2 expression, which correlates with reduced Paneth cells and increased goblet cell differentiation, similar to the data obtained in vivo. Further, characterization of intestinal APC subsets, devoid of AhR, revealed an expression pattern associated with aberrant intrinsic Wnt pathway regulation. At a functional level, the loss of AhR in APCs resulted in a dysfunctional epithelial barrier, associated with a more aggressive chemically induced colitis compared to wild type animals. Our results are consistent with a model whereby the AhR signalling pathway may participate in the regulation of innate immunity through intestinal epithelium development and mucosal immunity. PMID:27068235

  1. Ablating the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in CD11c+ cells perturbs intestinal epithelium development and intestinal immunity.

    PubMed

    Chng, Song Hui; Kundu, Parag; Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Teo, Wei Ling; Kawajiri, Kaname; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Mak, Tak Wah; Pettersson, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Diet and microbiome derived indole derivatives are known to activate the ligand induced transcription factor, the Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR). While the current understanding of AhR biology has confirmed its role in mucosal lymphocytes, its function in intestinal antigen presenting cells (APCs) is poorly understood. Here, we report that Cre-mediated deletion of AhR in CD11c-expressing cells in C57/BL6 mice is associated with altered intestinal epithelial morphogenesis in vivo. Moreover, when co-cultured with AhR-deficient DCs ex vivo, intestinal organoids showed reduced SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 and increased Mucin 2 expression, which correlates with reduced Paneth cells and increased goblet cell differentiation, similar to the data obtained in vivo. Further, characterization of intestinal APC subsets, devoid of AhR, revealed an expression pattern associated with aberrant intrinsic Wnt pathway regulation. At a functional level, the loss of AhR in APCs resulted in a dysfunctional epithelial barrier, associated with a more aggressive chemically induced colitis compared to wild type animals. Our results are consistent with a model whereby the AhR signalling pathway may participate in the regulation of innate immunity through intestinal epithelium development and mucosal immunity. PMID:27068235

  2. Residual Gases in Crystal Growth Systems: Their Origin, Magnitude, and Dependence on the Processing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Residual gases present in closed ampoules may affect different crystal growth processes. Their presence may affect techniques requiring low pressures and affect the crystal quality in different ways. For that reason a good understanding and control of formation of residual gases may be important for an optimum design and meaningful interpretation of crystal growth experiments. Our extensive experimental and theoretical study includes degassing of silica glass and generation of gases from various source materials. Different materials processing conditions, like outgassing under vacuum, annealing in hydrogen, resublimation, different material preparation procedures, multiple annealings, different processing times, and others were applied and their effect on the amount and composition of gas were analyzed. The experimental results were interpreted based on theoretical calculations on diffusion in silica glass and source materials and thermochemistry of the system. Procedures for a reduction of the amount of gas are also discussed.

  3. Electrochemistry of layered GaSe and GeS: applications to ORR, OER and HER.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shu Min; Chua, Chun Kiang; Sedmidubský, David; Sofer, Zdene Combining Breve K; Pumera, Martin

    2016-01-21

    Though many studies examined the properties of the class of IIIA-VIA and IVA-VIA layered materials, few have delved into the electrochemical aspect of such materials. In light of the burgeoning interest in layered structures towards various electrocatalytic applications, we endeavored to study the inherent electrochemical properties of representative layered materials of this class, GaSe and GeS, and their impact towards electrochemical sensing of redox probes as well as catalysis of oxygen reduction, oxygen evolution and hydrogen evolution reactions. In contrast to the typical sandwich structure of MoS2 layered materials, GeS is isoelectronic to black phosphorus with the same structure; GaSe is a layered material consisting of GaSe sheets bonded in the sequence Se-Ga-Ga-Se. We characterized GaSe and GeS by employing scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy complemented by electronic structure calculations. It was found that the encompassing surface oxide layers on GaSe and GeS greatly influenced their electrochemical properties, especially their electrocatalytic capabilities towards hydrogen evolution reaction. These findings provide fresh insight into the electrochemical properties of these IIIA-VIA and IVA-VIA layered structures which enables development for future applications. PMID:26675834

  4. Cancer-promoting and Inhibiting Effects of Dietary Compounds: Role of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR)

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Joann B.; Ghotbaddini, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic aromatic amines and dioxin-like compounds are environmental carcinogens shown to initiate cancer in a number of tissue types including prostate and breast. These environmental carcinogens elicit their effects through interacting with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand activated transcription factor. Naturally occurring compounds found in fruits and vegetables shown to have anti-carcinogenic effects also interact with the AhR. This review explores dietary and environmental exposure to chemical carcinogens and beneficial natural compounds whose effects are elicited by the AhR. PMID:25258701

  5. Course of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus infection in Dutch patients

    PubMed Central

    Friesema, Ingrid H. M.; Meijer, Adam; van Gageldonk‐Lafeber, Arianne B.; van der Lubben, Mariken; van Beek, Janko; Donker, Gé A.; Prins, Jan M.; de Jong, Menno D.; Boskamp, Simone; Isken, Leslie D.; Koopmans, Marion P. G.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Friesema et al. (2012). Course of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus infection in Dutch patients. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), e16–e20. The clinical dynamics of influenza A(H1N1) 2009 infections in 61 laboratory‐confirmed Dutch cases were examined. An episode lasted a median of 7·5 days of which 2 days included fever. Respiratory symptoms resolved slowly, while systemic symptoms peaked early in the episode and disappeared quickly. Severity of each symptom was rated highest in the first few days. Furthermore, diarrhoea was negatively associated with viral load, but not with faecal excretion of influenza virus. Cases with comorbidities appeared to have higher viral loads than the cases without, suggesting a less effective immune response. These results complement information obtained through traditional surveillance. PMID:22372759

  6. Fabrication and evaluation of 100 Ah cylindrical lithium ion battery for electric vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyung, Yoo-Eup; Moon, Seong-In; Yum, Duk-Hyeng; Yun, Seong-Kyu

    A total of 100 Ah class lithium ion cells with C/LiCoO 2 cell system for electric vehicles (EVs) was developed. EV-size lithium ion battery was developed by Sony, KERI/STC, SAFT, VARTA, Sanyo and Matsushita. GS battery and Hitachi have developed also stationary type large scale (70-80 Ah) lithium ion batteries. Lithium ion battery module for EVs was demonstrated by Sony/Nissan and KERI/STC in 1996. At present, the performance of developed EV-cells was up to 115 Wh/kg and 286 W/kg of specific power at 80% DOD. We assume our EV cells to have 248 and 242 km driving distance per one charge with DST-120 mode and ECE-15 mode, respectively. Finally, we performed safety/abuse tests of developed lithium ion cell.

  7. Detecting Polychlorinated Biphenyls by Ah Receptor and Fluorescence Quantitative PCR with Exonuclease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoxiang; Zhuang, Huisheng

    2010-11-01

    Tetrachlorobiphenyls as ligands were cultivated with goldfish, Ah receptors were extracted from the liver of goldfish and purified by hydroxyapatite. The complex of TCB ligands-receptors were analyzed by Surface Plasmon Resonance. DNA probes were amplified by PCR using Primers F1 and F2 with the DNA recognition site of responsive enhancer. DNA probes bound to the complex were not digested by exonuclease. The DNA that bound to the complex was quantified by real time PCR. A standard curve with TCB concentration to Ct values was obtained in the range of 10-12mol/L to 10-8 mol/L, according to TCB concentration in samples. The detection limit of the assay was below 10-12mol/L of TCB. Compared with HPLC, this assay is much more sensitive. These results suggest that fluorescence quantitative PCR with exonuclease by Ah receptors fits for detection of trace PCB.

  8. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in pigs, Togo, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Ducatez, Mariette F.; Awoume, Félix; Webby, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    We collected 325 nasal swabs from freshly slaughtered previously healthy pigs from October 2012 through January 2014 in a slaughterhouse near Lomé in Togo. Influenza A virus genome was detected by RT-PCR in 2.5% to 12.3% of the pooled samples, and results of hemagglutinin subtyping RT-PCR assays showed the virus in all the positive pools to be A(H1N1)pdm09. Virus was isolated on MDCK cells from a representative specimen, A/swine/Togo/ONA32/2013(H1N1). The isolate was fully sequenced and harbored 8 genes similar to A(H1N1)pdm09 virus genes circulating in humans in 2012–2013, suggesting human-to-swine transmission of the pathogen. PMID:25778544

  9. Leakage of AH26 and Ketac-Endo used with injected warm gutta-percha.

    PubMed

    Wu, M K; De Gee, A J; Wesselink, P R

    1997-05-01

    Condensing warm gutta-percha (GP) can greatly reduce the distance between the GP and the root canal walls (RCW). Different sealers with different film thicknesses may seal such close fits differently. With the use of a fluid transport model, leakage of AH26 and Ketac-Endo used with injected warm GP to fill root canals was measured. The distance between the condensed GP and RCW and the film thickness of the two sealers was determined as well. After condensation, the distance between GP and RCW was mostly less than 25 microns. AH26, with a film thickness of 39 microns, leaked more than Ketac-Endo (p < 0.05) of which the film thickness was 22 microns. It seems that film thickness of sealer is an influencing factor on the sealing ability of a root canal filling when condensation of thermoplasticized GP is performed. PMID:9545939

  10. Hyperascyrones A-H, polyprenylated spirocyclic acylphloroglucinol derivatives from Hypericum ascyron Linn.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hucheng; Chen, Chunmei; Liu, Junjun; Sun, Bin; Wei, Guangzheng; Li, Yan; Zhang, Jinwen; Yao, Guangmin; Luo, Zengwei; Xue, Yongbo; Zhang, Yonghui

    2015-07-01

    Eight polyprenylated spirocyclic acylphloroglucinol derivatives (PSAPs), hyperascyrones A-H, were isolated from the aerial parts of Hypericum ascyron Linn., together with six known analogs. Their structures were established by spectroscopic analyses including HRESIMS, 1D and 2D NMR, and their absolute configurations were determined by electronic circular dichroism calculations (ECD, Gaussian 09). Structures of previously reported tomoeones C, D, G, and H were revised. Hyperascyrones A-H were evaluated for their cytotoxic and anti-HIV-1 activities, with hyperascyrones C and G exhibiting significant cytotoxicities against HL-60 cell lines with IC50 values of 4.22 and 8.36 μM, respectively. In addition, the chemotaxonomic significance of these compounds was also discussed. PMID:25800107

  11. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Placement of AH-7921 Into Schedule I. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-04-14

    With the issuance of this final order, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration places the substance AH-7921 (Systematic IUPAC Name: 3,4-dichloro-N-[(1dimethylamino)cyclohexylmethyl]benzamide), including its isomers, esters, ethers, salts, and salts of isomers, esters and ethers, into schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. This scheduling action is pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act and is required in order for the United States to discharge its obligations under the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, 1961. This action imposes the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to schedule I controlled substances on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, import, export, engage in research or conduct instructional activities with, or possess), or propose to handle, AH-7921. PMID:27101639

  12. Modeling the selectivity of indoor pollution gases over N2 on covalent organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenliang; Pang, Yujia; Zhang, Jingping

    2014-07-01

    The selectivity of indoor pollution gases (including formaldehyde, benzene, and toluene) over N2 on a set of 37 covalent organic frameworks (COFs) was modeled by combining classical grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) methods and periodic density functional theory with dispersion correction (DFT-D2). The pore volume, pore size, and the isosteric heat (Q st) of gases on COFs were investigated to explore the origin of the high selectivity of pollution gases over N2. We found that the size match between the pore of the COFs and the corresponding pollution gases is the key factor for high selectivity. Additionally, the Q st for the investigated four gases follows the order of toluene > benzene > formaldehyde > N2, which is consistent with the order of selectivity. Furthermore, the favorite sites and interaction energies of pollution gases on COFs were calculated by the periodic DFT-D2 method. Our simulation procedure offers an alternative approach with which to evaluate or design the best candidate porous materials in capture pollution gases. PMID:24980986

  13. Plan, formulate, and discuss a NASTRAN finite element model of the AH-64A helicopter airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christ, Richard A.; Ferg, Douglas A.; Kilroy, Kevin A.; Toossi, Mostafa; Weisenburger, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    A discussion of modeling plan objectives, followed by a description of the AH-64A aircraft including all general features, major components, and primary and structure definitions are presented. Following the aircraft description, a discussion of the modeling guidelines and model checkout procedure are provided. The NASTRAN finite element analysis is set up to be suitable to predict both static internal loads and vibrations. Finally, the results, schedule, and planned versus actual manhours for this work are presented.

  14. Transmission parameters of the A/H1N1 (2009) influenza virus pandemic: a review

    PubMed Central

    Boëlle, Pierre‐Yves; Ansart, Séverine; Cori, Anne; Valleron, Alain‐Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Boëlle P‐Y et al. (2011) Transmission parameters of the A/H1N1 (2009) influenza virus pandemic: a review. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(5), 306–316. Background  The new influenza virus A/H1N1 (2009), identified in mid‐2009, rapidly spread over the world. Estimating the transmissibility of this new virus was a public health priority. Methods  We reviewed all studies presenting estimates of the serial interval or generation time and the reproduction number of the A/H1N1 (2009) virus infection. Results  Thirteen studies documented the serial interval from household or close‐contact studies, with overall mean 3 days (95% CI: 2·4, 3·6); taking into account tertiary transmission reduced this estimate to 2·6 days. Model‐based estimates were more variable, from 1·9 to 6 days. Twenty‐four studies reported reproduction numbers for community‐based epidemics at the town or country level. The range was 1·2–3·1, with larger estimates reported at the beginning of the pandemic. Accounting for under‐reporting in the early period of the pandemic and limiting variation because of the choice of the generation time interval, the reproduction number was between 1·2 and 2·3 with median 1·5. Discussion  The serial interval of A/H1N1 (2009) flu was typically short, with mean value similar to the seasonal flu. The estimates of the reproduction number were more variable. Compared with past influenza pandemics, the median reproduction number was similar (1968) or slightly smaller (1889, 1918, 1957). PMID:21668690

  15. LEO life tests on a 75 Ah bipolar nickel-hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenhart, S.; Koehler, C.; Applewhite, A.

    1988-01-01

    The design, building, and testing of an actively cooled 10-cell 75-Ah bipolar nickel/hydrogen battery are discussed. During the last 1000 cycles, the battery has shown some evidence of elecrical performance degradation. In particular, EOC and EOD voltages have increased and decreased by several millivolts, respectively, and deep discharge capacities to a 1.0 V/cell average cutoff voltage have decreased.

  16. Lithium-Ion Performance and Abuse Evaluation Using Lithium Technologies 9Ah cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Albert Daniel; Jeevarajan, Judith A.

    2006-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries in a pouch form offer high energy density and safety in their designs and more recently they are offering performance at higher rates. Lithium Technologies 9Ah high-power pouch cells were studied at different rates, thermal environments, under vacuum and several different conditions of abuse including overcharge, over-discharge and external short circuit. Results of this study will be presented.

  17. Life evaluation of 35Ah Ni-Cd cell in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwajima, S.; Kamimori, Nolimits; Nakatani, Ken

    1992-01-01

    The National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) began developing Nickel-Cadmium (Ni-Cd) cells for space use in 1985. Sanyo Electric was responsible for the cell design, manufacturing, and initial testing. The cell life was evaluated by NASDA in the Tsukuba Space Center (TKSC). The development is presently in the qualification Test (QT) phase. Recent life-cycle data for 35 Ah Ni-Cd cells are presented.

  18. Cellular responses to oxidative stress: the [Ah] gene battery as a paradigm.

    PubMed Central

    Nebert, D W; Petersen, D D; Fornace, A J

    1990-01-01

    A major source of oxidative stress in animals is plant stress metabolites, also termed phytoalexins. The aromatic hydrocarbon-responsive [Ah] gene battery is considered here as a model system in which we can study metabolically coordinated enzymes that respond to phytoalexin-induced oxidative stress. In the mouse, the [Ah] battery comprises at least six genes: two Phase I genes, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2; and four Phase II genes, Nmo-1, Aldh-1, Ugt-1, and Gt-1. All six genes appear to be regulated positively by inducers such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other ligands of the Ah receptor. In the absence of foreign inducer, the control of Nmo-1 gene expression is independent of the control of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 gene expression. The radiation deletion homozygote c14CoS/c14CoS mouse is lacking about 1.1 centiMorgans of chromosome 7. Although having no detectable CYP1A1 or CYP1A2 activation, the untreated c14CoS/c14CoS mouse exhibits markedly elevated transcripts of the Nmo-1 gene and three growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible (gadd) genes. These data suggest that the missing region on chromosome 7 in the c14CoS/c14CoS mouse contains a gene(s), which we propose to call Nmo-1n, encoding a trans-acting factor(s) that is a negative effector of the Nmo-1 and gadd genes. The three other [Ah] battery Phase II genes behave similarly to Nmo-1 in the c14CoS/c14CoS mouse. This coordinated response to oxidative stress and DNA damage, by way of the release of a mammalian battery of genes from negative control, bears an interesting resemblance to the SOS response in bacteria. PMID:2272308

  19. Hospitalization in two waves of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in England.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C N J; Mytton, O T; McLean, E M; Rutter, P D; Pebody, R G; Sachedina, N; White, P J; Hawkins, C; Evans, B; Waight, P A; Ellis, J; Bermingham, A; Donaldson, L J; Catchpole, M

    2011-10-01

    Uncertainties exist regarding the population risks of hospitalization due to pandemic influenza A(H1N1). Understanding these risks is important for patients, clinicians and policy makers. This study aimed to clarify these uncertainties. A national surveillance system was established for patients hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in England. Information was captured on demographics, pre-existing conditions, treatment and outcomes. The relative risks of hospitalization associated with pre-existing conditions were estimated by combining the captured data with population prevalence estimates. A total of 2416 hospitalizations were reported up to 6 January 2010. Within the population, 4·7 people/100,000 were hospitalized with pandemic influenza A(H1N1). The estimated hospitalization rate of cases showed a U-shaped distribution with age. Chronic kidney disease, chronic neurological disease, chronic respiratory disease and immunosuppression were each associated with a 10- to 20-fold increased risk of hospitalization. Patients who received antiviral medication within 48 h of symptom onset were less likely to be admitted to critical care than those who received them after this time (adjusted odds ratio 0·64, 95% confidence interval 0·44-0·94, P=0·024). In England the risk of hospitalization with pandemic influenza A(H1N1) has been concentrated in the young and those with pre-existing conditions. By quantifying these risks, this study will prove useful in planning for the next winter in the northern and southern hemispheres, and for future pandemics. PMID:21108872

  20. Influenza A(H5N8) virus isolation in Russia, 2014.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, Vasiliy Y; Susloparov, Ivan M; Kolosova, Nataliya P; Goncharova, Nataliya I; Shipovalov, Andrey V; Durymanov, Alexander G; Ilyicheva, Tatyana N; Budatsirenova, Lubov V; Ivanova, Valentina K; Ignatyev, Georgy A; Ershova, Svetlana N; Tulyahova, Valeriya S; Mikheev, Valeriy N; Ryzhikov, Alexander B

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we report the isolation of influenza A(H5N8) virus from a Eurasian wigeon (Anas penelope) in Sakha Republic of the Russian Far East. The strain A/wigeon/Sakha/1/2014 (H5N8) has been shown to be pathogenic for mammals. It is similar to the strains that caused outbreaks in wild birds and poultry in Southeast Asia and Europe in 2014. PMID:26306756

  1. Influenza A(H6N1) Virus in Dogs, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui-Ting; Wang, Ching-Ho; Chueh, Ling-Ling; Su, Bi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    We determined the prevalence of influenza A virus in dogs in Taiwan and isolated A/canine/Taiwan/E01/2014. Molecular analysis indicated that this isolate was closely related to influenza A(H6N1) viruses circulating in Taiwan and harbored the E627K substitution in the polymerase basic 2 protein, which indicated its ability to replicate in mammalian species. PMID:26583707

  2. Equine Influenza A(H3N8) Virus Isolated from Bactrian Camel, Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Yondon, Myagmarsukh; Zayat, Batsukh; Nelson, Martha I.; Heil, Gary L.; Anderson, Benjamin D.; Lin, Xudong; Halpin, Rebecca A.; McKenzie, Pamela P.; White, Sarah K.; Wentworth, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Because little is known about the ecology of influenza viruses in camels, 460 nasal swab specimens were collected from healthy (no overt illness) Bactrian camels in Mongolia during 2012. One specimen was positive for influenza A virus (A/camel/Mongolia/335/2012[H3N8]), which is phylogenetically related to equine influenza A(H3N8) viruses and probably represents natural horse-to-camel transmission. PMID:25418532

  3. Down regulation of hepatic PPARalpha function by AhR ligand.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Zein; El-Shazly, Samir; Abdelhady, Shawky; Fattouh, Ibrahim; Muzandu, Kaampwe; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Kazusaka, Akio; Fujita, Shoichi

    2004-11-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates a spectrum of toxic and biological effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related compounds. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) is a nuclear receptor involved in the maintenance of lipid and glucose homeostasis. In this study we hypothesized that one of the possible mechanisms for the effect of TCDD and its related chemicals on fat metabolism could be through down regulation of PPARalpha functions. We treated Wistar rats with an AhR ligand, Sudan III (S.III), and/or PPARalpha ligand, Clofibric Acid (CA), for 3 days. We analysed the expression of one of the PPARalpha-target gene products, CYP4A protein and its mRNA. We also tested HepG2 cells with the afore-mentioned treatments and evaluated their effects on PPARalpha and RXRalpha protein. Treatment of Wistar rats with S.III was found to down regulates CYP4A protein expression and reduced its induction with CA. It also decreased mRNA expressions of CYP4A1, CYP4A2, CYP4A3 and PPARalpha. In HepG2 cells, PPARalpha and RXRalpha protein expression was decreased by S.III treatment in a dose dependent manner. Our results suggest that AhR has an inhibitory effect on PPARalpha function and a new pathway by which AhR ligands could disturb lipid metabolism. PMID:15585952

  4. Ultrasonic propagation in gases at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, C.; Carnevale, E. H.; Lynworth, L. C.; Uva, S.

