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Sample records for ah nicd batteries

  1. 270V Battery Using COTS NiCd Cells For Manned Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric; Davies,Frank; Hummer, Leigh; Strangways, Brad

    2002-01-01

    A high power (>35 kW at 215V), low capacity (5.2 Ah), and compact (45L) NiCd battery was developed for the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV), which is an experimental version of the lifeboat for the International Space Station (ISS). A simple design and innovative approach using a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) NiCd cell design enabled the design, qualification, and production of 4 flight units of this highly reliable and safe spacecraft battery to be achieved rapidly (2 years) and cheaply ($13M).

  2. Behavior of a cycled Ni-Cd battery during pulse discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, G.; Vaidyanathan, H.; Nakhleh, W.

    1997-12-01

    The pulse discharge behavior of a 9-Ah, 12-V nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) battery fabricated for the FAST program was studied. The response of the battery voltage to a pulse with a current of 60 A and duration of 10 to 200 ms was measured, along with the capacity remaining at the end of pulse discharge. The maximum drop in voltage at the beginning of the pulse was 505 to 1,049 mV, and battery capacity remained stable.

  3. New NiCd Battery Standard and Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milden, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    The preparation and contents guides designed to provide specifications and standards for NiCd batteries for space missions are discussed. Requirements were established to assure proper in orbit performance and compliance with handling procedures to minimize degradation. The guides were designed to benefit both industries and the military. The surveys include: reasons given for and against the use of flight batteries in systems tests; use of rechargeable batteries during space vehicle testing; and military standards and specifications.

  4. Update: Viking Lander NiCd batteries. Year six

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britting, A. O., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of NiCd batteries on the Viking Mars landers is discussed. During evaluation, three of the four batteries were maintained in the discharged state. Battery charge regimes and close-together, deep-discharge, reconditioning cycles to retard degradation of batteries are discussed. The effect of elevated temperatures during Martian summer on battery performance were also considered. Tabulated data for average battery capacity as a function of time are given. A design uplink to allow more frequent, greater depth of discharge reconditioning cycles was proposed.

  5. Performance of a 100Ah common vessel monoblock nickel-cadmium battery

    SciTech Connect

    Anderman, M.; Tsenter, B.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the electrical test results of the Common Vessel Monoblock (CVM) 12V 100Ah Ni-Cd battery. The operation logic, temperature characteristics, gas and heat exchange between cells and regulator are discussed.

  6. Failure Modes Experienced on Spacecraft Nicd Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S.

    1985-01-01

    A review was made of failures and irregularities experienced on nickel cadmium batteries for 31 spacecraft. Only rarely did batteries fail completely. In many cases, poorly performing batteries were compensated for by a reduction in loads or by continuing to operate in spite of out-of-voltage conditions. Low discharge voltage was the most common problem observed in flight spacecraft (42%). Spacecraft batteries are often designed to protect against cell shorts, but cell shorts accounted for only 16% of the failures. Other causes of problems were high charge voltage (16%), battery problems caused by other elements of the spacecraft (10%), and open circuit failures (6%). Problems of miscellaneous or unknown causes occurred in 10% of the cases.

  7. Development of Large Scale Advanced NI-CD Batteries Employing Roll-Bonded Electrodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-17

    LONG-TERM TESTING ..................... TASK 3 - FABRICATION OF SIX ADVANCED 2000-Ah CELLS ........................ METHOD OF...TIME, h TABLE 2-24. 2000-AH NI-CD CELL 2-41 NSWCDD/TR-94/50 METHOD OF TEST A continuous method of testing was used following the formation procedure as...MICHAEL MCKUBRE C/O SRI INTERNATIONAL 333 RAVENSWOOD AVENUE MENLO PARK CA 84025 ATTN SATYAMARAYANA KODALI TACOM WARREN MI 48397-5000 ATTN BRADFORD M

  8. Results of deep DoD life cycle tests at high rates on 12Ah NiCd cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panneton, Paul E.; Meyer, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A 12 Ah Nickel-Cadmium (NiCd) Low Earth Orbit (LEO) life cycle test that induced 47 percent more deep Depth Of Discharge cycles by mixing them with shallow DOD cycles is discussed. The test showed how aggressive recharging to a C/D ratio of 1.15 nearly doubled performance over cycling below a C/D of 1.11.

  9. Bioleaching of spent Zn-Mn or Ni-Cd batteries by Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ji; Seo, Ja-Yeon; Choi, Yong-Seok; Kim, Gyu-Hyeok

    2016-05-01

    This research explores the recovery of metals from spent Zn-Mn or Ni-Cd batteries by a bioleaching using six Aspergillus species. Two different nutrients, malt extract and sucrose, were used to produce different types of organic acids. Oxalic acid and citric acid were shown to be the dominant organic acid in malt extract and sucrose media, respectively. In the bioleaching, the metal removal was higher in sucrose media than malt extract. All species, except A. niger KUC5254, showed more than 90% removal of metals from Zn-Mn battery. For Ni-Cd battery, more than 95% of metals was extracted by A. niger KUC5254 and A. tubingensis KUC5037. As a result, A. tubingensis KUC5037 which is a non-ochratoxigenic fungus was considered to have the greatest potential for improving the safety and efficiency of the bioleaching.

  10. An evaluation of potentially useful separator materials for nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd] satellite batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, H. A.; Toner, S. D.; Cuthrell, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation intended to determine the potential suitability and probable efficacy of a group of separator materials for use in nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) satellite batteries was carried out. These results were obtained using test procedures established in an earlier evaluation of other separator materials, some of which were used in experimental battery cells subjected to simulated use conditions. The properties that appear to be most important are: high electrolyte absorptivity, good electrolyte retention, low specific resistivity, rapid wettability and low resistance to air permeation. Wicking characteristics and wet-out time seem to be more important with respect to the initial filling of the battery with the electrolyte.

  11. Heat flow calorimeter. [measures output of Ni-Cd batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. C.; Johnston, W. V. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Heat flow calorimeter devices are used to measure heat liberated from or absorbed by an object. This device is capable of measuring the thermal output of sealed nickel-cadmium batteries or cells during charge-discharge cycles. An elongated metal heat conducting rod is coupled between the calorimeter vessel and a heat sink, thus providing the only heat exchange path from the calorimeter vessel itself.

  12. Design and Performance of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Super NiCd Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Anisa J.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Jallice, Doris E.; Moran Vickie E.

    1999-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is a joint mission between NASA and the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The observatory is designed to monitor and study tropical rainfall and the associated release of energy that helps to power the global atmospheric circulation shaping both weather and climate around the globe. The spacecraft was launched from Japan on November 27,1997 via the NASDA H-2 launch vehicle. The TRMM Power Subsystem is a Peak Power Tracking system that can support the maximum TRMM load of 815 watts at the end of its three year life. The Power Subsystem consists of two 50 Ampere Hour Super NiCd batteries, Gallium Arsenide Solar Array and the Power System Electronics. This paper describes the TRMM Power Subsystem, battery design, cell and battery ground test performance, and in-orbit battery operations and performance.

  13. Design, development, performance, and reconditioning of Ni-Cd batteries using polyropylene separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britting, A. O., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A performance assessment is made for the Viking Mars Lander Program's sealed, sterilizable, 8-ampere hour Ni-Cd batteries, which use a nonwoven polypropylene separator material. Attention is given to separator wettability, the optimization of electrolyte quantity, and the reduction of plate carbonate, in view of thermal considerations and other environmental design and test requirements generated by mission characteristics. Life data based on mission experience identify, in addition to performance and degradation behavior, a series of shallow discharge reconditioning cycles and an intensive program of deep discharge reconditioning.

  14. Battery Review Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Chester

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered are presented in viewgraph form: NASA Battery Review Board Charter; membership, board chronology; background; statement of problem; summary of problems with 50 AH standard Ni-Cd; activities for near term programs utilizing conventional Ni-Cd; present projects scheduled to use NASA standard Ni-Cd; other near-term NASA programs requiring secondary batteries; recommended direction for future programs; future cell/battery procurement strategy; and the NASA Battery Program.

  15. New technology from 100 ampere-hour Ni-Cd space battery program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaston, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    The present paper describes some of the results of a 100 Ah battery development program. Background, module design, cell terminal design, and other technology newly used are described. It is shown that the program led to successful production of both cell and module, and that several areas utilized new technology and contributed advances to the sealed secondary battery state-of-the-art.

  16. A Ni-Cd battery model considering state of charge and hysteresis effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Plaza, M.; Serrano-Jiménez, D.; Eloy-García Carrasco, J.; Alonso-Martínez, J.

    2015-02-01

    This paper introduces an electrical battery model. Based on a Thévenin circuit with two RC parallel branches, it includes an ampère-hour counting method to estimate the state of charge (SOC) and a novel model for the hysteresis. The presented model can consider variations in its parameters under changes in all of its internal and external variables, although only SOC and hysteresis are considered. Hysteresis consideration does not only allow distinguishing the parameters during charging and discharging, but also during transients between them. The model was designed to be capable of being implemented in online and offline systems. Finally the proposed model was validated for a single Ni-Cd cell, characterized by current interruption method, in an offline system. The validation was also extended to a stack of 210 cells of the same technology.

  17. Performance and Safety Characteristics of Sanyo NiCd Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Yi; Jeevarajan, Judith; Bragg, Bobby; Zhang, Wenlin

    2002-01-01

    NiCd batteries are widely used for high drain applications like power tools and also in other portable equipment like cameras, PCs, etc. NASA and Dreamtime Holdings, Inc. worked together to have the capability of a High Definition TV (HDTV) on the ISS and Space Shuttle. The Sanyo HD camcorder was used on the STS 105 fight in July, 2001 . The camcorder used two versions of a NiCd battery. One was a cOlnmercial off-the-shelf Sony BP90 battery pack that had Sanyo NiCd D cells. The other was a modified battery (FBP-90) made by Frezzi Energy, which also had the same Sanyo NiCd D cells. The battery has 10 NiCd D cells in series to form a 12 V pack with 5.0 Ah capacity. Our current study involved the perforn1ance and abuse tests on the Sanyo NiCd 5.0 Ah D cells. The best combination of charge/discharge current rate is 0.3C for charge and 1/2e for discharge within 200 cycles. No significant changes in capacity were observed in 200 cycles. The cell also showed capability of 5C (25.0A) high rate discharge. In overcharge and overdischarge tests, all tested cells passed the tests without venting. In imbalance tests, the battery pack could be charged and discharged only at relatively low current. At charge current of 1.0A or less, the imbalanced cells in the battery pack displayed relatively high temperatures during charge or discharge. The cells functioned normally during internal short and no mishap occurred during external short. Cells passed exposure tests at 80 C and no leakage till 150 C during heat-tovent tests.

  18. Hydrometallurgical route to recover nickel, cobalt and cadmium from spent Ni-Cd batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Aline; Afonso, Julio Carlos; Bourdot Dutra, Achilles Junqueira

    2012-12-01

    In this work a hydrometallurgical route to recover nickel, cobalt and cadmium after leaching spent Ni-Cd batteries with hydrochloric acid was investigated. Co(II) and Cd(II) were both recovered by solvent extraction. Cd(II) was first extracted (99.7 wt.%) with pure tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP), in the original leachate acidity (5.1 mol L-1), in two stages at 25 °C with an aqueous/organic (A/O) phase ratio = 1 v/v. The Co(II) present in the raffinate (free acidity 4.1 mol L-1) was extracted with Alamine 336 or Alamine 304 (10 vol.% in kerosene) at 25 °C with an A/O ratio = 1 in two stages. 97.5 wt.% of Co(II) was extracted using Alamine 336 while only 90.4 wt.% was extracted in the case of Alamine 304. Ni(II) was isolated from the raffinate as oxalate after addition of ammonium oxalate at pH 2.

  19. A 65 Ah rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, K.

    1986-01-01

    A rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide battery which has a number of superior performance characteristics which includes a high energy density, a high power density, and a long charge retention time was developed. The first cell sizes developed included a C size cell and an AA size cell. Over the last two years, a project to demonstrate the feasibility of the scale up to this technology to a BC size cell with 65 Ah capacity was undertaken. The objective was to develop, build, and test a .6 kWh storage battery consisting of 6 BC cells in series.

  20. Performance features of 22-cell, 19Ah single pressure vessel nickel hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    1996-01-01

    Two 22-cells 19Ah Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni-H2) Single Pressure Vessel (SPV) Qual batteries, one each from EPI/Joplin and EPI/Butler, were designed and procured. The two batteries differ in the cell encapsulation technology, stack preload, and activation procedure. Both the Butler and Joplin batteries met the specified requirements when subjected to qualification testing and completed 2100 and 1300 LEO cycles respectively, with nominal performance. This paper discusses advantages, design features, testing procedures, and results of the two single pressure vessel Ni-H2 batteries.

  1. The standard 20 AH battery. [for the mutlimission modular spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zollner, M. T.

    1977-01-01

    The modular power system, which is the first intended use for the NASA standard battery, is basically a four foot by four foot by eighteen inch box which can handle a complement of three 20 ampere hour batteries or later on the intended use is for three 50 ampere hour batteries to be the full complement. The system is designed to be used as a plug on component on a multi mission modular spacecraft. It has as a design point a basically 1250 watt orbital average load. The way it breaks up in a near earth orbit it would be somewhere around 1,000 watts for everything except 10 minutes, and during any 10 minute period it may go up to a peak of 3,000 watt load. Features of the battery reviewed include criteria to store electrical energy, the battery package, the covers and cases, and electrolytes. The capacities expected are 90 percent, the average cell capacity for 24 C, 90 percent of the actual battery capacity of 19 C, and 85 percent of the actual 25 degree battery capacity at zero discharge voltage for 50 percent DOD new battery is in the vicinity expected or predicted of 26.4 volts.

  2. LEO life tests on a 75 Ah bipolar nickel-hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenhart, S.; Koehler, C.; Applewhite, A.

    1988-01-01

    The design, building, and testing of an actively cooled 10-cell 75-Ah bipolar nickel/hydrogen battery are discussed. During the last 1000 cycles, the battery has shown some evidence of elecrical performance degradation. In particular, EOC and EOD voltages have increased and decreased by several millivolts, respectively, and deep discharge capacities to a 1.0 V/cell average cutoff voltage have decreased.

  3. Life cycle testing of a sealed 24-V, 42-Ah nickel-cadmium aircraft battery

    SciTech Connect

    Kulin, T.M.; Scoles, D.L.

    1997-12-01

    Extensive research has been conducted in the design and manufacture of very long life sealed maintenance free nickel-cadmium aircraft batteries. This study presents data on a 100% depth of discharge (DOD) life test performed on a nominal capacity 42-Ah battery. The purpose of this study is to validate design concepts, determine the life characteristics of the newly designed sealed nickel-cadmium batteries, and develop baseline information on failure rates and mechanisms. The data from this experiment can be used to compare depth of discharge versus battery life with similar tests such as the lower DOD experiments performed on spacecraft batteries. This information is important in the ongoing development of long life batteries and in developing failure models for life prediction.

  4. Characterization of 109 Ah Ni-MH batteries charging with hydrogen sensing termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viera, J. C.; González, M.; Liaw, B. Y.; Ferrero, F. J.; Álvarez, J. C.; Campo, J. C.; Blanco, C.

    The use of Ni-MH batteries for traction applications in electric and hybrid vehicles is increasingly attractive and reliable. Besides the energy and power handling, and the cost issues, high tolerance to abuse is an important aspect of the Ni-MH technology. Thus, the ability to reduce charging time and to absorb regenerative breaking is highly desirable in these traction applications. This requires an accurate control of the charge termination. To facilitate an easy and reliable charging control and to avoid battery premature failure or ageing it is very important to know the behavior of the battery under a range of charging conditions. In this paper, we described the performance of high capacity commercial Ni-MH traction batteries (12 V, 109 Ah modules) when subjected to different charging rates (0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 C) from 100% depth of discharge (DOD). Changes in battery voltage and temperature during charging were monitored, with a particular emphasis on the detection of the presence of hydrogen near the battery. This unique hydrogen detection outside the battery was used as the method for the end-of-charge termination to prevent overcharging of the battery. Relevant parameters, such as charge acceptance, energy efficiency, and charging time, were analyzed for comparison.

  5. Overview of battery usage in NASA/GSFC LEO and GEO missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    In July, 1989, Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) will be launched from a Delta rocket to study the big bang theory. The COBE, which is in a LEO/Polar orbit, will have two 20 Ah NiCd batteries, and 18 cells per battery, made by McDonnell Douglas Company. In December, 1989, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA-D) will be launched from an Atlas rocket for weather observation purposes. NOAA-D, which is in a LEO/Polar morning orbit, will have two 26.5 Ah NiCd batteries, and 17 cells per battery, made by Ge-Astro East Windor. NOAA-I, which is scheduled for May, 1991 launch in a LEO/Polar afternoon orbit, will have three 26.5 Ah NiCd batteries, 17 cells per battery, made by GE-Astro East Windor. In April, 1990, Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) will be launched from STS37 to study the gamma ray radiation phenomenon. GRO, which is in a LEO orbit, will have two modular power systems (MPS) made by McDonnell Douglas, each MPS consisting of three 50 Ah NiCd batteries, 22 cells per battery. In July, 1990, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-I) will be launched from an Atlas I rocket for weather observation purposes. GOES-I, which is in a GEO orbit, will have two 12 Ah NiCd batteries, 28 cells per battery, made by Ford Aerospace and Communications Company. In December, 1990, Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-E) will be launched from STS43 for communication purposes. TDRS-E, which is in a GEO orbit, will have three 40 Ah NiCd batteries, 24 cells per battery, made by TRW. In August, 1991, Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) will be launched from a Delta rocket. EUVE, which is in a LEO orbit, will have one modular power system (MPS) made by McDonnell Douglas. In December, 1991, Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) will be launched from STS50 to study the Earth's ozone layer and other environmental concerns. UARS, which is in a 56 deg inclination LEO orbit, will have one modular power systems (MPS) made by McDonnell Douglas.

  6. Cycle life testing of a 24-V, 15-Ah sealed lead-acid aircraft battery

    SciTech Connect

    Vutetakis, D.G.; Viswanathan, V.V.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents the results of cycle life testing of 24-V, 15-Ah sealed lead-acid batteries intended for use in the B-1B aircraft. Test samples were procured from two different manufacturers and subjected to cycle testing at 33% and 100% depth-of-discharge (DOD). The cycle life at 33% DOD ranged from 500 to 750 cycles. The cycle life at 100% DOD ranged from 160 to 260 cycles.

  7. Development of a high capacity toroidal Ni/Cd cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G. L.; Foos, J. S.; Avery, J. W.; Feiman, V.

    1981-01-01

    A nickel cadmium battery design which can offer better thermal management, higher energy density and much lower cost than the state-of-the-art is emphasized. A toroidal Ni/Cd cell concept is described. It was critically reviewed and used to develop two cell designs for practical implementation. One is a double swaged and the other a swaged welded configuration.

  8. Development of a high capacity toroidal Ni/Cd cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleck, G. L.; Foos, J. S.; Avery, J. W.; Feiman, V.

    1981-07-01

    A nickel cadmium battery design which can offer better thermal management, higher energy density and much lower cost than the state-of-the-art is emphasized. A toroidal Ni/Cd cell concept is described. It was critically reviewed and used to develop two cell designs for practical implementation. One is a double swaged and the other a swaged welded configuration.

  9. Long life 80Ah standard IPV NiH2 battery cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armantrout, Jon D.; Waller, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    A standard Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) battery cell is needed to meet future low cost, high performance mission requirements for NASA, military, and civil space programs. A common or standard cell design has evolved from the heritage of HST, Milstar, and other Air Force Mantech cell designs with substantial flight experience, while incorporating some of the historical COMSAT cell design features described in a previous NASA publication. Key features include slurry process nickel electrodes having high strength, long life and high yield (lower cost), and dual layer zircar separators for improved KOH retention, uniformality, and longer life. The cell design will have a zirconium oxide wall wick inside the pressure vessel to redistribute electrolyte and extend life. The slurry electrode will be 35 mils thick to take advantage of qualified cell mechanical configurations and proven assembly and activation techniques developed by Eagle Picher Industries (EPI) for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) RNH-90-3 and 'Generic HST' RNH-90-5 cell designs with back-to-back nickel electrodes produced by the dry sinter process. The 80Ah common cell design can be scaled to meet capacity requirements from 60Ah to 100Ah. Producibility, commonality, and long life performance will be enhanced with the robust cell design described herein.

  10. Evaluation of Cycle Life and Characterization of YTP 45 Ah Li-Ion Battery for EMU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Yi; Jeevarajan, Judith; Rehm, Raymond; Bragg, Bobby; Strangways, Brad

    2002-01-01

    Li-ion batteries, with longer cycle life and higher energy density features, are now more and more attractive and applied in multiple fields. The YTP 45 Ah Li-ion battery has been evaluated here and may be employed in EMU in the future. Evaluations were on: (1) Cycle life tests - 500 cycles total (completed 40 cycles in simulated shuttle use mode and 460 cycles in an accelerated use mode, and recorded differential voltage of individual cell in battery); (2) Characterization test - discharge capacity measurement in environment temperature of -10, 25, 50 C before and after 500 cycles; and (3) Thermal testing - charge and discharge at 50 C and -10 C before and after 500 cycles. The battery showed less than a 9% drop of initial discharge capacity and energy within 500 cycles with 475 cycles 59% DOD plus 25 cycles 100% DOD. The EOD voltage ranged from 16.0 to 18.0 V, which fits the requirement for operating the EMU.

  11. Management and Performance of APPLE Battery in High Temperature Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, M. S.; Subrahmanyam, A.; Agrawal, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    India's first experimental communication satellite, APPLE, carried a 12 AH Ni-Cd battery for supplying power during eclipse. Failure to deploy one of the two solar panels resulted in the battery operating in a high temperature environment, around 40 C. This also resulted in the battery being used in diurnal cycles rather than just half yearly eclipse seasons. The management and performance of the battery during its life of two years are described. An attempt to identify the probable degradation mechanisms is also made.

  12. A study of 40 Ah lithium ion batteries at zero percent state of charge as a function of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attidekou, Pierrot S.; Lambert, Simon; Armstrong, Matthew; Widmer, James; Scott, Keith; Christensen, Paul A.

    2014-12-01

    A theoretical equivalent circuit model of two 40 Ah commercial batteries supplied by Saft was formulated to interpret electrochemical impedance spectra as a function of temperature at zero state-of-charge. The batteries were chosen to represent viable and non-viable products from the Saft production line. This paper is the first contribution from a project in Newcastle to develop a rapid, non-destructive analytical method for quality control on the battery production line. Using the model, it proved straightforward to discriminate between viable and non-viable batteries based on the temperature dependence of the electrochemical reaction kinetics at the electrodes, the average diffusion coefficients and the charge transfer resistances. Furthermore, as well as marked differences, for example, between the time constants, activation energies, polarisation resistances of the viable and non-viable batteries, the individual contributions of the anodes and cathodes in the batteries were de-convoluted and interpreted through the model framework.

  13. 180 Ah kg-1 specific capacity positive tubular electrodes for lead acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrade, J.; Impinnisi, P. R.; do Vale, D. L.

    2011-05-01

    Two disadvantages of lead acid batteries are poor power and energy densities and the necessity of relatively long recharging times. In this paper it is presented the results of ongoing work aimed at increasing both the positive active material (PAM) specific capacity and the positive plate charge acceptability. The experimental results show that adequate curing processes can be used to develop an interconnected structure among nanometric PbO2 particles to produce tubular electrodes with specific capacity higher than 180 Ah kg-1 and maintain this value for 130 cycles with deep discharges. These PbO2 positive plates are expected to exhibit higher charge acceptability due to their larger PAM surface area as compared to conventional ones, but the results indicate that the high internal ohmic resistance of the grid/PAM zone limits the fast charge efficiency.

  14. Evaluation of advanced NiCd cell designs for NASA applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Stefano, S.; Halpert, G.; Yi, T. Y.; Dalton, P.; Hall, S.

    It is pointed out that an advanced NiCd cell based on a Hughes Aircraft Company design appears to show the most promise in the current generation of aerospace NiCd batteries. The cell was designed to ameliorate the major failure mechanisms of NiCd cells. This required cell design and process modifications and the use of alternate materials for some of the components (the most notable one being the substitution of zirconia cloth for nylon as the separator material). Recent reports in the literature indicate that the improvement in the performance of this technology appears to have been verified for GEO (geosynchronous)-type applications. The authors report on initial results of the evaluation of the advanced NiCd technology for applications of interest to NASA. They summarize the characteristics of cells based on the advanced technology from the time of manufacture to their current cell cycling status.

  15. Orbital management and design considerations for NiCd satellite power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausch, Benjamin J., II

    1994-01-01

    Several recently manufactured 50 and 60 ampere hour aerospace NiCd battery cell lots, produced by Gates Aerospace Batteries, are prone to premature on orbit performance degradation. The failure mechanism is cadmium migration, and the consequent development of soft shorts. A Martin Marietta Astronautics satellite program instituted an orbital management strategy for a set of these batteries that reduced the rate of degradation and brought the system to stable operation. This strategy involves: (1) minimizing the accumulated battery overcharge; (2) regular discharge exercises; and (3) periodic battery reconditioning. Because of changes in the NiCd cell manufacturing process, the actual performance of subsequent lots of NiCd cells is open to question. Future NiCd based power system designs should therefore allow for fine control of charge parameters, and an on orbit battery reconditioning capability. To minimize risk, it is much better to perform a full life test to qualify the cells before launch, rather than in parallel with orbital operations. If there are any changes in the manufacturing process of cells, it is extremely important to maintain very strong cognizance of secondary subcontractors, recognizing that the cell and battery manufacturing discipline is easily atrophied.

  16. Orbital management and design considerations for NiCd satellite power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tausch, Benjamin J., II

    1994-02-01

    Several recently manufactured 50 and 60 ampere hour aerospace NiCd battery cell lots, produced by Gates Aerospace Batteries, are prone to premature on orbit performance degradation. The failure mechanism is cadmium migration, and the consequent development of soft shorts. A Martin Marietta Astronautics satellite program instituted an orbital management strategy for a set of these batteries that reduced the rate of degradation and brought the system to stable operation. This strategy involves: (1) minimizing the accumulated battery overcharge; (2) regular discharge exercises; and (3) periodic battery reconditioning. Because of changes in the NiCd cell manufacturing process, the actual performance of subsequent lots of NiCd cells is open to question. Future NiCd based power system designs should therefore allow for fine control of charge parameters, and an on orbit battery reconditioning capability. To minimize risk, it is much better to perform a full life test to qualify the cells before launch, rather than in parallel with orbital operations. If there are any changes in the manufacturing process of cells, it is extremely important to maintain very strong cognizance of secondary subcontractors, recognizing that the cell and battery manufacturing discipline is easily atrophied.

  17. NiCd battery electrodes, C-150

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G.; Turchan, M.; Hopkins, J.

    1972-01-01

    Electrodes for a nongassing negative limited nickel-cadmium cell are discussed. The key element is the development of cadmium electrodes with high hydrogen overvoltage. For this, the following electrode structures were manufactured and their physical and electrochemical characteristics were evaluated: (1) silver-sinter-based Cd electrodes, (2) Teflon-bonded Cd electrodes, (3) electrodeposited Cd sponge, and (4) Cd-sinter structures.

  18. Development of a high capacity toroidal Ni/Cd cell. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Holleck, G.L.; Foos, J.S.; Avery, J.W.; Feiman, V.

    1981-07-01

    A nickel cadmium battery design which can offer better thermal management, higher energy density and much lower cost than the state-of-the-art is emphasized. A toroidal Ni/Cd cell concept is described. It was critically reviewed and used to develop two cell designs for practical implementation. One is a double swaged and the other a swaged welded configuration.

  19. Parametric tests of a 40-Ah bipolar nickel-hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    A series of tests were performed to characterize battery performance relating to certain operating parameters which include charge current, discharge current, temperature, and pressure. The parameters were varied to confirm battery design concepts and to determine optimal operating conditions.

  20. Parametric and cycle tests of a 40-AH bipolar nickel-hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of a 12 V, 40 ampere-hour bipolar battery during various charge current, discharge current, temperature, and pressure operating conditions is investigated. The cell voltages, temperatures, ampere-hours, and watt-hours derived from the charge/discharge cycle tests are studied. Consideration is given to battery voltage and discharge capacity as a function of discharge current, the correlation between energy delivered on a discharge and battery temperature, battery voltage response to pulse discharges, and the voltage-temperature relationship. The data reveal that the bipolar Ni-H battery is applicable to high power systems.

  1. Nickel-cadmium Battery Cell Reversal from Resistive Network Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    During the individual cell short-down procedures often used for storing or reconditioning nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries, it is possible for significant reversal of the lowest capacity cells to occur. The reversal is caused by the finite resistance of the common current-carrying leads in the resistive network that is generally used during short-down. A model is developed to evaluate the extent of such a reversal in any specific battery, and the model is verified by means of data from the short-down of a f-cell, 3.5-Ah battery. Computer simulations of short-down on a variety of battery configurations indicate the desirability of controlling capacity imbalances arising from cell configuration and battery management, limiting variability in the short-down resistors, minimizing lead resistances, and optimizing lead configurations.

  2. 20V, 40 Ah Lithium Ion Polymer Battery for the Spacesuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric; Wilburn, Monique; Hall, Dan; Roth, Peter; Das Gupta, Sankar; Jacobs, Jim; Bhola, Rakesh; Milicic, Gordan; Vandemeer, Dave

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Consider a new battery design for EMU. Results: a) Electrovaya s aerospace cell production line is improving, but must further improve to achieve acceptable reliability; b) Completed functional, vibration, and thermal cycling of LIB; c) So far, electrical safety tests have produced good results; d) Completed functional, vibration, thermal cycling, power quality and EMI of LIB Charger; e) Completed CDR on 9/23/04; and f) Manufacturing Readiness Review for flight cell/battery production scheduled for Dec 04.

  3. Chemical evaluation of non-woven nylon separators used in Ni/Cd cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    The goals of the chemical analysis was to identify Gates 2505 degradation mechanism, to determine if Eagle-Pitcher 2505 supply suitable for flight, and to assess the 2538 as a candidate replacement, based on chemical findings. Chemical testing strongly indicates that the Gates 2505 stored in Florida had undergone partial chemical deterioration, believed caused by exposure to high humidities and temperature. A suspected role of zinc chloride as a separator concern during storage was not verified in this study (the effect of ZnCl2 on cell/electrode performance was not addressed). No substantial chemical issues or concerns with using EP 2505 as Ni/Cd battery separator for Mars Observer and TOPEX could be found. No chemical issues or concerns with using 2538 as Ni/Cd battery separator were found, in fact, chemical evidence suggest that 2538 may be a better material, as compared to 2505.

  4. A 50 AH nickel cadmium battery activation and charge retention parametric study for LANDSAT-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tasevoli, M.

    1982-01-01

    An alternate nickel-cadmium cell activation scheme was developed which significantly reduces battery dissipation while maintaining the cell active material in the proper electrochemical state. The new procedure of charging at C/20 for 8 hours, C/10 for 6 hours and followed by C/5 to a voltage limit of 1.430 volt/cell significantly reduces the heat dissipation and charge period when compared to the standard activation practice of charging at C/20 for 48 hours. In addition, subsequent discharge voltage profiles using the new scheme are higher when compared to the standard practice. The effects of extended open-circuit periods on nickel-cadmium cell results in a capacity loss of approximately 0.7 percent and 1.4 percent per day at 23 and 35 degrees Celsius, respectively.

  5. Design and Performance Data for 81 Ah FNC Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, F.; Anderman, Menahem

    1997-01-01

    Design and performance data for 81 Ah FNC cells are given. The conclusions are: that a sealed Ni-Cd cells are not limited to 50 Ah with the FNC design; energy densities of 40 Wh/kg in a conservative high Cd, high electrolyte design have been demonstrated; uniform ATP data and LEO cycling performance is being demonstrated; internal cell pressures remain low under all conditions; and no conditioning is necessary under any LEO profile; accelerated LEO cycling exhibits performance well beyond traditional space Ni-Cd cells.

  6. Construction of temperature compensated constant voltage (VT) curves for super Ni-Cd (tm) cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, David A.; Pickett, David F.; Pearce, James M.; Rao, Gopalakrishna

    1994-01-01

    Tests to establish current-voltage characteristics at selected temperatures for 9 a-h Super Nickel-Cadmium cells were conducted at Hughes Industrial Electronics Company's Electron Dynamics Division (HIEC/EDD) under sponsorship of NASA/GSFC through their prime spacecraft contractors Fairchild Space (SMEX/SAMPEX) and TRW (TOMSEP). Curves were constructed using techniques established by Webster, Ford, et al, at NASA/GSFC in the late 1960's - early 1970's time period for conventional nickel cadmium cells used on OAO and OSO aircraft. The NASA/GSFC techniques were slightly modified by HIEC/EDD to fit the Super Ni-Cd situation.

  7. Aerospace applications of nickel-cadmium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, S. )

    1993-05-01

    Some recent NASA applications of Ni-Cd batteries are Magellan, Topex/Poseidon, and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite. Each of these automated spacecraft has a design lifetime of at least 3 years. Characteristics of the battery systems for each of these applications are given. Other topics discussed include the NASA standard Ni-Cd battery, the aerospace flight battery systems program, and the impact of the pending OHSA ruling.

  8. Experimental investigation and simulation of temperature distributions in a 16Ah-LiMnNiCoO2 battery during rapid discharge rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, S.; Dincer, I.; Agelin-Chaab, M.; Fraser, R.; Fowler, M.

    2017-03-01

    It is very important to have quantitative data regarding the temperature distributions of lithium-ion batteries at different discharge rates in order to design thermal management systems and also for battery thermal modellers. In this paper, the surface temperature distributions on a superior lithium polymer battery (SLPB) with lithium manganese nickel cobalt oxide (LiMnNiCoO2) cathode material (16 Ah capacity) at C/8, C/4, C/2, 1C, 2C, and 3C discharge rates are presented. Additionally, a battery thermal model is developed for this battery using a neural network approach with the Bayesian Regularization method and the simulated results are compared with experimental results in terms of temperature and voltage profiles at C/8, C/4, C/2, 1C, 2C, and 3C discharge rates. Thermal images, which were also captured during experiments with an IR camera at various discharge rates, and are reported in the paper. The results of this study show that the increased discharge rates between C/8 and 3C results in increased surface temperature distributions on the principal surface of the battery and decreased discharge capacity.

  9. Research, development and demonstration of lead-acid batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979. [165 Ah, 36. 5 Wh/kg

    SciTech Connect

    Bodamer, G.W.; Branca, G.C.; Cash, H.R.; Chrastina, J.R.; Yurick, E.M.

    1980-06-01

    Progress during the 1979 fiscal year is reported. All the tooling and capital equipment required for the pilot line production has been installed. A limited amount of plate production has been realized. A highly automated and versatile testing facility was established. The fabrication and testing of the initial calculated design is discussed. Cell component adjustments and the trade-offs associated with those changes are presented. Cells are being evaluated at the 3-hour rate. They have a capacity of 165 Ah and an energy density of 36.5 Wh/kg, and have completed 105 cycles to date. Experimental results being pursued under the advanced battery development program to enhance energy density and cycle life are presented. Data on the effects of different electrolyte specific gravity, separators, retainers, paste densities, battery additives and grid alloy composition on battery performance are presented and evaluated. Advanced battery prototype cells are under construction. Quality Assurance activities are summarized. They include monitoring the cell and battery fabrication and testing operations as well as all relevant documentation procedures. 12 figures, 28 tables.

  10. Preferential induction of the AhR gene battery in HepaRG cells after a single or repeated exposure to heterocyclic aromatic amines

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, Julie Josse, Rozenn Lambert, Carine Antherieu, Sebastien Laurent, Veronique Loyer, Pascal Robin, Marie-Anne Guillouzo, Andre

    2010-11-15

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) are two of the most common heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) produced during cooking of meat, fish and poultry. Both HAA produce different tumor profiles in rodents and are suspected to be carcinogenic in humans. In order to better understand the molecular basis of HAA toxicity, we have analyzed gene expression profiles in the metabolically competent human HepaRG cells using pangenomic oligonucleotide microarrays, after either a single (24-h) or a repeated (28-day) exposure to 10 {mu}M PhIP or MeIQx. The most responsive genes to both HAA were downstream targets of the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR): CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 after both time points and CYP1B1 and ALDH3A1 after 28 days. Accordingly, CYP1A1/1A2 induction in HAA-treated HepaRG cells was prevented by chemical inhibition or small interference RNA-mediated down-regulation of the AhR. Consistently, HAA induced activity of the CYP1A1 promoter, which contains a consensus AhR-related xenobiotic-responsive element (XRE). In addition, several other genes exhibited both time-dependent and compound-specific expression changes with, however, a smaller magnitude than previously reported for the prototypical AhR target genes. These changes concerned genes mainly related to cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, and cancer. In conclusion, these results identify the AhR gene battery as the preferential target of PhIP and MeIQx in HepaRG cells and further support the hypothesis that intake of HAA in diet might increase human cancer risk.

  11. Laser power beaming to extend lives of GSO NiCd satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, D.K.

    1993-12-31

    It is proposed that a ground-based laser can beam power to commercial communication satellites in geosynchronous orbit and reduce battery depth-of-discharge during eclipses. Two laser system designs are presented which have the capability of reducing battery discharge by 100%. Both utilize a steerable beam director, with a mirror diameter of 4 meters in one case and 8 meters in the other. Both also use an adaptive optics unit within the beam train to provide real-time corrections for wavefront distortions caused by atmospheric turbulence. The required system power output is in the range of 100 to 200 kW for a transmitted wavelength just under 900 nm. Laser power beaming can nearly double the remaining lifetime of a satellite that uses NiCd batteries. However, by the time such lasers become available, nearly all NiCd satellites will be replaced by NiH{sub 2} satellites, which stand to benefit much less from power beaming.

  12. Summary of LDEF battery analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Chris; Thaller, Larry; Bittner, Harlin; Deligiannis, Frank; Tiller, Smith; Sullivan, David; Bene, James

    1992-01-01

    Tests and analyses of NiCd, LiSO2, and LiCf batteries flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) includes results from NASA, Aerospace, and commercial labs. The LiSO2 cells illustrate six-year degradation of internal components acceptable for space applications, with up to 85 percent battery capacity remaining on discharge of some returned cells. LiCf batteries completed their mission, but lost any remaining capacity due to internal degradation. Returned NiCd batteries tested an GSFC showed slight case distortion due to pressure build up, but were functioning as designed.

  13. Development and testing of a high cycle life 30 A-h sealed AgO-Zn battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogner, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    A two-phase program was initiated to investigate design parameters and technology to develop an improved AgO-Zn battery. The basic performance goal was 100 charge/discharge cycles (22 h/2 h) at 50 percent depth of discharge following a six-month period of charged stand at room temperature. Phase 1, cell evaluation, involved testing 70 cells in five-cell groups. The major design variables were active material ratios, electrolyte concentrations, separator systems, and negative plate shape. Phase 1 testing showed that cycle life could be improved 10 percent to 20 percent by using greater ratios of zinc to silver oxide and higher electrolyte concentrations. Wedge-shaped negatives increased cycle life by nearly 100 percent. Phase 2 battery evaluation, which was initiated before the Phase 1 results were known completely, involved evaluation of six designs as 19-cell batteries. Only one battery exceeded 100 cycles following nine months charged stand.

  14. Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries, which use a new battery chemistry, are being developed under cooperative agreements between Lockheed Martin, Ultralife Battery, and the NASA Lewis Research Center. The unit cells are made in flat (prismatic) shapes that can be connected in series and parallel to achieve desired voltages and capacities. These batteries will soon be marketed to commercial original-equipment manufacturers and thereafter will be available for military and space use. Current NiCd batteries offer about 35 W-hr/kg compared with 110 W-hr/kg for current lithium ion batteries. Our ultimate target for these batteries is 200 W-hr/kg.

  15. Nickel cadmium battery operations on-orbit: Trials, tribulations, and success on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Miller, Scott D.

    1994-01-01

    The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), designed, built, integrated, tested, and operated by NASA and Martin Marietta is a low-Earth orbiting, Earth-observing spacecraft which was launched via Space Shuttle Discovery on September 12, 1991 and deployed three days later. The Modular Power Subsystem (MPS) onboard the satellite is equipped with three NASA Standard 50 Ampere-hour (Ah) nickel-cadmium (NiCd) batteries. McDonnell Douglas Electronics Systems Company fabricated the MPS, and batteries from Gates Aerospace Batteries cells. Nominal battery performance was achieved for the first four months of spacecraft operation. First evidence of anomalous battery performance was observed in January 1992, after the first maximum beta angle (low Depth of Discharge) period. Since then, the Flight Operations Team (FOT), under the direction of Goddard Space Flight Center's UARS Project and Space Power Application Branch, has monitored and managed battery performance by adjusting solar array offset angle, conducting periodic deep discharge, and controlling battery recharge ratio. This paper covers a brief overview of the UARS, the FOT's operational battery management, and the observed spacecraft battery performance.

  16. Super nickel-cadmium battery design and life test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, R. S.

    The super nickel-cadmium (S Ni/Cd) cell design utilizes polymer impregnated zirconia separators which are inert in place of degradable nylon separators. The positive and negative electrodes are manufactured by electrochemical impregnation methods which produce more stable electrodes than the chemically deposited electrodes used in the standard Ni/Cd cell. The quantity of electrolyte used in the S Ni/Cd cell was also increased in comparison to the standard Ni/Cd cell. Accelerated and real-time life tests are presented. Ten years of real-time geosynchronous orbit (GEO) life test have been obtained at 80 percent depth of discharge. Low earth orbit test data are presented along with charge potential data as a function of charge rate and temperature. Six different sizes of S Ni/Cd cells ranging in size from 5 to 50 Ah have been designed and built.

  17. Nickel-Cadmium Battery Operation Management Optimization Using Robust Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosiu, Julian O.; Deligiannis, Frank; DiStefano, Salvador

    1996-01-01

    In recent years following several spacecraft battery anomalies, it was determined that managing the operational factors of NASA flight NiCd rechargeable battery was very important in order to maintain space flight battery nominal performance. The optimization of existing flight battery operational performance was viewed as something new for a Taguchi Methods application.

  18. Handbook for handling and storage of nickel-cadmium batteries: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Floyd E.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Yi, Thomas Y.

    1994-01-01

    The handbook provides guidelines for the handling and storage of conventional NiCd flight batteries. The guidelines are based on many years of experience with ground and in-flight handling of batteries. The overall goal is to minimize the deterioration and irreversible effects of improper handling of NiCd flight batteries on flight performance. A secondary goal is to provide the reader with an understanding, in nonanalytical terms, of the degradation mechanisms of NiCd cells and how these mechanisms are affected by improper ground handling of flight hardware. Section 2 provides the reader with a brief introduction to NiCd cells. The effects of the environment on NiCd batteries are discussed in Section 3, and Section 4 contains 12 guidelines for battery handling and storage with supporting rationale for each guideline. The appendix provides a synopsis of NiCd cell design and evolution over 30 years of space flight on Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) satellites, along with a chronological review of key events that influenced the design of NiCd cells being flown today.

  19. Sodium-sulfur battery flight experiment definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Rebecca; Minck, Robert

    1989-01-01

    NaS batteries have been identified as the most likely successor to space Ni-H2 or Ni-Cd batteries, primarily due to a mass reduction by a factor 2 to 3 over Ni-H2 and by a factor of 4 over Ni-Cd. This yields major launch cost reductions or payload mass improvements. NaS batteries support NASA OAST's proposed Civil Space Technology Initiative goal of a factor of two improvement in spacecraft 2000 initiative. Since Ni-H2 and Ni-Cd batteries have been space flight proven, it is essential to have the flight experiment to establish a national space technology base to demonstrate the operation of the NaS battery for space applications.

  20. Nickel-cadium batteries for Apollo telescope mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, W. W.; Shikoh, A. E.

    1974-01-01

    The operational testing and evaluation program is presented which was conducted on 20-ampere-hour nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries for use on the Apollo telescope mount (ATM). The test program was initiated in 1967 to determine if the batteries could meet ATM mission requirements and to determine operating characteristics and methods. The ATM system power and charging power for the Ni-Cd secondary batteries is provided by a solar array during the 58-minute daylight portion of the orbit; during the 36-minute night portion of the orbit, the Ni-Cd secondary batteries will supply ATM system power. The test results reflect battery operating characteristics and parameters relative to simulated ATM orbital test conditions. Maximum voltage, charge requirements, capacity, temperature, and cyclic characteristics are presented.

  1. Design, Build and Qualification of 28 Volt Lithium-Ion battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curzon, D.; Spurrett, R.; Rao, G.

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. GSFC performance specifications requirements. 2. AEA philosophy: battery configuration. 3. AEA battery design: SONY cell, cell screening, 20Ah and 60Ah. 4. Testing: 20Ah battery qualification (environmental); 60Ah battery LEO life cycle. 5. Conclusion.: summary and lessons learned.

  2. High current LiSOCl2 batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debiccari, Daniel J.

    The paper describes cell construction, performance, and safety aspects of two high-rate active Li/SOCl2 batteries designed to operate at current densities as high as 26 mA/sq cm in pulse modes of 20 millisec to several minutes. Both cell designs employ a flat-plate arrangement of electrodes, a cyanoacrylate-coated anode, a bonded carbon/copper cathode, and a 1.6 M electrolyte. The major differences of the two designs are the size of the cell and the method of anode attachment. The two batteries were shown to provide over 10 times the mission life of the Ni-Cd batteries; thus, they will eliminate the logistic problems associated with the recharge requirements of the latter. In addition, a replacement of the Ni-Cd battery types with lighter Li-thionyl chloride batteries will significantly reduce battery weight and increase its capacity.

  3. 76 FR 41142 - Special Conditions; Cessna Aircraft Company Model M680 Airplane; Lithium-ion Battery Installations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... also considering the use of this Lithium-battery technology in several ] other auxiliary-battery... (c)(4), basically reworded the CAR requirements. Increased use of Ni-Cd batteries in small airplanes... proposed use of rechargeable Lithium batteries for equipment and systems on the Model 680 airplane...

  4. Preliminary results: Root cause investigation of orbital anomalies and failures in NASA standard 50 ampere-hour nickel-cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toft, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Two lots of NASA standard 50 A.H. Ni-Cd battery cells, manufactured by Gates Aerospace Batteries and built into batteries by McDonnell Douglas, have experienced significant performance problems. The two lots were used on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. Both of these satellites are Low Earth Orbital (LEO) satellites containing batteries on a parallel bus charged to NASA standard V/T curves using a NASA standard power regulator. The following preliminary conclusions were reached: (1) several plate and cell parameters have migrated within their spec limits over the years (in some cases, from one extreme to the other); (2) several parametric relationships, not generally monitored and therefore not under specification control, have also migrated over the years; (3) many of these changes appear to have taken place as a natural consequence of changes in GE/GAB materials and processes; (4) several of these factors may be 'conspiring' to aggravate known cell failure mechanisms (factors such as heavier plate, less teflon and/or less-uniform teflon, and less electrolyte) but all are still in spec (where specs exist); (5) the weight of the evidence collected to characterize the anomalies and to characterize the negative electrode itself, strongly suggests that alterations to the structure, composition, uniformity, and efficiency of the negative electrode are at the heart of the battery performance problems currently being experienced; and (6) further investigation at all levels (plate, cell, battery, and system) continues to be warranted.

  5. Super NiCd Open-Circuit Storage and Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Life Test Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, Jean Marie; Hwang, Warren C.; Ang, Valerie J.; Hayden, Jeff; Rao, Gopalakrishna; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation discusses Air Force tests performed on super NiCd cells to measure their performance under conditions simulating Low Earth Orbit (LEO) conditions. Super NiCd cells offer potential advantages over existing NiCd cell designs including advanced cell design with improved separator material and electrode making processes, but handling and storage requires active charging. These tests conclude that the super NiCd cells support generic Air Force qualifications for conventional LEO missions (up to five years duration) and that handling and storage may not actually require active charging as previously assumed. Topics covered include: Test Plan, Initial Characterization Tests, Open-Circuit Storage Tests, and post storage capacities.

  6. Special Test Methods for Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S.

    1984-01-01

    Various methods are described for measuring heat generation in primary and secondary batteries as well as the specific heat of batteries and cell thermal conductance. Problems associated with determining heat generation in large batteries are examined. Special attention is given to monitoring temperature gradients in nickel cadmium cells, the use of auxiliary electrodes for conducting tests on battery charge control, evaluating the linear sweep of current from charge to discharge, and determining zero current voltage. The fast transient behavior of batteries in the microsecond range, and the electrical conductance of nickel sinters in the thickness direction are also considered. Mechanical problems experienced in the vibration of Ni-Cd batteries and tests to simulate cyclic fatigue of the steel table connecting the plates to the comb are considered. Methods of defining the distribution of forces when cells are compressed during battery packaging are also explored.

  7. The importance of batteries in unmanned missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, John W.

    1989-12-01

    The planetary program has historically used batteries to supply peak power needs for mission specific applications. Any time that additional power has been required in order to meet peak power demands or those applications where only limited amounts of power were required, batteries have always been used. Up until the mid to late 70's they have performed their task admirably. Recently, however, we have all become aware of the growing problem of developing reliable NiCd batteries for long mission and high cycle life applications. Here, the role rechargeable batteries will play for future planetary and earth observing spacecraft is discussed. In conclusion, NiCds have been and will continue to be the mainstay of the power system engineers tools for peak power production. Recent experience has tarnished its once sterling reputation. However, the industry has stood up to this challenge and implemented wide ranging plans to rectify the situation. These efforts should be applauded and supported as new designs and materials become available. In addition, project managers must become aware of their responsibility to test their batteries and insure quality and mission operating characteristics. Without this teamwork, the role of NiCds in the future will diminish, and other batteries, not as optimum for high performance applications (low mass and volume) will take their place.

  8. The importance of batteries in unmanned missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, John W.

    1989-01-01

    The planetary program has historically used batteries to supply peak power needs for mission specific applications. Any time that additional power has been required in order to meet peak power demands or those applications where only limited amounts of power were required, batteries have always been used. Up until the mid to late 70's they have performed their task admirably. Recently, however, we have all become aware of the growing problem of developing reliable NiCd batteries for long mission and high cycle life applications. Here, the role rechargeable batteries will play for future planetary and earth observing spacecraft is discussed. In conclusion, NiCds have been and will continue to be the mainstay of the power system engineers tools for peak power production. Recent experience has tarnished its once sterling reputation. However, the industry has stood up to this challenge and implemented wide ranging plans to rectify the situation. These efforts should be applauded and supported as new designs and materials become available. In addition, project managers must become aware of their responsibility to test their batteries and insure quality and mission operating characteristics. Without this teamwork, the role of NiCds in the future will diminish, and other batteries, not as optimum for high performance applications (low mass and volume) will take their place.

  9. Hughes advanced nickel-cadmium batteries: An update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, R. Sam

    1991-05-01

    After delivering a significant data base on boilerplate and prototype advanced nickel cadmium (Ni/Cd) battery cells, Hughes decided to start using the Advanced Ni/Cd batteries on several of their flight programs. The advanced cell can been operated at 80 percent depth of discharge (DOD) for more than 10 years, and possibly 15 years, in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) applications. This cell offers an important weight saving over the standard Ni/Cd cell that is usually only operated at 50 to 60 percent DOD in GEO applications. The negative and positive electrodes are manufactured using electrochemical deposition methods which reduce the sinter corrosion problems encountered by the chemical deposition process used in the standard cells. The degradable nylon separators used in standard cells was replaced by polymer impregnated Zirconia separators.

  10. Hughes advanced nickel-cadmium batteries: An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogner, R. Sam

    1991-01-01

    After delivering a significant data base on boilerplate and prototype advanced nickel cadmium (Ni/Cd) battery cells, Hughes decided to start using the Advanced Ni/Cd batteries on several of their flight programs. The advanced cell can been operated at 80 percent depth of discharge (DOD) for more than 10 years, and possibly 15 years, in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) applications. This cell offers an important weight saving over the standard Ni/Cd cell that is usually only operated at 50 to 60 percent DOD in GEO applications. The negative and positive electrodes are manufactured using electrochemical deposition methods which reduce the sinter corrosion problems encountered by the chemical deposition process used in the standard cells. The degradable nylon separators used in standard cells was replaced by polymer impregnated Zirconia separators.

  11. The importance of batteries in unmanned missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The planetary program has historically used batteries to supply peak power needs for mission specific applications. Any time that additional power has been required in order to meet peak power demands or those applications where only limited amounts of power were required, batteries have always been used. Up until the mid to late 70s they have performed their task admirably. Recently, a growing problem of developing reliable Ni-Cd batteries for long mission and high cycle life applications has been identified. This problem and the role rechargeable batteries will play for future planetary and earth-observing spacecraft, are discussed.

  12. Performance test results of ETS-6 Ni-Cd cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakatani, Kensuke; Yano, Y.; Kuwajima, S.; Kusawake, Hiroaki

    1994-01-01

    The topics covered are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: development schedule; main specification; cell design; production flow; acceptance test (1); acceptance test (2); cell weight; 20 C performance; capacity; overcharge pressure; end of charge voltage; -5 C performance; ETS-VI simulation cycle test; and battery storage.

  13. Dielectric properties of battery electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    An effort was made to determine the effects of electromagnetic radiation on the terminal properties of electrochemical cells. Various constituents of the battery were measured to determine basic electromagnetic properties. These properties were used to predict how much radiation would be absorbed by a battery in a particular field configuration. The frequency range covered from 0 to 40 GHz with the greatest emphasis on the microwave range from 2.6 to 40 GHz. The measurements were made on NiCd, AgZn, and Pb acid cells. Results from observation show nothing which suggested any interaction between radiation and cells, and no incidence of any peaks of energy absorption was observed.

  14. Experimental investigation and model development of the Skylab ATM secondary nickel-cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, W. W.

    1974-01-01

    The performance of a Ni-Cd battery was evaluated and the cyclic battery controls to be used on the ATM batteries were determined. Cell and battery performance models were developed which to predict the performance of the secondary Ni-Cd batteries on the ATM. Capacity degradation and charge acceptance characteristics were considered. Mathematical models for each of these operating areas were developed based on data from two separate test programs. The capacity degradation model describes the expected usable battery capacity as a function of time, temperature, and depth-of-discharge. The charge acceptance model describes the cell charge acceptance as a function of charge rate, temperature, and state of charge. The models were designed for computer use and to facilitate possible battery modification. They can be used to predict expected performance or to compare real time performance during flight.

