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Sample records for ah receptor ligands

  1. Modeling of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) ligand binding domain and its utility in virtual ligand screening to predict new AhR ligands

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, William; Koch, Daniel; O’Donnell, Edmond; Khalil, Sammy M.; Kerkvliet, Nancy; Tanguay, Robert; Abagyan, Ruben; Kolluri, Siva Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor; the AhR Per-AhR/Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain binds ligands. We developed homology models of the AhR PAS domain to characterize previously observed intra- and inter-species differences in ligand binding using Molecular Docking. In silico structure-based virtual ligand screening using our model resulted in the identification of pinocembrin and 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone, which promoted nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation of AhR and AhR-dependent induction of endogenous target genes. PMID:19719119

  2. Ah receptor ligands and tumor promotion: survival of neoplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, M; Buchmann, A; Stinchcombe, S; Kalkuhl, A; Bock, K

    2000-03-15

    A number of agonists of the aryl hydrocarbon or dioxin receptor (AhR) are potent tumor promoters in rodent liver. The prototype compound is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Tumor promotion by TCDD is likely to be AhR-mediated. Tumor promoters may affect the rate of division, terminal differentiation or death (apoptosis) of tumor precursor cells. The present paper reviews some of the effects of TCDD on liver cell homeostasis that have been observed under diverse experimental settings and discusses some of the possible underlying mechanisms.

  3. Cloning of the Ah-receptor cDNA reveals a distinctive ligand-activated transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Burbach, K M; Poland, A; Bradfield, C A

    1992-01-01

    A cDNA encoding the murine Ah receptor (Ahb-1 allele for aromatic hydrocarbon responsiveness) has been isolated and characterized. Analysis of the deduced protein sequence revealed a region with similarity to the basic region/helix-loop-helix (BR/HLH) motif found in many transcription factors that undergo dimerization for function. In addition to the BR/HLH domain, the N-terminal domain of the Ah receptor has extensive sequence similarity to the human ARNT (aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator) protein and two regulatory proteins of Drosophila, Sim and Per. Photoaffinity labeling and peptide mapping studies indicate that the Ah receptor binds agonist at a domain that lies within this conserved N-terminal domain. The Ah receptor appears to be a ligand-activated transcription factor with a helix-loop-helix motif similar to those found in a variety of DNA-binding proteins, including Myc and MyoD. Images PMID:1325649

  4. Ligand-mediated cytoplasmic retention of the Ah receptor inhibits macrophage-mediated acute inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Muku, Gulsum E; Lahoti, Tejas S; Murray, Iain A; Podolsky, Michael A; Smith, Kayla J; Hubbard, Troy D; Kuzu, Guray; Gowda, Krishne; Amin, Shantu G; Perdew, Gary H

    2017-09-11

    The Ah receptor (AHR) has been shown to exhibit both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory activity in a context-specific manner. In vivo macrophage-driven acute inflammation models were utilized here to test whether the selective Ah receptor modulator 1-allyl-7-trifluoromethyl-1H-indazol-3-yl]-4-methoxyphenol (SGA360) would reduce inflammation. Exposure to SGA360 was capable of significantly inhibiting lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated endotoxic shock in a mouse model, both in terms of lethality and attenuating inflammatory signaling in tissues. Topical exposure to SGA360 was also able to mitigate joint edema in a monosodium urate (MSU) crystal gout mouse model. Inhibition was dependent on the expression of the high-affinity allelic AHR variant in both acute inflammation models. Upon peritoneal MSU crystal exposure SGA360 pretreatment inhibited neutrophil and macrophage migration into the peritoneum. RNA-seq analysis revealed that SGA360 attenuated the expression of numerous inflammatory genes and genes known to be directly regulated by AHR in thioglycolate-elicited primary peritoneal macrophages treated with LPS. In addition, expression of the high-affinity allelic AHR variant in cultured macrophages was necessary for SGA360-mediated repression of inflammatory gene expression. Mechanistic studies revealed that SGA360 failed to induce nuclear translocation of the AHR and actually enhanced cytoplasmic localization. LPS treatment of macrophages enhanced the occupancy of the AHR and p65 to the Ptgs2 promoter, whereas SGA360 attenuated occupancy. AHR ligand activity was detected in peritoneal exudates isolated from MSU-treated mice, thus suggesting that the anti-inflammatory activity of SGA360 is mediated at least in part through AHR antagonism of endogenous agonist activity. These results underscore an important role of the AHR in participating in acute inflammatory signaling and warrants further investigations into possible clinical applications

  5. Aminoflavone, a ligand of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR), inhibits HIF-1α expression in an AhR-independent fashion

    PubMed Central

    Terzuoli, Erika; Puppo, Maura; Rapisarda, Annamaria; Uranchimeg, Badarch; Cao, Liang; Burger, Angelika M.; Ziche, Marina; Melillo, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Aminoflavone (AF), the active component of a novel anticancer agent (AFP464) in phase I clinical trials, is a ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). AhR dimerizes with HIF-1β/ARNT, which is shared with HIF-1α, a transcription factor critical for the response of cells to oxygen deprivation. To address whether pharmacological activation of the AhR pathway might be a potential mechanism for inhibition of HIF-1, we tested the effects of AF on HIF-1 expression. AF inhibited HIF-1α transcriptional activity and protein accumulation in MCF-7 cells. However, inhibition of HIF-1α by AF was independent from a functional AhR pathway. Indeed, AF inhibited HIF-1α expression in AhR100 cells, in which the AhR pathway is functionally impaired, yet did not induce cytotoxicity, providing evidence that these effects are mediated by distinct signaling pathways. Moreover, AF was inactive in MDA-MB-231 cells, yet inhibited HIF-1α in MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with the SULT1A1 gene. AF inhibited HIF-1α mRNA expression by approximately 50%. Notably, actinomycin-D completely abrogated the ability of AF to down-regulate HIF-1α mRNA, indicating that active transcription was required for the inhibition of HIF-1α expression. Finally, AF inhibited HIF-1α protein accumulation and the expression of HIF-1-target genes in MCF-7 xenografts. These results demonstrate that AF inhibits HIF-1α in an AhR-independent fashion and they unveil additional activities of AF that may be relevant for its further clinical development. PMID:20736373

  6. Detection of the TCDD Binding-Fingerprint within the Ah Receptor Ligand Binding Domain by Structurally Driven Mutagenesis and Functional Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Song, Yujuan; Zhao, Jing; Bonati, Laura; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent, basic helix–loop–helix Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS)-containing transcription factor that can bind and be activated by structurally diverse chemicals, including the toxic environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Our previous three-dimensional homology model of the mouse AhR (mAhR) PAS B ligand binding domain allowed identification of the binding site and its experimental validation. We have extended this analysis by conducting comparative structural modeling studies of the ligand binding domains of six additional high-affinity mammalian AhRs. These results, coupled with site-directed mutagenesis and AhR functional analysis, have allowed detection of the “TCDD binding-fingerprint” of conserved residues within the ligand binding cavity necessary for high-affinity TCDD binding and TCDD-dependent AhR transformation DNA binding. The essential role of selected residues was further evaluated using molecular docking simulations of TCDD with both wild-type and mutant mAhRs. Taken together, our results dramatically improve our understanding of the molecular determinants of TCDD binding and provide a basis for future studies directed toward rationalizing the observed species differences in AhR sensitivity to TCDD and understanding the mechanistic basis for the dramatic diversity in AhR ligand structure. PMID:19456125

  7. Ligand-dependent interactions of the Ah receptor with coactivators in a mammalian two-hybrid assay

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shu; Rowlands, Craig; Safe, Stephen

    2008-03-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a high affinity ligand for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). In this study, we investigated structure-dependent differences in activation of the AhR by a series of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. TCDD, 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (PeCDD), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF), and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) induced CYP1A1-dependent activities in HEK293 human embryonic kidney, Panc1 pancreatic cancer, and Hepa1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cell lines. There was a structure-dependent difference in the efficacy of TCDF and PCB126 in HEK293 and Panc1 cells since induced CYP1A1 mRNA levels were lower than observed for the other congeners. A mammalian two-hybrid assay in cells transfected with GAL4-coactivator and AhR-VP16 chimeras was used to investigate structure-dependent interactions of these chimeras in Panc1, HEK293, and Hepa1c1c7 cells. The reporter construct pGAL4-luc contains five tandem GAL4 response elements linked to the luciferase gene and the GAL4-coactivator chimeras express several coactivators including steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1), SRC-2 and SRC-3, the mediator coactivator TRAP220, coactivator associated arginine methyl transferase 1 (CARM-1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator 1 (PGC-1). Results of the mammalian two-hybrid studies clearly demonstrate that activation of pGAL4-luc in cells transfected with VP-AhR and GAL4-coactivator chimeras is dependent on the structure of the HAH congener, cell context, and coactivator, suggesting that the prototypical HAH congeners used in this study exhibit selective AhR modulator activity.

  8. Benzimidazoisoquinolines: A New Class of Rapidly Metabolized Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) Ligands that Induce AhR-Dependent Tregs and Prevent Murine Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Punj, Sumit; Kopparapu, Prasad; Jang, Hyo Sang; Phillips, Jessica L.; Pennington, Jamie; Rohlman, Diana; O’Donnell, Edmond; Iversen, Patrick L.; Kolluri, Siva Kumar; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays multiple roles in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses. The ability of certain AhR ligands to induce regulatory T cells (Tregs) has generated interest in developing AhR ligands for therapeutic treatment of immune-mediated diseases. To this end, we designed a screen for novel Treg-inducing compounds based on our understanding of the mechanisms of Treg induction by the well-characterized immunosuppressive AhR ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). We screened a ChemBridge small molecule library and identified 10-chloro-7H-benzimidazo[2,1-a]benzo[de]Iso-quinolin-7-one (10-Cl-BBQ) as a potent AhR ligand that was rapidly metabolized and not cytotoxic to proliferating T cells. Like TCDD,10-Cl-BBQ altered donor CD4+ T cell differentiation during the early stages of a graft versus host (GVH) response resulting in expression of high levels of CD25, CTLA-4 and ICOS, as well as several genes associated with Treg function. The Treg phenotype required AhR expression in the donor CD4+ T cells. Foxp3 was not expressed in the AhR-induced Tregs implicating AhR as an independent transcription factor for Treg induction. Structure-activity studies showed that unsubstituted BBQ as well as 4, 11-dichloro-BBQ were capable of inducing AhR-Tregs. Other substitutions reduced activation of AhR. Daily treatment with 10-Cl-BBQ during the GVH response prevented development of GVH disease in an AhR-dependent manner with no overt toxicity. Together, our data provide strong support for development of select BBQs that activate the AhR to induce Tregs for treatment of immune-mediated diseases. PMID:24586378

  9. Identification of the Ah-Receptor Structural Determinants for Ligand Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yongna

    2012-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a transcription factor that responds to diverse ligands and plays a critical role in toxicology, immune function, and cardiovascular physiology. The structural basis of the AHR for ligand promiscuity and preferences is critical for understanding AHR function. Based on the structure of a closely related protein HIF2α, we modeled the AHR ligand binding domain (LBD) bound to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and identified residues that control ligand preferences by shape and H-bond potential. Mutations to these residues, particularly Q377 and G298, resulted in robust and opposite changes in the potency of TCDD and BaP and up to a 20-fold change in the ratio of TCDD/BaP efficacy. The model also revealed a flexible “belt” structure; molecular dynamic (MD) simulation suggested that the “belt” and several other structural elements in the AHR-LBD are more flexible than HIF2α and likely contribute to ligand promiscuity. Molecular docking of TCDD congeners to a model of human AHR-LBD ranks their binding affinity similar to experimental ranking of their toxicity. Our study reveals key structural basis for prediction of toxicity and understanding the AHR signaling through diverse ligands. PMID:22659362

  10. Mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR and induce CYP1A genes expression in human hepatocytes and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kubešová, Kateřina; Dořičáková, Aneta; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-07-25

    The effects of four copper(II) mixed-ligand complexes [Cu(qui1)(L)]NO3·H2O (1-3) and [Cu(qui2)(phen)]NO3 (4), where qui1=2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone, Hqui2=2-(4-amino-3,5-dichlorophenyl)-N-propyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone-7-carboxamide, L=1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (1), 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen) (2), bathophenanthroline (bphen) (3), on transcriptional activities of steroid receptors, nuclear receptors and xenoreceptors have been studied. The complexes (1-4) did not influence basal or ligand-inducible activities of glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor, thyroid receptor, pregnane X receptor and vitamin D receptor, as revealed by gene reporter assays. The complexes 1 and 2 dose-dependently induced luciferase activity in stable gene reporter AZ-AhR cell line, and this induction was reverted by resveratrol, indicating involvement of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in the process. The complexes 1, 2 and 3 induced CYP1A1 mRNA in LS180 cells and CYP1A1/CYP1A2 in human hepatocytes through AhR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay EMSA showed that the complexes 1 and 2 transformed AhR in its DNA-binding form. Collectively, we demonstrate that the complexes 1 and 2 activate AhR and induce AhR-dependent genes in human hepatocytes and cancer cell lines. In conclusion, the data presented here might be of toxicological importance, regarding the multiple roles of AhR in human physiology and pathophysiology.

  11. Predicting the sensitivity of fishes to dioxin-like compounds: possible role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand binding domain.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve; Hecker, Markus

    2013-03-01

    Dioxin-like compounds are chronically toxic to most vertebrates. However, dramatic differences in sensitivity to these chemicals exist both within and among vertebrate classes. A recent study found that in birds, critical amino acid residues in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand binding domain are predictive of sensitivity to dioxin-like compounds in a range of species. It is currently unclear whether similar predictive relationships exist for fishes, a group of animals at risk of exposure to dioxin-like compounds. Effects of dioxin-like compounds are mediated through the AhR in fishes and birds. However, AhR dynamics are more complex among fishes. Fishes possess AhRs that can be grouped within at least three distinct clades (AhR1, AhR2, AhR3) with each clade possibly containing multiple isoforms. AhR2 has been shown to be the active form in most teleosts, with AhR1 not binding dioxin-like compounds. The role of AhR3 in dioxin-like toxicity has not been established to date and this clade is only known to be expressed in some cartilaginous fishes. Furthermore, multiple mechanisms of sensitivity to dioxin-like compounds that are not relevant in birds could exist among fishes. Although, at this time, deficiencies exist for the development of such a predictive relationship for application to fishes, successfully establishing such relationships would offer a substantial improvement in assessment of risks of dioxin-like compounds for this class of vertebrates. Elucidation of such relationships would provide a mechanistic foundation for extrapolation among species to allow the identification of the most sensitive fishes, with the ultimate goal of the prediction of risk posed to endangered species that are not easily studied.

  12. The AhR Ligand, TCDD, Regulates Androgen Receptor Activity Differently in Androgen-Sensitive versus Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghotbaddini, Maryam; Powell, Joann B.

    2015-01-01

    The reported biological effects of TCDD include induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, wasting syndrome and tumor promotion. TCDD elicits most of its effects through binding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). TCDD induced degradation of AhR has been widely reported and requires ubiquitination of the protein. The rapid depletion of AhR following TCDD activation serves as a mechanism to modulate AhR mediated gene induction. In addition to inducing AhR degradation, TCDD has been reported to induce degradation of hormone receptors. The studies reported here, evaluate the effect of TCDD exposure on androgen receptor (AR) expression and activity in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and castration-resistant C4-2 prostate cancer cells. Our results show that TCDD exposure does not induce AhR or AR degradation in C4-2 cells. However, both AhR and AR are degraded in LNCaP cells following TCDD exposure. In addition, TCDD enhances AR phosphorylation and induces expression of AR responsive genes in LNCaP cells. Our data reveals that TCDD effect on AR expression and activity differs in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell models. PMID:26154658

  13. Newspapers and Newspaper Ink Contain Agonists for the Ah Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bohonowych, Jessica E. S.; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T.; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [3H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed. PMID:18203687

  14. Newspapers and newspaper ink contain agonists for the ah receptor.

    PubMed

    Bohonowych, Jessica E S; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T; Denison, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [(3)H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed.

  15. Identification of a novel mechanism of regulation of Ah (dioxin) receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Junsei; Ema, Masatsugu; Sogawa, Kazuhiro; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki

    1999-01-01

    Ah receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates pleiotropic effects of environmental pollutants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on host animals. In addition to induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes, the liganded AhR complex was found to activate gene expression of a factor designated AhR repressor (AhRR), which inhibits AhR function by competing with AhR for dimerizing with Arnt and binding to the XRE sequence. Thus, AhR and AhRR form a regulatory circuit in the xenobiotic signal transduction pathway and provide a novel mechanism of regulation of AhR function that may determine tissue-specific sensitivity to environmental pollutants. PMID:9887096

  16. Comparative Analysis of Homology Models of the Ah Receptor Ligand Binding Domain: Verification of Structure-Function Predictions by Site-Directed Mutagenesis of a Non-Functional AHR†

    PubMed Central

    Fraccalvieri, Domenico; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Karchner, Sibel I.; Franks, Diana G.; Pandini, Alessandro; Bonati, Laura; Hahn, Mark E.; Denison, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxic effects of a wide variety of structurally diverse chemicals, including the toxic environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). While significant interspecies differences in AHR ligand binding specificity, selectivity and response have been observed, the structural determinants responsible have not been determined and homology models of the AHR ligand-binding domain (LBD) are available for only a few species. Here we describe the development and comparative analysis of homology models of the LBD of sixteen AHRs from twelve mammalian and nonmammalian species and identify the specific residues contained within their ligand binding cavities. The ligand-binding cavity of the fish AHR exhibits differences from mammalian and avian AHRs, suggesting a slightly different TCDD binding mode. Comparison of the internal cavity in the LBD model of zebrafish (zf) AHR2, which binds TCDD with high affinity, to that of zfAHR1a, which does not bind TCDD, revealed that the latter has a dramatically shortened binding cavity due to the side chains of three residues (Tyr296, Thr386, His388) that reduce the internal space available to TCDD. Mutagenesis of two of these residues in zfAhR1a to those present in zfAHR2 (Y296H, T386A) restored the ability of zfAHR1a to bind TCDD and to exhibit TCDD-dependent binding to DNA. These results demonstrate the importance of these two amino acids and highlight the predictive potential of comparative analysis of homology models from diverse species. The availability of these AHR LBD homology models will facilitate in depth comparative studies of AHR ligand binding and ligand-dependent AHR activation and provide a novel avenue to examine species specific differences in AHR responsiveness. PMID:23286227

  17. The activation mechanism of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by molecular chaperone HSP90

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Noriko; Fukuda, Kana; Nagata, Yuhtaroh; Okada, Hirotaka; Haga, Asami; Hatakeyama, Shiori; Yoshida, Shiho; Okamoto, Tomoya; Hosaka, Miki; Sekine, Kazuhiro; Ohtaka, Kei; Yamamoto, Soh; Otaka, Michiro; Grave, Ewa; Itoh, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that associates with the molecular chaperone HSP90 in the cytoplasm. The activation mechanism of the AhR is not yet fully understood. It has been proposed that after binding of ligands such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 3methylcholanthrene (3-MC), or β-naphthoflavone (β-NF), the AhR dissociates from HSP90 and translocates to the nucleus. It has also been hypothesized that the AhR translocates to the nucleus and forms a complex with HSP90 and other co-chaperones. There are a few reports about the direct association or dissociation of AhR and HSP90 due to difficulties in purifying AhR. We constructed and purified the PAS domain from AhR. Binding of the AhR-PAS domain to β-NF affinity resin suggested that it possesses ligand-binding affinity. We demonstrated that the AhR-PAS domain binds to HSP90 and the association is not affected by ligand binding. The ligand 17-DMAG inhibited binding of HSP90 to GST-PAS. In an immunoprecipitation assay, HSP90 was co-immunoprecipitated with AhR both in the presence or absence of ligand. Endogenous AhR decreased in the cytoplasm and increased in the nucleus of HeLa cells 15 min after treatment with ligand. These results suggested that the ligand-bound AhR is translocated to nucleus while in complex with HSP90. We used an in situ proximity ligation assay to confirm whether AhR was translocated to the nucleus alone or together with HSP90. HSP90 was co-localized with AhR after the nuclear translocation. It has been suggested that the ligand-bound AhR was translocated to the nucleus with HSP90. Activated AhR acts as a transcription factor, as shown by the transcription induction of the gene CYP1A1 8 h after treatment with β-NF. PMID:25349783

  18. Ligand Promiscuity of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonists and Antagonists Revealed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Soshilov, Anatoly A.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that can be activated by structurally diverse chemicals. To examine the mechanisms responsible for the promiscuity in AhR ligand binding, we determined the effects of mutations within the AhR ligand-binding domain (LBD) on the activity of diverse AhR ligands. Site-directed mutagenesis identified Ile319 of the mouse AhR and, to a lesser extent, Phe318 as residues involved in ligand-selective modulation of AhR transformation using a panel of 12 AhR ligands. These ligands could be categorized into four distinct structurally related groups based on their ability to activate AhR mutants at position 319 in vitro. The mutation I319K was selectively activated by FICZ and not by other examined ligands in vitro and in cell culture. F318L and F318A mutations resulted in the conversion of AhR agonists β-naphthoflavone and 3-methylcholanthrene, respectively, into partial agonists/antagonists. Hsp90 binding to the AhR was decreased with several mutations and was inversely correlated with AhR ligand-binding promiscuity. Together, these data define overlapping amino acid residues within the AhR LBD involved in the selectivity of ligand binding, the agonist or antagonist mode of ligand binding, and hsp90 binding and provide insights into the ligand diversity of AhR activators. PMID:24591650

  19. Transgenic Overexpression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor (AhRR) and AhR-Mediated Induction of CYP1A1, Cytokines, and Acute Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Christoph F.A.; Chang, W.L. William; Kado, Sarah; McCulloh, Kelly; Vogel, Helena; Wu, Dalei; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; Yang, GuoXiang; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Matsumura, Fumio; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR) is known to repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling, but very little is known regarding the role of the AhRR in vivo. Objective: This study tested the role of AhRR in vivo in AhRR overexpressing mice on molecular and toxic end points mediated through a prototypical AhR ligand. Methods: We generated AhRR-transgenic mice (AhRR Tg) based on the genetic background of C57BL/6J wild type (wt) mice. We tested the effect of the prototypical AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1 and cytokines in various tissues of mice. We next analyzed the infiltration of immune cells in adipose tissue of mice after treatment with TCDD using flow cytometry. Results: AhRR Tg mice express significantly higher levels of AhRR compared to wt mice. Activation of AhR by TCDD caused a significant increase of the inflammatory cytokines Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-10, and CXCL chemokines in white epididymal adipose tissue from both wt and AhRR Tg mice. However, the expression of IL-1β, CXCL2 and CXCL3 were significantly lower in AhRR Tg versus wt mice following TCDD treatment. Exposure to TCDD caused a rapid accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages in white adipose tissue of wt and AhRR Tg mice. Furthermore we found that male AhRR Tg mice were protected from high-dose TCDD-induced lethality associated with a reduced inflammatory response and liver damage as indicated by lower levels of TCDD-induced alanine aminotransferase and hepatic triglycerides. Females from both wt and AhRR Tg mice were less sensitive than male mice to acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Conclusion: In conclusion, the current study identifies AhRR as a previously uncharacterized regulator of specific inflammatory cytokines, which may protect from acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Citation: Vogel CF, Chang WL, Kado S, McCulloh K, Vogel H, Wu D, Haarmann-Stemmann T, Yang GX, Leung PS, Matsumura F

  20. Altered adrenergic response and specificity of the receptors in rat ascites hepatoma AH130.

    PubMed

    Sanae, F; Miyamoto, K; Koshiura, R

    1989-11-15

    Adenylate cyclase activation through adrenergic receptors in rat ascites hepatoma (AH) 130 cells in response to adrenergic drugs was studied, and receptor binding and displacement were compared with those of normal rat hepatocytes. Epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) activated AH130 adenylate cyclase about half as much as isoproterenol (IPN) but equaled IPN after treatment with the alpha-antagonist phentolamine or islet-activating protein (IAP). The three catecholamines in hepatocytes were similar regardless of phentolamine or IAP. These catecholamines activated adenylate cyclase in order of IPN greater than NE greater than Epi in AH130 cells but IPN greater than Epi greater than NE in hepatocytes. We then used the alpha 1-selective ligand [3H]prazosin, the alpha 2-selective ligand [3H]clonidine, and the beta-ligand [125I]iodocyanopindolol [( 125I]ICYP), and found that AH130 cells had few prazosin-binding sites, about eight times as many clonidine-binding sites with high affinity, and many more ICYP-binding sites than in hepatocytes. The dissociation constant (Ki) of the beta 1-selective drug metoprolol by Hofstee plots for AH130 cells was lower than that for hepatocytes. The inhibition of specific ICYP binding by the beta 2-selective agonist salbutamol for AH130 cells gave only one Ki value which was much higher than both high and low Ki values of the drug for hepatocytes. These findings indicate that the alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors in hepatocytes are predominantly alpha 1-type and beta 2-type, but that those in AH130 cells are predominantly alpha 2-type and beta 1-type, and the low adrenergic response of AH130 cells is due to the dominant appearance of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, linked with the inhibitory guanine-nucleotide binding regulatory protein, instead of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors, and beta 1-adrenergic receptors with low affinity for the hormone.

  1. Transcript variations, phylogenetic tree and chromosomal localization of porcine aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) genes.

    PubMed

    Sadowska, Agnieszka; Paukszto, Lukasz; Nynca, Anna; Szczerbal, Izabela; Orlowska, Karina; Swigonska, Sylwia; Ruszkowska, Monika; Molcan, Tomasz; Jastrzebski, Jan P; Panasiewicz, Grzegorz; Ciereszko, Renata E

    2017-03-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor best known for mediating xenobiotic-induced toxicity. AhR requires aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) to form an active transcription complex and promote the activation of genes which have dioxin responsive element in their regulatory regions. The present study was performed to determine the complete cDNA sequences of porcine AhR and ARNT genes and their chromosomal localization. Total RNA from porcine livers were used to obtain the sequence of the entire porcine transcriptome by next-generation sequencing (NGS; lllumina HiSeq2500). In addition, both, in silico analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to determine chromosomal localization of porcine AhR and ARNT genes. In silico analysis of nucleotide sequences showed that there were two transcript variants of AhR and ARNT genes in the pig. In addition, computer analysis revealed that AhR gene in the pig is located on chromosome 9 and ARNT on chromosome 4. The results of FISH experiment confirmed the localization of porcine AhR and ARNT genes. In the present study, for the first time, the full cDNAs of AhR and ARNT were demonstrated in the pig. In future, it would be interesting to determine the tissue distribution of AhR and ARNT transcript variants in the pig and to test whether these variants are associated with different biological functions and/or different activation pathways.

  2. Access Path to the Ligand Binding Pocket May Play a Role in Xenobiotics Selection by AhR

    PubMed Central

    Szöllősi, Dániel; Erdei, Áron; Gyimesi, Gergely; Magyar, Csaba; Hegedűs, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of multidrug binding at the atomic level would facilitate drug design and strategies to modulate drug metabolism, including drug transport, oxidation, and conjugation. Therefore we explored the mechanism of promiscuous binding of small molecules by studying the ligand binding domain, the PAS-B domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Because of the low sequence identities of PAS domains to be used for homology modeling, structural features of the widely employed HIF-2α and a more recent suitable template, CLOCK were compared. These structures were used to build AhR PAS-B homology models. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to characterize dynamic properties of the PAS-B domain and the generated conformational ensembles were employed in in silico docking. In order to understand structural and ligand binding features we compared the stability and dynamics of the promiscuous AhR PAS-B to other PAS domains exhibiting specific interactions or no ligand binding function. Our exhaustive in silico binding studies, in which we dock a wide spectrum of ligand molecules to the conformational ensembles, suggest that ligand specificity and selection may be determined not only by the PAS-B domain itself, but also by other parts of AhR and its protein interacting partners. We propose that ligand binding pocket and access channels leading to the pocket play equally important roles in discrimination of endogenous molecules and xenobiotics. PMID:26727491

  3. Access Path to the Ligand Binding Pocket May Play a Role in Xenobiotics Selection by AhR.

    PubMed

    Szöllősi, Dániel; Erdei, Áron; Gyimesi, Gergely; Magyar, Csaba; Hegedűs, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of multidrug binding at the atomic level would facilitate drug design and strategies to modulate drug metabolism, including drug transport, oxidation, and conjugation. Therefore we explored the mechanism of promiscuous binding of small molecules by studying the ligand binding domain, the PAS-B domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Because of the low sequence identities of PAS domains to be used for homology modeling, structural features of the widely employed HIF-2α and a more recent suitable template, CLOCK were compared. These structures were used to build AhR PAS-B homology models. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to characterize dynamic properties of the PAS-B domain and the generated conformational ensembles were employed in in silico docking. In order to understand structural and ligand binding features we compared the stability and dynamics of the promiscuous AhR PAS-B to other PAS domains exhibiting specific interactions or no ligand binding function. Our exhaustive in silico binding studies, in which we dock a wide spectrum of ligand molecules to the conformational ensembles, suggest that ligand specificity and selection may be determined not only by the PAS-B domain itself, but also by other parts of AhR and its protein interacting partners. We propose that ligand binding pocket and access channels leading to the pocket play equally important roles in discrimination of endogenous molecules and xenobiotics.

  4. A novel AhR ligand, 2AI, protects the retina from environmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Mark A.; Davis, Sonnet S.; Rosko, Andrew; Nguyen, Steven M.; Mitchell, Kylie P.; Mateen, Samiha; Neves, Joana; Garcia, Thelma Y.; Mooney, Shaun; Perdew, Gary H.; Hubbard, Troy D.; Lamba, Deepak A.; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Various retinal degenerative diseases including dry and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy are associated with the degeneration of the retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer of the retina. This consequently results in the death of rod and cone photoreceptors that they support, structurally and functionally leading to legal or complete blindness. Therefore, developing therapeutic strategies to preserve cellular homeostasis in the RPE would be a favorable asset in the clinic. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a conserved, environmental ligand-dependent, per ARNT-sim (PAS) domain containing bHLH transcription factor that mediates adaptive response to stress via its downstream transcriptional targets. Using in silico, in vitro and in vivo assays, we identified 2,2′-aminophenyl indole (2AI) as a potent synthetic ligand of AhR that protects RPE cells in vitro from lipid peroxidation cytotoxicity mediated by 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) as well as the retina in vivo from light-damage. Additionally, metabolic characterization of this molecule by LC-MS suggests that 2AI alters the lipid metabolism of RPE cells, enhancing the intracellular levels of palmitoleic acid. Finally, we show that, as a downstream effector of 2AI-mediated AhR activation, palmitoleic acid protects RPE cells from 4HNE-mediated stress, and light mediated retinal degeneration in mice. PMID:27364765

  5. Aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor levels are selectively modulated by hsp90-associated immunophilin homolog XAP2.

    PubMed

    Meyer, B K; Petrulis, J R; Perdew, G H

    2000-07-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-inducible transcription factor that mediates biological responses to halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. The unliganded AhR is a cytoplasmic, tetrameric complex consisting of the AhR ligand-binding subunit, a dimer of hsp90, and the hepatitis B virus X-associated protein 2 (XAP2). The role of XAP2 as a member of the AhR core complex is poorly understood. XAP2 shares significant homology with the immunophilins FKBP12 and FKBP52, including a highly conserved, C-terminal, tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. XAP2 forms a complex with hsp90 and the AhR but can also bind to both independently. This binding is mediated by the conserved TPR domain. Single-point mutations in this region are sufficient to disrupt the association of XAP2 with both the AhR and hsp90 in cells. Cotransfection of the AhR and XAP2 in COS-1 cells results in increased AhR levels compared with cells transfected with the AhR alone. In contrast, coexpression of the AhR with the TPR containing proteins FKBP52, protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), or XAP2 TPR-mutants deficient in binding to the AhR and hsp90 does not affect AhR levels and coexpression of the AhR with the TPR domain of PP5 results in AhR down-regulation. These results demonstrate that XAP2 is apparently unique among hsp90-binding proteins in its ability to enhance AhR levels. A yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-XAP2-FLAG was constructed and biochemically characterized, and no loss of function was detected. YFP-XAP2-FLAG was transiently transfected into NIH 3T3 and was found to localize in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm when visualized by fluorescence microscopy. Treatment of Hepa-1 cells with the hsp90-binding benzoquinone ansamycin, geldanamycin, and the macrocyclic antifungal compound radicicol resulted in AhR but not XAP2 or FKBP52 turnover. Taken together, these results suggest that XAP2/hsp90 and FKBP52/hsp90 complexes are similar yet exhibit unique functional specificity.