    1970-01-01

    Ultrasonic pulse method /1 to 3 MHz/ measures both sound speed and absorption in monatomic and polyatomic gases in a temperature range of 300 to 20000 degrees K at atmospheric pressure. Helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon are investigated.

  5. REGIONAL DEPOSITION OF INHALED REACTIVE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical concept in inhalation toxicology involves the determination of dose as the first component for providing a perspective to judge the applicability of various toxicological results to human exposure conditions. Available experimental data for reactive gases were reviewed...

  6. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The Voluntary Reporting Program for greenhouse gases is part of an attempt by the U.S. Government to develop innovative, low-cost, and nonregulatory approaches to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. It is one element in an array of such programs introduced in recent years as part of the effort being made by the United States to comply with its national commitment to stabilize emissions of greenhouse gases under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions of greenhouse gases.

  7. Denitrification of combustion gases. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Yang, R.T.

    1980-10-09

    A method for treating waste combustion gas to remove the nitrogen oxygen gases therefrom is disclosed wherein the waste gas is first contacted with calcium oxide which absorbs and chemically reacts with the nitrogen oxide gases therein at a temperature from about 100/sup 0/ to 430/sup 0/C. The thus reacted calcium oxide (now calcium nitrate) is then heated at a temperature range between about 430/sup 0/ and 900/sup 0/C, resulting in regeneration of the calcium oxide and production of the decomposition gas composed of nitrogen and nitrogen oxide gas. The decomposition gases can be recycled to the calcium oxide contacting step to minimize the amount of nitrogen oxide gases in the final product gas.

  8. Silicon Carbide Transistor For Detecting Hydrocarbon Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Williams, Roger M.

    1996-01-01

    Proposed silicon carbide variable-potential insulated-gate field-effect transistor specially designed for use in measuring concentrations of hydrocarbon gases. Devices like this prove useful numerous automotive, industrial, aeronautical, and environmental monitoring applications.

  9. Quantum gases: The high-symmetry switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2014-10-01

    Accessing orbital exchange between highly symmetric many-component spins may hold the key to a number of exotic, strongly correlated quantum phenomena, but probing such exchange is far from easy. An experiment with ultracold gases takes on the task.

  10. Pillared Interlayered Clays as Adsorbents of Gases and Vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, J.; Pinto, M. L.

    This chapter reviews recent works where porous materials prepared from clays, particularly pillared interlayered clays (PILCs), were studied as gas phase adsorbents. It also includes the cases which used the adsorption of gases and vapors for the nanotextural characterization of the materials, other than the usual low temperature nitrogen adsorption. This is, for instance, the case of the adsorption of molecules of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), with various dimensions and shapes, which can be used as probe molecules for the characterization of the porosity or concerning the topic of the VOCs abatement. A similar situation occurs with water adsorption, whose results can be informative not only on the desiccant properties of the materials but also on their surface chemistry. A more recent line of studies of adsorption by materials prepared from clays, namely, the hydrocarbon purification from natural gas or biogas, was also addressed.

  11. 49 CFR 174.204 - Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank car delivery of gases, including cryogenic liquids. 174.204 Section 174.204 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY RAIL Detailed Requirements...

  12. 49 CFR 173.313 - UN Portable Tank Table for Liquefied Compressed Gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false UN Portable Tank Table for Liquefied Compressed Gases. 173.313 Section 173.313 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR...

  13. 49 CFR 173.466 - Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases. 173.466 Section 173.466 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS...

  14. 49 CFR 173.314 - Compressed gases in tank cars and multi-unit tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressed gases in tank cars and multi-unit tank cars. 173.314 Section 173.314 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR...

  15. 49 CFR 173.314 - Compressed gases in tank cars and multi-unit tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compressed gases in tank cars and multi-unit tank cars. 173.314 Section 173.314 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR...

  16. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Single Low Dose or High Dose of Clade 2 Influenza A(H5N1) Inactivated Vaccine in Adults Previously Primed With Clade 1 Influenza A(H5N1) Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Winokur, Patricia L; Patel, Shital M; Brady, Rebecca; Chen, Wilbur H; El-Kamary, Samer S; Edwards, Kathryn; Creech, C Buddy; Frey, Sharon; Keitel, Wendy A; Belshe, Robert; Walter, Emmanuel; Bellamy, Abbie; Hill, Heather

    2015-08-15

    Influenza A(H5N1) vaccination strategies that improve the speed of the immunological response and cross-clade protection are desired. We compared the immunogenicity of a single 15-μg or 90-μg dose of A/H5N1/Indonesia/05/05 (clade 2) vaccine in adults who were previously primed with A/H5N1/Vietnam/1203/2004 (clade 1) vaccine. High-dose vaccine resulted in significantly higher titers to both clade 1 and 2 antigens. Clade 2 titers were unaffected by the previous dose of clade 1 vaccine. Low-dose priming with a mismatched pandemic influenza A(H5N1) vaccine would improve the rapidity, magnitude, and cross-reactivity of the immunological response following a single high-dose, unadjuvanted, pandemic vaccine. PMID:25712967

  17. A novel AhR ligand, 2AI, protects the retina from environmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Mark A.; Davis, Sonnet S.; Rosko, Andrew; Nguyen, Steven M.; Mitchell, Kylie P.; Mateen, Samiha; Neves, Joana; Garcia, Thelma Y.; Mooney, Shaun; Perdew, Gary H.; Hubbard, Troy D.; Lamba, Deepak A.; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Various retinal degenerative diseases including dry and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy are associated with the degeneration of the retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer of the retina. This consequently results in the death of rod and cone photoreceptors that they support, structurally and functionally leading to legal or complete blindness. Therefore, developing therapeutic strategies to preserve cellular homeostasis in the RPE would be a favorable asset in the clinic. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a conserved, environmental ligand-dependent, per ARNT-sim (PAS) domain containing bHLH transcription factor that mediates adaptive response to stress via its downstream transcriptional targets. Using in silico, in vitro and in vivo assays, we identified 2,2′-aminophenyl indole (2AI) as a potent synthetic ligand of AhR that protects RPE cells in vitro from lipid peroxidation cytotoxicity mediated by 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) as well as the retina in vivo from light-damage. Additionally, metabolic characterization of this molecule by LC-MS suggests that 2AI alters the lipid metabolism of RPE cells, enhancing the intracellular levels of palmitoleic acid. Finally, we show that, as a downstream effector of 2AI-mediated AhR activation, palmitoleic acid protects RPE cells from 4HNE-mediated stress, and light mediated retinal degeneration in mice. PMID:27364765

  18. A novel AhR ligand, 2AI, protects the retina from environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Mark A; Davis, Sonnet S; Rosko, Andrew; Nguyen, Steven M; Mitchell, Kylie P; Mateen, Samiha; Neves, Joana; Garcia, Thelma Y; Mooney, Shaun; Perdew, Gary H; Hubbard, Troy D; Lamba, Deepak A; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Various retinal degenerative diseases including dry and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy are associated with the degeneration of the retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer of the retina. This consequently results in the death of rod and cone photoreceptors that they support, structurally and functionally leading to legal or complete blindness. Therefore, developing therapeutic strategies to preserve cellular homeostasis in the RPE would be a favorable asset in the clinic. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a conserved, environmental ligand-dependent, per ARNT-sim (PAS) domain containing bHLH transcription factor that mediates adaptive response to stress via its downstream transcriptional targets. Using in silico, in vitro and in vivo assays, we identified 2,2'-aminophenyl indole (2AI) as a potent synthetic ligand of AhR that protects RPE cells in vitro from lipid peroxidation cytotoxicity mediated by 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) as well as the retina in vivo from light-damage. Additionally, metabolic characterization of this molecule by LC-MS suggests that 2AI alters the lipid metabolism of RPE cells, enhancing the intracellular levels of palmitoleic acid. Finally, we show that, as a downstream effector of 2AI-mediated AhR activation, palmitoleic acid protects RPE cells from 4HNE-mediated stress, and light mediated retinal degeneration in mice. PMID:27364765

  19. Long life 80Ah standard IPV NiH2 battery cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armantrout, Jon D.; Waller, J. S.

    1995-02-01

    A standard Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) battery cell is needed to meet future low cost, high performance mission requirements for NASA, military, and civil space programs. A common or standard cell design has evolved from the heritage of HST, Milstar, and other Air Force Mantech cell designs with substantial flight experience, while incorporating some of the historical COMSAT cell design features described in a previous NASA publication. Key features include slurry process nickel electrodes having high strength, long life and high yield (lower cost), and dual layer zircar separators for improved KOH retention, uniformality, and longer life. The cell design will have a zirconium oxide wall wick inside the pressure vessel to redistribute electrolyte and extend life. The slurry electrode will be 35 mils thick to take advantage of qualified cell mechanical configurations and proven assembly and activation techniques developed by Eagle Picher Industries (EPI) for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) RNH-90-3 and 'Generic HST' RNH-90-5 cell designs with back-to-back nickel electrodes produced by the dry sinter process. The 80Ah common cell design can be scaled to meet capacity requirements from 60Ah to 100Ah. Producibility, commonality, and long life performance will be enhanced with the robust cell design described herein.

  20. Long life 80Ah standard IPV NiH2 battery cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armantrout, Jon D.; Waller, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    A standard Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) battery cell is needed to meet future low cost, high performance mission requirements for NASA, military, and civil space programs. A common or standard cell design has evolved from the heritage of HST, Milstar, and other Air Force Mantech cell designs with substantial flight experience, while incorporating some of the historical COMSAT cell design features described in a previous NASA publication. Key features include slurry process nickel electrodes having high strength, long life and high yield (lower cost), and dual layer zircar separators for improved KOH retention, uniformality, and longer life. The cell design will have a zirconium oxide wall wick inside the pressure vessel to redistribute electrolyte and extend life. The slurry electrode will be 35 mils thick to take advantage of qualified cell mechanical configurations and proven assembly and activation techniques developed by Eagle Picher Industries (EPI) for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) RNH-90-3 and 'Generic HST' RNH-90-5 cell designs with back-to-back nickel electrodes produced by the dry sinter process. The 80Ah common cell design can be scaled to meet capacity requirements from 60Ah to 100Ah. Producibility, commonality, and long life performance will be enhanced with the robust cell design described herein.

  1. Adaptation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in experimental mouse models.

    PubMed

    Prokopyeva, E A; Sobolev, I A; Prokopyev, M V; Shestopalov, A M

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, three mouse-adapted variants of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were obtained by lung-to-lung passages of BALB/c, C57BL/6z and CD1 mice. The significantly increased virulence and pathogenicity of all of the mouse-adapted variants induced 100% mortality in the adapted mice. Genetic analysis indicated that the increased virulence of all of the mouse-adapted variants reflected the incremental acquisition of several mutations in PB2, PB1, HA, NP, NA, and NS2 proteins. Identical amino acid substitutions were also detected in all of the mouse-adapted variants of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, including PB2 (K251R), PB1 (V652A), NP (I353V), NA (I106V, N248D) and NS1 (G159E). Apparently, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus easily adapted to the host after serial passages in the lungs, inducing 100% lethality in the last experimental group. However, cross-challenge revealed that not all adapted variants are pathogenic for different laboratory mice. Such important results should be considered when using the influenza mice model. PMID:26829383

  2. Structure and receptor binding preferences of recombinant human A(H3N2) virus hemagglutinins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Carney, Paul J; Chang, Jessie C; Guo, Zhu; Villanueva, Julie M; Stevens, James

    2015-03-01

    A(H3N2) influenza viruses have circulated in humans since 1968, and antigenic drift of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein continues to be a driving force that allows the virus to escape the human immune response. Since the major antigenic sites of the HA overlap into the receptor binding site (RBS) of the molecule, the virus constantly struggles to effectively adapt to host immune responses, without compromising its functionality. Here, we have structurally assessed the evolution of the A(H3N2) virus HA RBS, using an established recombinant expression system. Glycan binding specificities of nineteen A(H3N2) influenza virus HAs, each a component of the seasonal influenza vaccine between 1968 and 2012, were analyzed. Results suggest that while its receptor-binding site has evolved from one that can bind a broad range of human receptor analogs to one with a more restricted binding profile for longer glycans, the virus continues to circulate and transmit efficiently among humans. PMID:25617824

  3. Biological production of products from waste gases

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.

    2002-01-22

    A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

  4. Abiotic uptake of gases by organic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smagin, A. V.

    2007-12-01

    Methodological and experimental studies of the abiotic uptake of gaseous substances by organic soils were performed. The static adsorption method of closed vessels for assessing the interaction of gases with the solid and liquid soil phases and the dynamic method of determining the sorption isotherms of gases by soils were analyzed. The theoretical substantiation of the methods and their practical implementations on the basis of a PGA-7 portable gas analyzer (Russia) were considered. Good agreement between the equilibrium sorption isotherms of the gases and the Langmuir model was revealed; for the real ranges of natural gas concentrations, this model can be reduced to the linear Henry equation. The limit values of the gas sorption (Langmuir monolayer capacity) are typical for dry samples; they vary from 670 4000 g/m3 for methane and oxygen to 20 000 25 000 g/m3 for carbon dioxide. The linear distribution coefficients of gases between the solid and gas phases of organic soils (Henry constants) are 8 18 units for poorly sorbed gases (O2, CH4) and 40 60 units for CO2. The kinetics of the chemicophysical uptake of gases by the soil studied is linear in character and obeys the relaxation kinetic model of the first order with the corresponding relaxation constants, which vary from 1 h -1 in wet samples to 10 h -1 in dry samples.

  5. Source gases: Concentrations, emissions, and trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, Paul J.; Harriss, Robert; Penkett, Stuart A.; Makide, Yoshihiro; Sanhueza, Eugenio; Alyea, Fred N.; Rowland, F. Sherwood; Blake, Don; Sasaki, Toru; Cunnold, Derek M.

    1991-01-01

    Source gases are defined as those gases that influence levels of stratospheric ozone (O3) by transporting species containing halogen, hydrogen, and nitrogen to the stratosphere. Examples are the CFC's, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Other source gases that also come under consideration in an atmospheric O3 context are those that are involved in the O3 or hydroxyl (OH) radical chemistry of the troposphere. Examples are CH4, carbon monoxide (CO), and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC's). Most of the source gases, along with carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O), are climatically significant and thus affect stratospheric O3 levels by their influence on stratospheric temperatures. Carbonyl sulphide (COS) could affect stratospheric O3 through maintenance of the stratospheric sulphate aerosol layer, which may be involved in heterogeneous chlorine-catalyzed O3 destruction. The previous reviews of trends and emissions of source gases, either from the context of their influence on atmospheric O3 or global climate change, are updated. The current global abundances and concentration trends of the trace gases are given in tabular format.

  6. Structure of Inert Gases Adsorbed in MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Dylan; Sokol, Paul

    One-dimensional quantum liquids of 3He or 4He have generated recent interest for investigation in the Luttinger liquid model. Unfortunately, current studies lack a clear demonstration of definitively one-dimensional behavior. We propose using the templated, porous material, MCM-41, as a host for an atomic Luttinger liquid. In general, the pores of MCM-41 are too wide to provide a strictly one-dimensional environment, so we investigate preplating these pores with inert gases to effectively reduce their diameter. We present the results of studies of the structure of inert gases in MCM-41. Nitrogen sorption isotherms were used to characterize the sample. Then, using inert gases as adsorbates, we determined the minimum effective pore diameter that can be achieved in our sample before capillary condensation takes over. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was performed on the ideally preplated sample to investigate the structure of the adsorbates in the nanopores. The XRD measurements are compared to simulations of core-shell cylinder model scattering, and the validity of the model is assessed. The prospects for creating a definitively one-dimensional channel for the application of studying the structure and dynamics of helium confined in one dimension are discussed. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant DGE-1069091.

  7. Mixing weld gases offers advantages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, J. L.; Mendenhall, M. M.

    1969-01-01

    Argon added to helium during gas tungsten arc cover-pass welding in the horizontal position results in a better controlled wider bead width, increased arc stability, and reduction in heat input. Adequate filler material wetness and penetration pass coverage is possible with only one pass.

  8. The Life of Jorjani: One of the Persian Pioneers of Medical Encyclopedia Compiling: On the Occasion of His 1000th Birthday Anniversary (434, A.H. - 1434, A.H.)

    PubMed Central

    Moattar, Fariborz; Shams Ardekani, Mohammad Reza; Ghannadi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Background Seyyed Esmaeil Jorjani is one of the most prominent pioneers and scientists of Islamic and Iranian traditional medicine in the 11th and 12th centuries (4th and 5th centuries A.H.). The number of his books is not certainly clear, but it is signified that he has written a couple of great books concerning medicine for Persians and too many treatises in such fields as philosophy, theology, medical ethics, human anatomy, chemistry, pharmacy and other sciences. His most famous and important book is “Zakhireh Khwarazmshahi” or “The Treasure of King Khwarazm”, which is really a complete and valuable medical encyclopedia in Persian language. Materials and Methods In the present study, authors have attempted to state the life and time of Jorjani and his views by studying the history, old medical sources, and other provided recent medical literature in these fields. Results The biography of Hakim Jorjani has been well reviewed and described precisely. Conclusions Based on our findings, it is clear that Jorjani described and explained the symptoms, signs and treatments of several diseases, introduced the activities of various medicinal plants, and compound formulations. He achieved all of this during his continuous visits to prestigious medical centers and famous people of his time. PMID:24616781

  9. Solar wind record in the lunar regolith - Nitrogen and noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, Urs; Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1988-01-01

    The measured elemental and isotopic abundances of noble gases and nitrogen have been measured in five different samples of lunar regolith material. It was found noble gases liberated by chemical attack on grain surfaces from two of the samples were solar. The Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio in the two grain surface reservoir is 13.5-13.6, compared to the average value of 13.7 + or - 0.3 measured in the Apollo solar wind collection foils (Gochsler and Geiss, 1977). It is suggested that the noble gases in grain interiors have suffered severe mass fractionation. The surface-sited N/Ar in an ilmenite sample exceeds the predicted solar ratio by more than a factor of 10. It is concluded that the solar system abundances of Cameron (1982) describe the elemental composition of the noble gases in the solar wind very well.

  10. Solar wind record in the lunar regolith - Nitrogen and noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, U.; Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    The measured elemental and isotopic abundances of noble gases and nitrogen have been measured in five different samples of lunar regolith material. It was found noble gases liberated by chemical attack on grain surfaces from two of the samples were solar. The Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio in the two grain surface reservoir is 13.5-13.6, compared to the average value of 13.7 + or - 0.3 measured in the Apollo solar wind collection foils (Gochsler and Geiss, 1977). It is suggested that the noble gases in grain interiors have suffered severe mass fractionation. The surface-sited N/Ar in an ilmenite sample exceeds the predicted solar ratio by more than a factor of 10. It is concluded that the solar system abundances of Cameron (1982) describe the elemental composition of the noble gases in the solar wind very well.

  11. HealthLines: Quick Tips for Seasonal Health, Safety and Fun... "Ah, when the sun beats down…"

    MedlinePlus

    ... Photo courtesy of Vitality Communications "Ah, when the sun beats down …" The National Cancer Institute estimates there ... prevent skin cancer is to guard against the sun. For children, it's especially important from an early ...