  15. Synthesis, Characterization and Performance of Cathodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianxin

    Lithium ion batteries provide a high energy density, higher voltage as well as a long shelf life compared to traditionally used lead acid, NiMH and NiCd batteries. Thus, they are a very promising energy storage system for our daily life. As one of the most important components in a battery, cathode materials have been investigated intensively in recent years as they play a key role in determining the cell voltage and discharge capacity in a battery. Both layered Li(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O 2 (NCM) and olivine-structured LiFePO4 (LFP) materials are promising cathode candidates. However, these cathodes also have some disadvantages that have hindered further commercialization. The main issue with NCM is its rapid performance decay upon cycling. In addition, LFP is hindered by a low rate capacity and low lithium ion diffusivity. We studied the crystal growth behavior and performance of both Li(Ni 1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O2 and LiFePO4 cathodes in order to develop synthesis-structure-function relationships. Three different crystal growth behaviors were observed for the NCM annealing process: surface, volume and grain boundary diffusion. Further exploration of the mechanism of NCM performance decay revealed that microstructural changes were related to the strain accommodation ability in this system and that nanostructured materials were more stable during cycling. In the LFP synthesis, we observed both oriented attachment (OA) and Ostwald ripening (OR) during growth in a triethylene-glycol system. Both polycrystalline and single crystalline particles evolved as a function of a time-dependent pH change. Thus, the lithium ion diffusion rate of LiFePO4 was improved by tailoring the morphology and size though our modification of the precursor environment, revealing that polycrystalline LFP displayed better performance than single crystalline particles. Finally, the electronic conductivity of LiFePO4 was successfully increased via a polymer solution coating method. By producing more uniform

  16. Removal of nickel and cadmium from battery waste by a chemical method using ferric sulphate.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Umesh U; Hocheng, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The removal of nickel (Ni) and cadmium (Cd) from spent batteries was studied by the chemical method. A novel leaching system using ferric sulphate hydrate was introduced to dissolve heavy metals in batteries. Ni-Cd batteries are classified as hazardous waste because Ni and Cd are suspected carcinogens. More efficient technologies are required to recover metals from spent batteries to minimize capital outlay, environmental impact and to respond to increased demand. The results obtained demonstrate that optimal conditions, including pH, concentration of ferric sulphate, shaking speed and temperature for the metal removal, were 2.5, 60 g/L, 150 rpm and 30 degrees C, respectively. More than 88 (+/- 0.9) and 84 (+/- 2.8)% of nickel and cadmium were recovered, respectively. These results suggest that ferric ion oxidized Ni and Cd present in battery waste. This novel process provides a possibility for recycling waste Ni-Cd batteries in a large industrial scale.

  17. Time-to-failure analysis for NiCd batteries in a CPS orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sense, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    Cells operating at five degrees Celsius or less, and going to 60 to 65 percent depth of discharge, were studied as to whether they could achieve a useful working life of 7.5 years in a GPS orbit. The characteristics of various orbits were compared and it is noted that the GPS orbit experiences only 220 cycles a year and must be treated as a geosynchronous rather than a low Earth orbit. Cell degradation is considered to be the result of both trickle-charge degradation and degradation due to cycling. Time-to-failure values are presented for selected temperatures and depth of discharges.

  18. Nickel cadmium battery performance simulation - A means toward optimum design in satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, K.; Halpert, G.; Timmerman, P.

    1988-01-01

    It is noted that electrochemically based cell models can advance state-of-the-art battery prediction by allowing variations in the parameters that constitute wear-out and predict end-of-life performance. This modeling method is used as the foundation for the simulation of Ni-Cd battery performance. This simulation tool consists of a comprehensive computer model to be developed which would predict the voltage behavior of a battery under mission conditions.

  19. First principles nickel-cadmium and nickel hydrogen spacecraft battery models

    SciTech Connect

    Timmerman, P.; Ratnakumar, B.V.; Distefano, S.

    1996-02-01

    The principles of Nickel-Cadmium and Nickel-Hydrogen spacecraft battery models are discussed. The Ni-Cd battery model includes two phase positive electrode and its predictions are very close to actual data. But the Ni-H2 battery model predictions (without the two phase positive electrode) are unacceptable even though the model is operational. Both models run on UNIX and Macintosh computers.

  20. First principles nickel-cadmium and nickel hydrogen spacecraft battery models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, P.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Distefano, S.

    1996-01-01

    The principles of Nickel-Cadmium and Nickel-Hydrogen spacecraft battery models are discussed. The Ni-Cd battery model includes two phase positive electrode and its predictions are very close to actual data. But the Ni-H2 battery model predictions (without the two phase positive electrode) are unacceptable even though the model is operational. Both models run on UNIX and Macintosh computers.

  1. Test summary for advanced H2 cycle NI-CD cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Lee

    1987-01-01

    To improve operational tolerances and mass, the H2 gas recombination design provisions of the Ni-H2 system were incorporated into the sealed Ni-Cd system. Produced is a cell design capable of operating on the H2 cycle versus the normal O2 cycle. Three test cells have now completed approximately 4,330 LEO (90 minute) cycles at 20 percent depth of discharge (DOD). Performance remains stable although one cell exhibited a temporary pressure anomaly.

  2. Calorimetric Measurements on a 32 Ah Li/MnO2 Cell for the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric; Johnson, Chris

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines the batteries used for the X-38 crew return vehicle. Three battery systems are described: the 350 Ah Li/MnO2 battery module, the Li/MnO2 cell battery, and the battery string of 12 cells. First thermal vacuum test results are shown, and improvements for the battery thermal design are discussed. Preliminary findings for tests and future work are described.

  3. Results from the testing and analysis of LDEF batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear, Steve; Dursch, Harry; Johnson, Chris

    1992-01-01

    Batteries were used on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) to provide power to both the active experiments and the experiment support equipment such as the Experiment Initiative System, Experiment Power and Data System (data acquisition system), and the Environment Exposure Control Canisters. Three different types of batteries were used: lithium sulfur dioxide (LiSO2), lithium carbon monofluoride (LiCF), and nickel cadmium (NiCd). A total of 92 LiSO2, 10 LiCF, and 1 NiCd batteries were flown on the LDEF. In addition, approximately 20 LiSO2 batteries were kept in cold storage at NASA LaRC. The various investigations and post-flight analyses of the flight and control batteries are reviewed. The primary objectives of these studies was to identify degradation modes (if any) of the batteries and to provide information useful to future spacecraft missions. Systems SIG involvement in the post-flight evaluation of LDEF batteries was two-fold: (1) to fund SAFT (original manufacturer of the LiSO2 batteries) to perform characterization of 13 LiSO2 batteries (10 flight and 3 control batteries); and (2) to integrate investigator results.

  4. LEO test data for 81 Ah FNC cells

    SciTech Connect

    Anderman, M.; Cohen, F.

    1997-12-01

    LEO test data for 81 Ah Fiber Nickel-Cadmium (FNC) battery packs are presented. Trends in pressure, charge acceptance, discharge voltage, capacity, and impedance during 7,800, 60% DOD cycles will be discussed. It will be shown that the FNC is capable of high rate discharge and fast charge to high DOD with stable performance. The relationship between cell design and battery pack performance will also be discussed.

  5. AUSSAT battery life test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorian, P. W.; Pickett, D. F., Jr.; Bogner, R. S.; Chao, T. I.; Jordan, J. P.; Clark, K. B.

    1985-01-01

    AUSSAT Pty. Ltd., the Australian National Satellite organization, has contracted with the Hughes Aircraft Company (HAC) for the construction of 3 satellites based on the now familiar HS-376 product line. As part of the AUSSAT contract, HAC is conducting an extensive NiCd battery life test program. The life test program, objectives and test results to date are described. Particular emphasis is given to the evaluation of the FS2117 separator as a future replacement for the Pellon 2505 separator of which only a very limited quantity remains.

  6. Separator Materials Used in Secondary Alkaline Batteries Characterized and Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Nickel-cadmium (Ni/Cd) and nickel-hydrogen (Ni/H2) secondary alkaline batteries are vital to aerospace applications. Battery performance and cycle life are significantly affected by the type of separators used in those batteries. A team from NASA Lewis Research Center's Electrochemical Technology Branch developed standardized testing procedures to characterize and evaluate new and existing separator materials to improve performance and cycle life of secondary alkaline batteries. Battery separators must function as good electronic insulators and as efficient electrolyte reservoirs. At present, new types of organic and inorganic separator materials are being developed for Ni/Cd and Ni/H2 batteries. The separator material previously used in the NASA standard Ni/Cd was Pellon 2505, a 100-percent nylon-6 polymer that must be treated with zinc chloride (ZnCl2) to bond the fibers. Because of stricter Environmental Protection Agency regulation of ZnCl2 emissions, the battery community has been searching for new separators to replace Pellon 2505. As of today, two candidate separator materials have been identified; however, neither of the two materials have performed as well as Pellon 2505. The separator test procedures that were devised at Lewis are being implemented to expedite the search for new battery separators. The new test procedures, which are being carried out in the Separator Laboratory at Lewis, have been designed to guarantee accurate evaluations of the properties that are critical for sustaining proper battery operation. These properties include physical and chemical stability, chemical purity, gas permeability, electrolyte retention and distribution, uniformity, porosity, and area resistivity. A manual containing a detailed description of 12 separator test procedures has been drafted and will be used by the battery community to evaluate candidate separator materials for specific applications. These standardized procedures will allow for consistent, uniform

  7. Analysis of nickel-cadmium battery reliability data containing zero failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denson, William K.; Klein, Glenn C.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of reliability data on Nickel-Cadmium (NiCd) batteries (for use in spacecraft) is presented. The data were collected by Gates Aerospace and represent a substantial reliability database. The data were taken from the performance of 183 satellites which were in operation from between .1 and 22 years, for a total of 278 million cell-hours of operation.

  8. Lightweight, direct-radiating nickel hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalfe, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Two battery module configurations were developed which, in addition to integrating cylindrical nickel hydrogen (NiH2) cells into batteries, provide advances in the means of mounting, monitoring and thermal control of these cells. The main difference between the two modules is the physical arrangement of the cells: vertical versus horizontal. Direct thermal radiation to deep space is accomplished by substituting the battery structure for an exterior spacecraft panel. Unlike most conventional nickel-cadmium (NiCd) and NiH2 batteries, the cells are not tightly packed together; therefore ancillary heat conducting media to outside radiating areas, and spacecraft deck reinforcements for high mass concentration are not necessary. Testing included electrical characterization and a comprehensive regime of environmental exposures. The designs are flexible with respect to quantity and type of cells, orbit altitude and period, power demand profile, and the extent of cell parameter monitoring. This paper compares the characteristics of the two battery modules and summarizes their performance.

  9. Sealed aerospace metal-hydride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine

    1992-01-01

    Nickel metal hydride and silver metal hydride batteries are being developed for aerospace applications. There is a growing market for smaller, lower cost satellites which require higher energy density power sources than aerospace nickel-cadmium at a lower cost than space nickel-hydrogen. These include small LEO satellites, tactical military satellites and satellite constellation programs such as Iridium and Brilliant Pebbles. Small satellites typically do not have the spacecraft volume or the budget required for nickel-hydrogen batteries. NiCd's do not have adequate energy density as well as other problems such as overcharge capability and memory effort. Metal hydride batteries provide the ideal solution for these applications. Metal hydride batteries offer a number of advantages over other aerospace battery systems.

  10. The BATINTREC process for reclaiming used batteries.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yue-qing; Li, Guo-jian

    2004-01-01

    The Integrated Battery Recycling (BATINTREC) process is an innovative technology for the recycling of used batteries and electronic waste, which combines vacuum metallurgical reprocessing and a ferrite synthesis process. Vacuum metallurgical reprocessing can be used to reclaim the mercury (Hg) in the dry batteries and the cadmium (Cd) in the Ni-Cd batteries. The ferrite synthesis process reclaims the other heavy metals by synthesizing ferrite in a liquid phase. Mixtures of manganese oxide and carbon black are also produced in the ferrite synthesis process. The effluent from the process is recycled, thus significantly minimizing its discharge. The heavy metal contents of the effluent could meet the Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard of China if the ratio of the crushed battery scrap and powder to FeSO4.7H2O is set at 1:6. This process could not only stabilize the heavy metals, but also recover useful resource from the waste.

  11. Nickel hydrogen battery expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiva, Sajjan G.

    1991-01-01

    The Hubble Telescope Battery Testbed at MSFC uses the Nickel Cadmium (NiCd) Battery Expert System (NICBES-2) which supports the evaluation of performance of Hubble Telescope spacecraft batteries and provides alarm diagnosis and action advice. NICBES-2 provides a reasoning system along with a battery domain knowledge base to achieve this battery health management function. An effort is summarized which was used to modify NICBES-2 to accommodate Nickel Hydrogen (NiH2) battery environment now in MSFC testbed. The NICBES-2 is implemented on a Sun Microsystem and is written in SunOS C and Quintus Prolog. The system now operates in a multitasking environment. NICBES-2 spawns three processes: serial port process (SPP); data handler process (DHP); and the expert system process (ESP) in order to process the telemetry data and provide the status and action advice. NICBES-2 performs orbit data gathering, data evaluation, alarm diagnosis and action advice and status and history display functions. The adaptation of NICBES-2 to work with NiH2 battery environment required modification to all of the three component processes.

  12. Charge Characteristics of Rechargeable Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswaranathan, Ponn; Kelly, Cormac

    2014-03-01

    Rechargeable batteries play important role in technologies today and they are critical for the future. They are used in many electronic devices and their capabilities need to keep up with the accelerated pace of technology. Efficient energy capture and storage is necessary for the future rechargeable batteries. Charging and discharging characteristics of three popular commercially available re-chargeable batteries (NiCd, NiMH, and Li Ion) are investigated and compared with regular alkaline batteries. Pasco's 850 interface and their voltage & current sensors are used to monitor the current through and the potential difference across the battery. The discharge current and voltage stayed fairly constant until the end, with a slightly larger drop in voltage than current, which is more pronounced in the alkaline batteries. After 25 charge/discharge cycling there is no appreciable loss of charge capacities in the Li Ion battery. Energy densities, cycle characteristics, and memory effects will also be presented. Sponsored by the South Carolina Governor's school for Science and Mathematics under the Summer Program for Research Interns program.

  13. EMU Ag-Zn battery wet-life extension test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Bobby J.; Wooten, Claude M.

    1992-02-01

    The Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) silver/zinc (Ag/Zn) battery is an 11 cell battery of approximately 30 AH. The Ag/Zn battery is comprised of two 4-cell monoblocks and one 3-cell monoblock. A discussion of a wet-life extension test performed on the battery is given in viewgraph form.

  14. EMU Ag-Zn battery wet-life extension test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Bobby J.; Wooten, Claude M.

    1992-01-01

    The Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) silver/zinc (Ag/Zn) battery is an 11 cell battery of approximately 30 AH. The Ag/Zn battery is comprised of two 4-cell monoblocks and one 3-cell monoblock. A discussion of a wet-life extension test performed on the battery is given in viewgraph form.

  15. The importance of batteries in unmanned missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, John W.

    1989-01-01

    A brief overview of the current set of unmanned missions that are currently in operation and those planned for the next 5 to 10 years was presented. The important role of batteries in the development of successful missions was discussed. The workhorse battery, the NiCd, and its use throughout historical missions was explored. Its role on Observers and Landers was discussed, and the success those batteries had. The recent events in the issues of quality and life for NiCd batteries were discussed. These discussions focused on the current design activities for Mars Observer (MO), TOPEX, and Mariner Mark II. Separator selection and the need for uniform testing procedures to develop a quality battery product that can perform to mission requirements were discussed. The recent experiences with the GRO battery failure and the other events have led JPL to the decision to develop a testing program in conjunction with other NASA centers to determine the best separator material for these two missions. The decision for separator material and battery design must be made a year from now. Thus there will not be time to perform a total 2-year accelerated test. The JPL plan for coping with this compromise was discussed. A discussion of where NiH2 batteries are beginning to have an impact and the difficulties with their implementation were addressed. Such missions at Earth Observing System (EOS) and the NOAA series of satellites rely upon NiH2 for success but were not chosen for TOPEX or MO due to their large volume requirements.

  16. The importance of batteries in unmanned missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, John W.

    1989-03-01

    A brief overview of the current set of unmanned missions that are currently in operation and those planned for the next 5 to 10 years was presented. The important role of batteries in the development of successful missions was discussed. The workhorse battery, the NiCd, and its use throughout historical missions was explored. Its role on Observers and Landers was discussed, and the success those batteries had. The recent events in the issues of quality and life for NiCd batteries were discussed. These discussions focused on the current design activities for Mars Observer (MO), TOPEX, and Mariner Mark II. Separator selection and the need for uniform testing procedures to develop a quality battery product that can perform to mission requirements were discussed. The recent experiences with the GRO battery failure and the other events have led JPL to the decision to develop a testing program in conjunction with other NASA centers to determine the best separator material for these two missions. The decision for separator material and battery design must be made a year from now. Thus there will not be time to perform a total 2-year accelerated test. The JPL plan for coping with this compromise was discussed. A discussion of where NiH2 batteries are beginning to have an impact and the difficulties with their implementation were addressed. Such missions at Earth Observing System (EOS) and the NOAA series of satellites rely upon NiH2 for success but were not chosen for TOPEX or MO due to their large volume requirements.

  17. Changes in impedance of Ni/Cd cells with voltage and cycle life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Margaret A.

    1992-07-01

    Impedances of aerospace design Super Ni/Cd cells are being measured as functions of voltage and number of cycles. The cells have been cycled over 4400 cycles to date. Analysis of the impedance data has been made using a number of equivalent circuits. The model giving the best fit over the whole range of voltage has a parallel circuit of a kinetic resistance and a constant phase element in series with the ohmic resistance. The values for the circuit elements have been treated as empirical parameters, and no attempt has been made as yet to correlate them with physical and chemical changes in the electrode. No significant changes have been seen as yet with the exception of a decrease in kinetic resistance at low states of charge in the first 500 cycles.

  18. Long life and low weight Ni/Cd cells for spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H.S.; Knechtli, R.C.; Margerum, J.D.; Pickett, D.F.; Rogers, M.M.; Verzwyvelt, S.A.

    1984-08-01

    Nickel-cadmium cells of various designs, containing polymer reinforced inorganic separators and either chemically deposited or electrochemically deposited nickel and cadmium electrodes, have been studied for their cycle life performance. The performance goal of these Ni/Cd cells is more than 10 years of cycle life at 80% depth of discharge operation in a geosynchronous orbit. Three alternate cycle regimes, including one with a high rate (0.4C) charging (HGEO regime), were used to test the cells. In all cycle regimes, the performance goal appears to be feasible with selected cell designs. The cycle life, in general, was longer in the HGEO cycling regime. However, in practice this HGEO cycling requires a sequential charging system which results in a tradeoff to a standard low rate charge for GEO cycling because of the extra charge control equipment needed for an HGEO regime.

  19. Changes in impedance of Ni/Cd cells with voltage and cycle life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Margaret A.

    1992-01-01

    Impedances of aerospace design Super Ni/Cd cells are being measured as functions of voltage and number of cycles. The cells have been cycled over 4400 cycles to date. Analysis of the impedance data has been made using a number of equivalent circuits. The model giving the best fit over the whole range of voltage has a parallel circuit of a kinetic resistance and a constant phase element in series with the ohmic resistance. The values for the circuit elements have been treated as empirical parameters, and no attempt has been made as yet to correlate them with physical and chemical changes in the electrode. No significant changes have been seen as yet with the exception of a decrease in kinetic resistance at low states of charge in the first 500 cycles.

  20. Comparison of rechargeable lithium and nickel/cadmium battery cells for implantable circulatory support devices.

    PubMed

    MacLean, G K; Aiken, P A; Adams, W A; Mussivand, T

    1994-04-01

    Size and weight constraints are critical areas in the design of implantable medical devices. For this reason, a study of different rechargeable lithium and nickel/cadmium (Ni/Cd) battery cell types was undertaken to determine which cell type, when assembled into a multicell battery pack, would provide the smallest and lightest power source for implantation. The discharge rate and cycle life characteristics of 2 different rectangular prismatic Ni/Cd cells and 5 different rechargeable lithium cells were determined at 37 degrees C by charge/discharge cycling, the cells using a constant discharge load of 0.87 A. Using the observed discharge rate and cycle life characteristics of the cells, along with the desired performance criteria of 30 min operating time at the end of a 1-year implant period, the projected weight and volume of the various 12-V battery packs were determined. These results showed that one of the rectangular prismatic Ni/Cd cells would yield the smallest (53 ml) and lightest (189 g) 12-V battery pack that met the performance criteria specified. The results also indicate that, for applications requiring long implant times, cycle life can be more important in the selection of cells for a small, lightweight battery pack than specific energy or energy density.

  1. The rechargeable aluminum-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, N; Das, S K; Archer, L A

    2011-12-21

    We report a novel aluminium-ion rechargeable battery comprised of an electrolyte containing AlCl(3) in the ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, and a V(2)O(5) nano-wire cathode against an aluminium metal anode. The battery delivered a discharge capacity of 305 mAh g(-1) in the first cycle and 273 mAh g(-1) after 20 cycles, with very stable electrochemical behaviour.

  2. An Advanced Battery Management System for Lithium Ion Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    preliminary cycle life data of the 18650 1100 mAh, and 26650 2200 mAh Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4) cells from Tenergy Battery Corp. (Manufacturer...10 shows how the data might be used to estimate SOL of a 18650 cell. The plot shows the analytical life cycle curve (blue) superimposed on actual...of equation 3 result with real 18650 Tenergy cell cycle life data. REFERENCES [1] Z. Filipi, L. Louca, A. Stefanopoulou, J. Pukrushpan, B

  3. Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deluca, W. H.; Gillie, K. R.; Kulaga, J. E.; Smaga, J. A.; Tummillo, A. F.; Webster, C. E.

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during FY-92 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/FeS, Ni/Metal-Hydride, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most promising R&D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R&D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

  4. Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during FY 1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies [Na/S, Li/FeS, Ni/Metal-Hydride, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe]. These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and lie evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most promising R D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

  5. Spatiotemporal oscillations of Notch1, Dll1 and NICD are coordinated across the mouse PSM.

    PubMed

    Bone, Robert A; Bailey, Charlotte S L; Wiedermann, Guy; Ferjentsik, Zoltan; Appleton, Paul L; Murray, Philip J; Maroto, Miguel; Dale, J Kim

    2014-12-01

    During somitogenesis, epithelial somites form from the pre-somitic mesoderm (PSM) in a periodic manner. This periodicity is regulated by a molecular oscillator, known as the 'segmentation clock', that is characterised by an oscillatory pattern of gene expression that sweeps the PSM in a caudal-rostral direction. Key components of the segmentation clock are intracellular components of the Notch, Wnt and FGF pathways, and it is widely accepted that intracellular negative-feedback loops regulate oscillatory gene expression. However, an open question in the field is how intracellular oscillations are coordinated, in the form of spatiotemporal waves of expression, across the PSM. In this study, we provide a potential mechanism for this process. We show at the mRNA level that the Notch1 receptor and Delta-like 1 (Dll1) ligand vary dynamically across the PSM of both chick and mouse. Remarkably, we also demonstrate similar dynamics at the protein level; hence, the pathway components that mediate intercellular coupling themselves exhibit oscillatory dynamics. Moreover, we quantify the dynamic expression patterns of Dll1 and Notch1, and show they are highly correlated with the expression patterns of two known clock components [Lfng mRNA and the activated form of the Notch receptor (cleaved Notch intracellular domain, NICD)]. Lastly, we show that Notch1 is a target of Notch signalling, whereas Dll1 is Wnt regulated. Regulation of Dll1 and Notch1 expression thus links the activity of Wnt and Notch, the two main signalling pathways driving the clock.

  6. The 2004 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Topics covered include: Super NiCd(TradeMark) Energy Storage for Gravity Probe-B Relativity Mission; Hubble Space Telescope 2004 Battery Update; The Development of Hermetically Sealed Aerospace Nickel-Metal Hydride Cell; Serial Charging Test on High Capacity Li-Ion Cells for the Orbiter Advanced Hydraulic Power System; Cell Equalization of Lithium-Ion Cells; The Long-Term Performance of Small-Cell Batteries Without Cell-Balancing Electronics; Identification and Treatment of Lithium Battery Cell Imbalance under Flight Conditions; Battery Control Boards for Li-Ion Batteries on Mars Exploration Rovers; Cell Over Voltage Protection and Balancing Circuit of the Lithium-Ion Battery; Lithium-Ion Battery Electronics for Aerospace Applications; Lithium-Ion Cell Charge Control Unit; Lithium Ion Battery Cell Bypass Circuit Test Results at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory; High Capacity Battery Cell By-Pass Switches: High Current Pulse Testing of Lithium-Ion; Battery By-Pass Switches to Verify Their Ability to Withstand Short-Circuits; Incorporation of Physics-Based, Spatially-Resolved Battery Models into System Simulations; A Monte Carlo Model for Li-Ion Battery Life Projections; Thermal Behavior of Large Lithium-Ion Cells; Thermal Imaging of Aerospace Battery Cells; High Rate Designed 50 Ah Li-Ion Cell for LEO Applications; Evaluation of Corrosion Behavior in Aerospace Lithium-Ion Cells; Performance of AEA 80 Ah Battery Under GEO Profile; LEO Li-Ion Battery Testing; A Review of the Feasibility Investigation of Commercial Laminated Lithium-Ion Polymer Cells for Space Applications; Lithium-Ion Verification Test Program; Panasonic Small Cell Testing for AHPS; Lithium-Ion Small Cell Battery Shorting Study; Low-Earth-Orbit and Geosynchronous-Earth-Orbit Testing of 80 Ah Batteries under Real-Time Profiles; Update on Development of Lithium-Ion Cells for Space Applications at JAXA; Foreign Comparative Technology: Launch Vehicle Battery Cell Testing; 20V, 40 Ah Lithium Ion Polymer

  7. Development of long life lightweight nickel-cadmium cells and batteries. [used in space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritterman, P. F.; Bogner, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the development of a high-specific energy Ni-Cd cell for a lightweight battery. After preliminary cycling tests on laboratory and commercial cells, a cell was produced that features electrochemically impregnated positive and negative electrodes, a single terminal, and increased amount of electrolyte. This cell weighed an average of 948 g and had a measured specific energy of over 50 Wh/kg at a C/2 discharge to 1.0 V. The epoxy graphite case capable of withstanding internal pressures in excess of 300 psig represents a 35% weight reduction from a lightweight 0.30 mm Ni-Cd case. A pack of these cells was cycled at 70% maximum depth of discharge beyond 10 simulated geosynchronous orbit-eclipse seasons, and high end-of-charge voltages were obtained. A prototype battery consisting of 14 such cells was fabricated and has a measured specific energy of 46 Wh/kg.

  8. Survey of Commercial Small Lithium Polymer Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-19

    This report characterizes the power and energy of several small batteries from Atomic Workshop, Full River, Kokam , and TOBN, presenting discharge...13 4h. Kokam 145 mAh, 4.2 g Li polymer battery...14 4i. Physical analysis of Kokam , Full River and Atomic Workshop cells

  9. Rated Temperature Of Silver/Zinc Batteries Is Increased

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Derek P.

    1992-01-01

    Report shows silver-zinc batteries of specific commercial type (28 V, 20 A*h, Eagle-Picher Battery MAR 4546-5) operated safely at higher temperature than previously thought possible. Batteries operated to 239 degrees F (115 degrees C) without going into sustained thermal runaway. Operated 49 degrees F (27 degrees C) above previous maximum.

  10. NiH2 Battery Reconditioning for LEO Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armantrout, J. D.; Hafen, D. P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes reasons for and benefits of reconditioning nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) batteries used for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) applications. NiH2 battery cells do not have the classic discharge voltage problems more commonly associated with nickel-cadmium (NiCd) cells. This is due, in part, to use of hydrogen electrodes in place of cadmium electrodes. The nickel electrode, however, does have a similar discharge voltage signature for both cell designs. This can have an impact on LEO applications where peak loads at higher relative depths of discharge can impact operations. Periodic reconditioning provides information which can be used for analyzing long term performance trends to predict usable capacity to a specified voltage level. The reconditioning process described herein involves discharging NiH2 batteries at C/20 rates or less, to an average cell voltage of 1.0 volts or less. Recharge is performed at nominal C/5 rates to specified voltage/temperature (V/T) charge levels selected to restore required capacity with minimal overcharge. Reconditioning is a process of restoring reserve capacity lost on cycling, which is commonly called the memory effect in NiCd cells. This effect is characterized by decreases in the discharge voltage curve with operational life and cycling. The end effect of reconditioning NiH2 cells may be hidden in the versatility, of that design over the NiCd cell design and its associated negative electrode fading problem. The process of deep discharge at lower rates by way of reconditioning tends to redistribute electrolyte and water in the NiH2 cell electrode stack, while improving utilization and charge efficiency. NiH2 battery reconditioning effects on life are considered beneficial and may, in fact. extend life based on NiCd experience. In any case, usable capacity data obtained from reconditioning is required for performance evaluation and trend analysis. Characterization and life tests have provided the historical data base used to

  11. Application of First Principles Ni-Cd and Ni-H2 Battery Models to Spacecraft Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, Paul; Bugga, Ratnakumar; DiStefano, Salvador

    1997-01-01

    The conclusions of the application of first principles model to spacecraft operations are: the first principles of Bi-phasic electrode presented model provides an explanation for many behaviors on voltage fading on LEO cycling.

  12. Performance evaluation of advanced battery technologies for electric vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deluca, W. H.; Tummillo, A. F.; Kulaga, J. E.; Webster, C. E.; Gillie, K. R.; Hogrefe, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    At the Argonne Analysis and Diagnostic Laboratory, advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions. During 1989 and the first quarter of 1990, single cell and multicell modules from seven developers were examined for the Department of Energy and Electric Power Research Institute. The results provide battery users, developers, and program managers with an interim measure of the progress being made in battery R&D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and a source of basic data for modeling and continuing R&D. This paper summarizes the performance and life characterizations of two single cells and seven 3- to 960-cell modules that encompass six technologies (Na/S, Ni/Fe, Ni/Cd, Ni-metal hydride, lead-acid, and Zn/Br).

  13. Application of first principle nickel system battery models to aerospace situations

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano, S. Di; Timmerman, P.; Ratnakumar, B.V.

    1995-12-31

    Battery models based on first principles have been under development for the last five to ten years. More recently, the appearance of faster and more sophisticated computational techniques, has allowed significant advances in the field. The usual approach consists of selecting the critical physicochemical phenomena of the given system (chemistry, mass transfer, charge transfer, etc.), setting up the problem as a set of coupled differential equations and obtaining numerical solutions. This approach was successfully implemented for the Pb-Acid system and subsequently for the NiCd system, at the cell level, by Prof. Ralph White of Texas A and M University. This NiCd cell model served as the basis of the NiCd Aerospace Battery model developed at JPL and reported at previous IECEC meetings. At this time several aerospace battery models using the same approach are under development at JPL. The recent models are based on NiH2 and NiMH chemistries. The current set of models uses a simplified treatment of the electrodes, this treatment assumes planar (non porous) electrode geometry. The resulting models have very modest computational requirements, allowing them to operate on personal computers. Results of performance predictions and computational requirements for the new models are discussed.

  14. Impact on global metal flows arising from the use of portable rechargeable batteries.

    PubMed

    Rydh, Carl Johan; Svärd, Bo

    2003-01-20

    The use of portable rechargeable battery cells and their effects on global metal flows were assessed or the following three cases: (1) the base case, which reflects the situation in 1999 of the global production of batteries; (2) the global production of portable nickel-cadmium batteries in 1999, assumed to be replaced by other battery types; and (3) assessment of the projected battery market in 2009. The study included the following battery technologies: nickel-cadmium (NiCd); nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) (AB(5), AB(2)); and lithium-based batteries (Li-ion: Co, Ni, Mn; Li-polymer: V). Based on the lithospheric extraction indicator (LEI), which is the ratio of anthropogenic to natural metal flows, and the significance of battery production related to global metal mining, the potential environmental impact of metals used in different battery types was evaluated. The LEIs and average metal demand for the battery market in 1999, expressed as a percentage of global mining output in 1999, were estimated to be as follows: Ni 5.6 (2.0%); Cd 4.4 (37%); Li 0.65 (3.8%); V 0.33 (6.5%); Co 0.18 (15%); Nd 0.18 (8.4%); La 0.10 (9.5%); Ce 0.083 (4.4%); and Pr 0.073 (9.4%). The use of Ni and Cd is of the greatest environmental interest, due to their high LEIs. In the case of complete replacement of portable NiCd batteries by NiMH or Li-based batteries, the LEI for Ni (5.6) would change by -0.1-0.5% and the LEI for Cd would decrease from 4.4 to 3.0 (-31%). Meanwhile, the mobilization of metals considered less hazardous than Cd (LEI 0 < 5) would increase less than 7%. Based on this assessment, the replacement of NiCd batteries would result in decreased environmental impact. To decrease the impact on global metal flows arising from the use of portable batteries the following points should be considered: (1) development of battery technologies should aim at high energy density and long service life; (2) metals with high natural occurrence should be used; and (3) metals from disused

  15. Impedance and self-discharge mechanism studies of nickel metal hydride batteries for energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenhua; Zhu, Ying; Tatarchuk, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Nickel metal hydride battery packs have been found wide applications in the HEVs (hybrid electric vehicles) through the on-board rapid energy conservation and efficient storage to decrease the fossil fuel consumption rate and reduce CO2 emissions as well as other harmful exhaust gases. In comparison to the conventional Ni-Cd battery, the Ni-MH battery exhibits a relatively higher self-discharge rate. In general, there are quite a few factors that speed up the self-discharge of the electrodes in the sealed nickel metal hydride batteries. This disadvantage eventually reduces the overall efficiency of the energy conversion and storage system. In this work, ac impedance data were collected from the nickel metal hydride batteries. The self-discharge mechanism and battery capacity degradation were analyzed and discussed for further performance improvement.

  16. Study on sources of charging lead acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniş, C. M.; Popa, G. N.; Iagăr, A.

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents the general characteristics of lead acid batteries and two charging methods of these batteries. For charging of lead batteries was used an intelligent power source K 8012 (from Velleman). The power source allows fixing the level of the battery voltage and battery capacity. The intelligent power source uses the joint method (at constant current and, then, at constant voltage) and warning that indicates different situations in the charging process. Other method of charging presented in the paper is at constant voltage using a stabilized power source. In the paper experimental measurements were carried out using data acquisition card SER 10 BIT (from Conrad) for charging/ discharging of a lead acid battery 12V/9Ah (using an intelligent power source) and charging of another high capacity lead acid battery 12V/47Ah/390 A (using a stabilized power source). At the discharging of the lead acid batteries it were used automotive lamps as electric loads.

  17. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as hybrid

  18. The electrical performance of Ag Zn batteries for the Venus multi-probe mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palandati, C.

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation of 5 Ah and 21 Ah Silver-Zinc batteries was made to determine their suitability to meet the energy storage requirements of the bus vehicle, 3 small probes and large probe for the Venus multi-probe mission. The evaluation included a 4 Ah battery for the small probe, a 21 Ah battery for the large probe, one battery of each size for the bus vehicle power, a periodic cycling test on each size battery and a wet stand test of charged and discharged cells of both cell designs. The study on the probe batteries and bus vehicle batteries included both electrical and thermal simulation for the entire mission. The effects on silver migration and zinc penetration of the cellophane separators caused by the various test parameters were determined by visual and X-ray fluorescence analysis. The 5 Ah batteries supported the power requirements for the bus vehicle and small probe. The 21 Ah large probe battery supplied the required mission power. Both probe batteries delivered in excess of 132 percent of rated capacity at the completion of the mission simulation.

  19. Silicene for Na-ion battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiajie; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2016-09-01

    Na-ion batteries are promising candidates to replace Li-ion batteries in large scale applications because of the advantages in natural abundance and cost of Na. Silicene has potential as the anode in Li-ion batteries but so far has not received attention with respect to Na-ion batteries. In this context, freestanding silicene, a graphene-silicene-graphene heterostructure, and a graphene-silicene superlattice are investigated for possible application in Na-ion batteries, using first-principles calculations. The calculated Na capacities of 954 mAh/g for freestanding silicene and 730 mAh/g for the graphene-silicene superlattice (10% biaxial tensile strain) are highly competitive and potentials of \\gt 0.3 {{V}} against the Na{}+/Na potential exceed the corresponding value of graphite. In addition, the diffusion barriers are predicted to be \\lt 0.3 {eV}.

  20. Results of advanced battery technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1992-09-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight Into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, In a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991--1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies [Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid]. These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R&D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

  1. Results of advanced battery technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deluca, W. H.; Gillie, K. R.; Kulaga, J. E.; Smaga, J. A.; Tummillo, A. F.; Webster, C. E.

    1992-10-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis and Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991-1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R&D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

  2. Simulation studies for wells AH-4bis/AH-17 and AH-18, Ahuachapan Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Monterrosa, Manuel Ernesto

    1996-01-24

    Well AH-4bis, at the Ahuachapan Geothermal Field is planned to be drilled on the same pad as the former AH-4. A simulation study was carried out for two casing dameters 13 5/8 and 9 5/8” in order to estimate its production and to know its economic feasibility. The simulation results indcate a high probability of production in the range of 7 Mwe, equivalent to 120 kg/s total mass flow rate, 1250 kJ/kg at 6 bar-a for the new well AH-4bis. Well AH- 17 is good producer, during 1991 after ten years of production, the well was shut-in due to silica scaling problems. A wellbore simulation was carried out in order to predict the new production conditions after the work-over, mainly to estimate the water flow rate in order to reduce the silica scaling. The results indicate a very low water flow rate. The match between the simulated and measured production curves after the work-over was successful. The well AH-18 is located at the southern part of the actual bore field. CEL is planning to expand the borefield at this area and it is neccessary to estimate the possible production condtions at that zone. The results indicate a high probabilty of production at that area. The power potential is estimated at 3.5 Mwe per well at WHP 6 bar-a and the wells will not require induction.

  3. Simulations studies for wells AH-4bis/AH-17 and AH-18, Ahuachapan Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Monterrosa, M.E.

    1996-12-31

    Well AH-4{sub bis} at the Ahuachapan Geothermal Field is planned to be drilled on the same pad as the former AH-4. A simulation study was carried out for two casing diameters 13 5/8 and 9 5/8 inches in order to estimate its production and to know its economic feasibility. The simulation results indicate a high probability of production in the range of 7 Mwe, equivalent to 120 kg/s total mass flow rate, 1250 kJ/kg at 6 bar-a for the new well AH-4b{sub bis}. Well AH-17 is good producer, during 1991 after ten years of production, the well was shut-in due to silica scaling problems. A wellbore simulation was carried out in order to predict the new production conditions after the work-over, mainly to estimate the water flow rate in order to reduce the silica scaling. The results indicate a very low water flow rate. The match between the simulated and measured production curves after the work-over was successful. The well AH-18 is located at the southern part of the actual bore field. CEL is planning to expand the borefield at this area and it is necessary to estimate the possible production conditions at that zone. The results indicate a high probability of production at that area. The power potential is estimated at 3.5 Mwe per well at WHP 6 bar-a and the wells will not require induction.

  4. Graphdiyne as a high-capacity lithium ion battery anode material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Byungryul; Koo, Jahyun; Park, Minwoo; Lee, Hosik; Nam, Jaewook; Kwon, Yongkyung; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2013-12-01

    Using the first-principles calculations, we explored the feasibility of using graphdiyne, a 2D layer of sp and sp2 hybrid carbon networks, as lithium ion battery anodes. We found that the composite of the Li-intercalated multilayer α-graphdiyne was C6Li7.31 and that the calculated voltage was suitable for the anode. The practical specific/volumetric capacities can reach up to 2719 mAh g-1/2032 mAh cm-3, much greater than the values of ˜372 mAh g-1/˜818 mAh cm-3, ˜1117 mAh g-1/˜1589 mAh cm-3, and ˜744 mAh g-1 for graphite, graphynes, and γ-graphdiyne, respectively. Our calculations suggest that multilayer α-graphdiyne can serve as a promising high-capacity lithium ion battery anode.

  5. A PSPICE macromodel for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S.

    1997-12-01

    Battery models for simulation are useful for estimating operating life, stability, transient response, and related characteristics in circuits and systems. This paper presents a parametric PSPICE macromodel for simulating Lithium-Ion batteries. Comparisons of the simulation with experimental data from 1.25 Ah Lithium-Ion cells are then made.

  6. Advanced Battery Manufacturing (VA)

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, Jeremy

    2012-09-30

    LiFeBATT has concentrated its recent testing and evaluation on the safety of its batteries. There appears to be a good margin of safety with respect to overheating of the cells and the cases being utilized for the batteries are specifically designed to dissipate any heat built up during charging. This aspect of LiFeBATT’s products will be even more fully investigated, and assuming ongoing positive results, it will become a major component of marketing efforts for the batteries. LiFeBATT has continued to receive prismatic 20 Amp hour cells from Taiwan. Further testing continues to indicate significant advantages over the previously available 15 Ah cells. Battery packs are being assembled with battery management systems in the Danville facility. Comprehensive tests are underway at Sandia National Laboratory to provide further documentation of the advantages of these 20 Ah cells. The company is pursuing its work with Hybrid Vehicles of Danville to critically evaluate the 20 Ah cells in a hybrid, armored vehicle being developed for military and security applications. Results have been even more encouraging than they were initially. LiFeBATT is expanding its work with several OEM customers to build a worldwide distribution network. These customers include a major automotive consulting group in the U.K., an Australian maker of luxury off-road campers, and a number of makers of E-bikes and scooters. LiFeBATT continues to explore the possibility of working with nations that are woefully short of infrastructure. Negotiations are underway with Siemens to jointly develop a system for using photovoltaic generation and battery storage to supply electricity to communities that are not currently served adequately. The IDA has continued to monitor the progress of LiFeBATT’s work to ensure that all funds are being expended wisely and that matching funds will be generated as promised. The company has also remained current on all obligations for repayment of an IDA loan and lease

  7. Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deluca, W. H.; Gillie, K. R.; Kulaga, J. E.; Smaga, J. A.; Tummillo, A. F.; Webster, C. E.

    1993-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life and the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies: Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid. These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy's. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

  8. Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1993-03-25

    Argonne National Laboratory's Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life, and the most-promising R D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy's. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

  9. Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1993-03-25

    Argonne National Laboratory`s Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life, and the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy`s. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

  10. Performance and life evaluation of advanced battery technologies for electric vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deluca, W. H.; Gillie, K. R.; Kulaga, J. E.; Smaga, J. A.; Tummillo, A. F.; Webster, C. E.

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle (EV) operating conditions at the Argonne Analysis and Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provides a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1990 on nine single cells and fifteen 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six technologies: (Na/S, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, Ni/Cd, Ni-metal hydride, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy and Electric Power Research Institute. The results provide battery users, developers, and program managers an interim measure of the progress being made in battery R and D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and a source of basic data for modelling and continuing R and D.

  11. Performance and life evaluation of advanced battery technologies for electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle (EV) operating conditions at the Argonne Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provides a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1990 on nine single cells and fifteen 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six technologies (Na/S, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, Ni/Cd, Ni-metal hydride, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy and Electric Power Research Institute. The results provide battery users, developers, and program managers an interim measure of the progress being made in battery R D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and a source of basic data for modelling and continuing R D. 1 ref., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Kathryn R.

    Lead/acid batteries are produced in sizes from less than 1 to 3000 Ah for a wide variety of portable, industrial and automotive applications. Designs include Planté, Fauré or pasted, and tubular electrodes. In addition to the traditional designs which are flooded with sulfuric acid, newer 'valve-regulated" designs have the acid immolibized in a silica gel or absorbed in a porous glass separator. Development is ongoing worldwide to increase the specific power, energy and deep discharge cycle life of this commercially successful system to meet the needs of new applications such as electric vehicles, load leveling, and solar energy storage. The operating principles, current status, technical challenges and commercial impact of the lead/acid battery are reviewed.

  13. Battery/Ultracapacitor Evaluation for X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric; Strangways, Bradley

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reported on the evaluation of the battery/ultracapacitor for the crew return vehicle (CRV). The CRV, as part of the international space station (ISS) planning, will be available to return to earth an ill or injured crew person, or if the ISS becomes unsafe, and the shuttle is not available. The requirements of the X-38 CRV are reviewed, and in light of the power requirements, the battery's required performance is reviewed. The ultracapacitor bank, and its test method is described. The test results are reviewed. A picture of the test set up is displayed showing the ultracapacitor bank and the NiMH battery. The presentation continues by reviewing tests of 5 available trade high power cell designs: (1) Hawker lead acid, (2) Bolder lead acid, (3) Energizer NiMH, (4) Sanyo NiCd, and (5) Energizer NiCd. The test methods and results are reviewed. There is also a review of the issues concerning lead acid batteries and conclusions.

  14. RESULTS FROM THE AHS PESTICIDE EXPOSURE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study/Pesticide Exposure Study (AHS/PES) measured exposures resulting from agricultural use of 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos for a subset of applicators in the AHS cohort. Through on-farm measurements and observations, data collected in the exposure study will...

  15. Assessment of cardiac resynchronisation therapy in patients with wide QRS and non-specific intraventricular conduction delay: rationale and design of the multicentre randomised NICD-CRT study

    PubMed Central

    Eschalier, Romain; Ploux, Sylvain; Pereira, Bruno; Clémenty, Nicolas; Da Costa, Antoine; Defaye, Pascal; Garrigue, Stéphane; Gourraud, Jean-Baptiste; Gras, Daniel; Guy-Moyat, Benoît; Leclercq, Christophe; Mondoly, Pierre; Bordachar, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) was initially developed to treat patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB). However, many patients with heart failure have a widened QRS but neither left-BBB nor right-BBB; this is called non-specific intraventricular conduction delay (NICD). It is unclear whether CRT is effective in this subgroup of patients. Methods and analysis The NICD-CRT study is a prospective, double-blind, randomised (1:1), parallel-arm, multicentre trial comparing the effects of CRT in patients with heart failure, a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF <35%) and NICD, who have been implanted with a device (CRT-pacemaker or CRT-defibrillator) that has or has not been activated. Enrolment began on 15 July 2015 and should finish within 3 years; 40 patients have already been randomised and 11 centres have agreed to participate. The primary end point is the comparison of the proportion of patients improved, unchanged or worsened over the subsequent 12 months. 100 patients per group are required to demonstrate a difference between groups with a statistical power of 90%, a type I error of 0.05% (two-sided) and a loss to follow-up of 10%. This trial will add substantially to the modest amount of existing data on CRT in patients with NICD and should reduce uncertainty for guidelines and clinical practice when added to the pool of current information. Ethics and dissemination Local ethics committee authorisations have been obtained since May 2015. We will publish findings from this study in a peer-reviewed scientific journal and present results at national and international conferences. Trial registration number NCT02454439; pre-results. PMID:27836874

  16. Lithium-Ion Performance and Abuse Evaluation Using Lithium Technologies 9Ah cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Albert Daniel; Jeevarajan, Judith A.

    2006-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries in a pouch form offer high energy density and safety in their designs and more recently they are offering performance at higher rates. Lithium Technologies 9Ah high-power pouch cells were studied at different rates, thermal environments, under vacuum and several different conditions of abuse including overcharge, over-discharge and external short circuit. Results of this study will be presented.

  17. Wavelet-Transform-Based Power Management of Hybrid Vehicles with Multiple On-board Energy Sources Including Fuel Cell, Battery and Ultracapacitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-12

    parameters are shown in Table II, which are based on experimental data from a 18650 lithium battery Page 13 of 20 cell. The nominal voltage of this battery...To obtain the sufficient current outputting ability, we place forty 18650 lithium battery cells in parallel. Additionally the nominal capacity of an... 18650 lithium battery cell is 1.4Ah, and the reference current for battery modeling is set to 1.4A. So the nominal power of the battery stack is

  18. Design of a 10.8 kWh, 28V Ni-MH Battery Using Commercial Ni-MH Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellen, Robert M.; Darcy, Eric C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a 10.8 kWh, 28V, Ni-MH battery using commercial off-the shelf (COTS) 4/3A Ni-MH cells for the X-38 vehicle, an experimental version of the Crew Return Vehicle (CRY). This will be an autonomous vehicle that will enable International Space Station crews to return to earth in the event of a medical, or other, emergency. The X-38 will be powered by 3 batteries: a 32 V primary battery, which will power the vehicle avionics for up to 7 hours for a loiter and de-orbit phase of the descent; a 28 V Ni-MH battery which will take over for the primary battery after de-orbit until landing, and a 270V Ni-Cd battery, which will be used to power electromechanical actuators and the winches controlling a parachute for landing.

  19. Li-ion EMU Battery Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehm, Raymond; Bragg, Bobby; Strangways, Brad

    2001-01-01

    A 45Ah Lithium ion (Li-Ion) battery comprised of 5 Yardney prismatic cells was evaluated to replace the silver-zinc cells in the Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Tests determined that the five cell battery can meet the mission objective of 500 duty cycles and maintain a minimum voltage of 16.0 V without an individual cell voltage dropping below 3.0V. Forty real time cycles were conducted to develop BOL trend data. Decision to switch to accelerated cycling for the remaining 460 cycles was made since Real Time cycling requires 1 day/cycle. Conclusions indicate that battery replacement would indeed be prudent.

  20. New Lithium-ion Polymer Battery for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, J. A.; Darcy, E. C.

    2004-01-01

    The Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) suit currently has a silver-zinc battery that is 20.5 V and 45 Ah capacity. The EMU's portable life support system (PLSS) will draw power from the battery during the entire period of an EVA. Due to the disadvantages of using the silver-zinc battery in terms of cost and performance, a new high energy density battery is being developed for future use, The new battery (Lithium-ion battery or LIB) will consist of Li-ion polymer cells that will provide power to the EMU suit. The battery design consists of five 8 Ah cells in parallel to form a single module of 40 Ah and five such modules will be placed in series to give a 20.5 V, 40 Ah battery. Charging will be accomplished on the Shuttle or Station using the new LIB charger or the existing ALPS (Air Lock Power Supply) charger. The LIB delivers a maximum of 3.8 A on the average, for seven continuous hours, at voltages ranging from 20.5 V to 16.0 V and it should be capable of supporting transient pulses during start up and once every hour to support PLSS fan and pump operation. Figure 1 shows the placement of the battery in the backpack area of the EMU suit. The battery and cells will undergo testing under different conditions to understand its performance and safety characteristics.

  1. Nickel-cadmium batteries: effect of electrode phase composition on acid leaching process.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, C A; Margarido, F

    2012-01-01

    At the end of their life, Ni-Cd batteries cause a number of environmental problems because of the heavy metals they contain. Because of this, recycling of Ni-Cd batteries has been carried out by dedicated companies using, normally, pyrometallurgical technologies. As an alternative, hydrometallurgical processes have been developed based on leaching operations using several types of leachants. The effect of factors like temperature, acid concentration, reaction time, stirring speed and grinding of material on the leaching yields of metals contained in anodic and cathodic materials (nickel, cadmium and cobalt) using sulphuric acid, is herein explained based on the structural composition of the electrode materials. The nickel, cobalt and cadmium hydroxide phases, even with a small reaction time (less than 15 minutes) and low temperature (50 degrees C) and acid concentration (1.1 M H2SO4), were efficiently leached. However, leaching of the nickel metallic phase was more difficult, requiring higher values of temperature, acid concentration and reaction time (e.g. 85 degrees C, 1.1 M H2SO4 and 5 h, respectively) in order to obtain a good leaching efficiency for anodic and cathodic materials (70% and 93% respectively). The stirring speed was not significant, whereas the grinding of electrode materials seems to promote the compaction of particles, which appears to be critical in the leaching of Ni degrees. These results allowed the identification and understanding of the relationship between the structural composition of electrode materials and the most important factors that affect the H2SO4 leaching of spent Ni-Cd battery electrodes, in order to obtain better metal-recovery efficiency.

  2. Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory. Electric and hybrid propulsion systems, No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1992-12-31

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during FY 1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies [Na/S, Li/FeS, Ni/Metal-Hydride, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe]. These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and lie evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most promising R&D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R&D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

  3. Advanced Nanofiber-Based Lithium-Ion Battery Cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toprakci, Ozan

    Among various energy storage technologies, rechargeable lithium-ion batteries have been considered as effective solution to the increasing need for high-energy density electrochemical power sources. Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries offer energy densities 2 - 3 times and power densities 5 - 6 times higher than conventional Ni-Cd and Ni-MH batteries, and as a result, they weigh less and take less space for a given energy delivery. However, the use of lithium-ion batteries in many large applications such as electric vehicles and storage devices for future power grids is hindered by the poor thermal stability, relatively high toxicity, and high cost of lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) powders, which are currently used as the cathode material in commercial lithium-ion batteries. Recently, lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO 4) powders have become a favorable cathode material for lithium-ion batteries because of their low cost, high discharge potential (around 3.4 V versus Li/Li+), large specific capacity (170 mAh g -1), good thermal stability, and high abundance with the environmentally benign and safe nature. As a result, there is a huge demand for the production of high-performance LiFePO4. However, LiFePO4 also has its own limitation such as low conductivity (˜10-9 S cm -1), which results in poor rate capability. To address this problem, various approaches can be used such as decreasing particle size of LiFePO 4, doping LiFePO4 with metal ions or coating LiFePO 4 surface with carboneous materials. Formation of conductive layer on LiFePO4 and decreasing particle size are promising approaches due to their superior contribution to electrical conductivity and electrochemical performance of LiFePO4. Although different approaches can be used for surface coating and particle size decrement, electrospinning can be potentially considered as an efficient, simple and inexpensive way. In this study, LiFePO 4/carbon and carbon nanotube- and graphene-loaded electrospun LiFePO 4/carbon

  4. Data pieces-based parameter identification for lithium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Zou, Yuan; Sun, Fengchun; Hu, Xiaosong; Yu, Yang; Feng, Sen

    2016-10-01

    Battery characteristics vary with temperature and aging, it is necessary to identify battery parameters periodically for electric vehicles to ensure reliable State-of-Charge (SoC) estimation, battery equalization and safe operation. Aiming for on-board applications, this paper proposes a data pieces-based parameter identification (DPPI) method to identify comprehensive battery parameters including capacity, OCV (open circuit voltage)-Ah relationship and impedance-Ah relationship simultaneously only based on battery operation data. First a vehicle field test was conducted and battery operation data was recorded, then the DPPI method is elaborated based on vehicle test data, parameters of all 97 cells of the battery package are identified and compared. To evaluate the adaptability of the proposed DPPI method, it is used to identify battery parameters of different aging levels and different temperatures based on battery aging experiment data. Then a concept of "OCV-Ah aging database" is proposed, based on which battery capacity can be identified even though the battery was never fully charged or discharged. Finally, to further examine the effectiveness of the identified battery parameters, they are used to perform SoC estimation for the test vehicle with adaptive extended Kalman filter (AEKF). The result shows good accuracy and reliability.