  6. Retinoids repress Ah receptor CYP1A1 induction pathway through the SMRT corepressor.

    PubMed

    Fallone, Frédérique; Villard, Pierre-Henri; Sérée, Eric; Rimet, Odile; Nguyen, Quock Binh; Bourgarel-Rey, Véronique; Fouchier, Francis; Barra, Yves; Durand, Alain; Lacarelle, Bruno

    2004-09-17

    CYP1A1 isoform is mainly regulated by the transcription factor AhR and to a lesser extent by the nuclear receptor RAR. The effect of a coexposure with 3MC, a AhR ligand, and RA, a RAR ligand, which are, respectively, strong and weak CYP1A1 inducers, is poorly known. We showed in Caco-2 cells that addition of RA significantly decreased 3MC-induced CYP1A1 expression by -55% for mRNA level and -30% for promoter and enzymatic activities. We further showed that RA decreased AhR protein level. Moreover, a physical interaction between AhR and the RAR-corepressor SMRT has been described in vitro. Using the corepressor inhibitor TSA, transfected-cells with SMRT cDNA, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, we demonstrated that RA addition repressed AhR function through a marked AhR/SMRT physical interaction. This interaction explains the decrease of 3MC-induced CYP1A1 expression. This new mechanism involving the repression of AhR-induced CYP1A1 expression by retinoids allows better knowledge of the CYP1A1 regulation.

  7. A comparison of adrenergic receptors of rat ascites hepatoma AH130 cells with those of normal rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sanae, F; Miyamoto, K; Koshiura, R

    1988-04-01

    The pharmacological specificity of adrenergic receptors in the plasma membrane of rat ascites hepatoma AH130 cells was compared with that in normal rat hepatocytes. The number of [125I]iodocyanopindolol-binding sites was much greater in AH130 cells than in the hepatocytes. We characterized the alpha-adrenergic receptor subtypes using the alpha 1-selective ligand [3H]prazosin and the alpha 2-selective ligand [3H]clonidine. AH130 cells had fewer prazosin-binding sites than the hepatocytes and about 8 times as many clonidine-binding sites of high affinity. The results showed that the adrenergic receptors in AH130 cells have pharmacological properties that are very different from those of the receptors in normal rat hepatocytes.

  8. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand activity of commercial health foods.

    PubMed

    Amakura, Yoshiaki; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Masafumi; Handa, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Morio; Matsuda, Rieko; Yoshida, Takashi

    2011-06-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates toxicological effects by binding to agonists such as dioxins. We previously reported the presence of natural dioxin-like ligands in foods. To further characterise natural ligands with dioxin-like activity, we examined the influence of 50 kinds of commercial supplement and health food on the AhR, using a reporter gene assay. Some samples, prepared using soybean, sesame, or propolis as an ingredient, were revealed to show AhR-binding activity, similar to that of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), at high concentrations. To characterise the AhR-activating substances in eight active samples, the respective extracts were subjected to fractionation with n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and water, followed by estimating their AhR activities. The n-hexane fraction of the propolis extract sample, and the ethyl acetate fractions of the other samples, showed AhR activity similar to that of TCDD, at a high concentration range. HPLC analysis of the active fractions identified isoflavones, such as daidzein and glycitein, and flavones, such as tectochrysin and chrysin, in the samples. Among these compounds, tectochrysin exhibited marked AhR activation. Flavonoids, which are characterised as natural AhR ligands, are known to have representative beneficial effects on human health. The natural AhR ligands identified in this study are known to be useful for human health. Therefore, it is considered that AhR may play a beneficial regulatory role in humans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ah receptor- and TCDD-mediated liver tumor promotion: clonal selection and expansion of cells evading growth arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bock, Karl Walter; Köhle, Christoph

    2005-05-15

    The Ah receptor (AhR) has been characterized as a ligand-activated transcription factor which belongs to the bHLH/PAS (basic helix-loop-helix/Per-Arnt-Sim) family of chemosensors. Transgenic mouse models revealed adaptive and developmental functions of the AhR in the absence of exogenous ligands. Use of persistent agonists such as dioxins including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related compounds demonstrated that the AhR mediates a plethora of species- and tissue-dependent toxicities, including chloracne, wasting, teratogenicity, immunotoxicity, liver tumor promotion and carcinogenicity. However, molecular mechanisms underlying most aspects of these toxic responses as well as biological functions of the AhR are currently unknown. Previous studies of liver tumor promotion in the two-stage hepatocarcinogenesis model indicated that TCDD mediates clonal expansion of 'initiated' preneoplastic hepatocytes, identified as enzyme-altered foci (EAF) by inhibiting apoptosis and bypassing AhR-mediated growth arrest. In contrast, the Ah receptor has been shown in cell models to stimulate growth arrest and apoptosis. Possible underlying mechanisms of these AhR responses are discussed, including enhanced metabolism of retinoic acid which attenuates TGFbeta-mediated apoptosis and interaction of the Ah receptor with the hypophosphorylated retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein. The discrepancy between in vivo findings in EAF and AhR functions may be solved by hypothesizing that sustained activation of the Ah receptor generates a strong selective pressure in liver treated with genotoxic carcinogens leading to selection and expansion of clones evading growth arrest and apoptosis. Models are discussed which may facilitate verification of this hypothesis.

  10. The Nuclear Receptor AhR Controls Bone Homeostasis by Regulating Osteoclast Differentiation via the RANK/c-Fos Signaling Axis

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, Takashi; Arakaki, Rieko; Mori, Hiroki; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Kudo, Yasusei; Tanaka, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway plays a key role in receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)–mediated osteoclastogenesis. However, the mechanism underlying the regulation of AhR expression in osteoclasts and the signaling pathway through which AhR controls osteoclastogenesis remain unclear. We found that the expression of AhR in bone marrow–derived osteoclasts was upregulated by RANKL at an earlier stage than was the expression of signature osteoclast genes such as those encoding cathepsin K and NFAT, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1. In response to RANKL, bone marrow macrophages isolated from AhR−/− mice exhibited impaired phosphorylation of Akt and MAPK as well as NF-κB, whereas their response to M-CSF remained unchanged. Osteoclast differentiation mediated by the AhR signaling pathway was also regulated in an RANKL/c-Fos–dependent manner. Furthermore, ligand activation of AhR by the smoke toxin benzo[a]pyrene accelerated osteoclast differentiation in a receptor-dependent manner, and AhR-dependent regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in osteoclasts was observed. Moreover, AhR−/− mice exhibited impaired bone healing with delayed endochondral ossification. Taken together, the present results suggest that the RANKL/AhR/c-Fos signaling axis plays a critical role in osteoclastogenesis, thereby identifying the potential of AhR in treating pathological, inflammatory, or metabolic disorders of the bone. PMID:27849171

  11. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR. PMID:27635238

  12. The constitutively active Ah receptor (CA-AhR) mouse as a model for dioxin exposure - effects in reproductive organs.

    PubMed

    Brunnberg, Sara; Andersson, Patrik; Poellinger, Lorenz; Hanberg, Annika

    2011-12-01

    The dioxin/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates most toxic effects of dioxins. In utero/lactational exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) impairs fetal/neonatal development and the developing male reproductive tract are among the most sensitive tissues. TCDD causes antiestrogenic responses in rodent mammary gland and uterus and in human breast cancer cell lines in the presence of estrogen. Also, more recently an estrogen-like effect of TCDD/AhR has been suggested in the absence of estrogen. A transgenic mouse expressing a constitutively active AhR (CA-AhR) was developed as a model mimicking a situation of constant exposure to AhR agonists. Male and female reproductive tissues of CA-AhR mice were characterized for some of the effects commonly seen after dioxin exposure. Sexually mature CA-AhR female mice showed decreased uterus weight, while an uterotrophic assay in immature CA-AhR mice resulted in increased uterus weight. In immature mice, both TCDD-exposure and CA-AhR increased the expression of the estrogen receptor target gene Cathepsin D. When co-treated with 17β-estradiol no increase in Cathepsin D levels occurred in either TCDD-exposed or CA-AhR mice. In sexually mature male CA-AhR mice the weights of testis and ventral prostate were decreased and the epididymal sperm reserve was reduced. The results of the present study are in accordance with previous studies on dioxin-exposed rodents in that an activated AhR (here CA-AhR) leads to antiestrogenic effects in the presence of estrogen, but to estrogenic effects in the absence of estrogen. These results suggest the CA-AhR mouse model as a useful tool for studies of continuous low activity of the AhR from early development, resembling the human exposure situation.

  13. Cancer-promoting and Inhibiting Effects of Dietary Compounds: Role of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR)

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Joann B.; Ghotbaddini, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic aromatic amines and dioxin-like compounds are environmental carcinogens shown to initiate cancer in a number of tissue types including prostate and breast. These environmental carcinogens elicit their effects through interacting with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand activated transcription factor. Naturally occurring compounds found in fruits and vegetables shown to have anti-carcinogenic effects also interact with the AhR. This review explores dietary and environmental exposure to chemical carcinogens and beneficial natural compounds whose effects are elicited by the AhR. PMID:25258701

  14. Interaction between halogenated aromatic compounds in the Ah receptor signal transduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guosheng; Bunce, Nigel J

    2004-10-01

    Many toxic and biochemical responses to halogenated aromatic compounds (HACs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) are mediated through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which is an intracellular cytosolic target for HACs. Environmental exposure to HACs almost always involves complex mixtures of congeners, some of which can antagonize the action of potent HACs such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). In this work we studied TCDD and representative PCB congeners, alone and in mixture, for their effect on CYP1A gene transcription and protein levels in primary rat hepatocytes. Together with our previous work, our results suggest that formation of the Ah receptor-ligand-DRE (dioxin response element) complex is the principal point of divergence in the mechanism between an AhR agonist and an AhR antagonist. The coplanar PCBs 77 and 126 and the mono-ortho PCB 156 were full agonists toward CYP1A1 gene transcription and CYP1A protein levels, showing typical additive behavior with TCDD to the target molecule AhR. In contrast, the nonplanar PCB 153 antagonized the action of TCDD, even at concentrations that occupied a significant fraction of AhR molecules. Competitive inhibition explains the commonly reported decrease of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity when PCBs are present in high concentrations and the antagonism of PCBs to the EROD activity of TCDD. The result is that Western blotting offers a much more reliable measure of CYP1A protein concentration than does the EROD assay, despite the greater convenience of the latter. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent regulation of pulmonary miRNA by chronic cigarette smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sarah; de Souza, Angela Rico; Zago, Michela; Iu, Matthew; Guerrina, Necola; Gomez, Alvin; Matthews, Jason; Baglole, Carolyn J

    2017-01-12

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor historically known for its toxic responses to man-made pollutants such as dioxin. More recently, the AhR has emerged as a suppressor of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis from cigarette smoke by mechanisms that may involve the regulation of microRNA. However, little is known about the AhR regulation of miRNA expression in the lung in response to inhaled toxicants. Therefore, we exposed Ahr(-/-) and Ahr(+/-) mice to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks and evaluated lung miRNA expression by PCR array. There was a dramatic regulation of lung miRNA by the AhR in the absence of exogenous ligand. In response to cigarette smoke, there were more up-regulated miRNA in Ahr(-/-) mice compared to Ahr(+/-) mice, including the cancer-associated miRNA miR-96. There was no significant change in the expression of the AhR regulated proteins HuR and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). There were significant increases in the anti-oxidant gene sulfiredoxin 1 (Srxn1) and FOXO3a- predicted targets of miR-96. Collectively, these data support a prominent role for the AhR in regulating lung miRNA expression. Further studies to elucidate a role for these miRNA may further uncover novel biological function for the AhR in respiratory health and disease.

  16. Pityriazepin and other potent AhR ligands isolated from Malassezia furfur yeast.

    PubMed

    Mexia, Nikitia; Gaitanis, Georgios; Velegraki, Aristea; Soshilov, Anatoly; Denison, Michael S; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2015-04-01

    Malassezia furfur yeast strains isolated from diseased human skin preferentially biosynthesize indole alkaloids which can be detected in the human skin and are highly potent activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR-dependent gene expression. Chemical analysis of an EtOAc extract of a M. furfur strain obtained from diseased human skin and grown on l-tryptophan agar revealed several known AhR active tryptophan metabolites along with a previously unidentified compound, pityriazepin. While its structure resembled that of the known alkaloid pityriacitrin, the comprised pyridine ring had been transformed into an azepinone. The indoloazepinone scaffold of pityriazepin is extremely rare in nature and has only been reported once previously. Pityriazepin, like the other isolated compounds, was found to be a potent activator of the AhR-dependent reporter gene assay in recombinant cell lines derived from four different species, although significant species differences in relative potency were observed. The ability of pityriazepin to competitively bind to the AhR and directly stimulate AhR DNA binding classified it as a new naturally-occurring potent AhR agonist. M. furfur produces an expanded collection of extremely potent naturally occurring AhR agonists, which produce their biological effects in a species-specific manner.

  17. AhR ligand Aminoflavone inhibits α6-integrin expression and breast cancer sphere-initiating capacity.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Eileen; Callero, Mariana A; Berardi, Damian E; Campbell, Petreena; Rowland, Leah; Zylstra, Dain; Amis, Louisa; Yee, Michael; Simian, Marina; Todaro, Laura; Loaiza-Perez, Andrea I; Soto, Ubaldo

    2016-06-28

    Traditional chemotherapies debulk tumors but fail to produce long-term clinical remissions due to their inability to eradicate tumor-initiating cells (TICs). This necessitates therapy with activity against the TIC niche. Αlpha6-integrin (α6-integrin) promotes TIC growth. In contrast, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling activation impedes the formation of mammospheres (clusters of cells enriched for TICs). We investigated the ability of AhR agonist Aminoflavone (AF) and AF pro-drug (AFP464) to disrupt mammospheres derived from breast cancer cells and a M05 mammary mouse model of breast cancer respectively. We further examined the capacity of AF and AFP464 to exhibit anticancer activity and modulate the expression of 'stemness' genes including α6-integrin using immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and qRT-PCR analysis. AF disrupted mammospheres and prevented secondary mammosphere formation. In contrast, AF did not disrupt mammospheres derived from AhR ligand-unresponsive MCF-7 cells. AFP464 treatment suppressed M05 tumor growth and disrupted corresponding mammospheres. AF and AFP464 reduced the expression and percentage of cells that stained for 'stemness' markers including α6-integrin in vitro and in vivo respectively. These data suggest AFP464 thwarts bulk breast tumor and TIC growth via AhR agonist-mediated α6-integrin inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The constitutively active Ah receptor (CA-Ahr) mouse as a potential model for dioxin exposure--effects in vital organs.

    PubMed

    Brunnberg, Sara; Andersson, Patrik; Lindstam, Maria; Paulson, Ivar; Poellinger, Lorenz; Hanberg, Annika

    2006-07-25

    The dioxin/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates most, if not all, toxic effects of dioxins and functions as a ligand-activated transcription factor regulating transcription of a battery of genes. In order to study the mechanisms behind the toxicity of ligands of the Ah receptor we have created a transgenic mouse model expressing a constitutively active Ah receptor (CA-AhR). The mutant Ah receptor is expressed and functionally active in all organs studied. The purpose of the present study was to characterize histopathologically, the phenotype of the CA-AhR with regard to the liver, kidney, lung, heart, spleen and thymus of male and female transgenic CA-AhR mice. Moreover, cell-specific activity of the CA-AhR using up-regulation of the AhR target gene CYP1A1 as a marker, was also examined. The relative weight of liver, kidney and heart were increased while relative thymus weight was decreased. Furthermore, slight morphological lesions of the liver, kidney and spleen was seen. Expression of CYP1A1 was found in cells corresponding to endothelial cells in all of the organs studied. In some tissues additional cell types, such as hepatocytes, renal tubuli cell and Clara cells expressed CYP1A1. Both the effects on organ weights and the cellular expression of CYP1A1 in CA-AhR mice correspond well to observations in TCDD-exposed mice. In conclusion, this characterization further support that the CA-AhR mouse is a useful model for life-long continuous low-level activity of the AhR, i.e. the dioxin exposure situation of humans of the general population.

  19. What are Nuclear Receptor Ligands?

    PubMed Central

    Sladek, Frances M.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a family of highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcription in response to small lipophilic compounds. They play a role in every aspect of development, physiology and disease in humans. They are also ubiquitous in and unique to the animal kingdom suggesting that they may have played an important role in their evolution. In contrast to the classical endocrine receptors that originally defined the family, recent studies suggest that the first NRs might have been sensors of their environment, binding ligands that were external to the host organism. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad perspective on NR ligands and address the issue of exactly what constitutes a NR ligand from historical, biological and evolutionary perspectives. This discussion will lay the foundation for subsequent reviews in this issue as well as pose new questions for future investigation. PMID:20615454

  20. Malassezia yeasts produce a collection of exceptionally potent activators of the Ah (dioxin) receptor detected in diseased human skin

    PubMed Central

    Magiatis, Prokopios; Pappas, Periklis; Gaitanis, George; Mexia, Nikitia; Melliou, Eleni; Galanou, Maria; Vlachos, Christophoros; Stathopoulou, Konstantina; Skaltsounis, Alexios Leandros; Marselos, Marios; Velegraki, Aristea; Denison, Michael S.; Bassukas, Ioannis D.

    2013-01-01

    Malassezia yeasts are commensal microorganisms which under insufficiently understood conditions can become pathogenic. We have previously shown that specific strains isolated from diseased human skin can preferentially produce agonists of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), whose activation has been linked to certain skin diseases. Investigation of skin scale extracts from patients with Malassezia associated diseases demonstrated 10–1000 fold higher AhR activating capacity than control skin extracts. LC/MS/MS analysis of the patients’ extracts revealed the presence of indirubin, 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ), indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ), malassezin, and pityriacitrin. The same compounds were also identified in 9/12 Malassezia species culture extracts tested, connecting their presence in skin scales with this yeast. Studying the activity of the Malassezia culture-extracts and pure metabolites in HaCaT cells by Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time PCR revealed significant alterations in mRNA levels of the endogenous AhR-responsive genes Cyp1A1, Cyp1B1 and AhRR. Indirubin and FICZ activated AhR in HaCaT and human HepG2 cells with significantly higher, yet transient, potency as compared to the prototypical AhR ligand, dioxin. In loco synthesis of these highly potent AhR inducers by Malassezia yeasts could have a significant impact on skin homeostatic mechanisms and disease development. PMID:23448877

  1. Ablating the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in CD11c+ cells perturbs intestinal epithelium development and intestinal immunity.

    PubMed

    Chng, Song Hui; Kundu, Parag; Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Teo, Wei Ling; Kawajiri, Kaname; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Mak, Tak Wah; Pettersson, Sven

    2016-04-12

    Diet and microbiome derived indole derivatives are known to activate the ligand induced transcription factor, the Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR). While the current understanding of AhR biology has confirmed its role in mucosal lymphocytes, its function in intestinal antigen presenting cells (APCs) is poorly understood. Here, we report that Cre-mediated deletion of AhR in CD11c-expressing cells in C57/BL6 mice is associated with altered intestinal epithelial morphogenesis in vivo. Moreover, when co-cultured with AhR-deficient DCs ex vivo, intestinal organoids showed reduced SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 and increased Mucin 2 expression, which correlates with reduced Paneth cells and increased goblet cell differentiation, similar to the data obtained in vivo. Further, characterization of intestinal APC subsets, devoid of AhR, revealed an expression pattern associated with aberrant intrinsic Wnt pathway regulation. At a functional level, the loss of AhR in APCs resulted in a dysfunctional epithelial barrier, associated with a more aggressive chemically induced colitis compared to wild type animals. Our results are consistent with a model whereby the AhR signalling pathway may participate in the regulation of innate immunity through intestinal epithelium development and mucosal immunity.

  2. Analysis of Ah receptor pathway activation by brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Brown, David J; Van Overmeire, Ilse; Goeyens, Leo; Denison, Michael S; De Vito, Michael J; Clark, George C

    2004-06-01

    Brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) are used as additives in plastics to decrease the rate of combustion of these materials, leading to greater consumer safety. As the use of plastics has increased, the production and use of flame-retardants has also grown. Many BFRs are persistent and have been detected in environmental samples, raising concerns about the biological/toxicological risk associated with their use. Most BFRs appear to be non-toxic, however there is still some concern that these compounds, or possible contaminants in BFRs mixtures could interact with cellular receptors. In this study we have examined the interaction of decabromodiphenyl ether, Firemaster BP4A (tetrabromobisphenol A), Firemaster PHT4 (tetrabromophthalic anhydride), hexabromobenzene, pentabromotoluene, decabromobiphenyl, Firemaster BP-6 (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl) and possible contaminants of BFR mixtures with the Ah receptor. Receptor binding and activation was examined using the Gel Retardation Assay and increased expression of dioxin responsive genes was detected using the reporter gene based CALUX assay. The results demonstrate the ability of BFRs to activate the AhR signal transduction pathway at moderate to high concentrations as assessed using both assays. AhR-dependent activation by BFRs may be due in part to contaminants present in commercial/technical mixtures. This was suggested by our comparative analysis of Firemaster BP-6 versus its primary component 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl. Some technical mixtures of brominated flame-retardants contain brominated biphenyls, dioxins or dibenzofurans as contaminants. When tested in the CALUX assay these compounds were found to be equivalent to, or more active than their chlorinated analogues. Relative effective potency values were determined from dose response curves for these brominated HAHs.

  3. Lack of Ligand-Selective Binding of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor to Putative DNA Binding Sites Regulating Expression of Bax and Paraoxonase 1 Genes

    PubMed Central

    DeGroot, Danica E.; Hayashi, Ai; Denison, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxicological effects of structurally diverse chemicals through its ability to bind specific DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements (DREs)), and activate transcription of adjacent genes. While the DRE has a highly conserved consensus sequence, it has been suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may be ligand-dependent. The upstream regulatory regions of the murine Bax and human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) genes reportedly contain unique DRE-like sequences that respond to AhRs activated by some ligands but not others. Given the significant implications of this observation to understanding the diversity in AhR responses and that of other ligand-dependent nuclear receptors, a combination of DNA binding, nuclear translocation and gene expression analysis was used to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying these ligand-selective responses. Although known AhR agonists stimulated AhR nuclear translocation, DRE binding and gene expression, the ligand-selective DRE-like DNA elements identified in the Bax and PON1 upstream regulatory regions failed to bind ligand-activated AhR or confer AhR-responsiveness upon a reporter gene. These results argue against the reported ligand-selectivity of AhR DNA binding and suggest DNA binding by ligand activated AhR involves DRE-containing DNA. PMID:24200861

  4. Lack of ligand-selective binding of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor to putative DNA binding sites regulating expression of Bax and paraoxonase 1 genes.

    PubMed

    DeGroot, Danica E; Hayashi, Ai; Denison, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxicological effects of structurally diverse chemicals through its ability to bind specific DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements (DREs)), and activate transcription of adjacent genes. While the DRE has a highly conserved consensus sequence, it has been suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may be ligand-dependent. The upstream regulatory regions of the murine Bax and human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) genes reportedly contain unique DRE-like sequences that respond to AhRs activated by some ligands but not others. Given the significant implications of this observation to understanding the diversity in AhR responses and that of other ligand-dependent nuclear receptors, a combination of DNA binding, nuclear translocation and gene expression analysis was used to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying these ligand-selective responses. Although known AhR agonists stimulated AhR nuclear translocation, DRE binding and gene expression, the ligand-selective DRE-like DNA elements identified in the Bax and PON1 upstream regulatory regions failed to bind ligand-activated AhR or confer AhR-responsiveness upon a reporter gene. These results argue against the reported ligand-selectivity of AhR DNA binding and suggest DNA binding by ligand activated AhR involves DRE-containing DNA.

  5. Inhibition of constitutive aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling attenuates androgen independent signaling and growth in (C4-2) prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Cindy; Richmond, Oliver; Aaron, Latayia; Powell, Joann B

    2013-03-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a member of the basic-helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. AhR mediates the biochemical and toxic effects of a number of polyaromatic hydrocarbons such as 2,3,7,8,-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). AhR is widely known for regulating the transcription of drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the xenobiotic metabolism of carcinogens and therapeutic agents, such as cytochrome P450-1B1 (CYP1B1). Additionally, AhR has also been reported to interact with multiple signaling pathways during prostate development. Here we investigate the effect of sustained AhR signaling on androgen receptor function in prostate cancer cells. Immunoblot analysis shows that AhR expression is increased in androgen independent (C4-2) prostate cancer cells when compared to androgen sensitive (LNCaP) cells. RT-PCR studies revealed constitutive AhR signaling in C4-2 cells without the ligand induced activation required in LNCaP cells. A reduction of AhR activity by short RNA mediated silencing in C4-2 cells reduced expression of both AhR and androgen responsive genes. The decrease in androgen responsive genes correlates to a decrease in phosphorylated androgen receptor and androgen receptor expression in the nucleus. Furthermore, the forced decrease in AhR expression resulted in a 50% decline in the growth rate of C4-2 cells. These data indicates that AhR is required to maintain hormone independent signaling and growth by the androgen receptor in C4-2 cells. Collectively, these data provide evidence of a direct role for AhR in androgen independent signaling and provides insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for sustained androgen receptor signaling in hormone refractory prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification and expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhR1 and AhR2) provide insight in an evolutionary context regarding sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Sturgeons are ancient fishes, which are endangered in many parts of the world. Due to their benthic nature and longevity, sturgeon are at great risk of exposure to bioaccumulative contaminants such as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Despite their endangered status, little research has been conducted to characterize the relative sensitivity of sturgeons to DLCs. Proper assessment of risk of DLCs posed to these fishes therefore, requires a better understanding of this sensitivity and the factors that are driving it. Adverse effects associated with exposure to DLCs are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). This study identified and characterized two distinct AhRs, AhR1 and AhR2, in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) for the first time as a first step in studying the relative sensitivities of sturgeons to DLCs. Furthermore, tissue-specific expression of both AhRs under basal conditions and in response to exposure to the model DLC, β-naphthoflavone (βNF), was determined. The sequence of amino acids of AhR1 of white sturgeon had greater similarity to AhRs of tetrapods, including amphibians, birds, and mammals, than to AhR1s of other fishes. The sequence of amino acids in the ligand binding domain of the AhR1 had greater than 80% similarity to AhRs known to bind DLCs and was less similar to AhRs not known to bind DLCs. AhR2 of white sturgeon had greatest similarity to AhR2 of other fishes. Profiles of expression of AhR1 and AhR2 in white sturgeon were distinct from those known in other fishes and appear more similar to profiles observed in birds. Expressions of both AhR1 and AhR2 of white sturgeon were greatest in liver and heart, which are target organs for DLCs. Furthermore, abundances of transcripts of AhR1 and AhR2 in all tissues from white sturgeon were greater than controls (up to 35-fold) following exposure to βNF. Based upon both AhRs having similar abundances of transcript in target organs of DLC toxicity, both AhRs being up-regulated following

  7. Inhibitory Ah Receptor-Androgen Receptor Crosstalk in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    induced luciferase ac- cleft palate, immunotoxicity and porphyria in mice and tivity in the latter cell line. This suggests that inhibitory CYP1A1 in...Williamson, H. Asou, J.W. Said, porphyria in genetically inbred mice: partial antagonism and S. Holden, I. Miyoshi, H.P. Koeffler, Ligand for peroxisome

  8. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a marker of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) function in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Mattingly, C J; McLachlan, J A; Toscano, W A

    2001-08-01

    We developed an inducible in vivo reporter system to examine expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) during development in zebrafish (Danio rerio). AhR is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the toxic actions of environmental contaminants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Induction of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) is an early biomarker of AhR activation. A 1905 base pair region of the human CYP1A1 promoter/enhancer region was regulated by AhR in zebrafish liver cells after exposure to TCDD (10 nM) in a transient transfection assay. This regulatory region was fused to the cDNA sequence encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) of jellyfish (Aequorea victoria). Transgenic zebrafish were generated to express this AhR-regulated GFP construct. Injected fish exposed to TCDD exhibited induction of GFP in the eye, nose, and vertebrae of zebrafish embryos (48 and 72 hr after fertilization) compared to vehicle controls (DMSO), which did not express GFP. To investigate whether AhR-regulated GFP expression correlated with sites of TCDD toxicity, we exposed wild-type zebrafish to DMSO or TCDD and examined them for morphologic abnormalities. By 5 days after fertilization, TCDD-exposed fish exhibited gross dysmorphogenesis in cranio-facial and vertebral development.

  9. Ultraviolet light converts propranolol, a nonselective β-blocker and potential lupus-inducing drug, into a proinflammatory AhR ligand.

    PubMed

    Dorgham, Karim; Amoura, Zahir; Parizot, Christophe; Arnaud, Laurent; Frances, Camille; Pionneau, Cédric; Devilliers, Hervé; Pinto, Sandra; Zoorob, Rima; Miyara, Makoto; Larsen, Martin; Yssel, Hans; Gorochov, Guy; Mathian, Alexis

    2015-11-01

    UV light and some medications are known to trigger lupus erythematosus (LE). A common mechanism underlying the immunopathologic effect, resulting from exposure to these two seemingly unrelated factors, remains unknown. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) plays a key role in the regulation of IL-22 production in humans and can be activated by both xenobiotics and naturally occurring photoproducts. A significant expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells was observed in the peripheral blood of active systemic LE (SLE) patients, compared to inactive patients and controls. We also show that propranolol, a potential lupus-inducing drug, induced stronger AhR activation in PBMCs of SLE patients than in those of controls. AhR agonist activity of propranolol was enhanced by UV light exposure. MS analysis of irradiated propranolol revealed the generation of a proinflammatory photoproduct. This compound behaves like the prototypic AhR ligand 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole, a cutaneous UV light-induced tryptophan metabolite, both promoting IL-22, IL-8, and CCL2 secretion by T-cells and macrophages. Finally, LE patients exhibit signs of cutaneous AhR activation that correlate with lesional expression of the same proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting a role for photometabolites in the induction of skin inflammation. The AhR might therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention in LE. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent regulation of pulmonary miRNA by chronic cigarette smoke exposure

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Sarah; de Souza, Angela Rico; Zago, Michela; Iu, Matthew; Guerrina, Necola; Gomez, Alvin; Matthews, Jason; Baglole, Carolyn J.

    2017-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor historically known for its toxic responses to man-made pollutants such as dioxin. More recently, the AhR has emerged as a suppressor of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis from cigarette smoke by mechanisms that may involve the regulation of microRNA. However, little is known about the AhR regulation of miRNA expression in the lung in response to inhaled toxicants. Therefore, we exposed Ahr−/− and Ahr+/− mice to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks and evaluated lung miRNA expression by PCR array. There was a dramatic regulation of lung miRNA by the AhR in the absence of exogenous ligand. In response to cigarette smoke, there were more up-regulated miRNA in Ahr−/− mice compared to Ahr+/− mice, including the cancer-associated miRNA miR-96. There was no significant change in the expression of the AhR regulated proteins HuR and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). There were significant increases in the anti-oxidant gene sulfiredoxin 1 (Srxn1) and FOXO3a- predicted targets of miR-96. Collectively, these data support a prominent role for the AhR in regulating lung miRNA expression. Further studies to elucidate a role for these miRNA may further uncover novel biological function for the AhR in respiratory health and disease. PMID:28079158

  11. CB receptor ligands from plants.

    PubMed

    Woelkart, Karin; Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Bauer, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Advances in understanding the physiology and pharmacology of the endogenous cannabinoid system have potentiated the interest of cannabinoid receptors as potential therapeutic targets. Cannabinoids have been shown to modulate a variety of immune cell functions and have therapeutic implications on central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, chronic inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, and may be therapeutically useful in treating autoimmune conditions such as multiple sclerosis. Many of these drug effects occur through cannabinoid receptor signalling mechanisms and the modulation of cytokines and other gene products. Further, endocannabinoids have been found to have many physiological and patho-physiological functions, including mood alteration and analgesia, control of energy balance, gut motility, motor and co-ordination activities, as well as alleviation of neurological, psychiatric and eating disorders. Plants offer a wide range of chemical diversity and have been a growing domain in the search for effective cannabinoid ligands. Cannabis sativa L. with the known plant cannabinoid, Delta(9-)tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Echinacea species with the cannabinoid (CB) receptor-binding lipophilic alkamides are the best known herbal cannabimimetics. This review focuses on the state of the art in CB ligands from plants, as well their possible therapeutic and immunomodulatory effects.

  12. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor suppresses intestinal carcinogenesis in ApcMin/+ mice with natural ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kawajiri, Kaname; Kobayashi, Yasuhito; Ohtake, Fumiaki; Ikuta, Togo; Matsushima, Yoshibumi; Mimura, Junsei; Pettersson, Sven; Pollenz, Richard S.; Sakaki, Toshiyuki; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Akiyama, Tetsu; Kurosumi, Masafumi; Poellinger, Lorenz; Kato, Shigeaki; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki

    2009-01-01

    Intestinal cancer is one of the most common human cancers. Aberrant activation of the canonical Wnt signaling cascade, for example, caused by adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene mutations, leads to increased stabilization and accumulation of β-catenin, resulting in initiation of intestinal carcinogenesis. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has dual roles in regulating intracellular protein levels both as a ligand-activated transcription factor and as a ligand-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase. Here, we show that the AhR E3 ubiquitin ligase has a role in suppression of intestinal carcinogenesis by a previously undescribed ligand-dependent β-catenin degradation pathway that is independent of and parallel to the APC system. This function of AhR is activated by both xenobiotics and natural AhR ligands, such as indole derivatives that are converted from dietary tryptophan and glucosinolates by intestinal microbes, and suppresses intestinal tumor development in ApcMin/+ mice. These findings suggest that chemoprevention with naturally-occurring and chemically-designed AhR ligands can be used to successfully prevent intestinal cancers. PMID:19651607

  13. Naturally occurring marine brominated indoles are aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands/agonists.