  12. AhR activation underlies the CYP1A autoinduction by A-998679 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Michael J.; Lee, Chih-Hung; Liu, Hong; Ciurlionis, Rita; Ditewig, Amy C.; Doktor, Stella; Andracki, Mark E.; Gagne, Gerard D.; Waring, Jeffrey F.; Marsh, Kennan C.; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Blomme, Eric A. G.; Yang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Xenobiotic-mediated induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) is frequently encountered in drug discovery and can influence disposition, pharmacokinetic, and toxicity profiles. The CYP1A subfamily of DMEs plays a central role in the biotransformation of several drugs and environmental chemicals. Autoinduction of drugs through CYP3A enzymes is a common mechanism for their enhanced clearance. However, autoinduction via CYP1A is encountered less frequently. In this report, an experimental compound, A-998679 [3-(5-pyridin-3-yl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl) benzonitrile], was shown to enhance its own clearance via induction of Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2. Rats were dosed for 5 days with 30, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day A-998679. During the dosing period, the compound's plasma AUC decreased at 30 mg/kg (95%) and 100 mg/kg (80%). Gene expression analysis and immunohistochemistry of the livers showed a large increase in the mRNA and protein levels of Cyp1a, which was involved in the biotransformation of A-998679. Induction of CYP1A was confirmed in primary rat, human, and dog hepatocytes. The compound also weakly inhibited CYP1A2 in human liver microsomes. A-998679 activated the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in a luciferase gene reporter assay in HepG2 cells, upregulated expression of genes associated with AhR activation in rat liver and enhanced nuclear migration of AhR in HepG2 cells. Collectively these results demonstrate that A-998679 is an AhR activator that induces Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 expression, resulting in an autoinduction phenomenon. The unique properties of A-998679, along with its novel structure distinct from classical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), may warrant its further evaluation as a tool compound for use in studies involving AhR biology and CYP1A-related mechanisms of drug metabolism and toxicity. PMID:23112805

  13. Introducing the “TCDD-Inducible AhR-Nrf2 Gene Battery”

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Ronnie L.; Reisman, Scott A.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2009-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces genes via the transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), including Cyp1a1, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1a6 (Ugt1a6), and glutathione S-transferase a1 (Gsta1). These genes are referred to as the “AhR gene battery.” However, Nqo1 is also considered a prototypical target gene of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (Nrf2). In mice, TCDD induction of Nrf2 and Nrf2 target, Nqo1, is dependent on AhR, and thus TCDD induction of drug-processing genes may be routed through an AhR-Nrf2 sequence. There has been speculation that Nrf2 may be involved in the TCDD induction of drug-processing genes; however, the data are not definitive. Therefore, to address whether TCDD induction of Nqo1, Ugts, and Gsts is dependent on Nrf2, we conducted the definitive experiment by administering TCDD (50 μg/kg, ip) to Nrf2-null and wild-type (WT) mice and collecting livers 24 h later to quantify the mRNA of drug-processing genes. TCDD induction of Cyp1a1 and Ugt1a1 was similar in WT and Nrf2-null mice, whereas TCDD induction of Ugt1a5 and 1a9 was blunted in Nrf2-null mice. TCDD induced Nqo1, Ugt1a6, 2b34, 2b35, 2b36, UDP-glucuronic acid–synthesizing gene UDP-glucose dehydrogenase, and Gsta1, m1, m2, m3, m6, p2, t2, and microsomal Gst1 in WT mice but not in Nrf2-null mice. Therefore, the present study demonstrates the novel finding that Nrf2 is required for TCDD induction of classical AhR battery genes Nqo1, Ugt1a6, and Gsta1, as well as most Ugt and Gst isoforms in livers of mice. PMID:19474220

  14. A Newly Emerged Swine-Origin Influenza A(H3N2) Variant Dampens Host Antiviral Immunity but Induces Potent Inflammasome Activation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weiping; Mishina, Margarita; Ranjan, Priya; De La Cruz, Juan A; Kim, Jin Hyang; Garten, Rebecca; Kumar, Amrita; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Katz, Jacqueline M; Gangappa, Shivaprakash; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2015-12-15

    We compared the innate immune response to a newly emerged swine-origin influenza A(H3N2) variant containing the M gene from 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1), termed "A(H3N2)vpM," to the immune responses to the 2010 swine-origin influenza A(H3N2) variant and seasonal influenza A(H3N2). Our results demonstrated that A(H3N2)vpM-induced myeloid dendritic cells secreted significantly lower levels of type I interferon (IFN) but produced significantly higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and induced potent inflammasome activation. The reduction in antiviral immunity with increased inflammatory responses upon A(H3N2)vpM infection suggest that these viruses have the potential for increased disease severity in susceptible hosts. PMID:26068782

  15. Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Viruses, United States, 2013–14

    PubMed Central

    Okomo-Adhiambo, Margaret; Fry, Alicia M.; Su, Su; Nguyen, Ha T.; Elal, Anwar Abd; Negron, Elizabeth; Hand, Julie; Garten, Rebecca J.; Barnes, John; Xiyan, Xu; Villanueva, Julie M.

    2015-01-01

    We report characteristics of oseltamivir-resistant influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses and patients infected with these viruses in the United States. During 2013–14, fifty-nine (1.2%) of 4,968 analyzed US influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses had the H275Y oseltamivir resistance–conferring neuraminidase substitution. Our results emphasize the need for local surveillance for neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility among circulating influenza viruses. PMID:25532050

  16. The Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Gene AhLPAT2 Increases the Lipid Content of Transgenic Arabidopsis Seeds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Silong; Lei, Yong; Xu, Xian; Huang, Jiaquan; Jiang, Huifang; Wang, Jin; Cheng, Zengshu; Zhang, Jianan; Song, Yahui; Liao, Boshou; Li, Yurong

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAT), which converts lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) to phosphatidic acid (PA), catalyzes the addition of fatty acyl moieties to the sn-2 position of the LPA glycerol backbone in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis. We recently reported the cloning and temporal-spatial expression of a peanut (Arachis hypogaea) AhLPAT2gene, showing that an increase in AhLPAT2 transcript levels was closely correlated with an increase in seed oil levels. However, the function of the enzyme encoded by the AhLPAT2 gene remains unclear. Here, we report that AhLPAT2 transcript levels were consistently higher in the seeds of a high-oil cultivar than in those of a low-oil cultivar across different seed developmental stages. Seed-specific overexpression of AhLPAT2 in Arabidopsis results in a higher percentage of oil in the seeds and greater-than-average seed weight in the transgenic plants compared with the wild-type plants, leading to a significant increase in total oil yield per plant. The total fatty acid (FA) content and the proportion of unsaturated FAs also increased. In the developing siliques of AhLPAT2-overexpressing plants, the expression levels of genes encoding crucial enzymes involved in de novo FA synthesis, acetyl-CoA subunit (AtBCCP2) and acyl carrier protein 1 (AtACP1) were elevated. AhLPAT2 overexpression also promoted the expression of several key genes related to TAG assembly, sucrose metabolism, and glycolysis. These results demonstrate that the expression of AhLPAT2 plays an important role in glycerolipid production in peanuts. PMID:26302041

  17. Monitoring Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus through National Influenza-like Illness Surveillance, China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Cuiling; Havers, Fiona; Wang, Lijie; Chen, Tao; Shi, Jinghong; Wang, Dayan; Yang, Jing; Yang, Lei; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2013-01-01

    In China during March 4–April 28, 2013, avian influenza A(H7N9) virus testing was performed on 20,739 specimens from patients with influenza-like illness in 10 provinces with confirmed human cases: 6 (0.03%) were positive, and increased numbers of unsubtypeable influenza-positive specimens were not seen. Careful monitoring and rapid characterization of influenza A(H7N9) and other influenza viruses remain critical. PMID:23879887

  18. The Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Gene AhLPAT2 Increases the Lipid Content of Transgenic Arabidopsis Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Silong; Lei, Yong; Xu, Xian; Huang, Jiaquan; Jiang, Huifang; Wang, Jin; Cheng, Zengshu; Zhang, Jianan; Song, Yahui; Liao, Boshou; Li, Yurong

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAT), which converts lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) to phosphatidic acid (PA), catalyzes the addition of fatty acyl moieties to the sn-2 position of the LPA glycerol backbone in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis. We recently reported the cloning and temporal-spatial expression of a peanut (Arachis hypogaea) AhLPAT2gene, showing that an increase in AhLPAT2 transcript levels was closely correlated with an increase in seed oil levels. However, the function of the enzyme encoded by the AhLPAT2 gene remains unclear. Here, we report that AhLPAT2 transcript levels were consistently higher in the seeds of a high-oil cultivar than in those of a low-oil cultivar across different seed developmental stages. Seed-specific overexpression of AhLPAT2 in Arabidopsis results in a higher percentage of oil in the seeds and greater-than-average seed weight in the transgenic plants compared with the wild-type plants, leading to a significant increase in total oil yield per plant. The total fatty acid (FA) content and the proportion of unsaturated FAs also increased. In the developing siliques of AhLPAT2-overexpressing plants, the expression levels of genes encoding crucial enzymes involved in de novo FA synthesis, acetyl-CoA subunit (AtBCCP2) and acyl carrier protein 1 (AtACP1) were elevated. AhLPAT2 overexpression also promoted the expression of several key genes related to TAG assembly, sucrose metabolism, and glycolysis. These results demonstrate that the expression of AhLPAT2 plays an important role in glycerolipid production in peanuts. PMID:26302041

  19. Experimental study of the efficiency of oxidized dextran for prevention of influenza A/H5N1.

    PubMed

    Shkurupy, V A; Potapova, O V; Sharkova, T V; Troitskii, A V; Gulyaeva, E P; Bystrova, T N; Shestopalov, A M

    2014-11-01

    Oxidized dextran is suggested for prevention of infection induced by influenza A/H5N1 viruses, methods of its use and doses are determined. Two intravenous injections of dextran 3 and 1 days before experimental infection of outbred mice by influenza A/H5N1 A/goose/Krasnoozerskoye/627/05 virus resulted in a high preventive dose-dependent effect: the mean lifespan was 25% prolonged, the mortality decreased 3-fold. PMID:25403410

  20. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-0542) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 177.840, see the List of CFR Sections... disconnected. (e) Chlorine cargo tank motor vehicles shall be shipped only when equipped: (1) With a gas mask... Research Center, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for chlorine service; and (2) With...

  1. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-0542) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 177.840, see the List of CFR Sections... record of the cargo tank pressure and ambient (outside) temperature: (1) At the start of each trip, (2... temperature and pressure of the liquid must be reduced by a manually controlled release of vapor; and (2)...

  2. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., see the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume... a motor vehicle as follows: (i) The vehicle must have an open body equipped with a suitable rack or... the emergency discharge control requirements in § 173.315(n) of this subchapter must carry on...

  3. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-0542) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 177.840, see the List of CFR Sections... must have an open body equipped with a suitable rack or support having a means to hold the cylinder... § 173.315(n) of this subchapter must carry on or within the cargo tank motor vehicle written...

  4. 49 CFR 177.840 - Class 2 (gases) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... cryogenic liquid in a package exceeding 450 L (119 gallons) of water capacity shall avoid unnecessary delays... unloading to assure that they are of sound quality, without obvious defects detectable through visual... power equipment. (o) Daily test of off-truck remote shut-off activation device. For a cargo tank...

  5. An in vitro comparison of bond strengths of Gutta-percha/AH Plus, Resilon/Epiphany self-etch and EndoREZ obturation system to intraradicular dentin using a push-out test design

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sanjana A; Dodwad, Preeti K; Patil, Avinash A

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate and compare the push-out bond strengths of three obturation materials; Gutta-percha/AH Plus, Resilon/Epiphany self-etch (SE) and EndoREZ obturation system to intraradicular dentin. Materials and Methods: Sixty single-canal anterior teeth were prepared and assigned to experimental groups (n = 20), designated as Group I: Gutta-percha/AH Plus, Group II: Resilon/Epiphany SE and Group III: EndoREZ sealer/EndoREZ points. After obturation, each tooth was prepared for push-out assessment with root slices of 2 mm thickness using universal testing machine. Statistical Analysis: Two way analysis of variance and Scheffe's test. Results: Gutta-percha/AH Plus root fillings showed significantly highest bond strength. Also, root segment location did not have a significant influence on bond strength. Conclusion: The adhesiveness quality to root dentin promoted by newer methacrylate resin-based obturation systems like Resilon/Epihany SE and EndoREZ is compromised even when teeth with simple anatomic features were obturated under well-monitored laboratory conditions. PMID:23833458

  6. Measurement of antibodies to avian influenza virus A(H7N7) in humans by hemagglutination inhibition test.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Adam; Bosman, Arnold; van de Kamp, Esther E H M; Wilbrink, Berry; Du Ry van Beest Holle, Mirna; Koopmans, Marion

    2006-03-01

    During the epizootic of highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N7) in 2003 in The Netherlands, RT-PCR and culture confirmed infection was detected in 89 persons who were ill. A modified hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test using horse erythrocytes and 2 hemagglutinating units of virus was applied to assess retrospectively the extent of human (subclinical) infection. Validation of the HI-test with sera from 34 RT-PCR and culture confirmed A(H7) infected persons and sera from 100 persons from a human influenza vaccine trial in autumn 2002 showed that this HI-test had a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 100% when using a cut-off titer of > or =10. Using this cut-off value, A(H7) specific antibodies were detected in 49% of 508 persons exposed to poultry and in 64% of 63 persons exposed to A(H7) infected persons. Correlation of seropositivity with the occurrence of eye symptoms in exposed persons who had not received antiviral prophylaxis and of reduced seropositivity with taking antiviral prophylaxis provided further evidence that the A(H7) HI antibody titers were real. In conclusion, by applying an HI-test using horse erythrocytes human antibodies against the avian A(H7N7) virus were detected with high sensitivity and specificity in an unexpectedly high proportion of exposed persons. PMID:16271401

  7. Hydrodynamic Theory of Atomic Mixing in Multicomponent Gases and Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J D

    2001-08-22

    Atomic mixing in multicomponent gases and plasmas is usually described as a diffusional process. The diffusional description is an approximation to a more general dynamical description in which the motion of each individual species or material is governed by its own momentum equation, with appropriate coupling terms to represent the exchange of momentum between different species. These equations are not new, but they are scattered in the literature. Here we summarize the form of these species momentum equations, and the coupling coefficients therein, in sufficient detail to facilitate their inclusion and use to simulate atomic mixing in hydrodynamics codes.

  8. MAGNETIC METHOD FOR PRODUCING HIGH VELOCITY SHOCK WAVES IN GASES

    DOEpatents

    Josephson, V.

    1960-01-26

    A device is described for producing high-energy plasmas comprising a tapered shock tube of dielectric material and having a closed small end, an exceedingly low-inductance coll supported about and axially aligned with the small end of the tapered tube. an elongated multiturn coil supported upon the remninder of the exterior wall of the shock tube. a potential source and switch connected in series with the low-inductance coil, a potential source and switch connected in series with the elongated coil, means for hermetically sealing the large end of the tube, means for purging the tube of gases, and means for admitting a selected gas into the shock tube.

  9. Novel Highly Pathogenic Avian A(H5N2) and A(H5N8) Influenza Viruses of Clade 2.3.4.4 from North America Have Limited Capacity for Replication and Transmission in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Bryan S.; Russier, Marion; Jeevan, Trushar; Marathe, Bindumadhav; Govorkova, Elena A.; Russell, Charles J.; Kim-Torchetti, Mia; Choi, Young Ki; Brown, Ian; Saito, Takehiko; Stallknecht, David E.; Krauss, Scott

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Highly pathogenic influenza A(H5N8) viruses from clade 2.3.4.4 were introduced to North America by migratory birds in the fall of 2014. Reassortment of A(H5N8) viruses with avian viruses of North American lineage resulted in the generation of novel A(H5N2) viruses with novel genotypes. Through sequencing of recent avian influenza viruses, we identified PB1 and NP gene segments very similar to those in the viruses isolated from North American waterfowl prior to the introduction of A(H5N8) to North America, highlighting these bird species in the origin of reassortant A(H5N2) viruses. While they were highly virulent and transmissible in poultry, we found A(H5N2) viruses to be low pathogenic in mice and ferrets, and replication was limited in both hosts compared with those of recent highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses. Molecular characterization of the hemagglutinin protein from A(H5N2) viruses showed that the receptor binding preference, cleavage, and pH of activation were highly adapted for replication in avian species and similar to those of other 2.3.4.4 viruses. In addition, North American and Eurasian clade 2.3.4.4 H5NX viruses replicated to significantly lower titers in differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells than did seasonal human A(H1N1) and highly pathogenic A(H5N1) viruses isolated from a human case. Thus, despite their having a high impact on poultry, our findings suggest that the recently emerging North American A(H5N2) viruses are not expected to pose a substantial threat to humans and other mammals without further reassortment and/or adaptation and that reassortment with North American viruses has not had a major impact on viral phenotype. IMPORTANCE Highly pathogenic H5 influenza viruses have been introduced into North America from Asia, causing extensive morbidity and mortality in domestic poultry. The introduced viruses have reassorted with North American avian influenza viruses, generating viral genotypes

  10. Novel Highly Pathogenic Avian A(H5N2) and A(H5N8) Influenza Viruses of Clade 2.3.4.4 from North America Have Limited Capacity for Replication and Transmission in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Bryan S; Russier, Marion; Jeevan, Trushar; Marathe, Bindumadhav; Govorkova, Elena A; Russell, Charles J; Kim-Torchetti, Mia; Choi, Young Ki; Brown, Ian; Saito, Takehiko; Stallknecht, David E; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic influenza A(H5N8) viruses from clade 2.3.4.4 were introduced to North America by migratory birds in the fall of 2014. Reassortment of A(H5N8) viruses with avian viruses of North American lineage resulted in the generation of novel A(H5N2) viruses with novel genotypes. Through sequencing of recent avian influenza viruses, we identified PB1 and NP gene segments very similar to those in the viruses isolated from North American waterfowl prior to the introduction of A(H5N8) to North America, highlighting these bird species in the origin of reassortant A(H5N2) viruses. While they were highly virulent and transmissible in poultry, we found A(H5N2) viruses to be low pathogenic in mice and ferrets, and replication was limited in both hosts compared with those of recent highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses. Molecular characterization of the hemagglutinin protein from A(H5N2) viruses showed that the receptor binding preference, cleavage, and pH of activation were highly adapted for replication in avian species and similar to those of other 2.3.4.4 viruses. In addition, North American and Eurasian clade 2.3.4.4 H5NX viruses replicated to significantly lower titers in differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells than did seasonal human A(H1N1) and highly pathogenic A(H5N1) viruses isolated from a human case. Thus, despite their having a high impact on poultry, our findings suggest that the recently emerging North American A(H5N2) viruses are not expected to pose a substantial threat to humans and other mammals without further reassortment and/or adaptation and that reassortment with North American viruses has not had a major impact on viral phenotype. IMPORTANCE Highly pathogenic H5 influenza viruses have been introduced into North America from Asia, causing extensive morbidity and mortality in domestic poultry. The introduced viruses have reassorted with North American avian influenza viruses, generating viral genotypes not seen on

  11. 41 CFR 50-204.70 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Compressed gases. 50-204... Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists § 50-204.70 Compressed gases. The in-plant handling, storage, and utilization of all compressed gases in cylinders, portable tanks, rail tankcars, or motor vehicle cargo...

  12. 41 CFR 50-204.70 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Compressed gases. 50-204... Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists § 50-204.70 Compressed gases. The in-plant handling, storage, and utilization of all compressed gases in cylinders, portable tanks, rail tankcars, or motor vehicle cargo...

  13. 41 CFR 50-204.70 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compressed gases. 50-204... Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists § 50-204.70 Compressed gases. The in-plant handling, storage, and utilization of all compressed gases in cylinders, portable tanks, rail tankcars, or motor vehicle cargo...

  14. 41 CFR 50-204.70 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Compressed gases. 50-204... Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists § 50-204.70 Compressed gases. The in-plant handling, storage, and utilization of all compressed gases in cylinders, portable tanks, rail tankcars, or motor vehicle cargo...

  15. 40 CFR 86.514-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.514-78 Section 86.514-78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.514-78 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases...

  16. El Chichon - Composition of plume gases and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotra, J. P.; Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Hart, M. A.; Moyers, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Aircraft measurements were made of trace gases, atmospheric particles, and condensed acid volatiles in the plume of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico, in November 1982. Hydrogen sulfide was the primary gaseous sulfur species in the plume at the time of collection. Concentrations of 28 elements were determined by neutron activation analysis of particulate material from the plume. The volatile elements sulfur, chlorine, arsenic, selenium, bromine, antimony, iodine, tungsten, and mercury were enriched relative to bulk pyroclastic material by factors of 60 to 20,000. Arsenic, antimony, and selenium were associated predominantly with small (not greater than 3 micrometer) particles. Calcium and sodium were present almost exclusively on larger particles and aluminum and manganese were bimodally distributed. Ashladen particulate material injected into the stratosphere during the early violent eruptions was enriched by factors of 10 to 30 relative to ash in some of the same elements observed in the quiescent plume.

  17. Squishy Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habdas, Piotr; Weeks, Eric R.; Lynn, David G.

    2006-05-01

    Most people do not realize that many substances they use in the kitchen and the bathroom are not simple liquids or solids. Everyone is familiar with three states of matter: solids, liquids, and gases. However, creams, shampoo, toothpaste, and ketchup all have properties of both liquids and solids. This paper describes demonstrations and laboratory exercises1 that show intriguing properties of squishy substances, defined as materials that are not unambiguously solid, liquid, or gas. Unlike some areas of physics, the concepts behind squishy materials are understandable even by beginning students. Squishy physics can be used to show physics questions arising from everyday life and to convey the excitement of current research.