  5. The constitutively active Ah receptor (CA-Ahr) mouse as a potential model for dioxin exposure--effects in vital organs.

    PubMed

    Brunnberg, Sara; Andersson, Patrik; Lindstam, Maria; Paulson, Ivar; Poellinger, Lorenz; Hanberg, Annika

    2006-07-25

    The dioxin/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates most, if not all, toxic effects of dioxins and functions as a ligand-activated transcription factor regulating transcription of a battery of genes. In order to study the mechanisms behind the toxicity of ligands of the Ah receptor we have created a transgenic mouse model expressing a constitutively active Ah receptor (CA-AhR). The mutant Ah receptor is expressed and functionally active in all organs studied. The purpose of the present study was to characterize histopathologically, the phenotype of the CA-AhR with regard to the liver, kidney, lung, heart, spleen and thymus of male and female transgenic CA-AhR mice. Moreover, cell-specific activity of the CA-AhR using up-regulation of the AhR target gene CYP1A1 as a marker, was also examined. The relative weight of liver, kidney and heart were increased while relative thymus weight was decreased. Furthermore, slight morphological lesions of the liver, kidney and spleen was seen. Expression of CYP1A1 was found in cells corresponding to endothelial cells in all of the organs studied. In some tissues additional cell types, such as hepatocytes, renal tubuli cell and Clara cells expressed CYP1A1. Both the effects on organ weights and the cellular expression of CYP1A1 in CA-AhR mice correspond well to observations in TCDD-exposed mice. In conclusion, this characterization further support that the CA-AhR mouse is a useful model for life-long continuous low-level activity of the AhR, i.e. the dioxin exposure situation of humans of the general population.

  6. Characterization of the physico-chemical properties of polymeric materials for aerospace flight. [nickel cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, M.; Khan, S. Z.

    1980-01-01

    Factors contributing to the final failure of Ni-Cd batteries are listed. A differential thermal analyzer was used to study several positive and negative battery electrodes. The negative plates show a very large peak (endotherm) between 245 C and 250C. The second endotherm occurs at 300C indicating the decomposition of Cd(OH)2. In positive plates, a first weak endotherm occurs at 100C, which indicates loss of H2O from Ni(OH)2(H2O)n molecules. A second large endotherm occurs in the range of 290C to 300C, indicating the decomposition of Ni(OH2) to NiO and H2O. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to determine nickel, cobalt, cadmium, and potassium content in battery electrolytes and electrodes. Results are presented in tables.

  7. Recovery of discarded sulfated lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Hassan; Asadi, Raziyeh

    The aim of this research is to recover discarded sulfated lead-acid batteries. In this work, the effect of two methods (inverse charge and chemical charge) on the reactivation of sulfated active materials was investigated. At the inverse charge, the battery is deeply discharged and the electrolyte of battery is replaced with a new sulfuric acid solution of 1.28 g cm -3. Then, the battery is inversely charged with constant current method (2 A for the battery with the nominal capacity of 40 Ah) for 24 h. At the final stage, the inversely charged battery is directly charged for 48 h. Through these processes, a discarded battery can recover its capacity to more than 80% of a similar fresh and non-sulfated battery. At the chemical charge method, there are some effective parameters that including ammonium persulfate [(NH 4) 2S 2O 8] concentration, recovery temperature and recovery time. The effect of all parameters was optimized by one at a time method. The sulfated battery is deeply discharged and then, its electrolyte was replaced by a 40% ammonium persulfate solution (as oxidant) at temperature of 50 °C. By adding of oxidant solution, the chemical charging of positive and negative plates was performed for optimum time of 1 h. The chemically charged batteries were charged with constant voltage method (2.66 V for the battery with nominal voltage and nominal capacity of 2 V and 10 Ah, respectively) for 24 h. By performing of these processes, a discarded battery can recovers its capacity to more than 84% of the similar fresh and non-sulfated battery. Discharge and cyclelife behaviors of the recovered batteries were investigated and compared with similar healthy battery. The morphology and structure of plates was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after recovery.

  8. Design of a nickel-hydrogen battery simulator for the NASA EOS testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gur, Zvi; Mang, Xuesi; Patil, Ashok R.; Sable, Dan M.; Cho, Bo H.; Lee, Fred C.

    1992-01-01

    The hardware and software design of a nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H2) battery simulator (BS) with application to the NASA Earth Observation System (EOS) satellite is presented. The battery simulator is developed as a part of a complete testbed for the EOS satellite power system. The battery simulator involves both hardware and software components. The hardware component includes the capability of sourcing and sinking current at a constant programmable voltage. The software component includes the capability of monitoring the battery's ampere-hours (Ah) and programming the battery voltage according to an empirical model of the nickel-hydrogen battery stored in a computer.

  9. The Role of AhR in Breast Cancer Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    other cell types, galangin is a potent inhibitor of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), an environmental carcinogen-responsive transcription factor...constitutively active AhR. Constitutive and environmental chemical-inducible AhR activity was profoundly suppressed by galangin as was cell growth...However, the failure of a-naphthoflavone or FhAhRR transfection to block growth indicated that galangin -mediated AhR inhibition was either insufficient

  10. Multilayer Approach for Advanced Hybrid Lithium Battery.

    PubMed

    Ming, Jun; Li, Mengliu; Kumar, Pushpendra; Li, Lain-Jong

    2016-06-28

    Conventional intercalated rechargeable batteries have shown their capacity limit, and the development of an alternative battery system with higher capacity is strongly needed for sustainable electrical vehicles and hand-held devices. Herein, we introduce a feasible and scalable multilayer approach to fabricate a promising hybrid lithium battery with superior capacity and multivoltage plateaus. A sulfur-rich electrode (90 wt % S) is covered by a dual layer of graphite/Li4Ti5O12, where the active materials S and Li4Ti5O12 can both take part in redox reactions and thus deliver a high capacity of 572 mAh gcathode(-1) (vs the total mass of electrode) or 1866 mAh gs(-1) (vs the mass of sulfur) at 0.1C (with the definition of 1C = 1675 mA gs(-1)). The battery shows unique voltage platforms at 2.35 and 2.1 V, contributed from S, and 1.55 V from Li4Ti5O12. A high rate capability of 566 mAh gcathode(-1) at 0.25C and 376 mAh gcathode(-1) at 1C with durable cycle ability over 100 cycles can be achieved. Operando Raman and electron microscope analysis confirm that the graphite/Li4Ti5O12 layer slows the dissolution/migration of polysulfides, thereby giving rise to a higher sulfur utilization and a slower capacity decay. This advanced hybrid battery with a multilayer concept for marrying different voltage plateaus from various electrode materials opens a way of providing tunable capacity and multiple voltage platforms for energy device applications.

  11. Hubble Space Telescope 2004 Battery Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollandsworth, Roger; Armantrout, Jon; Whitt, Tom; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2006-01-01

    Battery cell wear out mechanisms and signatures are examined and compared to orbital data from the six on-orbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST) batteries, and the Flight Spare Battery (FSB) Test Bed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), which is instrumented with individual cell voltage monitoring. The on-orbit HST batteries were manufactured on an expedited basis after the Challenger Shuttle Disaster in 1986. The original design called for the HST to be powered by six 50 Ah Nickel Cadmium batteries, which would have required a shuttle mission every 5 years for battery replacement. The decision to use NiH2 instead has resulted in a longer life battery set which was launched with HST in April 1990, with a design life of 7 years that has now exceeded 14+ years of orbital cycling. This chart details the specifics of the original HST NiH2 cell design. The HST replacement batteries for Service Mission 4, originally scheduled for Spring 2005, are currently in cold storage at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The SM4 battery cells utilize slurry process electrodes having 80% porosity.

  12. Button batteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002764.htm Button batteries To use the sharing features on this page, please enable ... in the United States. Where Found These devices use button batteries: Calculators Cameras Hearing aids Penlights Watches Symptoms If ...

  13. The effect of cell design and test criteria on the series/parallel performance of nickel cadmium cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, G.; Webb, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Three batteries were operated in parallel from a common bus during charge and discharge. SMM utilized NASA Standard 20AH cells and batteries, and LANDSAT-D NASA 50AH cells and batteries of a similar design. Each battery consisted of 22 series connected cells providing the nominal 28V bus. The three batteries were charged in parallel using the voltage limit/current taper mode wherein the voltage limit was temperature compensated. Discharge occurred on the demand of the spacecraft instruments and electronics. Both flights were planned for three to five year missions. The series/parallel configuration of cells and batteries for the 3-5 yr mission required a well controlled product with built-in reliability and uniformity. Examples of how component, cell and battery selection methods affect the uniformity of the series/parallel operation of the batteries both in testing and in flight are given.

  14. Activated porous carbon wrapped sulfur sub-microparticles as cathode materials for lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Yan, Y. L.; Ren, B.; Yang, R.; Zhang, W.; Xu, Y. H.

    2017-03-01

    The lithium-sulfur batteries holds a high theoretical capacity and specific energy, which is 4-5 times larger than that of today’s lithium-ion batteries, yet the low sulfur loading and large particles in the cathode greatly offset its advantage in high energy density. In the present paper, a liquid phase deposition method was introduced to synthesize sub-micro sulfur particles, which utilized as cathode materials after composed with activated porous carbon. Compared with common sublimed sulfur cathodes, as-obtained composite cathode shows an enhanced initial discharge capacity from 840.7 mAh/g to 1093 mAh/g at C/10. The reversible specific capacity after 50 cycles increased from 383 mAh/g to 504 mAh/g. The developed method has the advantages of simple process, convenient operation and low cost, and is suitable for the industrial preparation of lithium/sulfur batteries.

  15. Performance and Comparison of Lithium-Ion Batteries Under Low-Earth-Orbit Mission Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.; Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Miller, Thomas B.; Gitzendanner, Rob

    2007-01-01

    The performance of two 28 V, 25 Ah lithium-ion batteries is being evaluated under low-Earth-orbit mission profiles for satellite and orbiter applications. The batteries are undergoing life testing and have achieved over 12,000 cycles to 40 percent depth-of-discharge.

  16. Battery separators.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pankaj; Zhang, Zhengming John

    2004-10-01

    The ideal battery separator would be infinitesimally thin, offer no resistance to ionic transport in electrolytes, provide infinite resistance to electronic conductivity for isolation of electrodes, be highly tortuous to prevent dendritic growths, and be inert to chemical reactions. Unfortunately, in the real world the ideal case does not exist. Real world separators are electronically insulating membranes whose ionic resistivity is brought to the desired range by manipulating the membranes thickness and porosity. It is clear that no single separator satisfies all the needs of battery designers, and compromises have to be made. It is ultimately the application that decides which separator is most suitable. We hope that this paper will be a useful tool and will help the battery manufacturers in selecting the most appropriate separators for their batteries and respective applications. The information provided is purely technical and does not include other very important parameters, such as cost of production, availability, and long-term stability. There has been a continued demand for thinner battery separators to increase battery power and capacity. This has been especially true for lithiumion batteries used in portable electronics. However, it is very important to ensure the continued safety of batteries, and this is where the role of the separator is greatest. Thus, it is essential to optimize all the components of battery to improve the performance while maintaining the safety of these cells. Separator manufacturers should work along with the battery manufacturers to create the next generation of batteries with increased reliability and performance, but always keeping safety in mind. This paper has attempted to present a comprehensive review of literature on separators used in various batteries. It is evident that a wide variety of separators are available and that they are critical components in batteries. In many cases, the separator is one of the major factors

  17. Dry cell battery poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  18. Nickel hydrogen batteries: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Odonnell, Patricia M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper on nickel hydrogen batteries is an overview of the various nickel hydrogen battery design options, technical accomplishments, validation test results and trends. There is more than one nickel hydrogen battery design, each having its advantage for specific applications. The major battery designs are individual pressure vessel (IPV), common pressure vessel (CPV), bipolar and low pressure metal hydride. State-of-the-art (SOA) nickel hydrogen batteries are replacing nickel cadmium batteries in almost all geosynchronous orbit (GEO) applications requiring power above 1 kW. However, for the more severe low earth orbit (LEO) applications (greater than 30,000 cycles), the current cycle life of 4000 to 10,000 cycles at 60 percent DOD should be improved. A LeRC innovative advanced design IPV nickel hydrogen cell led to a breakthrough in cycle life enabling LEO applications at deep depths of discharge (DOD). A trend for some future satellites is to increase the power level to greater than 6 kW. Another trend is to decrease the power to less than 1 kW for small low cost satellites. Hence, the challenge is to reduce battery mass,volume, and cost. A key is to develop a light weight nickel electrode and alternate battery designs. A common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel hydrogen battery is emerging as a viable alternative to the IPV design. It has the advantage of reduced mass, volume and manufacturing costs. A 10 Ah CPV battery has successfully provided power on the relatively short lived Clementine Spacecraft. A bipolar nickel hydrogen battery design has been demonstrated (15,000 LEO cycles, 40 percent DOD). The advantage is also a significant reduction in volume, a modest reduction in mass, and like most bipolar designs, features a high pulse power capability. A low pressure aerospace nickel metal hydride battery cell has been developed and is on the market. It is a prismatic design which has the advantage of a significant reduction in volume and a reduction in

  19. Alternate charging profiles for the onboard nickel cadmium batteries of the Explorer Platform/Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Prettyman-Lukoschek, Jill S.

    1995-01-01

    The Explorer Platform/Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EP/EUVE) spacecraft power is provided by the Modular Power Subsystems (MPS) which contains three 50 ampere-hour Nickel Cadmium (NiCd) batteries. The batteries were fabricated by McDonnell Douglas Electronics Systems Company, with the cells fabricated by Gates Aerospace Batteries (GAB), Gainesville, Florida. Shortly following launch, the battery performance characteristics showed similar signatures as the anomalous performance observed on both the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). This prompted the development and implementation of alternate charging profiles to optimize the spacecraft battery performance. The Flight Operations Team (FOT), under the direction of Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) EP/EUVE Project and Space Power Applications Branch have monitored and managed battery performance through control of the battery Charge to Discharge (C/D) ratio and implementation of a Solar Array (SA) offset. This paper provides a brief overview of the EP/EUVE mission, the MPS, the FOT's battery management for achieving the alternate charging profile, and the observed spacecraft battery performance.

  20. Advances in nickel hydrogen technology at Yardney Battery Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, J. G.; Hall, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    The current major activites in nickel hydrogen technology being addressed at Yardney Battery Division are outlined. Five basic topics are covered: an update on life cycle testing of ManTech 50 AH NiH2 cells in the LEO regime; an overview of the Air Force/industry briefing; nickel electrode process upgrading; 4.5 inch cell development; and bipolar NiH2 battery development.

  1. Intermetallic compounds as negative electrodes of Ni/MH batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas, F.; Joubert, J.-M.; Latroche, M.; Percheron-Guégan, A.

    2001-04-01

    This review is devoted to the main families of thermodynamically stable intermetallic compounds (AB5-, AB2- and AB-type alloys) that have been researched in the last thirty years as materials for negative electrodes in nickel-metal hydride batteries. The crystal structure of these compounds and their hydrides is widely described. Their solid-gas hydrogenation properties and, particularly, the related desorption isotherm curves are examined as a useful criterion for the selection of suitable battery materials. The electrochemical performances obtained with these alloys are reported and the given solutions to common problems such as corrosion, passivation, decrepitation and short cycle life are discussed. Only AB5-based compounds have achieved, up to now, enough development for being widely present on the market, and exhibit improved battery performances in comparison with the polluting Ni/Cd batteries. The high capacity of AB2-based compounds and the remarkable electrochemical activity of some AB-based alloys make, however, further research on all the reviewed families still valuable.

  2. Analysis of DMFC/battery hybrid power system for portable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bong-Do; Jung, Doo-Hwan; Ko, Young-Ho

    This study was carried out to develop a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC)/battery hybrid power system used in portable applications. For a portable power system, the DMFC was applied for the main power source at average load and the battery was applied for auxiliary power at overload. Load share characteristics of hybrid power source were analyzed by computational simulation. The connection apparatus between the DMFC and the battery was set and investigated in the real system. Voltages and currents of the load, the battery and the DMFC were measured according to fuel, air and load changes. The relationship between load share characteristic and battery capacity was surveyed. The relationship was also studied in abnormal operation. A DMFC stack was manufactured for this experiment. For the study of the connection characteristics to the fuel cell Pb-acid, Ni-Cd and Ni-MH batteries were tested. The results of this study can be applied to design the interface module of the fuel cell/battery hybrid system and to determine the design requirement in the fuel cell stack for portable applications.

  3. Air compressor battery duration with mechanical ventilation in a field anesthesia machine.

    PubMed

    Szpisjak, Dale F; Giberman, Anthony A

    2015-05-01

    Compressed air to power field anesthesia machine ventilators may be supplied by air compressor with battery backup. This study determined the battery duration when the compPAC ventilator's air compressor was powered by NiCd battery to ventilate the Vent Aid Training Test Lung modeling high (HC = 0.100 L/cm H2O) and low (LC = 0.020 L/cm H2O) pulmonary compliance. Target tidal volumes (VT) were 500, 750, and 1,000 mL. Respiratory rate = 10 bpm, inspiratory-to-expiratory time ratio = 1:2, and fresh gas flow = 1 L/min air. N = 5 in each group. Control limits were determined from the first 150 minutes of battery power for each run and lower control limit = mean VT - 3SD. Battery depletion occurred when VT was below the lower control limit. Battery duration ranged from 185.8 (±3.2) minutes in the LC-1000 group to 233.3 (±3.6) minutes in the HC-750 group. Battery duration of the LC-1000 group was less than all others (p = 0.027). The differences among the non-LC-1000 groups were not clinically significant.

  4. A Polymer Lithium-Oxygen Battery

    PubMed Central

    Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Hassoun, Jusef

    2015-01-01

    Herein we report the characteristics of a lithium-oxygen battery using a solid polymer membrane as the electrolyte separator. The polymer electrolyte, fully characterized in terms of electrochemical properties, shows suitable conductivity at room temperature allowing the reversible cycling of the Li-O2 battery with a specific capacity as high as 25,000 mAh gC−1 reflected in a surface capacity of 12.5 mAh cm−2. The electrochemical formation and dissolution of the lithium peroxide during Li-O2 polymer cell operation is investigated by electrochemical techniques combined with X-ray diffraction study, demonstrating the process reversibility. The excellent cell performances in terms of delivered capacity, in addition to its solid configuration allowing the safe use of lithium metal as high capacity anode, demonstrate the suitability of the polymer lithium-oxygen as high-energy storage system. PMID:26238552

  5. A Polymer Lithium-Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Hassoun, Jusef

    2015-08-04

    Herein we report the characteristics of a lithium-oxygen battery using a solid polymer membrane as the electrolyte separator. The polymer electrolyte, fully characterized in terms of electrochemical properties, shows suitable conductivity at room temperature allowing the reversible cycling of the Li-O2 battery with a specific capacity as high as 25,000 mAh gC(-1) reflected in a surface capacity of 12.5 mAh cm(-2). The electrochemical formation and dissolution of the lithium peroxide during Li-O2 polymer cell operation is investigated by electrochemical techniques combined with X-ray diffraction study, demonstrating the process reversibility. The excellent cell performances in terms of delivered capacity, in addition to its solid configuration allowing the safe use of lithium metal as high capacity anode, demonstrate the suitability of the polymer lithium-oxygen as high-energy storage system.

  6. AH Draconis - a tale of two periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, D.

    2010-04-01

    Using BAA data from the past 37 years, the SRb variable star AH Dra is found to have two slightly variable periods of around 105 and 189 days and a range of magnitude 7.0 to 8.9. This is in contrast to the GCVS period of 158 days and range of 8.5-9.3.

  7. Material Use in the United States - Selected Case Studies for Cadmium, Cobalt, Lithium, and Nickel in Rechargeable Batteries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, David R.

    2008-01-01

    This report examines the changes that have taken place in the consumer electronic product sector as they relate to (1) the use of cadmium, cobalt, lithium, and nickel contained in batteries that power camcorders, cameras, cell phones, and portable (laptop) computers and (2) the use of nickel in vehicle batteries for the period 1996 through 2005 and discusses forecasted changes in their use patterns through 2010. Market penetration, material substitution, and technological improvements among nickel-cadmium (NiCd), nickel-metal-hydride (NiMH), and lithium-ion (Li-ion) rechargeable batteries are assessed. Consequences of these changes in light of material consumption factors related to disposal, environmental effects, retail price, and serviceability are analyzed in a series of short case studies.

  8. A Comparison of Two Panasonic Lithium-Ion Batteries and Cells for the IBM Thinkpad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith A.; Cook, Joseph S.; Davies, Francis J.; Collins, Jacob; Bragg, Bobby J.

    2003-01-01

    The IBM Thinkpad 760XD has been used in the Orbiter and International Space Station since 2000. The Thinkpad is powered by a Panasonic Li-ion battery that has a voltage of 10.8 V and 3.0 Ah capacity. This Thinkpad is now being replaced by the IBM Thinkpad A31P which has a Panasonic Li-ion battery that has a voltage of 10.8 V and 4.0 Ah capacity. Both batteries have protective circuit boards. The Panasonic battery for the Thinkpad 760XD had 12 Panasonic 17500 cells of 0.75 Ah capacity in a 4P3S cOnfiguration. The new Panasonic battery has 6 Panasonic 18650 cells of 2.0 Ah capacity in a 2P3S configuration. The batteries and cells for both models have been evaluated for performance and safety. A comparison of the cells under similar test conditions will be presented. The performance of the cells has been evaluated under different rates of charge and discharge and different temperatures. The cells have been tested under abuse conditions and the safety features in the cells evaluated. The protective circuit board in the battery was also tested under conditions of overcharge, overdischarge, short circuit and unbalanced cell configurations. The results of the studies will be presented in this paper.

  9. power battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunyun, Zhang; Guoqing, Zhang; Weixiong, Wu; Weixiong, Liang

    2014-07-01

    Under hard acceleration or on a hill climb of (hybrid) electronic vehicles, the battery temperature would increase rapidly. High temperature decreases the battery cycle life, increases the thermal runaway, and even causes a battery to explode, that making the management of battery temperature an important consideration in the safety using of electronic vehicles. A study of increasing heat transfer area from the beginning design phase has been conducted to determine and enhance the heat dissipation on the battery surface. Both experiment and simulation methods were used to analyze the cooling performance under identical battery capacities and heights. Optimal external dimensions and cell sizes with the consideration of better battery workability was obtained from the analysis. The heat transfer coefficients were investigated in order to regulate the battery temperature under safety operating range. It was found that the temperature of the experiment battery would be controlled under safety critical when the cell was designed for 180 mm × 30 mm × 185 mm sizes and the surface heat transfer coefficient was 20 W m-2 K-1 at least.

  10. Performance of Li-Ion Cells Under Battery Voltage Charge Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2002-01-01

    Li-ion cells manufactured by YTP, SAFT, and MSA have completed 6714, 6226, and 3441 cycles, respectively. An increase in the charge voltage limit was required in all cases to maintain the discharge voltage. SAFT and MSA cells were capable of cycling at -10 C and 0 C with an increase in the charge voltage limit, whereas Yardney cells could not be cycled. Reconditioning improved the discharge voltage of SAFT and MSA cells; it is important to note that the effect has been temporary as in Ni-H and Ni-Cd batteries. It was demonstrated that the charge operation with VT clamp at battery rather than at cell level is feasible. Continuation of testing depends on the health of the cells and on the funding situation.

  11. Thermoelectrochemical simulations of performance and abuse in 50-Ah automotive cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Ung; Albertus, Paul; Cook, David; Monroe, Charles W.; Christensen, Jake

    2014-12-01

    The performance and thermal response of large-scale GS-Yuasa LEV50 50-Ah NMC automotive battery cells were investigated via simulation. To evaluate local transient temperature distributions, the Dualfoil model was coupled to local energy-balance equations. At similar C rates the difference between maximum and minimum temperature in the LEV50 was found to be higher than that in an 18650 cell with identical chemistry. Unlike thinner prismatic lithium ion batteries, the temperature variation through the cell thickness in the large-format cell was not negligible (∼5 °C at 4C discharge). Because of the non-uniform temperature distribution within the jellyroll, the risk of lithium plating at high charging rates and low ambient temperatures may be greater toward the jellyroll exterior. Simulations of thermal abuse (oven test) of the large cell showed a delayed thermal response relative to the 18650, but also indicated a lower onset temperature for thermal runaway.

  12. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  13. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  14. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  15. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  16. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  17. Cycle life testing of lithium-ion batteries for small satellite LEO space missions

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, S.T.; Feikert, J.H.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1993-08-16

    In 1990, Sony corporation announced their intention to manufacture a rechargeable lithium ion battery, based on the intercalation of lithium ions into a carbonaceous anode. The cells were first introduced for portable telephone use in June, 1991. (1) A 3.6V average cell voltage (4.1-2.75V range); (2) Excellent cycle life (1200 @ 100% DOD); (3) Good capacity retention (70% after 6 months); (4) Wide temperature range performance ({minus}20 to +60{degrees}C); (5) Excellent Discharge rate (82% capacity at 30 min. discharge rate); (6) Excellent Charge rate (100% Charge in <3 hrs); and (7) High energy density (264 W*hr/1 and 120 Whr/kg for ``D`` size cell. These specifications show significant promise for application of these batteries in low earth orbit (LEO) small satellites, particularly when compared to existing NiH{sub 2} and NiCd technology. The very high energy density and specific energy will reduce power system volume and weight. The wide temperature range enables simpler thermal design, particularly for new, small, high power satellites. The materials used in the lithium ion batteries are relatively inexpensive and benign, so that we expect costs to come down substantially in the future. The specified cycle life at 100% DOD is also 50% longer than most NiCds, so low DOD (depth of discharge) performance could be substantial. This study was undertaken to: (a) assess the feasibility for using lithium ion cells on small satellite LEO missions and (b) verify the claims of the manufacturer. This was accomplished by performing a detailed autopsy and various depth of discharge and rate tests on the cells. Of special interest was the cycle life performance of these cell at various depths of discharge DOD`s, to get an initial measure of the reduction in capacity fade with cycle conditions. Low DOD`s are used to extend the life of all batteries used in a space application.

  18. Electrospun carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate (CMCAB) nanofiber for high rate lithium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Shao, Ziqiang; Yang, Mingshan; Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Feijun; Xie, Long; Lv, Shaoyi; Zhang, Yunhua

    2013-07-01

    Cellulose derivative CMCAB was synthesized, and nanometer fiber composite material was obtained from lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4, LFP)/CMCAB by electrospinning. Under the protection of inert gas, modified LFP/carbon nanofibers (CNF) nanometer material was obtained by carbonization in 600°C. IR, TG-DSC, SEM and EDS were performed to characterize their morphologies and structures. LFP/CNF composite materials were assembled into lithium-ion battery and tested their performance. Specific capacity was increased from 147.6 mAh g(-1) before modification to 160.8 mAh g(-1) after modification for the first discharge at the rate of 2C. After 200 charge-discharge cycles, when discharge rate was increased from 2C to 5C to 10C, modified battery capacity was reduced from 152.4 mAh g(-1) to 127.9 mAh g(-1) to 106 mAh g(-1). When the ratio was reduced from 10C to 5C to 2C, battery capacity can be quickly approximate to the original level. Cellulose materials that were applied to lithium battery can improve battery performance by electrospinning.

  19. In-flight AHS MTF measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallefont-Robinet, Françoise; Fontanilles, Guillaume; de Miguel, Eduardo

    2008-10-01

    The disposal of couples of images of the same landscape acquired with two spatial resolutions gives the opportunity to assess the in-flight Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of the lower resolution sensor in the common spectral bands. For each couple, the higher resolution image stands for the landscape so that the ratio of the spectra obtained by FFT of the two images, gives the lower resolution sensor MTF. This paper begins with a brief recall of the method including the aliasing correction. The next step presents the data to be processed, provided by the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA). The model of the AHS MTF is described. The presentation of the corresponding AHS results naturally follows. Last part of the paper consists in a comparison with other measurements: measurements obtained with the edge method and laboratory measurements.

  20. A high-performance transcutaneous battery charger for medical implants.

    PubMed

    Artan, N; Vanjani, Hitesh; Vashist, Gurudath; Fu, Zhen; Bhakthavatsala, Santosh; Ludvig, Nandor; Medveczky, Geza; Chao, H

    2010-01-01

    As new functionality is added to the implantable devices, their power requirements also increase. Such power requirements make it hard for keeping such implants operational for long periods by non-rechargeable batteries. This result in a need for frequent surgeries to replace these batteries. Rechargeable batteries can satisfy the long-term power requirements of these new functions. To minimize the discomfort to the patients, the recharging of the batteries should be as infrequent as possible. Traditional battery charging methods have low battery charging efficiency. This means they may limit the amount of charge that can be delivered to the device, speeding up the depletion of the battery and forcing frequent recharging. In this paper, we evaluate the suitability of a state-of-the-art general purpose charging method called current-pumped battery charger (CPBC) for implant applications. Using off-the-shelf components and with minimum optimization, we prototyped a proof-of-concept transcutaenous battery charger based on CPBC and show that the CPBC can charge a 100 mAh battery transcutaneously within 137 minutes with at most 2.1°C increase in tissue temperature even with a misalignment of 1.3 cm in between the coils, while keeping the battery charging efficiency at 85%.

  1. Role of AhR/ARNT system in skin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Furue, Masutaka; Takahara, Masakazu; Nakahara, Takeshi; Uchi, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that binds to structurally diverse synthetic and naturally occurring chemicals including dioxins, flavonoids, tryptophan photoproducts, and Malassezia metabolites. Upon binding to its ligands, cytoplasmic AhR translocates to the nucleus, heterodimerizes with aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), and mediates numerous biological and toxicological effects by inducing the transcription of various AhR-responsive genes. AhR ligation controls oxidation/antioxidation, epidermal barrier function, photo-induced response, melanogenesis, and innate immunity. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of skin homeostasis mediated by the AhR/ARNT system.

  2. A Foldable Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Wu, Zi Ping; Sun, Hao; Chen, Deming; Gao, Jian; Suresh, Shravan; Chow, Philippe; Singh, Chandra Veer; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2015-11-24

    The next generation of deformable and shape-conformable electronics devices will need to be powered by batteries that are not only flexible but also foldable. Here we report a foldable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) rechargeable battery, with the highest areal capacity (∼3 mAh cm(-2)) reported to date among all types of foldable energy-storage devices. The key to this result lies in the use of fully foldable and superelastic carbon nanotube current-collector films and impregnation of the active materials (S and Li) into the current-collectors in a checkerboard pattern, enabling the battery to be folded along two mutually orthogonal directions. The carbon nanotube films also serve as the sulfur entrapment layer in the Li-S battery. The foldable battery showed <12% loss in specific capacity over 100 continuous folding and unfolding cycles. Such shape-conformable Li-S batteries with significantly greater energy density than traditional lithium-ion batteries could power the flexible and foldable devices of the future including laptops, cell phones, tablet computers, surgical tools, and implantable biomedical devices.

  3. A nickel-cadmium battery reconditioning circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanier, R.

    1977-01-01

    The circuit presented is simple and small enough to be included in a typical battery charge/power control assembly, yet provides the advantage of a complete ground-type battery reconditioning discharge. Test results on the circuit when used to recondition two 24 cell, 20 A-h nickel-cadmium batteries are given. These results show that a battery reconditioned with this circuit returns to greater than 90 percent of its original capacity (greater than nameplate capacity) and follows a typical new battery degradation curve even after over 20,000 simulated orbital cycles for a 4 year period. Applications of the circuit are considered along with recommendations relative to its use. Its application in low voltage (22 to 36 Vdc) power systems and in high voltage (100 to 150 Vdc) power systems is discussed. The implications are that the high voltage systems have a greater need for battery reconditioning than their low voltage counterparts, and that using these circuit techniques, the expected life of a battery in low Earth orbit can be up to 5 years.

  4. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Yang, Hui; Shen, Xiao-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Sodium metal chloride batteries, also called as ZEBRA batteries, possess many merits such as low cost, high energy density and high safety, but their high operation temperature (270-350 °C) may cause several issues and limit their applications. Therefore, decreasing the operation temperature is of great importance in order to broaden their usage. Using a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) catholyte composed of sodium chloride buffered 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride-aluminum chloride and a dense β″-aluminates solid electrolyte film with 500 micron thickness, we report an intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery which can be operated at only 150 °C, therefore alleviating the corrosion issues, improving the material compatibilities and reducing the operating complexities associated with the conventional ZEBRA batteries. The RTIL presents a high ionic conductivity (0.247 S cm-1) at 150 °C and a wide electrochemical window (-2.6 to 2.18 vs. Al3+/Al). With the discharge plateau at 2.64 V toward sodium and the specific capacity of 285 mAh g-1, this intermediate temperature battery exhibits an energy density (750 mWh g-1) comparable to the conventional ZEBRA batteries (728-785 mWh g-1) and superior to commercialized Li-ion batteries (550-680 mWh g-1), making it very attractive for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications.

  5. Nickel cadmium battery operations and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna; Prettyman-Lukoschek, Jill; Calvin, Richard; Berry, Thomas; Bote, Robert; Toft, Mark

    1994-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), and Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) spacecraft are operated from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland. On-board power subsystems for each satellite employ NASA Standard 50 Ampere-hour (Ah) nickel-cadmium batteries in a parallel configuration. To date, these batteries have exhibited degradation over periods from several months (anomalous behavior, UARS and CGRO (MPS-1); to little if any, EUVE) to several years (old age, normal behavior, ERBS). Since the onset of degraded performance, each mission's Flight Operations Team (FOT), under the direction of their cognizant GSFC Project Personnel and Space Power Application Branch's Engineers has closely monitored the battery performance and implemented several charge control schemes in an effort to extend battery life. Various software and hardware solutions have been developed to minimize battery overcharge. Each of the four sections of this paper covers a brief overview of each mission's operational battery management and its associated spacecraft battery performance. Also included are new operational procedures developed on-orbit that may be of special interest to future mission definition and development.

  6. Aircraft battery state of charge and charge control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, S.; Charkey, A.

    1986-02-01

    This Interim Report describes work done in developing an aircraft battery state of charge and charge control system. The basis for this system developed by ERC is a nickel-oxygen (NiO2) Pilot cell (0.374 Ah). This pilot cell is cycled in tandem with a nickel-cadmium battery. The oxygen pressure of the pilot cell is utilized to determine and control the state of charge of the nickel-cadmium battery. The NiO2 pilot cell baseline performance was determined during this period. The effect of using different nickel electrodes (ERC, SAFT, MARATHON) was also performed.

  7. Sclareolide enhances gemcitabine‑induced cell death through mediating the NICD and Gli1 pathways in gemcitabine‑resistant human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Wang, Ye; Zhang, Wen-Long; Dong, Mao-Sheng; Zhang, Jian-Hua

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a type of cancer, which rapidly develops resistance to chemotherapy. Gemcitabine is the treatment used clinically, however, gemcitabine resistance leads to limited efficacy and patient survival rates of only a few months following diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer and to select targeted agents combined with gemcitabine to promote the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Panc‑1 and ASPC‑1 human pancreatic cancer cells (HPCCs) were used to establish the experimental model, and HPCCs were exposed to gemcitabine of serially increased concentrations to generate gemcitabine‑resistant cells (GR‑HPCCs). The anticancer effect of gemcitabine combined with sclareolide was then assessed. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) and ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase 1 (RRM1) were detected in the HPCCs and GR‑HPCCs, and the mechanisms were investigated. Sclareolide resensitized the GR‑HPCCs to gemcitabine. The expression levels of hENT1 and RRM1 were lower and higher, respectively, in GR‑HPCCs, compared with HPCCs. Sclareolide upregulated hENT1, downregulated RRM1 and inhibited gemcitabine‑induced EMT through the TWIST1/Slug pathway in the GR‑HPCCs. In addition, sclareolide mediated the NOTCH 1 intracellular cytoplasmic domain (NICD)/glioma‑associated oncogene 1 (Gli1) pathway, which triggered TWIST1/Slug‑hENT1/RRM1 signaling and resensitized GR‑HPCCs to gemcitabine. Finally, sclareolide resensitized GR‑HPCCs to gemcitabine through inducing apoptosis; in vivo, the co‑administraion of sclareolide and gemcitabine effectively suppressed tumor growth. Sclareolide may be a novel agent in combination with gemcitabine for the treatment of gemcitabine‑resistant pancreatic cancer, which resensitizes GR‑HPCCs to gemcitabine through mediating NICD and Gli1.

  8. Paintable Battery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neelam; Galande, Charudatta; Miranda, Andrea; Mathkar, Akshay; Gao, Wei; Reddy, Arava Leela Mohana; Vlad, Alexandru; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2012-01-01

    If the components of a battery, including electrodes, separator, electrolyte and the current collectors can be designed as paints and applied sequentially to build a complete battery, on any arbitrary surface, it would have significant impact on the design, implementation and integration of energy storage devices. Here, we establish a paradigm change in battery assembly by fabricating rechargeable Li-ion batteries solely by multi-step spray painting of its components on a variety of materials such as metals, glass, glazed ceramics and flexible polymer substrates. We also demonstrate the possibility of interconnected modular spray painted battery units to be coupled to energy conversion devices such as solar cells, with possibilities of building standalone energy capture-storage hybrid devices in different configurations. PMID:22745900

  9. The constitutively active Ah receptor (CA-AhR) mouse as a model for dioxin exposure - effects in reproductive organs.

    PubMed

    Brunnberg, Sara; Andersson, Patrik; Poellinger, Lorenz; Hanberg, Annika

    2011-12-01

    The dioxin/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates most toxic effects of dioxins. In utero/lactational exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) impairs fetal/neonatal development and the developing male reproductive tract are among the most sensitive tissues. TCDD causes antiestrogenic responses in rodent mammary gland and uterus and in human breast cancer cell lines in the presence of estrogen. Also, more recently an estrogen-like effect of TCDD/AhR has been suggested in the absence of estrogen. A transgenic mouse expressing a constitutively active AhR (CA-AhR) was developed as a model mimicking a situation of constant exposure to AhR agonists. Male and female reproductive tissues of CA-AhR mice were characterized for some of the effects commonly seen after dioxin exposure. Sexually mature CA-AhR female mice showed decreased uterus weight, while an uterotrophic assay in immature CA-AhR mice resulted in increased uterus weight. In immature mice, both TCDD-exposure and CA-AhR increased the expression of the estrogen receptor target gene Cathepsin D. When co-treated with 17β-estradiol no increase in Cathepsin D levels occurred in either TCDD-exposed or CA-AhR mice. In sexually mature male CA-AhR mice the weights of testis and ventral prostate were decreased and the epididymal sperm reserve was reduced. The results of the present study are in accordance with previous studies on dioxin-exposed rodents in that an activated AhR (here CA-AhR) leads to antiestrogenic effects in the presence of estrogen, but to estrogenic effects in the absence of estrogen. These results suggest the CA-AhR mouse model as a useful tool for studies of continuous low activity of the AhR from early development, resembling the human exposure situation.

  10. Study of the factors influencing the metals solubilisation from a mixture of waste batteries by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Tanong, Kulchaya; Coudert, Lucie; Chartier, Myriam; Mercier, Guy; Blais, Jean-François

    2017-02-22

    This paper presents an innovative process for the recovery of valuable metals from a mixture of spent batteries. Different types of batteries, including alkaline, zinc-carbon (Zn-C), nickel cadmium (Ni-Cd), nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH), lithium ion (Li-ion) and lithium metallic (Li-M) batteries, were mixed according to the proportion of the Canadian sales of batteries. A Box-Behnken design was applied to find the optimum leaching conditions allowing a maximum of valuable metal removals from a mixture of spent batteries in the presence of an inorganic acid and a reducing agent. The results highlighted the positive effect of sodium metabisulfite on the performance of metals removal, especially for Mn. The solid/liquid ratio and the concentration of H2SO4 were the main factors affecting the leaching behavior of valuable metals (Zn, Mn, Cd, Ni) present in spent batteries. Finally, the optimum leaching conditions were found as follows: one leaching step, solid/liquid ratio = 10.9%, [H2SO4] = 1.34 M, sodium metabisulfite (Na2S2O5) = 0.45 g/g of battery powder and retention time = 45 min. Under such conditions, the removal yields achieved were 94% for Mn, 81% for Cd, 99% for Zn, 96% for Co and 68% for Ni.

  11. Performance of the “SiO”-carbon composite-negative electrodes for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries; prototype 14500 batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masayuki; Uchitomi, Kazutaka; Ueda, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Kazunobu; Ohzuku, Tsutomu

    2013-03-01

    Prototype 14500 batteries (14 mm dia. and 50 mm hgt.; AA size) consisted of the “SiO”-carbon composite-negative and LiCo1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2/LiCoO2 (7/3 by weight)-positive electrodes were designed, fabricated and examined in voltage ranging from 2.5 to 4.2 V at -20, -10, 0, and +23 °C. The batteries were stored and delivered 1 Ah at 200 mA and 0.96 Ah at 2 A, and the capacity remained after 300 cycles at 23 °C was 0.7 Ah. Abuse tests, such as overcharging to 12 V, nail penetration, and heating of fully charged batteries in an oven at 150 °C, were also carried out and shown that the batteries showed neither smoke nor fire for all the tests examined. The battery performance was compared to that of conventional batteries with graphite-negative electrodes in the same size and the characteristic features of the lithium-ion batteries with the SiO-carbon composite-negative electrodes were discussed from the experimental results.

  12. Flexible fiber batteries for applications in smart textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Hang; Semenikhin, Oleg; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate flexible fiber-based Al-NaOCl galvanic cells fabricated using fiber drawing process. Aluminum and copper wires are used as electrodes, and they are introduced into the fiber structure during drawing of the low-density polyethylene microstructured jacket. NaOCl solution is used as electrolyte, and it is introduced into the battery after the drawing process. The capacity of a 1 m long fiber battery is measured to be ˜10 mAh. We also detail assembly and optimization of the electrical circuitry in the energy-storing fiber battery textiles. Several examples of their applications are presented including lighting up an LED, driving a wireless mouse and actuating a screen with an integrated shape-memory nitinol wire. The principal advantages of the presented fiber batteries include: ease of fabrication, high flexibility, simple electrochemistry and use of widely available materials in the battery design.

  13. Developing Polymer Cathode Material for the Chloride Ion Battery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiangyu; Zhao, Zhigang; Yang, Meng; Xia, Hui; Yu, Tingting; Shen, Xiaodong

    2017-01-25

    The chloride ion battery is an attractive rechargeable battery owing to its high theoretical energy density and sustainable components. An important challenge for research and development of chloride ion batteries lies in the innovation of the cathode materials. Here we report a nanostructured chloride ion-doped polymer, polypyrrole chloride, as a new type of potential cathode material for the chloride ion battery. The as-prepared polypyrrole chloride@carbon nanotubes (PPyCl@CNTs) cathode shows a high reversible capacity of 118 mAh g(-1) and superior cycling stability. Reversible electrochemical reactions of the PPyCl@CNTs cathode based on the redox reactions of nitrogen species and chloride ion transfer are demonstrated. Our work may guide and offer electrode design principles for accelerating the development of rechargeable batteries with anion transfer.

  14. Bipolar battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1992-01-01

    A bipolar battery having a plurality of cells. The bipolar battery includes: a negative electrode; a positive electrode and a separator element disposed between the negative electrode and the positive electrode, the separator element electrically insulating the electrodes from one another; an electrolyte disposed within at least one of the negative electrode, the positive electrode and the separator element; and an electrode containment structure including a cup-like electrode holder.

  15. Zebra batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudworth, J. L.

    By using molten sodium chloroaluminate as secondary electrolyte, a series of solid transition metal chlorides can be used as positive electrodes in cells with sodium as the negative and beta-alumina as the solid electrlyte. Nickel chloride is preferred and Zebra batteries based on this cell reaction have been developed to the pilot-line production stage. The batteries have a number of features which make them attractive for electric-vehicle applications. Thus, the cells can be assebled in the discharged state eliminating the need to handle liquid sodium. By locating the positive electrode inside the beta-alumina tube, square cell cases can be used giving maximum packing efficiency in batteries. The absence of corrosion in the cell leads to a long life and high reliability. For electric-vehicle applications safety is very imporant, and crash testing has shown that even serious damage to the battery in a crash situation would not present a significant additional hazard to the driver or passengers. The remaining technical challenges are to increase the specific power of the battery towards the end of discharge and to demonstrate that the processes, which have been developed for cell and battery production, are capable of meeting the cost targets.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope six-battery nickel-cadmium mission simulation test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Lorna G.; Bush, John R., Jr.; Lanier, John R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A simulation test of the six-battery nickel-cadmium mission to determine battery life and electrical power system (EPS) performance characteristics for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) program, is described. The basic HST power system requirements are to provide power generation, energy storage, and EPS control and distribution for 2.5 years with the nickel-cadmium (NiCd) batteries at an end of life solar array of 2 years. Mission simulation life testing begain in April of 1986, and the batteries have completed their 2.5 year mission requirement. Conditions as close as practical to the actual predicted mission profiles were used. These included solar array degradation, load variations, beta angle changes, temperature changes (with excursions to 10 C), battery reconditioning, safemode simulations, and off-normal roll activities. Discounting system cycling interruptions caused by hardware, software, human error, and periodic updates and revisions, the HST EPS breadboard hardware operated continuously for 30 months and demonstrated the power system's ability to meet the HST requirement.

  17. Long-term cycling stability of porous Sn anode for sodium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changhyeon; Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Icpyo; Park, Jinsoo; Cho, Gyubong; Kim, Ki-Won; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Ahn, Hyo-Jun

    2016-06-01

    A phase-inversion technique is introduced to produce a porous Sn anode for sodium batteries, which can accommodate volume changes during sodiation and desodiation. The Sn electrode shows two plateaus with a capacity of 1066 mAh g-1 during the first sodiation and four flat plateaus with a charge capacity of 674 mAh g-1 at the first desodiation process. During 500 cycles, the Sn electrode shows reversible capacity more than 519 mAh g-1 with Coulombic efficiency of nearly 99%. The Sn electrode with a porous structure is a possible solution to the electrode degradation.

  18. Newspapers and newspaper ink contain agonists for the ah receptor.

    PubMed

    Bohonowych, Jessica E S; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T; Denison, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [(3)H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed.

  19. Newspapers and Newspaper Ink Contain Agonists for the Ah Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bohonowych, Jessica E. S.; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T.; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [3H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed. PMID:18203687

  20. Study of the fire behavior of high-energy lithium-ion batteries with full-scale burning test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Ping; Wang, QingSong; Huang, PeiFeng; Li, Ke; Sun, JinHua; Kong, DePeng; Chen, ChunHua

    2015-07-01

    A full-scale burning test is conducted to evaluate the safety of large-size and high-energy 50 Ah lithium-iron phosphate/graphite battery pack, which is composed of five 10 Ah single cells. The complex fire hazards associated with the combustion process of the battery are presented. The battery combustion behavior can be summarized into the following stages: battery expansion, jet flame, stable combustion, a second cycle of a jet flame followed by stable combustion, a third cycle of a jet flame followed by stable combustion, abatement and extinguishment. The multiple jets of flame indicate serious consequences for the battery and pose a challenge for battery safety. The battery ignites when the battery temperature reaches approximately 175-180 °C. This critical temperature is related to an internal short circuit of the battery, which results from the melting of the separator. The maximum temperature of the flame can reach 1500 °C. The heat release rate (HRR) varies based on the oxygen generated by the battery and the Joule effect of the internal short circuit. The HRR and heat of combustion can reach 49.4 kW and 18,195.1 kJ, respectively. The state of charge of the battery has a significant effect on the maximum HRR, the overall heat generation and the mass loss of the battery.

  1. Impact of shuttle environment on prelaunch handling of nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    Deployment of the American Satellite Company 1 spacecraft for the Space Shuttle Discovery in August 1985 set a new milestone in nickel-hydrogen battery technology. This communications satellite is equipped with two 35 Ah nickel-hydrogen batteries and it is the first such satellite launched into orbit via the Space Shuttle. The prelaunch activities, combined with the environmental constraints onboard the Shuttle, led to the development of a new battery handling procedure. An outline of the prelaunch activities, with particular attention to battery charging, is presented.

  2. [Rapid detection of influenza virus A (AH1, AH3) and B by nested-polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Watanabe, S; Imai, M

    1997-06-01

    We applied the Nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for laboratory diagnosis of influenza virus infection. We used three primer sets for detection of influenza virus A (AH1, AH3) and B. The primer sets for each type (AH1, AH3, B) was able to detect specifically each type of influenza. We measured the sensitivity for detection of vaccine strains. The PCR method was able to detect 0.9 PFU/assey of AH1 type, 1.0 PFU/assey of AH3 type and 1.8 PFU/assey of B type. Out of 46 isolation negative but antibody positive cases, 38 cases were positive for PCR (82.6%). This method is sensitive and useful for rapid diagnosis of influenza virus infection.

  3. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-10-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  4. A novel zinc-air battery for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P.N.

    1995-07-01

    A new type of zinc electrode is matched with new bifunctional air electrodes to produce a zinc-air battery of a novel design. The zinc electrode is a flow-thru type made from copper foam-metal. The air electrode uses corrosion resistant carbon black as a high area support for a highly dispersed spinel oxide electrocatalyst. The battery design employs flowing electrolyte, 12 M KOH saturated or supersaturated with zincate. Single cells as large as 200 cm{sup 2} (1/5 EV design scale) having a capacity of 20 AH have been tested with C/4--C/16 constant current cycling. More extensive and realistic life cycle testing was done with 2 Ah cells, including the Simplified Federal Urban Driving Schedule (SFUDS) cycle. This testing has confirmed that these cells can provide the necessary transient power response required for urban EV applications. The cells achieved an average of 72 SFUDS repetitions (7.2 hrs) per discharge cycle, more than twice the number with a sealed lead acid EV battery in similar testing. The full scale (30 kWh) EV battery design based on these single cell tests indicate an energy density of 90--100 Wh/kg, 60--80 W/kg, and a very low materials cost ($50 per kWh). These results indicate this battery would provide at least twice the vehicle range of a lead acid battery of the same volume at a comparable or even lower materials cost.

  5. Intracellular localization and trafficking of serine proteinase AhSub and cysteine proteinase AhCP of Acanthamoeba healyi.

    PubMed

    Moon, E-K; Lee, S-T; Chung, D-I; Kong, H-H

    2006-01-01

    Proteinases have been proposed to play important roles in pathogenesis and various biologic actions in Acanthamoeba. Although genetic characteristics of several proteases of Acanthamoeba have been reported, the intracellular localization and trafficking of these enzymes has yet to be studied. In the present study, we analyzed the intracellular localization and trafficking of two proteinases, AhSub and AhCP, of Acanthamoeba healyi by transient transfection. Full-length AhSub-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion protein was found in intracellular vesicle-like structures of transfected amoebae. Time-lapse photographs confirmed the secretion of the fluorescent material of the vesicle toward the extracellular space. The mutated AhSub, of which the pre or prepro region was deleted, was found to localize diffusely throughout the cytoplasm of the amoeba rather than concentrated in the secretory vesicle. Transfection of the construct containing the pre region only showed the same localization and trafficking of the full-length AhSub. A cysteine proteinase AhCP-EGFP fusion protein showed similar localization in the vesicle-like structure in the amoeba. However, using Lyso Tracker analysis, these vesicular structures of AhCP were confirmed to be lysosomes rather than secretory vesicles. The AhCP construct with a deletion of the prepro region showed a dispersed distribution of fluorescence in the cytoplasm of the cells. These results indicated that AhSub and AhCP would play different roles in Acanthameoba biology and that the pre region of AhSub and pro region of AhCP are important for proper intracellular localization and trafficking of each proteinase.

  6. Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The program has progressed to the stage of evaluating full-sized (220 Ah) cells, multicell modules, and 22 kWh batteries. Nickel electrodes that display stable capacities of up to 24 Ah/plate (at C/3 drain rate) at design thickness (2.5 mm) in tests at 200/sup +/ test cycles. Iron electrodes of the composite-type are also delivering 24 Ah/plate (at C/3) at target thickness (1.0 mm). Iron plates are displaying capacity stability for 300/sup +/ test cycles in continuing 3 plate cell tests. Best finished cells are delivering 57 to 63 Wh/kg at C/3, based on cell weights of the finished cells, and in the actual designed cell volume. 6-cell module (6-1) performance has demonstrated 239 Ah, 1735 Wh, 53 WH/kg at the C/3 drain rate. This module is now being evaluated at the National Battery Test Laboratory. The 2 x 4 battery has been constructed, tested, and delivered for engineering test and evaluation. The battery delivered 22.5 kWh, as required (199 Ah discharge at 113 V-bar) at the C/3 drain rate. The battery has performed satisfactorily under dynamometer and constant current drain tests. Some cell problems, related to construction, necessitated changing 3 modules, but the battery is now ready for further testing. Reduction in nickel plate swelling (and concurrent stack electrolyte starvation), to improve cycling, is one area of major effort to reach the final battery objectives. Pasted nickel electrodes are showing promise in initial full-size cell tests and will continue to be evaluated in finished cells, along with other technology advancements. 30 figures, 14 tables.