    PubMed

    DeGroot, Danica E; Franks, Diana G; Higa, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Junichi; Hahn, Mark E; Denison, Michael S

    2015-06-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the toxic and biological effects of structurally diverse chemicals, including the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). As part of a larger effort to identify the full spectrum of chemicals that can bind to and activate the AhR, we have examined the ability of several naturally occurring marine-derived brominated indoles and brominated (methylthio)indoles (collectively referred to as brominated indoles) to bind to the AhR and stimulate AhR-dependent gene expression. Incubation of mouse, rat, and guinea pig recombinant cell lines containing a stably transfected AhR-responsive luciferase reporter gene with eight brominated indoles revealed that all compounds stimulated luciferase reporter gene activity, although some species-specific differences were observed. All compounds induced significantly more luciferase activity when incubated with cells for 4 h as compared to 24 h, demonstrating that these compounds are transient activators of the AhR signaling pathway. Three of the brominated indoles induced CYP1A1 mRNA in human HepG2 cells in vitro and Cyp1a mRNA in zebrafish embryos in vivo. The identification of the brominated indoles as direct ligands and activators/agonists of the AhR was confirmed by their ability to compete with [(3)H]TCDD for binding to the AhR and to stimulate AhR transformation and DNA binding in vitro. Taken together, these results indicate that marine-derived brominated indoles are members of a new class of naturally occurring AhR agonists.

  14. Naturally-Occurring Marine Brominated Indoles are Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligands/Agonists

    PubMed Central

    DeGroot, Danica E.; Franks, Diana G.; Higa, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Junichi; Hahn, Mark E.; Denison, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the toxic and biological effects of structurally diverse chemicals, including the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). As part of a larger effort to identify the full spectrum of chemicals that can bind to and activate the AhR, we have examined the ability of several naturally-occurring marine-derived brominated indoles and brominated (methylthio)indoles (collectively referred to as “brominated indoles”) to bind to the AhR and stimulate AhR-dependent gene expression. Incubation of mouse, rat and guinea pig recombinant cell lines containing a stably transfected AhR-responsive luciferase reporter gene with eight brominated indoles revealed that all compounds stimulated luciferase reporter gene activity, although some species-specific differences were observed. All compounds induced significantly more luciferase activity when incubated with cells for 4 h as compared to 24 h, demonstrating that these compounds are transient activators of the AhR signaling pathway. Three of the brominated indoles induced CYP1A1 mRNA in human HepG2 cells in vitro and Cyp1a mRNA in zebrafish embryos in vivo. The identification of the brominated indoles as direct ligands and activators/agonists of the AhR was confirmed by their ability to compete with [3H]TCDD for binding to the AhR and to stimulate AhR transformation and DNA binding in vitro. Taken together, these marine-derived brominated indoles are members of a new class of naturally-occurring AhR agonists. PMID:26001051

  15. Role of AhR/ARNT system in skin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Furue, Masutaka; Takahara, Masakazu; Nakahara, Takeshi; Uchi, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that binds to structurally diverse synthetic and naturally occurring chemicals including dioxins, flavonoids, tryptophan photoproducts, and Malassezia metabolites. Upon binding to its ligands, cytoplasmic AhR translocates to the nucleus, heterodimerizes with aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), and mediates numerous biological and toxicological effects by inducing the transcription of various AhR-responsive genes. AhR ligation controls oxidation/antioxidation, epidermal barrier function, photo-induced response, melanogenesis, and innate immunity. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of skin homeostasis mediated by the AhR/ARNT system.

  16. Characterizing the role of endothelin-1 in the progression of cardiac hypertrophy in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Amie K.; Goens, M. Beth; Nunez, Bethany A.; Walker, Mary K. . E-mail: mkwalker@unm.edu

    2006-04-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor characterized to play a role in detection and adaptation to environmental stimuli. Genetic deletion of AhR results in hypertension, and cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, associated with elevated plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), thus AhR appears to contribute to cardiovascular homeostasis. In these studies, we tested the hypothesis that ET-1 mediates cardiovascular pathology in AhR null mice via ET{sub A} receptor activation. First, we determine the time courses of cardiac hypertrophy, and of plasma and tissue ET-1 expression in AhR wildtype and null mice. AhR null mice exhibited increases in heart-to-body weight ratio and age-related expression of cardiac hypertrophy markers, {beta}-myosin heavy chain ({beta}-MHC), and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), which were significant at 2 months. Similarly, plasma and tissue ET-1 expression was significantly elevated at 2 months and increased further with age. Second, AhR null mice were treated with ET{sub A} receptor antagonist, BQ-123 (100 nmol/kg/day), for 7, 28, or 58 days and blood pressure, cardiac fibrosis, and cardiac hypertrophy assessed, respectively. BQ-123 for 7 days significantly reduced mean arterial pressure in conscious, catheterized mice. BQ-123 for 28 days significantly reduced the histological appearance of cardiac fibrosis. Treatment for 58 days significantly reduced cardiac mass, assessed by heart weight, echocardiography, and {beta}-MHC and ANF expression; and reduced cardiac fibrosis as determined by osteopontin and collagen I mRNA expression. These findings establish ET-1 and the ET{sub A} receptor as primary determinants of hypertension and cardiac pathology in AhR null mice.

  17. Interrupting autocrine ligand-receptor binding: comparison between receptor blockers and ligand decoys.

    PubMed Central

    Forsten, K E; Lauffenburger, D A

    1992-01-01

    Stimulation of cell behavioral functions by ligand/receptor binding can be accomplished in autocrine fashion, where cells secrete ligand capable of binding to receptors on their own surfaces. This proximal secretion of autocrine ligands near the surface receptors on the secreting cell suggests that control of these systems by inhibitors of receptor/ligand binding may be more difficult than for systems involving exogenous ligands. Hence, it is of interest to predict the conditions under which successful inhibition of cell receptor binding by the autocrine ligand can be expected. Previous theoretical work using a compartmentalized model for autocrine cells has elucidated the conditions under which addition of solution decoys for the autocrine ligand can interrupt cell receptor/ligand binding via competitive binding of the secreted molecules (Forsten, K. E., and D. A. Lauffenburger. 1992. Biophys. J. 61:1-12.) We now apply a similar modeling approach to examine the addition of solution blockers targeted against the cell receptor. Comparison of the two alternative inhibition strategies reveals that a significantly lower concentration of receptor blockers, compared to ligand decoys, will obtain a high degree of inhibition. The more direct interruption scheme characteristic of the receptor blockers may make them a preferred strategy when feasible. PMID:1330038

  18. ANALYSIS OF AH RECEPTOR-ARNT AND AH RECEPTOR-ARNT2 COMPLEXES IN VITRO AND IN CELL CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Edward J.; Pollenz, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    ARNT and ARNT2 proteins are expressed in mammalian and aquatic species and exhibit a high level of amino acid identity in the bHLH/PAS domains involved in protein interactions and DNA binding. Since the analysis of ARNT2 function at the protein level has been limited, ARNT2 function in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediated signaling was evaluated and compared to ARNT. In vitro, ARNT and ARNT2 dimerized equally with the AHR in the presence of TCDD and ARNT2 out-competed ARNT for binding to the AHR when expressed in excess. In contrast, activation of the AHR with 3-methylcholanthrene or benzo[a]pyrene resulted in predominant formation of AHR•ARNT complexes. ARNT2 expressed in Hepa-1 cell culture lines with reduced ARNT protein resulted in minimal induction of endogenous CYP1A1 protein compared to cells expressing ARNT and mutation of the putative proline residue at amino acid 352 to histidine failed to produce an ARNT2 that could function in AHR-mediated signaling. However, the expression of ARNT2 in wild type Hepa-1 cells reduced TCDD-mediated induction of endogenous CYP1A1 protein by 30%, even though AHR•ARNT2 complexes could not be detected in nuclear extracts. Western blot analysis of numerous mouse tissues and various cell culture line showed that both endogenous ARNT and ARNT2 could be detected in cells derived from kidney, CNS and retinal epithelium. Thus, ARNT2 has the ability to dimerize with the liganded AHR in vitro.and is influenced by the activating ligand yet appears to be limited in its ability to influence AHR mediated signaling in cell culture. PMID:18096572

  19. [Central effects of ORL1 receptor ligands].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Lishmanov, Iu B; Calo, G; Ma, L

    2003-01-01

    It has been discussed literature data on molecular structure of ORL1 receptor and its interaction with intracellular signal systems and neurotransmitters. Data on chemical structure of ORL1 receptor ligands and their central effects (nociception, locomotion, feeding, cognition) are presented.

  20. Engineering death receptor ligands for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wajant, Harald; Gerspach, Jeannette; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2013-05-28

    CD95, TNFR1, TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 belong to a subgroup of TNF receptors which is characterized by a conserved cell death-inducing protein domain that connects these receptors to the apoptotic machinery of the cell. Activation of death receptors in malignant cells attracts increasing attention as a principle to fight cancer. Besides agonistic antibodies the major way to stimulate death receptors is the use of their naturally occurring "death ligands" CD95L, TNF and TRAIL. However, dependent from the concept followed to develop a death ligand-based therapy various limiting aspects have to be taken into consideration on the way to a "bedside" usable drug. Problems arise in particular from the cell associated transmembrane nature of the death ligands, the poor serum half life of the soluble fragments derived from the transmembrane ligands, the ubiquitous expression of the death receptors and the existence of additional non-death receptors of the death ligands. Here, we summarize strategies how these limitations can be overcome by genetic engineering. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. AH6809, a prostaglandin DP-receptor blocking drug on human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Keery, R. J.; Lumley, P.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of AH6809 (6-isopropoxy-9-oxoxanthene-2-carboxylic acid) has been studied upon the anti-aggregatory and aggregatory actions of various agents on human platelets in whole blood. 2. Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), BW245C, 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2, PGI2 and 5'-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) all inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood. The anti-aggregatory activity of PGD2, BW245C and 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 but not PGI2 or NECA was antagonized by AH6809. NECA was antagonized by AH6809. 3. The antagonism of the anti-aggregatory activity of PGD2 by AH6809 was concentration-related and could be overcome by increasing the concentration of PGD2. Analysis of the data yielded an apparent pA2 for AH6809 of 5.35. 4. At approximately 10 fold higher concentrations than those required to antagonize the action of PGD2, AH6809 also antagonized the aggregatory effect of U-46619 in whole blood (pA2 = 4.45). However, concentrations of AH6809 up to 300 microM were without effect upon either ADP- or platelet activating factor (Paf)-induced aggregation (pA2 less than 3.5). 5. The potency of AH6809 against PGD2 and U-46619 was increased in a resuspended platelet preparation suggesting that the drug is extensively bound to plasma proteins. However, in resuspended platelets the specificity of AH6809 relative to that seen in whole blood was reduced since aggregation by ADP and Paf was also slightly antagonized. 6. In conclusion, AH6809 appears to be a weak but specific DP-receptor blocking drug on human platelets and should prove to be a useful drug tool for defining the involvement of endogenous PGD2 in platelet aggregation and classifying the mode of action of anti-aggregatory prostanoids. PMID:2460179

  2. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) tyrosine 9, a residue that is essential for AhR DNA binding activity, is not a phosphoresidue but augments AhR phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Minsavage, Gary D; Park, Sang-ki; Gasiewicz, Thomas A

    2004-05-14

    We delineate a mechanism by which dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or TCDD)-mediated formation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) DNA binding complex is disrupted by a single mutation at the conserved AhR tyrosine 9. Replacement of tyrosine 9 with the structurally conservative phenylalanine (AhRY9F) abolished binding to dioxin response element (DRE) D, E, and A and abrogated DRE-driven gene induction mediated by the AhR with no effect on TCDD binding, TCDD-induced nuclear localization, or ARNT heterodimerization. The speculated role for phosphorylation at tyrosine 9 was also examined. Anti-phosphotyrosine immunoblotting could not detect a major difference between the AhRY9F mutant and wild-type AhR, but a basic isoelectric point shift was detected by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of AhRY9F. However, an antibody raised to recognize only phosphorylated tyrosine 9 (anti-AhRpY9) confirmed that AhR tyrosine 9 is not a phosphorylated residue required for DRE binding. Kinase assays using synthetic peptides corresponding to the wild-type and mutant AhR residues 1-23 demonstrated that a tyrosine at position 9 is important for substrate recognition at serine(s)/threonine(s) within this sequence by purified protein kinase C (PKC). Also, compared with AhRY9F, immunopurified full-length wild-type receptor was more rapidly phosphorylated by PKC. Furthermore, co-treatment of AhR-deficient cells that expressed AhRY9F and a DRE-driven luciferase construct with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and TCDD resulted in a 30% increase in luciferase activity compared with AhRY9F treated with TCDD alone. Overall, AhR tyrosine 9, which is not a phosphorylated residue itself but is required for DNA binding, appears to play a crucial role in AhR activity by permitting proper phosphorylation of the AhR.

  3. Immuno-detection of dioxins using a recombinant protein of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) fused with sfGFP.

    PubMed

    Faiad, Walaa; Hanano, Abdulsamie; Kabakibi, Mohamed Maher; Abbady, Abdul Qader

    2016-06-21

    Dioxins are one of the most toxic groups of persistent organic pollutants. Their bioaccumulation through the food chain constitutes a potential risk for human health. Upon cell entry, dioxins bind specifically and firmly to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), leading to the stimulation of several enzymes responsible for its detoxification. Dioxin/AhR interaction could be exploited as an affordable alternative to a variety of analytical methods for detecting dioxin contamination in the environment. In this work, the ligand binding domain (LBD) of the AhR was cloned downstream a superfolder form of the green fluorescent protein (sfGFP), resulting in the construct pRSET-sfGFP-AhR. High level of expressed sfGFP-AhR fusion protein (50 kDa) was recovered from the inclusion bodies of E. coli by simple solubilization with the Arginine, and purified by affinity chromatography via its N-terminal 6 × His tag. Its purity was confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis and immunoblotting with anti-His or anti-GFP antibodies. Indirect ELISA revealed the ability of the sfGFP-AhR, but not the sfGFP, to bind to the immobilized dioxin with the possibility to detect such interaction by both its 6 × His and GFP tags,Competitive ELISA showed that anti-dioxin antibody was more sensitive to low dioxin concentrations than sfGFP-AhR. Nevertheless,the detection range of sfGFP-AhR fusion was much wider and the detection limit was of about 10 ppt (parts per trillion) of free dioxin in the tested artificial samples. this highly expressed and functional sfGFP-AhR fusion protein provides a promising molecular tool for detecting and quantifying different congeners of dioxins.

  4. Ligand binding domain of vitamin D receptors.

    PubMed

    Rochel, Natacha; Moras, Dino

    2006-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor, a member of the nuclear receptor subgroup NR1I, is regulated by 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 to control calcium metabolism, cell proliferation and differentiation and immunomodulation. The therapeutic applications of vitamin D metabolites are wide. To develop efficient therapy, the elucidation of the structure-function relationships of VDR and its ligands are essential. In this review we will focus on the current structural understanding of the interactions of ligands in the ligand binding pocket of the VDR. These structures revealed the mutual adaptability of the ligands and the protein. In silico modeling has further revealed a possible new pocket in the VDR LBD responsible of the non-genomic action mediated by VDR. With the availability of all these structural information on VDR LBD, new ligands that are more selective, such as non-steroidal ligands, could be designed by taking into account the flexibility of some VDR regions. Tissue selectivity may also be achieved by developing ligands that specifically activate the non-genomic pathway.

  5. Studies on the role of the Ah receptor in hexachloro-benzene-induced porphyria

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Many of the effects of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) resemble those of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), whose effects are initiated by its binding to the AH receptor, the regulatory gene product of the Ah locus. I investigated the ability of HCB to interact with the AH receptor and the involvement of this protein in HCB-induced porphyria. The induction of two cytochrome P450 isozymes regulated by the Ah locus was also examined in light of their possible role in the pathogenesis of HCB- and TCDD-induced porphyria. HCB competitively inhibited the in vitro specific binding of ({sup 3}H)-TCDD to the rat hepatic Ah receptor (K{sub I} = 2.1 {mu}M) without affecting the solubility of ({sup 3}H)TCDD. Following the administration of HCB to rats, the number of ({sup 3}H)TCDD specific binding sites was reduced by up to 40%. HCB induced cytochromes P450b, P450e, P450c, and P450d, confirming that it is a mixed-type P450 inducer. The presence of porphyria in mice was assessed by measuring urinary and hepatic porphyrins and hepatic uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity.

  6. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR links atopic dermatitis and air pollution via induction of the neurotrophic factor artemin.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Takanori; Ogawa, Eisaku; Kobayashi, Eri H; Suzuki, Takafumi; Funayama, Ryo; Nagashima, Takeshi; Fujimura, Taku; Aiba, Setsuya; Nakayama, Keiko; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is increasing worldwide in correlation with air pollution. Various organic components of pollutants activate the transcription factor AhR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor). Through the use of AhR-CA mice, whose keratinocytes express constitutively active AhR and that develop atopic-dermatitis-like phenotypes, we identified Artn as a keratinocyte-specific AhR target gene whose product (the neurotrophic factor artemin) was responsible for epidermal hyper-innervation that led to hypersensitivity to pruritus. The activation of AhR via air pollutants induced expression of artemin, alloknesis, epidermal hyper-innervation and inflammation. AhR activation and ARTN expression were positively correlated in the epidermis of patients with atopic dermatitis. Thus, AhR in keratinocytes senses environmental stimuli and elicits an atopic-dermatitis pathology. We propose a mechanism of air-pollution-induced atopic dermatitis via activation of AhR.

  7. Coevolution between cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoid ligands.

    PubMed

    McPartland, John M; Norris, Ryan W; Kilpatrick, C William

    2007-08-01

    Genes for receptors and ligands must coevolve to maintain coordinated gene expression and binding affinities. Researchers have debated whether anandamide or 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG) is a more "intrinsic" ligand of cannabinoid receptors. We addressed this debate with a coevolutionary analysis, by examining genes for CB1, CB2, and ten genes that encode ligand metabolic enzymes: abhydrolase domain containing 4 protein, cyclooxygenase 2, diacylglycerol lipase paralogs (DAGLalpha, DAGLbeta), fatty acid amide hydrolase paralogs (FAAH1, FAAH2), monoglyceride lipase, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase, NAPE-selective phospholipase D, and protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22. Gene trees (cladograms) of CB1, CB2, and ligand enzymes were obtained by searching for orthologs (tBLASTn) in the genomes of nine phylogenetically diverse species, aligning ortholog sequences with ClustalX, and applying Bayesian analysis (MrBayes). Mirrored cladograms provided evidence of coevolution (i.e., parallel cladogenesis). Next we constructed phylograms of CB1, CB2, and the ten enzymes. Phylogram branch lengths were proportional to three sets of maximum likelihood metrics: all-nucleotide-substitutions and NS/SS ratios (using PAUP()), and Ka/Ks ratios (using FUGE). Spurious correlations in all-nucleotide-substitutions trees (due to phylogenetic bias) and in Ka/Ks ratio trees (due to simplistic modeling) were parsed. Branch lengths from equivalent branches in paired trees were correlated by linear regression. Regression analyses, mirrored cladograms, and phylogenetic profiles produced the same results: close associations between cannabinoid receptors and DAGL enzymes. Therefore we propose that cannabinoid receptors initially coevolved with a fatty acid ester ligand (akin to 2-AG) in ancestral metazoans, and affinity for fatty acid ethanolamide ligands (e.g., AEA) evolved thereafter.

  8. Muscarinic receptors and ligands in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nirish; Khurana, Sandeep; Cheng, Kunrong; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that muscarinic receptors and ligands play key roles in regulating cellular proliferation and cancer progression. Both neuronal and nonneuronal acetylcholine production results in neurocrine, paracrine, and autocrine promotion of cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and other features critical for cancer cell survival and spread. The present review comprises a focused critical analysis of evidence supporting the role of muscarinic receptors and ligands in cancer. Criteria are proposed to validate the biological importance of muscarinic receptor expression, activation, and postreceptor signaling. Likewise, criteria are proposed to validate the role of nonneuronal acetylcholine production in cancer. Dissecting cellular mechanisms necessary for muscarinic receptor activation as well as those needed for acetylcholine production and release will identify multiple novel targets for cancer therapy. PMID:19036940

  9. Indole and Tryptophan Metabolism: Endogenous and Dietary Routes to Ah Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Troy D.; Murray, Iain A.

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor recognized for its role in xenobiotic metabolism. The physiologic function of AHR has expanded to include roles in immune regulation, organogenesis, mucosal barrier function, and the cell cycle. These functions are likely dependent upon ligand-mediated activation of the receptor. High-affinity ligands of AHR have been classically defined as xenobiotics, such as polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins. Identification of endogenous AHR ligands is key to understanding the physiologic functions of this enigmatic receptor. Metabolic pathways targeting the amino acid tryptophan and indole can lead to a myriad of metabolites, some of which are AHR ligands. Many of these ligands exhibit species selective preferential binding to AHR. The discovery of specific tryptophan metabolites as AHR ligands may provide insight concerning where AHR is activated in an organism, such as at the site of inflammation and within the intestinal tract. PMID:26041783

  10. [Functional selectivity of opioid receptors ligands].

    PubMed

    Audet, Nicolas; Archer-Lahlou, Elodie; Richard-Lalonde, Mélissa; Piñeyro-Filpo, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    Opiates are the most effective analgesics available for the treatment of severe pain. However, their clinical use is restricted by unwanted side effects such as tolerance, physical dependence and respiratory depression. The strategy to develop new opiates with reduced side effects has mainly focused on the study and production of ligands that specifically bind to different opiate receptors subtypes. However, this strategy has not allowed the production of novel therapeutic ligands with a better side effects profile. Thus, other research strategies need to be explored. One which is receiving increasing attention is the possibility of exploiting ligand ability to stabilize different receptor conformations with distinct signalling profiles. This newly described property, termed functional selectivity, provides a potential means of directing the stimulus generated by an activated receptor towards a specific cellular response. Here we summarize evidence supporting the existence of ligand-specific active conformations for two opioid receptors subtypes (delta and mu), and analyze how functional selectivity may contribute in the production of longer lasting, better tolerated opiate analgesics. double dagger.

  11. The Retinoid X Receptors and Their Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Marcia I.; Xia, Zebin

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the current status of studies on the structural and molecular biology of the retinoid X receptor subtypes α, β, and γ (RXRs, NR2B1–3), their nuclear and cytoplasmic functions, post-transcriptional processing, and recently reported ligands. Points of interest are the different changes in the ligand-binding pocket induced by variously shaped agonists, the communication of the ligand–bound pocket with the coactivator binding surface and the heterodimerization interface, and recently identified ligands that are natural products, those that function as environmental toxins or drugs that had been originally designed to interact with other targets, as well as those that were deliberately designed as RXR-selective transcriptional agonists, synergists, or antagonists. Of these synthetic ligands, the general trend in design appears to be away from fully aromatic rigid structures to those containing partial elements of the flexible tetraene side chain of 9-cis-retinoic acid. PMID:22020178

  12. Early development of sigma-receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sanju; Bhat, Rohit; Mesangeau, Christophe; Poupaert, Jacques H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Sigma receptors (σ-1 and σ-2) are non-opioid proteins implicated in the pathophysiology of various neurological disorders and cancer. The σ-1 subtype is a chaperon protein widely distributed in the CNS and peripheral tissues. These receptors are involved in the modulation of K(+)- and Ca(2+)-dependent signaling cascades at the endoplasmic reticulum and modulation of neurotransmitter release. σ-1 receptors are emerging targets for the treatment of neurophychiatric diseases (schizophrenia and depression) and cocaine addiction. σ-2 receptors are lipid raft proteins. They are highly expressed on many tumor cells and hence considered potential targets for anticancer drugs. σ receptors bind to a diverse class of pharmacological compounds like cocaine, methamphetamine, benzomorphans like (±)-pentazocine, (±)-SKF-10,047 and endogenous neurosteroids and sphingolipids. In this review we focus on the early development of σ receptor-specific ligands and radiolabeling agents.

  13. Nucleotide Specificity of DNA Binding of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor:ARNT Complex Is Unaffected by Ligand Structure

    PubMed Central

    Denison, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the toxic and biological effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) and a wide variety of structurally diverse ligands through its ability to translocate into the nucleus and bind to a specific DNA recognition site (the dioxin-responsive element [DRE]) adjacent to responsive genes. Although the sequence of the DRE is well defined, several reports suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may vary depending on the structure of its bound ligand. Given the potential toxicological significance of this hypothesis, an unbiased DNA-selection-and-PCR-amplification approach was utilized to directly determine whether binding and activation of the AhR by structurally diverse agonists alter its nucleotide specificity of DNA binding. Guinea pig hepatic cytosolic AhR activated in vitro by equipotent concentrations of TCDD, 3-methylcholanthrene, β-naphthoflavone, indirubin, L-kynurenine, or YH439 was incubated with a pool of DNA oligonucleotides containing a 15-base pair variable region consisting of all possible nucleotides. The AhR-bound oligonucleotides isolated by immunoprecipitation were PCR amplified and used in subsequent rounds of selection. Sequence analysis of a total of 196 isolated oligonucleotides revealed that each ligand-activated AhR:ARNT complex only bound to DRE-containing DNA oligonucleotides; no non-DRE-containing DNA oligonucleotides were identified. These results demonstrate that the binding and activation of the AhR by structurally diverse agonists do not appear to alter its nucleotide specificity of DNA binding and suggest that stimulation of gene expression mediated by direct DNA binding of ligand-activated AhR:ARNT complexes is DRE dependent. PMID:24136190

  14. Nucleotide specificity of DNA binding of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor:ARNT complex is unaffected by ligand structure.

    PubMed

    DeGroot, Danica E; Denison, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the toxic and biological effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) and a wide variety of structurally diverse ligands through its ability to translocate into the nucleus and bind to a specific DNA recognition site (the dioxin-responsive element [DRE]) adjacent to responsive genes. Although the sequence of the DRE is well defined, several reports suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may vary depending on the structure of its bound ligand. Given the potential toxicological significance of this hypothesis, an unbiased DNA-selection-and-PCR-amplification approach was utilized to directly determine whether binding and activation of the AhR by structurally diverse agonists alter its nucleotide specificity of DNA binding. Guinea pig hepatic cytosolic AhR activated in vitro by equipotent concentrations of TCDD, 3-methylcholanthrene, β-naphthoflavone, indirubin, L-kynurenine, or YH439 was incubated with a pool of DNA oligonucleotides containing a 15-base pair variable region consisting of all possible nucleotides. The AhR-bound oligonucleotides isolated by immunoprecipitation were PCR amplified and used in subsequent rounds of selection. Sequence analysis of a total of 196 isolated oligonucleotides revealed that each ligand-activated AhR:ARNT complex only bound to DRE-containing DNA oligonucleotides; no non-DRE-containing DNA oligonucleotides were identified. These results demonstrate that the binding and activation of the AhR by structurally diverse agonists do not appear to alter its nucleotide specificity of DNA binding and suggest that stimulation of gene expression mediated by direct DNA binding of ligand-activated AhR:ARNT complexes is DRE dependent.

  15. Structural and Functional Characterization of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand Binding Domain by Homology Modeling and Mutational Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Denison, Michael S.; Song, Yujuan; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Bonati, Laura

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that is activated by a structurally diverse array of synthetic and natural chemicals, including toxic halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Analysis of the molecular events occurring in the AhR ligand binding and activation processes requires structural information on the AhR Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) B-containing ligand binding domain, for which no experimentally determined structure has been reported. With the availability of extensive structural information on homologous PAS-containing proteins, a reliable model of the mouse AhR PAS B domain was developed by comparative modeling techniques. The PAS domain structures of the functionally related hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α) and AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) proteins, which exhibit the highest degree of sequence identity and similarity with AhR, were chosen to develop a two-template model. To confirm the features of the modeled domain, the effects of point mutations in selected residue positions on both TCDD binding to the AhR and TCDD-dependent transformation and DNA binding were analyzed. Mutagenesis and functional analysis results are consistent with the proposed model and confirm that the cavity modeled in the interior of the domain is indeed involved in ligand binding. Moreover, the physicochemical characteristics of some residues and of their mutants, along with the effects of mutagenesis on TCDD and DNA binding, also suggest some key features that are required for ligand binding and activation of mAhR at a molecular level, thus providing a framework for further studies. PMID:17223691

  16. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory syn-aptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  17. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    2010-01-01

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:19184587

  18. Nitrosamines as nicotinic receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Schuller, Hildegard M

    2007-05-30

    Nitrosamines are carcinogens formed in the mammalian organism from amine precursors contained in food, beverages, cosmetics and drugs. The potent carcinogen, NNK, and the weaker carcinogen, NNN, are nitrosamines formed from nicotine. Metabolites of the nitrosamines react with DNA to form adducts responsible for genotoxic effects. We have identified NNK as a high affinity agonist for the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7nAChR) whereas NNN bound with high affinity to epibatidine-sensitive nAChRs. Diethylnitrosamine (DEN) bound to both receptors but with lower affinity. High levels of the alpha7nAChR were expressed in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and in hamster pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs), which serve as a model for the cell of origin of human SCLC. Exposure of SCLC or PNECs to NNK or nicotine increased expression of the alpha7nAChR and caused influx of Ca(2+), activation of PKC, Raf-1, ERK1/2, and c-myc, resulting in the stimulation of cell proliferation. Signaling via the alpha7nAChR was enhanced when cells were maintained in an environment of 10-15% CO(2) similar to that in the diseased lung. Hamsters with hyperoxia-induced pulmonary fibrosis developed neuroendocrine lung carcinomas similar to human SCLC when treated with NNK, DEN, or nicotine. The development of the NNK-induced tumors was prevented by green tea or theophylline. The beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol or theophylline blocked NNK-induced cell proliferation in vitro. NNK and nicotine-induced hyperactivity of the alpha7nAChR/RAF/ERK1/2 pathway thus appears to play a crucial role in the development of SCLC in smokers and could be targeted for cancer prevention.

  19. Nitrosamines as nicotinic receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Hildegard M.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrosamines are carcinogens formed in the mammalian organism from amine precursors contained in food, beverages, cosmetics and drugs. The potent carcinogen, NNK, and the weaker carcinogen, NNN, are nitrosamines formed from nicotine. Metabolites of the nitrosamines react with DNA to form adducts responsible for genotoxic effects. We have identified NNK as a high affinity agonist for the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) whereas NNN bound with high affinity to epibatidine-sensitive nAChRs. Diethylnitrosamine (DEN) bound to both receptors but with lower affinity. High levels of the α7nAChR were expressed in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and in hamster pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs), which serve as a model for the cell of origin of human SCLC. Exposure of SCLC or PNECs to NNK or nicotine increased expression of the a7nAChR and caused influx of Ca2+, activation of PKC, Raf-1, ERK1/2, and c-myc, resulting in the stimulation of cell proliferation. Signaling via the α7nAChR was enhanced when cells were maintained in an environment of 10–15% CO2 similar to that in the diseased lung. Hamsters with hyperoxia-induced pulmonary fibrosis developed neuroendocrine lung carcinomas similar to human SCLC when treated with NNK, DEN, or nicotine. The development of the NNK-induced tumors was prevented by green tea or theophylline. The beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol or theophylline blocked NNK-induced cell proliferation in vitro. NNK and nicotine-induced hyperactivity of the α7nAChR/RAF/ERK1/2 pathway thus appears to play a crucial role in the development of SCLC in smokers and could be targeted for cancer prevention. PMID:17459420

  20. Molecular modulators of benzodiazepine receptor ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, H.O.; Loew, G.H. )

    1989-01-01

    Ten derivatives of {beta}-carbolines with known affinities to the GABA{sub A}/BDZ (benzodiazepine) receptor were studied using the Am 1 and MNDO/H Semiempirical techniques to identify and characterize molecular modulators of receptor recognition. Steric, lipophilic, and electrostatic properties of these compounds were calculated and examined for their possible role in recognition. Particular attention was paid to the regions around the two most favorable proton-accepting sites, the ON and the substituent at the C{sub 3} position, already implicated in recognition, as well as to the acidic N9H group that could be a proton donating center. To probe further the role of these three ligand sites in receptor interactions, a model of the receptor using three methanol molecules was made and optimum interactions of these three sites with them characterized. The results indicate some similarity in the shape of these ligands, which could reflect a steric requirement. The receptor affinity appears to be modulated to some extent by the ratio of lipophilic to hydrophilic surface, the negative potential at the {beta}N, provided there is also one at the C{sub 3} substituent confirming the importance of two accepting sites in recognition. The acidic N9H does not appear to be a modulator of affinity or does it form a stable H-bond with methanol as acceptor. The two proton donating molecules do form such a stable complex, and both are needed for high affinity.