  18. Insights into the Indian Peanut Genotypes for ahFAD2 Gene Polymorphism Regulating Its Oleic and Linoleic Acid Fluxes.

    PubMed

    Nawade, Bhagwat; Bosamia, Tejas C; Thankappan, Radhakrishnan; Rathnakumar, Arulthambi L; Kumar, Abhay; Dobaria, Jentilal R; Kundu, Rahul; Mishra, Gyan P

    2016-01-01

    In peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), the customization of fatty acid profile is an evolving area to fulfill the nutritional needs in the modern market. A total of 174 peanut genotypes, including 167 Indian cultivars, 6 advanced breeding lines and "SunOleic95R"-a double mutant line, were investigated using AS-PCRs, CAPS and gene sequencing for the ahFAD2 allele polymorphism, along with its fatty acid compositions. Of these, 80 genotypes were found having substitution (448G>A) mutation only in ahFAD2A gene, while none recorded 1-bp insertion (441_442insA) mutation in ahFAD2B gene. Moreover, 22 wild peanut accessions found lacking both the mutations. Among botanical types, the ahFAD2A mutation was more frequent in ssp. hypogaea (89%) than in ssp. fastigiata (17%). This single allele mutation, found affecting not only oleic to linoleic acid fluxes, but also the composition of other fatty acids in the genotypes studied. Repeated use of a few selected genotypes in the Indian varietal development programs were also eminently reflected in its ahFAD2 allele polymorphism. Absence of known mutations in the wild-relatives indicated the possible origin of these mutations, after the allotetraploidization of cultivated peanut. The SNP analysis of both ahFAD2A and ahFAD2B genes, revealed haplotype diversity of 1.05% and 0.95%, while Ka/Ks ratio of 0.36 and 0.39, respectively, indicating strong purifying selection pressure on these genes. Cluster analysis, using ahFAD2 gene SNPs, showed presence of both mutant and non-mutant genotypes in the same cluster, which might be due the presence of ahFAD2 gene families. This investigation provided insights into the large number of Indian peanut genotypes, covering various aspects related to O/L flux regulation and ahFAD2 gene polymorphism. PMID:27610115

  19. Insights into the Indian Peanut Genotypes for ahFAD2 Gene Polymorphism Regulating Its Oleic and Linoleic Acid Fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Nawade, Bhagwat; Bosamia, Tejas C.; Thankappan, Radhakrishnan; Rathnakumar, Arulthambi L.; Kumar, Abhay; Dobaria, Jentilal R.; Kundu, Rahul; Mishra, Gyan P.

    2016-01-01

    In peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), the customization of fatty acid profile is an evolving area to fulfill the nutritional needs in the modern market. A total of 174 peanut genotypes, including 167 Indian cultivars, 6 advanced breeding lines and “SunOleic95R”—a double mutant line, were investigated using AS-PCRs, CAPS and gene sequencing for the ahFAD2 allele polymorphism, along with its fatty acid compositions. Of these, 80 genotypes were found having substitution (448G>A) mutation only in ahFAD2A gene, while none recorded 1-bp insertion (441_442insA) mutation in ahFAD2B gene. Moreover, 22 wild peanut accessions found lacking both the mutations. Among botanical types, the ahFAD2A mutation was more frequent in ssp. hypogaea (89%) than in ssp. fastigiata (17%). This single allele mutation, found affecting not only oleic to linoleic acid fluxes, but also the composition of other fatty acids in the genotypes studied. Repeated use of a few selected genotypes in the Indian varietal development programs were also eminently reflected in its ahFAD2 allele polymorphism. Absence of known mutations in the wild-relatives indicated the possible origin of these mutations, after the allotetraploidization of cultivated peanut. The SNP analysis of both ahFAD2A and ahFAD2B genes, revealed haplotype diversity of 1.05% and 0.95%, while Ka/Ks ratio of 0.36 and 0.39, respectively, indicating strong purifying selection pressure on these genes. Cluster analysis, using ahFAD2 gene SNPs, showed presence of both mutant and non-mutant genotypes in the same cluster, which might be due the presence of ahFAD2 gene families. This investigation provided insights into the large number of Indian peanut genotypes, covering various aspects related to O/L flux regulation and ahFAD2 gene polymorphism. PMID:27610115

  20. Methanol production from fermentor off-gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, B. E.; Moreira, A. R.

    The off gases from an acetone butanol fermentation facility are composed mainly of CO2 and H2. Such a gas stream is an ideal candidate as a feed to a methanol synthesis plant utilizing modern technology recently developed and known as the CDH-methanol process. A detailed economic analysis for the incremental cost of a methanol synthesis plant utilizing the off gases from an acetone butanol fermentation indicates a profitable rate of return of 25 to 30% under the most likely production conditions. Bench scale studies at different fermentor mixing rates indicate that the volume of gases released during the fermentation is a strong function of the agitation rate and point to a potential interaction between the volume of H2 evolved and the levels of butanol present in the final fermented broth. Such interaction may require establishing optimum operating conditions for an integrated butanol fermentation methanol synthesis plant.

  1. Rare gases in cyclosilicates and cogenetic minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, K.; Alexander, E. C., Jr.; Dragon, J. C.; Zashu, S.

    1984-01-01

    The cyclosilicate minerals, beryl, tourmaline, and cordierite, typically contain large amounts of He-4 and Ar-40 which are not in situ radiogenic products. In the study of excess rare gases in cyclosilicates, one of the most enigmatic observations is the age effect, a qualitative tendency for geologically older samples to contain more excess He-4 and Ar-40 than younger samples. The present investigation is concerned with measurements regarding the abundance and isotopic composition of all five rare gases in a number of cyclosilicates as well as in their cogenetic minerals. The significance of the obtained data is discussed. The data indicate that cyclosilicates sample the rare gases present in the environment in which they crystallize. This 'sampling' involves major elemental fractionations which are variable but mineral specific. Cyclosilicates can, therefore, be used to probe the isotopic ratios and elemental compositions.

  2. Where do California's greenhouse gases come from?

    ScienceCinema

    Fischer, Marc

    2013-05-29

    Last March, more than two years after California passed legislation to slash greenhouse gas emissions 25 percent by 2020, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist Marc Fischer boarded a Cessna loaded with air monitoring equipment and crisscrossed the skies above Sacramento and the Bay Area. Instruments aboard the aircraft measured a cocktail of greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide from fossil fuel use, methane from livestock and landfills, CO2 from refineries and power plants, traces of nitrous oxide from agriculture and fuel use, and industrially produced other gases like refrigerants. The flight was part of the Airborne Greenhouse Gas Emissions Survey, a collaboration between Berkeley Lab, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the University of California, and UC Davis to pinpoint the sources of greenhouse gases in central California. The survey is intended to improve inventories of the states greenhouse gas emissions, which in turn will help scientists verify the emission reductions mandated by AB-32, the legislation enacted by California in 2006.

  3. Bromine-containing source gases during EASOE

    SciTech Connect

    Fabian, P. ); Borchers, R.; Kourtidis, K. )

    1994-06-22

    The authors report three different vertical profile measurements of three bromine containing gases which are thought to be the major sources of active bromine in the stratosphere. These gases are CBrClF[sub 2] (Halon-1211), CBrF[sub 3] (Halon-1301) and methyl bromide (CH[sub 3]Br). They were sampled using cryogenic samplers from balloon borne flights from Kiruna during January, February and March 1992. The two halons are of anthropogenic origin, while methyl bromide is thought to have a relatively large natural origin. Consistent with the decrease in concentration of these gases with altitude was an increase in the density of BrO[sub x] with altitude.

  4. Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    2001-01-01

    AGAGE comprises continuous high frequency in-situ gas chromatographic FID/ECD measurements of two biogenic/anthropogenic gases (CH4, N2O) and five anthropogenic gases (CFCl3, CF2Cl2, CH3CCl3, CF2ClCFCl2, CCl4) which are carried out at five globally distributed sites (Ireland, California, Barbados, Samoa, Tasmania). Also, high frequency in-situ gas-chromatographic mass spectrometric measurements of about 30 species including chlorofluorocarbon replacements and many natural halocarbons are made at two sites (Ireland, Tasmania), and will soon begin at the other three sites. Finally, high frequency in-situ gas chromatographic HgO-RD measurements of CO and H2 are performed at two sites (Ireland, Tasmania). The goal is quantitative determination of the sources, sinks, and circulation of these environmentally important gases.

  5. Where do California's greenhouse gases come from?

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Last March, more than two years after California passed legislation to slash greenhouse gas emissions 25 percent by 2020, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist Marc Fischer boarded a Cessna loaded with air monitoring equipment and crisscrossed the skies above Sacramento and the Bay Area. Instruments aboard the aircraft measured a cocktail of greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide from fossil fuel use, methane from livestock and landfills, CO2 from refineries and power plants, traces of nitrous oxide from agriculture and fuel use, and industrially produced other gases like refrigerants. The flight was part of the Airborne Greenhouse Gas Emissions Survey, a collaboration between Berkeley Lab, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the University of California, and UC Davis to pinpoint the sources of greenhouse gases in central California. The survey is intended to improve inventories of the states greenhouse gas emissions, which in turn will help scientists verify the emission reductions mandated by AB-32, the legislation enacted by California in 2006.

  6. Bioprocessing of organic gases in waste air

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, H.L.

    1993-12-31

    Natural porous media (soils, compost, peat, wood bark chips) in biofilters effectively, safely, and inexpensively remove organic gases from air by adsorbing then and oxidizing them to CO{sub 2}. The sorption capacities of the media are low: their effectiveness is due to oxidation by the active microbial population which disposes the gas and continuously regenerates the sorption capacity. O-, N-, and S-containing organic gases generally oxidize rapidly and {>=}95% removal efficiency is routine. Aromatic and halogenated organic gases oxidize slowly and require correspondingly larger biofilter beds and reaction times to achieve high removal efficiencies. Installation costs of biofilters vary widely, operating costs are low because no fuel or oxidant is required, and no secondary pollution is created.

  7. Dark lump excitations in superfluid Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan-Xia; Duan, Wen-Shan

    2012-11-01

    We study the linear and nonlinear properties of two-dimensional matter-wave pulses in disk-shaped superfluid Fermi gases. A Kadomtsev—Petviashvili I (KPI) solitary wave has been realized for superfluid Fermi gases in the limited cases of Bardeen—Cooper—Schrieffer (BCS) regime, Bose—Einstein condensate (BEC) regime, and unitarity regime. One-lump solution as well as one-line soliton solutions for the KPI equation are obtained, and two-line soliton solutions with the same amplitude are also studied in the limited cases. The dependence of the lump propagating velocity and the sound speed of two-dimensional superfluid Fermi gases on the interaction parameter are investigated for the limited cases of BEC and unitarity.

  8. Evolution of the receptor binding properties of the influenza A(H3N2) hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi Pu; Xiong, Xiaoli; Wharton, Stephen A; Martin, Stephen R; Coombs, Peter J; Vachieri, Sebastien G; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Walker, Philip A; Liu, Junfeng; Skehel, John J; Gamblin, Steven J; Hay, Alan J; Daniels, Rodney S; McCauley, John W

    2012-12-26

    The hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A(H3N2) virus responsible for the 1968 influenza pandemic derived from an avian virus. On introduction into humans, its receptor binding properties had changed from a preference for avian receptors (α2,3-linked sialic acid) to a preference for human receptors (α2,6-linked sialic acid). By 2001, the avidity of human H3 viruses for avian receptors had declined, and since then the affinity for human receptors has also decreased significantly. These changes in receptor binding, which correlate with increased difficulties in virus propagation in vitro and in antigenic analysis, have been assessed by virus hemagglutination of erythrocytes from different species and quantified by measuring virus binding to receptor analogs using surface biolayer interferometry. Crystal structures of HA-receptor analog complexes formed with HAs from viruses isolated in 2004 and 2005 reveal significant differences in the conformation of the 220-loop of HA1, relative to the 1968 structure, resulting in altered interactions between the HA and the receptor analog that explain the changes in receptor affinity. Site-specific mutagenesis shows the HA1 Asp-225→Asn substitution to be the key determinant of the decreased receptor binding in viruses circulating since 2005. Our results indicate that the evolution of human influenza A(H3N2) viruses since 1968 has produced a virus with a low propensity to bind human receptor analogs, and this loss of avidity correlates with the marked reduction in A(H3N2) virus disease impact in the last 10 y. PMID:23236176

  9. An Influenza A/H1N1/2009 Hemagglutinin Vaccine Produced in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Yáñez, José M.; Portillo-Lara, Roberto; Mendoza-Ochoa, Gonzalo I.; García-Echauri, Sergio A.; López-Pacheco, Felipe; Bulnes-Abundis, David; Salgado-Gallegos, Johari; Lara-Mayorga, Itzel M.; Webb-Vargas, Yenny; León-Angel, Felipe O.; Rivero-Aranda, Ramón E.; Oropeza-Almazán, Yuriana; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M.; Zertuche-Guerra, Manuel I.; DuBois, Rebecca M.; White, Stephen W.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Russell, Charles J.; Alvarez, Mario M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The A/H1N1/2009 influenza pandemic made evident the need for faster and higher-yield methods for the production of influenza vaccines. Platforms based on virus culture in mammalian or insect cells are currently under investigation. Alternatively, expression of fragments of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein in prokaryotic systems can potentially be the most efficacious strategy for the manufacture of large quantities of influenza vaccine in a short period of time. Despite experimental evidence on the immunogenic potential of HA protein constructs expressed in bacteria, it is still generally accepted that glycosylation should be a requirement for vaccine efficacy. Methodology/Principal Findings We expressed the globular HA receptor binding domain, referred to here as HA63–286-RBD, of the influenza A/H1N1/2009 virus in Escherichia coli using a simple, robust and scalable process. The recombinant protein was refolded and purified from the insoluble fraction of the cellular lysate as a single species. Recombinant HA63–286-RBD appears to be properly folded, as shown by analytical ultracentrifugation and bio-recognition assays. It binds specifically to serum antibodies from influenza A/H1N1/2009 patients and was found to be immunogenic, to be capable of triggering the production of neutralizing antibodies, and to have protective activity in the ferret model. Conclusions/Significance Projections based on our production/purification data indicate that this strategy could yield up to half a billion doses of vaccine per month in a medium-scale pharmaceutical production facility equipped for bacterial culture. Also, our findings demonstrate that glycosylation is not a mandatory requirement for influenza vaccine efficacy. PMID:20661476

  10. Genetic variants associated with severe pneumonia in A/H1N1 influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga, J; Buendía-Roldán, I; Zhao, Y; Jiménez, L; Torres, D; Romo, J; Ramírez, G; Cruz, A; Vargas-Alarcon, G; Sheu, C-C; Chen, F; Su, L; Tager, A M; Pardo, A; Selman, M; Christiani, D C

    2012-03-01

    The A/H1N1 influenza strain isolated in Mexico in 2009 caused severe pulmonary illness in a small number of exposed individuals. Our objective was to determine the influence of genetic factors on their susceptibility. We carried out a case-control association study genotyping 91 patients with confirmed severe pneumonia from A/H1N1 infection and 98 exposed but asymptomatic household contacts, using the HumanCVD BeadChip (Illumina, San Diego, CA, USA). Four risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly (p<0.0001) associated with severe pneumonia: rs1801274 (Fc fragment of immunoglobulin G, low-affinity IIA, receptor (FCGR2A) gene, chromosome 1; OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.69-4.25); rs9856661 (gene unknown, chromosome 3; OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.64-4.18); rs8070740 (RPA interacting protein (RPAIN) gene, chromosome 17; OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.63-4.39); and rs3786054 (complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) gene, chromosome 17; OR 3.13, 95% CI 1.89-5.17). All SNP associations remained significant after adjustment for sex and comorbidities. The SNPs on chromosome 17 were in linkage disequilibrium. These findings revealed that gene polymorphisms located in chromosomes 1 and 17 might influence susceptibility to development of severe pneumonia in A/H1N1 infection. Two of these SNPs are mapped within genes (FCGR2A, C1QBP) involved in the handling of immune complexes and complement activation, respectively, suggesting that these genes may confer risk due to increased activation of host immunity. PMID:21737555

  11. The future of energy gases

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, D.G.

    1995-04-01

    Natural gas, mainly methane, produces lower CO {sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x}, SO {sub 2} and particulate emissions than either oil or coal; thus further substitutions of methane for these fuels could help mitigate air pollution. Methane is, however, a potent greenhouse gas and the domestication of ruminants, cultivation of rice, mining of coal, drilling for oil, and transportation of natural gas have all contributed to a doubling of the amount of atmospheric methane since 1800. Today nearly 300,000 wells yearly produce each 21 trillion cubic feet of methane. Known reserves suggest about a 10 year supply at the above rates of recovery; and the potential for undiscovered resources is obscured by uncertainty involving price, new technologies, and environmental restrictions stemming from the need to drill an enormous number of wells, many in ecologically sensitive areas. The atomic simplicity of methane, composed of one carbon and four hydrogen atoms, may mask the complexity of this, the most basic of organic molecules. Within the Earth, methane is produced through thermochemical alteration of organic materials, and by biochemical reactions mediated by metabolic processes of archaebacteria; some methane may even be primordial, a residue of planetary accretion. Methane is known to exist in the mantle and lower crust. Near the Earth`s surface, methane occurs in enormous oil and/or gas reservoirs in rock, and is absorbed in coal, dissolved in water, and trapped in a latticework of ice-like material called gas hydrate. Methane also occurs in smaller volumes in landfills, rice paddies, termite complexes, ruminants, and even many humans. As an energy source, methane accounts for roughly 25 percent of current U.S. consumption, but its full energy potential is controversial. Methane is touted by some as a viable bridge to future energy systems, fueled by the sun and uranium and carried by electricity and hydrogen.

  12. NMR studies and applications of perfluorocarbon gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yulin

    Hyperpolarized 3He has been very successful in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lungs. It provides ways to study the physiological properties of the lungs and lung function. However, the high costs of the polarizing apparatus and the complicated polarizing procedure are preventing this technique from being clinically used routinely. Recent developments have shown that several fluorinated gases have the potential to replace 3He in some of its applications. This thesis presents some preliminary results of human excised lung imaging using C2F6 and C3F8. These two fluorinated gases were able to yield images with good signal-to-noise ratio and reasonable resolutions in a 1.5 T magnet. Using diffusion MRI of these two gases can distinguish emphysematous lungs from healthy ones. An important application of these gases would be to determine local lung surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio in vivo, which requires the unrestricted (free) diffusivity in each pixel to be known. We present data in this thesis which allow free diffusivities to be calculated from the relaxation time T1. Samples of pure C 2F6 and C3F8 at different pressures and in mixtures with oxygen at different concentrations were made. Measurements were done at two different magnetic fields and temperature was regulated to study the temperature dependence over a small range. These two gases were also used in studies of carbon-block filters, where the strong adsorption of the gases to the high surface-area carbon is beneficial. A brief review of our work on mouse lung imaging using hyperpolarized 3He is presented in Appendix A; Appendix B is a study of the longitudinal spin magnetization in the presence of a strong magnetic field gradient; the construction of the pulsed field gradient waveform measurement coils and some experimental results using these coils are contained in Appendix C.

  13. 2-dimensional GaSe: Single crystal growth and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Huong; Nguyen, Anh Phuong; Duong, Anh Tuan; Nguyen, Van Quang; Song, Jae Yong; Park, Hyun-Min; Cho, Sunglae

    Like other semiconductor materials in III - VI compounds group (GaTe, In2Se3), Gallium Selenide (GaSe) is a layered chalcogenide semiconductor crystal with several outstanding properties. In most of the research, GaSe crystal was grown by Bridgman method which used a complex system to control difference temperature zones and the movement of ampoule. In our research, GaSe single crystal was grown from the high purity Ga and Se by temperature gradient method. This method is a simple growth technique producing high quality GaSe single crystal. The grown crystal can be cleaved in layer by layer without difficulty, confirmed the layered structure of GaSe. Meanwhile, the X-ray diffraction (XRD) result indicates the crystalline perfection of the grown single crystal as a hexagonal structure. The compositional and optical properties of sample have also been investigated by Electron probe micro-analyzer and UV-visible spectroscopy techniques, respectively. The absorption spectra analysis revealed the energy band gap of 1.98 eV, which is comparable to the reference value of 2.03 eV. We will discuss on layer thickness dependent optical properties of GaSe.