  7. Biologically enhanced cathode design for improved capacity and cycle life for lithium-oxygen batteries

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dahyun; Qi, Jifa; Lu, Yi-Chun; Zhang, Yong; Shao-Horn, Yang; Belcher, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-oxygen batteries have a great potential to enhance the gravimetric energy density of fully packaged batteries by 2–3 times that of lithium-ion cells. Recent studies have focused on finding stable electrolytes to address poor cycling capability and improve practical limitations of current lithium-oxygen batteries. In this study, the catalyst electrode, where discharge products are deposited and decomposed, was investigated since it plays a critical role in the operation of rechargeable lithium-oxygen batteries. Here we report the electrode design principle to improve specific capacity and cycling performance of lithium-oxygen batteries by utilizing high efficiency nanocatalysts assembled by M13 virus with earth abundant elements, such as manganese oxides. By incorporating only 3–5 wt % of palladium nanoparticles in the electrode, this hybrid nanocatalyst achieves 13,350 mAh g−1c (7,340 mAh g−1c+catalyst) of specific capacity at 0.4 A g−1c and a stable cycle life up to 50 cycles (4,000 mAh g−1c, 400 mAh g−1c+catalyst) at 1 A g−1c. PMID:24220635

  8. Thermal behavior and electrochemical heat generation in a commercial 40 Ah lithium ion pouch cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Elke; Ziebert, Carlos; Melcher, Andreas; Rohde, Magnus; Seifert, Hans Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative data on the thermal behavior of lithium ion batteries under charging and discharging conditions are essential for designing thermal management systems and improving battery safety. In this work, commercial 40 Ah lithium ion pouch cells with Li(Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3)O2 cathodes were tested under isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions in an Accelerating Rate Calorimeter at different charging/discharging currents from 5 A to 40 A. Adiabatic tests simulate the worst-case scenario of a battery pack without cooling. For charging and discharging an overall exothermic behavior was found and a total temperature increase for one half cycle between 3 and 11 K. Isoperibolic tests simulate a single cell under constant environmental temperature. Here an exothermic behavior for discharging and an endothermic behavior for charging were observed. To transfer the measured temperature changes into heat data, the effective specific heat capacity and the heat transfer coefficient were determined. For the first time the heat generation data for a large format pouch cell have been determined using both isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions. These data were compared with the total heat data calculated as the sum of reversible and irreversible heat that were measured by potentiometric and current interruption techniques respectively. A good agreement was found between all three heat generation determination methods.

  9. Evaluation of 20 Ah Li Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Huang, Charles K.; Surampudi, S.; Hill, Carole; Radzykewycz, Dan T.; Marsh, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Lithium ion cells of 20 Ah capacity were fabricated by Bluestar Advanced Technology Corporation, Canada under a developmental contract from US Air Force. In this paper, we report our studies on the evaluation of these cells under various test conditions. These include generic test conditions such as discharges and charges at different temperatures to understand the rate-limiting processes in the discharge/charge processes as a function of temperature, and cycle life under standard cycling conditions (100% DOD) at ambient temperature. In addition, tests are being done to ascertain the performance of the cells in the Mars 2001 Lander application, which includes pulse testing of the cells at 60 A and 40 A loads for 100 mS and 1 min., respectively at different states of charge and temperatures, and cycling at low temperature at partial depths of discharge.

  10. RADIOACTIVE BATTERY

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.; Jordan, K.C.

    1959-11-17

    A radioactive battery which includes a capsule containing the active material and a thermopile associated therewith is presented. The capsule is both a shield to stop the radiations and thereby make the battery safe to use, and an energy conventer. The intense radioactive decay taking place inside is converted to useful heat at the capsule surface. The heat is conducted to the hot thermojunctions of a thermopile. The cold junctions of the thermopile are thermally insulated from the heat source, so that a temperature difference occurs between the hot and cold junctions, causing an electrical current of a constant magnitude to flow.

  11. Spiral wound valve-regulated lead-acid batteries for hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, M. L.; Trinidad, F.; Lacadena, J. M.; Valenciano, J.; Arce, G.

    Future vehicle applications require the development of reliable and long life batteries operating under high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) working conditions. This paper updates work carried out to develop spiral wound valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries for vehicles with different hybridisation degrees, ranging from stop-start to mild hybrid applications. Former work on design optimisation and active material formulations has been implemented in two spiral wound VRLA batteries, rated 12 V 50 Ah and 6 V 24 Ah, and these two products are currently being tested both in benches and in vehicles with different hybridisation degrees within a demonstration project funded by the Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium and in collaboration with several European vehicle and electrical component manufacturers.

  12. Method of making a sealed lead-acid battery with a gel electrolyte and sealed lead-acid storage battery made according to this method

    SciTech Connect

    Chreitzberg, A.M.; Chiacchio, F.J.

    1987-08-18

    A method is described of making a sealed lead-acid storage battery having a plurality of electrodes and a gel electrolyte consisting substantially of sulfuric acid and a gelling agent, comprising the steps of: (a) activating a dry unformed battery by filling the battery with sulfuric acid, (b) maintaining the battery on open circuit or a period of time sufficient to chemically bond sulphuric acid as sulfate to the electrodes and lower the specific gravity of the acid to the desired gelling value, (c) dumping the free acid from the battery, (d) adding a solution of gelling agent and sulfuric acid to fill the battery to the normal formation level, (e) formation charging the battery by applying a constant charge current of 5-16 A/100 Ah for an input of 200-300 Ah/lb. positive active material whereby gelling of the electrolyte is effected, (f) when formation is complete, removing excess liquid, if any, to top of electrodes, and (g) sealing the battery with a pressure relief valve.

  13. A review of nickel hydrogen battery technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Odonnell, Patricia M.

    1995-05-01

    This paper on nickel hydrogen batteries is an overview of the various nickel hydrogen battery design options, technical accomplishments, validation test results and trends. There is more than one nickel hydrogen battery design, each having its advantage for specific applications. The major battery designs are individual pressure vessel (IPV), common pressure vessel (CPV), bipolar and low pressure metal hydride. State-of-the-art (SOA) nickel hydrogen batteries are replacing nickel cadmium batteries in almost all geosynchronous orbit (GEO) applications requiring power above 1 kW. However, for the more severe low earth orbit (LEO) applications (greater than 30,000 cycles), the current cycle life of 4000 to 10,000 cycles at 60 percent DOD should be improved. A NASA Lewis Research Center innovative advanced design IPV nickel hydrogen cell led to a breakthrough in cycle life enabling LEO applications at deep depths of discharge (DOD). A trend for some future satellites is to increase the power level to greater than 6 kW. Another trend is to decrease the power to less than 1 kW for small low cost satellites. Hence, the challenge is to reduce battery mass, volume and cost. A key is to develop a light weight nickel electrode and alternate battery designs. A common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel hydrogen battery is emerging as a viable alternative to the IPV design. It has the advantage of reduced mass, volume and manufacturing costs. A 10 Ah CPV battery has successfully provided power on the relatively short lived Clementine Spacecraft. A bipolar nickel hydrogen battery design has been demonstrated (15,000 LEO cycles, 40 percent DOD). The advantage is also a significant reduction in volume, a modest reduction in mass, and like most bipolar designs, features a high pulse power capability. A low pressure aerospace nickel metal hydride battery cell has been developed and is on the market. It is a prismatic design which has the advantage of a significant reduction in volume and a

  14. A review of nickel hydrogen battery technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Odonnell, Patricia M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper on nickel hydrogen batteries is an overview of the various nickel hydrogen battery design options, technical accomplishments, validation test results and trends. There is more than one nickel hydrogen battery design, each having its advantage for specific applications. The major battery designs are individual pressure vessel (IPV), common pressure vessel (CPV), bipolar and low pressure metal hydride. State-of-the-art (SOA) nickel hydrogen batteries are replacing nickel cadmium batteries in almost all geosynchronous orbit (GEO) applications requiring power above 1 kW. However, for the more severe low earth orbit (LEO) applications (greater than 30,000 cycles), the current cycle life of 4000 to 10,000 cycles at 60 percent DOD should be improved. A NASA Lewis Research Center innovative advanced design IPV nickel hydrogen cell led to a breakthrough in cycle life enabling LEO applications at deep depths of discharge (DOD). A trend for some future satellites is to increase the power level to greater than 6 kW. Another trend is to decrease the power to less than 1 kW for small low cost satellites. Hence, the challenge is to reduce battery mass, volume and cost. A key is to develop a light weight nickel electrode and alternate battery designs. A common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel hydrogen battery is emerging as a viable alternative to the IPV design. It has the advantage of reduced mass, volume and manufacturing costs. A 10 Ah CPV battery has successfully provided power on the relatively short lived Clementine Spacecraft. A bipolar nickel hydrogen battery design has been demonstrated (15,000 LEO cycles, 40 percent DOD). The advantage is also a significant reduction in volume, a modest reduction in mass, and like most bipolar designs, features a high pulse power capability. A low pressure aerospace nickel metal hydride battery cell has been developed and is on the market. It is a prismatic design which has the advantage of a significant reduction in volume and a

  15. Nickel-Hydrogen Batteries - An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; ODonnell, Patricia M.

    1996-01-01

    This article on nickel-hydrogen batteries is an overview of the various nickel-hydrogen battery design options, technical accomplishments, validation test results, and trends. There is more than one nickel-hydrogen battery design, each having its advantage for specific applications. The major battery designs are Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV), Common Pressure Vessel (CPV), bipolar, and low-pressure metal hydride. State-of-the-art nickel-hydrogen batteries are replacing nickel-cadmium batteries in almost all geosynchronous Earth orbit applications requiring power above 1 kW. However, for the more severe Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) applications (greater than 30,000 cycles), the current cycle life of 4000-10,000 cycles at 60 - 80 % DOD should be improved. A NASA Lewis Research Center innovative advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen cell led to a breakthrough in cycle life enabling LEO applications at deep Depths of Discharge (DOD). A trend for some future satellites is to increase the power level to greater than 6 kW. Another trend is to decrease the power to less than 1 kW for small low-cost satellites. Hence, the challenge is to reduce battery mass, volume, and cost. A key is to develop a lightweight nickel electrode and alternate battery designs. A CPV nickel-hydrogen battery is emerging as a viable alternative to the IPV design. It has the advantage of reduced mass, volume, and manufacturing costs. A 10-A-h CPV battery has successfully provided power on the relatively short-lived Clementine spacecraft. A bipolar nickel -hydrogen battery design has been demonstrated (15,000 LEO cycles, 40 % DOD). The advantage is also a significant reduction in volume, a modest reduction in mass, and like most bipolar designs, features a high-pulse power capability. A low-pressure aerospace nickel-metal-hydride battery cell has been developed and is on the market. It is a prismatic design that has the advantage of a significant reduction in volume and a reduction in manufacturing cost.

  16. Lithium-Ion Batteries for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, S.; Halpert, G.; Marsh, R. A.; James, R.

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews: (1) the goals and objectives, (2) the NASA and Airforce requirements, (3) the potential near term missions, (4) management approach, (5) the technical approach and (6) the program road map. The objectives of the program include: (1) develop high specific energy and long life lithium ion cells and smart batteries for aerospace and defense applications, (2) establish domestic production sources, and to demonstrate technological readiness for various missions. The management approach is to encourage the teaming of universities, R&D organizations, and battery manufacturing companies, to build on existing commercial and government technology, and to develop two sources for manufacturing cells and batteries. The technological approach includes: (1) develop advanced electrode materials and electrolytes to achieve improved low temperature performance and long cycle life, (2) optimize cell design to improve specific energy, cycle life and safety, (3) establish manufacturing processes to ensure predictable performance, (4) establish manufacturing processes to ensure predictable performance, (5) develop aerospace lithium ion cells in various AH sizes and voltages, (6) develop electronics for smart battery management, (7) develop a performance database required for various applications, and (8) demonstrate technology readiness for the various missions. Charts which review the requirements for the Li-ion battery development program are presented.

  17. Induction of AhR-Mediated Gene Transcription by Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toshio; Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Okinaga, Hiroko; Teramoto, Tamio

    2014-01-01

    Background Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is classically known to be activated by xenobiotics such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although it has been reported that PAHs are contained in roasted coffee beans, in general coffee beverages are not considered to be AhR activators. We tested whether exposure to coffee would activate AhR in cultured cells. Methods HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene were treated with coffee samples. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was quantitated by RT-PCR and Western blotting in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells, after treatment with coffee. In order to obtain sensitive and reproducible results, all the experiments were performed with the cells placed in either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or pure serum, instead of routinely-used culture medium, whose intrinsic AhR-stimulating activity turned out to be so strong as to interfere with the analyses. Results All the coffee samples tested robustly stimulated AhR-mediated transcription in the reporter gene assays. Of note, to what extent coffee and other AhR agonists activated AhR was different, depending on whether the experiments were done in PBS or serum. CYP1A1 mRNA was induced by coffee, in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells placed in either PBS or serum. CYP1A1 protein expression, which was not detected in these cells incubated in PBS, was also increased by coffee in cells placed in serum. Conclusions By using culture medium-free experimental settings, we have shown that coffee is a strong AhR activator. Our observation may help elucidate as-yet-unrecognized effects of coffee on human health. PMID:25007155

  18. Nanomaterials in Secondary Battery Development

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, C. R.

    1999-09-15

    This granted funded research into the application of nanoscience to Li-ion batteries. Different synthesis strategies were employed to create a nanofiber electrode (based on tin-oxide) and a honeycomb electrode (carbon). In both cases, we showed that the nanostructured material was capable of delivering dramatically increased specific capacity (mAh/g) upon discharge when compared to conventional film electrodes. This ability is due to the decreased solid-state diffusion distance of the Li-ion in the nanostructured electrodes. The nanofiber-SnO{sub 2} electrode was created by the template synthesis method. Briefly, a precursor solution impregnates the monodisperse nanoscopic pores of a sacrificial template membrane. The pores run the membrane's entire length. The precursor solution is then processed to the desired material, here using sol-gel chemistry, and the template is removed. This leaves nanostructures of the desired product intact and extending from a substrate like the bristles of a brush. This research topic combines this nanofabrication technique with the Sn-based anode. Tin-oxide based composites have shown great promise as an alternative material for Li-ion battery anodes. This material is electrochemically converted to composite Sn/LiO{sub 2} electrodes. In this form, they are theoretically capable of storing twice the amount of Li as carbon, the current commercial anode. We showed important improvements in rate-capabilities and cycle-life of this Sn-based nanoscale electrode compared to a thin-film electrode of the same material. Rate-capabilities are a measurement of the specific capacity able to be delivered at increasing discharge rates (1C = 1/h). Figure 1 compares the rate capabilities of the nanostructured electrode to that of the film control electrode. This report shows the nanostructured material was capable of delivering dramatically increased specific capacity (mAh/g) upon discharge when compared to conventional film electrodes.

  19. Space Battery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-13

    Space Command SPACE AND MISSILE SYSTEMS CENTER STANDARD SPACE BATTERY APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE ...person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control ... release , distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  20. Battery component

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, F.; Batson, D.C.; Miserendino, A.J.; Boyle, G.

    1988-03-15

    A mechanical component for reserve type electrochemical batteries having cylindrical porous members is described comprising a disc having: (i) circular grooves in one flat side for accepting the porous members; and (ii) at least one radial channel in the opposite flat side in fluid communication with the grooves.

  1. Hazards, Safety and Design Considerations for Commercial Lithium-ion Cells and Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the features of the Lithium-ion batteries, particularly in reference to the hazards and safety of the battery. Some of the characteristics of the Lithium-ion cell are: Highest Energy Density of Rechargeable Battery Chemistries, No metallic lithium, Leading edge technology, Contains flammable electrolyte, Charge cut-off voltage is critical (overcharge can result in fire), Open circuit voltage higher than metallic lithium anode types with similar organic electrolytes. Intercalation is a process that places small ions in crystal lattice. Small ions (such as lithium, sodium, and the other alkali metals) can fit in the interstitial spaces in a graphite lattice. These metallic ions can go farther and force the graphitic planes apart to fit two, three, or more layers of metallic ions between the carbon sheets. Other features of the battery/cell are: The graphite is conductive, Very high energy density compared to NiMH or NiCd, Corrosion of aluminum occurs very quickly in the presence of air and electrolyte due to the formation of HF from LiPF6 and HF is highly corrosive. Slides showing the Intercalation/Deintercalation and the chemical reactions are shown along with the typical charge/discharge for a cylindrical cell. There are several graphs that review the hazards of the cells.

  2. Experimental evaluation of battery cells for space-based radar application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskell, Craig A.; Metcalfe, John R.

    1994-01-01

    A test program was conducted to characterize five space-quality nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) battery cells. A subset of those tests was also done on five commercial nickel-cadmium (NiCd) cells, for correlation to the characteristics of an Energy Storage Unit Simulator. The test program implemented the recommendations of a 1991 study, as reported to IECEC-92. The findings of the tests are summarized, and expected impacts on the performance of the electrical power system (EPS) of a large space-based radar (SBR) surveillance satellite are derived. The main characteristics examined and compared were terminal voltage (average and transient) and capacity through discharge, equivalent series resistance, derived inductance and capacitance, charge return efficiency, and inter-pulse charge effectiveness.

  3. MGS 2-Cell CPV NiH2 Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiStefano, Sal

    1999-01-01

    The Nickel Hydrogen batteries used aboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) is described. The mission itself is briefly described. This is followed by a description of the full electric power subsystem, and the design of the MGS 20 AH cell design. Graphic presentations show characteristics of the battery's performance. In summary, even though the charge control seems to be well, the method used is not recommended, due to an unexpected increase in pressure observed in flight. The operations have been modified to further minimize overcharge, and the pressure increase is not expected to impact the mission.

  4. High power rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Huajun; Gao, Tao; Li, Xiaogang; Wang, Xiwen; Luo, Chao; Fan, Xiulin; Yang, Chongyin; Suo, Liumin; Ma, Zhaohui; Han, Weiqiang; Wang, Chunsheng

    2017-01-01

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries have attracted considerable attention because of their potential high energy density and low cost. However, their development has been severely hindered because of the lack of appropriate cathode materials. Here we report a rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery, in which the soluble iodine reacts with Mg2+ to form a soluble intermediate and then an insoluble final product magnesium iodide. The liquid-solid two-phase reaction pathway circumvents solid-state Mg2+ diffusion and ensures a large interfacial reaction area, leading to fast reaction kinetics and high reaction reversibility. As a result, the rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery shows a better rate capability (180 mAh g-1 at 0.5 C and 140 mAh g-1 at 1 C) and a higher energy density (~400 Wh kg-1) than all other reported rechargeable magnesium batteries using intercalation cathodes. This study demonstrates that the liquid-solid two-phase reaction mechanism is promising in addressing the kinetic limitation of rechargeable magnesium batteries.

  5. High power rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Huajun; Gao, Tao; Li, Xiaogang; ...

    2017-01-10

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries have attracted considerable attention because of their potential high energy density and low cost. However, their development has been severely hindered because of the lack of appropriate cathode materials. Here we report a rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery, in which the soluble iodine reacts with Mg2+ to form a soluble intermediate and then an insoluble final product magnesium iodide. The liquid–solid two-phase reaction pathway circumvents solid-state Mg2+ diffusion and ensures a large interfacial reaction area, leading to fast reaction kinetics and high reaction reversibility. As a result, the rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery shows a better rate capability (180 mAh g–1more » at 0.5 C and 140 mAh g–1 at 1 C) and a higher energy density (~400 Wh kg–1) than all other reported rechargeable magnesium batteries using intercalation cathodes. As a result, this study demonstrates that the liquid–solid two-phase reaction mechanism is promising in addressing the kinetic limitation of rechargeable magnesium batteries.« less

  6. Ultrafast all-polymer paper-based batteries.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Gustav; Razaq, Aamir; Strømme, Maria; Nyholm, Leif; Mihranyan, Albert

    2009-10-01

    Conducting polymers for battery applications have been subject to numerous investigations during the last two decades. However, the functional charging rates and the cycling stabilities have so far been found to be insufficient for practical applications. These shortcomings can, at least partially, be explained by the fact that thick layers of the conducting polymers have been used to obtain sufficient capacities of the batteries. In the present letter, we introduce a novel nanostructured high-surface area electrode material for energy storage applications composed of cellulose fibers of algal origin individually coated with a 50 nm thin layer of polypyrrole. Our results show the hitherto highest reported charge capacities and charging rates for an all polymer paper-based battery. The composite conductive paper material is shown to have a specific surface area of 80 m(2) g(-1) and batteries based on this material can be charged with currents as high as 600 mA cm(-2) with only 6% loss in capacity over 100 subsequent charge and discharge cycles. The aqueous-based batteries, which are entirely based on cellulose and polypyrrole and exhibit charge capacities between 25 and 33 mAh g(-1) or 38-50 mAh g(-1) per weight of the active material, open up new possibilities for the production of environmentally friendly, cost efficient, up-scalable and lightweight energy storage systems.

  7. Metal-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

    2011-08-01

    Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

  8. Battery Safety Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Batteries commonly used in flashlights and other household devices produce hydrogen gas as a product of zinc electrode corrosion. The amount of gas produced is affected by the batteries' design and charge rate. Dangerous levels of hydrogen gas can be released if battery types are mixed, batteries are damaged, batteries are of different ages, or…

  9. Batteries for Electric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conover, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Report summarizes results of test on "near-term" electrochemical batteries - (batteries approaching commercial production). Nickel/iron, nickel/zinc, and advanced lead/acid batteries included in tests and compared with conventional lead/acid batteries. Batteries operated in electric vehicles at constant speed and repetitive schedule of accerlerating, coasting, and braking.

  10. Recovery of zinc and manganese from spent alkaline batteries by liquid-liquid extraction with Cyanex 272

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Aline L.; Veloso, Aline M. O.; Pereira, Daniel D.; Gontijo, Glayson S.; Salum, Adriane; Mansur, Marcelo B.

    A hydrometallurgical route based on the liquid-liquid extraction technique using Cyanex 272 as extractant is investigated for the selective separation of metal values, in particular, zinc and manganese from spent alkaline batteries. The recycling route consists of following steps: (1) cryogenic dismantling of the spent batteries, (2) pre-treatment of the internal material consisting of drying, grinding and screening steps in order to produce a dry homogeneous powder, (3) leaching of the powder with sulphuric acid and (4) metal separation by liquid-liquid extraction. Bench scale experiments have shown that zinc and manganese are easily separated (ΔpH 1/2≈2.0) using 20% (v/v) Cyanex 272 dissolved in Escaid 110 at 50 °C. Therefore, the proposed route can treat residues from both zinc-carbon and alkaline batteries because metal composition of these batteries is quite similar. The metal content of other batteries such as Ni-Cd and nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) has been also determined in order to include them in future investigations.

  11. Lithium-ion Battery Charge Methodologies Observed with Portable Electronic Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Commercial lithium-ion batteries in portable electronic equipment has been used by NASA for space applications since 1999. First battery that was certified for flight and flown for Shuttle use was the Canon BP 927 (2.7 Ah) battery pack. Since then, numerous portable equipment with li-ion batteries have been certified and flown and remain on-orbit for crew usage. Laptops (two generations with third one being worked on now) Camcorder Camera PDA 2 versions (second one being li-ion polymer cells) Satellite Phone Due to expense and time, certified batteries are used with different equipment with the help of adapters or by working with the manufacturer of the equipment to build the appropriate battery compartment and connector. Certified and dedicated chargers are available on Shuttle and on the ISS for safe charging.

  12. Fe and Co methylene diphosphonates as conversion materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Sallard, Sébastien; Sheptyakov, Denis; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Novák, Petr; Villevieille, Claire

    2017-02-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials can introduce more flexibility in the choice of Li-ion battery materials due to the versatility of organic ligands. As an alternative to carboxylate-based ligands, Fe and Co methylene diphosphonate were successfully synthesised and tested as model diphosphonate-based negative electrode materials for Li-ion batteries, showing specific charges of 250 mAh g-1 and 395 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles at 50 mAh g-1, respectively. Operando X-ray diffraction and ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the expected conversion reaction mechanism involving amorphisation of the pristine materials and extrusion of transition metal particles upon reduction. Ex situ X-ray absorption spectra indicated that Fe methylene diphosphonate undergoes reversible Fe cycling between Fe(II) and Fe(0) metal particles.

  13. Scale-up of Metal Hexacyanoferrate Cathode Material for Sodium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Dzwiniel, Trevor L.; Pupek, Krzysztof Z.; Krumdick, Gregory K.

    2016-10-04

    Sharp Laboratories of America (SLA) approached Argonne National Laboratory with a bench-scale process to produce material for a sodium-ion battery, referred to as Prussian Blue, and a request to produce 1 kg of material for their ARPA-E program. The target performance criteria was an average capacity of >150 mAh/g.

  14. Battery depletion monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.S.

    1982-01-26

    A cmos inverter is used to compare pacemaker battery voltage to a referenced voltage. When the reference voltage exceeds the measured battery voltage, the inverter changes state to indicate battery depletion.

  15. Bunched akaganeite nanorod arrays: Preparation and high-performance for flexible lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shaomin; Yu, Lin; Sun, Ming; Cheng, Gao; Lin, Ting; Mo, Yudi; Li, Zishan

    2015-11-01

    Significant effort has been made to explore high-performance anode materials for flexible lithium-ion batteries. We report a facile hydrothermal route to synthesis self-organized bunched akaganeite (β-FeOOH) nanorod arrays directly grown on carbon cloth (CC/β-FeOOH NRAs). Interestingly, the single nanorod is assembled by numerous small nanowires. A possible growth mechanism for this unique structure is proposed. Owning to the essential crystal structure of β-FeOOH (body-centered cubic), porous morphology, high surface area and direct growth on current collector, the prepared CC/β-FeOOH NRAs manifest a very high reversible capacity of ≈2840 mAh g-1 (2.21 mAh cm-2), remarkable rate capability 568 mAh g-1 (0.43 mAh cm-2) at 10C, stable cycling performance and greater mechanical strength.

  16. DS-2 Mars Microprobe Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H.; Kindler, A.; Deligiannis, F.; Davies, E.; Blankevoort, J.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Surampudi, S.

    1999-01-01

    In January of 1999 the NM DS-2 Mars microprobe will be launched to impact on Mars in December. The technical objectives of the missions are to demonstrate: key technologies, a passive atmospheric entry, highly integrated microelectronics which can withstand both low temperatures and high decelerations, and the capability to conduct in-situ, surface and subsurface science data acquisition. The scientific objectives are to determine if ice is present below the Martian surface, measure the local atmospheric pressure, characterize the thermal properties of the martian subsurface soil, and to estimate the vertical temperature gradient of the Martian soil. The battery requirements are 2-4 cell batteries, with voltage of 6-14 volts, capacity of 550 mAh at 80C, and 2Ah at 25C, shelf life of 2.5 years, an operating temperature of 60C and below, and the ability to withstand shock impact of 80,000 g's. The technical challenges and the approach is reviewed. The Li-SOCL2 system is reviewed, and graphs showing the current and voltage is displayed, along with the voltage over discharge time. The problems encountered during the testing were: (1) impact sensitivity, (2) cracking of the seals, and (3) delay in voltage. A new design resulted in no problems in the impact testing phase. The corrective actions for the seal problems involved: (1) pre weld fill tube, (2) an improved heat sink during case to cover weld and (3) change the seal dimensions to reduce stress. To correct the voltage delay problem the solutions involved: (1) drying the electrodes to reduce contamination by water, (2) assemblage of the cells within a week of electrode manufacture, (3) ensure electrolyte purity, and (4) provide second depassivation pulse after landing. The conclusions on further testing were that the battery can: (1) withstand anticipated shock of up to 80,000 g, (2) meet the discharge profile post shock at Mars temperatures, (3) meet the required self discharge rate and (4) meet environmental

  17. AH-1S communication switch integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, Loran; Szoboszlay, Zoltan; Shively, Robert; Bick, Frank J.

    1989-01-01

    The C-6533/ARC communication system as installed on the test AH-1E Cobra helicopter was modified to allow discrete radio selection of all aircraft radios at the cyclic radio/intercommunication system switch. The current Cobra-fleet use of the C-6533 system is cumbersome, particularly during low-altitude operations. Operationally, the current system C-6533 configuration and design requires the pilot to estimate when he can safely remove his hand from an active flight control to select radios during low-altitude flight. The pilot must then physically remove his hand from the flight control, look inside the cockpit to select and verify the radio selection and then effect the selected radio transmission by activating the radio/ICS switch on the cyclic. This condition is potentially hazardous, especially during low-level flight at night in degraded weather. To improve pilot performance, communications effectiveness, and safety, manprint principles were utilized in the selection of a design modification. The modified C-6533 design was kept as basic as possible for potential Cobra-fleet modification. The communications system was modified and the design was subsequently flight-tested by the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate and NASA at the NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California. The design modification enables the Cobra pilot to maintain hands-on flight controls while selecting radios during nap-of-the-Earth (NOE) flight without looking inside the cockpit which resulted in reduced pilot workload ratings, better pilot handling quality ratings and increased flight safety for the NOE flight environment.

  18. Shari’ah Compliant Finance: Toward Economic Jihad

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-12

    principles in the areas of capital adequacy, corporate governance, risk management and transparency. The goal of the IFSB is to promote the awareness of...as excessive risk . To ensure compliance, investment firms must rely on guidance from a Shari’ah council, paid to assert the financial products...for explaining Shari’ah Compliant Financing, what it is, how it is managed , and what, if any, links there are to jihad. This monograph strives to

  19. Battery cell feedthrough apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1995-01-01

    A compact, hermetic feedthrough apparatus comprising interfitting sleeve portions constructed of chemically-stable materials to permit unique battery designs and increase battery life and performance.

  20. Modeling of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) ligand binding domain and its utility in virtual ligand screening to predict new AhR ligands

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, William; Koch, Daniel; O’Donnell, Edmond; Khalil, Sammy M.; Kerkvliet, Nancy; Tanguay, Robert; Abagyan, Ruben; Kolluri, Siva Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor; the AhR Per-AhR/Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain binds ligands. We developed homology models of the AhR PAS domain to characterize previously observed intra- and inter-species differences in ligand binding using Molecular Docking. In silico structure-based virtual ligand screening using our model resulted in the identification of pinocembrin and 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone, which promoted nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation of AhR and AhR-dependent induction of endogenous target genes. PMID:19719119

  1. Effects of imbalanced currents on large-format LiFePO4/graphite batteries systems connected in parallel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Hu, Xiaosong; Jin, Chao; Jiang, Jiuchun; Zhang, Yanru; Yip, Tony

    2016-05-01

    With the development and popularization of electric vehicles, it is urgent and necessary to develop effective management and diagnosis technology for battery systems. In this work, we design a parallel battery model, according to equivalent circuits of parallel voltage and branch current, to study effects of imbalanced currents on parallel large-format LiFePO4/graphite battery systems. Taking a 60 Ah LiFePO4/graphite battery system manufactured by ATL (Amperex Technology Limited, China) as an example, causes of imbalanced currents in the parallel connection are analyzed using our model, and the associated effect mechanisms on long-term stability of each single battery are examined. Theoretical and experimental results show that continuously increasing imbalanced currents during cycling are mainly responsible for the capacity fade of LiFePO4/graphite parallel batteries. It is thus a good way to avoid fast performance fade of parallel battery systems by suppressing variations of branch currents.

  2. Fatal intoxications associated with the designer opioid AH-7921.

    PubMed

    Kronstrand, R; Thelander, G; Lindstedt, D; Roman, M; Kugelberg, F C

    2014-10-01

    AH-7921 (3,4-dichloro-N-[(1-dimethylamino)cyclohexylmethyl]benzamide) is a designer opioid with ∼80% of morphine's µ-agonist activity. Over a 6-month period, we encountered nine deaths where AH-7921 was involved and detected in blood from the deceased. Shortly after the last death, on August 1 2013, AH-7921 was scheduled as a narcotic and largely disappeared from the illicit market in Sweden. AH-7921 was measured by a selective liquid chromatography-MS-MS method and the concentrations of AH-7921 ranged from 0.03 to 0.99 µg/g blood. Six of our cases had other drugs of abuse on board and most had other medications such as benzodiazepines, antidepressants and analgesics. However, the other medicinal drugs encountered were present in postmortem therapeutic concentrations and unlikely to have contributed to death. In addition to the parent compound, we identified six possible metabolites where two N-demethylated dominated and four mono-hydroxylated were found in trace amounts in the blood. In conclusion, deaths with AH-7921 seem to occur both at low and high concentrations, probably a result of different tolerance to the drug. Hence, it is reasonable to assume that no sharp dividing line exists between lethal and non-lethal concentrations. Further, poly-drug use did not seem to be a major contributing factor for the fatal outcome.

  3. A Molten Salt Lithium-Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Vincent; Tozier, Dylan; Tan, Hongjin; Burke, Colin M; Gallant, Betar M; Uddin, Jasim; Greer, Julia R; McCloskey, Bryan D; Chase, Gregory V; Addison, Dan

    2016-03-02

    Despite the promise of extremely high theoretical capacity (2Li + O2 ↔ Li2O2, 1675 mAh per gram of oxygen), many challenges currently impede development of Li/O2 battery technology. Finding suitable electrode and electrolyte materials remains the most elusive challenge to date. A radical new approach is to replace volatile, unstable and air-intolerant organic electrolytes common to prior research in the field with alkali metal nitrate molten salt electrolytes and operate the battery above the liquidus temperature (>80 °C). Here we demonstrate an intermediate temperature Li/O2 battery using a lithium anode, a molten nitrate-based electrolyte (e.g., LiNO3-KNO3 eutectic) and a porous carbon O2 cathode with high energy efficiency (∼95%) and improved rate capability because the discharge product, lithium peroxide, is stable and moderately soluble in the molten salt electrolyte. The results, supported by essential state-of-the-art electrochemical and analytical techniques such as in situ pressure and gas analyses, scanning electron microscopy, rotating disk electrode voltammetry, demonstrate that Li2O2 electrochemically forms and decomposes upon cycling with discharge/charge overpotentials as low as 50 mV. We show that the cycle life of such batteries is limited only by carbon reactivity and by the uncontrolled precipitation of Li2O2, which eventually becomes electrically disconnected from the O2 electrode.

  4. An improved high-performance lithium-air battery.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hun-Gi; Hassoun, Jusef; Park, Jin-Bum; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno

    2012-06-10

    Although dominating the consumer electronics markets as the power source of choice for popular portable devices, the common lithium battery is not yet suited for use in sustainable electrified road transport. The development of advanced, higher-energy lithium batteries is essential in the rapid establishment of the electric car market. Owing to its exceptionally high energy potentiality, the lithium-air battery is a very appealing candidate for fulfilling this role. However, the performance of such batteries has been limited to only a few charge-discharge cycles with low rate capability. Here, by choosing a suitable stable electrolyte and appropriate cell design, we demonstrate a lithium-air battery capable of operating over many cycles with capacity and rate values as high as 5,000 mAh g(carbon)(-1) and 3 A g(carbon)(-1), respectively. For this battery we estimate an energy density value that is much higher than those offered by the currently available lithium-ion battery technology.

  5. An improved high-performance lithium-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hun-Gi; Hassoun, Jusef; Park, Jin-Bum; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno

    2012-07-01

    Although dominating the consumer electronics markets as the power source of choice for popular portable devices, the common lithium battery is not yet suited for use in sustainable electrified road transport. The development of advanced, higher-energy lithium batteries is essential in the rapid establishment of the electric car market. Owing to its exceptionally high energy potentiality, the lithium-air battery is a very appealing candidate for fulfilling this role. However, the performance of such batteries has been limited to only a few charge-discharge cycles with low rate capability. Here, by choosing a suitable stable electrolyte and appropriate cell design, we demonstrate a lithium-air battery capable of operating over many cycles with capacity and rate values as high as 5,000 mAh gcarbon-1 and 3 A gcarbon-1, respectively. For this battery we estimate an energy density value that is much higher than those offered by the currently available lithium-ion battery technology.

  6. The performance of Ebonex ® electrodes in bipolar lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Keith; Hill, Andrew; Hill, John; Loyns, Andrew; Partington, Tom

    Recent work by Atraverda on the production of an Ebonex ® material that can be cheaply formulated and manufactured to form bipolar substrate plates for bipolar lead-acid batteries is described. In addition, data obtained by Atraverda from laboratory lead-acid batteries is presented indicating that weight savings of around 40% for a bipolar 36 V design (20 Ah capacity, 5 h rate, 9 kW) are potentially achievable in comparison to more conventional designs containing monopolar lead grids. Results indicate that their use as bipolar substrate materials will provide light-weight, long-lasting lead-acid batteries suitable for automotive, standby and power tool applications.

  7. A rechargeable Na-Zn hybrid aqueous battery fabricated with nickel hexacyanoferrate and nanostructured zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ke; Song, Bin; Zhang, Jintao; Ma, Houyi

    2016-07-01

    Rechargeable aqueous batteries are very attractive as a promising alternative energy storage system, although their reversible capacity is typically limited. A new rechargeable Na-Zn hybrid aqueous battery with nickel hexacyanoferrate (NiHCF) cathode and the nanostructured zinc anode is fabricated. The rational combination of two materials with mild aqueous electrolyte renders the devices with an average operating voltage close to 1.5 V, higher specific capacity of 76.2 mAh g-1, and a good cycling stability with 81% capacity retention for 1000 cycles. These remarkable features can provide guidance for the development of rechargeable batteries from the naturally abundant electrode materials with neutral aqueous electrolytes.

  8. Fabrication of an all-polymer battery based on derivatized polythiophenes.

    PubMed

    Gofer, Y; Sarker, H; Killian, J G; Giaccai, J; Poehler, T O; Searson, P C

    1998-01-01

    Conducting polymers that can be switched between an insulating neutral state and a conducting doped state are of interest for charge-storage applications such as secondary batteries. The authors report on the fabrication of an all-polymer battery incorporating derivatized polythiophene films electropolymerized onto graphite-coated polymeric supports and a polymer gel electrolyte film. The cells had discharge voltages of about 2.4 V and capacities of 9.5 to 11.5 mAh g-1. The elimination of any metallic components or liquids and the lightweight and flexible construction provide a unique alternative for secondary battery technology.

  9. Piezonuclear battery

    DOEpatents

    Bongianni, Wayne L.

    1992-01-01

    A piezonuclear battery generates output power arising from the piezoelectric voltage produced from radioactive decay particles interacting with a piezoelectric medium. Radioactive particle energy may directly create an acoustic wave in the piezoelectric medium or a moderator may be used to generate collision particles for interacting with the medium. In one embodiment a radioactive material (.sup.252 Cf) with an output of about 1 microwatt produced a 12 nanowatt output (1.2% conversion efficiency) from a piezoelectric copolymer of vinylidene fluoride/trifluorethylene.

  10. Antibacterial efficacy of AH Plus and AH26 sealers mixed with amoxicillin, triple antibiotic paste and nanosilver

    PubMed Central

    Kangarlou, Ali; Neshandar, Rojin; Matini, Negin; Dianat, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Background. Elimination of bacteria from the root canal system is one of the aims of endodontic treatment; hence the incorporation of antibiotics into sealers can increase their antimicrobial efficacy. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial effects of AH26 and AH Plus sealers mixed with amoxicillin, triple antibiotic paste and nanosilver on Enterococcus faecalis. Methods. In this experiment, amoxicillin, triple antibiotic paste and nanosilver powder were added at 10% of the total sealer weight to AH26 and AH Plus sealers and then cultured freshly or after 1, 3, and 7 days with suspension of E. faecalis for 24 hours. The zones of growth inhibition for E. faecalis were evaluated in each group. Results. Incorporation of nanosilver did not increase antibacterial effects of the sealers. Sealers combined with amoxicillin exhibited the highest antibacterial efficacy in fresh condition. In the set specimens, the results demonstrated that the mixture of sealers and triple antibiotic pastes exhibited the greatest antibacterial efficacy. Conclusion. Amoxicillin and triple antibiotic paste significantly improved the antibacterial properties of AH Plus and AH26 sealers. Such properties decreased with time, but the use of sealer-amoxicillin/triple paste combination was still superior to using sealers alone or in combination with nanosilver. PMID:28096947

  11. Antibacterial efficacy of AH Plus and AH26 sealers mixed with amoxicillin, triple antibiotic paste and nanosilver.

    PubMed

    Kangarlou, Ali; Neshandar, Rojin; Matini, Negin; Dianat, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Background. Elimination of bacteria from the root canal system is one of the aims of endodontic treatment; hence the incorporation of antibiotics into sealers can increase their antimicrobial efficacy. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial effects of AH26 and AH Plus sealers mixed with amoxicillin, triple antibiotic paste and nanosilver on Enterococcus faecalis. Methods. In this experiment, amoxicillin, triple antibiotic paste and nanosilver powder were added at 10% of the total sealer weight to AH26 and AH Plus sealers and then cultured freshly or after 1, 3, and 7 days with suspension of E. faecalis for 24 hours. The zones of growth inhibition for E. faecalis were evaluated in each group. Results. Incorporation of nanosilver did not increase antibacterial effects of the sealers. Sealers combined with amoxicillin exhibited the highest antibacterial efficacy in fresh condition. In the set specimens, the results demonstrated that the mixture of sealers and triple antibiotic pastes exhibited the greatest antibacterial efficacy. Conclusion. Amoxicillin and triple antibiotic paste significantly improved the antibacterial properties of AH Plus and AH26 sealers. Such properties decreased with time, but the use of sealer-amoxicillin/triple paste combination was still superior to using sealers alone or in combination with nanosilver.

  12. Evaluation of new plastic compression (Ziegler) type of seals for long life planetary batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.

    1973-01-01

    A program was initiated to develop improved types of terminal seals for aerospace Ni-Cd batteries. The approach used has not involved attempts, such as employed elsewhere, to improve the ceramic-to-metal seal that is now extensively employed for this application. Rather the approach has been directed toward the development and evaluation of new types of seals. Of prime interest in this initial investigation has been the Ziegler type of compression seal and in particular the injection molded version developed by the Bell Telephone Laboratories (BTL). A number of these units were designed, fabricated, and evaluated on an accelerated life test under a simulated battery environment. Results have shown that there are no major problems involved in scaling up the BTL small-size (5-amp) seal to a larger size (up to 50-amp) seal suitable for most JPL flight batteries. Five out of five such seals successfully completed over 10 months of continuous thermal cycling without developing any leaks greater than 1.8 x to 10 to the minus 9th power atm-cc-He/s.

  13. Identification of a novel mechanism of regulation of Ah (dioxin) receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Junsei; Ema, Masatsugu; Sogawa, Kazuhiro; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki

    1999-01-01

    Ah receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates pleiotropic effects of environmental pollutants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on host animals. In addition to induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes, the liganded AhR complex was found to activate gene expression of a factor designated AhR repressor (AhRR), which inhibits AhR function by competing with AhR for dimerizing with Arnt and binding to the XRE sequence. Thus, AhR and AhRR form a regulatory circuit in the xenobiotic signal transduction pathway and provide a novel mechanism of regulation of AhR function that may determine tissue-specific sensitivity to environmental pollutants. PMID:9887096

  14. Chemically Bonded Phosphorus/Graphene Hybrid as a High Performance Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jiangxuan; Yu, Zhaoxin; Gordin, Mikhail; Hu, Shilin; Yi, Ran; Tang, Duihai; Walter, Timothy; Regula, Michael; Choi, Daiwon; Li, Xiaolin; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Wang, Donghai

    2014-11-12

    Room temperature sodium-ion batteries are of great interest for high-energy-density energy storage systems because of low-cost, natural abundance of sodium. Here, we report a novel graphene nanosheets-wrapped phosphorus composite as an anode for high performance sodium-ion batteries though a facile ball-milling of red phosphorus and graphene nanosheets. Not only can the graphene nanosheets significantly improve the electrical conductivity, but they also serve as a buffer layer to accommodate the large volume change of phosphorus in the charge-discharge process. As a result, the graphene wrapped phosphorus composite anode delivers a high reversible capacity of 2077 mAh/g with excellent cycling stability (1700 mAh/g after 60 cycles) and high Coulombic efficiency (>98%). This simple synthesis approach and unique nanostructure can potentially extend to other electrode materials with unstable solid electrolyte interphases in sodium-ion batteries.

  15. An Overview and Future Perspectives of Aluminum Batteries.

    PubMed

    Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Marquardt, Krystan; Hoeppner, Katrin; Fantini, Sebastien; Lin, Rongying; Knipping, Etienne; Peters, Willi; Drillet, Jean-Francois; Passerini, Stefano; Hahn, Robert

    2016-09-01

    A critical overview of the latest developments in the aluminum battery technologies is reported. The substitution of lithium with alternative metal anodes characterized by lower cost and higher abundance is nowadays one of the most widely explored paths to reduce the cost of electrochemical storage systems and enable long-term sustainability. Aluminum based secondary batteries could be a viable alternative to the present Li-ion technology because of their high volumetric capacity (8040 mAh cm(-3) for Al vs 2046 mAh cm(-3) for Li). Additionally, the low cost aluminum makes these batteries appealing for large-scale electrical energy storage. Here, we describe the evolution of the various aluminum systems, starting from those based on aqueous electrolytes to, in more details, those based on non-aqueous electrolytes. Particular attention has been dedicated to the latest development of electrolytic media characterized by low reactivity towards other cell components. The attention is then focused on electrode materials enabling the reversible aluminum intercalation-deintercalation process. Finally, we touch on the topic of high-capacity aluminum-sulfur batteries, attempting to forecast their chances to reach the status of practical energy storage systems.

  16. Modified titanium foil's surface by high temperature carbon sintering method as the substrate for bipolar lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Xiaoshi; Wang, Dianlong; Zhu, Junsheng

    2014-12-01

    Titanium foil can be a type of ideal material as the substrate for bipolar lead-acid battery. However, it can't be directly used because it can be oxidized in the high voltage and strong oxidizing conditions. In this paper, we coat the titanium suboxide on the titanium foil surface by means of the high temperature carbon sintering method for the improvement of corrosion resistance of titanium metal and use it as the substrate to bipolar lead-acid battery to study its effect on the battery performances. Modified titanium foils are characterized by SEM, XRD, corrosion resistance test and electronic conductivity test. The electrochemical properties of the bipolar lead-acid battery are investigated by constant current charge/discharge method. The results demonstrate that the titanium foil carbon-sintered at 800 °C for 2 h has the most excellent chemical stability and electronic conductivity. Initial specific capacities of positive active material of bipolar lead-acid battery with modified titanium as the substrate at 0.25C, 0.5C, 1C and 2C discharge rate are 99.29 mAh g-1, 88.93 mAh g-1, 77.54 mAh g-1, and 65.41 mAh g-1. After 50 cycles, the specific capacity of positive active material at 0.5C is 81.36 mAh g-1 and after 100 cycles, the specific capacity at 1C is 61.92 mAh g-1.

  17. Galileo Probe Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagarin, B. P.; Taenaka, R. K.; Stofel, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    The conclusions of the Galileo probe battery system are: the battery performance met mission requirements with margin; extensive ground-based and flight tests of batteries prior to probe separation from orbiter provided good prediction of actual entry performance at Jupiter; and the Li-SO2 battery was an important choice for the probe's main power.

  18. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  19. AhR-mediated and antiestrogenic activity of humic substances.

    PubMed

    Janosek, J; Bittner, M; Hilscherová, K; Bláha, L; Giesy, J P; Holoubek, I

    2007-04-01

    Humic substances (HS) were for decades regarded as inert in the ecosystems with respect to their possible toxicity. However, HS have been recently shown to elicit various adverse effects generally attributed to xenobiotics. In our study, we used MVLN and H4IIE-luc cell lines stably transfected with luciferase gene under control of estrogen receptor (ER) and Ah receptor (AhR; receptor connected with so-called dioxin-like toxicity) for assessment of anti/estrogenic and AhR-mediated effects of 12 commercially available humic substances. Out of those, five humic acids were shown to induce AhR-mediated activity with relative potencies related to TCDD 2.6 x 10(-8)-7.4 x 10(-8). Organic extracts of HS solutions also elicited high activities what means that lipophilic molecules are responsible for a great part of effect. However, relatively high activity remaining in extracted solution suggests also presence of polar AhR-agonists. Contribution of persistent organic compounds to the observed effects was ruled out by H(2)SO(4) treatment. Eight out of twelve HS elicited significant antiestrogenic effects with IC(50) ranging from 40 to 164 mg l(-1). The possible explanations of the antiestrogenic effect include sorption of 17-beta-estradiol (E2) on HS, changes in membrane permeability for E2 or another specific mechanism.

  20. Activation of AhR-mediated toxicity pathway by emerging ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides (PCDPSs) are a group of environmental pollutants for which limited toxicological information is available. This study tested the hypothesis that PCDPSs could activate the mammalian aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated toxicity pathways. Eighteen PCDPSs were tested in the H4IIE-luc transactivation assay, with 13/18 causing concentration-dependent AhR activation. Potencies of several congeners were similar to those of mono-ortho substituted polychlorinated biphenyls. A RNA sequencing (RNA-seq)-based transcriptomic analysis was performed on H4IIE cells treated with two PCDPS congeners, 2,2',3,3',4,5,6-hepta-CDPS, and 2,4,4',5-tetra-CDPS. Results of RNA-seq revealed a remarkable modulation on a relatively short gene list by exposure to the tested concentrations of PCDPSs, among which, Cyp1 responded with the greatest fold up-regulation. Both the identities of the modulated transcripts and the associated pathways were consistent with targets and pathways known to be modulated by other types of AhR agonists and there was little evidence for significant off-target effects within the cellular context of the H4IIE bioassay. The results suggest AhR activation as a toxicologically relevant mode of action for PCDPSs suggests the utility of AhR-related toxicity pathways for predicting potential hazards associated with PCDPS exposure in mammals and potentially other vertebrates. Polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides (PCDPSs) are a group of en

  1. Interphase Evolution of a Lithium-Ion/Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Bresser, Dominic; Reiter, Jakub; Oberhumer, Philipp; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Passerini, Stefano; Hassoun, Jusef

    2015-10-14

    A novel lithium-ion/oxygen battery employing Pyr14TFSI-LiTFSI as the electrolyte and nanostructured LixSn-C as the anode is reported. The remarkable energy content of the oxygen cathode, the replacement of the lithium metal anode by a nanostructured stable lithium-alloying composite, and the concomitant use of nonflammable ionic liquid-based electrolyte result in a new and intrinsically safer energy storage system. The lithium-ion/oxygen battery delivers a stable capacity of 500 mAh g(-1) at a working voltage of 2.4 V with a low charge-discharge polarization. However, further characterization of this new system by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveals the progressive decrease of the battery working voltage, because of the crossover of oxygen through the electrolyte and its direct reaction with the LixSn-C anode.

  2. A primary battery-on-a-chip using monolayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iost, Rodrigo M.; Crespilho, Frank N.; Kern, Klaus; Balasubramanian, Kannan

    2016-07-01

    We present here a bottom-up approach for realizing on-chip on-demand batteries starting out with chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene. Single graphene monolayers contacted by electrode lines on a silicon chip serve as electrodes. The anode and cathode are realized by electrodeposition of zinc and copper respectively onto graphene, leading to the realization of a miniature graphene-based Daniell cell on a chip. The electrolyte is housed partly in a gel and partly in liquid form in an on-chip enclosure molded using a 3d printer or made out of poly(dimethylsiloxane). The realized batteries provide a stable voltage (∼1.1 V) for many hours and exhibit capacities as high as 15 μAh, providing enough power to operate a pocket calculator. The realized batteries show promise for deployment as on-chip power sources for autonomous systems in lab-on-a-chip or biomedical applications.

  3. Battery Systems for X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) and Deorbit Propulsion Stage (DPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric

    1998-01-01

    A 28V 32 Ah cell Li/MnO2 and a 28V NiMH battery systems for the Deorbit Propulsion Stage (DPS) and the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) are developed in Friwo-Silforkraft, Germany with the following objectives and approach: Provide safe battery designs for lowest volume and cost, and within schedule; Take advantage of less complex requests for V201 vs OPS CRV to simplify design and reduce cost; Use only existing commercial cell designs as building blocks for larger battery; Derive battery designs from the ASTRO-SPAS design which is the largest lithium battery design with Shuttle flight experience; Place maximum amount of battery energy on DPS; DPS battery is non rechargeable; and CRV batteries are rechargeable. This paper contains the following sections: a brief introduction on CRV requirements, CRV advantages over Soyuz, and X-38 programs; Battery objectives and approach; Battery requirements and groundrules (performance, on-orbit operation, etc); Design trades, solutions, redundancy plan, and margins; Envelope, size, and mass; Interfaces (structural, electrical & thermal); and Deviation from OPS CRV.

  4. A high power spiral wound lead-acid battery for hybrid electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.B.; Sexton, E.D.

    1997-12-01

    Optima Batteries, Inc. is currently in development of a high power (660 W/kg) spiral wound lead-acid 6V battery with a nominal capacity of 15 Ah. Its exceptional power and excellent thermal characteristics make it a promising choice for hybrid electric vehicle applications. The hybrid electric vehicle presents a new and unique challenge for energy storage systems. The batteries require high power for acceleration and hill climbing and good charge acceptance for regenerative braking and overall energy efficiency. Since the on board auxiliary power unit results in much lower demands for battery energy capacity, lead-acid batteries fit quite well into these performance requirements. Many of the remaining challenges involve the development of battery management systems which must function to maintain the battery pack at peak performance and achieve an economical cycle life. Related to the issue of battery management is information about conditions that may cause damage or unbalance of the pack. Experiments are described investigating the effects of extreme cell reversal on battery capacity and cycle life. The results demonstrate the amazing robustness of the lead-acid battery for tolerating over discharge.

  5. Development and characterization of a high capacity lithium/thionyl chloride battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Gerald H.; Goebel, Franz

    A 30 V lithium/thionyl chloride battery with 320 Ah capacity capable of operating at currents of 14 to 75 A has been developed and tested over a temperature range from 15 to 71 °C. The 81 lb battery consists of nine series connected cylindrical cells in a three-by-three arrangement within an aluminum case. The cells are of a parallel disc electrode design with a total active surface area of 10 200 cm 2. Cells and batteries have each been tested for safety, performance and to a space environment. The battery has clearly performed in excess of the specification requirements. The cell design is very adaptable to many battery design requirements.

  6. Determination the Usefulness of AhHMA4p1::AhHMA4 Expression in Biofortification Strategies.

    PubMed

    Weremczuk, Aleksandra; Barabasz, Anna; Ruszczyńska, Anna; Bulska, Ewa; Antosiewicz, Danuta Maria

    AhHMA4 from Arabidopsis thaliana encodes Zn/Cd export protein that controls Zn/Cd translocation to shoots. The focus of this manuscript is the evaluation of AhHMA4 expression in tomato for mineral biofortification (more Zn and less Cd in shoots and fruits). Hydroponic and soil-based experiments were performed. Transgenic and wild-type plants were grown on two dilution levels of Knop's medium (1/10, 1/2) with or without Cd, to determine if mineral composition affects the pattern of root/shoot partitioning of both metals due to AhHMA4 expression. Facilitation of Zn translocation to shoots of 19-day-old transgenic tomato was noted only when plants were grown in the more diluted medium. Moreover, the expression pattern of Zn-Cd-Fe cross-homeostasis genes (LeIRT1, LeChln, LeNRAMP1) was changed in transgenics in a medium composition-dependent fashion. In plants grown in soil (with/without Cd) up to maturity, expression of AhHMA4 resulted in more efficient translocation of Zn to shoots and restriction of Cd. These results indicate the usefulness of AhHMA4 expression to improve the growth of tomato on low-Zn soil, also contaminated with Cd.