  1. Nicotinic acid receptor subtypes and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Soudijn, Willem; van Wijngaarden, Ineke; Ijzerman, Adriaan P

    2007-05-01

    Half a century ago, nicotinic acid (niacin) was introduced into the clinic as the first orally available drug to treat high cholesterol levels and to improve the balance between (V)low density lipoproteins (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL). Remarkably, its putative mechanism of action has only been recently elucidated, particularly because of the cloning of a G protein-coupled receptor (HM74A or GPR109A). This receptor responds to both nicotinic acid and the ketone body beta-hydroxybutyrate, the latter thought to be the more probable endogenous ligand for HM74A. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacology and medicinal chemistry of this receptor subtype and a related one (HM74 or GPR109B). Although still in its infancy, the ligand repertoire is developing, and a number of compound classes have now been described, among which are both full and partial agonists. Antagonists, however, are still lacking, thus compromising thorough pharmacological studies. Mutagenesis experiments have provided clues regarding the ligand binding site; in particular, an arginine residue in transmembrane domain 3 of the receptor seems to recognize the acidic moiety present in nicotinic acid and related substances. HM74A has also been linked to one of the major side effects of nicotinic acid, that is, flushing, since this receptor subtype also occurs in skin immune cells. It is not known yet whether HM74 is also present on these cells. Since nicotinic acid is one of the few available medicines that raise HDL ("good cholesterol") levels, HM74A and HM74 appear promising targets for future pharmacotherapy. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Chemistry and pharmacology of GABAB receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents new clinical applications of the prototypic GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen for the treatment of addiction by drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, cocaine, nicotine, morphine, and heroin, a novel baclofen prodrug Arbaclofen placarbil, the GABA(B) receptor agonist AZD3355 (Lesogabaran) currently in Phase 2 clinical trials for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, and four positive allosteric modulators of GABA(B) receptors (CGP7930, GS39783, NVP-BHF177, and BHFF), which have less propensity for the development of tolerance due to receptor desensitization than classical GABA(B) receptor agonists. All four compounds showed anxiolytic affects. In the presence of positive allosteric modulators the "classical" GABA(B) receptor antagonists CGP35348 and 2-hydroxy-saclofen showed properties of partial GABA(B) receptor agonists. Seven micromolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists, phaclofen; 2-hydroxy-saclofen; CGP's 35348, 36742, 46381, 51176; and SCH50911, are discussed. CGP36742 (SGS742) showed statistically significant improvements of working memory and attention in a Phase 2 clinical trial in mild, but not in moderate Alzheimer patients. Eight nanomolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists are presented (CGP's 52432, 54626, 55845, 56433, 56999, 61334, 62349, and 63360) that were used by pharmacologists for numerous in vitro and in vivo investigations. CGP's 36742, 51176, 55845, and 56433 showed antidepressant effects. Several compounds are also available as radioligands, such as [(3)H]CGP27492, [(3)H]CGP54626, [(3)H]CGP5699, and [(3)H]CGP62349. Three novel fluorescent and three GABA(B) receptor antagonists with very high specific radioactivity (>2,000 Ci/mmol) are presented. [(125)I]CGP64213 and the photoaffinity ligand [(125)I]CGP71872 allowed the identification of GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b) receptors in the expression cloning work.

  3. AhR ligands, malassezin, and indolo[3,2-b]carbazole are selectively produced by Malassezia furfur strains isolated from seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gaitanis, George; Magiatis, Prokopios; Stathopoulou, Konstantina; Bassukas, Ioannis D; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C; Velegraki, Aristea; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros

    2008-07-01

    Malassezia yeasts are connected with seborrheic dermatitis (SD) whereas M. furfur pathogenicity is associated with the production of bioactive indoles. In this study, the production of indoles by M. furfur isolates from healthy and diseased skin was compared, the respective HPLC patterns were analyzed, and substances that are preferentially synthesized by strains isolated from SD lesions were isolated and characterized. Malassezin, pityriacitrin, indole-3-carbaldehyde, and indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ) were isolated by HPLC from extracts of M. furfur grown in L-tryptophan agar, and identified by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy. Of these, ICZ, a potent ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), is described for the first time to our knowledge as a M. furfur metabolite. HPLC-photodiode array detection analysis of strain extracts from 7 healthy subjects and 10 SD patients showed that M. furfur isolates from only SD patients consistently produce malassezin and ICZ. This discriminatory production of AhR agonists provides initial evidence for a previously unreported mechanism triggering development of SD and indicates that the variable pathogenicity patterns recorded for M. furfur-associated SD conditions may be attributed to selective production (P<0.001) of measurable bioactive indoles.

  4. Development of a Selective Modulator of Aryl Hydrocarbon (Ah) Receptor Activity that Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Iain A.; Krishnegowda, Gowdahalli; DiNatale, Brett C.; Flaveny, Colin; Chiaro, Chris; Lin, Jyh-Ming; Sharma, Arun K.; Amin, Shantu; Perdew, Gary H.

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. However, the role of the AHR in normal physiology is still an area of intense investigation. For example, this receptor plays an important role in certain immune responses. We have previously determined that the AHR can mediate repression of acute-phase genes in the liver. For this observation to be therapeutically useful, selective activation of the AHR would likely be necessary. Recently, the selective estrogen receptor ligand WAY-169916 has also been shown to be a selective AHR ligand. WAY-169916 can efficiently repress cytokine-mediated acute-phase gene expression (e.g. SAA1), yet fail to mediate a dioxin response element-driven increase in transcriptional activity. The goals of this study were to structurally modify WAY-169916 to block binding to the estrogen receptor and increase its affinity for the AHR. A number of WAY-169916 derivatives were synthesized and subjected to characterization as AHR ligands. The substitution of a key hydroxy group for a methoxy group ablates binding to the estrogen receptor and increases its affinity for the AHR. The compound 1-allyl-7-trifluoromethyl-1H-indazol-3-yl]-4-methoxyphenol (SGA 360), in particular, exhibited essentially no AHR agonist activity, yet was able to repress cytokine-mediated SAA1 gene expression in Huh7 cells. SGA 360 was tested in a 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-mediated ear inflammatory edema model using C57BL6/J and Ahr−/− mice. Our findings indicate that SGA 360 significantly inhibits TPA-mediated ear swelling and induction of a number of inflammatory genes (e.g. Saa3, Cox2, Il6) in C57BL6/J mice. In contrast, SGA 360 had no effect on TPA-mediated ear swelling or inflammatory gene expression in Ahr−/− mice. Collectively, these results indicate that SGA 360 is a selective Ah receptor modulator (SAhRM) that exhibits anti

  5. Affinity Regulates Spatial Range of EGF Receptor Autocrine Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, Ann; Iida, Tomoko; Lam, Ho-Yan; Hill, Virginia; Wiley, H S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2002-08-08

    Proper spatial localization of EGFR signaling activated by autocrine ligands represents a critical factor in embryonic development as well as tissue organization and function, and ligand/receptor binding affinity is among the molecular and cellular properties suggested to play a role in governing this localization. The authors employ a computational model to predict how receptor-binding affinity affects local capture of autocrine ligand vis-a-vis escape to distal regions, and provide experimental test by constructing cell lines expressing EGFR along with either wild-type EGF or a low-affinity mutant, EGF{sup L47M}. The model predicts local capture of a lower affinity autocrine ligand to be less efficient when the ligand production rate is small relative to receptor appearance rate. The experimental data confirm this prediction, demonstrating that cells can use ligand/receptor binding affinity to regulate ligand spatial distribution when autocrine ligand production is limiting for receptor signaling.

  6. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand ITE Inhibits TGFβ1-Induced Human Myofibroblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Geniece M.; Xi, Xia; Kulkarni, Ajit A.; Olsen, Keith C.; Pollock, Stephen J.; Baglole, Carolyn J.; Gupta, Shikha; Casey, Ann E.; Huxlin, Krystel R.; Sime, Patricia J.; Feldon, Steven E.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Fibrosis can occur in any human tissue when the normal wound healing response is amplified. Such amplification results in fibroblast proliferation, myofibroblast differentiation, and excessive extracellular matrix deposition. Occurrence of these sequelae in organs such as the eye or lung can result in severe consequences to health. Unfortunately, medical treatment of fibrosis is limited by a lack of safe and effective therapies. These therapies may be developed by identifying agents that inhibit critical steps in fibrotic progression; one such step is myofibroblast differentiation triggered by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1). In this study, we demonstrate that TGFβ1-induced myofibroblast differentiation is blocked in human fibroblasts by a candidate endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand 2-(1′H-indole-3′-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE). Our data show that ITE disrupts TGFβ1 signaling by inhibiting the nuclear translocation of Smad2/3/4. Although ITE functions as an AhR agonist, and biologically persistent AhR agonists, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, cause severe toxic effects, ITE exhibits no toxicity. Interestingly, ITE effectively inhibits TGFβ1-driven myofibroblast differentiation in AhR−/− fibroblasts: Its ability to inhibit TGFβ1 signaling is AhR independent. As supported by the results of this study, the small molecule ITE inhibits myofibroblast differentiation and may be useful clinically as an antiscarring agent. PMID:21406171

  7. Characterization of ligands for fish taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Oike, Hideaki; Nagai, Toshitada; Furuyama, Akira; Okada, Shinji; Aihara, Yoshiko; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Marui, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2007-05-23

    Recent progress in the molecular biology of taste reception has revealed that in mammals, the heteromeric receptors T1R1/3 and T1R2/3 respond to amino acids and sweeteners, respectively, whereas T2Rs are receptors for bitter tastants. Similar taste receptors have also been characterized in fish, but their ligands have not been identified yet. In the present study, we conducted a series of experiments to identify the fish taste receptor ligands. Facial nerve recordings in zebrafish (Danio rerio) demonstrated that the fish perceived amino acids and even denatonium, which is a representative of aversive bitter compounds for mammals and Drosophila. Calcium imaging analysis of T1Rs in zebrafish and medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) using an HEK293T heterologous expression system revealed that both T1R1/3 and a series of T1R2/3 responded to amino acids but not to sugars. A triple-labeling, in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that cells expressing T1R1/3 and T1R2/3s exist in PLCbeta2-expressing taste bud cells of medaka fish. Functional analysis using T2Rs showed that zfT2R5 and mfT2R1 responded to denatonium. Behavior observations confirmed that zebrafish prefer amino acids and avoid denatonium. These results suggest that, although there may be some fish-specific way of discriminating ligands, vertebrates could have a conserved gustatory mechanism by which T1Rs and T2Rs respond to attractive and aversive tastants, respectively.

  8. A QSAR evaluation of Ah receptor binding of halogenated aromatic xenobiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Mekenyan, O G; Veith, G D; Call, D J; Ankley, G T

    1996-01-01

    Because of their widespread occurrence and substantial biological activity, halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) comprise one of the more important classes of contaminants in the environment. Some chemicals in this class cause adverse biological effects after binding to an intracellular cytosolic protein called the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Toxic responses such as thymic atrophy, weight loss, immunotoxicity, and acute lethality, as well as induction of cytochrome P4501A1, have been correlated with the relative affinity of PCBs, PCDFs, and PCDDs for the AhR. Therefore, an important step in predicting the effects of these chemicals is the estimation of their binding to the receptor. To date, however, the use of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models to estimate binding affinity across multiple chemical classes has shown only modest success possibly due, in part, to a focus on minimum energy chemical structures as the active molecules. In this study, we evaluated the use of structural conformations other than those of minimum energy for the purpose of developing a model for AhR binding affinity that encompasses more of the halogenated aromatic chemicals known to interact with the receptor. Resultant QSAR models were robust, showing good utility across multiple classes of halogenated aromatic compounds. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 1. C Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:9118871

  9. Evidence of aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands in Presque Isle Bay of Lake Erie.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Leas, Tara L; Obert, Eric; Brown, David; Clark, George C; Vanden Heuvel, John P

    2003-08-20

    The purpose of the present studies was to use a biomarker approach to examine xenobiotic exposure of brown bullhead in Presque Isle Bay, Lake Erie (USA). In particular, the presence of compounds that act through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was of interest due to its central role in gene regulation and carcinogenesis of dioxins and certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Initial screening of Presque Isle Bay sediment samples by gene expression microarray in mouse hepatocytes revealed prototypical dioxin-response genes such as cytochrome P450 1A1 and 1B1 (CYP1A1 and CYP1B1). The presence of AhR ligands in sediment samples was confirmed and quantified using an in vitro assay, the Chemical Activated Luciferase Expression (CALUX) assay. The CALUX assay system, by using different incubation times, allows for determination of total dioxin induction equivalents (IEQ) for less persistent compounds such as PAHs as well as for stable compounds such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and certain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Parts of Presque Isle Bay have significant concentrations of AhR ligands in sediment ranging from 200 to 1400 parts per trillion (ppt) dioxin IEQ equivalents (dry weight). This is much higher than levels of dioxin equivalents found in similar sediment samples (approximately 10 ppt). Cascade Creek appears to be a major source of dioxin-like contaminants as IEQs in sediments taken from various regions of this tributary ranged from 1300 to 42000 ppt IEQ. In addition, the CALUX assay indicated that the majority of the IEQs (>90%) in PIB samples were in fact derived from less stable compounds. To determine if brown bullhead are exposed and respond to these high levels of AhR ligands, CYP1A cDNA was cloned from this species and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to examine mRNA levels. The CYP1A mRNA concentration was lower and less variable in fish taken from

  10. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway as a regulatory pathway for cell adhesion and matrix metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Tiffany; Murphy, K.A.; White, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an orphan receptor in the basic-helix-loop-helix PAS family of transcriptional regulators. Although the endogenous regulator of this pathway has not been identified, the AhR is known to bind and be activated by a variety of compounds ranging from environmental contaminants to flavanoids. The function of this receptor is still unclear; however, animal models indicate that the AhR is important for normal development. One hypothesis is that the AhR senses cellular stress and initiates the cellular response by altering gene expression and inhibiting cell cycle progression and that activation of the AhR by exogenous environmental chemicals results in the dysregulation of this normal function. In this review we will examine the role of the AhR in the regulation of genes and proteins involved in cell adhesion and matrix remodeling, and discuss the implications of these changes in development and disease. In addition, we will discuss evidence suggesting that the AhR pathway is responsive to changes in matrix composition as well as cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:18940186

  11. Ligand-independent activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling in PCB3-quinone treated HaCaT human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wusheng; Son, Jyungmean; Vorrink, Sabine U; Domann, Frederick E; Goswami, Prabhat C

    2015-03-18

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that plays a critical role in metabolism, cell proliferation, development, carcinogenesis, and xenobiotic response. In general, dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exhibit a ligand-dependent activation of AhR-signaling. Results from this study show that a quinone-derivative (1-(4-Chlorophenyl)-benzo-2,5-quinone; 4-ClBQ) of a non-dioxin like PCB (PCB3) also activates AhR-signaling. Treatments of HaCaT human keratinocytes with 4-ClBQ and dioxin-like PCB126 significantly increased AhR-target gene expression, CYP1A1 mRNA and protein levels. 4-ClBQ-induced increase CYP1A1 expression was associated with an increase in the nuclear translocation of AhR protein as well as an increase in the luciferase-reporter activity of a human CYP1A1 xenobiotic response element (XRE). 6,2',4'-Trimethoxyflavone (TMF), a well-characterized AhR-ligand antagonist significantly suppressed PCB126-induced increase in CYP1A1 expression, while the same treatment did not suppress 4-ClBQ-induced increase in CYP1A1 expression. However, siRNA-mediated down-regulation of AhR significantly inhibited 4-ClBQ-induced increase in CYP1A1 expression, suggesting that AhR mediates 4-ClBQ-induced increase in CYP1A1 expression. Interestingly, treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine significantly suppressed 4-ClBQ-induced increase in CYP1A1 expression. Furthermore, CYP1A1 expression also increased in cells treated with hydrogen peroxide. These results demonstrate that a ligand-independent and oxidative stress dependent pathway activates AhR-signaling in 4-ClBQ treated HaCaT cells. Because AhR signaling is believed to mediate xenobiotics response, our results may provide a mechanistic rationale for the use of antioxidants as effective countermeasure to environmental pollutant-induced adverse health effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ligand-independent activation of Aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling in PCB3-quinone treated HaCaT human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wusheng; Son, Jyungmean; Vorrink, Sabine U.; Domann, Frederick E.; Goswami, Prabhat C.

    2015-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that plays a critical role in metabolism, cell proliferation, development, carcinogenesis, and xenobiotic response. In general, dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exhibit a ligand-dependent activation of AhR-signaling. Results from this study show that a quinone-derivative (1-(4-Chlorophenyl)-benzo-2,5-quinone; 4-ClBQ) of a non-dioxin like PCB (PCB3) also activates AhR-signaling. Treatments of HaCaT human keratinocytes with 4-ClBQ and dioxin-like PCB126 significantly increased AhR-target gene expression, CYP1A1 mRNA and protein levels. 4-ClBQ-induced increase CYP1A1 expression was associated with an increase in the nuclear translocation of AhR protein as well as an increase in the luciferase-reporter activity of a human CYP1A1 xenobiotic response element (XRE). 6,2′,4′-trimethoxyflavone (TMF), a well-characterized AhR-ligand antagonist significantly suppressed PCB126-induced increase in CYP1A1 expression, while the same treatment did not suppress 4-ClBQ-induced increase in CYP1A1 expression. However, siRNA-mediated down-regulation of AhR significantly inhibited 4-ClBQ-induced increase in CYP1A1 expression, suggesting that AhR mediates 4-ClBQ-induced increase in CYP1A1 expression. Interestingly, treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine significantly suppressed 4-ClBQ-induced increase in CYP1A1 expression. Furthermore, CYP1A1 expression also increased in cells treated with hydrogen peroxide. These results demonstrate that a ligand-independent and oxidative stress dependent pathway activates AhR-signaling in 4-ClBQ treated HaCaT cells. Because AhR signaling is believed to mediate xenobiotics response, our results may provide a mechanistic rationale for the use of antioxidants as effective countermeasure to environmental pollutant-induced adverse health effects. PMID:25668756

  13. The ligand binding domain controls glucocorticoid receptor dynamics independent of ligand release.

    PubMed

    Meijsing, Sebastiaan H; Elbi, Cem; Luecke, Hans F; Hager, Gordon L; Yamamoto, Keith R

    2007-04-01

    Ligand binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) results in receptor binding to glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) and the formation of transcriptional regulatory complexes. Equally important, these complexes are continuously disassembled, with active processes driving GR off GREs. We found that co-chaperone p23-dependent disruption of GR-driven transcription depended on the ligand binding domain (LBD). Next, we examined the importance of the LBD and of ligand dissociation in GR-GRE dissociation in living cells. We showed in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies that dissociation of GR from GREs is faster in the absence of the LBD. Furthermore, GR interaction with a target promoter revealed ligand-specific exchange rates. However, using covalently binding ligands, we demonstrated that ligand dissociation is not required for receptor dissociation from GREs. Overall, these studies showed that activities impinging on the LBD regulate GR exchange with GREs but that the dissociation of GR from GREs is independent from ligand dissociation.

  14. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is Activated by Glucose and Regulates the Thrombospondin-1 Gene Promoter in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dabir, Pankaj; Marinic, Tina E.; Krukovets, Irene; Stenina, Olga I.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is an independent risk-factor for development of diabetic vascular complications. The molecular mechanisms that are activated by glucose in vascular cells and could explain the development of vascular complications are still poorly understood. A putative binding site for the transcription factor Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) was identified in the glucose-responsive fragment of the promoter of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), a potent anti-angiogenic and pro-atherogenic protein involved in development of diabetic vascular complications. AhR was expressed in aortic endothelial cells (EC), activated and bound to the promoter in response to high glucose stimulation of EC. The constitutively active form of AhR induced activation of the TSP-1 gene promoter. In response to high glucose stimulation, AhR was found in complex with Egr-1 and AP-2, two other nuclear transcription factors activated by glucose in EC that have not been previously detected in complex with AhR. The activity of the DNA-binding complex was regulated by glucose through the activation of hexosamine pathway and intracellular glycosylation. This is the first report of activation of AhR (a receptor for xenobiotic compounds) by a physiological stimulus. This report links the activation of AhR to the pathological effects of hyperglycemia in the vasculature. PMID:18515748

  15. [Peripheral effects of ligands of ORL1 receptors].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Lishmanov, Iu B; Calo, G; Ma, L; Lambert, D G

    2003-01-01

    It has been discussed literature data on the role for ORL1 (NOR) receptors in the regulation of function of gastrointestinal, respiratory, cardiovascular, immune, endocrine systems. In addition, it has been discussed a possibility of penetration of blood brain barrier for ORL1 receptor ligands and species dependence of NOR-ligands' effects.

  16. Amino acid sequence of the AhR1 ligand-binding domain predicts avian sensitivity to dioxin like compounds: in vivo verification in European starlings.

    PubMed

    Eng, Margaret L; Elliott, John E; Jones, Stephanie P; Williams, Tony D; Drouillard, Ken G; Kennedy, Sean W

    2014-12-01

    Research has demonstrated that the sensitivity of avian species to the embyrotoxic effects of dioxin-like compounds can be predicted by the amino acid identities at two key sites within the ligand-binding domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AhR1). The domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) has been established as a highly sensitive species to the toxic effects of dioxin-like compounds. Results from genotyping and in vitro assays predict that the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) is also highly sensitive to dioxin-like compound toxicity. The objective of the present study was to test that prediction in vivo. To do this, we used egg injections in field nesting starlings with 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-126), a dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl. Eggs were dosed with either the vehicle control or 1 of 5 doses (1.4, 7.1, 15.9, 32.1, and 52.9 ng PCB-126/g egg). A dose-dependent increase in embryo mortality occurred, and the median lethal dose (LD50; 95% confidence interval [CI]) was 5.61 (2.33-9.08) ng/g. Hepatic CYP1A4/5 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in hatchlings also increased in a dose-dependent manner, with CYP1A4 being more induced than CYP1A5. No effect of dose on morphological measures was seen, and we did not observe any overt malformations. These results indicate that, other than the chicken, the European starling is the most sensitive species to the effects of PCB-126 on avian embryo mortality reported to date, which supports the prediction of relative sensitivity to dioxin-like compounds based on amino acid sequence of the AhR1. © 2014 SETAC.

  17. Structural Analysis of Chemokine Receptor-Ligand Interactions.

    PubMed

    Arimont, Marta; Sun, Shan-Liang; Leurs, Rob; Smit, Martine; de Esch, Iwan J P; de Graaf, Chris

    2017-03-10

    This review focuses on the construction and application of structural chemokine receptor models for the elucidation of molecular determinants of chemokine receptor modulation and the structure-based discovery and design of chemokine receptor ligands. A comparative analysis of ligand binding pockets in chemokine receptors is presented, including a detailed description of the CXCR4, CCR2, CCR5, CCR9, and US28 X-ray structures, and their implication for modeling molecular interactions of chemokine receptors with small-molecule ligands, peptide ligands, and large antibodies and chemokines. These studies demonstrate how the integration of new structural information on chemokine receptors with extensive structure-activity relationship and site-directed mutagenesis data facilitates the prediction of the structure of chemokine receptor-ligand complexes that have not been crystallized. Finally, a review of structure-based ligand discovery and design studies based on chemokine receptor crystal structures and homology models illustrates the possibilities and challenges to find novel ligands for chemokine receptors.

  18. Environmental Ligands of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and Their Effects in Models of Adult Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vondráček, Jan; Machala, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of environmental and dietary ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in mature liver parenchymal cells is well appreciated, while considerably less attention has been paid to their impact on cell populations exhibiting phenotypic features of liver progenitor cells. Here, we discuss the results suggesting that the consequences of the AhR activation in the cellular models derived from bipotent liver progenitors could markedly differ from those in hepatocytes. In contact-inhibited liver progenitor cells, the AhR agonists induce a range of effects potentially linked with tumor promotion. They can stimulate cell cycle progression/proliferation and deregulate cell-to-cell communication, which is associated with downregulation of proteins forming gap junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes (such as connexin 43, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and plakoglobin), as well as with reduced cell adhesion and inhibition of intercellular communication. At the same time, toxic AhR ligands may affect the activity of the signaling pathways contributing to regulation of liver progenitor cell activation and/or differentiation, such as downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin and TGF-β signaling, or upregulation of transcriptional targets of YAP/TAZ, the effectors of Hippo signaling pathway. These data illustrate the need to better understand the potential role of liver progenitors in the AhR-mediated liver carcinogenesis and tumor promotion. PMID:27274734

  19. The crystal structure of the AhRR/ARNT heterodimer reveals the structural basis of the repression of AhR-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Shunya; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Ohto, Umeharu

    2017-09-13

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and related compounds (TCDDs) are extraordinarily potent environmental toxic pollutants. Most of the TCDD toxicities are mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix-Per-ARNT-Sim (bHLH-PAS) family. Upon ligand binding, AhR forms a heterodimer with AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) and induces the expression of genes involved in various biological responses. One of the genes induced by AhR encodes AhR repressor (AhRR), which also forms a heterodimer with ARNT and represses the activation of AhR-dependent transcription. The control of AhR activation is critical for managing AhR-mediated diseases, but the mechanisms by which AhRR represses AhR activation remain poorly understood, due to the lack of structural information. Here, we determined the structure of the AhRR/ARNT heterodimer by X-ray crystallography, which revealed an asymmetric intertwined domain organization presenting structural features that are both conserved and distinct among bHLH-PAS family members. The structures of AhRR/ARNT and AhR/ARNT were similar in the bHLH-PAS-A region, while the PAS-B of ARNT in the AhRR/ARNT complex exhibited a different domain arrangement in this family reported so far. The structure clearly disclosed that AhRR competitively represses AhR binding to ARNT and target DNA, and further suggested the existence of an AhRR/ARNT-specific repression mechanism. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the mechanism by which AhRR represses AhR-mediated gene transcription. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  20. The role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in the pathology of pleomorphic adenoma in parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Drozdzik, Agnieszka; Kowalczyk, Robert; Lipski, Mariusz; Łapczuk, Joanna; Urasinska, Elzbieta; Kurzawski, Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma (benign mixed tumor) is one of the most common salivary gland tumors. However, molecular mechanisms implicated in its development are not entirely defined. Therefore, the study aimed at definition of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) involvement in pleomorphic adenoma pathology, as the AhR controlled gene system was documented to play a role in development of various human tumors. The study was carried out in pleomorphic adenoma and control parotid gland tissues where gene expression of AHR, AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT), AhR repressor (AHRR), as well as AhR controlled genes: CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, at mRNA and protein (immunohistochemistry) levels were studied. Functional evaluation of AhR system was evaluated in HSY cells (human parotid gland adenocarcinoma cells) using 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) as AhR specific inducer. Pleomorphic adenoma specimens showed cytoplasmic and nuclear AhR expression in epithelial cells as well as in mesenchymal cells. In parotid gland AhR was expressed in cytoplasm of duct cells. Quantitative expression at mRNA level showed significantly higher expression of AHR, ARNT and CYP1B1, and comparable levels of CYP1A1 in pleomorphic adenoma tissue in comparison to healthy parotid gland. The HSY cell study revealed significantly higher expression level of AHRR in HSY as compared with MCF-7 cells (human breast adenocarcinoma cell line used as reference). Upon TCDD stimulation a drop in AHRR level in HSY cells and an increase in MCF-7 cells were observed. The HSY and MCF-7 cell proliferation rate (measured by WST-1 test) was not affected by TCDD. Summarizing both in vitro and in vivo observations it can be stated that AhR system may play a role in the pathology of pleomorphic adenoma. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Bivalent Ligands for the Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT3 receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel, which by virtue of its pentameric architecture, can be considered to be an intriguing example of intrinsically multivalent biological receptors. This paper describes a general design approach to the study of multivalency in this multimeric ion channel. Bivalent ligands for 5-HT3 receptor have been designed by linking an arylpiperazine moiety to probes showing different functional features. Both homobivalent and heterobivalent ligands have shown 5-HT3 receptor affinity in the nanomolar range, providing evidence for the viability of our design approach. Moreover, the high affinity shown by homobivalent ligands suggests that bivalency is a promising approach in 5-HT3 receptor modulation and provides the rational basis for applying the concepts of multivalency to the study of 5-HT3 receptor function. PMID:24900351

  2. Ligand binding was acquired during evolution of nuclear receptors

    PubMed Central

    Escriva, Hector; Safi, Rachid; Hänni, Catherine; Langlois, Marie-Claire; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Stehelin, Dominique; Capron, André; Pierce, Raymond; Laudet, Vincent

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily comprises, in addition to ligand-activated transcription factors, members for which no ligand has been identified to date. We demonstrate that orphan receptors are randomly distributed in the evolutionary tree and that there is no relationship between the position of a given liganded receptor in the tree and the chemical nature of its ligand. NRs are specific to metazoans, as revealed by a screen of NR-related sequences in early- and non-metazoan organisms. The analysis of the NR gene duplication pattern during the evolution of metazoans shows that the present NR diversity arose from two waves of gene duplications. Strikingly, our results suggest that the ancestral NR was an orphan receptor that acquired ligand-binding ability during subsequent evolution. PMID:9192646

  3. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  4. Tissue specificity of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated responses and relative sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to an AhR agonist.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Tendler, Brett J; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2012-06-15

    Sturgeons are endangered in some parts of the world. Due to their benthic nature and longevity sturgeon are at greater risk of exposure to bioaccumulative contaminants such as dioxin-like compounds that are associated with sediments. Despite their endangered status, little research has been conducted to characterize the relative responsiveness of sturgeon to dioxin-like compounds. In an attempt to study the biological effects and possible associated risks of exposure to dioxin-like compounds in sturgeon, the molecular and biochemical responses of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to a model aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist, β-naphthoflavone (βNF) were investigated. White sturgeon were injected intraperitoneally with one of three doses of βNF (0, 50, or 500mg/kg, bw). Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were used as a reference species since their responses have been well characterized in the past. Three days following injection with βNF, fish were euthanized and livers, gills, and intestines collected for biochemical and molecular analyses. White sturgeon exposed to βNF had significantly greater ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity in liver (up to 37-fold), gill (up to 41-fold), and intestine (up to 36-fold) than did unexposed controls. Rainbow trout injected with βNF exhibited EROD activity that was significantly greater in liver (88-fold), than that of controls, but was undetectable in gills or intestine. Abundance of CYP1A transcript displayed a comparable pattern of tissue-specific induction with intestine (up to 189-fold), gills (up to 53-fold), and liver (up to 21-fold). Methoxyresorufin O-deethylase (MROD) and pentoxyresorufin O-deethylase (PROD) activities were undetectable in unexposed white sturgeon tissues while exposed tissues displayed MROD activity that was only moderately greater than the activity that could be detected. Differential inducibility among liver, gill, and intestine following exposure to an AhR agonist is

  5. Imidazolines stimulate release of insulin from RIN-5AH cells independently from imidazoline I1 and I2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Olmos, G; Kulkarni, R N; Haque, M; MacDermot, J

    1994-09-01

    The effect on insulin release of efaroxan, an alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist and a highly potent drug at imidazoline I1 receptors, and the effects of seven other imidazoline compounds selective for the imidazoline I1 or I2 receptors, were studied in the rat insulinoma cell line RIN-5AH. The cells released insulin in response to glucose (0.3-10 mM), and efaroxan (100 microM) potentiated glucose-induced insulin release. (-)-Adrenaline completely displaced the binding of [125I]p-iodoclonidine to membranes of RIN-5AH cells, indicating that these cells do not express imidazoline I1 receptors. Cirazoline and idazoxan (100 microM), both highly potent drugs at imidazoline I2 receptors, and the guanidines guanoxan and amiloride (200 microM), also promoted insulin release from RIN-5AH cells. Irreversible blockade of imidazoline I2 receptors with 10 microM clorgyline did not prevent the stimulatory effects of cirazoline or idazoxan; however, these compounds completely reversed the inhibition by diazoxide (250 microM), an opener of ATP-dependent K+ channels (K+ATP channels), of glucose-induced insulin release. These data indicate that the imidazoline/guanidine compounds promote insulin release from RIN-5AH cells, by interacting with a novel binding site related to K+ATP channels that does not represent any of the known imidazoline I1 or I2 receptors.