  14. A highly immunogenic vaccine against A/H7N9 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weiping; Liepkalns, Justine S; Hassan, Ahmed O; Kamal, Ram P; Hofstetter, Amelia R; Amoah, Samuel; Kim, Jin Hyang; Reber, Adrian J; Stevens, James; Katz, Jacqueline M; Gangappa, Shivaprakash; York, Ian A; Mittal, Suresh K; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2016-02-01

    Since the first case of human infection in March 2013, continued reports of H7N9 cases highlight a potential pandemic threat. Highly immunogenic vaccines to this virus are urgently needed to protect vulnerable populations who lack protective immunity. In this study, an egg- and adjuvant-independent adenoviral vector-based, hemagglutinin H7 subtype influenza vaccine (HAd-H7HA) demonstrated enhanced cell-mediated immunity as well as serum antibody responses in a mouse model. Most importantly, this vaccine provided complete protection against homologous A/H7N9 viral challenge suggesting its potential utility as a pandemic vaccine. PMID:26765287

  15. EM experiments for computational model validation for AH-1S Cobra Helicopter

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.D.

    1997-04-06

    The effort described here describes a set of outdoor experiments performed on the AH-1S Cobra helicopter in order to validate and compare to the computational electromagnetic models of the bulk structure of the airframe in the frequency bands up to 4 GHz. Also included in this were coupling measurements to wires and cables inside of the airframe and various cavity to HPM pulse in this frequency range as part of other activities. Additionally, the low power modeling compression will be completed in this time frame.

  16. Investigation of difficult component effects on FEM vibration prediction for the AH-1G helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, Robert V.

    1988-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations program, a series of ground vibration tests and NASTRAN finite element model correlations were conducted on the Bell AH-1G helicopter gunship to investigate the effects of difficult components on the vibration response of the airframe. Secondary structure and damping were found to have significant effects on the frequency response of the airframe above 15 Hz. The nonlinear effects of thrust stiffening and elastomeric mounts on the low-frequency pylon modes below the main rotor were also significant.

  17. Performance features of 22-cell, 19Ah single pressure vessel nickel hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    1996-01-01

    Two 22-cells 19Ah Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni-H2) Single Pressure Vessel (SPV) Qual batteries, one each from EPI/Joplin and EPI/Butler, were designed and procured. The two batteries differ in the cell encapsulation technology, stack preload, and activation procedure. Both the Butler and Joplin batteries met the specified requirements when subjected to qualification testing and completed 2100 and 1300 LEO cycles respectively, with nominal performance. This paper discusses advantages, design features, testing procedures, and results of the two single pressure vessel Ni-H2 batteries.

  18. Correlation of AH-1G airframe test data with a NASTRAN mathematical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronkhite, J. D.; Berry, V. L.

    1976-01-01

    Test data was provided for evaluating a mathematical vibration model of the Bell AH-1G helicopter airframe. The math model was developed and analyzed using the NASTRAN structural analysis computer program. Data from static and dynamic tests were used for comparison with the math model. Static tests of the fuselage and tailboom were conducted to verify the stiffness representation of the NASTRAN model. Dynamic test data were obtained from shake tests of the airframe and were used to evaluate the NASTRAN model for representing the low frequency (below 30 Hz) vibration response of the airframe.

  19. Measuring Viscosities of Gases at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Hoshang, Chegini

    1987-01-01

    Variant of general capillary method for measuring viscosities of unknown gases based on use of thermal mass-flowmeter section for direct measurement of pressure drops. In technique, flowmeter serves dual role, providing data for determining volume flow rates and serving as well-characterized capillary-tube section for measurement of differential pressures across it. New method simple, sensitive, and adaptable for absolute or relative viscosity measurements of low-pressure gases. Suited for very complex hydrocarbon mixtures where limitations of classical theory and compositional errors make theoretical calculations less reliable.

  20. Stationary light in cold-atomic gases

    SciTech Connect

    Nikoghosyan, Gor; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2009-07-15

    We discuss stationary light created by a pair of counterpropagating control fields in {lambda}-type atomic gases with electromagnetically induced transparency for the case of negligible Doppler broadening. In this case, the secular approximation used in the discussion of stationary light in hot vapors is no longer valid. We discuss the quality of the effective light-trapping system and show that in contrast to previous claims it is finite even for vanishing ground-state dephasing. The dynamics of the photon loss is in general nonexponential and can be faster or slower than in hot gases.

  1. Composition of gases vented from a condenser

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, R.N.

    1980-08-01

    Designers of systems that involve condensers often need to predict the amount of process vapor that accompanies the noncondensable gases that are vented from the condensers. An approximation is given that appears to provide, in many cases, reasonably accurate values for the mole ratio of process vapor to noncondensable gases in the vented mixture. The approximation is particularly applicable to flash and direct-contact power systems for geothermal brines and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). More regorous relationships are available for exceptional cases.

  2. Dynamics and thermodynamics in spinor quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmaljohann, H.; Erhard, M.; Kronjäger, J.; Sengstock, K.; Bongs, K.

    2004-12-01

    We discuss magnetism in spinor quantum gases theoretically and experimentally with emphasis on temporal dynamics of the spinor order parameter in the presence of an external magnetic field. In a simple coupled Gross Pitaevskii picture we observe a dramatic suppression of spin dynamics due to quadratic Zeeman “dephasing”. In view of an inhomogeneous density profile of the trapped condensate we present evidence of spatial variations of spin dynamics. In addition we study spinor quantum gases as a model system for thermodynamics of Bose Einstein condensation. As a particular example we present measurements on condensate magnetisation due to the interaction with a thermal bath.

  3. Noble Gases in Carbonatite Magmatism: Oldonyo Lengai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnard, P.; Marty, B.; Fischer, T.; Hilton, D.; Mangasini, F.; Makene, C.

    2006-12-01

    Oldonyo Lengai,Tanzania, is the only volcano on Earth that is actively erupting carbonatitic lavas. In order to further constrain the origin of the Oldonyo Lengai magmas, an expedition to Oldonyo Lengai in July 2005 sampled to volcanic gases. Two fumaroles were sampled, one with a discharging temperature of 124 °C, the other more than 168 °C. The chemical composition of discharging gases is dominated by H2O (approx77 mol%) and CO2 (approx 22 mol%), SO2, H2S and HCl make up less than 1 mol%, combined. The inert gases (N2, He, He/Ne) show that these samples contain virtually no air. He/Ne ratios are between 2000 and 6500 and He/Ar ratios are up to 0.3 [Fischer et al, 2006, this volume]. The 3He/4He ratio of 6.7 - 6.8 Ra is consistent with an upper mantle origin of these gases. We have also measured Ne and Xe isotopic compositions of several aliquots of the sampled gases using a multicollector noble gas mass spectrometer (HELIX-MC). The additional precision afforded by multicollection allows us to identify noble gas isotopic anomalies at the sub 5 per mil level. Despite the excellent purity (low atmospheric content) of the gases, as evidenced by extremely high He/Ne ratios, the isotopic compositions of both Ne and Xe are very close to those of the atmosphere: a 2 per mil excess in 129Xe/130Xe ratio was observed (the remaining Xe isotope ratios being indistinguishable from air) and 20Ne/22Ne up to 10.3 was measured (50 per mil higher than air) in a split of the sample that has He/Ne = 6500. Although isotolically anomalous Ne was observed, it is not possible to determine if this is indeed mantle - derived Ne or if the 20Ne excesses result from kinetic fractionationed air entrained within the volcano's plumbing system: the composition of the three Ne isotopes (20Ne, 21Ne and 22Ne) are consistent with mass fractionation processes. Our results are most readily interpreted as atmospheric entrainment prior to sampling. However, further measurements of the remaining noble

  4. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Ohta, Taisuke; Howell, Stephen W.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kowalski, Brian M.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Spataru, Catalin D.; Pask, Jesse A.

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga2Se3 and amorphous Se. Furthermore, photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  5. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    SciTech Connect

    Beechem, Thomas E. Brumbach, Michael T.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Howell, Stephen W.; Ohta, Taisuke; Kowalski, Brian M.; Pask, Jesse A.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Spataru, Catalin D.

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga{sub 2}Se{sub 3} and amorphous Se. Photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  6. Measurement and interpretation of arterial blood gases.

    PubMed

    Syabbalo, N

    1997-01-01

    Arterial blood gases and pH are routinely being measured in clinical practice, both to provide diagnosis and to guide therapy in critically ill patients. Oximetry is clinically useful in establishing the presence of hypoxaemia in patients with respiratory diseases. Oximetry is also a simple and reliable method for monitoring patients undergoing anaesthesia, sleep studies and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. The search continues for new innovative techniques for continuous transcutaneous and intra-arterial blood gas monitoring. This is essential in the management of critically ill patients because blood analysers provide only intermittent monitoring of arterial blood gases. PMID:9293061

  7. Seeing Spin Dynamics in Atomic Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of internal spin, electronic orbital, and nuclear motion states of atoms and molecules have preoccupied the atomic and molecular physics community for decades. Increasingly, such dynamics are being examined within many-body systems composed of atomic and molecular gases. Our findings sometimes bear close relation to phenomena observed in condensed-matter systems, while on other occasions they represent truly new areas of investigation. I discuss several examples of spin dynamics that occur within spinor Bose-Einstein gases, highlighting the advantages of spin-sensitive imaging for understanding and utilizing such dynamics.

  8. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Ohta, Taisuke; Howell, Stephen W.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kowalski, Brian M.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Spataru, Catalin D.; Pask, Jesse A.

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga2Se3 and amorphous Se. Furthermore, photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  9. Managing biogeochemical cycles to reduce greenhouse gases

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Wilfred M; Venterea, Rodney

    2012-01-01

    This special issue focuses on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles as they relate to North America-wide budgeting and future projection of biogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs). Understanding the current magnitude and providing guidance on the future trajectories of atmospheric concentrations of these gases requires investigation of their (i) biogeochemical origins, (ii) response to climate feedbacks and other environmental factors, and (iii) susceptibility to management practices. This special issue provides a group of articles that present the current state of continental scale sources and sinks of biogenic GHGs and the potential to better manage them in the future.

  10. Origins of geothermal gases at Yellowstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Bergfeld, D.; Evans, William C.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Gas emissions at the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF) reflect open-system mixing of gas species originating from diverse rock types, magmas, and crustal fluids, all combined in varying proportions at different thermal areas. Gases are not necessarily in chemical equilibrium with the waters through which they vent, especially in acid sulfate terrain where bubbles stream through stagnant acid water. Gases in adjacent thermal areas often can be differentiated by isotopic and gas ratios, and cannot be tied to one another solely by shallow processes such as boiling-induced fractionation of a parent liquid. Instead, they inherit unique gas ratios (e.g., CH4/He) from the dominant rock reservoirs where they originate, some of which underlie the Quaternary volcanic rocks. Steam/gas ratios (essentially H2O/CO2) of Yellowstone fumaroles correlate with Ar/He and N2/CO2, strongly suggesting that H2O/CO2 is controlled by addition of steam boiled from water rich in atmospheric gases. Moreover, H2O/CO2 varies systematically with geographic location, such that boiling is more enhanced in some areas than others. The δ13C and 3He/CO2 of gases reflect a dominant mantle origin for CO2 in Yellowstone gas. The mantle signature is most evident at Mud Volcano, which hosts gases with the lowest H2O/CO2, lowest CH4 concentrations and highest He isotope ratios (~16Ra), consistent with either a young subsurface intrusion or less input of crustal and meteoric gas than any other location at Yellowstone. Across the YPVF, He isotope ratios (3He/4He) inversely vary with He concentrations, and reflect varied amounts of long- stored, radiogenic He added to the magmatic endmember within the crust. Similarly, addition of CH4 from organic-rich sediments is common in the eastern thermal areas at Yellowstone. Overall, Yellowstone gases reflect addition of deep, high-temperature magmatic gas (CO2-rich), lower-temperatures crustal gases (4He- and CH4-bearing), and those gases (N2, Ne, Ar) added

  11. Origins of geothermal gases at Yellowstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Bergfeld, Deborah; Evans, William C.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-09-01

    Gas emissions at the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF) reflect open-system mixing of gas species originating from diverse rock types, magmas, and crustal fluids, all combined in varying proportions at different thermal areas. Gases are not necessarily in chemical equilibrium with the waters through which they vent, especially in acid sulfate terrain where bubbles stream through stagnant acid water. Gases in adjacent thermal areas often can be differentiated by isotopic and gas ratios, and cannot be tied to one another solely by shallow processes such as boiling-induced fractionation of a parent liquid. Instead, they inherit unique gas ratios (e.g., CH4/He) from the dominant rock reservoirs where they originate, some of which underlie the Quaternary volcanic rocks. Steam/gas ratios (essentially H2O/CO2) of Yellowstone fumaroles correlate with Ar/He and N2/CO2, strongly suggesting that H2O/CO2 is controlled by addition of steam boiled from water rich in atmospheric gases. Moreover, H2O/CO2 varies systematically with geographic location, such that boiling is more enhanced in some areas than others. The δ13C and 3He/CO2 of gases reflect a dominant mantle origin for CO2 in Yellowstone gas. The mantle signature is most evident at Mud Volcano, which hosts gases with the lowest H2O/CO2, lowest CH4 concentrations and highest He isotope ratios (~ 16Ra), consistent with either a young subsurface intrusion or less input of crustal and meteoric gas than any other location at Yellowstone. Across the YPVF, He isotope ratios (3He/4He) inversely vary with He concentrations, and reflect varied amounts of long-stored, radiogenic He added to the magmatic endmember within the crust. Similarly, addition of CH4 from organic-rich sediments is common in the eastern thermal areas at Yellowstone. Overall, Yellowstone gases reflect addition of deep, high-temperature magmatic gas (CO2-rich), lower-temperatures crustal gases (4He- and CH4-bearing), and those gases (N2, Ne, Ar) added

  12. The Flow of Gases in Narrow Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, R E H

    1951-01-01

    Measurements were made of the flow of gases through various narrow channels a few microns wide at average pressures from 0.00003 to 40 cm. Hg. The flow rate, defined as the product of pressure and volume rate of flow at unit pressure difference, first decreased linearly with decrease in mean pressure in the channel, in agreement with laminar-flow theory, reached a minimum when the mean path length was approximately equal to the channel width, and then increased to a constant value. The product of flow rate and square root of molecular number was approximately the same function of mean path length for all gases for a given channel.

  13. Infant Respiratory Outcomes Associated with Prenatal Exposure to Maternal 2009 A/H1N1 Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fell, Deshayne B.; Wilson, Kumanan; Ducharme, Robin; Hawken, Steven; Sprague, Ann E.; Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Smith, Graeme; Wen, Shi Wu; Walker, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Infants are at high risk for influenza illness, but are ineligible for vaccination before 6 months. Transfer of maternal antibodies to the fetus has been demonstrated for 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic vaccines; however, clinical effectiveness is unknown. Our objective was to evaluate the association between 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic vaccination during pregnancy and rates of infant influenza and pneumonia. Methods We linked a population-based birth cohort to administrative databases to measure rates of influenza and pneumonia diagnosed during ambulatory physician visits, hospitalizations and emergency department visits during one year of follow-up. We estimated incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) using Poisson regression, comparing infants born to A/H1N1-vaccinated women (vaccine-exposed infants) with unexposed infants, adjusted for confounding using high-dimensional propensity scores. Results Among 117,335 infants in the study, 36,033 (31%) were born to A/H1N1-vaccinated women. Crude rates of influenza during the pandemic (per 100,000 infant-days) for vaccine-exposed and unexposed infants were similar (2.19, 95% CI: 1.27–3.76 and 3.60, 95% CI: 2.51–5.14, respectively), as were crude rates of influenza and pneumonia combined. We did not observe any significant differences in rates of study outcomes between study groups during the second wave of the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic, nor during any post-pandemic time period. Conclusion We observed no difference in rates of study outcomes among infants born to A/H1N1-vaccinated mothers relative to unexposed infants born during the second A/H1N1 pandemic wave; however, due to late availability of the pandemic vaccine, the available follow-up time during the pandemic time period was very limited. PMID:27486858

  14. Remodeling of Hyperpolarization-Activated Current, Ih, in Ah-Type Visceral Ganglion Neurons Following Ovariectomy in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Xiao; Yan, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jia-Ying; Zhang, Hao-Cheng; Wang, Li-Juan; Pan, Xiao-Dong; Fu, Yili

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated currents (Ih) mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels modulate excitability of myelinated A− and Ah-type visceral ganglion neurons (VGN). Whether alterations in Ih underlie the previously reported reduction of excitability of myelinated Ah-type VGNs following ovariectomy (OVX) has remained unclear. Here we used the intact nodose ganglion preparation in conjunction with electrophysiological approaches to examine the role of Ih remodeling in altering Ah-type neuron excitability following ovariectomy in adult rats. Ah-type neurons were identified based on their afferent conduction velocity. Ah-type neurons in nodose ganglia from non-OVX rats exhibited a voltage ‘sag’ as well as ‘rebound’ action potentials immediately following hyperpolarizing current injections, which both were suppressed by the Ih blocker ZD7288. Repetitive spike activity induced afterhyperpolarizations lasting several hundreds of milliseconds (termed post-excitatory membrane hyperpolarizations, PEMHs), which were significantly reduced by ZD7288, suggesting that they resulted from transient deactivation of Ih during the preceding spike trains. Ovariectomy reduced whole-cell Ih density, caused a hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of Ih activation, and slowed Ih activation. OVX-induced Ih remodeling was accompanied by a flattening of the stimulus frequency/response curve and loss of PEMHs. Also, HCN1 mRNA levels were reduced by ∼30% in nodose ganglia from OVX rats compared with their non-OVX counterparts. Acute exposure of nodose ganglia to 17beta-estradiol partly restored Ih density and accelerated Ih activation in Ah-type cells. In conclusion, Ih plays a significant role in modulating the excitability of myelinated Ah-type VGNs in adult female rats. PMID:23951107

  15. Environmental Isotope Characteristics of Landfill Leachates and Gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Keith C.; Liu, Chao-Li; Coleman, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    The isotopic characteristics of municipal landfill leachate and gases (carbon dioxide and methane) are unique relative to the aqueous and gaseous media in most other natural geologic environments. The ??13 C of the CO2 in landfills is significantly enriched in 13C, with values as high as +20??? reported. The ?? 13C and ??D values of the methane fall within a range of values representative of microbial methane produced primarily by the acetate-fermentation process. The ??D of landfill leachate is strongly enriched in deuterium, by approximately 30??? to nearly 60??? relative to local average precipitation values. This deuterium enrichment is undoubtedly due to the extensive production of microbial methane within the limited reservoir of a landfill. The concentration of the radiogenic isotopes, 14C and 3H, are significantly elevated in both landfill leachate and methane. The 14C values range between approximately 120 and 170 pMC and can be explained by the input of organic material that was affected by the increased 14C content of atmospheric CO2 caused by atmospheric testing of nuclear devices. The tritium measured in leachate, however, is often too high to be explained by previous atmospheric levels and must come from material buried within the landfill. The unique isotopic characteristics observed in landfill leachates and gases provide a very useful technique for confirming whether contamination is from a municipal landfill or some other local source.

  16. Interaction of nanodiamonds materials with influenza viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, V. T.; Ivanova, M. V.; Spitsyn, B. V.; Garina, K. O.; Trushakova, S. V.; Manykin, A. A.; Korzhenevsky, A. P.; Burseva, E. I.

    2012-02-01

    The perspectives of the application of modern materials contained nanodiamonds (ND) are considered in this study. The interaction between detonation paniculate ND, soot and influenza A and B viruses, fragments of cDNA were analyzed at the normal conditions. It was shown that these sorbents can interact with the following viruses: reference epidemic strains of influenza A(H1N1), A(H1N1)v, A(H3N2) and B viruses circulated in the word in 2000-2010. The allantoises, concentrated viruses, cDNA can be absorbed by ND sorbents and getting removed from water solutions within 20 min. ND sorbents can be used for the preparation of antivirus filters for water solution and for future diagnostic systems in virology.

  17. Quantitative autoradiography of brain binding sites for the vesicular acetylcholine transport blocker 2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (AH5183)

    SciTech Connect

    Marien, M.R.; Parsons, S.M.; Altar, C.A.

    1987-02-01

    2-(4-Phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (AH5183) is a noncompetitive and potent inhibitor of high-affinity acetylcholine transport into cholinergic vesicles. It is reported here that (/sup 3/H)AH5183 binds specifically and saturably to slide-mounted sections of the rat forebrain (Kd = 1.1 to 2.2 X 10(-8) M; Bmax = 286 to 399 fmol/mg of protein). The association and dissociation rate constants for (/sup 3/H)AH5183 binding are 8.6 X 10(6) M-1 X min-1 and 0.18 min-1, respectively. Bound (/sup 3/H)AH5183 can be displaced by nonradioactive AH5183 and by the structural analog (2 alpha,3 beta,4A beta,8A alpha)-decahydro-3-(4-phenyl-1-piperidinyl)-2- naphthalenol but not by 10 microM concentrations of the cholinergic drugs acetylcholine, choline, atropine, hexamethonium, eserine, or hemicholinium-3 or by the structurally related compounds 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine, (+/-)-N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10,047), levoxadrol, or dexoxadrol. Quantitative autoradiography reveals that (/sup 3/H)AH5183 binding sites are distributed heterogenously throughout the rat forebrain and are highly localized to cholinergic nerve terminal regions. At the level of the caudate nucleus-putamen, the highest concentrations of saturable (/sup 3/H)AH5183 binding (713-751 fmol/mg of protein) are found in the vertical limb of the diagonal band and the olfactory tubercle, with lesser amounts (334-516 fmol/mg of protein) in the caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, superficial layers of the cerebral cortex, and the primary olfactory cortex. At day 7 after transsection of the left fimbria, (/sup 3/H)AH5183 binding and choline acetyltransferase activity in the left hippocampus were reduced by 33 +/- 6% and 61 +/- 7%, respectively. These findings indicate that (/sup 3/H)AH5183 binds to a unique recognition site in rat brain that is topographically associated with cholinergic nerve terminals.