  7. Transgenic Overexpression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor (AhRR) and AhR-Mediated Induction of CYP1A1, Cytokines, and Acute Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Christoph F.A.; Chang, W.L. William; Kado, Sarah; McCulloh, Kelly; Vogel, Helena; Wu, Dalei; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; Yang, GuoXiang; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Matsumura, Fumio; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR) is known to repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling, but very little is known regarding the role of the AhRR in vivo. Objective: This study tested the role of AhRR in vivo in AhRR overexpressing mice on molecular and toxic end points mediated through a prototypical AhR ligand. Methods: We generated AhRR-transgenic mice (AhRR Tg) based on the genetic background of C57BL/6J wild type (wt) mice. We tested the effect of the prototypical AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1 and cytokines in various tissues of mice. We next analyzed the infiltration of immune cells in adipose tissue of mice after treatment with TCDD using flow cytometry. Results: AhRR Tg mice express significantly higher levels of AhRR compared to wt mice. Activation of AhR by TCDD caused a significant increase of the inflammatory cytokines Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-10, and CXCL chemokines in white epididymal adipose tissue from both wt and AhRR Tg mice. However, the expression of IL-1β, CXCL2 and CXCL3 were significantly lower in AhRR Tg versus wt mice following TCDD treatment. Exposure to TCDD caused a rapid accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages in white adipose tissue of wt and AhRR Tg mice. Furthermore we found that male AhRR Tg mice were protected from high-dose TCDD-induced lethality associated with a reduced inflammatory response and liver damage as indicated by lower levels of TCDD-induced alanine aminotransferase and hepatic triglycerides. Females from both wt and AhRR Tg mice were less sensitive than male mice to acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Conclusion: In conclusion, the current study identifies AhRR as a previously uncharacterized regulator of specific inflammatory cytokines, which may protect from acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Citation: Vogel CF, Chang WL, Kado S, McCulloh K, Vogel H, Wu D, Haarmann-Stemmann T, Yang GX, Leung PS, Matsumura F

  8. A new design for dry polyaniline rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Hassan; Mousavi, Mir Fazlollah; Shamsipur, Mojtaba

    Polyanilline powder of high conductivity is prepared by chemical polymerization of aniline in a solution of 0.10 M aniline, 2 M perchloric acid and 0.15 M ammonium persulfate at 5 °C. The powder is mixed with graphite and acetylene black to obtain the required conductivity and porosity. The mixed powder is compressed into a ring shape at a pressure of 2 t cm -2 for use as positive electrodes (cathodes) in batteries. Zinc powder is mixed with magnesium oxide, zinc oxide and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), and then compressed into a cylindrical shape at a pressure of 7 t cm -2 for use as negative electrodes (anodes) in batteries. The battery electrolyte comprises 2 M Zn(ClO 4) 2, 1 M NH 4ClO 4, and 1.0×10 -4 M Triton-X100 at pH 3. A 1 wt.% Optalloy powder is added to the negative-electrode composite to prevent the release of hydrogen gas. The assembled battery has an open-circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.64 V, a charge storage capacity of 125.43 m Ah g -1, and a Coulombic efficiency greater than 95% during the first 100 charge-discharge cycles. Due to the low amount of electrolyte used, the battery is considered as a dry battery.

  9. Rechargeable Ni-Li battery integrated aqueous/nonaqueous system.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiqiao; Wang, Yonggang; Na, Haitao; Liu, Haimei; Zhou, Haoshen

    2009-10-28

    A rechargeable Ni-Li battery, in which nickel hydroxide serving as a cathode in an aqueous electrolyte and Li metal serving as an anode in an organic electrolyte were integrated by a superionic conductor glass ceramic film (LISICON), was proposed with the expectation to combine the advantages of both a Li-ion battery and Ni-MH battery. It has the potential for an ultrahigh theoretical energy density of 935 Wh/kg, twice that of a Li-ion battery (414 Wh/kg), based on the active material in electrodes. A prototype Ni-Li battery fabricated in the present work demonstrated a cell voltage of 3.47 V and a capacity of 264 mAh/g with good retention during 50 cycles of charge/discharge. This battery system with a hybrid electrolyte provides a new avenue for the best combination of electrode/electrolyte/electrode to fulfill the potential of high energy density as well as high power density.

  10. High Capacity Pouch-Type Li-air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Deyu; Xiao, Jie; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

    2010-05-05

    The pouch-type Li-air batteries operated in ambient condition are reported in this work. The battery used a heat sealable plastic membrane as package material, O2¬ diffusion membrane and moisture barrier. The large variation in internal resistance of the batteries is minimized by a modified separator which can bind the cell stack together. The cells using the modified separators show improved and repeatable discharge performances. It is also found that addition of about 20% of 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) in PC:EC (1:1) based electrolyte solvent improves can improve the wetability of carbon electrode and the discharge capacities of Li-air batteries, but further increase in DME amount lead to a decreased capacity due to increase electrolyte loss during discharge process. The pouch-type Li-air batteries with the modified separator and optimized electrolyte has demonstrated a specific capacity of 2711 mAh g-1 based on carbon and a specific energy of 344 Wh kg-1 based on the complete batteries including package.

  11. Non-gassing nickel-cadmium battery electrodes and cells: Testing of 25 Ah cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luksha, E.; Gordy, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The testing of 30 practical size, experimental 25 ampere hour cells constructed as part of an earlier negative limited cell development program is discussed. The test results showed that the negative limited cell is a possible means of developing a long-lived secondary cell. The cells were tested for 500 cycles using an accelerated regime approximating a 90-minute orbit period. Three groups of ten cells were tested at 0,25, and 40 C. The cycle data showed that the negative limited cells had higher degradation rates at the higher operating temperatures. At the conclusion of 500 cycles, the three groups had average capacities of 16.83, 12.74, and 5.71 ampere hours for testing at 0, 25, 40 C, respectively. The conditioning capacities of these cells was in the 25 ampere hours range. The internal cell pressures of the three groups was also temperature dependent and was, in general, in the 2 psig range during the course of the test program. No periodic variation of the internal pressure with the state-of-charge was observed except with some cells tested at 40 C.

  12. High Efficiency Flexible Battery Based on Graphene-carbon Nanotube Hybrid Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-26

    densities. Numerical values represent current densities, at which charge and discharge cycles were conducted. Task II. 3 Dimensional Carbon ...Flexible Battery based on Graphene- Carbon Nanorube Hybrid Structure 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-11 -1-0135 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...based anode on Cu were synthesized-very high 1st cycle capacity(- 2500 mAh/g), at IC (- 900 mAh/g) and at 3C rates (767 mAhlg), and high capacity

  13. Quick charge battery

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    Electric and hybrid electric vehicles (EVs and HEVs) will become a significant reality in the near future of the automotive industry. Both types of vehicles will need a means to store energy on board. For the present, the method of choice would be lead-acid batteries, with the HEV having auxiliary power supplied by a small internal combustion engine. One of the main drawbacks to lead-acid batteries is internal heat generation as a natural consequence of the charging process as well as resistance losses. This limits the re-charging rate to the battery pack for an EV which has a range of about 80 miles. A quick turnaround on recharge is needed but not yet possible. One of the limiting factors is the heat buildup. For the HEV the auxiliary power unit provides a continuous charge to the battery pack. Therefore heat generation in the lead-acid battery is a constant problem that must be addressed. Presented here is a battery that is capable of quick charging, the Quick Charge Battery with Thermal Management. This is an electrochemical battery, typically a lead-acid battery, without the inherent thermal management problems that have been present in the past. The battery can be used in an all-electric vehicle, a hybrid-electric vehicle or an internal combustion engine vehicle, as well as in other applications that utilize secondary batteries. This is not restricted to only lead-acid batteries. The concept and technology are flexible enough to use in any secondary battery application where thermal management of the battery must be addressed, especially during charging. Any battery with temperature constraints can benefit from this advancement in the state of the art of battery manufacturing. This can also include nickel-cadmium, metal-air, nickel hydroxide, zinc-chloride or any other type of battery whose performance is affected by the temperature control of the interior as well as the exterior of the battery.

  14. Dithiophenedione-containing polymers for battery application.

    PubMed

    Häupler, Bernhard; Hagemann, Tino; Friebe, Christian; Wild, Andreas; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2015-02-18

    Redox-active polymers have received recently significant interest as active materials in secondary organic batteries. We designed a redox-active monomer, namely 2-vinyl-4,8-dihydrobenzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-4,8-dione that exhibits two one-electron redox reactions and has a low molar mass, resulting in a high theoretical capacity of 217 mAh/g. The free radical polymerization of the monomer was optimized by variation of solvent and initiator. The electrochemical behavior of the obtained polymer was investigated using cyclic voltammetry. The utilization of lithium salts in the supporting electrolyte leads to a merging of the redox waves accompanied by a shift to higher redox potentials. Prototype batteries manufactured with 10 wt % polymer as active material exhibit full material activity at the first charge/discharge cycle. During the first 100 cycles, the capacity drops to 50%. Higher contents of polymer (up to 40 wt %) leads to a lower material activity. Furthermore, the battery system reveals a fast charge/discharge ability, allowing a maximum speed up to 10C (6 min) with only a negligible loss of capacity.

  15. Efficiency studies of hysteretic and PWM boost converters: Controller- and battery-type effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Juan Herminio, III

    A continuous conduction boost converter is studied as a function of four battery types and two controllers. The battery types are alkaline, NiCd, NiMH, and sealed lead-acid. The controllers implement voltage-mode pulse-width modulation (PWM) and hysteretic current-mode (HCM) control schemes, respectively. The boost converter is designed to produce an output of 3W at 12V DC with battery voltages ranging from 6V to 3V. The study focuses on converter efficiency as affected by battery type, controller type, and the combined effects of battery type and controller type. Computer simulations predict and experimental results verify that differences in converter efficiency between the different battery types are due to differences in capacity, current-handling capabilities, and sustained voltage levels. The HCM controller uses a control scheme, in which the switching frequency decreases as battery voltage decreases, resulting in lower MOSFET switching losses. This effect partially compensates for the increased conduction losses in converter components as more current is drawn from batteries at lower input voltages. The PWM controller has a fixed switching frequency (50 kHz) and both its switching and conduction losses increase with decreasing input voltage. Efficiency levels of 88% are achieved for higher battery voltages, decreasing to 80% for lower voltages. A difference of up to 2% higher efficiency is observed in the HCM over the PWM. The major power losses are due to the combination of the inductor's ESR and the resistance of the wire used to increase the Hall-effect current sensor turns-ratio (increasing from 400mW to 1.2W). Simulations predict that in the absence of this resistance, efficiency levels of 95% can be achieved. Conduction losses through the rectifier are in the range of 40mW to 50mW for both controllers. MOSFET switching losses amount to 50mW for both controllers at high input voltages, increasing to 100mW for the PWM, but only to 65mW for the HCM at

  16. Battery cell for a primary battery

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkinen, A.

    1984-12-11

    A battery cell for a primary battery, particularly a flat cell battery to be activated on being taken into use, e.g., when submerged into water. The battery cell comprises a positive current collector and a negative electrode. A separator layer which, being in contact with the negative electrode, is disposed between said negative electrode and the positive current collector. A depolarizing layer containing a depolarizing agent is disposed between the positive current collector and the separate layer. An intermediate layer of a porous, electrically insulating, and water-absorbing material is disposed next to the positive current collector and arranged in contact with the depolarizing agent.

  17. Hierarchical three-dimensional ZnCo₂O₄ nanowire arrays/carbon cloth anodes for a novel class of high-performance flexible lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Xianfu; Chen, Gui; Chen, Di; Zhou, Chongwu; Shen, Guozhen

    2012-06-13

    Flexible electronics is an emerging and promising technology for next generation of optoelectronic devices. Herein, hierarchical three-dimensional ZnCo(2)O(4) nanowire arrays/carbon cloth composites were synthesized as high performance binder-free anodes for Li-ion battery with the features of high reversible capacity of 1300-1400 mAh g(-1) and excellent cycling ability even after 160 cycles with a capacity of 1200 mAh g(-1). Highly flexible full batteries were also fabricated, exhibiting high flexibility, excellent electrical stability, and superior electrochemical performances.

  18. A Rechargeable Li-Air Fuel Cell Battery Based on Garnet Solid Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiyang; Zhao, Ning; Li, Yiqiu; Guo, Xiangxin; Feng, Xuefei; Liu, Xiaosong; Liu, Zhi; Cui, Guanglei; Zheng, Hao; Gu, Lin; Li, Hong

    2017-01-24

    Non-aqueous Li-air batteries have been intensively studied in the past few years for their theoretically super-high energy density. However, they cannot operate properly in real air because they contain highly unstable and volatile electrolytes. Here, we report the fabrication of solid-state Li-air batteries using garnet (i.e., Li6.4La3Zr1.4Ta0.6O12, LLZTO) ceramic disks with high density and ionic conductivity as the electrolytes and composite cathodes consisting of garnet powder, Li salts (LiTFSI) and active carbon. These batteries run in real air based on the formation and decomposition at least partially of Li2CO3. Batteries with LiTFSI mixed with polyimide (PI:LiTFSI) as a binder show rechargeability at 200 °C with a specific capacity of 2184 mAh g(-1)carbon at 20 μA cm(-2). Replacement of PI:LiTFSI with LiTFSI dissolved in polypropylene carbonate (PPC:LiTFSI) reduces interfacial resistance, and the resulting batteries show a greatly increased discharge capacity of approximately 20300 mAh g(-1)carbon and cycle 50 times while maintaining a cutoff capacity of 1000 mAh g(-1)carbon at 20 μA cm(-2) and 80 °C. These results demonstrate that the use of LLZTO ceramic electrolytes enables operation of the Li-air battery in real air at medium temperatures, leading to a novel type of Li-air fuel cell battery for energy storage.

  19. A Rechargeable Li-Air Fuel Cell Battery Based on Garnet Solid Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiyang; Zhao, Ning; Li, Yiqiu; Guo, Xiangxin; Feng, Xuefei; Liu, Xiaosong; Liu, Zhi; Cui, Guanglei; Zheng, Hao; Gu, Lin; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Non-aqueous Li-air batteries have been intensively studied in the past few years for their theoretically super-high energy density. However, they cannot operate properly in real air because they contain highly unstable and volatile electrolytes. Here, we report the fabrication of solid-state Li-air batteries using garnet (i.e., Li6.4La3Zr1.4Ta0.6O12, LLZTO) ceramic disks with high density and ionic conductivity as the electrolytes and composite cathodes consisting of garnet powder, Li salts (LiTFSI) and active carbon. These batteries run in real air based on the formation and decomposition at least partially of Li2CO3. Batteries with LiTFSI mixed with polyimide (PI:LiTFSI) as a binder show rechargeability at 200 °C with a specific capacity of 2184 mAh g‑1carbon at 20 μA cm‑2. Replacement of PI:LiTFSI with LiTFSI dissolved in polypropylene carbonate (PPC:LiTFSI) reduces interfacial resistance, and the resulting batteries show a greatly increased discharge capacity of approximately 20300 mAh g‑1carbon and cycle 50 times while maintaining a cutoff capacity of 1000 mAh g‑1carbon at 20 μA cm‑2 and 80 °C. These results demonstrate that the use of LLZTO ceramic electrolytes enables operation of the Li-air battery in real air at medium temperatures, leading to a novel type of Li-air fuel cell battery for energy storage.

  20. A Rechargeable Li-Air Fuel Cell Battery Based on Garnet Solid Electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiyang; Zhao, Ning; Li, Yiqiu; Guo, Xiangxin; Feng, Xuefei; Liu, Xiaosong; Liu, Zhi; Cui, Guanglei; Zheng, Hao; Gu, Lin; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Non-aqueous Li-air batteries have been intensively studied in the past few years for their theoretically super-high energy density. However, they cannot operate properly in real air because they contain highly unstable and volatile electrolytes. Here, we report the fabrication of solid-state Li-air batteries using garnet (i.e., Li6.4La3Zr1.4Ta0.6O12, LLZTO) ceramic disks with high density and ionic conductivity as the electrolytes and composite cathodes consisting of garnet powder, Li salts (LiTFSI) and active carbon. These batteries run in real air based on the formation and decomposition at least partially of Li2CO3. Batteries with LiTFSI mixed with polyimide (PI:LiTFSI) as a binder show rechargeability at 200 °C with a specific capacity of 2184 mAh g−1carbon at 20 μA cm−2. Replacement of PI:LiTFSI with LiTFSI dissolved in polypropylene carbonate (PPC:LiTFSI) reduces interfacial resistance, and the resulting batteries show a greatly increased discharge capacity of approximately 20300 mAh g−1carbon and cycle 50 times while maintaining a cutoff capacity of 1000 mAh g−1carbon at 20 μA cm−2 and 80 °C. These results demonstrate that the use of LLZTO ceramic electrolytes enables operation of the Li-air battery in real air at medium temperatures, leading to a novel type of Li-air fuel cell battery for energy storage. PMID:28117359

  1. PESTICIDE TRADE NAMES AND THEIR ACTIVE INGREDIENTS IN THE AHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The detailed information on the use of specific pesticides is a major strength of exposure assessment conducted for the Agricultural Health Study (AHS). During the enrollment interviews, a check list was used to collect information on the frequency and duration of use for 28 p...

  2. A new method of modeling and state of charge estimation of the battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Congzhi; Liu, Weiqun; Wang, Lingyan; Hu, Guangdi; Ma, Luping; Ren, Bingyu

    2016-07-01

    Accurately estimating the State of Charge (SOC) of the battery is the basis of Battery Management System (BMS). This paper has introduced a new modeling and state estimation method for the lithium battery system, which utilizes the fractional order theories. Firstly, a fractional order model based on the PNGV (Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicle) model is proposed after analyzing the impedance characteristics of the lithium battery and compared with the integer order model. With the observability of the discrete non-linear model of the battery confirmed, the method of the state observer based on the extended fractional Kalman filter (EFKF) and the least square identification method of battery parameters are studied. Then, it has been applied successfully to estimate the battery SOC using the measured battery current and voltage. Finally, a standard HPPC (Hybrid Pulse Power Characteristic) test is used for parameter identification and several experimental validations are investigated on a ternary manganese-nickel-cobalt lithium battery pack with a nominal capacity of 24 Ah which consists of ten Sony commercial cells (US18650GR G7) in parallels. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the fractional order model and the estimation method.

  3. Battery cell feedthrough apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1995-03-14

    A compact, hermetic feedthrough apparatus is described comprising interfitting sleeve portions constructed of chemically-stable materials to permit unique battery designs and increase battery life and performance. 8 figs.

  4. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge.

  5. Ionene membrane battery separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moacanin, J.; Tom, H. Y.

    1969-01-01

    Ionic transport characteristics of ionenes, insoluble membranes from soluble polyelectrolyte compositions, are studied for possible application in a battery separator. Effectiveness of the thin film of separator membrane essentially determines battery lifetime.

  6. Batteries: Widening voltage windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kang; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-10-01

    The energy output of aqueous batteries is largely limited by the narrow voltage window of their electrolytes. Now, a hydrate melt consisting of lithium salts is shown to expand such voltage windows, leading to a high-energy aqueous battery.

  7. Auto Battery Safety Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... inside the battery to spill through the vents. Use a battery carrier when available and always handle with extreme care. This publication is copyrighted. This sheet may be ... reprint, excerption or use is not permitted without written consent. Because of ...

  8. Carbon Cryogel Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodworth James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 10 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-4,9 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  9. Comparative epidemiology of human infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) and A(H5N1) viruses in China

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Benjamin J.; Jin, Lianmei; Lau, Eric H. Y.; Liao, Qiaohong; Wu, Peng; Jiang, Hui; Tsang, Tim K.; Zheng, Jiandong; Fang, Vicky J.; Chang, Zhaorui; Ni, Michael Y.; Zhang, Qian; Ip, Dennis K. M.; Yu, Jianxing; Li, Yu; Wang, Liping; Tu, Wenxiao; Meng, Ling; Wu, Joseph T.; Luo, Huiming; Li, Qun; Shu, Yuelong; Li, Zhongjie; Feng, Zijian; Yang, Weizhong; Wang, Yu; Leung, Gabriel M.; Yu, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    Background The novel influenza A(H7N9) virus recently emerged, while influenza A(H5N1) virus has infected humans since 2003 in mainland China. Both infections are thought to be predominantly zoonotic. We compared the epidemiologic characteristics of the complete series of laboratory-confirmed cases of both viruses in mainland China to date. Methods An integrated database was constructed with information on demographic, epidemiological, and clinical variables of laboratory-confirmed A(H7N9) and A(H5N1) cases that were reported to the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention up to May 24, 2013. We described disease occurrence by age, sex and geography and estimated key epidemiologic parameters. Findings Among 130 and 43 patients with confirmed A(H7N9) and A(H5N1) respectively, the median ages were 62y and 26y. In urban areas, 74% of cases of both viruses were male whereas in rural areas the proportions were 62% for A(H7N9) and 33% for A(H5N1). Among cases of A(H7N9) and A(H5N1), 75% and 71% reported recent exposure to poultry. The mean incubation periods of A(H7N9) and A(H5N1) were 3.1 and 3.3 days, respectively. On average, 21 and 18 contacts were traced for each A(H7N9) case in urban and rural areas respectively; compared to 90 and 63 for A(H5N1). The hospitalization fatality risk was 35% (95% CI: 25%, 44%) for A(H7N9) and 70% (95% CI: 56%, 83%) for A(H5N1). Interpretation The sex ratios in urban compared to rural cases are consistent with poultry exposure driving the risk of infection. However the difference in susceptibility to serious illness with the two different viruses remains unexplained, given that most A(H7N9) cases were in older adults while most A(H5N1) cases were in younger individuals. Funding Ministry of Science and Technology, China; Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Disease and University Grants Committee, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China; and the US National Institutes of Health. PMID:23803488

  10. Numerical estimation of heat distribution from the implantable battery system of an undulation pump LVAD.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Makino, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Chinzei, Tsuneo; Abe, Yusuke; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Mochizuki, Shu-ichi; Imachi, Kou; Inoue, Yusuke; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2006-01-01

    We have been developing an implantable battery system using three series-connected lithium ion batteries having an energy capacity of 1,800 mAh to drive an undulation pump left ventricular assist device. However, the lithium ion battery undergoes an exothermic reaction during the discharge phase, and the temperature rise of the lithium ion battery is a critical issue for implantation usage. Heat generation in the lithium ion battery depends on the intensity of the discharge current, and we obtained a relationship between the heat flow from the lithium ion battery q(c)(I) and the intensity of the discharge current I as q(c)(I) = 0.63 x I (W) in in vitro experiments. The temperature distribution of the implantable battery system was estimated by means of three-dimentional finite-element method (FEM) heat transfer analysis using the heat flow function q(c)(I), and we also measured the temperature rise of the implantable battery system in in vitro experiments to conduct verification of the estimation. The maximum temperatures of the lithium ion battery and the implantable battery case were measured as 52.2 degrees C and 41.1 degrees C, respectively. The estimated result of temperature distribution of the implantable battery system agreed well with the measured results using thermography. In conclusion, FEM heat transfer analysis is promising as a tool to estimate the temperature of the implantable lithium ion battery system under any pump current without the need for animal experiments, and it is a convenient tool for optimization of heat transfer characteristics of the implantable battery system.

  11. Non-gassing nickel-cadmium battery electrodes and cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luksha, E.; Gordy, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    The concept of a negative limited nongassing nickel-cadmium battery was demonstrated by constructing and testing practical size experimental cells of approximately 25 Ah capacity. These batteries operated in a gas-free manner and had measured energy densities of 10-11 Wh/lb. Thirty cells were constructed for extensive testing. Some small cells were tested for over 200 cycles at 100% depth. For example, a small cell with an electrodeposited cadmium active mass on a silver screen still had 55% of its theoretical capacity (initial efficiency was 85%). There was no evidence of deterioration of gassing properties with cycling of the nickel electrodes. The charge temperature was observed to be the most critical variable governing nickel electrode gassing. This variable was shown to be age dependent. Four types of cadmium electrodes were tested: an electrodeposited cadmium active mass on a cadmium or silver substrate, a porous sintered silver substrate based electrode, and a Teflon bonded pressed cadmium electrode. The electrodeposited cadmium mass on a silver screen was found to be the best all-around electrode from a performance point of view and from the point of view of manufacturing them in a size required for a 25 Ah size battery.

  12. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-06-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g-1) with 600 mAh g-1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions.

  13. Handbook of Battery Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besenhard, J. O.

    1999-04-01

    Batteries find their applications in an increasing range of every-day products: discmen, mobile phones and electric cars need very different battery types. This handbook gives a concise survey about the materials used in modern battery technology. The physico-chemical fundamentals are as well treated as are the environmental and recycling aspects. It will be a profound reference source for anyone working in the research and development of new battery systems, regardless if chemist, physicist or engineer.

  14. Study of bipolar batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, J. E.

    1984-06-01

    The status of development of bipolar batteries with an aqueous electrolyte was determined. Included in the study were lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, nickel-zinc, nickel-iron, and nickel-hydrogen batteries. The technical and patent literature is reviewed and a bibliography covering the past 15 years is presented. Literature data are supplemented by a survey of organizations. The principal interest was in bipolar lead-acid batteries and more recently in bipolar nickel-hydrogen batteries for space applications.

  15. Prelithiation of silicon-carbon nanotube anodes for lithium ion batteries by stabilized lithium metal powder (SLMP).

    PubMed

    Forney, Michael W; Ganter, Matthew J; Staub, Jason W; Ridgley, Richard D; Landi, Brian J

    2013-09-11

    Stabilized lithium metal powder (SLMP) has been applied during battery assembly to effectively prelithiate high capacity (1500-2500 mAh/g) silicon-carbon nanotube (Si-CNT) anodes, eliminating the 20-40% first cycle irreversible capacity loss. Pressure-activation of SLMP is shown to enhance prelithiation and enable capacity matching between Si-CNT anodes and lithium nickel cobalt aluminum oxide (NCA) cathodes in full batteries with minimal added mass. The prelithiation approach enables high energy density NCA/Si-CNT batteries achieving >1000 cycles at 20% depth-of-discharge.

  16. Online Parameterization of Lumped Thermal Dynamics in Cylindrical Lithium Ion Batteries for Core Temperature Estimation and Health Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to validate the de- signed parameterization scheme. A 2.3Ah A123TM 26650 LiFePO4 /graphite battery is cycled with a BitrodeTM...management strategy. The type of battery used in the experiment ( LiFePO4 26650) is different from the one in Fig. 3. Schematics of the Flow Chamber [23...of a cylindrical lifepo4 /graphite lithium-ion battery,” Journal of Power Sources, vol. 195, pp. 2961–2968, 2010. [9] C. W. Park and A. K. Jaura

  17. Electric Vehicle Battery Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    A serious drawback to electric vehicles [batteries only] is the idle time needed to recharge their batteries. In this challenge, students can develop ideas and concepts for battery change-out at automotive service stations. Such a capability would extend the range of electric vehicles.

  18. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which a flexible diaphragm sealing elements respectively engage opposite sides of a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  19. Aerospace Nickel-cadmium Cell Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.; Strawn, D. Michael; Hall, Stephen W.

    2001-01-01

    During the early years of satellites, NASA successfully flew "NASA-Standard" nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) cells manufactured by GE/Gates/SAFF on a variety of spacecraft. In 1992 a NASA Battery Review Board determined that the strategy of a NASA Standard Cell and Battery Specification and the accompanying NASA control of a standard manufacturing control document (MCD) for Ni-Cd cells and batteries was unwarranted. As a result of that determination, standards were abandoned and the use of cells other than the NASA Standard was required. In order to gain insight into the performance and characteristics of the various aerospace Ni-Cd products available, tasks were initiated within the NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Program that involved the procurement and testing of representative aerospace Ni-Cd cell designs. A standard set of test conditions was established in order to provide similar information about the products from various vendors. The objective of this testing was to provide independent verification of representative commercial flight cells available in the marketplace today. This paper will provide a summary of the verification tests run on cells from various manufacturers: Sanyo 35 Ampere-hour (Ali) standard and 35 Ali advanced Ni-Cd cells, SAFr 50 Ah Ni-Cd cells and Eagle-Picher 21 Ali Magnum and 21 Ali Super Ni-CdTM cells from Eagle-Picher were put through a full evaluation. A limited number of 18 and 55 Ali cells from Acme Electric were also tested to provide an initial evaluation of the Acme aerospace cell designs. Additionally, 35 Ali aerospace design Ni-MH cells from Sanyo were evaluated under the standard conditions established for this program. Ile test program is essentially complete. The cell design parameters, the verification test plan and the details of the test result will be discussed.

  20. The inhibition of lung cancer cell migration by AhR-regulated autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chi-Hao; Li, Ching-Hao; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Lee, Chen-Chen; Liao, Po-Lin; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Shih-Hsuan; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2017-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is highly expressed in multiple organs and tissues. Whereas AhR mediates the metabolism of xenobiotic and endogenous compounds, its novel function in cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) remains controversial. Autophagy also participates in tumour progression through its functions in cell homeostasis and facilitates adaptation to EMT progression. In the present study, we found that AhR-regulated autophagy positively modulates EMT in non-small cell lung cancer cells. The motility of A549, H1299, and CL1-5 cells were correlated with different AhR expression levels. Invasive potential and cell morphology also changed when AhR protein expression was altered. Moreover, AhR levels exerted a contrasting effect on autophagy potential. Autophagy was higher in CL1-5 and H1299 cells with lower AhR levels than in A549 cells. Both AhR overexpression and autophagy inhibition decreased CL1-5 metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, AhR promoted BNIP3 ubiquitination for proteasomal degradation. AhR silencing in A549 cells also reduced BNIP3 ubiquitination. Taken together, these results provide a novel insight into the cross-linking between AhR and autophagy, we addressed the mechanistic BNIP3 modulation by endogenous AhR, which affect cancer cell EMT progression. PMID:28195146

  1. The combustion behavior of large scale lithium titanate battery

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peifeng; Wang, Qingsong; Li, Ke; Ping, Ping; Sun, Jinhua

    2015-01-01

    Safety problem is always a big obstacle for lithium battery marching to large scale application. However, the knowledge on the battery combustion behavior is limited. To investigate the combustion behavior of large scale lithium battery, three 50 Ah Li(NixCoyMnz)O2/Li4Ti5O12 batteries under different state of charge (SOC) were heated to fire. The flame size variation is depicted to analyze the combustion behavior directly. The mass loss rate, temperature and heat release rate are used to analyze the combustion behavior in reaction way deeply. Based on the phenomenon, the combustion process is divided into three basic stages, even more complicated at higher SOC with sudden smoke flow ejected. The reason is that a phase change occurs in Li(NixCoyMnz)O2 material from layer structure to spinel structure. The critical temperatures of ignition are at 112–121°C on anode tab and 139 to 147°C on upper surface for all cells. But the heating time and combustion time become shorter with the ascending of SOC. The results indicate that the battery fire hazard increases with the SOC. It is analyzed that the internal short and the Li+ distribution are the main causes that lead to the difference. PMID:25586064

  2. A Novel Potassium-Ion-Based Dual-Ion Battery.

    PubMed

    Ji, Bifa; Zhang, Fan; Song, Xiaohe; Tang, Yongbing

    2017-03-15

    In this work, combining both advantages of potassium-ion batteries and dual-ion batteries, a novel potassium-ion-based dual-ion battery (named as K-DIB) system is developed based on a potassium-ion electrolyte, using metal foil (Sn, Pb, K, or Na) as anode and expanded graphite as cathode. When using Sn foil as the anode, the K-DIB presents a high reversible capacity of 66 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 50 mA g(-1) over the voltage window of 3.0-5.0 V, and exhibits excellent long-term cycling performance with 93% capacity retention for 300 cycles. Moreover, as the Sn foil simultaneously acts as the anode material and the current collector, dead load and dead volume of the battery can be greatly reduced, thus the energy density of the K-DIB is further improved. It delivers a high energy density of 155 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 116 W kg(-1) , which is comparable with commercial lithium-ion batteries. Thus, with the advantages of environmentally friendly, cost effective, and high energy density, this K-DIB shows attractive potential for future energy storage application.

  3. The combustion behavior of large scale lithium titanate battery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peifeng; Wang, Qingsong; Li, Ke; Ping, Ping; Sun, Jinhua

    2015-01-14

    Safety problem is always a big obstacle for lithium battery marching to large scale application. However, the knowledge on the battery combustion behavior is limited. To investigate the combustion behavior of large scale lithium battery, three 50 Ah Li(Ni(x)Co(y)Mn(z))O2/Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) batteries under different state of charge (SOC) were heated to fire. The flame size variation is depicted to analyze the combustion behavior directly. The mass loss rate, temperature and heat release rate are used to analyze the combustion behavior in reaction way deeply. Based on the phenomenon, the combustion process is divided into three basic stages, even more complicated at higher SOC with sudden smoke flow ejected. The reason is that a phase change occurs in Li(Ni(x)Co(y)Mn(z))O2 material from layer structure to spinel structure. The critical temperatures of ignition are at 112-121 °C on anode tab and 139 to 147 °C on upper surface for all cells. But the heating time and combustion time become shorter with the ascending of SOC. The results indicate that the battery fire hazard increases with the SOC. It is analyzed that the internal short and the Li(+) distribution are the main causes that lead to the difference.

  4. A selective equalizer for NiMH batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hande, A.; Stuart, T. A.

    A unique method has been developed to equalize nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery packs using a new selective equalizer. This equalizer detects batteries either at a very low state of charge (SOC) or at an extremely high SOC. In this system a set of electromechanical relays is connected in a matrix to route boost current to the weaker batteries. The relay switching is controlled by a 32 bit microcontroller, and the boost current is supplied by a boost charger. Once a weak battery is detected, it is scheduled for a specific boost time by a special "Round Robin" (RR) algorithm. The equalizer was tested on a pack of 12 series connected 12 V 93 ampere hour (Ah) NiMH batteries. Test results show that the equalizer was able to re-balance an artificially unbalanced pack, and the capacity was increased by 27% within six charge-discharge cycles. Results indicate the number of cycles required to re-balance the pack was significantly reduced by using this technique.

  5. A novel non-aqueous aluminum sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Gil; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2015-06-01

    An aluminum-sulfur battery comprised of a composite sulfur cathode, aluminum anode and an ionic liquid electrolyte of AlCl3/1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride is described. The electrochemical reduction of elemental sulfur has been studied in different molar ratios of the electrolyte, and aluminum tetrachloride ions have been identified at the electroactive ionic species. The Al/S battery exhibits a discharge voltage plateau of 1.1-1.2 V, with extremely high charge storage capacity of more than 1500 mAh g-1, relative to the mass of sulfur in the cathode. The energy density of the Al/S cell is estimated to be 1700 Wh kg-1 sulfur, which is competitive with the most attractive battery chemistries targeted for high-energy electrochemical storage. Characterization by means of SEM, XRD and XPS of the battery components reveal complete dissolution of sulfur-based discharge products to the electrolyte. The low cost, natural abundance and high volumetric energy density of both anode and cathode materials define a research path for new materials and cell designs for next-generation Al/S battery systems.

  6. Nanoparticle iron-phosphate anode material for Li-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Dongyeon; Kim, Eunjin; Kim, Tae-Gon; Kim, Min Gyu; Cho, Jaephil; Park, Byungwoo

    2004-12-01

    Nanoparticle crystalline iron phosphates (FePO4•2H2O and FePO4) were synthesized using a (CTAB) surfactant as an anode material for Li rechargeable batteries. The electrochemical properties of the nanoparticle iron phosphates were characterized with a voltage window of 2.4-0 V. A variscite orthorhombic FePO4•2H2O showed a large initial charge capacity of 609mAh/g. On the other hand, a tridymite triclinic FePO4 exhibited excellent cyclability: the capacity retention up to 30 cycles was ˜80%, from 485 to 375mAh/g. The iron phosphate anodes exhibited the highest reported capacity, while the cathode LiFePO4 has an ideal capacity of 170mAh/g.

  7. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy.

  8. Silicon Carbide Radioisotope Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, George C.

    2005-01-01

    The substantial radiation resistance and large bandgap of SiC semiconductor materials makes them an attractive candidate for application in a high efficiency, long life radioisotope battery. To evaluate their potential in this application, simulated batteries were constructed using SiC diodes and the alpha particle emitter Americium Am-241 or the beta particle emitter Promethium Pm-147. The Am-241 based battery showed high initial power output and an initial conversion efficiency of approximately 16%, but the power output decayed 52% in 500 hours due to radiation damage. In contrast the Pm-147 based battery showed a similar power output level and an initial conversion efficiency of approximately 0.6%, but no degradation was observed in 500 hours. However, the Pm-147 battery required approximately 1000 times the particle fluence as the Am-242 battery to achieve a similar power output. The advantages and disadvantages of each type of battery and suggestions for future improvements will be discussed.

  9. A magnesium–sodium hybrid battery with high operating voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hui; Li, Yifei; Liang, Yanliang; Li, Guosheng; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Ren, Yang; Lu, Yuhao; Yao, Yan

    2016-06-10

    We report a high performance magnesium-sodium hybrid battery utilizing a magnesium-sodium dual-salt electrolyte, a magnesium anode, and a Berlin green cathode. The cell delivers an average discharge voltage of 2.2 V and a reversible capacity of 143 mAh g-1. We also demonstrate the cell with an energy density of 135 Wh kg-1 and a high power density of up to 1.67 kW kg-1.

  10. Development of sintered fiber nickel electrodes for aerospace batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Francisco, J.; Chiappetti, D.; Brill, J.

    1997-12-01

    The nickel electrode is the specific energy limiting component in nickel battery systems. A concerted effort is currently underway to improve NiH{sub 2} performance while decreasing system cost. Increased performance with electrode specific energy (mAh/g) is the major goal of this effort. However, cost reduction is also an important part of the overall program, achieved by reducing the electrode weight. A lightweight, high energy density nickel electrode is being developed based on a highly porous, sintered fiber, nickel substrate. This developing technology has many applications, but is highly applicable to the military and aerospace industries.

  11. Development of Sintered Fiber Nickel Electrodes for Aerospace Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francisco, Jennifer; Chiappetti, Dennis; Brill, Jack

    1997-01-01

    The nickel electrode is the specific energy limiting component in nickel battery systems. A concerted effort is currently underway to improve NiH2 performance while decreasing system cost. Increased performance with electrode specific energy (mAh/g) is the major goal of this effort. However, cost reduction is also an important part of the overall program, achieved by reducing the electrode weight. A lightweight, high energy density, nickel electrode is being, developed based on a highly porous, sintered fiber, nickel substrate. This developing technology has many applications, but is highly, applicable to the military and aerospace industries.

  12. Comparing introduction to Europe of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses A(H5N8) in 2014 and A(H5N1) in 2005.

    PubMed

    Adlhoch, C; Gossner, C; Koch, G; Brown, I; Bouwstra, R; Verdonck, F; Penttinen, P; Harder, T

    2014-12-18

    Since the beginning of November 2014, nine outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) A(H5N8) in poultry have been detected in four European countries. In this report, similarities and differences between the modes of introduction of HPAIV A(H5N1) and A(H5N8) into Europe are described. Experiences from outbreaks of A(H5N1) in Europe demonstrated that early detection to control HPAIV in poultry has proven pivotal to minimise the risk of zoonotic transmission and prevention of human cases.

  13. Increasing round trip efficiency of hybrid Li-air battery with bifunctional catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K; Li, YF; Xing, YC

    2013-07-30

    Previously it was shown that Pt as cathode catalyst ha's a large overpotential during charge in rechargeable hybrid Li-air battery with sulfuric acid catholyte. This article demonstrates that a bifunctional catalyst composed of Pt and IrO2 supported on carbon nanotubes can address this problem. The specially designed and synthesized bifunctional catalyst showed significant overpotential reduction and achieved a round trip energy efficiency of 81% after 10 cycles, higher than many achieved in aprotic Li-O-2 batteries. The hybrid Li-air battery was discharged and recharged for 20 cycles at 0.2 mA/cm(2), showing a fairly stable cell performance. A specific capacity of 306 mAh/g and a specific energy of 1110 Wh/kg were obtained for the hybrid Li-air battery in terms of acid weight. (c) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Time domain simulation of Li-ion batteries using non-integer order equivalent electrical circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riu, D.; Montaru, M.; Bultel, Y.

    2013-06-01

    For electric vehicle (EV) or hybrid EV (HEV) development and integration of renewables in electrical networks, battery monitoring systems have to be more and more precise to take into account the state-of-charge and the dynamic behavior of the battery. Some non-integer order models of electrochemical batteries have been proposed in literacy with a good accuracy and a low number of parameters in the frequential domain. Nevertheless, time simulation of such models required to approximate this non-integer order system by an equivalent high integer order model. An adapted algorithm is then proposed in this article to simulate the non-integer order model without any approximation, thanks to the construction of a 3-order generalized state-space system. This algorithm is applied and validated on a 2.3 A.h Li-ion battery.

  15. Magnet Design and Analysis of a 40 Tesla Long Pulse System Energized by a Battery Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Y. L.; Peng, T.; Wang, G. B.; Ding, T. H.; Han, X. T.; Pan, Y.; Li, L.

    2013-03-01

    A 40 tesla long pulse magnet and a battery bank as the power supply have been designed. This is now under construction at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. The 22 mm bore magnet will generate smooth pulses with duration 1 s and rise time 0.5 s. The battery bank consists of 945 12V/200 Ah lead-acid battery cells. The magnet and battery bank were optimized by codes developed in-house and by ANSYS. The coil was made from soft copper with internal reinforcement by fiber-epoxy composite; it is divided into two sections connected in series. The inner section consists of helix coils with each layer reinforced by Zylon composite. The outer section will be wound from copper sheet and externally reinforced by carbon fiber composite.

  16. Flagellar filament bio-templated inorganic oxide materials - towards an efficient lithium battery anode.

    PubMed

    Beznosov, Sergei N; Veluri, Pavan S; Pyatibratov, Mikhail G; Chatterjee, Abhijit; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Fedorov, Oleg V; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-13

    Designing a new generation of energy-intensive and sustainable electrode materials for batteries to power a variety of applications is an imperative task. The use of biomaterials as a nanosized structural template for these materials has the potential to produce hitherto unachievable structures. In this report, we have used genetically modified flagellar filaments of the extremely halophilic archaea species Halobacterium salinarum to synthesize nanostructured iron oxide composites for use as a lithium-ion battery anode. The electrode demonstrated a superior electrochemical performance compared to existing literature results, with good capacity retention of 1032 mAh g(-1) after 50 cycles and with high rate capability, delivering 770 mAh g(-1) at 5 A g(-1) (~5 C) discharge rate. This unique flagellar filament based template has the potential to provide access to other highly structured advanced energy materials in the future.

  17. Preparation and performance of a sulfur/graphene composite for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feifei; Dong, Yunhui; Huang, Yun; Huang, Gang; Zhang, Xinbo; Wang, Limin

    2012-01-01

    The lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising electrochemical system that has high theoretical capacity. The sulfur/graphene nanosheets (S/GNS) composite is prepared through thermal reduction between the sulfur (S) and graphene oxide (GO). The morphology and composition of the composite are analyzed by means of x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) characterization. It is found that the element S distributed uniformly between the layers of GNS. Graphene with a two-dimensional structure of carbon atoms is employed as a conductive and absorbing agent for the S cathode materials of rechargeable Li-S battery. The S/GNS composite cathode shows a specific electrochemical capacity, which is about 1598 mAh g-1 S at the initial discharge and remains above 670 mAh g-1 after 80 cycles.

  18. Carbon treated commercial aluminium alloys as anodes for aluminium-air batteries in sodium chloride electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, M.; Herranz, D.; Chacón, J.; Fatás, E.; Ocón, P.

    2016-09-01

    An easy treatment based in carbon layer deposition into aluminium alloys is presented to enhance the performance of Al-air primary batteries with neutral pH electrolyte. The jellification of aluminate in the anode surface is described and avoided by the carbon covering. Treated commercial Al alloys namely Al1085 and Al7475 are tested as anodes achieving specific capacities above 1.2 Ah g-1vs 0.5 Ah g-1 without carbon covering. The influence of the binder proportion in the treatment as well as different carbonaceous materials, Carbon Black, Graphene and Pyrolytic Graphite are evaluated as candidates for the covering. Current densities of 1-10 mA cm-2 are measured and the influence of the alloy explored. A final battery design of 4 cells in series is presented for discharges with a voltage plateau of 2 V and 1 Wh g-1 energy density.

  19. Flagellar filament bio-templated inorganic oxide materials - towards an efficient lithium battery anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznosov, Sergei N.; Veluri, Pavan S.; Pyatibratov, Mikhail G.; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Macfarlane, Douglas R.; Fedorov, Oleg V.; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Designing a new generation of energy-intensive and sustainable electrode materials for batteries to power a variety of applications is an imperative task. The use of biomaterials as a nanosized structural template for these materials has the potential to produce hitherto unachievable structures. In this report, we have used genetically modified flagellar filaments of the extremely halophilic archaea species Halobacterium salinarum to synthesize nanostructured iron oxide composites for use as a lithium-ion battery anode. The electrode demonstrated a superior electrochemical performance compared to existing literature results, with good capacity retention of 1032 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles and with high rate capability, delivering 770 mAh g-1 at 5 A g-1 (~5 C) discharge rate. This unique flagellar filament based template has the potential to provide access to other highly structured advanced energy materials in the future.

  20. Flagellar filament bio-templated inorganic oxide materials – towards an efficient lithium battery anode

    PubMed Central

    Beznosov, Sergei N.; Veluri, Pavan S.; Pyatibratov, Mikhail G.; Chatterjee, Abhijit; MacFarlane, Douglas R.; Fedorov, Oleg V.; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Designing a new generation of energy-intensive and sustainable electrode materials for batteries to power a variety of applications is an imperative task. The use of biomaterials as a nanosized structural template for these materials has the potential to produce hitherto unachievable structures. In this report, we have used genetically modified flagellar filaments of the extremely halophilic archaea species Halobacterium salinarum to synthesize nanostructured iron oxide composites for use as a lithium-ion battery anode. The electrode demonstrated a superior electrochemical performance compared to existing literature results, with good capacity retention of 1032 mAh g−1 after 50 cycles and with high rate capability, delivering 770 mAh g−1 at 5 A g−1 (~5 C) discharge rate. This unique flagellar filament based template has the potential to provide access to other highly structured advanced energy materials in the future. PMID:25583370

  1. 29 CFR 1926.441 - Batteries and battery charging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Batteries and battery charging. 1926.441 Section 1926.441... for Special Equipment § 1926.441 Batteries and battery charging. (a) General requirements—(1) Batteries of the unsealed type shall be located in enclosures with outside vents or in well ventilated...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.441 - Batteries and battery charging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Batteries and battery charging. 1926.441 Section 1926.441... for Special Equipment § 1926.441 Batteries and battery charging. (a) General requirements—(1) Batteries of the unsealed type shall be located in enclosures with outside vents or in well ventilated...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.441 - Batteries and battery charging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Batteries and battery charging. 1926.441 Section 1926.441... for Special Equipment § 1926.441 Batteries and battery charging. (a) General requirements—(1) Batteries of the unsealed type shall be located in enclosures with outside vents or in well ventilated...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.441 - Batteries and battery charging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Batteries and battery charging. 1926.441 Section 1926.441... for Special Equipment § 1926.441 Batteries and battery charging. (a) General requirements—(1) Batteries of the unsealed type shall be located in enclosures with outside vents or in well ventilated...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.441 - Batteries and battery charging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Batteries and battery charging. 1926.441 Section 1926.441... for Special Equipment § 1926.441 Batteries and battery charging. (a) General requirements—(1) Batteries of the unsealed type shall be located in enclosures with outside vents or in well ventilated...

  6. Optimized Operating Range for Large-Format LiFePO4/Graphite Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jiuchun; Shi, Wei; Zheng, Jianming; Zuo, Pengjian; Xiao, Jie; Chen, Xilin; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-06-01

    e investigated the long-term cycling performance of large format 20Ah LiFePO4/graphite batteries when they are cycled in various state-of-charge (SOC) ranges. It is found that batteries cycled in the medium SOC range (ca. 20~80% SOC) exhibit superior cycling stability than batteries cycled at both ends (0-20% or 80-100%) of the SOC even though the capcity utilized in the medium SOC range is three times as large as those cycled at both ends of the SOC. Several non-destructive techniques, including a voltage interruption approach, model-based parameter identification, electrode impedance spectra analysis, ΔQ/ΔV analysis, and entropy change test, were used to investigate the performance of LiFePO4/graphite batteries within different SOC ranges. The results reveal that batteries at the ends of SOC exhibit much higher polarization impedance than those at the medium SOC range. These results can be attributed to the significant structural change of cathode and anode materials as revealed by the large entropy change within these ranges. The direct correlation between the polarization impedance and the cycle life of the batteries provides an effective methodology for battery management systems to control and prolong the cycle life of LiFePO4/graphite and other batteries.

  7. Understanding the Effects of Electrode Formulation on the Mechanical Strength of Composite Electrodes for Flexible Batteries.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Abhinav M; Arias, Ana Claudia

    2017-02-22

    Flexible lithium-ion batteries are necessary for powering the next generation of wearable electronic devices. In most designs, the mechanical flexibility of the battery is improved by reducing the thickness of the active layers, which in turn reduces the areal capacity and energy density of the battery. The performance of a battery depends on the electrode composition, and in most flexible batteries, standard electrode formulation is used, which is not suitable for flexing. Even with considerable efforts made toward the development of flexible lithium-ion batteries, the formulation of the electrodes has received very little attention. In this study, we investigate the relation between the electrode formulation and the mechanical strength of the electrodes. Peel and drag tests are used to compare the adhesion and cohesion strength of the electrodes. The strength of an electrode is sensitive to the particle size and the choice of polymeric binder. By optimizing the electrode composition, we were able to fabricate a high areal capacity (∼2 mAh/cm(2)) flexible lithium-ion battery with conventional metal-based current collectors that shows superior electrochemical and mechanical performance in comparison to that of batteries with standard composition.

  8. Characterization of large format lithium ion battery exposed to extremely high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xuning; Sun, Jing; Ouyang, Minggao; He, Xiangming; Lu, Languang; Han, Xuebing; Fang, Mou; Peng, Huei

    2014-12-01

    This paper provides a study on the characterizations of large format lithium ion battery cells exposed to extreme high temperature but without thermal runaway. A unique test is set up: an extended volume-accelerating rate calorimetry (EV-ARC) test is terminated at a specific temperature before thermal runaway happens in the battery. The battery was cooled down after an EV-ARC test with early termination. The performances of the battery before and after the EV-ARC test are investigated in detail. The results show that (a) the melting point of the separator dictates the reusability of the 25 Ah NCM battery after a near-runaway event. The battery cannot be reused after being heated to 140 °C or higher because of the exponential rise in ohmic resistance; (b) a battery can lose up to 20% of its capacity after being heated to 120 °C just one time; (c) if a battery is cycled after a thermal event, its lost capacity may be recovered partially. Furthermore, the fading and recovery mechanisms are analyzed by incremental capacity analysis (ICA) and a prognostic/mechanistic model. Model analysis confirms that the capacity loss at extremely high temperature is caused by the increase of the resistance, the loss of lithium ion (LLI) at the anode and the loss of active material (LAM) at the cathode.

  9. Modeling and simulation of the zinc-nickel single flow batteries based on MATLAB/Simulink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shouguang; Liao, Peng; Xiao, Min; Cheng, Jie; He, Ke

    2016-12-01

    Based on the working principle of the zinc-nickel single flow batteries (ZNBs), this paper builds the electrochemical model and mechanical model, analyzes the effect of electrolyte flux on the battery performance and obtains a single cell with a 216 Ah charge-discharge capacity as an example, and thereafter conducts a simulation to obtain several results under the condition of constant current charge and discharge. The simulation results are well matched in comparison with the experimental results. An optimal flux exists during the charge and discharge, which indicates that the model can well simulate the charge and discharge characteristics of the ZNBs under the condition of constant current.

  10. A high performance hybrid battery based on aluminum anode and LiFePO4 cathode

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Bi, Zhonghe; Liu, Hansan; ...

    2015-12-07

    A unique battery hybrid utilizes an aluminum anode, a LiFePO4 cathode and an acidic ionic liquid electrolyte based on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMImCl) and aluminum trichloride (AlCl 3) (EMImCl-AlCl 3, 1-1.1 in molar ratio) with or without LiAlCl4 is proposed. This hybrid ion battery delivers an initial high capacity of 160 mAh g-1 at a current rate of C/5. It also shows good rate capability and cycling performance.

  11. Design of a Battery Intermediate Storage System for Rep-Rated Pulsed Power Loads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    will be charged with a bank of LiFePO4 batteries in conjunction with a DC-DC converter. During discharge, the batteries will generate heat from the...able to use typical wall power. High power electrochemical cells will be used as the prime power source and emerging technologies such as LiFePO4 ...LFP26650 LiFePO4 cells connected in series [1]. Each cell has a capacity of roughly 2.6Ah, has an approximate internal resistance of 9mΩ, and a

  12. Carbonized-leaf Membrane with Anisotropic Surfaces for Sodium-ion Battery.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbian; Shen, Fei; Luo, Wei; Dai, Jiaqi; Han, Xiaogang; Chen, Yanan; Yao, Yonggang; Zhu, Hongli; Fu, Kun; Hitz, Emily; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-01-27

    A simple one-step thermal pyrolysis route has been developed to prepare carbon membrane from a natural leaf. The carbonized leaf membrane possesses anisotropic surfaces and internal hierarchical porosity, exhibiting a high specific capacity of 360 mAh/g and a high initial Coulombic efficiency of 74.8% as a binder-free, current-collector-free anode for rechargeable sodium ion batteries. Moreover, large-area carbon membranes with low contact resistance are fabricated by simply stacking and carbonizing leaves, a promising strategy toward large-scale sodium-ion battery developments.