  6. Development of Species-Specific Ah Receptor-Responsive Third Generation CALUX Cell Lines with Increased Sensitivity and Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Jennifer C.; He, Guochun; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Zhao, Jing; Wirth, Ed; Fulton, Michael H.; Denison, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The Ah receptor (AhR)-responsive CALUX (chemically-activated luciferase expression) cell bioassay is commonly used for rapid screening of samples for the presence of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin), dioxin-like compounds, and AhR agonists/antagonists. By increasing the number of AhR DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements), we previously generated a novel third generation (G3) recombinant AhR-responsive mouse CALUX cell line (H1L7.5c3) with significantly enhanced sensitivity and response to DLCs compared to existing AhR-CALUX cell bioassays. However, the elevated background luciferase activity of these cells and the absence of comparable G3 cell lines derived from other species have limited their utility for screening purposes. Here, we describe the development and characterization of species-specific G3 recombinant AhR-responsive CALUX cell lines (rat, human, and guinea pig) that exhibit significantly improved sensitivity and dramatically increased TCDD induction response. The low background luciferase activity, low minimal detection limit (0.1 pM TCDD) and enhanced induction response of the rat G3 cell line (H4L7.5c2) over the H1L7.5c3 mouse G3 cells, identifies them as a more optimal cell line for screening purposes. The utility of the new G3 CALUX cell lines were demonstrated by screening sediment extracts and a small chemical compound library for the presence of AhR agonists. The increased sensitivity and response of these new G3 CALUX cell lines will facilitate species-specific analysis of DLCs and AhR agonists in samples with low levels of contamination and/or in small sample volumes. PMID:26366531

  7. Fluorescent Ligand for Human Progesterone Receptor Imaging in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We employed molecular modeling to design and then synthesize fluorescent ligands for the human progesterone receptor. Boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) or tetramethylrhodamine were conjugated to the progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 (Mifepristone) through an extended hydrophilic linker. The fluorescent ligands demonstrated comparable bioactivity to the parent antagonist in live cells and triggered nuclear translocation of the receptor in a specific manner. The BODIPY labeled ligand was applied to investigate the dependency of progesterone receptor nuclear translocation on partner proteins and to show that functional heat shock protein 90 but not immunophilin FKBP52 activity is essential. A tissue distribution study indicated that the fluorescent ligand preferentially accumulates in tissues that express high levels of the receptor in vivo. The design and properties of the BODIPY-labeled RU486 make it a potential candidate for in vivo imaging of PR by positron emission tomography through incorporation of 18F into the BODIPY core. PMID:23600997

  8. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M

    2015-09-09

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand-receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  9. Expression of nuclear receptors (AhR, PXR, CAR) and transcription factor (Nrf2) in human parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Droździk, Agnieszka; Kowalczyk, Robert; Urasińska, Elzbieta; Kurzawski, Mateusz

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors and transcription factors coordinate expression of many genes, and regulation of their expression determines cellular response to various endo- and exogenous factors. There is paucity of data regarding expression of nuclear receptors and factors in salivary glands. In the present study, a focus was placed on human parotid gland expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Parotid salivary tissue was obtained from patients undergoing the gland dissection. Quantitative real-time PCR aimmunohistochemical staining were used for expression studies. The highest mRNA expression was documented for NFE2L2 coding for Nrf2. Lower expression was seen in the case of AHR gene coding for AhR. PXR was constitutively present at very low level and CAR expression was below the limit of quantification. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the parotid gland specimens revealed cytoplasmic Nrf2 expression in striated duct cells as well as within myoepithelial cells. Acinar cells were mostly negative for Nrf2. Expression of AhR was found within the cytoplasm in striated duct cells. Acinar and myoepithelial cells were negative for AhR. Having in mind their role in regulating function of many enzymes and transmembrane transporters, expression of these factors seem play a role in salivary gland physiology, pathology as well as drug transport and metabolism.

  10. Formyl peptide receptor chimeras define domains involved in ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Perez, H D; Holmes, R; Vilander, L R; Adams, R R; Manzana, W; Jolley, D; Andrews, W H

    1993-02-05

    We have begun to study the structural requirements for the binding of formyl peptides to their specific receptors. As an initial approach, we constructed C5a-formyl peptide receptor chimeras. Unique (and identical) restriction sites were introduced within the transmembrane domains of these receptors that allowed for the exchange of specific areas. Four types of chimeric receptors were generated. 1) The C5a receptor was progressively substituted by the formyl peptide receptor. 2) The formyl peptide receptor was progressively substituted by the C5a receptor. 3) Specific domains of the C5a receptor were substituted by the corresponding domain of the formyl peptide receptor. 4) Specific domains of the formyl peptide receptor were replaced by the same corresponding domain of the C5a receptor. Wild type and chimeric receptors were transfected into COS 7 cells and their ability to bind formyl peptide determined, taking into account efficiency of transfection and expression of chimeric protein. Based on these results, a ligand binding model is presented in which the second, third, and fourth extracellular (and/or their transmembrane) domains together with the first transmembrane domain form a ligand binding pocket for formyl peptides. It is proposed that the amino-terminal domain plays a role by presumably providing a "lid" to the pocket. The carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic tail appears to modulate ligand binding by regulating receptor affinity.

  11. A high-throughput ligand competition binding assay for the androgen receptor and other nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Féau, Clémentine; Arnold, Leggy A; Kosinski, Aaron; Guy, R Kiplin

    2009-01-01

    Standardized, automated ligand-binding assays facilitate evaluation of endocrine activities of environmental chemicals and identification of antagonists of nuclear receptor ligands. Many current assays rely on fluorescently labeled ligands that are significantly different from the native ligands. The authors describe a radiolabeled ligand competition scintillation proximity assay (SPA) for the androgen receptor (AR) using Ni-coated 384-well FlashPlates and liganded AR-LBD protein. This highly reproducible, low-cost assay is well suited for automated high-throughput screening. In addition, the authors show that this assay can be adapted to measure ligand affinities for other nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor gamma, thyroid receptors alpha and beta).

  12. In Vivo Dioxin Favors Interleukin-22 Production by Human CD4+ T Cells in an Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR)-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Brembilla, Nicolò Costantino; Ramirez, Jean-Marie; Chicheportiche, Rachel; Sorg, Olivier; Saurat, Jean-Hilaire; Chizzolini, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Background The transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates the effects of a group of chemicals known as dioxins, ubiquitously present in our environment. However, it is poorly known how the in vivo exposure to these chemicals affects in humans the adaptive immune response. We therefore assessed the functional phenotype of T cells from an individual who developed a severe cutaneous and systemic syndrome after having been exposed to an extremely high dose of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Methodology/Principal Findings T cells of the TCDD-exposed individual were studied for their capacity to produce cytokines in response to polyclonal and superantigenic stimulation, and for the expression of chemokine receptors involved in skin homing. The supernatants from T cells of the exposed individual contained a substantially increased amount of interleukin (IL)-22 but not of IL-17A, interferon (IFN)-γ or IL-10 when compared to nine healthy controls. In vitro experiments confirmed a direct, AhR-dependent, enhancing effect of TCDD on IL-22 production by CD4+ T cells. The increased production of IL-22 was not dependent on AhR occupancy by residual TCDD molecules, as demonstrated in competition experiments with the specific AhR antagonist CH-223191. In contrast, it was due to an increased frequency of IL-22 single producing cells accompanied by an increased percentage of cells expressing the skin-homing chemokine receptors CCR6 and CCR4, identified through a multiparameter flow cytometry approach. Of interest, the frequency of CD4+CD25hiFoxP3+ T regulatory cells was similar in the TCDD-exposed and healthy individuals. Conclusions/Significance This case strongly supports the contention that human exposure to persistent AhR ligands in vivo induce a long-lasting effect on the human adaptive immune system and specifically polarizes CD4+ T cells to produce IL-22 and not other T cell cytokines with no effect on T regulatory cells. PMID:21525997

  13. CLiBE: a database of computed ligand binding energy for ligand-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Ji, Z L; Zhi, D G; Chen, Y Z

    2002-11-01

    Consideration of binding competitiveness of a drug candidate against natural ligands and other drugs that bind to the same receptor site may facilitate the rational development of a candidate into a potent drug. A strategy that can be applied to computer-aided drug design is to evaluate ligand-receptor interaction energy or other scoring functions of a designed drug with that of the relevant ligands known to bind to the same binding site. As a tool to facilitate such a strategy, a database of ligand-receptor interaction energy is developed from known ligand-receptor 3D structural entries in the Protein Databank (PDB). The Energy is computed based on a molecular mechanics force field that has been used in the prediction of therapeutic and toxicity targets of drugs. This database also contains information about ligand function and other properties and it can be accessed at http://xin.cz3.nus.edu.sg/group/CLiBE.asp. The computed energy components may facilitate the probing of the mode of action and other profiles of binding. A number of computed energies of some PDB ligand-receptor complexes in this database are studied and compared to experimental binding affinity. A certain degree of correlation between the computed energy and experimental binding affinity is found, which suggests that the computed energy may be useful in facilitating a qualitative analysis of drug binding competitiveness.

  14. Adenosine receptor ligands: differences with acute versus chronic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; von Lubitz, Dag K. J. E.; Daly, John W.; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine receptors have been the target of intense research with respect to potential use of selective ligands in a variety of therapeutic areas. Caffeine and theophylline are adenosine receptor antagonists, and over the past three decades a wide range of selective agonists and antagonists for adenosine receptor subtypes have been developed. A complication to the therapeutic use of adenosine receptor ligands is the observation that the effects of acute administration of a particular ligand can be diametrically opposite to the chronic effects of the same ligand. This ‘effect inversion’ is discussed here by Ken Jecobson and colleagues, and has been observed for effects on cognitive processes, seizures and ischaemic damage. PMID:8936347

  15. Synthesis of 3-alkyl naphthalenes as novel estrogen receptor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jing; Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Britton, Jonathan E.; Katamreddy, Subba R.; Navas III, Frank; Miller, Aaron B.; Williams, Shawn P.; Gray, David W.; Orband-Miller, Lisa A.; Shearin, Jean; Heyer, Dennis

    2009-06-24

    A series of estrogen receptor ligands based on a 3-alkyl naphthalene scaffold was synthesized using an intramolecular enolate-alkyne cycloaromatization as the key step. Several of these compounds bearing a C6-OH group were shown to be high affinity ligands. All compounds had similar ER{alpha} and ER{beta} binding affinity ranging from micromolar to low nanomolar.

  16. Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners, a DIP subset

    DOE Data Explorer

    Graeber, Thomas G.; Eisenberg, David

    The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information (see the DIP User's Guide). DLRP is a web supplement for: Thomas G. Graeber and David Eisenberg. Bioinformatic identification of potential autocrine signaling loops in cancers from gene expression profiles. Nature Genetics, 29(3):295-300 (November 2001). [Quoted from the DLRP homepage at http://dip.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/dip/DLRP.cgi] Also available from this page is the DLRP chemokine subset.

  17. Hexachlorobenzene induces cell proliferation, and aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression (AhR) in rat liver preneoplastic foci, and in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. AhR is a mediator of ERK1/2 signaling, and cell cycle regulation in HCB-treated HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    de Tomaso Portaz, Ana Clara; Caimi, Giselle Romero; Sánchez, Marcela; Chiappini, Florencia; Randi, Andrea S; Kleiman de Pisarev, Diana L; Alvarez, Laura

    2015-10-02

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a widespread environmental pollutant, and a liver tumor promoter in rodents. Depending on the particular cell lines studied, exposure to these compounds may lead to cell proliferation, terminal differentiation, or apoptosis. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is involved in drug and xenobiotic metabolism. AhR can also modulate a variety of cellular and physiological processes that can affect cell proliferation and cell fate determination. The mechanisms by which AhR ligands, both exogenous and endogenous, affect these processes involve multiple interactions between AhR and other signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined the effect of HCB on cell proliferation and AhR expression, using an initiation-promotion hepatocarcinogenesis protocol in rat liver and in the human-derived hepatoma cell line, HepG2. Female Wistar rats were initiated with a single dose of 100 mg/kg of diethylnitrosamine (DEN) at the start of the experiment. Two weeks later, daily dosing of 100 mg/kg HCB was maintained for 10 weeks. Partial hepatectomy was performed 3 weeks after initiation. The number and area of glutathione S-transferase-P (GST-P)-positive foci, in the rat liver were used as biomarkers of liver precancerous lesions. Immunohistochemical staining showed an increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells, along with enhanced AhR protein expression in hepatocytes within GST-P-positive foci of (DEN HCB) group, when compared to DEN. In a similar manner, Western blot analysis demonstrated that HCB induced PCNA and AhR protein expression in HepG2 cells. Flow cytometry assay indicated that the cells were accumulated at S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. HCB increased cyclin D1 protein levels and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of cells with a selective MEK1 inhibitor, prevented HCB-stimulatory effect on PCNA and cyclinD1, indicating that these effects

  18. Biotechnological Fluorescent Ligands of the Bradykinin B1 Receptor: Protein Ligands for a Peptide Receptor.

    PubMed

    Charest-Morin, Xavier; Marceau, François

    2016-01-01

    The bradykinin (BK) B1 receptor (B1R) is a peculiar G protein coupled receptor that is strongly regulated to the point of being inducible in immunopathology. Limited clinical evidence suggests that its expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is a biomarker of active inflammatory states. In an effort to develop a novel imaging/diagnostic tool, we report the rational design and testing of a fusion protein that is a ligand of the human B1R but not likely to label peptidases. This ligand is composed of a fluorescent protein (FP) (enhanced green FP [EGFP] or mCherry) prolonged at its N-terminus by a spacer peptide and a classical peptide agonist or antagonist (des-Arg9-BK, [Leu8]des-Arg9-BK, respectively). The design of the spacer-ligand joint peptide was validated by a competition assay for [3H]Lys-des-Arg9-BK binding to the human B1R applied to 4 synthetic peptides of 18 or 19 residues. The labeling of B1R-expressing cells with EGFP or mCherry fused with 7 of such peptides was performed in parallel (microscopy). Both assays indicated that the best design was FP-(Asn-Gly)n-Lys-des-Arg9-BK; n = 15 was superior to n = 5, suggesting benefits from minimizing steric hindrance between the FP and the receptor. Cell labeling concerned mostly plasma membranes and was inhibited by a B1R antagonist. EGFP-(Asn-Gly)15-Lys-des-Arg9-BK competed for the binding of [3H]Lys-des-Arg9-BK to human recombinant B1R, being only 10-fold less potent than the unlabeled form of Lys-des-Arg9-BK to do so. The fusion protein did not label HEK 293a cells expressing recombinant human BK B2 receptors or angiotensin converting enzyme. This study identifies a modular C-terminal sequence that can be adapted to protein cargoes, conferring high affinity for the BK B1R, with possible applications in diagnostic cytofluorometry, histology and drug delivery (e.g., in oncology).

  19. Exploiting ligand-protein conjugates to monitor ligand-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Hirohito; Gonzalez, Monica Rengifo; Johnsson, Kai

    2012-01-01

    We introduce three assays for analyzing ligand-receptor interactions based on the specific conjugation of ligands to SNAP-tag fusion proteins. Conjugation of ligands to different SNAP-tag fusions permits the validation of suspected interactions in cell extracts and fixed cells as well as the establishment of high-throughput assays. The different assays allow the analysis of strong and weak interactions. Conversion of ligands into SNAP-tag substrates thus provides access to a powerful toolbox for the analysis of their interactions with proteins.

  20. Differences in activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptors of white sturgeon relative to lake sturgeon are predicted by identities of key amino acids in the ligand binding domain.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Farmahin, Reza; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Kennedy, Sean W; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2015-04-07

    Dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) are pollutants of global environmental concern. DLCs elicit their adverse outcomes through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). However, there is limited understanding of the mechanisms that result in differences in sensitivity to DLCs among different species of fishes. Understanding these mechanisms is critical for protection of the diversity of fishes exposed to DLCs, including endangered species. This study investigated specific mechanisms that drive responses of two endangered fishes, white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) to DLCs. It determined whether differences in sensitivity to activation of AhRs (AhR1 and AhR2) can be predicted based on identities of key amino acids in the ligand binding domain (LBD). White sturgeon were 3- to 30-fold more sensitive than lake sturgeon to exposure to 5 different DLCs based on activation of AhR2. There were no differences in sensitivity between white sturgeon and lake sturgeon based on activation of AhR1. Adverse outcomes as a result of exposure to DLCs have been shown to be mediated through activation of AhR2, but not AhR1, in all fishes studied to date. This indicates that white sturgeon are likely to have greater sensitivity in vivo relative to lake sturgeon. Homology modeling and in silico mutagenesis suggests that differences in sensitivity to activation of AhR2 result from differences in key amino acids at position 388 in the LBD of AhR2 of white sturgeon (Ala-388) and lake sturgeon (Thr-388). This indicates that identities of key amino acids in the LBD of AhR2 could be predictive of both in vitro activation by DLCs and in vivo sensitivity to DLCs in these, and potentially other, fishes.

  1. Estrogen receptor and aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Jason; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2006-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) are ligand activated transcription factors and members of the nuclear receptor and bHLH-PAS superfamilies, respectively. AhR is involved in xenobiotic metabolism and in mediating the toxic effects of dioxin-like compounds. Crosstalk has been observed among AhR and nuclear receptors, but has been most well studied with respect to ER signaling. Activated AhR inhibits ER activity through a number of different mechanisms, whereas ERα has been reported to have a positive role in AhR signaling. Here we will discuss recent data revealing that dioxin bound AhR recruits ERα to AhR regulated genes. We will also consider the implications of ER recruitment to AhR target genes on ER and AhR signaling. PMID:16862222

  2. Novel biosensors for the detection of estrogen receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    De, Siddhartha; Macara, Ian G; Lannigan, Deborah A

    2005-08-01

    There exists a significant need for the detection of novel estrogen receptor (ER) ligands for pharmaceutical uses, especially for treating complications associated with menopause. We have developed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors that permit the direct in vitro detection of ER ligands. These biosensors contain an ER ligand-binding domain (LBD) flanked by the FRET donor fluorophore, cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), and the acceptor fluorophore, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). The ER-LBD has been modified so that Ala 430 has been changed to Asp, which increases the magnitude of the FRET signal in response to ligand-binding by more than four-fold compared to the wild-type LBD. The binding of agonists can be distinguished from that of antagonists on the basis of the distinct ligand-induced conformations in the ER-LBD. The approach to binding equilibrium occurs within 30min, and the FRET signal is stable over 24h. The biosensor demonstrates a high signal-to-noise, with a Z' value (a statistical determinant of assay quality) of 0.72. The affinity of the ER for different ligands can be determined using a modified version of the biosensor in which a truncated YFP and an enhanced CFP are used. Thus, we have developed platforms for high-throughput screens for the identification of novel estrogen receptor ligands. Moreover, we have demonstrated that this FRET technology can be applied to other nuclear receptors, such as the androgen receptor.

  3. Endogenous toll-like receptor ligands and their biological significance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Wang, Liantang; Chen, Shangwu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a family of pattern recognition receptors, recognize and respond to conserved components of microbes and play a crucial role in both innate and adaptive immunity. In addition to binding exogenous ligands derived from pathogens, TLRs interact with endogenous molecules released from damaged tissues or dead cells and regulate many sterile inflammation processes. Putative endogenous TLR ligands include proteins and peptides, polysaccharides and proteoglycan, nucleic acids and phospholipids, which are cellular components, particularly extracellular matrix degradation products. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that endogenous ligand-mediated TLR signalling is involved in pathological conditions such as tissue injury, repair and regeneration; autoimmune diseases and tumorigenesis. The ability of TLRs to recognize endogenous stimulators appears to be essential to their function in regulating non-infectious inflammation. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of endogenous TLR ligands and discuss the biological significance of TLR signalling triggered by endogenous ligands in several sterile inflammation conditions. PMID:20629986

  4. Regulation of ligands for the NKG2D activating receptor

    PubMed Central

    Raulet, David H.; Gasser, Stephan; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Deng, Weiwen; Jung, Heiyoun

    2014-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed by all NK cells and subsets of T cells. It serves as a major recognition receptor for detection and elimination of transformed and infected cells and participates in the genesis of several inflammatory diseases. The ligands for NKG2D are self-proteins that are induced by pathways that are active in certain pathophysiological states. NKG2D ligands are regulated transcriptionally, at the level of mRNA and protein stability, and by cleavage from the cell surface. In some cases, ligand induction can be attributed to pathways that are activated specifically in cancer cells or infected cells. We review the numerous pathways that have been implicated in the regulation of NKG2D ligands, discuss the pathologic states in which those pathways are likely to act, and attempt to synthesize the findings into general schemes of NKG2D ligand regulation in NK cell responses to cancer and infection. PMID:23298206

  5. Orphan receptor ligand discovery by pickpocketing pharmacological neighbors.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Tony; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Stewart, Alastair G; Coleman, James L J; McRobb, Fiona M; Riek, R Peter; Graham, Robert M; Abagyan, Ruben; Kufareva, Irina; Smith, Nicola J

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the pharmacological similarity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is paramount for predicting ligand off-target effects, drug repurposing, and ligand discovery for orphan receptors. Phylogenetic relationships do not always correctly capture pharmacological similarity. Previous family-wide attempts to define pharmacological relationships were based on three-dimensional structures and/or known receptor-ligand pairings, both unavailable for orphan GPCRs. Here, we present GPCR-CoINPocket, a novel contact-informed neighboring pocket metric of GPCR binding-site similarity that is informed by patterns of ligand-residue interactions observed in crystallographically characterized GPCRs. GPCR-CoINPocket is applicable to receptors with unknown structure or ligands and accurately captures known pharmacological relationships between GPCRs, even those undetected by phylogeny. When applied to orphan receptor GPR37L1, GPCR-CoINPocket identified its pharmacological neighbors, and transfer of their pharmacology aided in discovery of the first surrogate ligands for this orphan with a 30% success rate. Although primarily designed for GPCRs, the method is easily transferable to other protein families.

  6. Uric acid stones in the urinary bladder of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Ryan; Inzunza, Jose; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2012-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knockout mice raised in the laboratory of Fujii-Kuriyama have been under investigation for several years because of the presence in their urinary bladder of large, yellowish stones. The stones are composed of uric acid and become apparent in the bladders as tiny stones when mice are 10 wk of age. By the time the mice are 6 mo of age, there are usually two or three stones with diameters of 3–4 mm. The urate concentration in the serum was normal but in the urine the concentration was 40–50 mg/dL, which is 10 times higher than that in the WT littermates. There were no apparent histological pathologies in the kidney or joints and the levels of enzymes involved in elimination of purines were normal. The source of the uric acid was therefore judged to be from degradation of nucleic acids due to a high turnover of cells in the bladder itself. The bladder was fibrotic and the luminal side of the bladder epithelium was filled with eosinophilic granules. There was loss of E-cadherin between some epithelial cells, with an enlarged submucosal area filled with immune cells and sometimes invading epithelial cells. We hypothesize that in the absence of AhR there is loss of detoxifying enzymes, which leads to accumulation of unconjugated cytotoxins and carcinogens in the bladder. The presence of bladder toxins may have led to the increased apoptosis and inflammation as well as invasion of epithelial cells in the bladders of older mice. PMID:22232670

  7. Uric acid stones in the urinary bladder of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Butler, Ryan; Inzunza, Jose; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2012-01-24

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knockout mice raised in the laboratory of Fujii-Kuriyama have been under investigation for several years because of the presence in their urinary bladder of large, yellowish stones. The stones are composed of uric acid and become apparent in the bladders as tiny stones when mice are 10 wk of age. By the time the mice are 6 mo of age, there are usually two or three stones with diameters of 3-4 mm. The urate concentration in the serum was normal but in the urine the concentration was 40-50 mg/dL, which is 10 times higher than that in the WT littermates. There were no apparent histological pathologies in the kidney or joints and the levels of enzymes involved in elimination of purines were normal. The source of the uric acid was therefore judged to be from degradation of nucleic acids due to a high turnover of cells in the bladder itself. The bladder was fibrotic and the luminal side of the bladder epithelium was filled with eosinophilic granules. There was loss of E-cadherin between some epithelial cells, with an enlarged submucosal area filled with immune cells and sometimes invading epithelial cells. We hypothesize that in the absence of AhR there is loss of detoxifying enzymes, which leads to accumulation of unconjugated cytotoxins and carcinogens in the bladder. The presence of bladder toxins may have led to the increased apoptosis and inflammation as well as invasion of epithelial cells in the bladders of older mice.

  8. The imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain modulation

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Nurcan; Nemutlu, Dilara; Arslan, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Pain is an unpleasant experience and effects daily routine negatively. Although there are various drugs, many of them are not entirely successful in relieving pain, since pain modulation is a complex process involving numerous mediators and receptors. Therefore, it is a rational approach to identify the factors involved in the complex process and develop new agents that act on these pain producing mechanisms. In this respect, the involvement of the imidazoline receptors in pain modulation has drawn attention in recent years. In this review, it is aimed to focus on the imidazoline receptors and their ligands which contribute to the pain modulation. It is demonstrated that imidazoline-2 (I2) receptors are steady new drug targets for analgesics. Even if the mechanism of I2 receptor is not well known in the modulation of pain, it is known that it plays a role in tonic and chronic pain but not in acute phasic pain. Moreover, the I2 receptor ligands increase the analgesic effects of opioids in both acute and chronic pain and prevent the development of opioid tolerance. So, they are valuable for the chronic pain treatment and also therapeutic coadjuvants in the management of chronic pain with opiate drugs due to the attenuation of opioid tolerance and addiction. Thus, the use of the ligands which bind to the imidazoline receptors is an effective strategy for relieving pain. This educational forum exhibits the role of imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain process by utilizing experimental studies. PMID:26600633

  9. The imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain modulation.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Nurcan; Nemutlu, Dilara; Arslan, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Pain is an unpleasant experience and effects daily routine negatively. Although there are various drugs, many of them are not entirely successful in relieving pain, since pain modulation is a complex process involving numerous mediators and receptors. Therefore, it is a rational approach to identify the factors involved in the complex process and develop new agents that act on these pain producing mechanisms. In this respect, the involvement of the imidazoline receptors in pain modulation has drawn attention in recent years. In this review, it is aimed to focus on the imidazoline receptors and their ligands which contribute to the pain modulation. It is demonstrated that imidazoline-2 (I2) receptors are steady new drug targets for analgesics. Even if the mechanism of I2 receptor is not well known in the modulation of pain, it is known that it plays a role in tonic and chronic pain but not in acute phasic pain. Moreover, the I2 receptor ligands increase the analgesic effects of opioids in both acute and chronic pain and prevent the development of opioid tolerance. So, they are valuable for the chronic pain treatment and also therapeutic coadjuvants in the management of chronic pain with opiate drugs due to the attenuation of opioid tolerance and addiction. Thus, the use of the ligands which bind to the imidazoline receptors is an effective strategy for relieving pain. This educational forum exhibits the role of imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain process by utilizing experimental studies.

  10. Ligand-Receptor Binding Measured by Laser-Scanning Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuck, Paul; Lao, Zhege; Skwish, Stephen; Fraser Glickman, J.; Yang, Ke; Burbaum, Jonathan; Inglese, James

    1999-09-01

    This report describes the integration of laser-scanning fluorometric cytometry and nonseparation ligand-binding techniques to provide new assay methods adaptable to miniaturization and high-throughput screening. Receptor-bound, cyanine dye-labeled ligands, [Cy]ligands, were discriminated from those free in solution by measuring the accumulated fluorescence associated with a receptor-containing particle. To illustrate the various binding formats accommodated by this technique, saturation- and competition-binding analyses were performed with [Cy]ligands and their cognate receptors expressed in CHO cells or as fusion proteins coated on polystyrene microspheres. We have successfully applied this technique to the analysis of G protein-coupled receptors, cytokine receptors, and SH2 domains. Multiparameter readouts from ligands labeled separately with Cy5 and Cy5.5 demonstrate the simultaneous analysis of two target receptors in a single well. In addition, laser-scanning cytometry has been used to assay enzymes such as phosphatases and in the development of single-step fluorescent immunoassays.

  11. Pharmacology and therapeutic potential of sigma(1) receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Cobos, E J; Entrena, J M; Nieto, F R; Cendán, C M; Del Pozo, E

    2008-12-01

    Sigma (sigma) receptors, initially described as a subtype of opioid receptors, are now considered unique receptors. Pharmacological studies have distinguished two types of sigma receptors, termed sigma(1) and sigma(2). Of these two subtypes, the sigma(1) receptor has been cloned in humans and rodents, and its amino acid sequence shows no homology with other mammalian proteins. Several psychoactive drugs show high to moderate affinity for sigma(1) receptors, including the antipsychotic haloperidol, the antidepressant drugs fluvoxamine and sertraline, and the psychostimulants cocaine and methamphetamine; in addition, the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin allosterically modulates sigma(1) receptors. Certain neurosteroids are known to interact with sigma(1) receptors, and have been proposed to be their endogenous ligands. These receptors are located in the plasma membrane and in subcellular membranes, particularly in the endoplasmic reticulum, where they play a modulatory role in intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Sigma(1) receptors also play a modulatory role in the activity of some ion channels and in several neurotransmitter systems, mainly in glutamatergic neurotransmission. In accordance with their widespread modulatory role, sigma(1) receptor ligands have been proposed to be useful in several therapeutic fields such as amnesic and cognitive deficits, depression and anxiety, schizophrenia, analgesia, and against some effects of drugs of abuse (such as cocaine and methamphetamine). In this review we provide an overview of the present knowledge of sigma(1) receptors, focussing on sigma(1) ligand neuropharmacology and the role of sigma(1) receptors in behavioral animal studies, which have contributed greatly to the potential therapeutic applications of sigma(1) ligands.

  12. Ligands and therapeutic perspectives of adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Diniz, C; Borges, F; Santana, L; Uriarte, E; Oliveira, J M A; Gonçalves, J; Fresco, P

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine A(2A) receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor family and mediate multiple physiological effects of adenosine, both at the central nervous system (CNS) and at peripheral tissues, by activating several pathways or interacting with other receptors or proteins. Increasing evidence relate A(2A) receptors with pharmacological stress testing, neurodegenerative disorders (such as Parkinson's disease) and inflammation, renewing the interest in these receptors, increasingly viewed as promising therapeutic targets. Series of agonists and antagonists have been developed by medicinal chemistry artwork either by structure activity relationship (SAR) or quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) studies. These studies have allowed identification of the structural and electrostatic requirements for high affinity A(2A) receptor binding and, therefore, contributing to the rational design of A(2A) receptor ligands. Additional rational chemical modifications of the existing A(2A) receptor ligands may further improve their affinity/selectivity. The purpose of this review is to analize and summarize aspects related to the medicinal chemistry of A(2A) receptor ligands, their present and potencial therapeutic applications by exploring the molecular structure and physiological and pathophysiological roles of A(2A) receptors.

  13. A Natural Mutation in Helix 5 of the Ligand Binding Domain of Glucocorticoid Receptor Enhances Receptor-Ligand Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Reyer, Henry; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Kanitz, Ellen; Pöhland, Ralf; Wimmers, Klaus; Murani, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a central player in the neuroendocrine stress response; it mediates feedback regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and physiological actions of glucocorticoids in the periphery. Despite intensive investigations of GR in the context of receptor-ligand interaction, only recently the first naturally occurring gain-of-function substitution, Ala610Val, of the ligand binding domain was identified in mammals. We showed that this mutation underlies a major quantitative trait locus for HPA axis activity in pigs, reducing cortisol production by about 40–50 percent. To unravel the molecular mechanisms behind this gain of function, receptor-ligand interactions were evaluated in silico, in vitro and in vivo. In accordance with previously observed phenotypic effects, the mutant Val610 GR showed significantly increased activation in response to glucocorticoid and non-glucocorticoid steroids, and, as revealed by GR-binding studies in vitro and in pituitary glands, enhanced ligand binding. Concordantly, the protein structure prediction depicted reduced binding distances between the receptor and ligand, and altered interactions in the ligand binding pocket. Consequently, the Ala610Val substitution opens up new structural information for the design of potent GR ligands and to examine effects of the enhanced GR responsiveness to glucocorticoids on the entire organism. PMID:27736993

  14. Ligand-biased ensemble receptor docking (LigBEnD): a hybrid ligand/receptor structure-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Polo C.-H.; Abagyan, Ruben; Totrov, Maxim

    2017-09-01

    Ligand docking to flexible protein molecules can be efficiently carried out through ensemble docking to multiple protein conformations, either from experimental X-ray structures or from in silico simulations. The success of ensemble docking often requires the careful selection of complementary protein conformations, through docking and scoring of known co-crystallized ligands. False positives, in which a ligand in a wrong pose achieves a better docking score than that of native pose, arise as additional protein conformations are added. In the current study, we developed a new ligand-biased ensemble receptor docking method and composite scoring function which combine the use of ligand-based atomic property field (APF) method with receptor structure-based docking. This method helps us to correctly dock 30 out of 36 ligands presented by the D3R docking challenge. For the six mis-docked ligands, the cognate receptor structures prove to be too different from the 40 available experimental Pocketome conformations used for docking and could be identified only by receptor sampling beyond experimentally explored conformational subspace.