  18. Catalytic desulfurization of industrial waste gases

    SciTech Connect

    Dupin, Th.

    1985-07-30

    Industrial waste gases containing objectionable/polluting compounds of sulfur, e.g., H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/ and such organosulfur derivatives as COS, CS/sub 2/ and mercaptans, are catalytically desulfurized, e.g., by Claus process, employing an improved catalyst comprising titanium dioxide and calcium, barium, strontium or magnesium sulfate.

  19. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  20. Collective modes in cold paramagnetic gases

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, T L; Rubin, P L

    2014-02-28

    We have obtained a condition for the emergence of spin waves in paramagnetic gases Re >> ImÂ, which is fulfilled only at temperatures of the order of 1 μK. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  1. Refractive Indices of Gases at Microwave Frequencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhead, D. T.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple microwave interferometer capable of measuring small phase shifts. Proposes laboratory exercises involving the use of the interferometer in the determination of refractive indices of gases and the analysis of the reflection in a test chamber. (Author/CP)

  2. Elimination of gases and contamination from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, A. P.

    1970-01-01

    Filtration system with membrane type hydrophilic and hydrophobic filters gives absolute filtration with automatic venting of freed gases, and prevents backward transmission of contamination with no bacterial growth through the filters. Filter aids in degassing industrial solutions and in removing oxygen from sea water.

  3. 40 CFR 90.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 90.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. The expiration...); (4) Purified synthetic air, also referred to as “zero air” or “zero gas” (Contamination ≤ 1 ppm C... following chemical compositions must be available: C3 H8 and purified synthetic air and/or C3 H8...

  4. Managing biogeochemical cycles to reduce greenhouse gases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special issue focuses on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and their roles in determining current continental-scale budgets and future trends in biogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) for North America. Understanding the current magnitude and forecasting future trajectories of atmospheric GHG concent...

  5. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from polyether sulfone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Olcomendy, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    A sample of polyether sulfone was evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis gases, using the toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. Animal response times were relatively short at pyrolysis temperatures of 600 to 800 C, with death occurring within 6 min. The principal toxicant appeared to be a compound other than carbon monoxide.

  6. Removing Sulphur Dioxide From Stack Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    Process types, process concepts, claims and counterclaims, cost factors, and the level of developed technology for sulfur dioxide control in stack gases are focused upon and evaluated. Wet and dry processes as well as recovery and throwaway processes are compared. (BL)

  7. Fullerenes and the Nature of Planetary Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann; Poreda, Robert J.; Nuth, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Over the past several decades, two issues have dominated the discussion of planetary noble gas patterns: 1) the general resemblance of the noble gas abundances in carbonaceous chondrites to those measured in the Earth s atmosphere and; 2) atmospheric inventories of argon and neon that fall off significantly with increasing distance from the Sun. The recognition of the latter has led to the conclusion that the planetary component is not found on planets. In particular, the inability to explain the missing xenon reservoir, once thought to be sequestered in crustal rocks has been extremely troublesome. Some models have focused on various fractionations of solar wind rather than condensation as the process for the evolution of noble gases in the terrestrial planets. However, these models cannot explain the observed gradient of the gases, nor do they account for the similar Ne/Ar ratios and the dissimilar planetary Ar/Kr ratios. More recent studies have focused on hydrodynamic escape to explain the fractionation of gases, like neon, in the atmosphere and the mantle. Escape theory also seems to explain, in part, the isotopically heavy argon on Mars, however, it does not explain the discrepancies observed for the abundances of argon and neon on Venus and the Earth. This has led to the assumption that some combination of solar wind implantation, absorption and escape are needed to explain the nature of planetary noble gases.

  8. Phylogeography of Influenza A(H3N2) Virus in Peru, 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha I.; Kasper, Matthew; Tinoco, Yeny; Simons, Mark; Romero, Candice; Silva, Marita; Lin, Xudong; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Fedorova, Nadia; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Wentworth, David; Holmes, Edward C.; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear whether lineages of influenza A(H3N2) virus can persist in the tropics and seed temperate areas. We used viral gene sequence data sampled from Peru to test this source–sink model for a Latin American country. Viruses were obtained during 2010–2012 from influenza surveillance cohorts in Cusco, Tumbes, Puerto Maldonado, and Lima. Specimens positive for influenza A(H3N2) virus were randomly selected and underwent hemagglutinin sequencing and phylogeographic analyses. Analysis of 389 hemagglutinin sequences from Peru and 2,192 global sequences demonstrated interseasonal extinction of Peruvian lineages. Extensive mixing occurred with global clades, but some spatial structure was observed at all sites; this structure was weakest in Lima and Puerto Maldonado, indicating that these locations may experience greater viral traffic. The broad diversity and co-circulation of many simultaneous lineages of H3N2 virus in Peru suggests that this country should not be overlooked as a potential source for novel pandemic strains. PMID:26196599

  9. Effect of LEO cycling on 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen battery cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced 125 Ah individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen cell was designed. The primary function of the advanced cell is to store and deliver energy for long-term, low earth-orbit (LEO) spacecraft missions. The new features of this design are: (1) use of 26 percent rather than 31 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte, (2) use of a patented catalyzed wall wick, (3) use of serrated-edge separators to facilitate gaseous oxygen and hydrogen flow within the cell, while still maintaining physical contact with the wall wick for electrolyte management, and (4) use of a floating rather than a fixed stack (state-of-the-art) to accommodate nickel electrode expansion. Six 125-Ah flight cells based on this design were fabricated by Eagle-Picher. Three of the cells contain all of the advanced features (test cells) and three are the same as the test cells except they don't have catalyst on the wall wick (control cells). All six cells are in the process of being evaluated in a LEO cycle life test. The cells have accumulated about 4700 LEO cycles (60 percent DOD 10 C). There have been no cell failures; the catalyzed wall wick cells, however, are performing better.

  10. Validation test of 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1993-01-01

    An update of validation test results confirming the advanced design nickel-hydrogen cell is presented. An advanced 125 Ah individual pressure vessel Ni-H cell was designed. The primary function of the advanced cell is to store and deliver energy for long-term LEO spacecraft missions. The new features of this design are: (1) use of 26 percent rather than 31 percent KOH electrolyte; (2) use of a patented catalyzed wall wick; (3) use of serrated-edge separators to facilitate gaseous O and H flow within the cell, while maintaining physical contact with the wall wick for electrolyte management; and (4) use of a floating rather than a fixed stack to accommodate Ni electrode expansion due to charge/discharge cycling. The significant improvements resulting from these innovations are extended cycle life; enhanced thermal, electrolyte, and oxygen management; and accommodation of Ni electrode expansion. Six 125 Ah flight cells based on this design were fabricated; the catalyzed wall wick cells have been cycled for over 19,000 cycles with no cell failures in the continuing test. Two of the noncatalyzed wall wick cells failed (cycles 9588 and 13,900).

  11. Effect of LEO cycling on 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen battery cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced 125 Ah individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen cell was designed. The primary function of the advanced cell, is to store and deliver energy for long term, low earth-orbit (LEO) spacecraft missions. The new features of this design are: (1) use of 26 percent rather than 31 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte, (2) use of a patented catalyzed wall wick, (3) use of serrated edge separators to facilitate gaseous oxygen and hydrogen flow within the cell, while still maintaining physical contact with the wall wick for electrolyte management, and (4) use of a floating rather than a fixed stack (state-of-the-art) to accommodate nickel electrode expansion. Six 125 Ah flight cells based on this design were fabricated by Eagle-Picher. Three of the cells contain all of the advanced features (test cells) and three are the same as the test cells except they don't have catalyst on the wall wick (control cells). All six cells are in the process of being evaluated in a LEO cycle life test. The cells have accumulated about 4700 LEO cycles (60 percent DOD 10 C). There have been no cell failures, the catalyzed wall wick cells however, are performing better.

  12. Partial purification and characterization of lipase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus AH22.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Arife Pınar; Dinçer, Barbaros; Baltaş, Nimet; Adıgüzel, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The lipase was partially purified by ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration column chromatography, and was characterized from Geobacillus stearothermophilus AH22 strain. The lipase was purified 18.3-folds with 19.7% recovery. The lipase activity was determined by using p-nitrophenyl esters (C2-C12) as substrates. The Km values of the enzyme for these substrates were found as 0.16, 0.02, 0.19 and 0.55 mM, respectively, while Vmax values were 0.52, 1.03, 0.72 and 0.15 U mg(-1). The enzyme showed maximum activity at 50 °C and between pH 8.0 and 9.0. The enzyme was found to be quite stable at pH range of 4.0-10.0, and thermal stability between 50 and 60 °C. It was found that the best inhibitory effect of the enzyme activity was of Hg(2+). The inhibitory effect as orlistat, catechin, propyl paraben, p-coumaric acid, 3,4-dihydroxy hydro-cinnamic acid was examined. These results suggest that G. stearothermophilus AH22 lipase presents very suitable properties for industrial applications. PMID:25798692

  13. Structural Integrity Recording System (SIR) for U.S. Army AH-1G Helicopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, T. G.; Johnson, R. B.; Tyler, M. C.

    1981-03-01

    A Structural Integrity Recording System (SIRS) was designed and developed to track the fatigue damage accumulation on 10 critical helicopter components for the subsequent timely replacement of such components for safer and more economical helicopter operation. SIRS comprises three discrete but interrelated subsystems: an airborne microprocessor-based recorder, a portable flight-line data retrieval unit, and a software system. The validation of SIRS, initially configured for the AH-1G helicopter, consisted of two phases. Phase I (Development Test and Evaluation - DT E) covered the design, fabrication, laboratory qualification testing, reliability analysis, and flight-testing of the prototype SIRS recorder. Phase II (Initial Operational Test and Evaluation - IOT E) covered the evaluation of the entire system operation and the resultant data acquired during a 3-month recording period with five AH-1G's, each equipped with a SIRS recorder. As the documentation of both DT E and IOT E, this report describes the characteristics and functions of the entire system and details the successful performance of the SIRS recorder in the laboratory qualification testing and the flight environment. The SIRS recorder performed as designed, operated reliably, and yielded valid data.

  14. Metapopulation Dynamics Enable Persistence of Influenza A, Including A/H5N1, in Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Parviez Rana; Fuller, Trevon; Harrigan, Ryan; Zhao, Delong; Arriola, Carmen Sofia; Gonzalez, Armandoe; Miller, Matthew Joshua; Xiao, Xiangming; Smith, Tom B.; Jones, Jamie Holland; Daszak, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic influenza A/H5N1 has persistently but sporadically caused human illness and death since 1997. Yet it is still unclear how this pathogen is able to persist globally. While wild birds seem to be a genetic reservoir for influenza A, they do not seem to be the main source of human illness. Here, we highlight the role that domestic poultry may play in maintaining A/H5N1 globally, using theoretical models of spatial population structure in poultry populations. We find that a metapopulation of moderately sized poultry flocks can sustain the pathogen in a finite poultry population for over two years. Our results suggest that it is possible that moderately intensive backyard farms could sustain the pathogen indefinitely in real systems. This fits a pattern that has been observed from many empirical systems. Rather than just employing standard culling procedures to control the disease, our model suggests ways that poultry production systems may be modified. PMID:24312455

  15. Advanced driver assistance system for AHS over communication links with random packet dropouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Seshadhri; Ayyagari, Ramakalyan

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we propose an advanced driver assist system (ADAS) for platoon based automated highway system (AHS) with packet loss in inter-vehicle communication. Using the concept of rigidity, we first show that vehicles in a platoon tend to fall apart in the event of a packet loss among vehicles. To overcome this, we propose an estimation based dynamic platooning algorithm which employs the state estimate to maintain the platoon. Communication among the vehicle is reduced by using minimum spanning tree (MST) in state estimation algorithm. Effectiveness of the proposed ADAS scheme is illustrated by simulation wherein, dynamic platoons of holonomic vehicles with integrator dynamics are considered. Simulation studies indicate that the proposed algorithm maintains the platoon up to a packet loss rate of 48%. State transmission scheme proposed in our algorithm has three significant advantages, they are: (1) it handles packet loss in inter-vehicle communication, (2) reduces the effect of error in measured output, and (3) reduces the inter-vehicle communication. These advantages significantly increase the reliability and safety of the AHS.

  16. Neuroinvasive influenza virus A(H5N8) in fattening ducks, Hungary, 2015.

    PubMed

    Bányai, Krisztián; Bistyák, Andrea Tóthné; Thuma, Ákos; Gyuris, Éva; Ursu, Krisztina; Marton, Szilvia; Farkas, Szilvia L; Hortobágyi, Eleonóra; Bacsadi, Árpád; Dán, Ádám

    2016-09-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A virus H5N8 was detected in far east Asian countries during 2014 and emerged in late 2014 in European countries. Hungary reported a HPAI A(H5N8) outbreak during late winter of 2015 at a Pekin duck fattening facility. Epidemiologic monitoring was extended to holdings in neighboring areas and nearby habitats used by wild birds but failed to identify the source of infection. In addition to respiratory symptoms, the affected birds showed lethargy and neuronal signs, including torticollis. Consistent with this finding, influenza A virus antigen was detected in large quantity in the brain. Molecular analysis of the identified strain showed very close genetic relationship (and >99% nucleotide sequence identity) with co-circulating HPAI A(H5N8) strains. A number of unique or rarely detected amino acid changes was detected in the HA (T220I, R512G), the M2 (I39M), the NA (T211I), the NS1 (P85T), and the PB2 (I261V) proteins of the Hungarian strain. Further studies are needed to demonstrate whether any of these mutations can be linked to neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence in ducks. PMID:27215706

  17. Metapopulation dynamics enable persistence of influenza A, including A/H5N1, in poultry.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Parviez Rana; Fuller, Trevon; Harrigan, Ryan; Zhao, Delong; Arriola, Carmen Sofia; Gonzalez, Armandoe; Miller, Matthew Joshua; Xiao, Xiangming; Smith, Tom B; Jones, Jamie Holland; Daszak, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic influenza A/H5N1 has persistently but sporadically caused human illness and death since 1997. Yet it is still unclear how this pathogen is able to persist globally. While wild birds seem to be a genetic reservoir for influenza A, they do not seem to be the main source of human illness. Here, we highlight the role that domestic poultry may play in maintaining A/H5N1 globally, using theoretical models of spatial population structure in poultry populations. We find that a metapopulation of moderately sized poultry flocks can sustain the pathogen in a finite poultry population for over two years. Our results suggest that it is possible that moderately intensive backyard farms could sustain the pathogen indefinitely in real systems. This fits a pattern that has been observed from many empirical systems. Rather than just employing standard culling procedures to control the disease, our model suggests ways that poultry production systems may be modified. PMID:24312455

  18. [Direct immunofluorescence assay performance in diagnosis of the Influenza A(H1N1) virus].

    PubMed

    Pianciola, Luis; González, Gladys; Mazzeo, Melina; Navello, Mariano; Quidel, Natalia; Bulgheroni, María Fernanda

    2010-06-01

    By 25 April 2009, less than one month after the first human with Influenza A(H1N1) virus was detected in Mexico, the disease had already spread to more than 40 countries, with over 10,000 cases reported. Due to its unpredictability, this type of virus requires appropriate, reliable, and safe diagnostic methods that are also accessible to clinical laboratories. Through the analysis of 291 samples taken from patients with suspected Influenza A(H1N1) virus infection in Neuquén, Argentina, this study compares the two diagnostic methods used simultaneously: direct immunofluorescence assay (DFA) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). DFA had a sensitivity of 44.4%, a specificity of 99.6%, a positive predictive value of 95.2%, and a negative predictive value of 90.7%. Positive results obtained with this method can be considered true positives. A negative result does not rule out the presence of the virus. In this case, the sample should be examined by RT-PCR. Out of a total of 291 samples, there were 45 positive results with RT-PCR and 21 positive results with DFA. PMID:20721445

  19. Photometric Study of AH Cancri, a W UMa-Type System in M67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, R. X.; Deng, L.

    2005-02-01

    We present time-series CCD photometry of AH Cnc, a W UMa-type binary system in the old open cluster M67. Over 3500 measurements in two filters were recorded on 15 nights from 2001 to 2004. From the data, 17 new times of minima for the eclipsing binary were obtained, from which a new ephemeris was derived. The orbital period of the system is refined as 0.36045754 days. A photometric analysis for the obtained light curves is performed based on the Wilson-Devinney code. The photometric solutions reveal a totally eclipsing contact configuration for AH Cnc. The photometric mass ratio is determined to be 0.149+/-0.002. The masses and radii of the components are estimated as 1.21+/-0.08 Msolar and 1.36+/-0.03 Rsolar for the primary and 0.18+/-0.02 Msolar and 0.62+/-0.02 Rsolar for the secondary, respectively. The evolutionary status of the contact system is briefly discussed.

  20. Hemagglutination Inhibition Antibody Titers as a Correlate of Protection Against Seasonal A/H3N2 Influenza Disease

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Anne; Beran, Jiri; Devaster, Jeanne-Marie; Esen, Meral; Launay, Odile; Leroux-Roels, Geert; McElhaney, Janet E.; Oostvogels, Lidia; van Essen, Gerrit A.; Gaglani, Manjusha; Jackson, Lisa A.; Vesikari, Timo; Legrand, Catherine; Tibaldi, Fabian; Innis, Bruce L.; Dewé, Walthère

    2015-01-01

    Background. To investigate the relationship between hemagglutinin-inhibition (HI) antibody levels to the risk of influenza disease, we conducted a correlate of protection analysis using pooled data from previously published randomized trials. Methods. Data on the occurrence of laboratory-confirmed influenza and HI levels pre- and postvaccination were analyzed from 4 datasets: 3 datasets included subjects aged <65 years who received inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) or placebo, and 1 dataset included subjects aged ≥65 years who received AS03-adjuvanted TIV (AS03-TIV) or TIV. A logistic model was used to evaluate the relationship between the postvaccination titer of A/H3N2 HI antibodies and occurrence of A/H3N2 disease. We then built a receiver-operating characteristic curve to identify a potential cutoff titer between protection and no protection. Results. The baseline odds ratio of A/H3N2 disease was higher for subjects aged ≥65 years than <65 years and higher in seasons of strong epidemic intensity than moderate or low intensity. Including age and epidemic intensity as covariates, a 4-fold increase in titer was associated with a 2-fold decrease in the risk of A/H3N2 disease. Conclusions. The modeling exercise confirmed a relationship between A/H3N2 disease and HI responses, but it did not allow an evaluation of the predictive power of the HI response. PMID:26180823

  1. Modelling influenza A(H1N1) 2009 epidemics using a random network in a distributed computing environment.

    PubMed

    González-Parra, Gilberto; Villanueva, Rafael-J; Ruiz-Baragaño, Javier; Moraño, Jose-A

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we propose the use of a random network model for simulating and understanding the epidemics of influenza A(H1N1). The proposed model is used to simulate the transmission process of influenza A(H1N1) in a community region of Venezuela using distributed computing in order to accomplish many realizations of the underlying random process. These large scale epidemic simulations have recently become an important application of high-performance computing. The network model proposed performs better than the traditional epidemic model based on ordinary differential equations since it adjusts better to the irregularity of the real world data. In addition, the network model allows the consideration of many possibilities regarding the spread of influenza at the population level. The results presented here show how well the SEIR model fits the data for the AH1N1 time series despite the irregularity of the data and returns parameter values that are in good agreement with the medical data regarding AH1N1 influenza virus. This versatile network model approach may be applied to the simulation of the transmission dynamics of several epidemics in human networks. In addition, the simulation can provide useful information for the understanding, prediction and control of the transmission of influenza A(H1N1) epidemics. PMID:25559047

  2. AhR modulates the IL-22-producing cell proliferation/recruitment in imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Cochez, Perrine M; Michiels, Camille; Hendrickx, Emilie; Van Belle, Astrid B; Lemaire, Muriel M; Dauguet, Nicolas; Warnier, Guy; de Heusch, Magali; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Ryffel, Bernhard; Coulie, Pierre G; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Dumoutier, Laure