  13. Carbyne polysulfide as a novel cathode material for rechargeable magnesium batteries.

    PubMed

    NuLi, Yanna; Chen, Qiang; Wang, Weikun; Wang, Ying; Yang, Jun; Wang, Jiulin

    2014-01-01

    We report the formation of carbyne polysulfide by coheating carbon containing carbyne moieties and elemental sulfur. The product is proved to have a sp2 hybrid carbon skeleton with polysulfide attached on it. The electrochemical performance of carbyne polysulfide as a novel cathode material for rechargeable magnesium batteries is firstly investigated. The material exhibits a high discharge capacity of 327.7 mAh g(-1) at 3.9 mA g(-1). These studies show that carbyne polysulfide is a promising candidate as cathode material for rechargeable Mg batteries if the capacity retention can be significantly improved.

  14. Charge–discharge properties of tin dioxide for sodium-ion battery

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jinsoo; Park, Jin-Woo; Han, Jeong-Hui; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Ki-Young; Ryu, Ho-Suk; Kim, Ki-Won; Wang, Guoxiu; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Ahn, Hyo-Jun

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The electrochemical reaction of SnO2 as an anode for Na-ion batteries was studied. • The SnO2 electrode delivered the initial discharge capacity of 747 mAh/g. • Alarge irreversible capacity (597 mAh/g)was observedin the first cycle. • The in-plain crack in the electrode caused the incompletereduction of SnO{sub 2}. - Abstract: Tin dioxide was investigated as an anode material for sodium-ion batteries. The Na/SnO{sub 2} cell delivered a first discharge capacity of 747 mAh/g, but the first charge capacity was 150 mAh/g. The irreversible capacity in the first cycle was examined through characterization by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the SnO{sub 2} active material was not reduced fully to metallic Sn. Furrows and wrinkles were formed on the electrode surface owing to the volumetric expansion upon first discharge, which led to a deterioration of the electrode structure and a loss of electrical contact between the active materials. The analysis is summarized in the schematic drawing.

  15. Polysulfide-Scission Reagents for the Suppression of the Shuttle Effect in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Hua, Wuxing; Yang, Zhi; Nie, Huagui; Li, Zhongyu; Yang, Jizhang; Guo, Zeqing; Ruan, Chunping; Chen, Xi'an; Huang, Shaoming

    2017-02-28

    Lithium-sulfur batteries have become an appealing candidate for next-generation energy-storage technologies because of their low cost and high energy density. However, one of their major practical problems is the high solubility of long-chain lithium polysulfides and their infamous shuttle effect, which causes low Coulombic efficiency and sulfur loss. Here, we introduced a concept involving the dithiothreitol (DTT) assisted scission of polysulfides into lithium-sulfur system. Our designed porous carbon nanotube/S cathode coupling with a lightweight graphene/DTT interlayer (PCNTs-S@Gra/DTT) exhibited ultrahigh cycle-ability even at 5 C over 1100 cycles, with a capacity degradation rate of 0.036% per cycle. Additionally, the PCNTs-S@Gra/DTT electrode with a 3.51 mg cm(-2) sulfur mass loading delivered a high initial areal capacity of 5.29 mAh cm(-2) (1509 mAh g(-1)) at current density of 0.58 mA cm(-2), and the reversible areal capacity of the cell was maintained at 3.45 mAh cm(-2) (984 mAh g(-1)) over 200 cycles at a higher current density of 1.17 mA cm(-2). Employing this molecule scission principle offers a promising avenue to achieve high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries.

  16. Conductive Polymer-Coated VS4 Submicrospheres As Advanced Electrode Materials in Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanli; Li, Yanlu; Yang, Jing; Tian, Jian; Xu, Huayun; Yang, Jian; Fan, Weiliu

    2016-07-27

    VS4 as an electrode material in lithium-ion batteries holds intriguing features like high content of sulfur and one-dimensional structure, inspiring the exploration in this field. Herein, VS4 submicrospheres have been synthesized via a simple solvothermal reaction. However, they quickly degrade upon cycling as an anode material in lithium-ion batteries. So, three conductive polymers, polythiophene (PEDOT), polypyrrole (PPY), and polyaniline (PANI), are coated on the surface to improve the electron conductivity, suppress the diffusion of polysulfides, and modify the interface between electrode/electrolyte. PANI is the best in the polymers. It improves the Coulombic efficiency to 86% for the first cycle and keeps the specific capacity at 755 mAh g(-1) after 50 cycles, higher than the cases of naked VS4 (100 mAh g(-1)), VS4@PEDOT (318 mAh g(-1)), and VS4@PPY (448 mAh g(-1)). The good performances could be attributed to the improved charge-transfer kinetics and the strong interaction between PANI and VS4 supported by theoretical simulation. The discharge voltage ∼2.0 V makes them promising cathode materials.

  17. High-density sodium and lithium ion battery anodes from banana peels.

    PubMed

    Lotfabad, Elmira Memarzadeh; Ding, Jia; Cui, Kai; Kohandehghan, Alireza; Kalisvaart, W Peter; Hazelton, Michael; Mitlin, David

    2014-07-22

    Banana peel pseudographite (BPPG) offers superb dual functionality for sodium ion battery (NIB) and lithium ion battery (LIB) anodes. The materials possess low surface areas (19-217 m(2) g(-1)) and a relatively high electrode packing density (0.75 g cm(-3) vs ∼1 g cm(-3) for graphite). Tested against Na, BPPG delivers a gravimetric (and volumetric) capacity of 355 mAh g(-1) (by active material ∼700 mAh cm(-3), by electrode volume ∼270 mAh cm(-3)) after 10 cycles at 50 mA g(-1). A nearly flat ∼200 mAh g(-1) plateau that is below 0.1 V and a minimal charge/discharge voltage hysteresis make BPPG a direct electrochemical analogue to graphite but with Na. A charge capacity of 221 mAh g(-1) at 500 mA g(-1) is degraded by 7% after 600 cycles, while a capacity of 336 mAh g(-1) at 100 mAg(-1) is degraded by 11% after 300 cycles, in both cases with ∼100% cycling Coulombic efficiency. For LIB applications BPPG offers a gravimetric (volumetric) capacity of 1090 mAh g(-1) (by material ∼2200 mAh cm(-3), by electrode ∼900 mAh cm(-3)) at 50 mA g(-1). The reason that BPPG works so well for both NIBs and LIBs is that it uniquely contains three essential features: (a) dilated intergraphene spacing for Na intercalation at low voltages; (b) highly accessible near-surface nanopores for Li metal filling at low voltages; and (c) substantial defect content in the graphene planes for Li adsorption at higher voltages. The <0.1 V charge storage mechanism is fundamentally different for Na versus for Li. A combination of XRD and XPS demonstrates highly reversible Na intercalation rather than metal underpotential deposition. By contrast, the same analysis proves the presence of metallic Li in the pores, with intercalation being much less pronounced.

  18. Role of Nitrogen Doped Graphene for Improved High Capacity Potassium Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Share, Keith; Cohn, Adam P; Carter, Rachel; Rogers, Bridget; Pint, Cary L

    2016-10-09

    Potassium is an earth abundant alternative to lithium for rechargeable batteries, but a critical limitation in potassium ion battery anodes is the low capacity of KC8 graphite intercalation compounds in comparison to conventional LiC6. Here we demonstrate that nitrogen doping of few-layered graphene can increase the storage capacity of potassium from a theoretical maximum of 278 mAh/g in graphite to over 350 mAh/g, competitive with anode capacity in commercial lithium-ion batteries and the highest reported anode capacity so far for potassium ion batteries. Control studies distinguish the importance of nitrogen dopant sites as opposed to sp3 carbon defect sites to achieve the improved performance, which also enables > 6X increase in rate performance of doped versus undoped materials. Finally, in-situ Raman spectroscopy studies elucidate the staging sequence for doped and undoped materials and demonstrate the mechanism of the observed capacity enhancement to be correlated with distributed storage at local nitrogen sites in a staged KC8 compound. This study demonstrates a pathway to overcome the limitations of graphitic carbons for anodes in potassium ion batteries by atomically precise engineering of nanomaterials.

  19. Improving lithium-ion battery performances by adding fly ash from coal combustion on cathode film

    SciTech Connect

    Dyartanti, Endah Retno; Jumari, Arif Nur, Adrian; Purwanto, Agus

    2016-02-08

    A lithium battery is composed of anode, cathode and a separator. The performance of lithium battery is also influenced by the conductive material of cathode film. In this research, the use of fly ash from coal combustion as conductive enhancer for increasing the performances of lithium battery was investigated. Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO{sub 4}) was used as the active material of cathode. The dry fly ash passed through 200 mesh screen, LiFePO{sub 4} and acethylene black (AB), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a binder and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent were mixed to form slurry. The slurry was then coated, dried and hot pressed to obtain the cathode film. The ratio of fly ash and AB were varied at the values of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5% while the other components were at constant. The anode film was casted with certain thickness and composition. The performance of battery lithium was examined by Eight Channel Battery Analyzer, the composition of the cathode film was examined by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), and the structure and morphology of the anode film was analyzed by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). The composition, structure and morphology of cathode film was only different when fly ash added was 4% of AB or more. The addition of 2% of AB on cathode film gave the best performance of 81.712 mAh/g on charging and 79.412 mAh/g on discharging.

  20. All-Solid-State Textile Batteries Made from Nano-Emulsion Conducting Polymer Inks for Wearable Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Di; Cotton, Darryl; Ryhänen, Tapani

    2012-01-01

    A rollable and all-solid-state textile lithium battery based on fabric matrix and polymer electrolyte that allows flexibility and fast-charging capability is reported. When immerged into poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nano-emulsion inks, an insulating fabric is converted into a conductive battery electrode for a fully solid state lithium battery with the highest specific energy capacity of 68 mAh/g. This is superior to most of the solid-state conducting polymer primary and/or secondary batteries reported. The bending radius of such a textile battery is less than 1.5 mm while lightening up an LED. This new material combination and inherent flexibility is well suited to provide an energy source for future wearable and woven electronics. PMID:28348307

  1. 3D Interconnected Electrode Materials with Ultrahigh Areal Sulfur Loading for Li-S Batteries.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruopian; Zhao, Shiyong; Hou, Pengxiang; Cheng, Min; Wang, Shaogang; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Liu, Chang; Li, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Sulfur electrodes based on a 3D integrated hollow carbon fiber foam (HCFF) are synthesized with high sulfur loadings of 6.2-21.2 mg cm(-2) . Benefiting from the high electrolyte absorbability of the HCFF and the multiple conductive channels, the obtained electrode demonstrates excellent cycling stability and a high areal capacity of 23.32 mAh cm(-2) , showing great promise in commercially viable Li-S batteries.

  2. Design and test of a 100 ampere-hour nickel cadmium battery module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaston, S.; Wertheim, M.; Burgess, F. S.; Lehrfeld, D.; Winegard, A.

    1973-01-01

    A feasibility study was conducted on the design and construction of a flight-worthy replaceable battery module consisting of four 100 A.H. nickel-cadmium rechargeable cells for large manned space vehicles. The module is planned to weigh less than 43 pounds and be fully maintainable in a zero-g environment by one man without use of special tools. An active environmental control system was designed for the temperature control of the module.

  3. Optimization of mesoporous carbon structures for lithium–sulfur battery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaolin; Cao, Yuliang; Qi, Wen N.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Xiao, Jie; Nie, Zimin; Mietek, Jaroniec; Zhang, Jiguang; Schwenzer, Birgit; Liu, Jun

    2011-11-07

    Mesoporous carbon (MC) with tunable pore sizes (22nm, 12nm, 7nm, and 3nm) and pore volumes (from 1.3 to 4.8 cc/g) containing sulfur inside the pores were systematically studied as mesoporous carbon-sulfur (MCS) composite electrodes for Li-S batteries. Investigation on these MCS composites reveals that the pore structure has no influence on the battery performance at full sulfur loading conditions (the pore volume is fully filled by sulfur) but the maximum sulfur loading capability is higher for MC with larger pore volume. MC with large pore volumes, partial sulfur filling (part of the pore volume left unfilled), and surface modification, can have reasonably high sulfur loading, improved electrical and ionic contacts of sulfur with MC and with electrolytes, which subsequently promotes the battery performance. An initial capacity of ~1250 mAh/g (based on sulfur) and 650 mAh/g capacity retention over 100 cycles were obtained with 50 wt% sulfur loading in the MC with 22nm pore size (4.8 cc/g). When the surface of MCS was coated with Clevios P to reduce the dissolve of polysulfide anions in electrolytes, it exhibits a high initial discharge capacity of ~1390 mAh/g and improved cycling stability with capacity retention of ~840 mAh/g over 100 cycles. The reported correlation among the structure, sulfur filling, surface modification and the electrochemical performance of the MCS composite cathodes provides guidance in designing new electrodes for lithium-sulfur batteries

  4. Electric-vehicle batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oman, Henry; Gross, Sid

    1995-02-01

    Electric vehicles that can't reach trolley wires need batteries. In the early 1900's electric cars disappeared when owners found that replacing the car's worn-out lead-acid battery costs more than a new gasoline-powered car. Most of today's electric cars are still propelled by lead-acid batteries. General Motors in their prototype Impact, for example, used starting-lighting-ignition batteries, which deliver lots of power for demonstrations, but have a life of less than 100 deep discharges. Now promising alternative technology has challenged the world-wide lead miners, refiners, and battery makers into forming a consortium that sponsors research into making better lead-acid batteries. Horizon's new bipolar battery delivered 50 watt-hours per kg (Wh/kg), compared with 20 for ordinary transport-vehicle batteries. The alternatives are delivering from 80 Wh/kg (nickel-metal hydride) up to 200 Wh/kg (zinc-bromine). A Fiat Panda traveled 260 km on a single charge of its zinc-bromine battery. A German 3.5-ton postal truck traveled 300 km with a single charge in its 650-kg (146 Wh/kg) zinc-air battery. Its top speed was 110 km per hour.

  5. The testing of batteries linked to supercapacitors with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy: A comparison between Li-ion and valve regulated lead acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferg, Ernst; Rossouw, Claire; Loyson, Peter

    2013-03-01

    For electric vehicles, a supercapacitor can be coupled to the electrical system in order to increase and optimize the energy and power densities of the drive system during acceleration and regenerative breaking. This study looked at the charge acceptance and maximum discharge ability of a valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) and a Li-ion battery connected in parallel to supercapacitors. The test procedure evaluated the advantage of using a supercapacitor at a 2 F:1 Ah ratio with the battery types at various states of charge (SoC). The results showed that about 7% of extra charge was achieved over a 5-s test time for a Li-ion hybrid system at 20% SoC, whereas at the 80% SoC the additional capacity was approximately 16%. While for the VRLA battery hybrid system, an additional charge of up to 20% was achieved when the battery was at 80% SoC, with little or no benefit at the 20% SoC. The advantage of the supercapacitor in parallel with a VRLA battery was noticeable on its discharge ability, where significant extra capacity was achieved for short periods of time for a battery at the 60% and 40% SoC when compared to the Li-ion hybrid system. The study also made use of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) with a suitable equivalent circuit model to explain, in particular, the internal resistance and capacitance differences observed between the different battery chemistries with and without a supercapacitor.

  6. Joint Battery Industry Sector Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-31

    prototp Fmr ectdc Vehicle uses nickel cadmium batteries PSA’s WEIT A uses nickel cadmium batteries Table 8-19. Nickel Cadmium Batteries in Electric...BMDO to develop a nickel oxidedhydrogen multilayer bipolar battery for pulsed power. These batteries will be used to operate directed energy weapons in

  7. The 1975 GSFC Battery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The proceedings of the 1975 Goddard Space Flight Center Battery Workshop are presented. The major topics of discussion were nickel cadmium batteries and, to a lesser extent, nickel hydrogen batteries. Battery design, manufacturing techniques, testing programs, and electrochemical characteristics were considered. The utilization of these batteries for spacecraft power supplies was given particular attention.

  8. Bipolar lead-acid battery for hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saakes, M.; Woortmeijer, R.; Schmal, D.

    Within the framework of the European project bipolar lead-acid power source (BILAPS), a new production route is being developed for the bipolar lead-acid battery. The performance targets are 500 W kg -1, 30 Wh kg -1 and 100 000 power-assist life cycles (PALCs). The operation voltage of the battery can be, according to the requirements, 12, 36 V or any other voltage. Tests with recently developed 4 and 12 V prototypes, each of 30 Ah capacity have demonstrated that the PALC can be operated using 10 C discharge and 9 C charge peaks. The tests show no overvoltage or undervoltage problems during three successive test periods of 16 h with 8 h rest in between. The temperature stabilizes during these tests at 40-45 °C using a thermal-management system. The bipolar lead acid battery is operated at an initial 50% state-of-charge. During the tests, the individual cell voltages display only very small differences. Tests are now in progress to improve further the battery-management system, which has been developed at the cell level, during the period no PALCs are run in order to improve the hybrid behaviour of the battery. The successful tests show the feasibility of operating the bipolar lead-acid battery in a hybrid mode. The costs of the system are estimated to be much lower than those for nickel-metal-hydride or Li-ion based high-power systems. An additional advantage of the lead-acid system is that recycling of lead-acid batteries is well established.

  9. Solid-state graft copolymer electrolytes for lithium battery applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qichao; Caputo, Antonio; Sadoway, Donald R

    2013-08-12

    Battery safety has been a very important research area over the past decade. Commercially available lithium ion batteries employ low flash point (< 80 °C), flammable, and volatile organic electrolytes. These organic based electrolyte systems are viable at ambient temperatures, but require a cooling system to ensure that temperatures do not exceed 80 °C. These cooling systems tend to increase battery costs and can malfunction which can lead to battery malfunction and explosions, thus endangering human life. Increases in petroleum prices lead to a huge demand for safe, electric hybrid vehicles that are more economically viable to operate as oil prices continue to rise. Existing organic based electrolytes used in lithium ion batteries are not applicable to high temperature automotive applications. A safer alternative to organic electrolytes is solid polymer electrolytes. This work will highlight the synthesis for a graft copolymer electrolyte (GCE) poly(oxyethylene) methacrylate (POEM) to a block with a lower glass transition temperature (Tg) poly(oxyethylene) acrylate (POEA). The conduction mechanism has been discussed and it has been demonstrated the relationship between polymer segmental motion and ionic conductivity indeed has a Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) dependence. Batteries containing commercially available LP30 organic (LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC):dimethyl carbonate (DMC) at a 1:1 ratio) and GCE were cycled at ambient temperature. It was found that at ambient temperature, the batteries containing GCE showed a greater overpotential when compared to LP30 electrolyte. However at temperatures greater than 60 °C, the GCE cell exhibited much lower overpotential due to fast polymer electrolyte conductivity and nearly the full theoretical specific capacity of 170 mAh/g was accessed.

  10. Solid-state Graft Copolymer Electrolytes for Lithium Battery Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qichao; Caputo, Antonio; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    Battery safety has been a very important research area over the past decade. Commercially available lithium ion batteries employ low flash point (<80 °C), flammable, and volatile organic electrolytes. These organic based electrolyte systems are viable at ambient temperatures, but require a cooling system to ensure that temperatures do not exceed 80 °C. These cooling systems tend to increase battery costs and can malfunction which can lead to battery malfunction and explosions, thus endangering human life. Increases in petroleum prices lead to a huge demand for safe, electric hybrid vehicles that are more economically viable to operate as oil prices continue to rise. Existing organic based electrolytes used in lithium ion batteries are not applicable to high temperature automotive applications. A safer alternative to organic electrolytes is solid polymer electrolytes. This work will highlight the synthesis for a graft copolymer electrolyte (GCE) poly(oxyethylene) methacrylate (POEM) to a block with a lower glass transition temperature (Tg) poly(oxyethylene) acrylate (POEA). The conduction mechanism has been discussed and it has been demonstrated the relationship between polymer segmental motion and ionic conductivity indeed has a Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) dependence. Batteries containing commercially available LP30 organic (LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC):dimethyl carbonate (DMC) at a 1:1 ratio) and GCE were cycled at ambient temperature. It was found that at ambient temperature, the batteries containing GCE showed a greater overpotential when compared to LP30 electrolyte. However at temperatures greater than 60 °C, the GCE cell exhibited much lower overpotential due to fast polymer electrolyte conductivity and nearly the full theoretical specific capacity of 170 mAh/g was accessed. PMID:23963203

  11. Thin-film rechargeable lithium batteries for implantable devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.b.; Dudney, N.J.

    1997-05-01

    Thin films of LiCoO{sub 2} have been synthesized in which the strongest x-ray reflection is either weak or missing, indicating a high degree of preferred orientation. Thin-film solid state batteries with these textured cathode films can deliver practical capacities at high current densities. For example, for one of the cells 70% of the maximum capacity between 4.2 V and 3 V ({approximately}0.2 mAh/cm{sup 2}) was delivered at a current of 2 mA/cm{sup 2}. When cycled at rates of 0.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, the capacity loss was 0.001 %/cycle or less. The reliability and performance of Li-LiCoO{sub 2} thin-film batteries make them attractive for application in implantable devices such as neural stimulators, pacemakers, and defibrillators.

  12. Thin-film Rechargeable Lithium Batteries for Implantable Devices

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bates, J. B.; Dudney, N. J.

    1997-05-01

    Thin films of LiCoO{sub 2} have been synthesized in which the strongest x ray reflection is either weak or missing, indicating a high degree of preferred orientation. Thin film solid state batteries with these textured cathode films can deliver practical capacities at high current densities. For example, for one of the cells 70% of the maximum capacity between 4.2 V and 3 V ({approximately}0.2 mAh/cm{sup 2}) was delivered at a current of 2 mA/cm{sup 2}. When cycled at rates of 0.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, the capacity loss was 0.001%/cycle or less. The reliability and performance of Li LiCoO{sub 2} thin film batteries make them attractive for application in implantable devices such as neural stimulators, pacemakers, and defibrillators.

  13. Functional Conservation and Divergence of Four Ginger AP1/AGL9 MADS–Box Genes Revealed by Analysis of Their Expression and Protein–Protein Interaction, and Ectopic Expression of AhFUL Gene in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juanjuan; Sun, Wei; Xia, Kuaifei; Liao, Jingping; Zhang, Mingyong

    2014-01-01

    Alpinia genus are known generally as ginger–lilies for showy flowers in the ginger family, Zingiberaceae, and their floral morphology diverges from typical monocotyledon flowers. However, little is known about the functions of ginger MADS–box genes in floral identity. In this study, four AP1/AGL9 MADS–box genes were cloned from Alpinia hainanensis, and protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and roles of the four genes in floral homeotic conversion and in floral evolution are surveyed for the first time. AhFUL is clustered to the AP1lineage, AhSEP4 and AhSEP3b to the SEP lineage, and AhAGL6–like to the AGL6 lineage. The four genes showed conserved and divergent expression patterns, and their encoded proteins were localized in the nucleus. Seven combinations of PPI (AhFUL–AhSEP4, AhFUL–AhAGL6–like, AhFUL–AhSEP3b, AhSEP4–AhAGL6–like, AhSEP4–AhSEP3b, AhAGL6–like–AhSEP3b, and AhSEP3b–AhSEP3b) were detected, and the PPI patterns in the AP1/AGL9 lineage revealed that five of the 10 possible combinations are conserved and three are variable, while conclusions cannot yet be made regarding the other two. Ectopic expression of AhFUL in Arabidopsis thaliana led to early flowering and floral organ homeotic conversion to sepal–like or leaf–like. Therefore, we conclude that the four A. hainanensis AP1/AGL9 genes show functional conservation and divergence in the floral identity from other MADS–box genes. PMID:25461565

  14. Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report for 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The FY 1980 program continued to involve full-size, prototype cell, module and battery fabrication and evaluation, aimed at advancing the technical capabilities of the nickel-iron battery, while simultaneously reducing its potential cost in materials and process areas. Improved Electroprecipitation Process (EPP) nickel electrodes of design thickness (2.5 mm) are now being prepared that display stable capacities of 23 to 25 Ah for the C/3 drain rate at 200+ test cycles. Iron electrodes of the composite-type are delivering 24 Ah at the target thickness (1.0 mm). Iron electrodes are displaying capacity stability for > 1000 test cycles in continuing 3 plate cell tests. Finished cells have delivered 57 to 61 Wh/kg at C/3, and have demonstrated cyclic stability to 500+ cycles at 80% depth of discharge profiles at Westinghouse. A 6-cell module that demonstrated 239 Ah, 1735 Wh, 48 Wh/kg at the C/3 drain rate has also been evaluated at the National Battery Test Laboratory, ANL. It operated for 327 test cycles, to a level of 161 Ah at the C/3 rate, before being removed from test. Reduction in nickel electrode swelling (and concurrent stack starvation), to improve cycling, continues to be an area of major effort to reach the final battery cycle life objectives. Pasted nickel electrodes continue to show promise for meeting the life objectives while, simultaneously, providing a low manufacturing cost. Refinements have occurred in the areas of cell hardware, module manifolding and cell interconnections. These improvements have been incorporated into the construction and testing of the cells and modules for this program. Temperature tests at 0/sup 0/C were performed on a 6-cell module and showed a decrease in capacity of only 25% in Ah and .29% in Wh as compared to 25/sup 0/C performance. Additional tests are planned to demonstrate performance at -15/sup 0/C and 40/sup 0/C.

  15. A Sugar-Derived Room-Temperature Sodium Sulfur Battery with Long Term Cycling Stability.

    PubMed

    Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Douglas, Anna; Muralidharan, Nitin; Cohn, Adam P; Pint, Cary L

    2017-03-08

    We demonstrate a room-temperature sodium sulfur battery based on a confining microporous carbon template derived from sucrose that delivers a reversible capacity over 700 mAh/gS at 0.1C rates, maintaining 370 mAh/gS at 10 times higher rates of 1C. Cycling at 1C rates reveals retention of over 300 mAh/gS capacity across 1500 cycles with Coulombic efficiency >98% due to microporous sulfur confinement and stability of the sodium metal anode in a glyme-based electrolyte. We show sucrose to be an ideal platform to develop microporous carbon capable of mitigating electrode-electrolyte reactivity and loss of soluble intermediate discharge products. In a manner parallel to the low-cost materials of the traditional sodium beta battery, our work demonstrates the combination of table sugar, sulfur, and sodium, all of which are cheap and earth abundant, for a high-performance stable room-temperature sodium sulfur battery.

  16. Ultralong Cycle Life Achieved by a Natural Plant: Miscanthus × giganteus for Lithium Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Bi, Xuanxuan; Tao, Ran; Wang, Qingzhen; Yao, Ying; Wu, Feng; Zhang, Cunzhong

    2017-02-08

    Large energy-storage systems and electric vehicles require energy devices with high power and high energy density. Lithium oxygen (Li-O2) batteries could achieve high energy density, but they are still facing problems such as low practical capacity and poor cyclability. Here, we prepare activated carbons (MGACs) based on the natural plant Miscanthus × giganteus (MG) through slow pyrolysis. It possesses a large surface area, plenty of active sites, and high porosity, which are beneficial to the utilization of oxygen electrode in Li-O2 batteries. The MGACs-based oxygen electrode delivers a high specific capacity of 9400 mAh/g at 0.02 mA/cm(2), and long cycle life of 601 cycles (with a cutoff capacity of 500 mAh/g) and 295 cycles (with a cutoff capacity of 1000 mAh/g) at 0.2 mA/cm(2), respectively. Additionally, the material exhibits high rate capability and high reversibility, which is a promising candidate for the application in Li-O2 batteries.

  17. Potassium Secondary Batteries.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Ali; Jian, Zelang; Ji, Xiulei

    2017-02-08

    Potassium may exhibit advantages over lithium or sodium as a charge carrier in rechargeable batteries. Analogues of Prussian blue can provide millions of cyclic voltammetric cycles in aqueous electrolyte. Potassium intercalation chemistry has recently been demonstrated compatible with both graphite and nongraphitic carbons. In addition to potassium-ion batteries, potassium-O2 (or -air) and potassium-sulfur batteries are emerging. Additionally, aqueous potassium-ion batteries also exhibit high reversibility and long cycling life. Because of potentially low cost, availability of basic materials, and intriguing electrochemical behaviors, this new class of secondary batteries is attracting much attention. This mini-review summarizes the current status, opportunities, and future challenges of potassium secondary batteries.

  18. A desalination battery.

    PubMed

    Pasta, Mauro; Wessells, Colin D; Cui, Yi; La Mantia, Fabio

    2012-02-08

    Water desalination is an important approach to provide fresh water around the world, although its high energy consumption, and thus high cost, call for new, efficient technology. Here, we demonstrate the novel concept of a "desalination battery", which operates by performing cycles in reverse on our previously reported mixing entropy battery. Rather than generating electricity from salinity differences, as in mixing entropy batteries, desalination batteries use an electrical energy input to extract sodium and chloride ions from seawater and to generate fresh water. The desalination battery is comprised by a Na(2-x)Mn(5)O(10) nanorod positive electrode and Ag/AgCl negative electrode. Here, we demonstrate an energy consumption of 0.29 Wh l(-1) for the removal of 25% salt using this novel desalination battery, which is promising when compared to reverse osmosis (~ 0.2 Wh l(-1)), the most efficient technique presently available.

  19. Viking lander spacecraft battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking Lander was the first spacecraft to fly a sterilized nickel-cadmium battery on a mission to explore the surface of a planet. The significant results of the battery development program from its inception through the design, manufacture, and test of the flight batteries which were flown on the two Lander spacecraft are documented. The flight performance during the early phase of the mission is also presented.

  20. Satellite battery testing status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, R.; Hall, S.

    1986-01-01

    Because of the large numbers of satellite cells currently being tested and anticipated at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NAVWPNSUPPCEN) Crane, Indiana, satellite cell testing is being integrated into the Battery Test Automation Project (BTAP). The BTAP, designed to meet the growing needs for battery testing at the NAVWPNSUPPCEN Crane, will consist of several Automated Test Stations (ATSs) which monitor batteries under test. Each ATS will interface with an Automation Network Controller (ANC) which will collect test data for reduction.

  1. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Yahnke, Mark S.; Shlomo, Golan; Anderson, Marc A.

    1994-01-01

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range.

  2. Polyoxometalate flow battery

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Travis M.; Pratt, Harry D.

    2016-03-15

    Flow batteries including an electrolyte of a polyoxometalate material are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, the flow battery includes an electrochemical cell including an anode portion, a cathode portion and a separator disposed between the anode portion and the cathode portion. Each of the anode portion and the cathode portion comprises a polyoxometalate material. The flow battery further includes an anode electrode disposed in the anode portion and a cathode electrode disposed in the cathode portion.

  3. Lithium battery management system

    DOEpatents

    Dougherty, Thomas J [Waukesha, WI

    2012-05-08

    Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

  4. Zinc air battery development for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putt, R. A.; Merry, G. W.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of research conducted during the sixteen month continuation of a program to develop rechargeable zinc-air batteries for electric vehicles. The zinc-air technology under development incorporates a metal foam substrate for the zinc electrode, with flow of electrolyte through the foam during battery operation. In this 'soluble' zinc electrode the zincate discharge product dissolves completely in the electrolyte stream. Cycle testing at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, where the electrode was invented, and at MATSI showed that this approach avoids the zinc electrode shape change phenomenon. Further, electrolyte flow has been shown to be necessary to achieve significant cycle life (greater than 25 cycles) in this open system. Without it, water loss through the oxygen electrode results in high resistance failure of the cell. The Phase 1 program, which focused entirely on the zinc electrode, elucidated the conditions necessary to increase electrode capacity from 75 to as much as 300 mAh/sq cm. By the end of the Phase 1 program over 500 cycles had accrued on one of the zinc-zinc half cells undergoing continuous cycle testing. The Phase 2 program continued the half cell cycle testing and separator development, further refined the foam preplate process, and launched into performance and cycle life testing of zinc-air cells.

  5. Zinc air battery development for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putt, Ronald A.

    1990-05-01

    This document reports the progress and accomplishments of a 16 month program to develop a rechargeable zinc-air battery for electric vehicle propulsion, from October 1988 through January 1990. The program was the first stage in the transition of alkaline zinc electrode technology, invented at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, to private industry. The LBL invention teaches the use of a copper metal foam substrate for the zinc electrode, in combination with forced convection of electrolyte through the foam during battery operation. Research at LBL showed promise that this approach would avoid shape change (densification and dendrite growth), the primary failure mode of this electrode. The program comprised five tasks: (1) cell design, (2) capacity maximization, (3) cycle testing, (4) materials qualification, and (5) a cost/design study. The cell design contemplates a plate and frame stack, with alternating zinc and oxygen electrode frame assemblies between rigid end plates. A 200 Ah cell, as may be required for the EV application, would comprise a stack of five zinc and six oxygen electrode frame/assemblies.

  6. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries.

  7. Zinc air battery development for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Putt, R.A.; Merry, G.W. )

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of research conducted during the sixteen month continuation of a program to develop rechargeable zinc-air batteries for electric vehicles. The zinc-air technology under development incorporates a metal foam substrate for the zinc electrode, with flow of electrolyte through the foam during battery operation. In this soluble'' zinc electrode the zincate discharge product dissolves completely in the electrolyte stream. Cycle testing at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, where the electrode was invented, and at MATSI showed that this approach avoids the zinc electrode shape change phenomenon. Further, electrolyte flow has been shown to be necessary to achieve significant cycle life (> 25 cycles) in this open system. Without it, water loss through the oxygen electrode results in high-resistance failure of the cell. The Phase I program, which focused entirely on the zinc electrode, elucidated the conditions necessary to increase electrode capacity from 75 to as much as 300 mAh/cm{sup 2}. By the end of the Phase I program over 500 cycles had accrued on one of the zinc-zinc half cells undergoing continuous cycle testing. The Phase II program continued the half cell cycle testing and separator development, further refined the foam preplate process, and launched into performance and cycle life testing of zinc-air cells.

  8. Competition between insertion of Li+ and Mg2+: An example of TiO2-B nanowires for Mg rechargeable batteries and Li+/Mg2+ hybrid-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yuan; Wang, Dashuai; Wei, Yingjin; Zhu, Kai; Zhao, Yingying; Bian, Xiaofei; Du, Fei; Liu, Bingbing; Gao, Yu; Chen, Gang

    2017-04-01

    Titanium dioxide bronze (TiO2-B) nanowires were prepared by the hydrothermal method and used as the positive electrode for Mg rechargeable batteries and Li+/Mg2+ hybrid-ion batteries. First-principles calculations showed that the diffusion barrier for Mg2+ (0.6 eV) in the TiO2-B lattice was more than twice of that for Li+ (0.3 eV). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that the charge transfer resistance of TiO2-B in the Mg2+ ion electrolyte was much larger than that in the Li+/Mg2+ hybrid electrolyte. For these reasons, the Mg rechargeable battery showed a small discharge capacity of 35 mAh g-1 resulting from an electrochemical double-layer capacitive process. In comparison, the TiO2-B nanowires exhibited a large capacity (242 mAh g-1 at the 20 mA g-1 current density), high rate capability (114 mAh g-1 at 1 A g-1), and excellent cycle stability in the Li+/Mg2+ hybrid-ion battery. The dominant reaction occurred in the TiO2-B electrode was intercalation of Li+ ions, of which about 74% of the total capacity was attributed to Li+ pseudo-capacitance.

  9. Electronically configured battery pack

    SciTech Connect

    Kemper, D.

    1997-03-01

    Battery packs for portable equipment must sometimes accommodate conflicting requirements to meet application needs. An electronically configurable battery pack was developed to support two highly different operating modes, one requiring very low power consumption at a low voltage and the other requiring high power consumption at a higher voltage. The configurable battery pack optimizes the lifetime and performance of the system by making the best use of all available energy thus enabling the system to meet its goals of operation, volume, and lifetime. This paper describes the cell chemistry chosen, the battery pack electronics, and tradeoffs made during the evolution of its design.

  10. Nonleaking battery terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, W. E.; Nagle, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Three different terminals were designed for usage in a 40 ampere/hour silver zinc battery which has a 45 percent KOH by weight electrolyte in a plastic battery case. Life tests, including thermal cycling, electrical charge and discharge for up to three years duration, were conducted on these three different terminal designs. Tests for creep rate and tensile strength were conducted on the polyphenylene oxide (PPO) plastic battery cases. Some cases were unused and others containing KOH electrolyte were placed on life tests. The design and testing of nonleaking battery terminals for use with a potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte in a plastic case are discussed.

  11. Nonleaking battery terminals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, W. E.; Nagle, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Three different terminals were designed for usage in a 40 ampere/hour silver zinc battery which has a 45% KOH by weight electrolyte in a plastic battery case. Life tests, including thermal cycling, electrical charge and discharge for up to three years duration, were conducted on these three different terminal designs. Tests for creep rate and tensile strength were conducted on the polyphenylene oxide plastic battery cases. Some cases were unused and others containing KOH electrolyte were placed on life tests. The design and testing of nonleaking battery terminals for use with a KOH electrolyte in a plastic case are considered.

  12. Battery Thermal Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, Matthew; Saxon, Aron; Powell, Mitchell; Shi, Ying

    2016-06-07

    This poster shows the progress in battery thermal characterization over the previous year. NREL collaborated with U.S. DRIVE and USABC battery developers to obtain thermal properties of their batteries, obtained heat capacity and heat generation of cells under various power profiles, obtained thermal images of the cells under various drive cycles, and used the measured results to validate thermal models. Thermal properties are used for the thermal analysis and design of improved battery thermal management systems to support achieve life and performance targets.

  13. An experimental study of heat pipe thermal management system with wet cooling method for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui; Gu, Junjie; Liu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    An effective battery thermal management (BTM) system is required for lithium-ion batteries to ensure a desirable operating temperature range with minimal temperature gradient, and thus to guarantee their high efficiency, long lifetime and great safety. In this paper, a heat pipe and wet cooling combined BTM system is developed to handle the thermal surge of lithium-ion batteries during high rate operations. The proposed BTM system relies on ultra-thin heat pipes which can efficiently transfer the heat from the battery sides to the cooling ends where the water evaporation process can rapidly dissipate the heat. Two sized battery packs, 3 Ah and 8 Ah, with different lengths of cooling ends are used and tested through a series high-intensity discharges in this study to examine the cooling effects of the combined BTM system, and its performance is compared with other four types of heat pipe involved BTM systems and natural convection cooling method. A combination of natural convection, fan cooling and wet cooling methods is also introduced to the heat pipe BTM system, which is able to control the temperature of battery pack in an appropriate temperature range with the minimum cost of energy and water spray.

  14. The emerging roles of AhR in physiology and immunity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Whitelaw, Murray L

    2013-09-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is traditionally defined as a transcriptional regulator involved in adaptive xenobiotic response, however, emerging evidence supports physiological functions of AhR in normal cell development and immune response. The role of AhR in immunomodulation is multi-dimensional. On the one hand, activation of AhR by TCDD and other ligands leads to profound immunosuppression, potentially via skewed Th1/Th2 cell balance toward Th1 dominance, and boosted Treg cell differentiation. On the other hand, activation of AhR can also induce Th17 cell polarization and increase the severity of autoimmune disease. In addition to T lymphocytes, the AhR also appears to play a vital role in B cell maturation, and regulates the activity of macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils following lipopolysaccharide challenge or influenza virus infection. In these scenarios, activation of AhR is associated with decreased host response and reduced survival. Furthermore, gene knock out studies suggest that AhR is indispensable for the postnatal maintenance of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and skin-resident dendritic epidermal gamma delta T cells, providing a potential link between AhR and gut immunity and wound healing. It is well accepted that the magnitude and the type of immune response is dependent on the local cytokine milieu and the AhR appears to be one of the key factors involved in the fine turning of this cytokine balance.

  15. Electric vehicle battery research and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    High energy battery technology for electric vehicles is reviewed. The state-of-the-art in conventional batteries, metal-gas batteries, alkali-metal high temperature batteries, and organic electrolyte batteries is reported.

  16. Assessing Antigenic Drift of Seasonal Influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tewawong, Nipaporn; Prachayangprecha, Slinporn; Vichiwattana, Preeyaporn; Korkong, Sumeth; Klinfueng, Sirapa; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Thongmee, Thanunrat; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Under selective pressure from the host immune system, antigenic epitopes of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) have continually evolved to escape antibody recognition, termed antigenic drift. We analyzed the genomes of influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 virus strains circulating in Thailand between 2010 and 2014 and assessed how well the yearly vaccine strains recommended for the southern hemisphere matched them. We amplified and sequenced the HA gene of 120 A(H3N2) and 81 A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus samples obtained from respiratory specimens and calculated the perfect-match vaccine efficacy using the pepitope model, which quantitated the antigenic drift in the dominant epitope of HA. Phylogenetic analysis of the A(H3N2) HA1 genes classified most strains into genetic clades 1, 3A, 3B, and 3C. The A(H3N2) strains from the 2013 and 2014 seasons showed very low to moderate vaccine efficacy and demonstrated antigenic drift from epitopes C and A to epitope B. Meanwhile, most A(H1N1)pdm09 strains from the 2012–2014 seasons belonged to genetic clades 6A, 6B, and 6C and displayed the dominant epitope mutations at epitopes B and E. Finally, the vaccine efficacy for A(H1N1)pdm09 (79.6–93.4%) was generally higher than that of A(H3N2). These findings further confirmed the accelerating antigenic drift of the circulating influenza A(H3N2) in recent years. PMID:26440103

  17. Characterization of Peanut Germin-Like Proteins, AhGLPs in Plant Development and Defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhu, Fanghe; Li, Haifen; Li, Ling; Yang, Qingli; Chi, Xiaoyuan; Yu, Shanlin; Liang, Xuanqiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Germin-like superfamily members are ubiquitously expressed in various plant species and play important roles in plant development and defense. Although several GLPs have been identified in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), their roles in development and defense remain unknown. In this research, we study the spatiotemporal expression of AhGLPs in peanut and their functions in plant defense. Results We have identified three new AhGLP members (AhGLP3b, AhGLP5b and AhGLP7b) that have distinct but very closely related DNA sequences. The spatial and temporal expression profiles revealed that each peanut GLP gene has its distinct expression pattern in various tissues and developmental stages. This suggests that these genes all have their distinct roles in peanut development. Subcellular location analysis demonstrated that AhGLP2 and 5 undergo a protein transport process after synthesis. The expression of all AhGLPs increased in responding to Aspergillus flavus infection, suggesting AhGLPs' ubiquitous roles in defense to A. flavus. Each AhGLP gene had its unique response to various abiotic stresses (including salt, H2O2 stress and wound), biotic stresses (including leaf spot, mosaic and rust) and plant hormone stimulations (including SA and ABA treatments). These results indicate that AhGLPs have their distinct roles in plant defense. Moreover, in vivo study of AhGLP transgenic Arabidopsis showed that both AhGLP2 and 3 had salt tolerance, which made transgenic Arabidopsis grow well under 100 mM NaCl stress. Conclusions For the first time, our study analyzes the AhGLP gene expression profiles in peanut and reveals their roles under various stresses. These results provide an insight into the developmental and defensive roles of GLP gene family in peanut. PMID:23626720

  18. Nanostructured electrode materials for Li-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaya, Palani; Saravanan, Kuppan; Hariharan, Srirama

    2010-04-01

    Nanostructured materials have triggered a great excitement in recent times due to both fundamental interest as well as technological impact relevant for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Size reduction in nanocrystals leads to a variety of unexpected exciting phenomena due to enhanced surface-to-volume ratio and reduced transport length. We will consider a few examples of nanostructured electrode materials in the context of lithium batteries for achieving high storage and high rate performances: 1) LiFePO4 nanoplates synthesized using solvothermal method could store Li-ions comparable to its theoretical capacity at C/10, while at 30C, they exhibit storage capacity up to 45 mAh/g. Size reduction (~30 nm) at the b-axis favors the fast Li-ion diffusion. In addition to this, uniform ~5 nm carbon coating throughout the plates provides excellent electronically conducting path for electrons. This nano architecture enables fast insertion/extraction of both Li-ions as well as electrons; 2) Mesporous-TiO2 with high surface area (135m2/g) synthesized using soft-template method exhibits high volumetric density compared to commercial nanopowder (P25), with excellent Li-storage behavior. C16 meso-TiO2 synthesized from CTAB exhibits reversible storage capacity of 288mAh/g at 0.2C and 109 mAh/g at 30C; 3) Zero strain Li4Ti5O12 anode material has been synthesized using several wet chemical routes. The best condition has been optimized to achieve storage capability close to theoretical limit of 175mAh/g at C/10. At 10C, we could retain lithium storage up to 88 mAh/g; 4) We report our recent results on α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3 using conversion reaction, providing insight for a better storage capability in γ-phase than the α-phase at 2C resulting solely from the nanocrystallinity.

  19. Analysis of Ah receptor pathway activation by brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Brown, David J; Van Overmeire, Ilse; Goeyens, Leo; Denison, Michael S; De Vito, Michael J; Clark, George C

    2004-06-01

    Brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) are used as additives in plastics to decrease the rate of combustion of these materials, leading to greater consumer safety. As the use of plastics has increased, the production and use of flame-retardants has also grown. Many BFRs are persistent and have been detected in environmental samples, raising concerns about the biological/toxicological risk associated with their use. Most BFRs appear to be non-toxic, however there is still some concern that these compounds, or possible contaminants in BFRs mixtures could interact with cellular receptors. In this study we have examined the interaction of decabromodiphenyl ether, Firemaster BP4A (tetrabromobisphenol A), Firemaster PHT4 (tetrabromophthalic anhydride), hexabromobenzene, pentabromotoluene, decabromobiphenyl, Firemaster BP-6 (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl) and possible contaminants of BFR mixtures with the Ah receptor. Receptor binding and activation was examined using the Gel Retardation Assay and increased expression of dioxin responsive genes was detected using the reporter gene based CALUX assay. The results demonstrate the ability of BFRs to activate the AhR signal transduction pathway at moderate to high concentrations as assessed using both assays. AhR-dependent activation by BFRs may be due in part to contaminants present in commercial/technical mixtures. This was suggested by our comparative analysis of Firemaster BP-6 versus its primary component 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl. Some technical mixtures of brominated flame-retardants contain brominated biphenyls, dioxins or dibenzofurans as contaminants. When tested in the CALUX assay these compounds were found to be equivalent to, or more active than their chlorinated analogues. Relative effective potency values were determined from dose response curves for these brominated HAHs.

  20. Battery-powered, electrocuting trap for stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae).

    PubMed

    Pickens, L G

    1991-11-01

    A solar-charged, battery-powered, electrocuting grid was combined with a white plywood base to make a portable, pulsed-current, pest-electrocuting device that attracted and killed stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), outdoors. The grid was powered once every 1-2 s by a 0.016-s pulse of 60-Hz alternating current of 4 mA and 9,500 V. Power was turned off at night by a photoresistor. The trap functioned continuously for 14 d with an unrecharged 12-V, 18A/h lawn-tractor battery and killed as many as 4,000 flies per day. Solar cells were used to charge a single 12-V battery continuously that operated 12 grids for a period of 90 d. The grid did not short circuit for any length of time even during heavy rainstorms or when large insects were killed. The incorporation of moiré patterns and the utilization of the correct size, orientation, and placement of wires made the electrocuting grid itself attractive to stable flies. The traps were spaced at distances of up to 120 m from the battery and pulse circuit. The electrocuting traps were more effective than sticky traps and avoided the problems associated with chemicals. They are well suited for use around calf pens, dog kennels, or large animal shelters.

  1. Investigation of lithium-thionyl chloride battery safety hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, A. I.; Gabriel, K. A.; Burns, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    In the ten years since the feasibility of a lithium-thionyl chloride cell was first recognized (1) remarkable progress has been made in hardware development. Cells as large as 16,000 Ah (2) and batteries of 10.8 MWh (3) have been demonstrated. In a low rate configuration, energy densities of 500 to 600 Wh/kg are easily achieved. Even in the absence of reported explosions, safety would be a concern for such a dense energetic package; the energy density of a lithium-thionyl chloride cell is approaching that of dynamite (924 Wh/kg). In fact explosions have occurred. In general the hazards associated with lithium-thionyl chloride batteries may be divided into four categories: Explosions as a result of an error in battery design. Very large cells were in prototype development prior to a full appreciation of the hazards of the system. It is possible that some of the remaining safety issues are related to cell design; Explosions as a result of external physical abuse such as cell incineration and puncture; Explosions due to short circuiting which could lead to thermal runaway reactions. These problems appear to have been solved by changes in the battery design (4); and Explosions due to abnormal electrical operation (i.e., charging (5) and overdischarging (6) and in partially or fully discharged cells on storage (7 and 8).

  2. Rechargeable aluminum batteries with conducting polymers as positive electrodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Hudak, Nicholas S.

    2013-12-01

    This report is a summary of research results from an Early Career LDRD project con-ducted from January 2012 to December 2013 at Sandia National Laboratories. Demonstrated here is the use of conducting polymers as active materials in the posi-tive electrodes of rechargeable aluminum-based batteries operating at room tempera-ture. The battery chemistry is based on chloroaluminate ionic liquid electrolytes, which allow reversible stripping and plating of aluminum metal at the negative elec-trode. Characterization of electrochemically synthesized polypyrrole films revealed doping of the polymers with chloroaluminate anions, which is a quasi-reversible reac-tion that facilitates battery cycling. Stable galvanostatic cycling of polypyrrole and polythiophene cells was demonstrated, with capacities at near-theoretical levels (30-100 mAh g-1) and coulombic efficiencies approaching 100%. The energy density of a sealed sandwich-type cell with polythiophene at the positive electrode was estimated as 44 Wh kg-1, which is competitive with state-of-the-art battery chemistries for grid-scale energy storage.

  3. Calorimetry of 25 Ah lithium/thionyl chloride cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. J.; Dawson, S.

    1991-01-01

    Heat flow measurements of 25-Ah lithium thionyl chloride cells provided a method to calculate an effective thermal potential, E(TP) of 3.907 V. The calculation is useful to determine specific heat generation of this cell chemistry and design. The E(TP) value includes heat generation by electrochemical cell reactions, competitive chemical reactions, and resistance heating at the tabs, connectors, and leads. Heat flow was measured while applying electrical loads to the cell in an isothermal calorimeter set at 0, 20, and 60 C.

  4. Ultrahigh Capacity Lithium-Oxygen Batteries Enabled by Dry-Pressed Holey Graphene Air Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi; Moitoso, Brandon; Martinez-Martinez, Chalynette; Walsh, Evan D; Lacey, Steven D; Kim, Jae-Woo; Dai, Liming; Hu, Liangbing; Connell, John W

    2017-03-31

    Lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries have the highest theoretical energy density of all the Li-based energy storage systems, but many challenges prevent them from practical use. A major obstacle is the sluggish performance of the air cathode, where both oxygen reduction (discharge) and oxygen evolution (charge) reactions occur. Recently, there have been significant advances in the development of graphene-based air cathode materials with a large surface area and catalytically active for both oxygen reduction and evolution reactions especially with additional catalysts or dopants. However, most studies reported so far have examined air cathodes with a limited areal mass loading rarely exceeding 1 mg/cm(2). Despite the high gravimetric capacity values achieved, therefore, the actual (areal) capacities of those batteries were far from sufficient for practical applications. Here, we present the fabrication, performance, and mechanistic investigations of high mass loading (up to 10 mg/cm(2)) graphene-based air electrodes for high-performance Li-O2 batteries. Such air electrodes could be easily prepared within minutes under solvent-free and binder-free conditions by compression molding holey graphene materials because of their unique dry compressibility associated with in-plane holes. Li-O2 batteries with a high mass loading thus prepared exhibited excellent gravimetric capacity as well as ultrahigh areal capacity (as high as ~40 mAh/cm(2)). The batteries were also cycled at a high curtailing areal capacity (2 mAh/cm(2)), showing a better cycling stability for ultrathick cathodes than their thinner counterparts. Detailed postmortem analyses of the electrodes clearly revealed the battery failure mechanisms under both primary and secondary modes, arising from the oxygen diffusion blockage and the catalytic site deactivation, respectively. These results strongly suggest that the dry-pressed holey graphene electrodes are a highly viable architectural platform for high capacity

  5. Poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) polymer electrolyte for paper-based and flexible battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliahmad, Nojan; Shrestha, Sudhir; Varahramyan, Kody; Agarwal, Mangilal

    2016-06-01

    Paper-based batteries represent a new frontier in battery technology. However, low-flexibility and poor ionic conductivity of solid electrolytes have been major impediments in achieving practical mechanically flexible batteries. This work discuss new highly ionic conductive polymer gel electrolytes for paper-based battery applications. In this paper, we present a poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDH-HFP) porous membrane electrolyte enhanced with lithium bis(trifluoromethane sulphone)imide (LiTFSI) and lithium aluminum titanium phosphate (LATP), with an ionic conductivity of 2.1 × 10-3 S cm-1. Combining ceramic (LATP) with the gel structure of PVDF-HFP and LiTFSI ionic liquid harnesses benefits of ceramic and gel electrolytes in providing flexible electrolytes with a high ionic conductivity. In a flexibility test experiment, bending the polymer electrolyte at 90° for 20 times resulted in 14% decrease in ionic conductivity. Efforts to further improving the flexibility of the presented electrolyte are ongoing. Using this electrolyte, full-cell batteries with lithium titanium oxide (LTO) and lithium cobalt oxide (LCO) electrodes and (i) standard metallic current collectors and (ii) paper-based current collectors were fabricated and tested. The achieved specific capacities were (i) 123 mAh g-1 for standard metallic current collectors and (ii) 99.5 mAh g-1 for paper-based current collectors. Thus, the presented electrolyte has potential to become a viable candidate in paper-based and flexible battery applications. Fabrication methods, experimental procedures, and test results for the polymer gel electrolyte and batteries are presented and discussed.

  6. Water soluble graphene as electrolyte additive in magnesium-air battery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saminathan, K.; Mayilvel Dinesh, M.; Selvam, M.; Srither, S. R.; Rajendran, V.; Kaler, Karan V. I. S.

    2015-02-01

    Magnesium-air (Mg-air) batteries are an important energy source used to power electronic equipment and automobiles. Metal-air batteries give more energy density due to surplus air involved in reduction reaction at air cathode. In this study, the scope of improvements in the efficiency of Metal-air batteries is investigated through addition of water soluble graphene (WSG) as inhibitor in NaCl electrolyte. The discharge performance, corrosion behaviour and electrochemical impedance are studied for (i) the conventional Mg-air battery using 3.5% NaCl and (ii) Mg-air battery with WSG-based 3.5% NaCl electrolyte. X-ray diffraction analysis for WSG is carried out and it shows the crystalline nature of WSG by an intense sharp peak at 26.3°. Scanning electron microscope study is also performed and shows the flake-like structure of WSG denoted by thin layers of carbon. The immersion of WSG in 3.5% NaCl electrolyte increased the current density from 13.24 to 19.33 mA cm-2. Meanwhile, the WSG-based Mg-air battery was found to hold specific discharge capacity of 1030.71 mAh g-1, which was higher than that obtained in 3.5% NaCl electrolyte (i.e., 822.85 mAh g-1). The WSG-based Mg-air battery shows good self-discharge capacity and higher electrochemical activity during discharge.