  15. Optimizing electrostatic affinity in ligand-receptor binding: Theory, computation, and ligand properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, Erik; Tidor, Bruce

    1998-11-01

    The design of a tight-binding molecular ligand involves a tradeoff between an unfavorable electrostatic desolvation penalty incurred when the ligand binds a receptor in aqueous solution and the generally favorable intermolecular interactions made in the bound state. Using continuum electrostatic models we have developed a theoretical framework for analyzing this problem and have shown that the ligand-charge distribution can be optimized to produce the most favorable balance of these opposing free energy contributions [L.-P. Lee and B. Tidor, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8681 (1997)]. Herein the theoretical framework is extended and calculations are performed for a wide range of model receptors. We examine methods for computing optimal ligands (including cases where there is conformational change) and the resulting properties of optimized ligands. In particular, indicators are developed to aid in the determination of the deficiencies in a specific ligand or basis. A connection is established between the optimization problem here and a generalized image problem, from which an inverse-image basis set can be defined; this basis is shown to perform very well in optimization calculations. Furthermore, the optimized ligands are shown to have favorable electrostatic binding free energies (in contrast to many natural ligands), there is a strong correlation between the receptor desolvation penalty and the optimized binding free energy for fixed geometry, and the ligand and receptor cannot generally be mutually optimal. Additionally, we introduce the display of complementary desolvation and interaction potentials and the deviation of their relationship from ideal as a useful tool for judging effective complementarity. Scripts for computing and displaying these potentials with GRASP are available at http://mit.edu/tidor.

  16. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) inhibits vanadate-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in TRAMP prostates

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Wayne A.; Lin, Tien-Min; Peterson, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) are basic helix-loop-helix/per-arnt-sim (PAS) family transcription factors. During angiogenesis and tumor growth, HIF-1α dimerizes with ARNT, inducing expression of many genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). ARNT also dimerizes with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). AhR-null (Ahr−/−) transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice develop prostate tumors with greater frequency than AhR wild-type (Ahr+/+) TRAMP mice, even though prevalence of prostate epithelial hyperplasia is not inhibited. This suggests that Ahr inhibits prostate carcinogenesis. In TRAMP mice, prostatic epithelial hyperplasia results in stabilized HIF-1α, inducing expression of VEGF, a prerequisite for tumor growth and angiogenesis. Since ARNT is a common dimerization partner of AhR and HIF-1α, we hypothesized that the AhR inhibits prostate tumor formation by competing with HIF-1α for ARNT, thereby limiting VEGF production. Prostates from Ahr+/+, Ahr+/− and Ahr−/− C57BL/6J TRAMP mice were cultured in the presence of graded concentrations of vanadate, an inducer of VEGF through the HIF-1α–ARNT pathway. Vanadate induced VEGF protein in a dose-dependent fashion in Ahr+/− and Ahr−/− TRAMP cultures, but not in Ahr+/+ cultures. However, vanadate induced upstream proteins in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-signaling cascade to a similar extent in TRAMPs of each Ahr genotype, evidenced by v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (Akt) phosphorylation. These findings suggest that AhR sequesters ARNT, decreasing interaction with HIF-1α reducing VEGF production. Since VEGF is required for tumor vascularization and growth, these studies further suggest that reduction in VEGF correlates with inhibited prostate carcinogenesis in Ahr+/+ TRAMP mice. PMID:18359762

  17. Ligand- and receptor-based docking with LiBELa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos Muniz, Heloisa; Nascimento, Alessandro S.

    2015-08-01

    Methodologies on molecular docking are constantly improving. The problem consists on finding an optimal interplay between the computational cost and a satisfactory physical description of ligand-receptor interaction. In pursuit of an advance in current methods we developed a mixed docking approach combining ligand- and receptor-based strategies in a docking engine, where tridimensional descriptors for shape and charge distribution of a reference ligand guide the initial placement of the docking molecule and an interaction energy-based global minimization follows. This hybrid docking was evaluated with soft-core and force field potentials taking into account ligand pose and scoring. Our approach was found to be competitive to a purely receptor-based dock resulting in improved logAUC values when evaluated with DUD and DUD-E. Furthermore, the smoothed potential as evaluated here, was not advantageous when ligand binding poses were compared to experimentally determined conformations. In conclusion we show that a combination of ligand- and receptor-based strategy docking with a force field energy model results in good reproduction of binding poses and enrichment of active molecules against decoys. This strategy is implemented in our tool, LiBELa, available to the scientific community.

  18. Development of Benzophenone-Alkyne Bifunctional Sigma Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lian-Wang; Hajipour, Abdol R.; Karaoglu, Kerim; Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Ruoho, Arnold E.

    2012-01-01

    Sigma (σ) receptors represent unique non-opioid binding sites that are associated with a broad range of disease states. Sigma-2 receptors provide a promising target for diagnostic imaging and pharmacological interventions to curb tumor progression. Most recently, the progesterone receptor (PGRMC1, 25 kDa) has been identified to contain σ2 receptor-like binding properties, highlighting the need to understand the biological function of an 18-kDa protein that exhibits σ2-like photoaffinity labeling (herein denoted as σ2-18k) but the amino acid sequence of which is not known. In order to provide novel tools for the study of the σ2-18k protein, we have developed bifunctional sigma receptor ligands that bear a benzophenone photo-crosslinking moiety and an alkyne group, to which an azide-containing biotin affinity tag can be covalently attached via click chemistry following photo-crosslink. While several compounds showed favorable σ2 binding properties, compound 22 exhibited the highest affinity (2 nM) and the greatest potency in blocking photolabeling of the σ2-18k by a radioactive photoaffinity ligand. Thus, these benzophenone-alkyne sigma receptor ligands may be amenable for studying the σ2-18k protein via chemical biology approaches. To our knowledge, these compounds represent the first reported benzophenone-containing clickable sigma receptor ligands, which may potentially serve broad applications by “plugging” in various tags. PMID:23001760

  19. Regulation of ligands for the activating receptor NKG2D

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Anita R; O'Callaghan, Chris A

    2007-01-01

    The outcome of an encounter between a cytotoxic cell and a potential target cell depends on the balance of signals from inhibitory and activating receptors. Natural Killer group 2D (NKG2D) has recently emerged as a major activating receptor on T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. In both humans and mice, multiple different genes encode ligands for NKG2D, and these ligands are non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. The NKG2D–ligand interaction triggers an activating signal in the cell expressing NKG2D and this promotes cytotoxic lysis of the cell expressing the ligand. Most normal tissues do not express ligands for NKG2D, but ligand expression has been documented in tumour and virus-infected cells, leading to lysis of these cells. Tight regulation of ligand expression is important. If there is inappropriate expression in normal tissues, this will favour autoimmune processes, whilst failure to up-regulate the ligands in pathological conditions would favour cancer development or dissemination of intracellular infection. PMID:17614877

  20. A response calculus for immobilized T cell receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Andersen, P S; Menné, C; Mariuzza, R A; Geisler, C; Karjalainen, K

    2001-12-28

    To address the molecular mechanism of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, we have formulated a model for T cell activation, termed the 2D-affinity model, in which the density of TCR on the T cell surface, the density of ligand on the presenting surface, and their corresponding two-dimensional affinity determine the level of T cell activation. When fitted to T cell responses against purified ligands immobilized on plastic surfaces, the 2D-affinity model adequately simulated changes in cellular activation as a result of varying ligand affinity and ligand density. These observations further demonstrated the importance of receptor cross-linking density in determining TCR signaling. Moreover, it was found that the functional two-dimensional affinity of TCR ligands was affected by the chemical composition of the ligand-presenting surface. This makes it possible that cell-bound TCR ligands, despite their low affinity in solution, are of optimal two-dimensional affinity thereby allowing effective TCR binding under physiological conditions, i.e. at low ligand densities in cellular interfaces.

  1. A Spectroscopic Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation on the Reduction of Uranium(VI) by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2DS)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Wagnon, Ken B.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Liu, Chongxuan; Rosso, Kevin M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-11-03

    In this project, the reduction rate of uranyl complexes with hydroxide, carbonate, EDTA, and Desferriferrioxamine B (DFB) by anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2DS), a potential electron shuttle for microbial reduction of metal ions (Newman and Kolter 2000), is studied by stopped-flow kinetics techniques under anoxic atmosphere. The apparent reaction rates varied with ligand type, solution pH, and U(VI) concentration. For each ligand, a single largest kobs within the studied pH range was observed, suggesting the influence of pH-dependent speciation on the U(VI) reduction rate. The maximum reaction rate found in each case followed the order of OH- > CO32- > EDTA > DFB, consistent with the same trend of the thermodynamic stability of the uranyl complexes and ionic sizes of the ligands. Increasing the stability of uranyl complexes and ligand size decreased the maximum reduction rate. The pH-dependent rates were modeled using a second-order rate expression that was assumed to be dependent on a single U(VI) complex and AH2DS species. By quantitatively comparing the calculated and measured apparent rate constants as a function of pH, species AHDS3- was suggested as the primary reductant in all cases examined. Species UO2CO3(aq) , UO2HEDTA-, and (UO2)2(OH)22+ were suggested as the principal electron acceptors among the U(VI) species mixture in carbonate, EDTA, and hydroxyl systems, respectively.

  2. Monitoring of xenobiotic ligands for human estrogen receptor and aryl hydrocarbon receptor in industrial wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Chou, Pei-Hsin; Liu, Tong-Cun; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2014-07-30

    Industrial wastewater contains a variety of toxic substances, which may severely contaminate the aquatic environment if discharged without adequate treatment. In this study, effluents from a thin film transistor liquid crystal display wastewater treatment plant and the receiving water were analyzed by bioassays and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to investigate the presence of estrogenic compounds, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists, and genotoxicants. Xenobiotic AhR agonists were frequently detected and, in particular, strong AhR agonist activity and genotoxicity were found in the suspended solids of the aeration tank outflow. The high AhR agonist activity in the final effluent (FE) and the downstream river water suggested that the treatment plant failed to remove the wastewater-related AhR agonists. In contrast, although significant estrogenic potency could be detected in raw wastewater or effluents from different treatment processes, the FE and the receiving river water exhibited no or weak estrogenicity. Instrumental analysis showed that bisphenol A was often detected in water samples. However, the investigated estrogenic compounds could only account for a small portion of the estrogenicity in the collected samples. Therefore, further investigation is necessary to identify the major estrogenic compounds and AhR agonist contaminants in the wastewater effluents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. BRCA-1 promoter hypermethylation and silencing induced by the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor-ligand TCDD are prevented by resveratrol in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Papoutsis, Andreas J; Borg, Jamie L; Selmin, Ornella I; Romagnolo, Donato F

    2012-10-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms may contribute to reduced expression of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA-1 in sporadic breast cancers. Through environmental exposure and diet, humans are exposed to xenobiotics and food compounds that bind the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). AhR-ligands include the dioxin-like and tumor promoter 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The activated AhR regulates transcription through binding to xenobiotic response elements (XREs=GCGTG) and interactions with transcription cofactors. Previously, we reported on the presence of several XREs in the proximal BRCA-1 promoter and that the expression of endogenous AhR was required for silencing of BRCA-1 expression by TCDD. Here, we document that in estrogen receptor-α-positive and BRCA-1 wild-type MCF-7 breast cancer cells, the treatment with TCDD attenuated 17β-estradiol-dependent stimulation of BRCA-1 protein and induced hypermethylation of a CpG island spanning the BRCA-1 transcriptional start site of exon-1a. Additionally, we found that TCDD enhanced the association of the AhR; DNA methyl transferase (DNMT)1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b; methyl binding protein (MBD)2; and trimethylated H3K9 (H3K9me3) with the BRCA-1 promoter. Conversely, the phytoalexin resveratrol, selected as a prototype dietary AhR antagonist, antagonized at physiologically relevant doses (1 μmol/L) the TCDD-induced repression of BRCA-1 protein, BRCA-1 promoter methylation and the recruitment of the AhR, MBD2, H3K9me3 and DNMTs (1, 3a and 3b). Taken together, these observations provide mechanistic evidence for AhR agonists in the establishment of BRCA-1 promoter hypermethylation and the basis for the development of prevention strategies based on AhR antagonists.

  4. Bifunctional Ligands Allow Deliberate Extrinsic Reprogramming of the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Højfeldt, Jonas W.; Cruz-Rodríguez, Osvaldo; Imaeda, Yasuhiro; Van Dyke, Aaron R.; Carolan, James P.; Mapp, Anna K.

    2014-01-01

    Therapies based on conventional nuclear receptor ligands are extremely powerful, yet their broad and long-term use is often hindered by undesired side effects that are often part of the receptor's biological function. Selective control of nuclear receptors such as the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) using conventional ligands has proven particularly challenging. Because they act solely in an allosteric manner, conventional ligands are constrained to act via cofactors that can intrinsically partner with the receptor. Furthermore, effective means to rationally encode a bias for specific coregulators are generally lacking. Using the (GR) as a framework, we demonstrate here a versatile approach, based on bifunctional ligands, that extends the regulatory repertoire of GR in a deliberate and controlled manner. By linking the macrolide FK506 to a conventional agonist (dexamethasone) or antagonist (RU-486), we demonstrate that it is possible to bridge the intact receptor to either positively or negatively acting coregulatory proteins bearing an FK506 binding protein domain. Using this strategy, we show that extrinsic recruitment of a strong activation function can enhance the efficacy of the full agonist dexamethasone and reverse the antagonist character of RU-486 at an endogenous locus. Notably, the extrinsic recruitment of histone deacetylase-1 reduces the ability of GR to activate transcription from a canonical GR response element while preserving ligand-mediated repression of nuclear factor-κB. By providing novel ways for the receptor to engage specific coregulators, this unique ligand design approach has the potential to yield both novel tools for GR study and more selective therapeutics. PMID:24422633

  5. Targeting Ligand Dependent and Ligand Independent Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    or replace the effect of a natural peptide. A classic example is the human analogue of insulin , admin- istered to patients with insulin - dependent ... diabetes . Initially purified from bovine and porcine (44), insulin is now routinely manufactured via recombinant methods as pro- insulin (45). However...2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting Ligand Dependent and Ligand Independent Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  6. Pharmacological profiles of opioid ligands at Kappa opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gharagozlou, Parham; Hashemi, Ezzat; DeLorey, Timothy M; Clark, J David; Lameh, Jelveh

    2006-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to describe the activity of a set of opioid drugs, including partial agonists, in a human embryonic kidney cell system stably expressing only the mouse κ-opioid receptors. Receptor activation was assessed by measuring the inhibition of cyclic adenosine mono phosphate (cAMP) production stimulated by 5 μM forskolin. Intrinsic activities and potencies of these ligands were determined relative to the endogenous ligand dynorphin and the κ agonist with the highest intrinsic activity that was identified in this study, fentanyl. Results Among the ligands studied naltrexone, WIN 44,441 and dezocine, were classified as antagonists, while the remaining ligands were agonists. Intrinsic activity of agonists was assessed by determining the extent of inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production. The absolute levels of inhibition of cAMP production by each ligand was used to describe the rank order of intrinsic activity of the agonists; fentanyl = lofentanil ≥ hydromorphone = morphine = nalorphine ≥ etorphine ≥ xorphanol ≥ metazocine ≥ SKF 10047 = cyclazocine ≥ butorphanol > nalbuphine. The rank order of affinity of these ligands was; cyclazocine > naltrexone ≥ SKF 10047 ≥ xorphanol ≥ WIN 44,441 > nalorphine > butorphanol > nalbuphine ≥ lofentanil > dezocine ≥ metazocine ≥ morphine > hydromorphone > fentanyl. Conclusion These results elucidate the relative activities of a set of opioid ligands at κ-opioid receptor and can serve as the initial step in a systematic study leading to understanding of the mode of action of these opioid ligands at this receptor. PMID:16433932

  7. The Principles of Ligand Specificity on beta-2-adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H. C. Stephen; Filipek, Slawomir; Yuan, Shuguang

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are recognized as one of the largest families of membrane proteins. Despite sharing a characteristic seven-transmembrane topology, G protein-coupled receptors regulate a wide range of cellular signaling pathways in response to various physical and chemical stimuli, and prevail as an important target for drug discovery. Notably, the recent progress in crystallographic methods led to a breakthrough in elucidating the structures of membrane proteins. The structures of β2-adrenergic receptor bound with a variety of ligands provide atomic details of the binding modes of agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. In this study, we selected four representative molecules from each functional class of ligands and investigated their impacts on β2-adrenergic receptor through a total of 12 × 100 ns molecular dynamics simulations. From the obtained trajectories, we generated molecular fingerprints exemplifying propensities of protein-ligand interactions. For each functional class of compounds, we characterized and compared the fluctuation of the protein backbone, the volumes in the intracellular pockets, the water densities in the receptors, the domain interaction networks as well as the movements of transmembrane helices. We discovered that each class of ligands exhibits a distinct mode of interactions with mainly TM5 and TM6, altering the shape and eventually the state of the receptor. Our findings provide insightful prospective into GPCR targeted structure-based drug discoveries. PMID:27703221

  8. GPCR drug discovery: novel ligands for CNS receptors.

    PubMed

    Lim, William K

    2007-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest class of cell surface receptors in humans. They convey extracellular signals into the cell interior by activating intracellular processes such as heterotrimeric G protein-dependent signaling pathways. They are widely distributed in the nervous system, and mediate key physiological processes including cognition, mood, appetite, pain and synaptic transmission. With at least 30% of marketed drugs being GPCR modulators, they are a major therapeutic target in the pharmaceutical industry's drug discovery programs. This review will survey recently patented ligands for GPCRs implicated in CNS disorders, in particular the metabotropic glutamate, adenosine and cannabinoid receptors. Metabotropic glutamate receptors regulate signaling by glutamate, the major excitatory brain neurotransmitter, while adenosine is a ubiquitous neuromodulater mediating diverse physiological effects. Recent patents for ligands of these receptors include mGluR5 antagonists and adenosine A(1) receptor agonists. Cannabinoid receptors remain one of the most important GPCR drug discovery target due to the intense interest in CB(1) receptor antagonists for treating obesity and metabolic syndrome. Such small molecule ligands are the outcome of the continuing focus of many pharmaceutical companies to identify novel GPCR agonist, antagonist or allosteric modulators useful for CNS disorders, for which more effective drugs are eagerly awaited.

  9. Ligand-binding pocket of the ecdysone receptor.

    PubMed

    Billas, Isabelle M L; Moras, Dino

    2005-01-01

    The ecdysone receptor (EcR) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors (NRs) that are ligand-dependent transcription factors. Ecdysone receptor is present only in invertebrates and plays a central role in regulating the expression of a vast array of genes during development and reproduction. The functional entity is a heterodimer composed of EcR and the ultraspiracle protein (USP)-the orthologue of the vertebrate retinoid X receptor (RXR). Ecdysone receptor is the molecular target of ecdysteroids-the endogenous steroidal molting hormones found in arthropods and nonarthropod invertebrates. In addition, EcR is the target of the environmentally safe bisacylhydrazine insecticides used against pests, such as caterpillars, that cause severe damage to agriculture. The crystal structures of the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of the EcR/USP heterodimer, complexed to the ecdysteroid ponasterone A (ponA) and to the lepidopteran specific bisacylhydrazine BYI06830 used in the agrochemical pest control, provide the first insight at atomic level for these important functional complexes. The EcR/USP heterodimer has a shape similar to that seen for the known vertebrate heterodimer complexes with a conserved main interface, but with features, that are specific to this invertebrate heterodimer. The two EcR-LBD structures in complex with steroidal and nonsteroidal ligands reveal substantial differences. The adaptability of EcR to its ligand results in two radically different and only partially overlapping ligand-binding pockets with different residues involved in ligand recognition. The concept brought by these structural studies of a ligand-dependent binding pocket has potential applications for other NRs.

  10. Quantification of ligand bias for clinically relevant β2-adrenergic receptor ligands: implications for drug taxonomy.

    PubMed

    van der Westhuizen, Emma T; Breton, Billy; Christopoulos, Arthur; Bouvier, Michel

    2014-03-01

    The concepts of functional selectivity and ligand bias are becoming increasingly appreciated in modern drug discovery programs, necessitating more informed approaches to compound classification and, ultimately, therapeutic candidate selection. Using the β2-adrenergic receptor as a model, we present a proof of concept study that assessed the bias of 19 β-adrenergic ligands, including many clinically used compounds, across four pathways [cAMP production, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation, calcium mobilization, and receptor endocytosis] in the same cell background (human embryonic kidney 293S cells). Efficacy-based clustering placed the ligands into five distinct groups with respect to signaling signatures. In some cases, apparent functional selectivity originated from off-target effects on other endogenously expressed adrenergic receptors, highlighting the importance of thoroughly assessing selectivity of the responses before concluding receptor-specific ligand-biased signaling. Eliminating the nonselective compounds did not change the clustering of the 10 remaining compounds. Some ligands exhibited large differences in potency for the different pathways, suggesting that the nature of the receptor-effector complexes influences the relative affinity of the compounds for specific receptor conformations. Calculation of relative effectiveness (within pathway) and bias factors (between pathways) for each of the compounds, using an operational model of agonism, revealed a global signaling signature for all of the compounds relative to isoproterenol. Most compounds were biased toward ERK1/2 activation over the other pathways, consistent with the notion that many proximal effectors converge on this pathway. Overall, we demonstrate a higher level of ligand texture than previously anticipated, opening perspectives for the establishment of pluridimensional correlations between signaling profiles, drug classification, therapeutic efficacy, and

  11. Identification of Ligand-Receptor Interactions: Ligand Molecular Arrays, SPR and NMR Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Day, Christopher J; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E; Korolik, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Despite many years of research into bacterial chemotaxis, the only well characterized system to date is that of E. coli. Even for E. coli, the direct ligand binding had been fully characterized only for aspartate and serene receptors Tar and Tsr. In 30 years since, no other direct receptor-ligand interaction had been described for bacteria, until the characterization of the C. jejuni aspartate and multiligand receptors (Hartley-Tassell et al. Mol Microbiol 75:710-730, 2010). While signal transduction components of many sensory pathways have now been characterized, ligand-receptor interactions remain elusive due to paucity of high-throughput screening methods. Here, we describe the use of microarray screening we developed to identify ligands, surface plasmon resonance, and saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) we used to verify the hits and to determine the affinity constants of the interactions, allowing for more targeted verification of ligands with traditional chemotaxis and in vivo assays described in Chapter 13 .

  12. Brain endogenous liver X receptor ligands selectively promote midbrain neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Theofilopoulos, Spyridon; Wang, Yuqin; Kitambi, Satish Srinivas; Sacchetti, Paola; Sousa, Kyle M; Bodin, Karl; Kirk, Jayne; Saltó, Carmen; Gustafsson, Magnus; Toledo, Enrique M; Karu, Kersti; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R; Ernfors, Patrik; Sjövall, Jan; Griffiths, William J; Arenas, Ernest

    2013-02-01

    Liver X receptors (Lxrα and Lxrβ) are ligand-dependent nuclear receptors critical for ventral midbrain neurogenesis in vivo. However, no endogenous midbrain Lxr ligand has so far been identified. Here we used LC/MS and functional assays to identify cholic acid as a new Lxr ligand. Moreover, 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol (24,25-EC) was found to be the most potent and abundant Lxr ligand in the developing mouse midbrain. Both Lxr ligands promoted neural development in an Lxr-dependent manner in zebrafish in vivo. Notably, each ligand selectively regulated the development of distinct midbrain neuronal populations. Whereas cholic acid increased survival and neurogenesis of Brn3a-positive red nucleus neurons, 24,25-EC promoted dopaminergic neurogenesis. These results identify an entirely new class of highly selective and cell type-specific regulators of neurogenesis and neuronal survival. Moreover, 24,25-EC promoted dopaminergic differentiation of embryonic stem cells, suggesting that Lxr ligands may thus contribute to the development of cell replacement and regenerative therapies for Parkinson's disease.

  13. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 is a novel target gene of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xingguo; Vispute, Saurabh G.; Liu, Jie; Cheng, Christine; Kharitonenkov, Alexei; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-07-01

    The toxic effects of dioxins, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), mainly through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) are well documented. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 plays critical roles in metabolic adaptation to fasting by increasing lipid oxidation and ketogenesis in the liver. The present study was performed to determine whether activation of the AhR induces Fgf21 expression. In mouse liver, TCDD increased Fgf21 mRNA in both dose- and time-dependent manners. In addition, TCDD markedly increased Fgf21 mRNA expression in cultured mouse and human hepatocytes. Moreover, TCDD increased mRNA (in liver) and protein levels (in both liver and serum) of Fgf21 in wild-type mice, but not in AhR-null mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that TCDD increased AhR protein binding to the Fgf21 promoter (− 105/+ 1 base pair). Fgf21-null mice administered 200 μg/kg of TCDD died within 20 days, whereas wild-type mice receiving the same treatment were still alive at one month after administration. This indicates that TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression protects against TCDD toxicity. Diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) pretreatment attenuated TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression in mouse liver and white adipose tissue, which may explain a previous report that DEHP pretreatment decreases TCDD-induced wasting. In conclusion, Fgf21 appears to be a target gene of AhR-signaling pathway in mouse and human liver. - Highlights: • TCDD induced Fgf21 expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Fgf21 induction by TCDD is AhR-dependent. • DEHP attenuated TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression.

  14. Estrogen Receptor Ligands: A Review (2013–2015)

    PubMed Central

    Farzaneh, Shabnam; Zarghi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) are a group of compounds named for their importance in both menstrual and estrous reproductive cycles. They are involved in the regulation of various processes ranging from tissue growth maintenance to reproduction. Their action is mediated through ER nuclear receptors. Two subtypes of the estrogen receptor, ERα and ERβ, exist and exhibit distinct cellular and tissue distribution patterns. In humans, both receptor subtypes are expressed in many cells and tissues, and they control key physiological functions in various organ systems. Estrogens attract great attention due to their wide applications in female reproductive functions and treatment of some estrogen-dependent cancers and osteoporosis. This paper provides a general review of ER ligands published in international journals patented between 2013 and 2015. The broad physiological profile of estrogens has attracted the attention of many researchers to develop new estrogen ligands as therapeutic molecules for various clinical purposes. After the discovery of the ERβ receptor, subtype-selective ligands could be used to elicit beneficial estrogen-like activities and reduce adverse side effects, based on the different distributions and relative levels of the two ER subtypes in different estrogen target tissues. Therefore, recent literature has focused on selective estrogen ligands as highly promising agents for the treatment of some types of cancer, as well as for cardiovascular, inflammatory, and neurodegenerative diseases. Estrogen receptors are nuclear transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of many complex physiological functions in humans. Selective estrogen ligands are highly promising targets for treatment of some types of cancer, as well as for cardiovascular, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies of ER ligands based on small molecules indicate that many different structural scaffolds may provide high

  15. Ligand competition binding assay for the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Féau, Clémentine; Arnold, Leggy A; Kosinski, Aaron; Guy, R Kiplin

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating endocrine activities of environmental chemicals or screening for new small molecule modulators of the androgen receptor (AR) transcription activity requires standardized and reliable assay procedures. Scintillation proximity assays (SPA) are sensitive and reliable techniques that are suitable for ligand competition binding assays. We have utilized a radiolabeled ligand competition binding assay for the androgen receptor (AR) that can be carried out in a 384-well format. This standardized, highly reproducible and low-cost assay has been automated for high-throughput screening (HTS) purposes.

  16. Structure-activity relationship of nuclear receptor-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Greschik, Holger; Moras, Dino

    2003-01-01

    Small molecules such as retinoids, steroid hormones, fatty acids, cholesterol metabolites, or xenobiotics are involved in the regulation of numerous physiological and patho-physiological processes by binding to and controlling the activity of members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. In addition to natural ligands, synthetic agonists or antagonists have been identified that in some cases specifically target NR isotypes, or elicit tissue-, signaling pathway-, or promoter-selective transcriptional responses. For these ligands the term "selective NR modulators" (SNRMs) has been introduced. Structure determination of apo- and holo-NR ligand-binding domains (LBDs)--some of them complexed to small coactivator or corepressor fragments--revealed the major principles of ligand-dependent NR action and determinants of (isotype-) selective ligand binding. These studies also stimulated the interpretation of tissue-specific effects of SNRMs on wild-type or mutant receptors. In contrast to the increasing knowledge on the structure-activity relationship of NRs with known SNRMs, rather basic questions remain about the regulation of orphan NRs (for which no ligands are known) or "adopted" orphan NRs (for which only recently ligands were identified). Several crystal structures of orphan NR LBDs uncovered unexpected properties, contributed to the understanding of orphan NR function, and may in the future permit the identification or design of ligands. This review will (i) focus on the current understanding of the structure-activity relationship of NR-ligand interactions, (ii) discuss recent advances in the field of "orphan" NR crystallography, and (iii) outline future challenges in NR structural biology.

  17. Inside job: ligand-receptor pharmacology beneath the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Joseph J; Li, Min

    2013-07-01

    Most drugs acting on the cell surface receptors are membrane permeable and thus able to engage their target proteins in different subcellular compartments. However, these drugs' effects on cell surface receptors have historically been studied on the plasma membrane alone. Increasing evidence suggests that small molecules may also modulate their targeted receptors through membrane trafficking or organelle-localized signaling inside the cell. These additional modes of interaction have been reported for functionally diverse ligands of GPCRs, ion channels, and transporters. Such intracellular drug-target engagements affect cell surface expression. Concurrent intracellular and cell surface signaling may also increase the complexity and therapeutic opportunities of small molecule modulation. Here we discuss examples of ligand-receptor interactions that are present in both intra- and extracellular sites, and the potential therapeutic opportunities presented by this phenomenon.

  18. Ligand regulation of a constitutively dimeric EGF receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Daniel M.; Alvarado, Diego; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2015-06-01

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization has traditionally been viewed as the key event in transmembrane signalling by epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans EGFR orthologue LET-23 is constitutively dimeric, yet responds to its ligand LIN-3 without changing oligomerization state. SAXS and mutational analyses further reveal that the preformed dimer of the LET-23 extracellular region is mediated by its domain II dimerization arm and resembles other EGFR extracellular dimers seen in structural studies. Binding of LIN-3 induces only minor structural rearrangements in the LET-23 dimer to promote signalling. Our results therefore argue that EGFR can be regulated by allosteric changes within an existing receptor dimer--resembling signalling by insulin receptor family members, which share similar extracellular domain compositions but form covalent dimers.

  19. Inside job: ligand-receptor pharmacology beneath the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Babcock, Joseph J; Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    Most drugs acting on the cell surface receptors are membrane permeable and thus able to engage their target proteins in different subcellular compartments. However, these drugs' effects on cell surface receptors have historically been studied on the plasma membrane alone. Increasing evidence suggests that small molecules may also modulate their targeted receptors through membrane trafficking or organelle-localized signaling inside the cell. These additional modes of interaction have been reported for functionally diverse ligands of GPCRs, ion channels, and transporters. Such intracellular drug-target engagements affect cell surface expression. Concurrent intracellular and cell surface signaling may also increase the complexity and therapeutic opportunities of small molecule modulation. Here we discuss examples of ligand-receptor interactions that are present in both intra- and extracellular sites, and the potential therapeutic opportunities presented by this phenomenon. PMID:23685953

  20. Ligand-induced ErbB receptor dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Lemmon, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Structural studies have provided important new insights into how ligand binding promotes homodimerization and activation of the EGF receptor and the other members of the ErbB family or receptor tyrosine kinases. These structures have also suggested possible explanations for the unique properties of ErbB2, which has no known ligand and can cause cell transformation (and tumorigenesis) by simple overexpression. In parallel with these advances, studies of the EGF receptor at the cell surface increasingly argue that the structural studies are missing key mechanistic components. This is particularly evident in the structural prediction that EGF binding linked to receptor dimerization should be positively cooperative, whereas cell-surface EGF-binding studies suggest negative cooperativity. In this review, I summarize studies of ErbB receptor extracellular regions in solution and of intact receptors at the cell surface, and attempt to reconcile the differences suggested by the two approaches. By combining results obtained with receptor ‘parts’, it is qualitatively possible to explain some models for the properties of the whole receptor. These considerations underline the need to consider the intact ErbB receptors as intact allosterically regulated enzymes, and to combine cellular and structural studies into a complete picture. PMID:19038249

  1. Tools and techniques to study ligand-receptor interactions and receptor activation by TNF superfamily members.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Pascal; Willen, Laure; Smulski, Cristian R

    2014-01-01

    Ligands and receptors of the TNF superfamily are therapeutically relevant targets in a wide range of human diseases. This chapter describes assays based on ELISA, immunoprecipitation, FACS, and reporter cell lines to monitor interactions of tagged receptors and ligands in both soluble and membrane-bound forms using unified detection techniques. A reporter cell assay that is sensitive to ligand oligomerization can identify ligands with high probability of being active on endogenous receptors. Several assays are also suitable to measure the activity of agonist or antagonist antibodies, or to detect interactions with proteoglycans. Finally, self-interaction of membrane-bound receptors can be evidenced using a FRET-based assay. This panel of methods provides a large degree of flexibility to address questions related to the specificity, activation, or inhibition of TNF-TNF receptor interactions in independent assay systems, but does not substitute for further tests in physiologically relevant conditions.