    2016-06-01

    IL-22 has a detrimental role in skin inflammatory processes, for example in psoriasis. As transcription factor, AhR controls the IL-22 production by several cell types (i.e. Th17 cells). Here, we analyzed the role of Ahr in IL-22 production by immune cells in the inflamed skin, using an imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model. Our results indicate that IL-22 is expressed in the ear of imiquimod-treated Ahr(-/-) mice but less than in wild-type mice. We then studied the role of AhR on three cell populations known to produce IL-22 in the skin: γδ T cells, Th17 cells, and ILC3, and a novel IL-22-producing cell type identified in this setting: CD4(-) CD8(-) TCRβ(+) T cells. We showed that AhR is required for IL-22 production by Th17, but not by the three other cell types, in the imiquimod-treated ears. Moreover, AhR has a role in the recruitment of γδ T cells, ILC3, and CD4(-) CD8(-) TCRβ(+) T cells into the inflamed skin or in their local proliferation. Taken together, AhR has a direct role in IL-22 production by Th17 cells in the mouse ear skin, but not by γδ T cells, CD4(-) CD8(-) TCRβ(+) T cells and ILCs. PMID:27000947

  3. Thickness dependence on the optoelectronic properties of multilayered GaSe based photodetector.

    PubMed

    Ko, Pil Ju; Abderrahmane, Abdelkader; Takamura, Tsukasa; Kim, Nam-Hoon; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2016-08-12

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials exhibit unique optoelectronic properties at atomic thicknesses. In this paper, we fabricated metal-semiconductor-metal based photodetectors using layered gallium selenide (GaSe) with different thicknesses. The electrical and optoelectronic properties of the photodetectors were studied, and these devices showed good electrical characteristics down to GaSe flake thicknesses of 30 nm. A photograting effect was observed in the absence of a gate voltage, thereby implying a relatively high photoresponsivity. Higher values of the photoresponsivity occurred for thicker layers of GaSe with a maximum value 0.57 AW(-1) and external quantum efficiency of of 132.8%, and decreased with decreasing GaSe flake thickness. The detectivity was 4.05 × 10(10) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1) at 532 nm laser wavelength, underscoring that GaSe is a promising p-type 2D material for photodetection applications in the visible spectrum. PMID:27354428

  4. Soda pulp and fuel gases synthesis from Hesperaloe funifera.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Rafael; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Requejo, Ana; Ferrer, Ana; Navarro, Enrique

    2010-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to evaluate the suitability of Hesperaloe funifera which is an alternative raw material, for pulping with soda-anthraquinone to produce pulp and paper. It was studied the influence of operational variables (temperature (155-185 degrees C), cooking time (20-60 min) and soda concentration (5-15%), with a constant addition of 1% of anthraquinone and a liquid/solid ratio of 8, in soda-anthraquinone cooking of H. funifera on pulps and paper sheets properties obtained. Finally, the cooking liquors were acidified to separate solid fractions that were subjected to pyrolysis and gasification in order to obtain synthesis and fuel gases. H. funifera contains little lignin and abundant alpha-cellulose; this, together with the morphological characteristics of its fibers, makes it a potentially highly useful papermaking raw material. PMID:20430614

  5. 2012/13 influenza vaccine effectiveness against hospitalised influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2) and B: estimates from a European network of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rondy, M; Launay, O; Puig-Barberà, J; Gefenaite, G; Castilla, J; de Gaetano Donati, K; Galtier, F; Hak, E; Guevara, M; Costanzo, S; Moren, A

    2015-01-01

    While influenza vaccines aim to decrease the incidence of severe influenza among high-risk groups, evidence of influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) among the influenza vaccine target population is sparse. We conducted a multicentre test-negative case-control study to estimate IVE against hospitalised laboratory-confirmed influenza in the target population in 18 hospitals in France, Italy, Lithuania and the Navarre and Valencia regions in Spain. All hospitalised patients aged ≥18 years, belonging to the target population presenting with influenza-like illness symptom onset within seven days were swabbed. Patients positive by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for influenza virus were cases and those negative were controls. Using logistic regression, we calculated IVE for each influenza virus subtype and adjusted it for month of symptom onset, study site, age and chronic conditions. Of the 1,972 patients included, 116 were positive for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, 58 for A(H3N2) and 232 for influenza B. Adjusted IVE was 21.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): -25.2 to 50.6; n=1,628), 61.8% (95% CI: 26.8 to 80.0; n=557) and 43.1% (95% CI: 21.2 to 58.9; n=1,526) against influenza A(H1N1) pdm09, A(H3N2) and B respectively. Our results suggest that the 2012/13 IVE was moderate against influenza A(H3N2) and B and low against influenza A(H1N1) pdm09. PMID:25613779

  6. Evaluation of Emission of Greenhouse Gases from Soils Amended with Sewage Sludge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increase in concentrations of various greenhouse gases originated by various human activities, including agricultural origin, could contribute to climate change. Anthropogenic activities such as cultivation of flooded rice and application of waste materials, such as sewage sludge which are rich in ...

  7. 46 CFR 194.20-15 - Chemical stores other than compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chemical stores other than compressed gases. 194.20-15 Section 194.20-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Chemical Stores and/or Storerooms § 194.20-15 Chemical...

  8. Effect of foam age on toxicity of pyrolysis gases from polyurethane flexible foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Murphy, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from some samples of polyurethane flexible foams appears to have decreased with age, while other samples seem to exhibit no significant change with age in this respect. The changes observed were greater than could be accounted for by variations in the material, or test variations or artifacts.

  9. Fractal structures of dendrites in GaSe crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, N. N.; Borisenko, E. B.; Borisenko, D. N.; Bozhko, S. I.

    2008-07-01

    Solidification of melts at substantial supercooling is associated with instability on the growth front. This causes growth of dendrites, which form as a branched tree in a crystal. In the layered melt-grown GaSe crystals dendrites are observed, if growth rates are rather high [N.N. Kolesnikov, E.B. Borisenko, D.N. Borisenko, V.K. Gartman, Influence of growth conditions on microstructure and properties of GaSe crystals, J. Crystal Growth 300 (2) (2007) 294-298]. Models based on solution of the thermal diffusion problem are traditionally used to describe dendrite growth. Solution of this problem requires information about several physical parameters, such as diffusion coefficient, heat conductivity coefficient and supercooling at the solid/liquid interface. The study of scale invariance of dendrites formed in a crystal provides a new approach to solution of the dynamic growth problem. The calculated fractal dimensionality of the experimentally observed dendrites in GaSe crystals is D=1.7. It coincides with dimensionality of the clusters obtained through computer simulation in terms of the model of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). This result provides a new approach to description of the dynamics of dendrite growth. We have shown that the dendrite growth mechanism in the layered semiconductor crystals can be described by a two-dimensional DLA model. It is shown that probabilistic simulation can be used to show the development of a dendrite in any material. In contrast to the classical theories of dendrite growth, this approach does not require information on physical parameters.

  10. Establishment by adriamycin exposure of multidrug-resistant rat ascites hepatoma AH130 cells showing low DT-diaphorase activity and high cross resistance to mitomycins.

    PubMed

    Wakusawa, S; Nakamura, S; Miyamoto, K

    1997-01-01

    A resistant subline (AH130/5A) selected from rat hepatoma AH130 cells after exposure to adriamycin (ADM) showed remarkable resistance to multiple antitumor drugs, including mitomycin C (MMC) and porfiromycin (PFM). PFM, vinblastine (VLB), and ADM accumulated in AH130/5A far less than in the parent AH130 (AH130/P) cells. AH130/5A cells showed overexpression of P-glycoprotein (PGP), an increase in glutathione S-transferase activity, and a decrease in DT-diaphorase and glutathione peroxidase activity. The resistance to MMC and VLB of AH130/5A cells was partly reversed by H-87, an inhibitor of PGP. Buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthase, did not affect the action of MMC. tert-Butylhydroquinone induced DT-diaphorase activity, increased PFM uptake, and enhanced the growth-inhibitory action of MMC in AH130/5A cells. Dicumarol, an inhibitor of DT-diaphorase, decreased PFM uptake and reduced the growth-inhibitory action of MMC in AH130/P cells. These results indicated that the adriamycin treatment of hepatoma cells caused multifactorial multidrug resistance involving a decrease in DT-diaphorase activity. PMID:9045901

  11. Detection of the TCDD Binding-Fingerprint within the Ah Receptor Ligand Binding Domain by Structurally Driven Mutagenesis and Functional Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Song, Yujuan; Zhao, Jing; Bonati, Laura; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent, basic helix–loop–helix Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS)-containing transcription factor that can bind and be activated by structurally diverse chemicals, including the toxic environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Our previous three-dimensional homology model of the mouse AhR (mAhR) PAS B ligand binding domain allowed identification of the binding site and its experimental validation. We have extended this analysis by conducting comparative structural modeling studies of the ligand binding domains of six additional high-affinity mammalian AhRs. These results, coupled with site-directed mutagenesis and AhR functional analysis, have allowed detection of the “TCDD binding-fingerprint” of conserved residues within the ligand binding cavity necessary for high-affinity TCDD binding and TCDD-dependent AhR transformation DNA binding. The essential role of selected residues was further evaluated using molecular docking simulations of TCDD with both wild-type and mutant mAhRs. Taken together, our results dramatically improve our understanding of the molecular determinants of TCDD binding and provide a basis for future studies directed toward rationalizing the observed species differences in AhR sensitivity to TCDD and understanding the mechanistic basis for the dramatic diversity in AhR ligand structure. PMID:19456125

  12. Pandemic influenza A(H1N1)v viruses currently circulating in New Zealand are sensitive to oseltamivir.

    PubMed

    Hall, R J; Peacey, M P; Ralston, J C; Bocacao, J; Ziki, M; Gunn, W; Quirk, A; Huang, Q S

    2009-07-30

    New Zealand, like other southern hemisphere countries with a temperate climate, has been in the winter period with seasonal influenza activity. New Zealand has also experienced a dramatic increase in the number of cases of pandemic influenza A(H1N1)v virus. Early reports from the northern hemisphere at the beginning of the pandemic showed that the virus was sensitive to the antiviral drug oseltamivir. In this study we report that pandemic influenza A(H1N1)v viruses currently circulating in New Zealand are sensitive to oseltamivir, but seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses - the co-circulating predominant seasonal strain, is resistant to oseltamivir. PMID:19643060

  13. Combustion control system adding a liquid, exhaust gases, and PCV gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, J.E.

    1980-01-15

    A combustion control system is disclosed that adds a fluid and heat energy to the air-fuel mixture of the induction system of an internal combustion engine in response to engine need to improve combustion, to increase power, to improve efficiency, and to reduce emissions. The system incorporates fluidic control mechanisms which provide the control functions without any moving parts. The system incorporates one or more variable impedance flow control mechanisms, each of which produces an impedance to flow through the control mechanism which varies in a controlled relationship to the pressure differential across the control mechanism. In one embodiment, the main variable impedance control mechanism is a vortex chamber. The outlet of the vortex chamber is connected to the positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) inlet to intake manifold downstream of the butterfly valve. The vortex chamber has inputs for supplying air, the liquid, exhaust gases, and PCV gases for mixing within the vortex chamber. The incoming liquid, air, exhaust gases, and PCV gases are transmitted into the main vortex chamber by input constructions which, in themselves, provide for controlled regulation of both the relative proportions and total amounts of the incoming liquid and gases. In a specific embodiment, the input constructions include a liquid-exhaust gas acceleration chamber for mixing liquid with exhaust gases and a PCV-exhaust gas vortex chamber for mixing exhaust gases with PCV gases and air and swirl producing devices for causing controlled choking of the inlets of one or more of the vortex chambers. The system also incorporates a variable impedance syphon break in the line connecting the liquid source with the liquid-exhaust gas acceleration chamber.

  14. Clinical and Virological Factors Associated with Viremia in Pandemic Influenza A/H1N1/2009 Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Herman; To, Kelvin K. W.; Wen, Xi; Chen, Honglin; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Tsoi, Hoi-Wah; Li, Iris W. S.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2011-01-01

    Background Positive detection of viral RNA in blood and other non-respiratory specimens occurs in severe human influenza A/H5N1 viral infection but is not known to occur commonly in seasonal human influenza infection. Recently, viral RNA was detected in the blood of patients suffering from severe pandemic influenza A/H1N1/2009 viral infection, although the significance of viremia had not been previously studied. Our study aims to explore the clinical and virological factors associated with pandemic influenza A/H1N1/2009 viremia and to determine its clinical significance. Methodology/Principal Findings Clinical data of patients admitted to hospitals in Hong Kong between May 2009 and April 2010 and tested positive for pandemic influenza A/H1N1/2009 was collected. Viral RNA was detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) targeting the matrix (M) and HA genes of pandemic influenza A/H1N1/2009 virus from the following specimens: nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA), endotracheal aspirate (ETA), blood, stool and rectal swab. Stool and/ or rectal swab was obtained only if the patient complained of any gastrointestinal symptoms. A total of 139 patients were included in the study, with viral RNA being detected in the blood of 14 patients by RT-PCR. The occurrence of viremia was strongly associated with a severe clinical presentation and a higher mortality rate, although the latter association was not statistically significant. D222G/N quasispecies were observed in 90% of the blood samples. Conclusion Presence of pandemic influenza A/H1N1/2009 viremia is an indicator of disease severity and strongly associated with D222G/N mutation in the viral hemagglutinin protein. PMID:21980333

  15. Entry and exit screening of airline travellers during the A(H1N1) 2009 pandemic: a retrospective evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Eckhardt, Rose; Brownstein, John S; Naqvi, Raza; Hu, Wei; Kossowsky, David; Scales, David; Arino, Julien; MacDonald, Michael; Wang, Jun; Sears, Jennifer; Cetron, Martin S

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the screening measures that would have been required to assess all travellers at risk of transporting A(H1N1)pdm09 out of Mexico by air at the start of the 2009 pandemic. Methods Data from flight itineraries for travellers who flew from Mexico were used to estimate the number of international airports where health screening measures would have been needed, and the number of travellers who would have had to be screened, to assess all air travellers who could have transported the H1N1 influenza virus out of Mexico during the initial stages of the 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic. Findings Exit screening at 36 airports in Mexico, or entry screening of travellers arriving on direct flights from Mexico at 82 airports in 26 other countries, would have resulted in the assessment of all air travellers at risk of transporting A(H1N1)pdm09 out of Mexico at the start of the pandemic. Entry screening of 116 travellers arriving from Mexico by direct or connecting flights would have been necessary for every one traveller at risk of transporting A(H1N1)pdm09. Screening at just eight airports would have resulted in the assessment of 90% of all air travellers at risk of transporting A(H1N1)pdm09 out of Mexico in the early stages of the pandemic. Conclusion During the earliest stages of the A(H1N1) pandemic, most public health benefits potentially attainable through the screening of air travellers could have been achieved by screening travellers at only eight airports. PMID:23678200

  16. Functional variants regulating LGALS1 (Galectin 1) expression affect human susceptibility to influenza A(H7N9)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Jie; Cheng, Zhongshan; Yang, Shigui; Chu, Hin; Fan, Yanhui; Li, Cun; Wong, Bosco Ho-Yin; Zheng, Shufa; Zhu, Yixin; Yu, Fei; Wang, Yiyin; Liu, Xiaoli; Gao, Hainv; Yu, Liang; Tang, Linglin; Cui, Dawei; Hao, Ke; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma′en; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Song, You-Qiang; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; Sham, Pak Chung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-01-01

    The fatality of avian influenza A(H7N9) infection in humans was over 30%. To identify human genetic susceptibility to A(H7N9) infection, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) involving 102 A(H7N9) patients and 106 heavily-exposed healthy poultry workers, a sample size critically restricted by the small number of human A(H7N9) cases. To tackle the stringent significance cutoff of GWAS, we utilized an artificial imputation program SnipSnip to improve the association signals. In single-SNP analysis, one of the top SNPs was rs13057866 of LGALS1. The artificial imputation (AI) identified three non-genotyped causal variants, which can be represented by three anchor/partner SNP pairs rs13057866/rs9622682 (AI P = 1.81 × 10−7), rs4820294/rs2899292 (2.13 × 10−7) and rs62236673/rs2899292 (4.25 × 10−7) respectively. Haplotype analysis of rs4820294 and rs2899292 could simulate the signal of a causal variant. The rs4820294/rs2899292 haplotype GG, in association with protection from A(H7N9) infection (OR = 0.26, P = 5.92 × 10−7) correlated to significantly higher levels of LGALS1 mRNA (P = 0.050) and protein expression (P = 0.025) in lymphoblast cell lines. Additionally, rs4820294 was mapped as an eQTL in human primary monocytes and lung tissues. In conclusion, functional variants of LGALS1 causing the expression variations are contributable to the differential susceptibility to influenza A(H7N9). PMID:25687228

  17. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 is a novel target gene of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xingguo; Vispute, Saurabh G.; Liu, Jie; Cheng, Christine; Kharitonenkov, Alexei; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-07-01

    The toxic effects of dioxins, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), mainly through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) are well documented. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 plays critical roles in metabolic adaptation to fasting by increasing lipid oxidation and ketogenesis in the liver. The present study was performed to determine whether activation of the AhR induces Fgf21 expression. In mouse liver, TCDD increased Fgf21 mRNA in both dose- and time-dependent manners. In addition, TCDD markedly increased Fgf21 mRNA expression in cultured mouse and human hepatocytes. Moreover, TCDD increased mRNA (in liver) and protein levels (in both liver and serum) of Fgf21 in wild-type mice, but not in AhR-null mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that TCDD increased AhR protein binding to the Fgf21 promoter (− 105/+ 1 base pair). Fgf21-null mice administered 200 μg/kg of TCDD died within 20 days, whereas wild-type mice receiving the same treatment were still alive at one month after administration. This indicates that TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression protects against TCDD toxicity. Diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) pretreatment attenuated TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression in mouse liver and white adipose tissue, which may explain a previous report that DEHP pretreatment decreases TCDD-induced wasting. In conclusion, Fgf21 appears to be a target gene of AhR-signaling pathway in mouse and human liver. - Highlights: • TCDD induced Fgf21 expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Fgf21 induction by TCDD is AhR-dependent. • DEHP attenuated TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression.

  18. Evaluation of safety of A/H1N1 pandemic vaccination during pregnancy: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Francesco; Da Cas, Roberto; Spila Alegiani, Stefania; Gramegna, Maria; Venegoni, Mauro; Zocchetti, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the risk of maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcomes associated with the administration of an MF59 adjuvanted A/H1N1 vaccine during pregnancy. Design Historical cohort study. Setting Singleton pregnancies of the resident population of the Lombardy region of Italy. Participants All deliveries between 1 October 2009 and 30 September 2010. Data on exposure to A/H1N1 pandemic vaccine, pregnancy, and birth outcomes were retrieved from regional databases. Vaccinated and non-vaccinated women were compared in a propensity score matched analysis to estimate risks of adverse outcomes. Main outcome measures Main maternal outcomes included type of delivery, admission to intensive care unit, eclampsia, and gestational diabetes; fetal and neonatal outcomes included perinatal deaths, small for gestational age births, and congenital malformations. Results Among the 86 171 eligible pregnancies, 6246 women were vaccinated (3615 (57.9%) in the third trimester and 2557 (40.9%) in the second trimester). No difference was observed in terms of spontaneous deliveries (adjusted odds ratio 1.02, 95% confidence interval 0.96 to 1.08) or admissions to intensive care units (0.95, 0.47 to 1.88), whereas a limited increase in the prevalence of gestational diabetes (1.26, 1.04 to 1.53) and eclampsia (1.19, 1.04 to 1.39) was seen in vaccinated women. Rates of fetal and neonatal outcomes were similar in vaccinated and non-vaccinated women. A slight increase in congenital malformations, although not statistically significant, was present in the exposed cohort (1.14, 0.99 to 1.31). Conclusions Our findings add relevant information about the safety of the MF59 adjuvanted A/H1N1 vaccine in pregnancy. Residual confounding may partly explain the increased risk of some maternal outcomes. Meta-analysis of published studies should be conducted to further clarify the risk of infrequent outcomes, such as specific congenital malformations. PMID:24874845

  19. Development and validation of a blade-element mathematical model for the AH-64A Apache helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansur, M. Hossein

    1995-01-01

    A high-fidelity blade-element mathematical model for the AH-64A Apache Advanced Attack Helicopter has been developed by the Aeroflightdynamics Directorate of the U.S. Army's Aviation and Troop Command (ATCOM) at Ames Research Center. The model is based on the McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems' (MDHS) Fly Real Time (FLYRT) model of the AH-64A (acquired under contract) which was modified in-house and augmented with a blade-element-type main-rotor module. This report describes, in detail, the development of the rotor module, and presents some results of an extensive validation effort.