  7. Electrochemical characterization of Fe-air rechargeable oxide battery in planar solid oxide cell stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qingping; Berger, Cornelius M.; Menzler, Norbert H.; Bram, Martin; Blum, Ludger

    2016-12-01

    Iron-air rechargeable oxide batteries (ROB) comprising solid oxide cells (SOC) as energy converters and Fe/metal-oxide redox couples were characterized using planar SOC stacks. The charge and discharge of the battery correspond to the operations in the electrolysis and fuel cell modes, respectively, but with a stagnant atmosphere consisting of hydrogen and steam. A novel method was employed to establish the stagnant atmosphere for battery testing during normal SOC operation without complicated modification to the test bench and stack/battery concept. Manipulation of the gas compositions during battery operation was not necessary, but the influence of the leakage current from the testing system had to be considered. Batteries incorporating Fe2O3/8YSZ, Fe2O3/CaO and Fe2O3/ZrO2 storage materials were characterized at 800 °C. A maximum charge capacity of 30.4 Ah per layer (with an 80 cm2 active cell area) with ∼0.5 mol Fe was reached with a current of 12 A. The charge capacity lost 11% after ∼130 ROB cycles due to the increased agglomeration of active materials and formation of a dense oxide layer on the surface. The round trip efficiencies of the tested batteries were ≤84% due to the large internal resistance. With state-of-the-art cells, the round trip efficiency can be further improved.

  8. Discrete carbon nanotubes increase lead acid battery charge acceptance and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swogger, Steven W.; Everill, Paul; Dubey, D. P.; Sugumaran, Nanjan

    2014-09-01

    Performance demands placed upon lead acid batteries have outgrown the technology's ability to deliver. These demands, typically leading to Negative Active Material (NAM) failure, include: short, high-current surges; prolonged, minimal, overvoltage charging; repeated, Ah deficit charging; and frequent deep discharges. Research shows these failure mechanisms are attenuated by inclusion of carbon allotropes into the NAM. Addition of significant quantities of carbon, however, produces detrimental changes in paste rheology, leading to lowered industrial throughput. Additionally, capacity, cold-cranking performance, and other battery metrics are negatively affected at high carbon loads. Presented here is Molecular Rebar® Lead Negative, a new battery additive comprising discrete carbon nanotubes (dCNT) which uniformly disperse within battery pastes during mixing. NS40ZL batteries containing dCNT show enhanced charge acceptance, reserve capacity, and cold-cranking performance, decreased risk of polarization, and no detrimental changes to paste properties, when compared to dCNT-free controls. This work focuses on the dCNT as NAM additives only, but early-stage research is underway to test their functionality as a PAM additive. Batteries infused with Molecular Rebar® Lead Negative address the needs of modern lead acid battery applications, produce none of the detrimental side effects associated with carbon additives, and require no change to existing production lines.

  9. A Membrane-Free Ferrocene-Based High-Rate Semiliquid Battery.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Zhao, Yu; Yu, Guihua

    2015-06-10

    We report here a ferrocene-based membrane-free, high-rate semiliquid battery that takes advantage of a highly soluble ferrocene/ferrocenium redox couple in nonaqueous phase. The designed battery exhibits stable capacity retention up to 94% of theoretical capacity of ferrocene (145 mAh g(-1)) at a broad current rate up to 60 C owing to rapid mass transport in a liquid phase and fast redox kinetics. The diffusion coefficient and the standard reaction constant are determined to be in the order of 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) and 10(-1) cm s(-1), respectively, orders of magnitude greater than those in a solid-phase electrode and those in conventional redox flow batteries. Additionally, the battery demonstrates power density and energy density exceeding 1400 W L(-1) and 40 Wh L(-1), respectively, and stable cyclability with capacity retention of ∼80% for 500 cycles. Compared with state-of-the-art energy storage technologies such as Li-ion batteries or conventional redox flow batteries, the proposed liquid battery shows the potential to be an efficient energy storage system with exceptionally high power and reasonable energy density.

  10. Battery thermal management unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Nicholas A.

    1989-03-01

    A battery warming device has been designed which uses waste heat from an operating internal combustion engine to warm a battery. A portion of the waste heat is stored in the sensible and latent heat of a phase change type material for use in maintaining the battery temperature after the engine is shut off. The basic design of the device consists of a Phase Change Material (PCM) reservoir and a simple heat exchanger connected to the engineer's cooling system. Two types of units were built, tested and field trialed. A strap-on type which was strapped to the side of an automotive battery and was intended for the automotive after-market and a tray type on which a battery or batteries sat. This unit was intended for the heavy duty truck market. It was determined that both types of units increased the average cranking power of the batteries they were applied to. Although there were several design problems with the units such as the need for an automatic thermostatically controlled bypass valve, the overall feeling is that there is a market opportunity for both the strap-on and tray type battery warming units.

  11. Aerospace applications of batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid

    1993-01-01

    NASA has developed battery technology to meet the demanding requirements for aerospace applications; specifically, the space vacuum, launch loads, and high duty cycles. Because of unique requirements and operating environments associated with space applications, NASA has written its own standards and specifications for batteries.

  12. Battery Particle Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-15

    Two simulations show the differences between a battery being drained at a slower rate, over a full hour, versus a faster rate, only six minutes (a tenth of an hour). In both cases battery particles go from being fully charged (green) to fully drained (red), but there are significant differences in the patterns of discharge based on the rate.

  13. The GSFC Battery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on electric storage batteries are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) a low cost/standardization program, (2) test and flight experience, (3) materials and cell components, and (4) new developments in the nickel/hydrogen system. The application of selected batteries in specific space vehicles is examined.

  14. Hydrophobic, Porous Battery Boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Bobby J.; Casey, John E., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Boxes made of porous, hydrophobic polymers developed to contain aqueous potassium hydroxide electrolyte solutions of zinc/air batteries while allowing air to diffuse in as needed for operation. Used on other types of batteries for in-cabin use in which electrolytes aqueous and from which gases generated during operation must be vented without allowing electrolytes to leak out.

  15. Battery Pack Thermal Design

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-14

    This presentation describes the thermal design of battery packs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. A battery thermal management system essential for xEVs for both normal operation during daily driving (achieving life and performance) and off-normal operation during abuse conditions (achieving safety). The battery thermal management system needs to be optimized with the right tools for the lowest cost. Experimental tools such as NREL's isothermal battery calorimeter, thermal imaging, and heat transfer setups are needed. Thermal models and computer-aided engineering tools are useful for robust designs. During abuse conditions, designs should prevent cell-to-cell propagation in a module/pack (i.e., keep the fire small and manageable). NREL's battery ISC device can be used for evaluating the robustness of a module/pack to cell-to-cell propagation.

  16. Performance of Li-Ion Cells Under Battery Voltage Charge Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A study consisting of electrochemical characterization and Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) cycling of Li-Ion cells from three vendors was initiated in 1999 to determine the cycling performance and to infuse the new technology in the future NASA missions. The 8-cell batteries included in this evaluation are prismatic cells manufactured by Mine Safety Appliances Company (MSA), cylindrical cells manufactured by SAFT and prismatic cells manufactured by Yardney Technical Products, Inc. (YTP). The three batteries were cycle tested in the LEO regime at 40% depth of discharge, and under a charge control technique that consists of battery voltage clamp with a current taper. The initial testing was conducted at 20 C; however, the batteries were cycled also intermittently at low temperatures. YTP 20 Ah cells consisted of mixed-oxide (Co and Ni) positive, graphitic carbon negative, LIPF6 salt mixed with organic carbonate solvents. The battery voltage clamp was 32 V. The low temperature cycling tests started after 4575 cycles at 20 C. The cells were not capable of cycling. at low temperature since the charge acceptance at battery level was poor. There was a cell in the battery that showed too high an end-of-charge (EOC) voltage thereby limiting the ability to charge the rest of the cells in the battery. The battery has completed 6714 cycles. SAFT 12 Ah cells consisted of mixed-oxide (Co and NO positive, graphitic carbon negative, LiPF6 salt mixed with organic carbonate solvents. The battery voltage clamp was for 30.8 V. The low temperature cycling tests started after 4594 cycles at 20 C. A cell that showed low end of discharge (EOD) and EOC voltages and three other cells that showed higher EOC voltages limited the charge acceptance at the selected voltage limit during charge. The cells were capable of cycling at 10 C and 0 C but the charge voltage limit had to be increased to 34.3 V (4.3 V per cell). The low temperature cycling may have induced poor chargeability since the voltage had to

  17. Polyacene (PAS) batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Yata, Shizukuni

    1995-12-31

    Human activity has been recognized to seriously influence the earth`s environment. Therefore, a clean battery with long-life and safe-use is important and its demand has increased at present. Of the ``clean`` batteries proposed, polymer batteries are the best candidate for environment-friendly and highly-reliable because they do not contain a toxic heavy metal such as cadmium and mercury. The author has developed polyacenic semiconductor (PAS) materials prepared from pyrolytic treatment of phenol-formaldehyde resin. PAS is a conductive polymer which can be doped to either P-type or N-type quite successfully and is extremely resistant to oxidation, chemicals and heat. Because PAS can be doped with both electron acceptors and donors, it is possible to design an all polymer battery using PAS for both electrodes. By taking advantage of stability of PAS, PAS battery can embody greater and longer-lasting reliability than conventional secondary batteries. Usually, lithium metal, which is used in the lithium secondary batteries for an anode-active material, makes dendrites during charging/discharging cycles, which limits the life of the batteries to a few dozen cycles. Furthermore, the dendrites of lithium metal have a safety problem because of its reactivity with water. An investigation of a new anode-material aiming to replace the lithium metal with another safety electrode, is one of the major trend, in secondary batteries. In this paper, the author first describes the structure and the properties of the PAS material, and second its application as an electrode material for rechargeable batteries.

  18. One-Step Synthesis of Titanium Oxyhydroxy-Fluoride Rods and Research on the Electrochemical Performance for Lithium-ion Batteries and Sodium-ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Biao; Gao, Zhan; Wang, Dake; Hao, Qiaoyan; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yongkun; Tang, Kaibin

    2015-10-01

    Titanium oxyhydroxy-fluoride, TiO0.9(OH)0.9F1.2 · 0.59H2O rods with a hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) structure, was synthesized via a facile one-step solvothermal method. The structure, morphology, and component of the products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), ion chromatograph, energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyses, and so on. Different rod morphologies which ranged from nanoscale to submicron scale were simply obtained by adjusting reaction conditions. With one-dimension channels for Li/Na intercalation/de-intercalation, the electrochemical performance of titanium oxyhydroxy-fluoride for both lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) was also studied. Electrochemical tests revealed that, for LIBs, titanium oxyhydroxy-fluoride exhibited a stabilized reversible capacity of 200 mAh g-1 at 25 mA g-1 up to 120 cycles in the electrode potential range of 3.0-1.2 V and 140 mAh g-1 at 250 mA g-1 up to 500 cycles, especially; for SIBs, a high capacity of 100 mAh g-1 was maintained at 25 mA g-1 after 115 cycles in the potential range of 2.9-0.5 V.

  19. Aeroelastic characteristics of the AH-64 bearingless tail rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, D.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a wind tunnel test program to determine the performance loads and dynamic characteristics of the Composite Flexbeam Tail Rotor (CFTR) for the AH-64 Advanced Attack Helicopter are reported. The CFTR uses an elastomeric shear attachment of the flexbeam to the hub to provide soft-inplane S-mode and stiff-inplane C-mode configuration. The properties of the elastomer were selected for proper frequency placement and scale damping of the inplane S-mode. Kinematic pitch-lag coupling was introduced to provide the first cyclic inplane C-mode damping at high collective pitch. The CFTR was tested in a wind tunnel over the full slideslip envelop of the AH-64. It is found that the rotor was aeroelastically stable throughout the complete collective pitch range and up to rotor speeds of 1403 rpm. The dynamic characteristics of the rotor were found to be satisfactory at all pitch angles and rotor speeds of the tunnel tests. The design characteristics of the rotor which permit the high performance characteristics are discussed. Several schematic drawings and photographs of the rotor are provided.

  20. AH-64 IHADSS aviator vision experiences in Operation Iraqi Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiatt, Keith L.; Rash, Clarence E.; Harris, Eric S.; McGilberry, William H.

    2004-09-01

    Forty AH-64 Apache aviators representing a total of 8564 flight hours and 2260 combat hours during Operation Iraqi Freedom and its aftermath were surveyed for their visual experiences with the AH-64's monocular Integrated Helmet and Display Sighting System (IHADSS) helmet-mounted display in a combat environment. A major objective of this study was to determine if the frequencies of reports of visual complaints and illusions reported in the previous studies, addressing mostly benign training environments, differ in the more stressful combat environments. The most frequently reported visual complaints, both while and after flying, were visual discomfort and headache, which is consistent with previous studies. Frequencies of complaints after flying in the current study were numerically lower for all complaint types, but differences from previous studies are statistically significant only for visual discomfort and disorientation (vertigo). With the exception of "brownout/whiteout," reports of degraded visual cues in the current study were numerically lower for all types, but statistically significant only for impaired depth perception, decreased field of view, and inadvertent instrumental meteorological conditions. This study also found statistically lower reports of all static and dynamic illusions (with one exception, disorientation). This important finding is attributed to the generally flat and featureless geography present in a large portion of the Iraqi theater and to the shift in the way that the aviators use the two disparate visual inputs presented by the IHADSS monocular design (i.e., greater use of both eyes as opposed to concentrating primarily on display imagery).

  1. Hybrid aqueous battery based on Na3V2(PO4)3/C cathode and zinc anode for potential large-scale energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guolong; Yang, Ze; Jiang, Yan; Zhang, Wuxing; Huang, Yunhui

    2016-03-01

    A hybrid aqueous rechargeable battery with Na3V2(PO4)3 as cathode and metal Zn as anode has been proposed. Na3V2(PO4)3 is co-incorporated by carbon and reduced graphene oxide. The battery delivers a capacity of 92 mAh g-1 at a current density of 50 mA g-1 with a high and flat operating voltage of 1.42 V. It exhibits a capacity of 60 mAh g-1 at a high current density of 2000 mA g-1, indicative of excellent rate capability. Such inexpensive and safe battery shows an energy density as high as 112 Wh kg-1, demonstrating that it is potential for future application in large-scale energy storage.

  2. Detecting Spread of Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Beyond China.

    PubMed

    Millman, Alexander J; Havers, Fiona; Iuliano, A Danielle; Davis, C Todd; Sar, Borann; Sovann, Ly; Chin, Savuth; Corwin, Andrew L; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Lindblade, Kim A; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Kaewthong, Viriya; Kile, James C; Nguyen, Hien T; Pham, Dong V; Donis, Ruben O; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2015-05-01

    During February 2013-March 2015, a total of 602 human cases of low pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) were reported; no autochthonous cases were reported outside mainland China. In contrast, since highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) reemerged during 2003 in China, 784 human cases in 16 countries and poultry outbreaks in 53 countries have been reported. Whether the absence of reported A(H7N9) outside mainland China represents lack of spread or lack of detection remains unclear. We compared epidemiologic and virologic features of A(H5N1) and A(H7N9) and used human and animal influenza surveillance data collected during April 2013-May 2014 from 4 Southeast Asia countries to assess the likelihood that A(H7N9) would have gone undetected during 2014. Surveillance in Vietnam and Cambodia detected human A(H5N1) cases; no A(H7N9) cases were detected in humans or poultry in Southeast Asia. Although we cannot rule out the possible spread of A(H7N9), substantial spread causing severe disease in humans is unlikely.

  3. Detecting Spread of Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Beyond China

    PubMed Central

    Havers, Fiona; Iuliano, A. Danielle; Davis, C. Todd; Sar, Borann; Sovann, Ly; Chin, Savuth; Corwin, Andrew L.; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Lindblade, Kim A.; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Kaewthong, Viriya; Kile, James C.; Nguyen, Hien T.; Pham, Dong V.; Donis, Ruben O.; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2015-01-01

    During February 2013–March 2015, a total of 602 human cases of low pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) were reported; no autochthonous cases were reported outside mainland China. In contrast, since highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) reemerged during 2003 in China, 784 human cases in 16 countries and poultry outbreaks in 53 countries have been reported. Whether the absence of reported A(H7N9) outside mainland China represents lack of spread or lack of detection remains unclear. We compared epidemiologic and virologic features of A(H5N1) and A(H7N9) and used human and animal influenza surveillance data collected during April 2013–May 2014 from 4 Southeast Asia countries to assess the likelihood that A(H7N9) would have gone undetected during 2014. Surveillance in Vietnam and Cambodia detected human A(H5N1) cases; no A(H7N9) cases were detected in humans or poultry in Southeast Asia. Although we cannot rule out the possible spread of A(H7N9), substantial spread causing severe disease in humans is unlikely. PMID:25897654

  4. Molecular Engineering with Organic Carbonyl Electrode Materials for Advanced Stationary and Redox Flow Rechargeable Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jun

    2017-04-03

    Organic carbonyl electrode materials that have the advantages of high capacity, low cost and being environmentally friendly, are regarded as powerful candidates for next-generation stationary and redox flow rechargeable batteries (RFBs). However, low carbonyl utilization, poor electronic conductivity and undesired dissolution in electrolyte are urgent issues to be solved. Here, we summarize a molecular engineering approach for tuning the capacity, working potential, concentration of active species, kinetics, and stability of stationary and redox flow batteries, which well resolves the problems of organic carbonyl electrode materials. As an example, in stationary batteries, 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) with two carbonyls delivers a capacity of 257 mAh g(-1) (2.27 V vs Li(+) /Li), while increasing the number of carbonyls to four with the formation of 5,7,12,14-pentacenetetrone results in a higher capacity of 317 mAh g(-1) (2.60 V vs Li(+) /Li). In RFBs, AQ, which is less soluble in aqueous electrolyte, reaches 1 M by grafting -SO3 H with the formation of 9,10-anthraquinone-2,7-disulphonic acid, resulting in a power density exceeding 0.6 W cm(-2) with long cycling life. Therefore, through regulating substituent groups, conjugated structures, Coulomb interactions, and the molecular weight, the electrochemical performance of carbonyl electrode materials can be rationally optimized. This review offers fundamental principles and insight into designing advanced carbonyl materials for the electrodes of next-generation rechargeable batteries.

  5. Electrocatalysis of lithium polysulfides: current collectors as electrodes in Li/S battery configuration.

    PubMed

    Babu, Ganguli; Ababtain, Khalid; Ng, K Y Simon; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy

    2015-03-05

    Lithium Sulfur (Li/S) chemistries are amongst the most promising next-generation battery technologies due to their high theoretical energy density. However, the detrimental effects of their intermediate byproducts, polysulfides (PS), have to be resolved to realize these theoretical performance limits. Confined approaches on using porous carbons to entrap PS have yielded limited success. In this study, we deviate from the prevalent approach by introducing catalysis concept in Li/S battery configuration. Engineered current collectors were found to be catalytically active towards PS, thereby eliminating the need for carbon matrix and their processing obligatory binders, additives and solvents. We reveal substantial enhancement in electrochemical performance and corroborate our findings using a detailed experimental parametric study involving variation of several kinetic parameters such as surface area, temperature, current rate and concentration of PS. The resultant novel battery configuration delivered a discharge capacity of 700 mAh g(-1) with the two dimensional (2D) planar Ni current collectors and an enhancement in the capacity up to 900 mAh g(-1) has been realized using the engineered three dimensional (3D) current collectors. The battery capacity has been tested for stability over 100 cycles of charge-discharge.

  6. A Fluorinated Ether Electrolyte Enabled High Performance Prelithiated Graphite/Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuru; Yu, Zhaoxin; Gordin, Mikhail L; Yi, Ran; Song, Jiangxuan; Wang, Donghai

    2017-03-01

    Lithium/sulfur (Li/S) batteries have attracted great attention as a promising energy storage technology, but so far their practical applications are greatly hindered by issues of polysulfide shuttling and unstable lithium/electrolyte interface. To address these issues, a feasible strategy is to construct a rechargeable prelithiated graphite/sulfur batteries. In this work, a fluorinated ether of bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) ether (BTFE) was reported to blend with 1,3-dioxolane (DOL) for making a multifunctional electrolyte of 1.0 M LiTFSI DOL/BTFE (1:1, v/v) to enable high performance prelithiated graphite/S batteries. First, the electrolyte significantly reduces polysulfide solubility to suppress the deleterious polysulfide shuttling and thus improves capacity retention of sulfur cathodes. Second, thanks to the low viscosity and good wettability, the fluorinated electrolyte dramatically enhances the reaction kinetics and sulfur utilization of high-areal-loading sulfur cathodes. More importantly, this electrolyte forms a stable solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer on graphite surface and thus enables remarkable cyclability of graphite anodes. By coupling prelithiated graphite anodes with sulfur cathodes with high areal capacity of ∼3 mAh cm(-2), we demonstrate prelithiated graphite/sulfur batteries that show high sulfur-specific capacity of ∼1000 mAh g(-1) and an excellent capacity retention of >65% after 450 cycles at C/10.

  7. Electrochemically Formed Ultrafine Metal Oxide Nanocatalysts for High-Performance Lithium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Yan, Pengfei; Xu, Wu; Zheng, Jianming; He, Yang; Luo, Langli; Bowden, Mark E; Wang, Chong-Min; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2016-08-10

    Lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries have an extremely high theoretical specific energy density when compared with conventional energy-storage systems. However, practical application of the Li-O2 battery system still faces significant challenges. In this work, we report a new approach for synthesis of ultrafine metal oxide nanocatalysts through an electrochemical prelithiation process. This process reduces the size of NiCo2O4 (NCO) particles from 20-30 nm to a uniformly distributed domain of ∼2 nm and significantly improves their catalytic activity. Structurally, the prelithiated NCO nanowires feature ultrafine NiO/CoO nanoparticles that are highly stable during prolonged cycles in terms of morphology and particle size, thus maintaining an excellent catalytic effect to oxygen reduction and evolution reactions. A Li-O2 battery using this catalyst demonstrated an initial capacity of 29 280 mAh g(-1) and retained a capacity of >1000 mAh g(-1) after 100 cycles based on the weight of the NCO active material. Direct in situ transmission electron microscopy observations conclusively revealed the lithiation/delithiation process of as-prepared NCO nanowires and provided in-depth understanding for both catalyst and battery chemistries of transition-metal oxides. This unique electrochemical approach could also be used to form ultrafine nanoparticles of a broad range of materials for catalyst and other applications.

  8. Electrocatalysis of Lithium Polysulfides: Current Collectors as Electrodes in Li/S Battery Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Ganguli; Ababtain, Khalid; Ng, K. Y. Simon; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Lithium Sulfur (Li/S) chemistries are amongst the most promising next-generation battery technologies due to their high theoretical energy density. However, the detrimental effects of their intermediate byproducts, polysulfides (PS), have to be resolved to realize these theoretical performance limits. Confined approaches on using porous carbons to entrap PS have yielded limited success. In this study, we deviate from the prevalent approach by introducing catalysis concept in Li/S battery configuration. Engineered current collectors were found to be catalytically active towards PS, thereby eliminating the need for carbon matrix and their processing obligatory binders, additives and solvents. We reveal substantial enhancement in electrochemical performance and corroborate our findings using a detailed experimental parametric study involving variation of several kinetic parameters such as surface area, temperature, current rate and concentration of PS. The resultant novel battery configuration delivered a discharge capacity of 700 mAh g−1 with the two dimensional (2D) planar Ni current collectors and an enhancement in the capacity up to 900 mAh g−1 has been realized using the engineered three dimensional (3D) current collectors. The battery capacity has been tested for stability over 100 cycles of charge-discharge. PMID:25740731

  9. Electrochemically Formed Ultrafine Metal Oxide Nanocatalysts for High-Performance Lithium–Oxygen Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin; Yan, Pengfei; Xu, Wu; Zheng, Jianming; He, Yang; Luo, Langli; Bowden, Mark E.; Wang, Chong-Min; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2016-08-10

    Lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) battery has an extremely high theoretical specific energy density as compared with conventional energy storage systems. However, practical application of Li-O2 battery system still faces significant challenges, especially its poor cyclability. In this work, we report a new approach to synthesis ultrafine metal oxide nanocatalysts through an electrochemical pre-lithiation process. This process reduces the size of NiCo2O4 (NCO) particles from 20~30 nm to a uniformly distributed domain of ~ 2 nm and largely improved their catalytic activity. Structurally, the pre-lithiated NCO NWs are featured by ultrafine NiO/CoO nanoparticles, which show high stability during prolonged cycles in terms of morphology and the particle size, therefore maintaining an excellent catalytic effect to oxygen reduction and evolution reactions. Li-O2 battery using this catalyst has demonstrated an initial capacity of 29,280 mAh g-1 and has retained a stable capacity of over 1,000 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles based on the weight of NCO active material. Direct in-situ TEM observation conclusively reveals the lithiation/delithiation process of as-prepared NCO NWs, clarifying the NCO/Li electrochemical reaction mechanism that can be extended to other transition-metal oxides and providing the in depth understandings on the catalysts and battery chemistries of other ternary transition-metal oxides.

  10. Deciphering Dimerization Modes of PAS Domains: Computational and Experimental Analyses of the AhR:ARNT Complex Reveal New Insights Into the Mechanisms of AhR Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Corrada, Dario; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor that mediates the biochemical response to xenobiotics and the toxic effects of a number of environmental contaminants, including dioxins. Recently, endogenous regulatory roles for the AhR in normal physiology and development have also been reported, thus extending the interest in understanding its molecular mechanisms of activation. Since dimerization with the AhR Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) protein, occurring through the Helix-Loop-Helix (HLH) and PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domains, is needed to convert the AhR into its transcriptionally active form, deciphering the AhR:ARNT dimerization mode would provide insights into the mechanisms of AhR transformation. Here we present homology models of the murine AhR:ARNT PAS domain dimer developed using recently available X-ray structures of other bHLH-PAS protein dimers. Due to the different reciprocal orientation and interaction surfaces in the different template dimers, two alternative models were developed for both the PAS-A and PAS-B dimers and they were characterized by combining a number of computational evaluations. Both well-established hot spot prediction methods and new approaches to analyze individual residue and residue-pairwise contributions to the MM-GBSA binding free energies were adopted to predict residues critical for dimer stabilization. On this basis, a mutagenesis strategy for both the murine AhR and ARNT proteins was designed and ligand-dependent DNA binding ability of the AhR:ARNT heterodimer mutants was evaluated. While functional analysis disfavored the HIF2α:ARNT heterodimer-based PAS-B model, most mutants derived from the CLOCK:BMAL1-based AhR:ARNT dimer models of both the PAS-A and the PAS-B dramatically decreased the levels of DNA binding, suggesting this latter model as the most suitable for describing AhR:ARNT dimerization. These novel results open new research directions focused at elucidating basic molecular mechanisms underlying the

  11. Assessing the potential risk of oil-field produced waters using a battery of bioassays/biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Ma, Mei; Cui, Qing; Wang, Zijian

    2008-06-01

    A battery of in vitro bioassays was conducted to assess the potential risks of organic extracts from oilfield produced wastewaters and from the receiving waters. In SOS/umu bioassay for the genotoxicity, our results showed that direct and indirect genotoxic substances were observed and metabolic activation greatly enhanced the genotoxic effects. In Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase bioassay, levels of AhR-agonists, expressed as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalences, varied from 13.3 to 16.7 pg L(-1). We conclude that oilfield produced wastewater contains substantial quantity of indirect genotoxic substances exclusive of AhR agonists. Both genotoxic and AhR agonistic chemicals could not be effectively removed by the treatment processes.

  12. A Deep Reduction and Partial Oxidation Strategy for Fabrication of Mesoporous Si Anode for Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jianwen; Li, Xiaona; Hou, Zhiguo; Zhang, Wanqun; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2016-02-23

    A deep reduction and partial oxidation strategy to convert low-cost SiO2 into mesoporous Si anode with the yield higher than 90% is provided. This strategy has advantage in efficient mesoporous silicon production and in situ formation of several nanometers SiO2 layer on the surface of silicon particles. Thus, the resulted silicon anode provides extremely high reversible capacity of 1772 mAh g(-1), superior cycling stability with more than 873 mAh g(-1) at 1.8 A g(-1) after 1400 cycles (corresponding to the capacity decay rate of 0.035% per cycle), and good rate capability (∼710 mAh g(-1) at 18A g(-1)). These promising results suggest that such strategy for mesoporous Si anode can be potentially commercialized for high energy Li-ion batteries.

  13. Characteristics of coke carbon modified with mesophase-pitch as a negative electrode for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuichi; Kikuchi, Yasuo; Nakano, Takeshi; Okuno, Gaku; Kobayakawa, Koichi; Kawai, Takanobu; Yokoyama, Akira

    To increase the charge-discharge capacity of carbon electrodes for lithium ion secondary batteries, coke carbon, a relatively cheap material, was modified with mesophase-pitch carbon by a heat treatment. While coke carbon powder, mesophase-pitch, and a mixture thereof (4:1 by weight) supplied between 0 and 1.5 V vs. Li/Li + an initial discharge capacity of about 295 mAh/g, 310 mAh/g, and 310 mAh/g, respectively, the modified coke deintercalated 400 mA h/g of lithium with a high degree of reversibility. The difference in capacity between the modified carbon and mixture are discussed based on the shape of their current-potential curves and their galvanostatic charge-discharge curves.

  14. Specially designed carbon black nanoparticle-sulfur composite cathode materials with a novel structure for lithium-sulfur battery application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhenjie; Xiao, Min; Wang, Shuanjin; Han, Dongmei; Song, Shuqin; Chen, Guohua; Meng, Yuezhong

    2015-07-01

    Sulfur is a promising cathode material with a high theoretical capacity of 1672 mAh g-1, but the challenges of the low electrical conductivity of sulfur and the high solubility of polysulfide intermediates still hinder its practical application. In this work, we design and synthesize a special carbon black nanoparticle-sulfur composite cathode material (NCB-S@NCB) with a novel structure and a high sulfur content of 84 wt% for lithium-sulfur battery application. The NCB-S@NCB composite cathode delivers a high initial discharge capacity of 1258 mAh g-1 and still maintains a reversible capacity of 865 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles with a relatively constant Coulombic efficiency around 98.0%.

  15. Studies of rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yi

    polyvinylpyrrolidone-modified carbon paper (CP-PVP) current collector in Li/polysulfide cells. PVP is soluble in the electrolyte solvent, but shows strong affinity with lithium polysulfides. The retention of polysulfides in the CP-PVP current collector is improved by ˜50%, which is measured by a linear sweep voltammetry method. Without LiNO3 additive in the electrolyte, the CP-PVP current collector with 50 ug of PVP can significantly improve cycling stability with a capacity retention of > 90% over 50 cycles at C/10 rate. With LiNO3 additive in the electrolyte, the cell shows a reversible capacity of > 1000 mAh g-1 and a capacity retention of > 80% over 100 cycles at C/5 rate. The third part of this thesis is about a study on a binder-free sulfur/carbon composite electrode prepared by a sulfur sublimation method for Li-S batteries. Sulfur nanoparticles fill large pores in a carbon paper substrate and primarily has a monoclinic crystal structure. The composite electrode shows a long cycle life of over 200 cycles with a good rate performance in Li-S batteries.

  16. Nano-structured electrocatalysts for high performance lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosavati, Negar

    Ni nanoparticles has been investigated as a carbon-free cathode material for dissolved polysulfide Li-S battery. A series of Ni nanoparticles with nominal particle size of 20, 40, and 100 nm have been used as electrocatalysts, and the effect of particle size on Li-S battery performance has been investigated. In addition, graphene has been chosen as a support to anchor the Ni nanoparticles, and the synergetic effect of carbon material and Ni nanoparticles on Li-S battery electrochemical performance has been studied. The results indicated there is a strong particle size effect. Ni/graphene electrode exhibits a capacity of 753 mAh g-1 sulfur after 40 cycles due to its high conductivity and electrocatalytic activity toward polysulfide reduction reaction. This capacity is significantly higher than similar studies. Based on the understanding of the electrocathalytic effect of Ni and capacity fading mechanism, transition metal nitrides has been investigated as a new class of cathode materials. Titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticle was studied as a novel cathode material for Li/dissolved polysulfide batteries. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was used to obtain a deeper understanding of the mechanism underlying polysulfide conversion reactions with TiN cathode, and during charge and discharge processes. TiN exhibited a superior performance in a Li/dissolved polysulfide battery configuration. Knowing the superior performance of TiN, the study was expanded to different transition metal nitrides to investigate the role of surface composition and morphology in enhancing the electrochemical performance of Li-S batteries. WN, Mo2N, and VN were synthesized and the electrochemical performance, surface composition, and oxidation/reduction mechanism of these cathodes electrodes were studied for lithium sulfur batteries. Understanding the fading mechanisms of dissolved polysulfide system for metal nitride cathodes, It was tried to enhance Li-S battery

  17. Assessment of battery technologies for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, E.Z. ); Henriksen, G.L. )

    1990-02-01

    This document, Part 2 of Volume 2, provides appendices to this report and includes the following technologies, zinc/air battery; lithium/molybdenum disulfide battery; sodium/sulfur battery; nickel/cadmium battery; nickel/iron battery; iron/oxygen battery and iron/air battery. (FI)

  18. HST Replacement Battery Initial Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krol, Stan; Waldo, Greg; Hollandsworth, Roger

    2009-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) original Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) batteries were replaced during the Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) after 19 years and one month on orbit.The purpose of this presentation is to highlight the findings from the assessment of the initial sm4 replacement battery performance. The batteries are described, the 0 C capacity is reviewed, descriptions, charts and tables reviewing the State Of Charge (SOC) Performance, the Battery Voltage Performance, the battery impedance, the minimum voltage performance, the thermal performance, the battery current, and the battery system recharge ratio,

  19. Battery equalization active methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo-Lozano, Javier; Romero-Cadaval, Enrique; Milanes-Montero, M. Isabel; Guerrero-Martinez, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    Many different battery technologies are available for the applications which need energy storage. New researches are being focused on Lithium-based batteries, since they are becoming the most viable option for portable energy storage applications. As most of the applications need series battery strings to meet voltage requirements, battery imbalance is an important matter to be taken into account, since it leads the individual battery voltages to drift apart over time, and premature cells degradation, safety hazards, and capacity reduction will occur. A large number of battery equalization methods can be found, which present different advantages/disadvantages and are suitable for different applications. The present paper presents a summary, comparison and evaluation of the different active battery equalization methods, providing a table that compares them, which is helpful to select the suitable equalization method depending on the application. By applying the same weight to the different parameters of comparison, switch capacitor and double-tiered switching capacitor have the highest ratio. Cell bypass methods are cheap and cell to cell ones are efficient. Cell to pack, pack to cell and cell to pack to cell methods present a higher cost, size, and control complexity, but relatively low voltage and current stress in high-power applications.

  20. Advanced Thermal Batteries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    demonstrated that a thermal battery with a LiAl alloy anode, a NaAlCl4 anolyte , and a catholyte made primarily with MoCl5 was at least feasible. However, the...Varying Amounts of Mg Arranged In order Of Increasing Magnesiun 33 Battery Test Data For Batteries Made With 102 Anodes That Contained Anolyte and LiAl...1.75 gm anolyte , and 1.9 grams catholyte, to prepare the first McO 3 cells. The cells averaged 0.081 inches thick. These cells were tested on the

  1. Magnesium battery disposal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffer, Louis; Atwater, Terrill

    1994-12-01

    This study assesses the disposal characteristics of U.S. Army procured military magnesium batteries under current Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste identification regulations administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Magnesium batteries were tested at 100, 50, 10 and 0 percent remaining state of charge. Present findings indicate that magnesium batteries with less than 50 percent remaining charge do not exceed the federal regulatory limit of 5.0 mg/L for chromium. All other RCRA contaminates were below regulatory limits at all levels of remaining charge. Assay methods, findings, disposal requirements and design implications are discussed.

  2. Battery scanning system

    SciTech Connect

    Dieu, L.F.

    1984-11-20

    A battery scanning system which is capable of monitoring and displaying the voltage of each cell in a battery or upon command provides the cell voltage distribution by displaying the cell number and voltage value of highest and lowest cell. The system has a digital logic system, display, input switches for operator generated variables, an alarm, relays, relay selection gates, an optically coupled isolation amplifier, power source and an analog-digital converter. The optically coupled analog amplifier electrically isolates the system from the battery so that large voltage offsets will not adversely affect the automatic measuring of the cells.

  3. BEEST: Electric Vehicle Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: The U.S. spends nearly a $1 billion per day to import petroleum, but we need dramatically better batteries for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles (EV/PHEV) to truly compete with gasoline-powered cars. The 10 projects in ARPA-E’s BEEST Project, short for “Batteries for Electrical Energy Storage in Transportation,” could make that happen by developing a variety of rechargeable battery technologies that would enable EV/PHEVs to meet or beat the price and performance of gasoline-powered cars, and enable mass production of electric vehicles that people will be excited to drive.

  4. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Yahnke, M.S.; Shlomo, G.; Anderson, M.A.

    1994-08-30

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range. 2 figs.

  5. Battery Technology Stores Clean Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Headquartered in Fremont, California, Deeya Energy Inc. is now bringing its flow batteries to commercial customers around the world after working with former Marshall Space Flight Center scientist, Lawrence Thaller. Deeya's liquid-cell batteries have higher power capability than Thaller's original design, are less expensive than lead-acid batteries, are a clean energy alternative, and are 10 to 20 times less expensive than nickel-metal hydride batteries, lithium-ion batteries, and fuel cell options.

  6. Improving the electrochemical behavior of lithium-sulfur batteries through silica-coated nickel-foam cathode collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung Ho; Cho, Sung Man; Bae, Ki Yoon; Kim, Byung Hyuk; Yoon, Woo Young

    2017-02-01

    A facile method that improves the initial specific capacity and capacity retention rate of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, using silica-back-coated nickel foam has been studied. A new cathode collector in which silica is back-coated onto the nickel foam is fabricated by a facile method that utilizes an ultrasonicator for reducing the electrolyte viscosity at the surface of the sulfur electrode using a polysulfide absorbent. The nickel foam provides more reaction sites than an aluminum current collector does, thus allowing the back-coated silica to absorb the polysulfides. This synergetic effect of nickel foam and silica suppresses the increasing viscosity of the electrolyte and leads to a higher initial specific capacity (1341 mAh/g) at a 0.2-C rate and a higher capacity retention rate after 150 cycles (85%), relative to pristine Li-S batteries (951 mAh/g and 79%, respectively).

  7. Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled SiO-SnxCoyCz Anode for High-Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Fu, Yanbao; Ling, Min; Jia, Zhe; Song, Xiangyun; Chen, Zonghai; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil; Liu, Gao

    2016-06-01

    A SiOSnCoC composite anode is assembled using a conductive polymer binder for the application in next-generation high energy density lithium-ion batteries. A specific capacity of 700 mAh/g is achieved at a 1C (900 mA/g) rate. A high active material loading anode with an areal capacity of 3.5 mAh/cm(2) is demonstrated by mixing SiOSnCoC with graphite. To compensate for the lithium loss in the first cycle, stabilized lithium metal powder (SLMP) is used for prelithiation; when paired with a commercial cathode, a stable full cell cycling performance with a 86% first cycle efficiency is realized. By achieving these important metrics toward a practical application, this conductive polymer binder/SiOSnCoC anode system presents great promise to enable the next generation of high-energy lithium-ion batteries.

  8. The activation mechanism of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by molecular chaperone HSP90

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Noriko; Fukuda, Kana; Nagata, Yuhtaroh; Okada, Hirotaka; Haga, Asami; Hatakeyama, Shiori; Yoshida, Shiho; Okamoto, Tomoya; Hosaka, Miki; Sekine, Kazuhiro; Ohtaka, Kei; Yamamoto, Soh; Otaka, Michiro; Grave, Ewa; Itoh, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that associates with the molecular chaperone HSP90 in the cytoplasm. The activation mechanism of the AhR is not yet fully understood. It has been proposed that after binding of ligands such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 3methylcholanthrene (3-MC), or β-naphthoflavone (β-NF), the AhR dissociates from HSP90 and translocates to the nucleus. It has also been hypothesized that the AhR translocates to the nucleus and forms a complex with HSP90 and other co-chaperones. There are a few reports about the direct association or dissociation of AhR and HSP90 due to difficulties in purifying AhR. We constructed and purified the PAS domain from AhR. Binding of the AhR-PAS domain to β-NF affinity resin suggested that it possesses ligand-binding affinity. We demonstrated that the AhR-PAS domain binds to HSP90 and the association is not affected by ligand binding. The ligand 17-DMAG inhibited binding of HSP90 to GST-PAS. In an immunoprecipitation assay, HSP90 was co-immunoprecipitated with AhR both in the presence or absence of ligand. Endogenous AhR decreased in the cytoplasm and increased in the nucleus of HeLa cells 15 min after treatment with ligand. These results suggested that the ligand-bound AhR is translocated to nucleus while in complex with HSP90. We used an in situ proximity ligation assay to confirm whether AhR was translocated to the nucleus alone or together with HSP90. HSP90 was co-localized with AhR after the nuclear translocation. It has been suggested that the ligand-bound AhR was translocated to the nucleus with HSP90. Activated AhR acts as a transcription factor, as shown by the transcription induction of the gene CYP1A1 8 h after treatment with β-NF. PMID:25349783

  9. Nanoscale silicon as anode for Li-ion batteries: The fundamentals, promises, and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Meng; He, Yang; Zheng, Jianming; Wang, Chongmin

    2015-10-01

    Silicon (Si), associated with its natural abundance, low discharge voltage vs. Li/Li+, and extremely high theoretical discharge capacity (~ 4200 mAh g-1,), has been extensively explored as anode for lithium ion battery. One of the key challenges for using Si as anode is the large volume change upon lithiation and delithiation, which causes a fast capacity fading. Over the last few years, dramatic progress has been made for addressing this issue. In this paper, we summarize the progress towards tailoring of Si as anode for lithium ion battery. The paper is organized such that it covers the fundamentals, the promise offered based on nanoscale designing, and the remaining challenges that need to be attacked to allow using of Si based materials as anode for battery.

  10. Mechanochemical approaches to employ silicon as a lithium-ion battery anode

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoi, Norihiro Bahena-Garrido, Sharon; Tanaka, Yasumitsu; Qiwu, Zhang

    2015-05-15

    Silicon is essential as an active material in lithium-ion batteries because it provides both high-charge and optimal cycle characteristics. The authors attempted to realize a composite by a simple mechanochemical grinding approach of individual silicon (Si) particles and copper monoxide (CuO) particles to serve as an active material in the anode and optimize the charge-discharge characteristics of a lithium-ion battery. The composite with Si and CuO allowed for a homogenous dispersion with nano-scale Si grains, nano-scale copper-silicon alloy grains and silicon monoxide oxidized the oxide from CuO. The authors successfully achieved the synthesis of an active composite unites the structural features of an active material based on silicon composite as an anode in Li-ion battery with high capacity and cyclic reversible charge properties of 3256 mAh g{sup −1} after 200 cycles.

  11. Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The objective of the Eagle-Picher nickel-iron battery program is to develop a nickel-iron battery for use in the propulsion of electric and electric-hybrid vehicles. To date, the program has concentrated on the characterization, fabrication and testing of the required electrodes, the fabrication and testing of full-scale cells, and finally, the fabrication and testing of full-scale (270 AH) six (6) volt modules. Electrodes of the final configuration have now exceeded 1880 cycles and are showing minimal capacity decline. Full-scale cells have presently exceeded 600 cycles and are tracking the individual electrode tests almost identically. Six volt module tests have exceeded 500 cycles, with a specific energy of 48 Wh/kg. Results to date indicate the nickel-iron battery is beginning to demonstrate the performance required for electric vehicle propulsion.

  12. Chemical modification approaches for improved performance of Na-ion battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byles, Bryan; Clites, Mallory; Pomerantseva, Ekaterina

    2015-08-01

    Na-ion batteries have received considerable attention in recent years but still face performance challenges such as limited cycle lifetime and low capacities at high current rates. In this work, we propose novel combinations of preand post-synthesis treatments to modify known Na-ion battery electrode materials to achieve enhanced electrochemical performance. We work with two model metal oxide materials to demonstrate the effectiveness of the different treatments. First, wet chemical preintercalation is combined with post-synthesis aging, hydrothermal treatment, and annealing of α-V2O5, resulting in enhanced capacity retention in a Na-ion battery system. The hydrothermal treatment resulted in an increased specific capacity of nearly 300 mAh/g. Second, post-synthesis acid leaching is performed on α- MnO2, also resulting in improved electrochemical capacity. The chemical, structural, and morphological changes brought about by the modifications are fully characterized.

  13. Paper-based, printed zinc-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, M.; Winther-Jensen, B.; Clark, N. B.

    A flexible battery is printed on paper by screen-printing a zinc/carbon/polymer composite anode on one side of the sheet, polymerising a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) cathode on the other side of the sheet, and applying a lithium chloride electrolyte between the two electrodes. The PEDOT cathode is prepared by inkjet printing a pattern of iron(III) p-toluenesulfonate as a solution in butan-1-ol onto paper, followed by vapour phase polymerisation of the monomer. The electrolyte is prepared as a solution of lithium chloride and lithium hydroxide and also applied by inkjet printing on to paper, where it is absorbed into the sheet cross-section. Measurements on a zinc/carbon-PEDOT/air battery in a similar configuration on a polyethylene naphthalate substrate shows a discharge capacity of up to 1.4 mAh cm -2 for an initial load of 2.5 mg zinc, equivalent to almost 70% of the zinc content of the anode, which generates 0.8 V at a discharge current of 500 μA. By comparison, the performance of the paper-based battery is lower, with an open-circuit voltage of about 1.2 V and a discharge capacity of 0.5 mAh cm 2. It appears that the paper/electrolyte combination has a limited ability to take up anode oxidation products before suffering a reduction in ionic mobility. The effects of different zinc/carbon/binder combinations, differences in application method for the zinc/carbon composite and various electrolyte compositions are discussed.

  14. Enhanced performance of spherical natural graphite coated by Li4Ti5O12 as anode for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mi; Tian, Yanyan; Zheng, Xiaodong; Gao, Jun; Huang, Bing

    2012-12-01

    The natural graphite (NG) is coated with Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) and the composite shows a markedly enhanced rate performance due to the decrease of charge transfer resistance after LTO coating. The specific capacity of the NG charge-discharged at 2 C is increased by 60.3% (128.7 vs. 80.3 mAh g-1) by coating it with 1 wt.% of Li4Ti5O12 (LTO). The comparison of the NG and that coated with 1 wt.% LTO at 0.1 C shows that the initial reversible capacity is increased from 318.1 mAh g-1 to 357.5 mAh g-1 after coating, while the total irreversible capacity loss after 50 cycles is decreased from 122.8 mAh g-1 to 103.9 mAh g-1. The composite improves the energy and power densities, safety, cycle life and lowers the price of the lithium-ion battery while avoiding the gas-swelling of full battery caused by Ti4+ because the final coating material is the lithiated LTO (Li7Ti5O12 or Li9Ti5O12).

  15. A high performance hybrid battery based on aluminum anode and LiFePO4 cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Bi, Zhonghe; Liu, Hansan; Bridges, Craig A.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2015-12-07

    A unique battery hybrid utilizes an aluminum anode, a LiFePO4 cathode and an acidic ionic liquid electrolyte based on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMImCl) and aluminum trichloride (AlCl 3) (EMImCl-AlCl 3, 1-1.1 in molar ratio) with or without LiAlCl4 is proposed. This hybrid ion battery delivers an initial high capacity of 160 mAh g-1 at a current rate of C/5. It also shows good rate capability and cycling performance.

  16. Improved electrochemical performances of CuO nanotube array prepared via electrodeposition as anode for lithium ion battery

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Anguo Zhou, Shibiao; Zuo, Chenggang; Zhuan, Yongbing; Ding, Xiang

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: CuO nanotube array electrodes prepared by electrodeposition method exhibit an excellent lithium ion storage ability as anode of Li-ion battery. - Highlights: • CuO nanotube arrays are synthesized by an electrodeposition method. • CuO nanotube shows a high-rate performance. • CuO nanotube shows an excellent cycling performance. - Abstract: We report a facile strategy to prepared CuO nanotube arrays directly grown on Cu plate through the electrodeposition method. The as-prepared CuO nanotubes show a quasi-cylinder nanostructure with internal diameters of ca. ∼100 nm, external diameters of ca. ∼120 nm, and average length of ∼3 μm. As an anode for lithium ion batteries, the electrochemical properties of the CuO nanotube arrays are investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge/discharge tests. Due to the unique nanotube nanostructure, the as-prepared CuO electrodes exhibit good rate performance (550 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.1 C and 464 mAh g{sup −1} at 1 C) and cycling performance (581 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.1 C and 538 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.5 C)

  17. Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric-vehicle propulsion. Annual report for 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Progress in work at Exide in three main development areas, i.e., battery design and development, nickel cathode study, and electrochemical studies is reported. Battery design and development concentrated on the optimization of design parameters, including electrode spacing, charging methods, electrolyte concentration, the design and fabrication of prototype cells and modules, and testing to verify these parameters. Initial experiments indicated that an interelectrode spacing of 2.5 mm was optimum when normal (D.C.) charging is used. It was during these experiments that a high rate charging technique was developed to deposit a dense active zinc which did not shed during vibration. A 4 cell - 300 Ah experimental module was built and sent to NBTL for testing. Initial testing on this module and a 300 Ah cell are reported. Experiments on electrolyte concentration indicate that higher concentrations of KOH (8M, 9M or 10M) are beneficial to capacity maintenance. Available nickel cathodes were evaluated for possible use in the VIBROCEL. These included pocket, sintered plaque impregnated, nickel plated steel wool impregnated, plastic bonded and CMG (multifoil) electrodes. These electrodes have Coulombic densities ranging from 70 Ah/Kg for pocket plates to 190 Ah/Kg for CMG electrodes. Detailed test data are presented for each type including rate capability, effect of zincate on performance, and capacity maintenance with cycling. Work on zinc deposition emphasized the special charging technique. This is a deposition using special waveforms of charging current, to deposit dense crystalline zinc on the anode substrate.

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis and potential applicability of rhombohedral siderite as a high-capacity anode material for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shiqiang; Yu, Yue; Wei, Shanshan; Wang, Yuxi; Zhao, Chenhao; Liu, Rui; Shen, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    Natural siderite is a valuable iron mineral composed of ferrous carbonate (FeCO3), which is commonly found in hydrothermal veins and contains no sulfur or phosphorus. In this paper, micro-sized FeCO3 crystallites are synthesized via a facile hydrothermal route, and almost all of them possess a rhombohedral shape similar to that of natural products. When applied as an anode material for lithium ion batteries, the synthetic siderite can deliver an initial specific discharge capacity of ∼1587 mAh g-1 with a coulombic efficiency of 68% at 200 mA g-1, remaining a reversible value of 1018 mAh g-1 over 120 cycles. Even at a high current density of 1000 mA g-1, after 120 cycles the residual specific capacity (812 mAh g-1) is still higher than the theoretical capacity of FeCO3 (463 mAh g-1). Moreover, a novel reversible conversion mechanism accounts for the excellent electrochemical performances of rhombohedral FeCO3 to a great extent, implying the potential applicability of synthetic siderite as lithium ion battery anodes.

  19. Centrifugally-spun carbon microfibers and porous carbon microfibers as anode materials for sodium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirican, Mahmut; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2016-09-01

    Natural abundance and low cost of sodium resources bring forward the sodium-ion batteries as a promising alternative to widely-used lithium-ion batteries. However, insufficient energy density and low cycling stability of current sodium-ion batteries hinder their practical use for next-generation smart power grid and stationary storage applications. Electrospun carbon microfibers have recently been introduced as a high-performance anode material for sodium-ion batteries. However, electrospinning is not feasible for mass production of carbon microfibers due to its complex processing condition, low production rate and high cost. Herein, we report centrifugal spinning, a high-rate and low-cost microfiber production method, as an alternative approach to electrospinning for carbon microfiber production and introduce centrifugally-spun carbon microfibers (CMFs) and porous carbon microfibers (PCMFs) as anode materials for sodium-ion batteries. Electrochemical performance results indicated that the highly porous nature of centrifugally-spun PCMFs led to increased Na+ storage capacity and improved cycling stability. The reversible capacity of centrifugally-spun PCMF anodes at the 200th cycle was 242 mAh g-1, which was much higher than that of centrifugally-spun CMFs (143 mAh g-1). The capacity retention and coulombic efficiency of the centrifugally-spun PCMF anodes were 89.0% and 99.9%, respectively, even at the 200th cycle.

  20. Characterization of LiFePO{sub 4} cathode by addition of graphene for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Honggowiranto, Wagiyo Kartini, Evvy

    2016-02-08

    The improvement of LiFePO{sub 4} (LFP) cathode performance has been performed by addition of Graphene (LFP+Graphene). The cathode was prepared from the active material with 5 wt % graphene and 10 wt % polyvinylidene fluoride in an n-methyl pyrrolidone solvent. Another cathode material used only 5% artificial graphite for comparison (LFP+Graphite). The crystal structure, microstructure, electronic conductivity, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) of the cathodes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and Impedance spectroscopy, respectively. Two half cell coin batteries were assembled using a lithium metal as an anode and LiPf{sub 6} as an electrolyte, and two cathodes (LFP+Graphene) and (LFP+Graphite). Charge discharge performance of battery was characterized by Battery analyser (BTS 8). The electronic conductivity of cathode with grapheme increased of about one order magnitude compared with the only cathode with graphite, namely from 1.97E-7S/cm (LFP+Graphite) to 1.92E-6S/cm (LFP+Graphene). The charge-discharge capacity after 10{sup th} cycles of LiFePO{sub 4} with graphene decreased of about 0.68% from 114.3 mAh/g to113.1 mAh/g, while LFP with graphite decreased of about 2.84% from 110.2 mAh/g to 107.1 mAh, at 0.1C-rates. It could be concluded that the addition of graphene has increased the ionic conductivity, and improved performance of the LFP lithium ion battery, such as higher capacity and better efficiency.