  2. [Endorphines--the endogenous ligands of opiate receptors (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Teschemacher, H

    1978-01-01

    The demonstration of opiate receptors in the nervous tissue of vertebrates in 1973 was the starting point of an intensive search for the endogenous ligands of these receptors. During the following years, several of such "edogenous opiates", called "endorphines", were isolated from various tissues of the mammalian organism. These are peptides which are able to elicit the same effects as do opiates. Possibly, they play a role in the reaction of the organism to stress.

  3. [Effect of ligand concentration on the precision of determining the parameters of ligand-receptor interaction by serial dilution methods].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A

    2004-01-01

    Earlier we suggested the method of serial dilution, which allows one to determine the parameters of ligand-receptor interaction even if the reactants are in a mixture and their concentrations are unknown. The method is especially useful if the liability of studied receptor does not allow its separation from corresponding ligand. The important prerequisite of the method's precision is that the concentration of the ligand should be sufficiently high comparing to the concentration of the receptor. In the present paper it was demonstrated that the method allows one to obtain sufficiently good precision even in the case when the concentration of the ligand is only one tenth of the receptor concentration.

  4. [Determining the parameters for receptor-ligand interaction by serial dilution method for the case when the ligand and receptor are in a pre-existing mixture].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A

    2005-01-01

    New methods of determining the binding parameters for ligand-receptor interaction are considered. The considered approaches are based on the earlier suggested method of serial dilution and application of so-called coordinates of dilution. It was shown that the suggested methods allow to evaluate affinity constant and ligand concentration even for the case, when the receptor and corresponding ligand of unknown concentration are in a mixture and their separation from each other is impossible. In this connection the suggested methods are especially useful for studying the ligand-receptor interaction if the receptor is very liable and its purification from the ligand would cause drastic changes of its binding properties.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Nonsteroidal Androgen Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wenqing; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Testosterone and structurally related anabolic steroids have been used to treat hypogonadism, muscle wasting, osteoporosis, male contraception, cancer cachexia, anemia, and hormone replacement therapy in aging men or age-related frailty; while antiandrogens may be useful for treatment of conditions like acne, alopecia (male-pattern baldness), hirsutism, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. However, the undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of steroidal androgen receptor (AR) ligands limited their clinical use. Nonsteroidal AR ligands with improved pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties have been developed to overcome these problems. This review focuses on the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and pharmacology of clinically used and emerging nonsteroidal AR ligands, including antagonists, agonists, and selective androgen receptor modulators. PMID:16841196

  6. IGF Ligand and Receptor Regulation of Mammary Development

    PubMed Central

    Rowzee, Anne M.; Lazzarino, Deborah A.; Rota, Lauren; Sun, Zhaoyu; Wood, Teresa L.

    2009-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors, IGF-I and IGF-II, have endocrine as well as autocrine-paracrine actions on tissue growth. Both IGF ligands are expressed within developing mammary tissue throughout postnatal stages with specific sites of expression in the epithelial and stromal compartments. The elucidation of circulating versus local actions and of epithelial versus stromal actions of IGFs in stimulating mammary epithelial development has been the focus of several laboratories. The recent studies addressing IGF ligand function provide support for the hypotheses that 1) the diverse sites of IGF expression may mediate different cellular outcomes, and 2) IGF-I and IGF-II are distinctly regulated and have diverse functions in mammary development. The mechanisms for IGF function likely are mediated, in part, through diverse IGF signaling receptors. The local actions of the IGF ligands and receptors as revealed through recent publications are the focus of this review. PMID:19020961

  7. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of nonsteroidal androgen receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenqing; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T

    2006-08-01

    Testosterone and structurally related anabolic steroids have been used to treat hypogonadism, muscle wasting, osteoporosis, male contraception, cancer cachexia, anemia, and hormone replacement therapy in aging men or age-related frailty; while antiandrogens may be useful for treatment of conditions like acne, alopecia (male-pattern baldness), hirsutism, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. However, the undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of steroidal androgen receptor (AR) ligands limited their clinical use. Nonsteroidal AR ligands with improved pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties have been developed to overcome these problems. This review focuses on the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and pharmacology of clinically used and emerging nonsteroidal AR ligands, including antagonists, agonists, and selective androgen receptor modulators.

  8. Central nicotinic receptors: structure, function, ligands, and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, M Novella; Gratteri, Paola; Guandalini, Luca; Martini, Elisabetta; Bonaccini, Claudia; Gualtieri, Fulvio

    2007-06-01

    The growing interest in nicotinic receptors, because of their wide expression in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues and their involvement in several important CNS pathologies, has stimulated the synthesis of a high number of ligands able to modulate their function. These membrane proteins appear to be highly heterogeneous, and still only incomplete information is available on their structure, subunit composition, and stoichiometry. This is due to the lack of selective ligands to study the role of nAChR under physiological or pathological conditions; so far, only compounds showing selectivity between alpha4beta2 and alpha7 receptors have been obtained. The nicotinic receptor ligands have been designed starting from lead compounds from natural sources such as nicotine, cytisine, or epibatidine, and, more recently, through the high-throughput screening of chemical libraries. This review focuses on the structure of the new agonists, antagonists, and allosteric ligands of nicotinic receptors, it highlights the current knowledge on the binding site models as a molecular modeling approach to design new compounds, and it discusses the nAChR modulators which have entered clinical trials.

  9. REACTIVITY PROFILE OF CONFORMATIONALLY-FLEXIBLE RETINOID RECEPTOR LIGANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retinoids and associated derivatives represent a class of endogenousr hormones that bind to and activate different families of retinoic acid receptors (RARs, RXRs), and control many aspects of normal vertebrate development. Identification of potential RAR and RXRs ligands is of i...

  10. Nonsteroidal Androgen Receptor Ligands: Versatile Syntheses and Biological Data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report herein a stereoselective and straightforward methodology for the synthesis of new androgen receptor ligands with (anti)-agonistic activities. Oxygen–nitrogen replacement in bicalutamide-like structures paves the way to the disclosure of a new class of analogues, including cyclized/nitrogen-substituted derivatives, with promising antiandrogen (or anabolic) activity. PMID:24900495

  11. REACTIVITY PROFILE OF CONFORMATIONALLY-FLEXIBLE RETINOID RECEPTOR LIGANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retinoids and associated derivatives represent a class of endogenousr hormones that bind to and activate different families of retinoic acid receptors (RARs, RXRs), and control many aspects of normal vertebrate development. Identification of potential RAR and RXRs ligands is of i...

  12. Identification of a New Selective Dopamine D4 Receptor Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Dinithia; Zhu, Xue Y.; Eyunni, Suresh V. K.; Etukala, Jagan R.; Ofori, Edward; Bricker, Barbara; Lamango, Nazarius S.; Setola, Vincent; Roth, Bryan L.; Ablordeppey, Seth Y.

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine D4 receptor has been shown to play key roles in certain CNS pathologies including addiction to cigarette smoking. Thus, selective D4 ligands may be useful in treating some of these conditions. Previous studies in our laboratory have indicated that the piperazine analog of haloperidol exhibits selective and increased affinity to the DAD4 receptor subtype, in comparison to its piperidine analog. This led to further exploration of the piperazine moiety to identify new agents that are selective at the D4 receptor. Compound 27 (KiD4 = 0.84 nM) was the most potent of the compounds tested. However, it only had moderate selectivity for the D4 receptor. Compound 28 (KiD4 = 3.9 nM) while not as potent, was more discriminatory for the D4 receptor subtype. In fact, compound 28 has little or no binding affinity to any of the other four DA receptor subtypes. In addition, of the 23 CNS receptors evaluated, only two, 5HT1AR and 5HT2BR, have binding affinity constants better than 100 nM (Ki < 100 nM). Compound 28 is a potentially useful D4-selective ligand for probing disease treatments involving the D4 receptor, such as assisting smoking cessation, reversing cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and treating erectile dysfunction. Thus, further optimization, functional characterization and evaluation in animal models may be warranted. PMID:24800940

  13. Oxytocin receptors: ligand binding, signalling and cholesterol dependence.

    PubMed

    Gimpl, Gerald; Reitz, Julian; Brauer, Sabine; Trossen, Conny

    2008-01-01

    The G protein coupled oxytocin receptor (OTR) reveals some specific molecular and physiological characteristics. Ligand-receptor interaction has been analysed by photoaffinity labelling, site-directed mutagenesis, the construction of receptor chimeras and molecular modelling. Major results of these studies will be summarized. The N-terminus of the OTR is mainly involved in agonist binding. Notably, antagonists that are derived from the ground structure of oxytocin, bind the receptor at distinct sites partly non-overlapping with the agonist binding site. OTRs are able to couple to different G proteins, with a subsequent stimulation of phospholipase C-beta isoforms. In dependence on G protein coupling, OTRs can transduce growth-inhibitory or proliferatory signals. Some evidence is provided that OTRs are also present in form of dimeric or oligomeric complexes at the cell surface. The affinity of the receptor for ligands is strongly dependent on the presence of divalent cations (Mg(2+)) and cholesterol that both act like positive allosteric modulators. While the high-affinity state of the receptor for agonists requires divalent cations and cholesterol, the high-affinity state for antagonists is only dependent on a sufficient amount of cholesterol. Cholesterol affects ligand-binding affinity, receptor signalling and stability. Since the purification of the OTR has never been achieved, alternative methods to study the receptor in its native environment are necessary. Promising strategies for the site-specific labelling of the OTR will be presented. The employment of diverse reporter molecules introduced at different positions within the OTR might allow us in the near future to measure conformational changes of the receptor in its native lipid environment.

  14. Indoxyl sulfate downregulates expression of Mas receptor via OAT3/AhR/Stat3 pathway in proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hwee-Yeong; Yisireyili, Maimaiti; Saito, Shinichi; Lee, Chien-Te; Adelibieke, Yelixiati; Nishijima, Fuyuhiko; Niwa, Toshimitsu

    2014-01-01

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Angiotensin converting enzyme-related carboxypeptidase 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis counteracts the deleterious actions of Ang II. ACE2 exerts its actions by cleaving Ang II into Ang-(1-7) which activates Mas receptor. This study aimed to determine if the expression of Mas receptor is altered in the kidneys of CKD rats, and if indoxyl sulfate (IS), a uremic toxin, affects the expression of Mas receptor in rat kidneys and cultured human proximal tubular cells (HK-2 cells). The expression of Mas receptor was examined in the kidneys of CKD and AST-120-treated CKD rats using immunohistochemistry. Further, the effects of IS on Mas receptor expression in the kidneys of normotensive and hypertensive rats were examined. The effects of IS on the expression of Mas receptor and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in HK-2 cells were examined using immunoblotting. CKD rats showed reduced renal expression of Mas receptor, while AST-120 restored its expression. Administration of IS downregulated Mas receptor expression in the kidneys of normotensive and hypertensive rats. IS downregulated Mas receptor expression in HK-2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) inhibited IS-induced downregulation of Mas receptor and phosphorylated eNOS. N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, also inhibited IS-induced downregulation of Mas receptor and phosphorylated eNOS. Ang-(1-7) attenuated IS-induced transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) expression. Mas receptor expression is reduced in the kidneys of CKD rats. IS downregulates renal expression of Mas receptor via OAT3/AhR/Stat3 pathway in proximal tubular cells. IS-induced downregulation of Mas receptor might be involved in upregulation of TGF-β1 in proximal tubular

  15. Role of Fluctuations in Ligand Binding Cooperativity of Membrane Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lizhe; Frenkel, Daan; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2011-04-01

    Signal transduction upon binding of a ligand to a membrane protein can occur not only via allosteric conformational changes but also through fluctuations. We report a numerical study on the influence of conformational fluctuations on the cooperativity of a binding reaction in a simple model of an integral membrane receptor consisting of transmembrane helices. We find that small fluctuations lateral as well as perpendicular to the membrane can increase the cooperativity, with the former more dominant. Moreover, too much fluctuation induces negative cooperativity. Proteins with fewer than four helices do not show positive cooperativity under any circumstances. This behavior is rather robust, and independent of the receptor topology or ligand size. Fluctuations measured in all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of a G-protein coupled receptor fall within the predicted region of maximum cooperativity.

  16. Why do cannabinoid receptors have more than one endogenous ligand?

    PubMed Central

    Di Marzo, Vincenzo; De Petrocellis, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system was revealed following the understanding of the mechanism of action of marijuana's major psychotropic principle, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, and includes two G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors), their endogenous ligands (the endocannabinoids, the best studied of which are anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)), and the proteins that regulate the levels and activity of these receptors and ligands. However, other minor lipid metabolites different from, but chemically similar to, anandamide and 2-AG have also been suggested to act as endocannabinoids. Thus, unlike most other GPCRs, cannabinoid receptors appear to have more than one endogenous agonist, and it has been often wondered what could be the physiological meaning of this peculiarity. In 1999, it was proposed that anandamide might also activate other targets, and in particular the transient receptor potential of vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels. Over the last decade, this interaction has been shown to occur both in peripheral tissues and brain, during both physiological and pathological conditions. TRPV1 channels can be activated also by another less abundant endocannabinoid, N-arachidonoyldopamine, but not by 2-AG, and have been proposed by some authors to act as ionotropic endocannabinoid receptors. This article will discuss the latest discoveries on this subject, and discuss, among others, how anandamide and 2-AG differential actions at TRPV1 and cannabinoid receptors contribute to making this signalling system a versatile tool available to organisms to fine-tune homeostasis. PMID:23108541

  17. Receptor Specific Ligands for Spect Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. F.

    2003-02-25

    In the past funding period we have concentrated in developing new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs. Basic chemistry of ligand synthesis, radiochemistry of Re and 99mTc complex formation, separation of stereoisomers and in vitro stability were investigated. We have prepared a number of new MIBG derivatives containing chelating moiety N2S2 and additional groups to increase lipophilicity. Unfortunately none of the new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs showed promise as an imaging agent for myocardial neuronal function. Radioactive-iodine-labeled meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is currently being used as an in vivo imaging agent to evaluate neuroendocrine tumors as well as the myocardial sympathetic nervous system in patients with myocardial infarct and cardiomyopathy. It is generally accepted that MIBG is an analog of norepinephrine and its uptake in the heart corresponds to the distribution of norepinephrine and the density of sympathetic neurons. A series of MIBG derivatives containing suitable chelating functional groups N2S2 for the formation of [Tcv0]+3N2S2 complex was successfully synthesized and the 99mTc-labeled complexes were prepared and tested in rats. One of the compounds, [99mTc]M2, tested showed significant, albeit lower, heart uptakes post iv injection in rats (0.18% dose/organ at 4 hours) as compared to [l25l]MIBG (1.4% dose/organ at 4 hours). The heart uptake of the 99mTc-labeled complex, [99mTc]M2, appears to be specific and can be reduced by coinjection with nonradioactive MIBG or by pretreatment with desipramine. a selective norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. Further evaluation of the in vitro uptake of [99mTc]M2 in cultured neuroblastoma cells displayed consistently lower, but measurable uptake (app. 10% of that for [125l]MlBG). These preliminary results suggested that the mechanisms of heart uptake of [99mTc]M2 may be related to those for [125l]MIBG uptake. To improve the heart uptake of the MIBG derivatives we have developed chemistry related to the

  18. Ligand specificity and evolution of liver X receptors§

    PubMed Central

    Reschly, Erica J.; Ai, Ni; Welsh, William J.; Ekins, Sean; Hagey, Lee R.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2008-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are key regulators of lipid and cholesterol metabolism in mammals. Little is known, however, about the function and evolution of LXRs in non-mammalian species. The present study reports the cloning of LXRs from African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis), Western clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis), and zebrafish (Danio rerio), and their functional characterization and comparison with human and mouse LXRs. Additionally, an ortholog of LXR in the chordate invertebrate Ciona intestinalis was cloned and functionally characterized. Ligand specificities of the frog and zebrafish LXRs were very similar to LXRα and LXRβ from human and mouse. All vertebrate LXRs studied were activated robustly by the synthetic ligands T-0901317 and GW3965 and by a variety of oxysterols. In contrast, Ciona LXR was not activated by T-0901317 or GW3965 but was activated by a limited number of oxysterols, as well as some androstane and pregnane steroids. Pharmacophore analysis, homology modeling, and docking studies of Ciona LXR predict a receptor with a more restricted ligand-binding pocket and less intrinsic disorder in the ligand-binding domain compared to vertebrate LXRs. The results suggest that LXRs have a long evolutionary history, with vertebrate LXRs diverging from invertebrate LXRs in ligand specificity. PMID:18395439

  19. Thiophene-Core Estrogen Receptor Ligands Having Superagonist Activity

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jian; Wang, Pengcheng; Srinivasan, Sathish; Nwachukwu, Jerome C.; Guo, Pu; Huang, Minjian; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Nettles, Kendall W.; Zhou, Hai-Bing

    2013-01-01

    To probe the importance of the heterocyclic core of estrogen receptor (ER) ligands, we prepared a series of thiophene-core ligands by Suzuki cross-coupling of aryl boronic acids with bromo-thiophenes, and we assessed their receptor binding and cell biological activities. The disposition of the phenol substituents on the thiophene core, at alternate or adjacent sites, and the nature of substituents on these phenols all contribute to binding affinity and subtype selectivity. Most of the bis(hydroxyphenyl)-thiophenes were ERβ selective, whereas the tris(hydroxyphenyl)-thiophenes were ERα selective; analogous furan-core compounds generally have lower affinity and less selectivity. Some diarylthiophenes show distinct superagonist activity in reporter gene assays, giving maximal activities 2–3 times that of estradiol, and modeling suggests that these ligands have a different interaction with a hydrogen-bonding residue in helix-11. Ligand-core modification may be a new strategy for developing ER ligands whose selectivity is based on having transcriptional activity greater than that of estradiol. PMID:23586645

  20. Ligands for cannabinoid receptors, promising anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Nikan, Marjan; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Manayi, Azadeh

    2016-02-01

    Cannabinoid compounds are unique to cannabis and provide some interesting biological properties. These compounds along with endocannabinoids, a group of neuromodulator compounds in the body especially in brain, express their effects by activation of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. There are several physiological properties attributed to the endocannabinoids including pain relief, enhancement of appetite, blood pressure lowering during shock, embryonic development, and blocking of working memory. On the other hand, activation of endocannabinoid system may be suppresses evolution and progression of several types of cancer. According to the results of recent studies, CB receptors are over-expressed in cancer cell lines and application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds reduce tumor size through decrease of cell proliferation or induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis along with desirable effect on decrease of tumor-evoked pain. Therefore, modulation of endocannabinoid system by inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme, which metabolized endocannabinoids, or application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds, may be appropriate for the treatment of several cancer subtypes. This review focuses on how cannabinoid affect different types of cancers.

  1. ALX receptor ligands define a biochemical endotype for severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Ricklefs, Isabell; Barkas, Ioanna; Duvall, Melody G; Cernadas, Manuela; Grossman, Nicole L; Israel, Elliot; Bleecker, Eugene R; Castro, Mario; Erzurum, Serpil C; Fahy, John V; Gaston, Benjamin M; Denlinger, Loren C; Mauger, David T; Wenzel, Sally E; Comhair, Suzy A; Coverstone, Andrea M; Fajt, Merritt L; Hastie, Annette T; Johansson, Mats W; Peters, Michael C; Phillips, Brenda R; Levy, Bruce D

    2017-07-20

    In health, inflammation resolution is an active process governed by specialized proresolving mediators and receptors. ALX/FPR2 receptors (ALX) are targeted by both proresolving and proinflammatory ligands for opposing signaling events, suggesting pivotal roles for ALX in the fate of inflammatory responses. Here, we determined if ALX expression and ligands were linked to severe asthma (SA). ALX expression and levels of proresolving ligands (lipoxin A4 [LXA4], 15-epi-LXA4, and annexin A1 [ANXA1]), and a proinflammatory ligand (serum amyloid A [SAA]) were measured in bronchoscopy samples collected in Severe Asthma Research Program-3 (SA [n = 69], non-SA [NSA, n = 51] or healthy donors [HDs, n = 47]). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 were decreased and SAA was increased in SA relative to NSA. BAL macrophage ALX expression was increased in SA. Subjects with LXA4loSAAhi levels had increased BAL neutrophils, more asthma symptoms, lower lung function, increased relative risk for asthma exacerbation, sinusitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease, and were assigned more frequently to SA clinical clusters. SAA and aliquots of LXA4loSAAhi BAL fluid induced IL-8 production by lung epithelial cells expressing ALX receptors, which was inhibited by coincubation with 15-epi-LXA4. Together, these findings have established an association between select ALX receptor ligands and asthma severity that define a potentially new biochemical endotype for asthma and support a pivotal functional role for ALX signaling in the fate of lung inflammation. Severe Asthma Research Program-3 (SARP-3; ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01606826)FUNDING Sources. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the NIH, and the German Society of Pediatric Pneumology.

  2. ALX receptor ligands define a biochemical endotype for severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ricklefs, Isabell; Barkas, Ioanna; Duvall, Melody G.; Grossman, Nicole L.; Israel, Elliot; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Castro, Mario; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Fahy, John V.; Gaston, Benjamin M.; Denlinger, Loren C.; Mauger, David T.; Wenzel, Sally E.; Comhair, Suzy A.; Coverstone, Andrea M.; Fajt, Merritt L.; Hastie, Annette T.; Johansson, Mats W.; Peters, Michael C.; Phillips, Brenda R.; Levy, Bruce D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. In health, inflammation resolution is an active process governed by specialized proresolving mediators and receptors. ALX/FPR2 receptors (ALX) are targeted by both proresolving and proinflammatory ligands for opposing signaling events, suggesting pivotal roles for ALX in the fate of inflammatory responses. Here, we determined if ALX expression and ligands were linked to severe asthma (SA). METHODS. ALX expression and levels of proresolving ligands (lipoxin A4 [LXA4], 15-epi-LXA4, and annexin A1 [ANXA1]), and a proinflammatory ligand (serum amyloid A [SAA]) were measured in bronchoscopy samples collected in Severe Asthma Research Program-3 (SA [n = 69], non-SA [NSA, n = 51] or healthy donors [HDs, n = 47]). RESULTS. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 were decreased and SAA was increased in SA relative to NSA. BAL macrophage ALX expression was increased in SA. Subjects with LXA4loSAAhi levels had increased BAL neutrophils, more asthma symptoms, lower lung function, increased relative risk for asthma exacerbation, sinusitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease, and were assigned more frequently to SA clinical clusters. SAA and aliquots of LXA4loSAAhi BAL fluid induced IL-8 production by lung epithelial cells expressing ALX receptors, which was inhibited by coincubation with 15-epi-LXA4. CONCLUSIONS. Together, these findings have established an association between select ALX receptor ligands and asthma severity that define a potentially new biochemical endotype for asthma and support a pivotal functional role for ALX signaling in the fate of lung inflammation. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Severe Asthma Research Program-3 (SARP-3; ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01606826) FUNDING Sources. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the NIH, and the German Society of Pediatric Pneumology. PMID:28724795

  3. Therapeutic potential of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Shaun P; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is widely distributed in the human body and contributes to a vast number of physiological processes. Since its discovery, NPY has been implicated in metabolic regulation and, although interest in its role in central mechanisms related to food intake and obesity has somewhat diminished, the topic remains a strong focus of research concerning NPY signalling. In addition, a number of other uses for modulators of NPY receptors have been implied in a range of diseases, although the development of NPY receptor ligands has been slow, with no clinically approved receptor therapeutics currently available. Nevertheless, several interesting small molecule compounds, notably Y2 receptor antagonists, have been published recently, fueling optimism in the field. Herein we review the role of NPY in the pathophysiology of a number of diseases and highlight instances where NPY receptor signalling systems are attractive therapeutic targets. PMID:20972986

  4. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand 5F 203 Induces Oxidative Stress That Triggers DNA Damage in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Lancelot S.; Watkins, Cheri N.; Campbell, Petreena; Zylstra, Dain; Rowland, Leah; Amis, Louisa H.; Scott, Lia; Babb, Crystal E.; Livingston, W. Joel; Darwanto, Agus; Davis, Willie L.; Senthil, Maheswari; Sowers, Lawrence C.; Brantley, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Breast tumors often show profound sensitivity to exogenous oxidative stress. Investigational agent 2-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)-5-fluorobenzothiazole (5F 203) induces aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated DNA damage in certain breast cancer cells. Since AhR agonists often elevate intracellular oxidative stress, we hypothesize that 5F 203 increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) to induce DNA damage, which thwarts breast cancer cell growth. We found that 5F 203 induced single-strand break formation. 5F 203 enhanced oxidative DNA damage that was specific to breast cancer cells sensitive to its cytotoxic actions, as it did not increase oxidative DNA damage or ROS formation in nontumorigenic MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. In contrast, AhR agonist and procarcinogen benzo[a]pyrene and its metabolite, 1,6-benzo[a]pyrene quinone, induced oxidative DNA damage and ROS formation, respectively, in MCF-10A cells. In sensitive breast cancer cells, 5F 203 activated ROS-responsive kinases: c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38). AhR antagonists (alpha-naphthoflavone, CH223191) or antioxidants (N-acetyl-l-cysteine, EUK-134) attenuated 5F 203-mediated JNK and p38 activation, depending on the cell type. Pharmacological inhibition of AhR, JNK, or p38 attenuated 5F 203-mediated increases in intracellular ROS, apoptosis, and single-strand break formation. 5F 203 induced the expression of cytoglobin, an oxidative stress-responsive gene and a putative tumor suppressor, which was diminished with AhR, JNK, or p38 inhibition. Additionally, 5F 203-mediated increases in ROS production and cytoglobin were suppressed in AHR100 cells (AhR ligand-unresponsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells). Our data demonstrate 5F 203 induces ROS-mediated DNA damage at least in part via AhR, JNK, or p38 activation and modulates the expression of oxidative stress-responsive genes such as cytoglobin to confer its anticancer action. PMID:25781201

  5. The AXL Receptor is a Sensor of Ligand Spatial Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Zweemer, Annelien J.M.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    The AXL receptor is a TAM (Tyro3, AXL, MerTK) receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) important in physiological inflammatory processes such as blood clotting, viral infection, and innate immune-mediated cell clearance. Overexpression of the receptor in a number of solid tumors is increasingly appreciated as a key drug resistance and tumor dissemination mechanism. Although the ligand-receptor (Gas6-AXL) complex structure is known, literature reports on ligand-mediated signaling have provided conflicting conclusions regarding the influence of other factors such as phosphatidylserine binding, and a detailed, mechanistic picture of AXL activation has not emerged. Integrating quantitative experiments with mathematical modeling, we show here that AXL operates to sense local spatial heterogeneity in ligand concentration, a feature consistent with its physiological role in inflammatory cell responses. This effect arises as a result of an intricate reaction-diffusion interaction. Our results demonstrate that AXL functions distinctly from other RTK families, a vital insight for envisioned design of AXL-targeted therapeutic intervention. PMID:26236777

  6. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials. PMID:19630739

  7. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction.

    PubMed

    Olive, M Foster

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials.

  8. Cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling in the mouse uterus.

    PubMed Central

    Das, S K; Paria, B C; Chakraborty, I; Dey, S K

    1995-01-01

    Using RNA (Northern) blot hybridization and reverse transcription-PCR, we demonstrate that the brain-type cannabinoid receptor (CB1-R) mRNA, but not the spleen-type cannabinoid receptor (CB2-R) mRNA, is expressed in the mouse uterus and that this organ has the capacity to synthesize the putative endogenous cannabinoid ligand, anandamide (arachidonylethanolamide). The psychoactive cannabinoid component of marijuana--delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)--or anandamide, but not the inactive and nonpsychoactive cannabidiol (CBD), inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP formation in the mouse uterus, which was prevented by pertussis toxin pretreatment. These results suggest that uterine CB1-R is coupled to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and is biologically active. Autoradiographic studies identified ligand binding sites ([3H]anandamide) in the uterine epithelium and stromal cells, suggesting that these cells are perhaps the targets for cannabinoid action. Scatchard analysis of the binding of [3H]WIN 55212-2, another cannabinoid receptor ligand, showed a single class of high-affinity binding sites in the endometrium with an apparent Kd of 2.4 nM and Bmax of 5.4 x 10(9) molecules per mg of protein. The gene encoding lactoferrin is an estrogen-responsive gene in the mouse uterus that was rapidly and transiently up-regulated by THC, but not by CBD, in ovariectomized mice in the absence of ovarian steroids. This effect, unlike that of 17 beta-estradiol (E2), was not influenced by a pure antiestrogen, ICI 182780, suggesting that the THC-induced uterine lactoferrin gene expression does not involve estrogen receptors. We propose that the uterus is a new target for cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7753807

  9. Probability description of ligand-receptor interactions. Evaluation of reliability of events with small and supersmall doses. I. Kinetics of ligand-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, K G; Varfolomeev, S D

    1999-09-01

    We have developed mathematical methods for describing ligand-receptor interactions (LRI) using Markov chains. Under some conditions, the mean value of ligand-receptor complexes obtained using Markov chains coincides with that obtained from the law of mass action. Using the calculated ratio of standard deviation to mean number of ligand-receptor complexes, we show that with small concentrations of ligand-receptor complexes LRI must be described using probability methods. Using data from the literature, we show that LRI description using the mass-action law under these conditions can cause significant errors in interpretation of experimental data.

  10. The inhibition of lung cancer cell migration by AhR-regulated autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chi-Hao; Li, Ching-Hao; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Lee, Chen-Chen; Liao, Po-Lin; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Shih-Hsuan; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2017-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is highly expressed in multiple organs and tissues. Whereas AhR mediates the metabolism of xenobiotic and endogenous compounds, its novel function in cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) remains controversial. Autophagy also participates in tumour progression through its functions in cell homeostasis and facilitates adaptation to EMT progression. In the present study, we found that AhR-regulated autophagy positively modulates EMT in non-small cell lung cancer cells. The motility of A549, H1299, and CL1-5 cells were correlated with different AhR expression levels. Invasive potential and cell morphology also changed when AhR protein expression was altered. Moreover, AhR levels exerted a contrasting effect on autophagy potential. Autophagy was higher in CL1-5 and H1299 cells with lower AhR levels than in A549 cells. Both AhR overexpression and autophagy inhibition decreased CL1-5 metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, AhR promoted BNIP3 ubiquitination for proteasomal degradation. AhR silencing in A549 cells also reduced BNIP3 ubiquitination. Taken together, these results provide a novel insight into the cross-linking between AhR and autophagy, we addressed the mechanistic BNIP3 modulation by endogenous AhR, which affect cancer cell EMT progression. PMID:28195146

  11. Constitutive and ligand-induced nuclear localization of oxytocin receptor.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Conan G; Bussolati, Gianni; Bosco, Martino; Kimura, Tadashi; Pizzorno, Marie C; Chernin, Mitchell I; Cassoni, Paola; Novak, Josef F

    2007-01-01

    Oxytocin receptor (OTR) is a membrane protein known to mediate oxytocin (OT) effects, in both normal and neoplastic cells. We report here that human osteosarcoma (U2OS, MG63, OS15 and SaOS2), breast cancer (MCF7), and primary human fibroblastic cells (HFF) all exhibit OTR not only on the cell membrane, but also in the various nuclear compartments including the nucleolus. Both an OTR-GFP fusion protein and the native OTR appear to be localized to the nucleus as detected by transfection and/or confocal immunofluorescence, respectively. Treatment with oxytocin causes internalization of OTR and the resulting vesicles accumulate in the vicinity of the nucleus and some of the perinuclear OTR enters the nucleus. Western blots indicate that OTR in the nucleus and on the plasma membrane are likely to be the same biochemical and immunological entities. It appears that OTR is first visible in the nucleoli and subsequently disperses within the nucleus into 4-20 spots while some of the OTR diffuses throughout the nucleoplasm. The behaviour and kinetics of OTR-GFP and OTR are different, indicating interference by GFP in both OTR entrance into the nucleus and subsequent relocalization of OTR within the nucleus. There are important differences among the tested cells, such as the requirement of a ligand for transfer of OTR in nuclei. A constitutive internalization of OTR was found only in osteosarcoma cells, while the nuclear localization in all other tested cells was dependent on ligand binding. The amount of OTR-positive material within and in the vicinity of the nucleus increased following a treatment with oxytocin in both constitutive and ligand-dependent type of cells. The evidence of OTR compartmentalization at the cell nucleus (either ligand-dependent or constitutive) in different cell types suggests still unknown biological functions of this protein or its ligand and adds this G-protein-coupled receptor to other heptahelical receptors displaying this atypical and unexpected

  12. Cancer therapy using natural ligands that target estrogen receptor beta.

    PubMed

    Sareddy, Gangadhara R; Vadlamudi, Ratna K

    2015-11-01

    Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is one of the two key receptors (ERα, ERβ) that facilitate biological actions of 17β-estradiol (E2). ERβ is widely expressed in many tissues, and its expression is reduced or lost during progression of many tumors. ERβ facilitates estrogen signaling by both genomic (classical and non-classical) and extra-nuclear signaling. Emerging evidence suggests that ERβ functions as a tissue-specific tumor suppressor with anti-proliferative actions. Recent studies have identified a number of naturally available selective ERβ agonists. Targeting ERβ using its naturally available ligands is an attractive approach for treating and preventing cancers. This review presents the beneficial actions of ERβ signaling and clinical utility of several natural ERβ ligands as potential cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cancer therapy using natural ligands that target estrogen receptor beta

    PubMed Central

    Sareddy, Gangadhara R; Vadlamudi, Ratna K.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is one of the two key receptors (ERα, ERβ) that facilitate biological actions of 17β-estradiol (E2). ERβ is widely expressed in many tissues, and its expression is reduced or lost during progression of many tumors. ERβ facilitates estrogen signaling by both genomic (classical and non-classical) and extra-nuclear signaling. Emerging evidence suggests that ERβ functions as a tissue-specific tumor suppressor with anti-proliferative actions. Recent studies have identified a number of naturally available selective ERβ agonists. Targeting ERβ using its naturally available ligands is an attractive approach for treating and preventing cancers. This review presents the beneficial actions of ERβ signaling and clinical utility of several natural ERβ ligands as potential cancer therapy. PMID:26614454

  14. High-affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligands among benzodiazepines and betacarbolines with different intrinsic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yliniemelae, A.; Gynther, J. ); Konschin, H.; Tylli, H. ); Rouvinen, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Structural and electrostatic features of diazepam, flumazenil, and methyl betacarboline-3-carboxylate (BCCM) have been investigated using the molecular superimposition method. These high-affinity benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor ligands are structurally unrelated and they have different intrinsic activity. These ligands are superimposed in such a way that common structural and electrostatic features essential for the high receptor binding affinity overlap. In addition to this binding pharmacophore, there are roughly three separate binding zones in the BZ receptor, one for each class of ligands. The intrinsic activity of BZ receptor ligands depends on the molecular structures and the way the ligand approaches the receptor.