  20. [Advances in the structure and function of pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus HA protein].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Qiang; Song, Shao-Xia; Wang, Tong-Zhan

    2012-06-01

    Since March 2009, pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus has been spreading throughout many countries including China. The emerged virus caused great harm to human health and social economy. Hemagglutinin (HA) is the most important viral surface glycoprotein, mainly possessing three kinds of functions: (1) binding to host cell receptor, (2) triggering the fusion between viral envelop and target cell membrane, (3) stimulating the body to generate the neutralizing antibody. Advances in the structure, primary function, evolution and antigenicity of pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus HA protein are reviewed in this paper. PMID:22978172

  1. EVALUATION OF SIGNIFICANT ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES OF RADIATIVELY IMPORTANT TRACE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an initial evaluation of significant anthropogenic sources of radiatively important trace gases. missions of greenhouse gases from human activities--including fossil fuel combustion, industrial/agricultural activities, and transportation--contribute to the increasin...

  2. Mercury transformation and speciation in flue gases from anthropogenic emission sources: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Wang, S. X.; Wu, Q. R.; Wang, F. Y.; Lin, C.-J.; Zhang, L. M.; Hui, M. L.; Hao, J. M.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury transformation mechanisms and speciation profiles are reviewed for mercury formed in and released from flue gases of coal-fired boilers, non-ferrous metal smelters, cement plants, iron and steel plants, municipal solid waste incinerators, and biomass burning. Mercury in coal, ores and other raw materials is released to flue gases in the form of Hg0 during combustion or smelting in boilers, kilns or furnaces. Decreasing temperature from over 800 °C to below 300 °C in flue gases leaving boilers, kilns or furnaces promotes homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0) to gaseous divalent mercury (Hg2+), with a portion of Hg2+ adsorbed onto fly ash to form particulate-bound mercury (Hgp). Halogen is the primary oxidizer for Hg0 in flue gases, and active components (e.g.,TiO2, Fe2O3, etc.) on fly ash promote heterogeneous oxidation and adsorption processes. In addition to mercury removal, mercury transformation also occurs when passing through air pollution control devices (APCDs), affecting the mercury speciation in flue gases. In coal-fired power plants, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system promotes mercury oxidation by 34-85 %, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and fabric filter (FF) remove over 99 % of Hgp, and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFGD) captures 60-95 % of Hg2+. In non-ferrous metal smelters, most Hg0 is converted to Hg2+ and removed in acid plants (APs). For cement clinker production, mercury cycling and operational conditions promote heterogeneous mercury oxidation and adsorption. The mercury speciation profiles in flue gases emitted to the atmosphere are determined by transformation mechanisms and mercury removal efficiencies by various APCDs. For all the sectors reviewed in this study, Hgp accounts for less than 5 % in flue gases. In China, mercury emission has a higher fraction (66-82 % of total mercury) in flue gases from coal combustion, in contrast to a greater Hg2+ fraction (29-90 %) from non

  3. Mercury transformation and speciation in flue gases from anthropogenic emission sources: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Shuxiao; Wu, Qingru; Wang, Fengyang; Lin, Che-Jen; Zhang, Leiming; Hui, Mulin; Yang, Mei; Su, Haitao; Hao, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Mercury transformation mechanisms and speciation profiles are reviewed for mercury formed in and released from flue gases of coal-fired boilers, non-ferrous metal smelters, cement plants, iron and steel plants, waste incinerators, biomass burning and so on. Mercury in coal, ores, and other raw materials is released to flue gases in the form of Hg0 during combustion or smelting in boilers, kilns or furnaces. Decreasing temperature from over 800 °C to below 300 °C in flue gases leaving boilers, kilns or furnaces promotes homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation of Hg0 to gaseous divalent mercury (Hg2+), with a portion of Hg2+ adsorbed onto fly ash to form particulate-bound mercury (Hgp). Halogen is the primary oxidizer for Hg0 in flue gases, and active components (e.g., TiO2, Fe2O3, etc.) on fly ash promote heterogeneous oxidation and adsorption processes. In addition to mercury removal, mercury transformation also occurs when passing through air pollution control devices (APCDs), affecting the mercury speciation in flue gases. In coal-fired power plants, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system promotes mercury oxidation by 34-85 %, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and fabric filter (FF) remove over 99 % of Hgp, and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFGD) captures 60-95 % of Hg2+. In non-ferrous metal smelters, most Hg0 is converted to Hg2+ and removed in acid plants (APs). For cement clinker production, mercury cycling and operational conditions promote heterogeneous mercury oxidation and adsorption. The mercury speciation profiles in flue gases emitted to the atmosphere are determined by transformation mechanisms and mercury removal efficiencies by various APCDs. For all the sectors reviewed in this study, Hgp accounts for less than 5 % in flue gases. In China, mercury emission has a higher Hg0 fraction (66-82 % of total mercury) in flue gases from coal combustion, in contrast to a greater Hg2+ fraction (29-90 %) from non-ferrous metal smelting, cement and

  4. Granular gases of rodlike grains in micro-gravity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harth, Kirsten; May, Kathrin; Trittel, Torsten; Wegner, Sandra; Stannarius, Ralf

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the dynamics of granular materials is relevant both in fundamental physics and from the technological point of view, but many well-known phenomena are still insufficiently understood. Granular gases are dilute ensembles of macroscopic grains, interacting by inelastic collisions. Permanent energy supply is required to maintain dynamic equilibrium. Granular gases of spherical grains have been widely investigated theoretically and in experiments in 2 dimensions. Microgravity is necessary for maintaining such a gas in 3 dimensions (3D). Only dynamics in the Knudsen-regime and clustering instabilities were accessible in previous experiments. Our experiment with rodlike grains offers access to statistical dynamics in the rod-rod collision dominated regime as well as the oppotunity to measure the rotational degrees of freedom of the particles. We present recent results from sounding rocket and drop-tower experiments. Ensembles of rods are confined in a 3D container, monitored by video cameras. Individual rods are tracked in consecutive frames. We analyse spatial and temporal density fluctuations, translational and rotational velocity distributions, the partition of kinetic energy and the influence of different experimental parameters. DLR, SNSB and ESA are acknowledged for funding within projects REXUS-GAGa, GAGa DropT and GAGa.

  5. Granular gases of rodlike grains in micro-gravity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harth, Kirsten; May, Kathrin; Trittel, Torsten; Wegner, Sandra; Stannarius, Ralf

    Understanding the dynamics of granular materials is relevant both in fundamental physics and from the technological point of view, but many well-known phenomena are still insufficiently understood. Granular gases are dilute ensembles of macroscopic grains, interacting by inelastic collisions. Permanent energy supply is required to maintain a dynamic steady state. Granular gases of spherical grains have been widely investigated theoretically and in experiments in 2 dimensions. Microgravity is necessary for maintaining such a gas in 3 dimensions (3D). In previous experiments, only dynamics in the Knudsen-regime and clustering instabilities were accessible. Our experiment with rodlike grains offers access to statistical dynamics in the regime dominated by rod-rod collision, as well as the opportunity to measure the rotational degrees of freedom of the particles. We present recent results from sounding rocket experiments (REXUS 10) and drop-tower experiments at ZARM Bremen (ESA Drop Your Thesis!, DLR GAGa). Ensembles of rods are confined in a 3D container, monitored by video cameras. Individual rods are tracked in consecutive frames. We analyse spatial and temporal density fluctuations, translational and rotational velocity distributions, the partition of kinetic energy and the influence of different experimental parameters.

  6. Measurement of fission product gases in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schell, W. R.; Tobin, M. J.; Marsan, D. J.; Schell, C. W.; Vives-Batlle, J.; Yoon, S. R.

    1997-01-01

    The ability to quickly detect and assess the magnitude of releases of fission-produced radioactive material is of significant importance for ongoing operations of any conventional nuclear power plant or other activities with a potential for fission product release. In most instances, the control limits for the release of airborne radioactivity are low enough to preclude direct air sampling as a means of detection, especially for fission gases that decay by beta or electron emission. It is, therefore, customary to concentrate the major gaseous fission products (krypton, xenon and iodine) by cryogenic adsorption for subsequent separation and measurement. This study summarizes our initial efforts to develop an automated portable system for on-line separation and concentration with the potential for measuring environmental levels of radioactive gases, including 85Kr, 131,133,135Xe, 14C, 3H, 35S, 125,131I, etc., without using cryogenic fluids. Bench top and prototype models were constructed using the principle of heatless fractionation of the gases in a pressure swing system. This method removes the requirement for cryogenic fluids to concentrate gases and, with suitable electron and gamma ray detectors, provides for remote use under automatic computer control. Early results using 133Xe tracer show that kinetic chromatography, i.e., high pressure adsorption of xenon and low pressure desorption of air, using specific types of molecular sieves, permits the separation and quantification of xenon isotopes from large volume air samples. We are now developing the ability to measure the presence and amounts of fission-produced xenon isotopes that decay by internal conversion electrons and beta radiation with short half-lives, namely 131mXe, 11.8 d, 133mXe, 2.2 d, 133Xe, 5.2 d and 135Xe, 9.1 h. The ratio of the isotopic concentrations measured can be used to determine unequivocally the amount of fission gas and time of release of an air parcel many kilometers downwind from a

  7. Characteristic amino acid changes of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus PA protein enhance A(H7N9) viral polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Huang, Feng; Zhang, Junsong; Tan, Likai; Lu, Gen; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Human coinfection with a novel H7N9 influenza virus and the 2009 pandemic A(H1N1) influenza virus, H1N1pdm09, has recently been reported in China. Because reassortment can occur during coinfection, it is necessary to clarify the effects of gene reassortment between these two viruses. Among the viral ribonucleoprotein complex (vRNP) genes, only the PA gene of H1N1pdm09 enhances the avian influenza viral polymerase activity. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, we show a special evolutionary feature of the H1N1pdm09 PA gene, which clustered with those of the novel H7N9 virus and related H9N2 viruses, rather than in the outgroup as the H1N1pdm09 genes do on the phylogenetic trees of other vRNP genes. Using a minigenome system of the novel H7N9 virus, we further demonstrate that replacement of its PA gene significantly enhanced its polymerase activity, whereas replacement of the other vRNP genes reduced its polymerase activity. We also show that the residues of PA evolutionarily conserved between H1N1pdm09 and the novel H7N9 virus are associated with attenuated or neutral polymerase activity. The mutations associated with the increased activity of the novel H7N9 polymerase are characteristic of the H1N1pdm09 gene, and are located almost adjacent to the surface of the PA protein. Our results suggest that the novel H7N9 virus has more effective PB1, PB2, and NP genes than H1N1pdm09, and that H1N1pdm09-like PA mutations enhance the novel H7N9 polymerase function. PMID:26980671

  8. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Photoresponsive Two-Dimensional GaSe Nanosheet Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Gresback, Ryan G; Tian, Mengkun; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Eres, Gyula; Ivanov, Ilia N; Xiao, Kai; McGuire, Michael A; Duscher, Gerd; Geohegan, David B

    2014-01-01

    Here we explore pulsed laser deposition (PLD), a well known and versatile synthesis method principally used for epitaxial oxide thin film growth, for the synthesis of functional metal chalcogenide (GaSe) nanosheet networks by stoichiometric transfer of laser vaporized material from bulk GaSe targets in Ar background gas. Uniform coverage of interconnected, crystalline, few-layer, photoresponsive GaSe nanosheets in both in-plane and out-of-plane orientations were achieved under different ablation plume conditions over ~1.5 cm2 areas. Plume propagation was characterized by in situ ICCD-imaging. High (1 Torr) Ar background gas pressures were found to be crucial for the stoichiometric growth of GaSe nanosheet networks. Individual 1-3 layer GaSe triangular nanosheets of ~ 200 nm domain size were formed within 30 laser pulses, coalescing to form nanosheet networks in as few as 100 laser pulses. The thickness of the deposited networks increased linearly with pulse number, adding layers in a two-dimensional (2D) growth mode while maintaining a surface roughness of 2 GaSe layers for increasing overall thickness. Field effect transistors using these interconnected crystalline GaSe networks showed p-type semiconducting characteristics with mobilities reaching as high as 0.1 cm2V-1s-1. Spectrally-resolved photoresponsivities and external quantum efficiencies ranged from 0.4 AW-1 and 100% at 700 nm, to 1.4 AW-1 and 600 % at 240 nm, respectively. Pulsed laser deposition under these conditions appears to provide a versatile and rapid approach to stoichiometrically transfer and deposit photoresponsive networks of 2D nanosheets with digital thickness control and substrate-scale uniformity for a variety of applications.

  9. Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Turick, C.E.

    1997-06-10

    A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases. 3 figs.

  10. Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Turick, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases.

  11. Study of electron transport in hydrocarbon gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, H.; Date, H.

    2015-04-01

    The drift velocity and the effective ionization coefficient of electrons in the organic gases, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, CH3OH, C2H5OH, C6H6, and C6H5CH3, have been measured over relatively wide ranges of density-reduced electric fields (E/N) at room temperature (around 300 K). The drift velocity was measured, based on the arrival-time spectra of electrons by using a double-shutter drift tube over the E/N range from 300 to 2800 Td, and the effective ionization coefficient (α - η) was determined by the steady-state Townsend method from 150 to 3000 Td. Whenever possible, these parameters were compared with those available in the literature. It has been shown that the swarm parameters for these gases have specific tendencies, depending on their molecular configurations.

  12. New spectral features of stratospheric trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Kosters, J. J.; Murcray, F. H.; Murcray, D. G.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A new Michelson-type interferometer system operating in the infrared at very high resolution (0.002 to 0.003 wavenumber FWHM) was used to record numerous balloon-borne solar absorption spectra of the stratosphere, ground-based solar absorption spectra, and laboratory spectra of molecules of atmospheric interest. Results obtained are reported for several important stratospheric trace gases, HNO3, ClONO2, HO2NO2, NO2, and COF2, in the 8 to 12 micron spectral region. Many features of these gases were identified in the stratospheric spectra. Comparison of the spectra with line-by-line simulations shows previous spectral parameters are often inadequate. New analysis of high resolution laboratory and atmospheric spectra and improved theoretical calculations will be required for all bands. Preliminary versions of several sets of improved line parameters are presented.

  13. Anesthetic gases and occupationally exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Casale, Teodorico; Caciari, Tiziana; Rosati, Maria Valeria; Gioffrè, Pier Agostino; Schifano, Maria Pia; Capozzella, Assunta; Pimpinella, Benedetta; Tomei, Gianfranco; Tomei, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate whether the occupational exposure to low dose anesthetic gases could cause alterations of blood parameters in health care workers. 119 exposed subjects and 184 not exposed controls were included in the study. Each worker underwent the complete blood count test (CBC), proteinaemia, leukocyte count, serum lipids, liver and kidney blood markers. The liver blood markers show statistically significant differences in health care workers compared with controls (p<0.05), a statistically significant decrease in neutrophils and an increase of lymphocytes in health care workers compared with controls (p<0.05). The prevalence of values outside the range for GPT, GGT, total bilirubin, lymphocytes and neutrophils was statistically significant in health care workers compared with controls (p<0.05). The results suggest that occupational exposure to low dose anesthetic gases could influence some haematochemical hepatic and hematopoietic parameters in exposed health care workers. PMID:24374387

  14. Simulating frustrated magnetism with spinor Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debelhoir, T.; Dupuis, N.

    2016-05-01

    Although there is a broad consensus on the fact that critical behavior in stacked triangular Heisenberg antiferromagnets—an example of frustrated magnets with competing interactions—is described by a Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson Hamiltonian with O(3 )×O(2 ) symmetry, the nature of the phase transition in three dimensions is still debated. We show that spin-one Bose gases provide us with a simulator of the O(3 )×O(2 ) model. Using a renormalization-group approach, we argue that the transition is weakly first order and shows pseudoscaling behavior, and give estimates of the pseudocritical exponent ν in 87Rb, 41K, and 7Li atom gases which can be tested experimentally.

  15. Dilute spin-orbit Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado-Mundo, Daniel; He, Lianyi; Öhberg, Patrik; Valiente, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    We study repulsive Fermi gases with Rashba spin-orbit coupling in two and three dimensions when they are dilute enough that a single branch of the spectrum is occupied in the non-interacting ground state. We develop an effective renormalizable theory for fermions in the lower branch and obtain the energy of the system in three dimensions to second order in the renormalized coupling constant. We then exploit the non-Galilean-relativistic nature of spin-orbit coupled gases. We find that at finite momentum, the two-dimensional Fermi sea is deformed in a non-trivial way. Using mean-field theory to include interactions, we show that the ground-state of the system acquires a finite momentum, and is consequently deformed, when the interaction is stronger than a critical value. Heriot-Watt University. CM-DTC. SUPA. EPSRC.

  16. Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.; Kurylo, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    We seek funding from NASA for the third year (2005) of the four-year period January 1, 2003 - December 31, 2006 for continued support of the MIT contributions to the multi-national global atmospheric trace species measurement program entitled Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE). The case for real-time high-frequency measurement networks like AGAGE is very strong and the observations and their interpretation are widely recognized for their importance to ozone depletion and climate change studies and to verification issues arising from the Montreal Protocol (ozone) and Kyoto Protocol (climate). The proposed AGAGE program is distinguished by its capability to measure over the globe at high frequency almost all of the important species in the Montreal Protocol and almost all of the significant non-CO2 gases in the Kyoto Protocol.

  17. Biofilters remove VOCs from stack gases

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Weyerhaeuser's strandboard plant in Grayling, Mich., is using biofiltration to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at the site. Primary constituents in the Weyerhaeuser stack gases are alcohols, aldehydes, organic acids, benzene and toluene. The alternative to biofiltration is incineration, but because the concentration of VOCs in the stack gases is so dilute, natural gas would be required. Incineration would be costly, and could introduce pollution problems by generating excess carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) and possibly nitrogen oxides. Two pilot biofilters, each about 20ft by 100ft in area, with 4-ft thick media of bark and ground trim ends, are using naturally occurring bacteria to destroy VOCs emanating from a wood panel press and a wood flake dryer. The press offgas biofilter, activated February 1993, had risen to 93% efficiency in removing VOCs by mid-May. The flake dryer exhaust biofilter, placed in service in April, already was more than 80% efficient.

  18. Regional deposition of inhaled reactive gases

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, F.J.; Overton, J.H.; Graham, R.C.

    1987-03-01

    A critical concept in inhalation toxicology involves the determination of dose as the first component for providing a perspective to judge the applicability of various toxicological results to human-exposure conditions. Available experimental data for reactive gases were reviewed, and basic concepts in the formulation of mathematical dosimetry models were discussed. The complexity of factors influencing dose was illustrated as related to rate-constant sensitivity, thickness of the protective layer of the lungs, the choice of anatomical model, ventilatory parameters, and path distance. Results obtained thus far illustrate the feasibility of making interspecies dosimetric comparisons as an integral step in evaluating the toxicity of inhaled reactive gases, assisting in experimental design, and providing sensitivity studies to determine parameters and processes needing additional research.

  19. Aminoterminal amphipathic α-helix AH1 of hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 4B possesses a dual role in RNA replication and virus production.

    PubMed

    Gouttenoire, Jérôme; Montserret, Roland; Paul, David; Castillo, Rosa; Meister, Simon; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Penin, François; Moradpour, Darius

    2014-10-01

    Nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B) is a key organizer of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication complex formation. In concert with other nonstructural proteins, it induces a specific membrane rearrangement, designated as membranous web, which serves as a scaffold for the HCV replicase. The N-terminal part of NS4B comprises a predicted and a structurally resolved amphipathic α-helix, designated as AH1 and AH2, respectively. Here, we report a detailed structure-function analysis of NS4B AH1. Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance structural analyses revealed that AH1 folds into an amphipathic α-helix extending from NS4B amino acid 4 to 32, with positively charged residues flanking the helix. These residues are conserved among hepaciviruses. Mutagenesis and selection of pseudorevertants revealed an important role of these residues in RNA replication by affecting the biogenesis of double-membrane vesicles making up the membranous web. Moreover, alanine substitution of conserved acidic residues on the hydrophilic side of the helix reduced infectivity without significantly affecting RNA replication, indicating that AH1 is also involved in virus production. Selective membrane permeabilization and immunofluorescence microscopy analyses of a functional replicon harboring an epitope tag between NS4B AH1 and AH2 revealed a dual membrane topology of the N-terminal part of NS4B during HCV RNA replication. Luminal translocation was unaffected by the mutations introduced into AH1, but was abrogated by mutations introduced into AH2. In conclusion, our study reports the three-dimensional structure of AH1 from HCV NS4B, and highlights the importance of positively charged amino acid residues flanking this amphipathic α-helix in membranous web formation and RNA replication. In addition, we demonstrate that AH1 possesses a dual role in RNA replication and virus production, potentially governed by different topologies of the N-terminal part of NS4B. PMID:25392992

  20. Glass Membrane For Controlled Diffusion Of Gases

    DOEpatents

    Shelby, James E.; Kenyon, Brian E.

    2001-05-15

    A glass structure for controlled permeability of gases includes a glass vessel. The glass vessel has walls and a hollow center for receiving a gas. The glass vessel contains a metal oxide dopant formed with at least one metal selected from the group consisting of transition metals and rare earth metals for controlling diffusion of the gas through the walls of the glass vessel. The vessel releases the gas through its walls upon exposure to a radiation source.