  1. Poly(exTTF): a novel redox-active polymer as active material for li-organic batteries.

    PubMed

    Häupler, Bernhard; Burges, René; Friebe, Christian; Janoschka, Tobias; Schmidt, Daniel; Wild, Andreas; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2014-08-01

    The first polymer bearing exTTF units intended for the use in electrical charge storage is presented. The polymer undergoes a redox reaction involving two electrons at -0.20 V vs Fc/Fc(+) and is applied as active cathode material in a Li-organic battery. The received coin cells feature a theoretical capacity of 132 mAh g(-1) , a cell potential of 3.5 V, and a lifetime exceeding more than 250 cycles.

  2. Oxygen-selective immobilized liquid membranes for operation of lithium-air batteries in ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Xu, Wu; Liu, Wei

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, nonaqueous-electrolyte-based Li-air batteries with O2-selective immobilized liquid membranes have been developed and operated in ambient air with 20~30% relative humidity(RH). Continuous anhydrous O2 can be supplied from the ambient through a membrane barrier layer at interface of the cathode and ambient air. The membranes allow O2 permeate through while blocking moisture. These membranes were prepared by loading O2-selective liquid fluids such as silicone oils into porous supports such as porous metal sheets and Teflon (PTFE) films. It was found that silicone oil of high viscosity shows better performance. The membrane performance was not affected by the oil loading temperature. The immobilized silicone oil (viscosity 100,000cst) membrane in porous PTFE film enabled the Li-air batteries with Ketjen black carbon air electrodes to operate in ambient air (with 20% RH) for 16.3 days with a specific capacity of 789 mAh/g carbon and a specific energy of 2182 Wh/kg carbon. Its performance is much better than reference battery assembled with the same battery material but by use of a commercial, porous PTFE diffusion membranes as the moisture barrier layer on the cathode, which only had a discharge time of 5.5 days corresponding to a specific capacity of 267 mAh/g carbon and a specific energy of 704 Wh/kg carbon. The Li-air battery with the present selective membrane barrier layer even showed better performance in ambient air operation (20% RH) than the reference battery tested in the dry air box (< 1% RH).

  3. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an improvement in a sodium sulfur battery construction in which a seal between various battery compartments is made by a structure in which a soft metal seal member is held in a sealing position by holding structure. A pressure applying structure is used to apply pressure on the soft metal seal member when it is being held in sealing relationship to a surface of a container member of the sodium sulfur battery by the holding structure. The improvement comprises including a thin, well-adhered, soft metal layer on the surface of the container member of the sodium sulfur battery to which the soft metal seal member is to be bonded.

  4. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  5. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  6. Lithium Sulfuryl Chloride Battery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Primary batteries , Electrochemistry, Ionic current, Electrolytes, Cathodes(Electrolytic cell), Anodes(Electrolytic cell), Thionyl chloride ...Phosphorus compounds, Electrical conductivity, Calibration, Solutions(Mixtures), Electrical resistance, Performance tests, Solvents, Lithium compounds

  7. Thermal battery degradation mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Missert, Nancy A.; Brunke, Lyle Brent

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to investigate the effect of accelerated aging on LiSi based anodes in simulated MC3816 batteries. DRIFTS spectra showed that the oxygen, carbonate, hydroxide and sulfur content of the anodes changes with aging times and temperatures, but not in a monotonic fashion that could be correlated to phase evolution. Bands associated with sulfur species were only observed in anodes taken from batteries aged in wet environments, providing further evidence for a reaction pathway facilitated by H2S transport from the cathode, through the separator, to the anode. Loss of battery capacity with accelerated aging in wet environments was correlated to loss of FeS2 in the catholyte pellets, suggesting that the major contribution to battery performance degradation results from loss of active cathode material.

  8. A Modified Delphi Study to Define "Ah Ha" Moments in Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilcher, Jobeth

    2015-01-01

    Ah ha moments are often mentioned in education literature. These moments are suggested to be a powerful aspect of learning, yet limited research is present regarding this topic. Ah ha learning moments have also not been defined in the education literature, resulting in the likelihood that each educator and learner may have differing definitions.…

  9. Novel avian influenza A(H7N9) virus in tree sparrow, Shanghai, China, 2013.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baihui; Zhang, Xi; Zhu, Wenfei; Teng, Zheng; Yu, Xuelian; Gao, Ye; Wu, Di; Pei, Enle; Yuan, Zhengan; Yang, Lei; Wang, Dayan; Shu, Yuelong; Wu, Fan

    2014-05-01

    In spring 2013, influenza A(H7N9) virus was isolated from an apparently healthy tree sparrow in Chongming Dongping National Forest Park, Shanghai City, China. The entire gene constellation of the virus is similar to that of isolates from humans, highlighting the need to monitor influenza A(H7N9) viruses in different species.

  10. Subclinical avian influenza A(H5N1) virus infection in human, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Le, Mai Quynh; Horby, Peter; Fox, Annette; Nguyen, Hien Tran; Le Nguyen, Hang Khanh; Hoang, Phuong Mai Vu; Nguyen, Khanh Cong; de Jong, Menno D; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Rogier van Doorn, H; Farrar, Jeremy; Wertheim, Heiman F L

    2013-10-01

    Laboratory-confirmed cases of subclinical infection with avian influenza A(H5N1) virus in humans are rare, and the true number of these cases is unknown. We describe the identification of a laboratory-confirmed subclinical case in a woman during an influenza A(H5N1) contact investigation in northern Vietnam.

  11. Human Infection with Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus - China

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduction Human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus – China Disease outbreak news 18 January 2017 On ... confirmed human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus and on 12 January 2017, the Health Bureau, ...

  12. Pityriazepin and other potent AhR ligands isolated from Malassezia furfur yeast.

    PubMed

    Mexia, Nikitia; Gaitanis, Georgios; Velegraki, Aristea; Soshilov, Anatoly; Denison, Michael S; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2015-04-01

    Malassezia furfur yeast strains isolated from diseased human skin preferentially biosynthesize indole alkaloids which can be detected in the human skin and are highly potent activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR-dependent gene expression. Chemical analysis of an EtOAc extract of a M. furfur strain obtained from diseased human skin and grown on l-tryptophan agar revealed several known AhR active tryptophan metabolites along with a previously unidentified compound, pityriazepin. While its structure resembled that of the known alkaloid pityriacitrin, the comprised pyridine ring had been transformed into an azepinone. The indoloazepinone scaffold of pityriazepin is extremely rare in nature and has only been reported once previously. Pityriazepin, like the other isolated compounds, was found to be a potent activator of the AhR-dependent reporter gene assay in recombinant cell lines derived from four different species, although significant species differences in relative potency were observed. The ability of pityriazepin to competitively bind to the AhR and directly stimulate AhR DNA binding classified it as a new naturally-occurring potent AhR agonist. M. furfur produces an expanded collection of extremely potent naturally occurring AhR agonists, which produce their biological effects in a species-specific manner.

  13. AhR-mediated Gene Expression in the Developing Mouse Telencephalon

    PubMed Central

    Gohlke, Julia M; Stockton, Pat S; Sieber, Stella; Foley, Julie; Portier, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesize that TCDD induced developmental neurotoxicity is modulated through an AhR dependent interaction with key regulatory neuronal differentiation pathways during telencephalon development. To test this hypothesis we examined global gene expression in both dorsal and ventral telencephalon tissues in E13.5 AhR -/- and wildtype mice exposed to TCDD or vehicle. Consistent with previous biochemical, pathological and behavioral studies, our results suggest TCDD initiated changes in gene expression in the developing telencephalon are primarily AhR dependent, as no statistically significant gene expression changes are evident after TCDD exposure in AhR -/- mice. Based on a gene regulatory network for neuronal specification in the developing telencephalon, the present analysis suggests differentiation of GABAergic neurons in the ventral telencephalon is compromised in TCDD exposed and AhR-/- mice. In addition, our analysis suggests Sox11 may be directly regulated by AhR based on gene expression and comparative genomics analyses. In conclusion, this analysis supports the hypothesis that AhR has a specific role in the normal development of the telencephalon and provides a mechanistic framework for neurodevelopmental toxicity of chemicals that perturb AhR signaling. PMID:19465110

  14. Battery packaging - Technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Maiser, Eric

    2014-06-16

    This paper gives a brief overview of battery packaging concepts, their specific advantages and drawbacks, as well as the importance of packaging for performance and cost. Production processes, scaling and automation are discussed in detail to reveal opportunities for cost reduction. Module standardization as an additional path to drive down cost is introduced. A comparison to electronics and photovoltaics production shows 'lessons learned' in those related industries and how they can accelerate learning curves in battery production.

  15. OAO battery data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaston, S.; Wertheim, M.; Orourke, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Summary, consolidation and analysis of specifications, manufacturing process and test controls, and performance results for OAO-2 and OAO-3 lot 20 Amp-Hr sealed nickel cadmium cells and batteries are reported. Correlation of improvements in control requirements with performance is a key feature. Updates for a cell/battery computer model to improve performance prediction capability are included. Applicability of regression analysis computer techniques to relate process controls to performance is checked.

  16. Lead-acid battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A light weight lead-acid battery (30) having a positive terminal (36) and a negative terminal (34) and including one or more cells or grid stacks having a plurality of vertically stacked conductive monoplates (10, 20) with positive active material and negative active material deposited on alternating plates in the cell or grid stack. Electrolyte layers (26, 28) positioned between each monoplate are included to provide a battery cell having four sides which is capable of being electrically charged and discharged. Two vertical positive bus bars (42, 43) are provided on opposite sides of the battery cell for connecting the monoplates (10) with positive active material together in parallel current conducting relation. In addition, two negative bus bars (38, 39) on opposite sides of the battery cell each being adjacent the positive bus bars are provided for connecting the monoplates (20) with negative active material together in parallel current conducting relation. The positive (42, 43) and negative (38, 39) bus bars not only provide a low resistance method for connecting the plurality of conductive monoplates of their respective battery terminals (36, 34) but also provides support and structural strength to the battery cell structure. In addition, horizontal orientation of monoplates (10, 20) is provided in a vertical stacking arrangement to reduce electrolyte stratification and short circuiting due to flaking of positive and negative active materials from the monoplates.

  17. Performance of Nickel-Cadmium Batteries on the GOES I-K Series of Weather Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Sat P.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Alsbach, Walter G.

    1997-01-01

    The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) spacecraft (among others) to support weather forecasting, severe storm tracking, and meteorological research by the National Weather Service (NWS). The latest in the GOES series consists of 5 spacecraft (originally named GOES I-M), three of which are in orbit and two more in development. Each of five spacecraft carry two Nickel-Cadmium batteries, with batteries designed and manufactured by Space Systems Loral (SS/L) and cells manufactured by Gates Aerospace Batteries (sold to SAFT in 1993). The battery, which consists of 28 cells with a 12 Ah capacity, provides the spacecraft power needs during the ascent phase and during the semi-annual eclipse seasons lasting for approximately 45 days each. The maximum duration eclipses are 72 minutes long which result in a 60 percent depth of discharge (DOD) of the batteries. This paper provides a description of the batteries, reconditioning setup, DOD profile during a typical eclipse season, and flight performance from the 3 launched spacecraft (now GOES 8, 9, and 10) in orbit.

  18. Performance of Nickel-Cadmium Batteries on the GOES 1-K Series of Weather Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Sat P.; Alsbach, Walter G.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    1998-01-01

    The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) spacecraft (among others) to support weather forecasting, severe storm tracking, and meteorological research by the National Weather Service (NWS). The latest in the GOES series consists of five spacecraft (originally named GOES 1-M), three of which are in orbit and and two more in development. Each of the five spacecraft carries two Nickel-Cadmium battery, with batteries designed by Space Systems Loral (SS/L) and cells manufactured by Gates Aerospace Batteries (sold to SAFT in 1993). The battery, which consists of 28 cells with a 12 Ah capacity, provides the spacecraft power needs during the ascent phase and during the semi-annual eclipse seasons lasting for approximately 45 days each. The maximum duration eclipses are 72 minutes long which result in a 60 percent depth of discharge (DOD) of the batteries. This paper provides a description of the batteries, reconditioning setup, DOD profile during a typical eclipse season, and flight performance from the three launched spacecraft (now GOES 8, 9, and 10) in orbit.

  19. Heteroaromatic organic compound with conjugated multi-carbonyl as cathode material for rechargeable lithium batteries

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Meixiang; Zhang, Fen; Wu, Yiwen; Chen, Mujuan; Yao, Chunfeng; Nan, Junmin; Shu, Dong; Zeng, Ronghua; Zeng, Heping; Chou, Shu-Lei

    2016-01-01

    The heteroaromatic organic compound, N,N’-diphenyl-1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetra- carboxylic diimide (DP-NTCDI-250) as the cathode material of lithium batteries is prepared through a simple one-pot N-acylation reaction of 1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetra-carboxylic dianhydride (NTCDA) with phenylamine (PA) in DMF solution followed by heat treatment in 250 °C. The as prepared sample is characterized by the combination of elemental analysis, NMR, FT-IR, TGA, XRD, SEM and TEM. The electrochemical measurements show that DP-NTCDI-250 can deliver an initial discharge capacity of 170 mAh g−1 at the current density of 25 mA g−1. The capacity of 119 mAh g−1 can be retained after 100 cycles. Even at the high current density of 500 mA g−1, its capacity still reaches 105 mAh g−1, indicating its high rate capability. Therefore, the as-prepared DP-NTCDI-250 could be a promising candidate as low cost cathode materials for lithium batteries. PMID:27064938

  20. Self-healing Li-Bi liquid metal battery for grid-scale energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, XH; Phadke, S; Chung, B; Yin, HY; Burke, P; Sadoway, DR

    2015-02-01

    In an assessment of the performance of a Li vertical bar LiCl-LiF vertical bar Bi liquid metal battery, increasing the current density from 200 to 1250 mA cm(-2) results in a less than 30% loss in specific discharge capacity at 550 degrees C. The charge and discharge voltage profiles exhibit two distinct regions: one corresponding to a Li-Bi liquid alloy and one corresponding to the two-phase mixture of Li-Bi liquid alloy and the intermetallic solid compound, Li3Bi. Full cell prototypes of 0.1 Ah nameplate capacity have been assembled and cycled at 3 C rate for over a 1000 cycles with only 0.004% capacity fade per cycle. This is tantamount to retention of over 85% of original capacity after 10 years of daily cycling. With minimal changes in design, cells of 44.8 Ah and 134 Ah capacity have been fabricated and cycled at C/3 rate. After a hundred cycles and over a month of testing, no capacity fade is observed. The coulombic efficiency of 99% and energy efficiency of 70% validate the ease of scalability of this battery chemistry. Post mortem cross sections of the cells in various states of charge demonstrate the total reversibility of the Li3Bi solid phase formed at high degrees of lithiation. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Vertically aligned sulfur-graphene nanowalls on substrates for ultrafast lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Li, Songmei; Liu, Jianhua; Wang, Bo; Yang, Shubin

    2015-05-13

    Although lithium-sulfur batteries have gained great interest owing to their high energy density, they lack suitable electrodes capable of rapid charging and discharging to enable a high power density critical for wide applications. Here, we demonstrate a simply electrochemical assembly strategy to achieve vertically aligned sulfur-graphene (S-G) nanowall onto electrically conductive substrates. Remarkably, in each individual S-G nanowalls, sulfur nanoparticles are homogeneously anchored in between of graphene layers and ordered graphene arrays arrange perpendicularly to the substrates, which are favorable for the fast diffusions of both lithium and electron. Moreover, the hierarchical and porous structures facilate the effective accommodation of the volume change of sulfur. As a consequence, a high reversible capacity of 1261 mAh g(-1) in the first cycle and over 1210 mAh g(-1) after 120 cycles with excellent cyclability and high-rate performance (over 400 mAh g(-1) at 8C, 13.36 A g(-1)) are achieved with these S-G nanowalls as cathodes for lithium-sulfur batteries, providing the best reported rate performance for sulfur-graphene cathodes to date.

  2. Core-Shell Coating Silicon Anode Interfaces with Coordination Complex for Stable Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinqiu; Qian, Tao; Wang, Mengfan; Xu, Na; Zhang, Qi; Li, Qun; Yan, Chenglin

    2016-03-02

    In situ core-shell coating was used to improve the electrochemical performance of Si-based anodes with polypyrrole-Fe coordination complex. The vast functional groups in the organometallic coordination complex easily formed hydrogen bonds when in situ modifying commercial Si nanoparticles. The incorporation of polypyrrole-Fe resulted in the conformal conductive coating surrounding each Si nanoparticle, not only providing good electrical connection to the particles but also promoting the formation of a stable solid-electrolyte-interface layer on the Si electrode surface, enhancing the cycling properties. As an anode material for Li-ion batteries, modified silicon powders exhibited high reversible capacity (3567 mAh/g at 0.3 A/g), good rate property (549.12 mAh/g at 12 A/g), and excellent cycling performance (reversible capacity of 1500 mAh/g after 800 cycles at 1.2 A/g). The constructed novel concept of core-shell coating Si particles presented a promising route for facile and large-scale production of Si-based anodes for extremely durable Li-ion batteries, which provided a wide range of applications in the field of energy storage of the renewable energy derived from the solar energy, hydropower, tidal energy, and geothermal heat.

  3. Synthesis and modification of FeVO4 as novel anode for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaolin; Cao, Yuancheng; Zheng, Hao; Chen, Xiao; Feng, Chuanqi

    2017-02-01

    FeVO4 and FeVO4/graphene nanorods were synthesized successfully by combining a facile hydrothermal and heat treatment method. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The content of graphene in FeVO4/graphene was determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TG). The electrochemical properties of the samples were also investigated by battery testing system. The results showed that the FeVO4 formed were taken on morphology of nanorods with the length between 0.5 and 1 μm and the diameter in range of 50 to 100 nm. Besides, the size of FeVO4/graphene was smaller than that of pure FeVO4. The content of graphene in composite was about 25.0% by weight. The reversible discharge capacities of FeVO4 and FeVO4/graphene were 405.2 mAh g-1 and 1046.5 mAh g-1 separately after 100 cycles at the current density of 100 mAh g-1 in the voltage range of 0.01-3 V. The reasons for the FeVO4/graphene composite to behave outstanding electrochemical properties were also discussed. The FeVO4/graphene composite can be a novel and promising anode material for lithium ion battery application.

  4. Extremely Accessible Potassium Nitrate (KNO3) as the Highly Efficient Electrolyte Additive in Lithium Battery.

    PubMed

    Jia, Weishang; Fan, Cong; Wang, Liping; Wang, Qingji; Zhao, Mingjuan; Zhou, Aijun; Li, Jingze

    2016-06-22

    The systematic investigation of RNO3 salts (R = Li, Na, K, and Cs) as electrolyte additives was carried out for lithium-battery systems. For the first time, the abundant and extremely available KNO3 was proved to be an excellent alternative of LiNO3 for suppression of the lithium dendrites. The reason was ascribed to the possible synergetic effect of K(+) and NO3(-) ions: The positively charged K(+) ion could surround the lithium dendrites by electrostatic attraction and then delay their further growth, while simultaneously the oxidative NO3(-) ion could be reduced and subsequently profitable to the reinforcement of the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI). By adding KNO3 into the practical Li-S battery, the discharging capacity was enhanced to average 687 mAh g(-1) from the case without KNO3 (528 mAh g(-1)) during 100 cycles, which was comparable to the one with the well-known LiNO3 additive (637 mAh g(-1)) under the same conditions.

  5. A graphene loading heterogeneous hydrated forms iron based fluoride nanocomposite as novel and high-capacity cathode material for lithium/sodium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yongqiang; Wang, Xianyou; Hu, Hai; Jiang, Miaoling; Yang, Xiukang; Shu, Hongbo

    2015-06-01

    A graphene loading heterogeneous hydrated forms iron based fluoride (abbreviated as FeF3·xH2O/G) nanocomposite is successfully designed and synthesized for the first time by a sol-gel method. It found that the FeF3·xH2O nanoparticles distribute randomly on the surface of the graphene, stacking together to form a nanocomposite with high specific surface and abundant mesporous structure. The FeF3·xH2O was consisted of FeF3·3H2O and FeF2.5·0.5H2O with pyrochlore phase structure and FeF3·0.33H2O with hexagonal-tungsten-bronze-type structure (HTB). The FeF3·xH2O/G was used as cathode materials of rechargeable lithium/sodium batteries, respectively. It has been found that it can deliver a large reversible capacity exceeding 200 mAh g-1 and excellent cyclic performance with a residual capacity of 183 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles at 0.2C and 149 mAh g-1 after 200 cycles at 1C, especially, an outstanding rate performance exceeding 130 mAh g-1 at 5C in the voltage range of 1.5-4.5 V for Li-ion batteries. Moreover, when FeF3·xH2O/G is used as cathode material of Na-ion batteries, it exhibits also a high reversible capacity of 101 mAh g-1 after 30 cycles in the voltage range of 1.0-4.0 V at 0.1C. Therefore, FeF3·xH2O/G will a promising cathode material for high-performance lithium/sodium ion batteries.

  6. Nitrogen, sulfur-codoped graphene sponge as electroactive carbon interlayer for high-energy and -power lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Ling-Bao; Xi, Kai; Li, Qiuyan; Su, Zhong; Lai, Chao; Zhao, Xinsheng; Kumar, R. Vasant

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur is an attractive cathode material in energy storage devices since its high theoretical capacity of 1672 mAh g-1. However, practical application of lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries can be achieved only when the major barriers, including the insulating nature of element sulfur and shuttling effect of polysulfides (Li2Sx, x = 3-8), are tackled. Here, nitrogen, sulfur-codoped (N,S-codoped) sponge-like graphene, which presents a high reversible capacity, is used as electroactive interlayer for Li-S batteries to address these issues. An impressive high capacity of 2193.2 mAh g-1 can be obtained for the sulfur cathodes with such an interlayer at the rate of 0.2C, and it can be stably maintained at 829.4 mAh g-1 at the rate of 6C, for which the contribution from the electroactive interlayer is ca. 30.0%. High energy density of 418.5 Wh Kg-1 still can be released at the power density of 4.55 kW kg-1 (6C) based on the total mass of the sulfur cathode and interlayer for the assembled Li-S batteries.

  7. Study on titanium foil coated with partial reduction titanium dioxide as bipolar lead-acid battery's substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Xiaoshi; Wang, Dianlong; Tang, Shenzhi; Zhu, Junsheng; Guo, Chenfeng

    2014-12-01

    Pure titanium foil cannot be directly as the substrate for the bipolar lead-acid battery due to its surface oxidized into titanium dioxide in the cell cycle. The poor electronic conductivity of titanium dioxide will increase substrate's ohmic resistance and can affect the cell's electrochemical performances. In this paper, titanium foil's surface is coated with a lay of partial reduction titanium dioxide (TiO2-x) which has excellent chemical stability and high electronic conductivity by means of sol-gel method. Through XRD, SEM and four-probe test, it shows that the modified titanium's surface has the most superior crystal structure and morphology and the highest electronic conductivity in the sintering temperature of 800 °C. We subsequently assemble bipolar lead-acid batteries with Ti coated by TiO2-x as the substrate material. The batteries are discovered that when charged and discharged in 3.5 V-4.84 V at 0.5C the voltage between the charge and discharge voltage platform is 0.3 V, and the initial discharge specific capacity can reach 80 mAh g-1. When the current rate is up to 1C and 2C, the initial discharge specific capacity is 70 mAh g-1and 60 mAh g-1. After 100 cycles, the initial specific capacity only decreases 12.5%.

  8. Flexible one-dimensional carbon-selenium composite nanofibers with superior electrochemical performance for Li-Se/Na-Se batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Linchao; Wei, Xiang; Wang, Jiaqing; Jiang, Yu; Li, Weihan; Yu, Yan

    2015-05-01

    A facile strategy is developed to synthesis selenium/carbon composites (Se@CNFs-CNT) by co-heating Se powder and electrospun Polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-CNT nanofibers at 600°Cin a sealed vessel. The Se molecules are chemically bonded and physical encapsulated by carbonized PAN-CNT composite (CNFs-CNT), which leads to prevent the dissolution of polyselenide intermediates in carbonate based electrolyte. When directly used as flexible free-standing cathode material for Li-Se batteries in low cost carbonate-based electrolyte, the Se@CNFs-CNT electrode exhibits improved cyclability (517 mAh g-1 after 500 cycles at 0.5 A g-1) and rate capability (485 mAh g-1 at 1 A g-1). Moreover, when tested as sodium batteries, it maintains a reversible capacity of 410 mAh g-1 after 240 cycles at 0.5 A g-1. The superior electrochemical performance (especially at high rates) of Se@CNFs-CNT is attributed to synergistic effect of the additive of CNT, the well confine of Se in the CNFs-CNT matrix through chemical bonding and the 3D interconnected carbon nanofibers (CNFs). This simple yet efficient process thus provides a promising route towards fabrication of a variety of high performance flexible Li-Se and Na-Se batteries.

  9. Surface oxidized mesoporous carbons derived from porous silicon as dual polysulfide confinement and anchoring cathodes in lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Rachel; Ejorh, Dennis; Share, Keith; Cohn, Adam P.; Douglas, Anna; Muralidharan, Nitin; Tovar, Trenton M.; Pint, Cary L.

    2016-10-01

    Despite widespread focus on porous carbons for lithium-sulfur battery cathode materials, electrode design to preserve mass-specific performance and sustained extended cycling stability remains a challenge. Here, we demonstrate electrochemically etched porous silicon as a sacrificial template to produce a new class of functional mesoporous carbons optimized for dual chemical and physical confinement of soluble polysulfides in lithium-sulfur battery cathodes. Melt infiltration loading of sulfur at 60 wt% enables initial discharge capacity of 1350 mAh/gsulfur at rates of 0.1 C - approaching theoretical capacity of 1675 mAh/gsulfur. Cycling performance measured at 0.2 C indicates 81% capacity retention measured over 100 cycles with 830 mAh/gsulfur capacity. Unlike other carbons, this template combines structural properties necessary for sulfur containment and polysulfide confinement to achieve high specific capacity, but also boasts surface-bound oxygen-containing functional groups that are able to chemically anchor the soluble Li2Sn species on the interior of the mesoporous carbon to sustain cycling performance. In turn, this elucidates a scalable and competitive material framework that is capable, without the addition of additional membranes or inactive anchoring materials, of providing the simultaneous anchoring and confinement effects necessary to overcome performance limitations in lithium sulfur batteries.

  10. Janus Solid-Liquid Interface Enabling Ultrahigh Charging and Discharging Rate for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiaxin; Hou, Yuyang; Duan, Yandong; Song, Xiaohe; Wei, Yi; Liu, Tongchao; Hu, Jiangtao; Guo, Hua; Zhuo, Zengqing; Liu, Lili; Chang, Zheng; Wang, Xiaowei; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Fang, Yanyan; Lin, Yuan; Xu, Kang; Wang, Lin-Wang; Wu, Yuping; Pan, Feng

    2015-09-09

    LiFePO4 has long been held as one of the most promising battery cathode for its high energy storage capacity. Meanwhile, although extensive studies have been conducted on the interfacial chemistries in Li-ion batteries,1-3 little is known on the atomic level about the solid-liquid interface of LiFePO4/electrolyte. Here, we report battery cathode consisted with nanosized LiFePO4 particles in aqueous electrolyte with an high charging and discharging rate of 600 C (3600/600 = 6 s charge time, 1 C = 170 mAh g(-1)) reaching 72 mAh g(-1) energy storage (42% of the theoretical capacity). By contrast, the accessible capacity sharply decreases to 20 mAh g(-1) at 200 C in organic electrolyte. After a comprehensive electrochemistry tests and ab initio calculations of the LiFePO4-H2O and LiFePO4-EC (ethylene carbonate) systems, we identified the transient formation of a Janus hydrated interface in the LiFePO4-H2O system, where the truncated symmetry of solid LiFePO4 surface is compensated by the chemisorbed H2O molecules, forming a half-solid (LiFePO4) and half-liquid (H2O) amphiphilic coordination environment that eases the Li desolvation process near the surface, which makes a fast Li-ion transport across the solid/liquid interfaces possible.

  11. Forskolin inhibits the Gs-stimulated adenylate cyclase in rat ascites hepatoma AH66F cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R; Matsunaga, T; Hasegawa, T; Takagi, K; Satake, T

    1989-09-01

    Forskolin increased intracellular cyclic AMP and augmented cyclic AMP formation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) in normal rat hepatocytes and ascites hepatoma AH66 cells. However, in AH66F cells which were derived from the AH66 cell line, the diterpene only slightly increased the cyclic AMP level, and dose-dependently inhibited the accumulation caused by PGE1. Forskolin dose-dependently activated adenylate cyclase in these membranes, and the magnitude of activation by forskolin was largest in the following order: hepatocytes, AH66 cells, and AH66F cells. This difference may be based on the number of forskolin-binding sites. The binding affinity of forskolin for each cell membrane was similar. The number and affinity of forskolin-binding sites in these cells were not influenced by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p]. In hepatocytes and AH66 cells, forskolin and other adenylate cyclase activators such as PGE1, GTP, Gpp(NH)p, F-, and Mn2+ synergistically increased the enzyme activity. In AH66F cells, the forskolin-stimulated activity was hardly influenced by the GTP analog, and forskolin diminished the activities induced by the GTP analog in a manner similar to that of diterpene alone. Forskolin (10 microM) also significantly inhibited the activities induced by PGE1, GTP, and F-. The effect of forskolin with Mn2+ was additive in AH66F cells. The data suggest that forskolin promotes the interaction between the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and the catalytic unit in the membrane of normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, but it interferes with the coupling in AH66F cells.

  12. AH6809, a prostaglandin DP-receptor blocking drug on human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Keery, R. J.; Lumley, P.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of AH6809 (6-isopropoxy-9-oxoxanthene-2-carboxylic acid) has been studied upon the anti-aggregatory and aggregatory actions of various agents on human platelets in whole blood. 2. Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), BW245C, 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2, PGI2 and 5'-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) all inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood. The anti-aggregatory activity of PGD2, BW245C and 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 but not PGI2 or NECA was antagonized by AH6809. NECA was antagonized by AH6809. 3. The antagonism of the anti-aggregatory activity of PGD2 by AH6809 was concentration-related and could be overcome by increasing the concentration of PGD2. Analysis of the data yielded an apparent pA2 for AH6809 of 5.35. 4. At approximately 10 fold higher concentrations than those required to antagonize the action of PGD2, AH6809 also antagonized the aggregatory effect of U-46619 in whole blood (pA2 = 4.45). However, concentrations of AH6809 up to 300 microM were without effect upon either ADP- or platelet activating factor (Paf)-induced aggregation (pA2 less than 3.5). 5. The potency of AH6809 against PGD2 and U-46619 was increased in a resuspended platelet preparation suggesting that the drug is extensively bound to plasma proteins. However, in resuspended platelets the specificity of AH6809 relative to that seen in whole blood was reduced since aggregation by ADP and Paf was also slightly antagonized. 6. In conclusion, AH6809 appears to be a weak but specific DP-receptor blocking drug on human platelets and should prove to be a useful drug tool for defining the involvement of endogenous PGD2 in platelet aggregation and classifying the mode of action of anti-aggregatory prostanoids. PMID:2460179

  13. A New Sealed Lithium-Peroxide Battery with a Co-Doped Li2O Cathode in a Superconcentrated Lithium Bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuoka, Shin-Ichi; Ogasawara, Yoshiyuki; Suga, Yosuke; Hibino, Mitsuhiro; Kudo, Tetsuichi; Ono, Hironobu; Yonehara, Koji; Sumida, Yasutaka; Yamada, Yuki; Yamada, Atsuo; Oshima, Masaharu; Tochigi, Eita; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2014-07-01

    We propose a new sealed battery operating on a redox reaction between an oxide (O2-) and a peroxide (O22-) with its theoretical specific energy of 2570 Wh kg-1 (897 mAh g-1, 2.87 V) and demonstrate that a Co-doped Li2O cathode exhibits a reversible capacity over 190 mAh g-1, a high rate capability, and a good cyclability with a superconcentrated lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide electrolyte in acetonitrile. The reversible capacity is largely dominated by the O2-/O22- redox reaction between oxide and peroxide with some contribution of the Co2+/Co3+ redox reaction.

  14. Compositionally graded SiCu thin film anode by magnetron sputtering for lithium ion battery

    SciTech Connect

    Polat, B. D.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Keles, O; Erdemir, A; Amine, Khalil

    2015-10-22

    Compositionally graded and non-graded composite SiCu thin films were deposited by magnetron sputtering technique on Cu disks for investigation of their potentials in lithium ion battery applications. The compositionally graded thin film electrodes with 30 at.% Cu delivered a 1400 mAh g-1 capacity with 80% Coulombic efficiency in the first cycle and still retained its capacity at around 600 mAh g-1 (with 99.9% Coulombic efficiency) even after 100 cycles. On the other hand, the non-graded thin film electrodes with 30 at.% Cu exhibited 1100 mAh g-1 as the first discharge capacity with 78% Coulombic efficiency but the cycle life of this film degraded very quickly, delivering only 250 mAh g-1 capacity after 100th cycles. Not only the Cu content but also the graded film thickness were believed to be the main contributors to the much superior performance of the compositionally graded SiCu films. We also believe that the Cu-rich region of the graded film helped reduce internal stress build-up and thus prevented film delamination during cycling. In particular, the decrease of Cu content from interface region to the top of the coating reduced the possibility of stress build-up across the film during cycling, thus leading to a high electrochemical performance.

  15. Electrochemical properties of carbon-coated Si/B composite anode for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Sun; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Cho, Byung Won

    Carbon-coated Si and Si/B composite powders prepared by hydrocarbon gas (argon + 10 mol% propylene) pyrolysis were investigated as the anodes for lithium-ion batteries. Carbon-coated silicon anode demonstrated the first discharge and charge capacity as 1568 mAh g -1 and 1242 mAh g -1, respectively, with good capacity retention for 10 cycles. The capacity fading rate of carbon-coated Si/B composite anode decreased as the amounts of boron increased. In addition, the cycle life of carbon-coated Si/B/graphite composite anode has been significantly improved by using sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR)/NaCMC mixture binders compared to the poly(vinylidene fluoride, PVdF) binder. A reversible capacity of about 550 mAh g -1 has been achieved at 0.05 mAm g -1 rate and its capacity could be maintained up to 450 mAh g -1 at high rate of 0.2 mAm g -1 even after 30 cycles. The improvement of the cycling performance is attributed to the lower interfacial resistance due to good electric contact between silicon particles and copper substrate.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope battery background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standlee, Dan

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: the MSFC Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Nickel-Hydrogen Battery Contract; HST battery design requirements; HST nickel-hydrogen battery development; HST nickel-hydrogen battery module; HST NiH2 battery module hardware; pressure vessel design; HST NiH2 cell design; offset non-opposing vs. rabbit ear cell; HST NiH2 specified capacity; HST NiH2 battery design; and HST NiH2 module design.

  17. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR links atopic dermatitis and air pollution via induction of the neurotrophic factor artemin.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Takanori; Ogawa, Eisaku; Kobayashi, Eri H; Suzuki, Takafumi; Funayama, Ryo; Nagashima, Takeshi; Fujimura, Taku; Aiba, Setsuya; Nakayama, Keiko; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is increasing worldwide in correlation with air pollution. Various organic components of pollutants activate the transcription factor AhR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor). Through the use of AhR-CA mice, whose keratinocytes express constitutively active AhR and that develop atopic-dermatitis-like phenotypes, we identified Artn as a keratinocyte-specific AhR target gene whose product (the neurotrophic factor artemin) was responsible for epidermal hyper-innervation that led to hypersensitivity to pruritus. The activation of AhR via air pollutants induced expression of artemin, alloknesis, epidermal hyper-innervation and inflammation. AhR activation and ARTN expression were positively correlated in the epidermis of patients with atopic dermatitis. Thus, AhR in keratinocytes senses environmental stimuli and elicits an atopic-dermatitis pathology. We propose a mechanism of air-pollution-induced atopic dermatitis via activation of AhR.

  18. Design and Flight Performance of NOAA-K Spacecraft Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Chetty, P. R. K.; Spitzer, Tom; Chilelli, P.

    1999-01-01

    The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates the Polar Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) spacecraft (among others) to support weather forecasting, severe storm tracking, and meteorological research by the National Weather Service (NWS). The latest in the POES series of spacecraft, named as NOAA-KLMNN, is in orbit and four more are in various phases of development. The NOAA-K spacecraft was launched on May 13, 1998. Each of these spacecraft carry three Nickel-Cadmium batteries designed and manufactured by Lockheed Martin. The battery, which consists of seventeen 40 Ah cells manufactured by SAFT, provides the spacecraft power during the ascent phase, orbital eclipse and when the power demand is in excess of the solar array capability. The NOAA-K satellite is in a 98 degree inclination, 7:30AM ascending node orbit. In this orbit the satellite experiences earth occultation only 25% of the year. This paper provides a brief overview of the power subsystem, followed by the battery design and qualification, the cell life cycle test data, and the performance during launch and in orbit.

  19. Glassy materials for lithium batteries: electrochemical properties and devices performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclot, Michel; Souquet, Jean-Louis

    Amorphous or glassy materials may be used as electrolyte or electrode materials for lithium primary or secondary batteries. A first generation proceeded from classical coin cells in which the organic electrolyte was replaced by a high lithium conductive glassy electrolyte. The solid components were assembled under isostatic pressure. The main advantages of such cells are a good storage stability and ability to operate until 200°C. Nevertheless, the high resistivity of the glassy electrolyte below room temperature and a limited depth for charge and discharge cycles makes these cells not competitive compared to conventional lithium-ion batteries. More promising, are the thin films solid state microbatteries realised by successive depositions of electrodes and electrolyte. The low resistance of the electrolyte amorphous layer allows cycling at temperatures as low as -10°C. The total thickness of thin film batteries, including packaging is less than 100 μm. A capacity of about 100 μAh cm -2 with over 10 4 charge-discharge cycles at 90% in depth of discharge is well suited for energy independent smart cards or intelligent labels, which represent for these devices a large and unrivalled market.

  20. Lithium use in batteries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium has a number of uses but one of the most valuable is as a component of high energy-density rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Because of concerns over carbon dioxide footprint and increasing hydrocarbon fuel cost (reduced supply), lithium may become even more important in large batteries for powering all-electric and hybrid vehicles. It would take 1.4 to 3.0 kilograms of lithium equivalent (7.5 to 16.0 kilograms of lithium carbonate) to support a 40-mile trip in an electric vehicle before requiring recharge. This could create a large demand for lithium. Estimates of future lithium demand vary, based on numerous variables. Some of those variables include the potential for recycling, widespread public acceptance of electric vehicles, or the possibility of incentives for converting to lithium-ion-powered engines. Increased electric usage could cause electricity prices to increase. Because of reduced demand, hydrocarbon fuel prices would likely decrease, making hydrocarbon fuel more desirable. In 2009, 13 percent of worldwide lithium reserves, expressed in terms of contained lithium, were reported to be within hard rock mineral deposits, and 87 percent, within brine deposits. Most of the lithium recovered from brine came from Chile, with smaller amounts from China, Argentina, and the United States. Chile also has lithium mineral reserves, as does Australia. Another source of lithium is from recycled batteries. When lithium-ion batteries begin to power vehicles, it is expected that battery recycling rates will increase because vehicle battery recycling systems can be used to produce new lithium-ion batteries.

  1. Incorporating bioavailability into toxicity assessment of Cu-Ni, Cu-Cd, and Ni-Cd mixtures with the extended biotic ligand model and the WHAM-F(tox) approach.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hao; Vijver, Martina G; He, Erkai; Liu, Yang; Wang, Peng; Xia, Bing; Smolders, Erik; Versieren, Liske; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2015-12-01

    There are only a limited number of studies that have developed appropriate models which incorporate bioavailability to estimate mixture toxicity. Here, we explored the applicability of the extended biotic ligand model (BLM) and the WHAM-F(tox) approach for predicting and interpreting mixture toxicity, with the assumption that interactions between metal ions obey the BLM theory. Seedlings of lettuce Lactuca sativa were exposed to metal mixtures (Cu-Ni, Cu-Cd, and Ni-Cd) contained in hydroponic solutions for 4 days. Inhibition to root elongation was the endpoint used to quantify the toxic response. Assuming that metal ions compete with each other for binding at a single biotic ligand, the extended BLM succeeded in predicting toxicity of three mixtures to lettuce, with more than 82% of toxicity variation explained. There were no significant differences in the values of f(mix50) (i.e., the overall amounts of metal ions bound to the biotic ligand inducing 50% effect) for the three mixture combinations, showing the possibility of extrapolating these values to other binary metal combinations. The WHAM-F(tox) approach showed a similar level of precision in estimating mixture toxicity while requiring fewer parameters than the BLM-f(mix) model. External validation of the WHAM-F(tox) approach using literature data showed its applicability for other species and other mixtures. The WHAM-F(tox) model is suitable for delineating mixture effects where the extended BLM also applies. Therefore, in case of lower data availability, we recommend the lower parameterized WHAM-F(tox) as an effective approach to incorporate bioavailability in quantifying mixture toxicity.

  2. Two-dimensional SiS as a potential anode material for lithium-based batteries: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, H. R.; Zhao, T. S.; Liu, M.; Wu, M. C.; Yan, X. H.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we perform first-principles study to investigate the potential of two-dimensional (2D) SiS as an anode material for lithium-based batteries. Four predicted structures of 2D SiS are considered, including α-SiS, β-SiS, Pma2-SiS and silicene sulfide. Results show that among the samples studied, α-SiS exhibits: i) a negative adsorption energy to lithium of -0.44 eV; ii) the highest theoretical specific capacity of 446 mAh g-1, which is even higher than that of phosphorene (433 mAh g-1) and Ti3C2 (320 mAh g-1); iii) a low average open-circuit-voltage (OCV) of 0.20 V; iv) a fast lithium diffusivity with an energy barrier of only 0.17 eV, lower than that on MoS2 (0.25 eV), VS2 (0.22 eV) and silicene (0.23 eV); and v) a change from semiconducting to metallic state after lithiation. These advantages demonstrate that α-SiS is a promising anode material for lithium-ion batteries, and gives a choice for other lithium-based batteries such as lithium-oxygen and lithium-sulfur batteries as well.

  3. Battery Vent Mechanism And Method

    DOEpatents

    Ching, Larry K. W.

    2000-02-15

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

  4. Battery venting system and method

    DOEpatents

    Casale, Thomas J.; Ching, Larry K. W.; Baer, Jose T.; Swan, David H.

    1999-01-05

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

  5. Battery venting system and method

    DOEpatents

    Casale, T.J.; Ching, L.K.W.; Baer, J.T.; Swan, D.H.

    1999-01-05

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve. 8 figs.

  6. Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Tuffner, Francis K [Richland, WA; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W. [Richland, WA; Hammerstrom, Donald J [West Richland, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2012-05-22

    Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems. According to one aspect, a battery charging control method includes accessing information regarding a presence of at least one of a surplus and a deficiency of electrical energy upon an electrical power distribution system at a plurality of different moments in time, and using the information, controlling an adjustment of an amount of the electrical energy provided from the electrical power distribution system to a rechargeable battery to charge the rechargeable battery.

  7. The effect of a monocular helmet-mounted display on aircrew health: a 10-year prospective cohort study of Apache AH MK 1 pilots: study midpoint update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiatt, Keith L.; Rash, Clarence E.; Watters, Raymond W.; Adams, Mark S.

    2009-05-01

    A collaborative occupational health study has been undertaken by Headquarters Army Aviation, Middle Wallop, UK, and the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory, Fort Rucker, Alabama, to determine if the use of the Integrated Helmet and Display Sighting System (IHADSS) monocular helmet-mounted display (HMD) in the Apache AH Mk 1 attack helicopter has any long-term (10-year) effect on visual performance. The test methodology consists primarily of a detailed questionnaire and an annual battery of vision tests selected to capture changes in visual performance of Apache aviators over their flight career (with an emphasis on binocular visual function). Pilots using binocular night vision goggles serve as controls and undergo the same methodology. Currently, at the midpoint of the study, with the exception of a possible colour discrimination effect, there are no data indicating that the long-term use of the IHADSS monocular HMD results in negative effects on vision.

  8. Circulating current battery heater

    DOEpatents

    Ashtiani, Cyrus N.; Stuart, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    A circuit for heating energy storage devices such as batteries is provided. The circuit includes a pair of switches connected in a half-bridge configuration. Unidirectional current conduction devices are connected in parallel with each switch. A series resonant element for storing energy is connected from the energy storage device to the pair of switches. An energy storage device for intermediate storage of energy is connected in a loop with the series resonant element and one of the switches. The energy storage device which is being heated is connected in a loop with the series resonant element and the other switch. Energy from the heated energy storage device is transferred to the switched network and then recirculated back to the battery. The flow of energy through the battery causes internal power dissipation due to electrical to chemical conversion inefficiencies. The dissipated power causes the internal temperature of the battery to increase. Higher internal temperatures expand the cold temperature operating range and energy capacity utilization of the battery. As disclosed, either fixed frequency or variable frequency modulation schemes may be used to control the network.

  9. Retinoids repress Ah receptor CYP1A1 induction pathway through the SMRT corepressor.

    PubMed

    Fallone, Frédérique; Villard, Pierre-Henri; Sérée, Eric; Rimet, Odile; Nguyen, Quock Binh; Bourgarel-Rey, Véronique; Fouchier, Francis; Barra, Yves; Durand, Alain; Lacarelle, Bruno

    2004-09-17

    CYP1A1 isoform is mainly regulated by the transcription factor AhR and to a lesser extent by the nuclear receptor RAR. The effect of a coexposure with 3MC, a AhR ligand, and RA, a RAR ligand, which are, respectively, strong and weak CYP1A1 inducers, is poorly known. We showed in Caco-2 cells that addition of RA significantly decreased 3MC-induced CYP1A1 expression by -55% for mRNA level and -30% for promoter and enzymatic activities. We further showed that RA decreased AhR protein level. Moreover, a physical interaction between AhR and the RAR-corepressor SMRT has been described in vitro. Using the corepressor inhibitor TSA, transfected-cells with SMRT cDNA, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, we demonstrated that RA addition repressed AhR function through a marked AhR/SMRT physical interaction. This interaction explains the decrease of 3MC-induced CYP1A1 expression. This new mechanism involving the repression of AhR-induced CYP1A1 expression by retinoids allows better knowledge of the CYP1A1 regulation.

  10. Relativity and the mercury battery.

    PubMed

    Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Pyykkö, Pekka

    2011-10-06

    Comparative, fully relativistic (FR), scalar relativistic (SR) and non-relativistic (NR) DFT calculations attribute about 30% of the mercury-battery voltage to relativity. The obtained percentage is smaller than for the lead-acid battery, but not negligible.

  11. TUNING SILICON NANORODS FOR ANODES OF LI-ION RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES

    SciTech Connect

    Au, M.

    2010-11-23

    Silicon is a promising anode material for Li-ion batteries in regarding of high capacity, low cost and safety, but it suffers poor cycling stability due to the pulverization induced by severe volume expansion/shrinkage (297%) during lithium insertion/extraction. In our previous investigation on aluminum nanorods anodes, it is found the selection of substrates in which Al nanorods grown plays the role in prevention of pulverization resulting in the increase of cycling life. Adapting this knowledge, we investigated the Si based nanorods anodes by tuning its composition and element distribution. Our results show that although the Si nanorods demonstrated higher initial anodic capacity of 1500 mAh/g, it diminished after 50 cycles due to morphology change and pulverization. By codepositing Cu, the Si-Cu composite nanorods demonstrated sustainable capacity of 500 mAh/g in 100 cycles attributing to its flexible and less brittle nature.

  12. Viologens as charge carriers in a polymer-based battery anode.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sujat; Saraidaridis, James; Kim, Sung Yeol; Palmore, G Tayhas R

    2013-08-28

    Viologens, either as anions in solution or as pendant substituents to pyrrole, were incorporated as dopants to electrodeposited films of polypyrrole. The resulting polymer films exhibited redox activity at -0.5 V vs Ag/AgCl. The film consisting of polypyrrole with pendant viologens exhibited the best charge-discharge behavior with a maximum capacity of 55 mAh/g at a discharge current of 0.25 mA/cm(2). An anode consisting of polypyrrole (pPy) doped with viologen (V) was coupled to a cathode consisting of pPy doped with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) to yield a polymer-based battery with a cell electromotive force (emf) of 1.0 V, maximum capacity of 16 mAh/g, and energy density of 15 Wh/kg.

  13. Porous Silicon Nanotube Arrays as Anode Material for Li-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Alexander T; Gonzalez, Roberto; Coffer, Jeffery L; Djenizian, Thierry

    2015-09-23

    We report the electrochemical performance of Si nanotube vertical arrays possessing thin porous sidewalls for Li-ion batteries. Porous Si nanotubes were fabricated on stainless steel substrates using a sacrificial ZnO nanowire template method. These porous Si nanotubes are stable at multiple C-rates. A second discharge capacity of 3095 mAh g(-1) with a Coulombic efficiency of 63% is attained at a rate of C/20 and a stable gravimetric capacity of 1670 mAh g(-1) obtained after 30 cycles. The high capacity values are attributed to the large surface area offered by the porosity of the 3D nanostructures, thereby promoting lithium-ion storage according to a pseudocapacitive mechanism.

  14. Cross-Linked Chitosan as an Efficient Binder for Si Anode of Li-ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Lee, Sang Ha; Cho, Misuk; Kim, Jaehoon; Lee, Youngkwan

    2016-02-03

    We investigate the use of chitosan (CS) as a new cross-linkable and water-soluble binder for the Si anode of Li-ion batteries. In contrast to the traditional binder utilizing a hydrogen bond and/or van der Waals force-linked anode electrodes, CS can easily form a 3D network to limit the movement of Si particles through the cross-linking between the amino groups of CS and the dialdehyde of glutaraldehyde (GA). Chemical, mechanical, and morphological analyses are conducted by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, tensile testing, and scanning electron microscopy. The cross-linked Si/CS-GA anode exhibits an initial discharge capacity of 2782 mAh g(-1) with a high initial Coulombic efficiency of 89% and maintained a capacity of 1969 mAh g(-1) at the current density of 500 mA g(-1) over 100 cycles.

  15. Graphene oxide wrapped croconic acid disodium salt for sodium ion battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chao; Zhu, Yujie; Xu, Yunhua; Liu, Yihang; Gao, Tao; Wang, Jing; Wang, Chunsheng

    2014-03-01

    Croconic acid disodium salt (CADS), a renewable or recyclable organic compound, is investigated as an anode material in sodium ion battery for the first time. The pristine micro-sized CADS delivers a high capacity of 246.7 mAh g-1, but it suffers from fast capacity decay during charge/discharge cycles. The detailed investigation reveals that the severe capacity loss is mainly attributed to the pulverization of CADS particles induced by the large volume change during sodiation/desodiation rather than the generally believed dissolution of CADS in the organic electrolyte. Minimizing the particle size can effectively suppress the pulverization, thus improving the cycling stability. Wrapping CADS with graphene oxide by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis can enhance the integration and conductivity of CADS electrodes, thus providing a high capacity of 293 mAh g-1.

  16. Hollow carbon-nanotube/carbon-nanofiber hybrid anodes for Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuming; Li, Xiaoyan; Park, Kyusung; Song, Jie; Hong, Jianhe; Zhou, Limin; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Huang, Haitao; Goodenough, John B

    2013-11-06

    By a novel in situ chemical vapor deposition, activated N-doped hollow carbon-nanotube/carbon-nanofiber composites are prepared having a superhigh specific Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of 1840 m(2) g(–1) and a total pore volume of 1.21 m(3) g(–1). As an anode, this material has a reversible capacity of ~1150 mAh g(–1) at 0.1 A g(–1) (0.27 C) after 70 cycles. At 8 A g(–1) (21.5 C), a capacity of ~320 mAh g(–1) fades less than 20% after 3500 cycles, which makes it a superior anode material for a Li-ion battery.

  17. Superior Cathode Performance of Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Frameworks for Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dongbin; Li, Xifei; Bai, Zhimin; Shan, Hui; Fan, Linlin; Wu, Chunxia; Li, Dejun; Lu, Shigang

    2017-03-14

    Development of alternative cathode materials is of highly desirable for sustainable and cost-efficient lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) in energy storage fields. In this study, for the first time, we report tunable nitrogen-doped graphene with active functional groups for cathode utilization of LIBs. When employed as cathode materials, the functionalized graphene frameworks with a nitrogen content of 9.26 at% retain a reversible capacity of 344 mAh g(-1) after 200 cycles at a current density of 50 mA g(-1). More surprisingly, when conducted at a high current density of 1 A g(-1), this cathode delivers a high reversible capacity of 146 mAh g(-1) after 1000 cycles. Our current research demonstrates the effective significance of nitrogen doping on enhancing cathode performance of functionalized graphene for LIBs.

  18. Prussian Blue: A Potential Material to Improve the Electrochemical Performance of Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yueying; Li, Bing; Wang, Yunhui; He, Xinyi; Huang, Jianxing; Zhao, Jinbao

    2017-02-08

    The Prussian blue, as a potential adsorbent of polysulfides to suppress the dissolution and shuttle of polysulfides for lithium-sulfur batteries, has been studied in this work. Our results show that Prussian blue improves the electrochemical reaction kinetics during discharge/charge processes. More importantly, the cathode with Prussian blue exhibits better cycling stability and higher discharge capacity retention (722 mAh g(-1) at 0.2 A g(-1) after 100 cycles) than the one without Prussian blue (151 mAh g(-1)). These improvements of electrochemical performances are ascribed to the fact that Prussian blue is very effective in suppressing the dissolution of polysulfides into liquid electrolyte by chemical adsorption.

  19. Nafion coated sulfur-carbon electrode for high performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qiwei; Shan, Zhongqiang; Wang, Li; Qin, Xue; Zhu, Kunlei; Tian, Jianhua; Liu, Xuesheng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a nafion coated electrode is prepared to improve the performance of lithium sulfur batteries. It is demonstrated from a series of measurements that the nafion layer is quite effective in reducing shuttle effect and enhancing the stability and the reversibility of the electrode. When measured under the rate of 0.2 C, the initial discharge capacity of the nafion coated electrode can reach 1084 mAh g-1, with a Columbic efficiency of about 100%. After 100 charge/discharge cycles, this electrode can also deliver a reversible capacity of as high as 879 mAh g-1. Significantly, the charge-transfer resistance of the electrode tends to be reducing after coated with an appropriate thickness of nafion film. The cation conductivity as well as anion inconductivity is considered to be the dominant factor for the superior electrochemical properties.

  20. Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries Based on Carbon Cryogels and Carbon Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nanofoams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.