  15. Site-directed mutagenesis implicates a threonine residue in TM6 in the subtype selectivities of UH-AH 37 and pirenzepine at muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J; Seidenberg, M

    2000-08-01

    The structural basis for the selectivity of the antagonist UH-AH 37 at human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was investigated by expressing mutant receptors in COS-7 cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that the interaction between UH-AH 37 and [(3)H]N-methylscopolamine in equilibrium assays is competitive and that the high affinity of UH-AH 37 for the M(5) subtype, compared to M(2), is due to an epitope in the sixth transmembrane domain (TM6) or the third outer loop of the receptor. By mutating each nonconserved residue in this region of M(2) and M(5) to its counterpart in the other receptor, we identified a threonine residue in the middle of TM6 uniquely responsible for the higher affinity of the M(5) receptor (M(1), M(3), and M(4) receptors also carry a threonine at that location and also have high affinity for UH-AH 37). The mutant receptor in which the corresponding alanine of the M(2) receptor was replaced by threonine, M(2)(401)ala --> thr, expressed enhanced affinity for pirenzepine as well as for UH-AH 37. The chick M(2) receptor, which expresses anomalously high affinity for pirenzepine, differs from its mammalian counterparts by the presence of a threonine at this position. Affinities of AF-DX 116 and 4-DAMP, as well as the allosteric potency of UH-AH 37, were not sensitive to the M(2)(401) ala --> thr mutation. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Functionality of aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhR1 and AhR2) of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and implications for the risk assessment of dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Farmahin, Reza; Wiseman, Steve; Kennedy, Sean W; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-07-15

    Worldwide, populations of sturgeons are endangered, and it is hypothesized that anthropogenic chemicals, including dioxin-like compounds (DLCs), might be contributing to the observed declines in populations. DLCs elicit their toxic action through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which is believed to regulate most, if not all, adverse effects associated with exposure to these chemicals. Currently, risk assessment of DLCs in fishes uses toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) developed for the World Health Organization (WHO) that are based on studies of embryo-lethality with salmonids. However, there is a lack of knowledge of the sensitivity of sturgeons to DLCs, and it is uncertain whether TEFs developed by the WHO are protective of these fishes. Sturgeons are evolutionarily distinct from salmonids, and the AhRs of sturgeons differ from those of salmonids. Therefore, this study investigated the sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to DLCs in vitro via the use of luciferase reporter gene assays using COS-7 cells transfected with AhR1 or AhR2 of white sturgeon. Specifically, activation and relative potencies (RePs) of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachloro-dibenzofuran, 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzofuran, 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl, 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl, and 2,3,3',4,4'-pentachlorobiphenyl were determined for each AhR. It was demonstrated that white sturgeon expresses AhR1s and AhR2s that are both activated by DLCs with EC50 values for 2,3,7,8-TCDD that are lower than those of any other AhR of vertebrates tested to date. Both AhRs of white sturgeon had RePs for polychlorinated dibenzofurans more similar to TEFs for birds, while RePs for polychlorinated biphenyls were most similar to TEFs for fishes. Measured concentrations of select DLCs in tissues of white sturgeon from British Columbia, Canada, were used to calculate toxic equivalents (TEQs) by use of TEFs for fishes used by the WHO and TCDD

  17. Optimizing Ligand Efficiency of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) containing the 1-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol core have been optimized for androgen receptor (AR) potency and drug-like properties. We have taken advantage of the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) parameter as a guide to interpret the effect of structural changes on AR activity. Over the course of optimization efforts the LLE increased over 3 log units leading to a SARM 43 with nanomolar potency, good aqueous kinetic solubility (>700 μM), and high oral bioavailability in rats (83%). PMID:26819671

  18. Optimizing Ligand Efficiency of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs).

    PubMed

    Handlon, Anthony L; Schaller, Lee T; Leesnitzer, Lisa M; Merrihew, Raymond V; Poole, Chuck; Ulrich, John C; Wilson, Joseph W; Cadilla, Rodolfo; Turnbull, Philip

    2016-01-14

    A series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) containing the 1-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol core have been optimized for androgen receptor (AR) potency and drug-like properties. We have taken advantage of the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) parameter as a guide to interpret the effect of structural changes on AR activity. Over the course of optimization efforts the LLE increased over 3 log units leading to a SARM 43 with nanomolar potency, good aqueous kinetic solubility (>700 μM), and high oral bioavailability in rats (83%).

  19. Stamping vital cells - a force-based ligand receptor assay.

    PubMed

    Wienken, Uta; Gaub, Hermann E

    2013-12-17

    Gaining information about receptor profiles on cells, and subsequently finding the most efficient ligands for these signaling receptors, remain challenging tasks in stem cell and cancer research as well as drug development. We introduce a live-cell method with great potential in both screening for surface receptors and analysing binding forces of different ligands. The technique is based on the molecular force assay, a parallel-format, high-throughput experiment on a single-molecule level. On human red blood cells, we demonstrate the detection of the interaction of N-acetyl-α-D-galactosaminyl residues with the lectin helix pomatia agglutinine and of the CD47 receptor with its antibody. The measurements are performed under nearly physiological conditions and still provide a highly specific binding signal. Moreover, with a detailed comparative force analysis on two cell types with different morphology, we show that our method even allows the determination of a DNA force equivalent for the interaction of the CD47 receptor and its antibody. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural basis of ligand recognition in 5-HT3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kesters, Divya; Thompson, Andrew J; Brams, Marijke; van Elk, René; Spurny, Radovan; Geitmann, Matthis; Villalgordo, Jose M; Guskov, Albert; Helena Danielson, U; Lummis, Sarah C R; Smit, August B; Ulens, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The 5-HT3 receptor is a pentameric serotonin-gated ion channel, which mediates rapid excitatory neurotransmission and is the target of a therapeutically important class of anti-emetic drugs, such as granisetron. We report crystal structures of a binding protein engineered to recognize the agonist serotonin and the antagonist granisetron with affinities comparable to the 5-HT3 receptor. In the serotonin-bound structure, we observe hydrophilic interactions with loop E-binding site residues, which might enable transitions to channel opening. In the granisetron-bound structure, we observe a critical cation–π interaction between the indazole moiety of the ligand and a cationic centre in loop D, which is uniquely present in the 5-HT3 receptor. We use a series of chemically tuned granisetron analogues to demonstrate the energetic contribution of this electrostatic interaction to high-affinity ligand binding in the human 5-HT3 receptor. Our study offers the first structural perspective on recognition of serotonin and antagonism by anti-emetics in the 5-HT3 receptor. PMID:23196367

  1. Portraying G Protein-Coupled Receptors with Fluorescent Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamics of ligand–receptor interactions at the surface of living cells represents a fundamental aspect of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) biology; thus, its detailed elucidation constitutes a challenge for modern pharmacology. Interestingly, fluorescent ligands have been developed for a variety of GPCRs in order to monitor ligand–receptor binding in living cells. Accordingly, new methodological strategies derived from noninvasive fluorescence-based approaches, especially fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), have been successfully developed to characterize ligand–receptor interactions. Importantly, these technologies are supplanting more hazardous and expensive radioactive binding assays. In addition, FRET-based tools have also become extremely powerful approaches for visualizing receptor–receptor interactions (i.e., GPCR oligomerization) in living cells. Thus, by means of the synthesis of compatible fluorescent ligands these novel techniques can be implemented to demonstrate the existence of GPCR oligomerization not only in heterologous systems but also in native tissues. Finally, there is no doubt that these methodologies would also be relevant in drug discovery in order to develop new high-throughput screening approaches or to identify new therapeutic targets. Overall, herein, we provide a thorough assessment of all technical and biological aspects, including strengths and weaknesses, of these fluorescence-based methodologies when applied to the study of GPCR biology at the plasma membrane of living cells. PMID:25010291

  2. Peptide ligand recognition by G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    The past few years have seen spectacular progress in the structure determination of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We now have structural representatives from classes A, B, C, and F. Within the rhodopsin-like class A, most structures belong to the α group, whereas fewer GPCR structures are available from the β, γ, and δ groups, which include peptide GPCRs such as the receptors for neurotensin (β group), opioids, chemokines (γ group), and protease-activated receptors (δ group). Structural information on peptide GPCRs is restricted to complexes with non-peptidic drug-like antagonists with the exception of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 that has been crystallized in the presence of a cyclic peptide antagonist. Notably, the neurotensin receptor 1 is to date the only peptide GPCR whose structure has been solved in the presence of a peptide agonist. Although limited in number, the current peptide GPCR structures reveal great diversity in shape and electrostatic properties of the ligand binding pockets, features that play key roles in the discrimination of ligands. Here, we review these aspects of peptide GPCRs in view of possible models for peptide agonist binding. PMID:25852552

  3. 5D-QSAR for spirocyclic sigma1 receptor ligands by Quasar receptor surface modeling.

    PubMed

    Oberdorf, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas J; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2010-07-01

    Based on a contiguous and structurally as well as biologically diverse set of 87 sigma(1) ligands, a 5D-QSAR study was conducted in which a quasi-atomistic receptor surface modeling approach (program package Quasar) was applied. The superposition of the ligands was performed with the tool Pharmacophore Elucidation (MOE-package), which takes all conformations of the ligands into account. This procedure led to four pharmacophoric structural elements with aromatic, hydrophobic, cationic and H-bond acceptor properties. Using the aligned structures a 3D-model of the ligand binding site of the sigma(1) receptor was obtained, whose general features are in good agreement with previous assumptions on the receptor structure, but revealed some novel insights since it represents the receptor surface in more detail. Thus, e.g., our model indicates the presence of an H-bond acceptor moiety in the binding site as counterpart to the ligands' cationic ammonium center, rather than a negatively charged carboxylate group. The presented QSAR model is statistically valid and represents the biological data of all tested compounds, including a test set of 21 ligands not used in the modeling process, with very good to excellent accuracy [q(2) (training set, n=66; leave 1/3 out) = 0.84, p(2) (test set, n=21)=0.64]. Moreover, the binding affinities of 13 further spirocyclic sigma(1) ligands were predicted with reasonable accuracy (mean deviation in pK(i) approximately 0.8). Thus, in addition to novel insights into the requirements for binding of spirocyclic piperidines to the sigma(1) receptor, the presented model can be used successfully in the rational design of new sigma(1) ligands. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Steroid receptors and their ligands: Effects on male gamete functions

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, Saveria; De Amicis, Francesca

    2014-11-01

    In recent years a new picture of human sperm biology is emerging. It is now widely recognized that sperm contain nuclear encoded mRNA, mitochondrial encoded RNA and different transcription factors including steroid receptors, while in the past sperm were considered incapable of transcription and translation. One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. Expression studies on Progesterone Receptor, estrogen receptor, androgen receptor and their specific ligands, demonstrate the presence of these systems in mature spermatozoa as surface but also as nuclear conventional receptors, suggesting that both systemic and local steroid hormones, through sperm receptors, may influence male reproduction. However, the relationship between the signaling events modulated by steroid hormones and sperm fertilization potential as well as the possible involvement of the specific receptors are still controversial issues. The main line of this review highlights the current research in human sperm biology examining new molecular systems of response to the hormones as well as specific regulatory pathways controlling sperm cell fate and biological functions. Most significant studies regarding the identification of steroid receptors are reported and the mechanistic insights relative to signaling pathways, together with the change in sperm metabolism energy influenced by steroid hormones are discussed.The reviewed evidences suggest important effects of Progesterone, Estrogen and Testosterone and their receptors on spermatozoa and implicate the involvement of both systemic and local steroid action in the regulation of male fertility potential. - Highlights: • One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. • Pg/PR co-work to stimulate enzymatic activities to sustain a capacitation process. • E2/ERs regulate sperm motility, capacitation and acrosome reaction and act as survival factors. • Androgens

  5. Competitive and allosteric interactions of 6-chloro-5,10-dihydro-5-[(1-methyl-4-piperidinyl)acetyl]-11H-di benzo[b,e][1, 4]diazepine-11-one hydrochloride (UH-AH 37) at muscarinic receptors, via distinct epitopes.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J; Seidenberg, M

    1999-01-15

    6-Chloro-5,10-dihydro-5-[( 1-methyl-4-piperidinyl)acetyl]-11H-dibenzo[b,e][1,4]diazepine-11one++ + hydrochloride (UH-AH 37) is an analog of pirenzepine that has previously been reported to interact with classical muscarinic antagonists in a competitive manner, yet its binding has also been found to be sensitive to the same epitope as is that of the allosteric ligand gallamine. The present study was carried out with wild-type and chimeric muscarinic receptors to determine whether UH-AH 37 might also have an allosteric mode of action. In assays that detect only allosteric interactions, UH-AH 37 slowed the rate of dissociation of [3H]N-methylscopolamine (NMS) from all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, with the highest apparent affinity at m2. By contrast, studies carried out under equilibrium conditions have found UH-AH 37 to have the lowest affinity for the m2 subtype. Studies with m2/m5 chimeric receptors found the allosteric potency of UH-AH 37 to be sensitive to an epitope in the seventh transmembrane domain (TM). Again, this contrasts with equilibrium studies, wherein an epitope in the sixth TM has been implicated. Simultaneous analysis of the interactions between UH-AH 37 and [3H]NMS at the m2 receptor under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions found that a simple allosteric model could not accommodate both sets of data. On the other hand, the model did accommodate such data for gallamine; gallamine also displays concordance in order-of-potency and epitope sensitivity between equilibrium and non-equilibrium assays. Based on these results, we conclude that UH-AH 37 interacts at the classical muscarinic binding site with high affinity and at a second (allosteric) site with lower affinity.

  6. Structural basis of ligand interaction with atypical chemokine receptor 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Martin; Wang, Liwen; van Gils, Noortje; Stephens, Bryan S.; Zhang, Penglie; Schall, Thomas J.; Yang, Sichun; Abagyan, Ruben; Chance, Mark R.; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines drive cell migration through their interactions with seven-transmembrane (7TM) chemokine receptors on cell surfaces. The atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) binds chemokines CXCL11 and CXCL12 and signals exclusively through β-arrestin-mediated pathways, without activating canonical G-protein signalling. This receptor is upregulated in numerous cancers making it a potential drug target. Here we collected over 100 distinct structural probes from radiolytic footprinting, disulfide trapping, and mutagenesis to map the structures of ACKR3:CXCL12 and ACKR3:small-molecule complexes, including dynamic regions that proved unresolvable by X-ray crystallography in homologous receptors. The data are integrated with molecular modelling to produce complete and cohesive experimentally driven models that confirm and expand on the existing knowledge of the architecture of receptor:chemokine and receptor:small-molecule complexes. Additionally, we detected and characterized ligand-induced conformational changes in the transmembrane and intracellular regions of ACKR3 that elucidate fundamental structural elements of agonism in this atypical receptor.

  7. Structural basis of ligand interaction with atypical chemokine receptor 3

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsson, Martin; Wang, Liwen; van Gils, Noortje; Stephens, Bryan S.; Zhang, Penglie; Schall, Thomas J.; Yang, Sichun; Abagyan, Ruben; Chance, Mark R.; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines drive cell migration through their interactions with seven-transmembrane (7TM) chemokine receptors on cell surfaces. The atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) binds chemokines CXCL11 and CXCL12 and signals exclusively through β-arrestin-mediated pathways, without activating canonical G-protein signalling. This receptor is upregulated in numerous cancers making it a potential drug target. Here we collected over 100 distinct structural probes from radiolytic footprinting, disulfide trapping, and mutagenesis to map the structures of ACKR3:CXCL12 and ACKR3:small-molecule complexes, including dynamic regions that proved unresolvable by X-ray crystallography in homologous receptors. The data are integrated with molecular modelling to produce complete and cohesive experimentally driven models that confirm and expand on the existing knowledge of the architecture of receptor:chemokine and receptor:small-molecule complexes. Additionally, we detected and characterized ligand-induced conformational changes in the transmembrane and intracellular regions of ACKR3 that elucidate fundamental structural elements of agonism in this atypical receptor. PMID:28098154

  8. Effect-directed assessment of the bioaccumulation potential and chemical nature of Ah receptor agonists in crude and refined oils.

    PubMed

    Vrabie, Cozmina M; Sinnige, Theo L; Murk, Albertinka J; Jonker, Michiel T O

    2012-02-07

    Recent studies have indicated that in addition to narcosis certain chemicals in crude oils and refined petroleum products may induce specific modes of action, such as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonism. The risks these toxic compounds pose to organisms depend on internal exposure levels, as driven by the chemicals' bioaccumulation potential. Information on this potential however is lacking, as the chemicals' identity mostly is unknown. This study showed that AhR agonists bioaccumulate from oil-spiked sediments into aquatic worms and persist in the worms for at least several weeks. Chemical fractionations of eight pure oils into saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes (SARA), followed by effect-directed analyses using in vitro reporter gene assays revealed that the agonists predominantly are aromatic and resin-like chemicals. Some of the compounds were easily metabolized in vitro, while others were resistant to biotransformation. HPLC-assisted hydrophobicity profiling subsequently indicated that the AhR-active chemicals had a high to extremely high bioaccumulation potential, considering their estimated logK(ow) values of 4 to >10. Most of the AhR agonism, however, was assigned to compounds with logK(ow) of 5-8. These compounds were present mainly in the mid to high boiling point fractions of the oils (C(14)-C(32) alkane range), which are usually not being considered (the most) toxic in current risk assessment. The fractionations further revealed considerable oil and fraction-dependent antagonism in pure oils and SARA fractions. The results of this study clearly demonstrate that crude oils and refined petroleum products contain numerous compounds that can activate the AhR and which because of their likely persistence and extremely high bioaccumulation potential could be potential PBT (persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic) or vPvB (very persistent and very bioaccumulative) substance candidates. Many chemicals were identified by GC-MS, but the responsible

  9. Receptor-based 3D QSAR analysis of estrogen receptor ligands - merging the accuracy of receptor-based alignments with the computational efficiency of ligand-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, Wolfgang

    2000-08-01

    One of the major challenges in computational approaches to drug design is the accurate prediction of binding affinity of biomolecules. In the present study several prediction methods for a published set of estrogen receptor ligands are investigated and compared. The binding modes of 30 ligands were determined using the docking program AutoDock and were compared with available X-ray structures of estrogen receptor-ligand complexes. On the basis of the docking results an interaction energy-based model, which uses the information of the whole ligand-receptor complex, was generated. Several parameters were modified in order to analyze their influence onto the correlation between binding affinities and calculated ligand-receptor interaction energies. The highest correlation coefficient ( r 2 = 0.617, q 2 LOO = 0.570) was obtained considering protein flexibility during the interaction energy evaluation. The second prediction method uses a combination of receptor-based and 3D quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D QSAR) methods. The ligand alignment obtained from the docking simulations was taken as basis for a comparative field analysis applying the GRID/GOLPE program. Using the interaction field derived with a water probe and applying the smart region definition (SRD) variable selection, a significant and robust model was obtained ( r 2 = 0.991, q 2 LOO = 0.921). The predictive ability of the established model was further evaluated by using a test set of six additional compounds. The comparison with the generated interaction energy-based model and with a traditional CoMFA model obtained using a ligand-based alignment ( r 2 = 0.951, q 2 LOO = 0.796) indicates that the combination of receptor-based and 3D QSAR methods is able to improve the quality of the underlying model.

  10. Label-free integrative pharmacology on-target of opioid ligands at the opioid receptor family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In vitro pharmacology of ligands is typically assessed using a variety of molecular assays based on predetermined molecular events in living cells. Many ligands including opioid ligands pose the ability to bind more than one receptor, and can also provide distinct operational bias to activate a specific receptor. Generating an integrative overview of the binding and functional selectivity of ligands for a receptor family is a critical but difficult step in drug discovery and development. Here we applied a newly developed label-free integrative pharmacology on-target (iPOT) approach to systematically survey the selectivity of a library of fifty-five opioid ligands against the opioid receptor family. All ligands were interrogated using dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays in both recombinant and native cell lines that express specific opioid receptor(s). The cells were modified with a set of probe molecules to manifest the binding and functional selectivity of ligands. DMR profiles were collected and translated to numerical coordinates that was subject to similarity analysis. A specific set of opioid ligands were then selected for quantitative pharmacology determination. Results Results showed that among fifty-five opioid ligands examined most ligands displayed agonist activity in at least one opioid receptor expressing cell line under different conditions. Further, many ligands exhibited pathway biased agonism. Conclusion We demonstrate that the iPOT effectively sorts the ligands into distinct clusters based on their binding and functional selectivity at the opioid receptor family. PMID:23497702

  11. Analytical determination of receptor-ligand dissociation constants of two populations of receptors from displacement curves.

    PubMed Central

    Almagor, H; Levitzki, A

    1990-01-01

    The determination of receptor-ligand dissociation constants from displacement data has been restricted until recently to the condition of receptor saturation, in which the concentration of receptor is negligible as compared to the displaced ligand and the displacing ligand used. This restriction has lately been removed since an accurate method has been developed for the determination of the dissociation constants for all experimental conditions for a system that includes a single type of binding site. In many cases, however, there are two types of receptor binding sites that exhibit different affinities toward the ligand. The present study provides an analytic solution for the problem of determination of the two dissociation constants as well as the proportion of the two receptor types. The formal derivation of the equations is described, along with analysis of a displacement simulation. The sensitivity of the method to the ratio between the two dissociation constants is also investigated. The application of the method is demonstrated for the analysis of the binding of beta-adrenergic receptors to the agonist isoproterenol as monitored by the displacement of the beta-antagonist 125I-labeled cyanopindolol. PMID:2168549

  12. Feedback, receptor clustering, and receptor restriction to single cells yield large Turing spaces for ligand-receptor-based Turing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurics, Tamás; Menshykau, Denis; Iber, Dagmar

    2014-08-01

    Turing mechanisms can yield a large variety of patterns from noisy, homogenous initial conditions and have been proposed as patterning mechanism for many developmental processes. However, the molecular components that give rise to Turing patterns have remained elusive, and the small size of the parameter space that permits Turing patterns to emerge makes it difficult to explain how Turing patterns could evolve. We have recently shown that Turing patterns can be obtained with a single ligand if the ligand-receptor interaction is taken into account. Here we show that the general properties of ligand-receptor systems result in very large Turing spaces. Thus, the restriction of receptors to single cells, negative feedbacks, regulatory interactions among different ligand-receptor systems, and the clustering of receptors on the cell surface all greatly enlarge the Turing space. We further show that the feedbacks that occur in the FGF10-SHH network that controls lung branching morphogenesis are sufficient to result in large Turing spaces. We conclude that the cellular restriction of receptors provides a mechanism to sufficiently increase the size of the Turing space to make the evolution of Turing patterns likely. Additional feedbacks may then have further enlarged the Turing space. Given their robustness and flexibility, we propose that receptor-ligand-based Turing mechanisms present a general mechanism for patterning in biology.

  13. Characterization of cannabinoid receptor ligands in tissues natively expressing cannabinoid CB2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Pietro; Cascio, Maria-Grazia; King, Angela; Pertwee, Roger G; Ross, Ruth A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although cannabinoid CB2 receptor ligands have been widely characterized in recombinant systems in vitro, little pharmacological characterization has been performed in tissues natively expressing CB2 receptors. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacology of CB2 receptor ligands in tissue natively expressing CB2 receptors (human, rat and mouse spleen) and hCB2-transfected CHO cells. Experimental Approach We tested the ability of well-known cannabinoid CB2 receptor ligands to stimulate or inhibit [35S]GTPγS binding to mouse, rat and human spleen membranes and to hCB2-transfected CHO cell membranes. cAMP assays were also performed in hCB2-CHO cells. Key Results The data presented demonstrate that: (i) CP 55,940, WIN 55,212-2 and JWH 133 behave as CB2 receptor full agonists both in spleen and hCB2-CHO cells, in both [35S]GTPγS and cAMP assays; (ii) JWH 015 behaves as a low-efficacy agonist in spleen as well as in hCB2-CHO cells when tested in the [35S]GTPγS assay, while it displays full agonism when tested in the cAMP assay using hCB2-CHO cells; (iii) (R)-AM 1241 and GW 405833 behave as agonists in the [35S]GTPγS assay using spleen, instead it behaves as a low-efficacy inverse agonist in hCB2-CHO cells; and (iv) SR 144528, AM 630 and JTE 907 behave as CB2 receptor inverse agonists in all the tissues. Conclusion and Implications Our results demonstrate that CB2 receptor ligands can display differential pharmacology when assays are conducted in tissues that natively express CB2 receptors and imply that conclusions from recombinant CB2 receptors should be treated with caution. PMID:23711022

  14. A DNA-Based T Cell Receptor Reveals a Role for Receptor Clustering in Ligand Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Marcus J; Husain, Kabir; Gartner, Zev J; Mayor, Satyajit; Vale, Ronald D

    2017-03-23

    A T cell mounts an immune response by measuring the binding strength of its T cell receptor (TCR) for peptide-loaded MHCs (pMHC) on an antigen-presenting cell. How T cells convert the lifetime of the extracellular TCR-pMHC interaction into an intracellular signal remains unknown. Here, we developed a synthetic signaling system in which the extracellular domains of the TCR and pMHC were replaced with short hybridizing strands of DNA. Remarkably, T cells can discriminate between DNA ligands differing by a single base pair. Single-molecule imaging reveals that signaling is initiated when single ligand-bound receptors are converted into clusters, a time-dependent process requiring ligands with longer bound times. A computation model reveals that receptor clustering serves a kinetic proofreading function, enabling ligands with longer bound times to have disproportionally greater signaling outputs. These results suggest that spatial reorganization of receptors plays an important role in ligand discrimination in T cell signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lighting up G protein-coupled purinergic receptors with engineered fluorescent ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ciruela, Francisco; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of G protein-coupled receptors fluorescent ligands is undergoing continuous expansion. In line with this, fluorescent agonists and antagonists of high affinity for G protein-coupled adenosine and P2Y receptors have been shown to be useful pharmacological probe compounds. Fluorescent ligands for A1R, A2AR, and A3R (adenosine receptors) and P2Y2R, P2Y4R, P2Y6R, and P2Y14R (nucleotide receptors) have been reported. Such ligands have been successfully applied to drug discovery and to GPCR characterization by flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and scanning confocal microscopy. Here we summarize recently reported and readily available representative fluorescent ligands of purinergic receptors. In addition, we pay special attention on the use of this family of fluorescent ligands revealing two main aspects of purinergic receptor biology, namely ligand binding and receptor oligomerization. PMID:25890205

  16. NKG2D receptor and its ligands in host defense

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Lewis L.

    2015-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ T cells, and subsets of CD4+ T cells, iNKT cells, and γδ T cells. In humans NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least 8 genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and post-translation. In general healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyper-proliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone “stress”. Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26041808

  17. NKG2D Receptor and Its Ligands in Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-06-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8(+) T cells, and subsets of CD4(+) T cells, invariant NKT cells (iNKT), and γδ T cells. In humans, NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit, and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least eight genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and posttranslation. In general, healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyperproliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves as a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone "stress." Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system, and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

  18. Multiresolution imaging of in-vivo ligand-receptor interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevenaz, Philippe; Millet, Philippe

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study is to obtain voxel-by-voxel images of binding parameters between [11C]-flumazenil and benzodiazepine receptors using positron emission tomography (PET). We estimate five local parameters (k1, k2, B'max, kon/VR, koff) by fitting a three- compartment ligand-receptor model for each voxel of a PET time series. It proves difficult to fit the ligand-receptor model to the data. We trade noise and spatial resolution to get better results. Our strategy is based on the use of a multiresolution pyramid. It is much easier to solve the problem at coarse resolution because there are fewer data to process. To increase resolution, we expand the parameter maps to the next finer level and use them as initial solution to further optimization, which then proceeds at a fast pace and is more likely to escape false local minima. For this approach to work optimally, the residue between data at a given pyramid level and data at the next level must be as small as possible. We satisfy this constraint by working with spline-based least- squares pyramids. To achieve speed, the optimizer must be efficient, particularly when it is nearing the solution. To that effect, we have developed a Marquardt-Levenberg algorithm that exhibits superlinear convergence properties.

  19. Amino Acid Substitutions That Affect Receptor Binding and Stability of the Hemagglutinin of Influenza A/H7N9 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Schrauwen, Eefje J. A.; Burke, David F.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Herfst, Sander; Fouchier, Ron A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-binding preference and stability of hemagglutinin have been implicated as crucial determinants of airborne transmission of influenza viruses. Here, amino acid substitutions previously identified to affect these traits were tested in the context of an A/H7N9 virus. Some combinations of substitutions, most notably G219S and K58I, resulted in relatively high affinity for α2,6-linked sialic acid receptor and acid and temperature stability. Thus, the hemagglutinin of the A/H7N9 virus may adopt traits associated with airborne transmission. PMID:26792744

  20. Styrene Trimer May Increase Thyroid Hormone Levels via Down-Regulation of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) Target Gene UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Yanagiba, Yukie; Ito, Yuki; Yamanoshita, Osamu; Zhang, Shu-Yun; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Li, Chun Mei; Inotsume, Yuko; Kamijima, Michihiro; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Nakajima, Tamie

    2008-01-01

    Background Styrene trimers (STs) are polystyrene-container–eluted materials that are sometimes detected in packaged foods. Although the possible endocrine-disrupting effects of STs, such as estrogenic activities, have been reported, their potential thyroid toxicity, such as that caused by the related endocrine disruptor 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), has not been studied in detail. Objective Using wild-type and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr)–null mice, we investigated whether 2,4,6-triphenyl-1-hexene (ST-1), an isomer of STs, influences thyroxin (T4) levels in the same manner as TCDD, which induces UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) via the AhR, resulting in a decrease in T4 levels in the plasma of mice. Methods Both wild-type and Ahr-null mice (five mice per group) were treated for 4 days by gavage with ST-1 (0, 32, or 64 μmol/kg). Results High-dose (64 μmol/kg) ST-1 decreased the expression of AhR, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1/2, UGT1A1/A6, and CYP2B10 mRNAs and the enzyme activity for CYP1A and UGT1A only in the wild-type mice. This dose decreased AhR DNA binding, but paradoxically increased AhR translocation to the nucleus. In contrast, a high dose of ST-1 increased T4 levels in the plasma in wild-type mice but did not influence T4 levels in AhR-null mice. Conclusions Although ST-1 treatment might cause an increase in AhR levels in the nucleus by inhibiting AhR export, this chemical down-regulated AhR mRNA, thus leading to down-regulation of AhR target genes and an increase in plasma T4 levels. PMID:18560529

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibits effects of aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands on cell death in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ghatrehsamani, Mahdi; Soleimani, Masoud; Esfahani, Behjat A Moayedi; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Hakemi, Mazdak G; Mossahebimohammadi, Majid; Eskandari, Nahid; Adib, Minoo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to diverse outcome in various kinds of cells. AhR activation may induce apoptosis or prevent of apoptosis and cell death. Recent studies suggest that apoptosis effects of AhR can be modulated by inflammatory cytokine like tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In this study, we try to investigate the possible interaction of TNF-α with the 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a ligand of AhR, on peripheral lymphocytes. Materials and Methods: Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from peripheral blood by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation on ficoll. Isolated PBMCs were divided into four groups: Control group, TNF-α administered group, TCDD administered group, co-administered group with TCDD and TNF-α. Cells were maintained for a week in lymphocyte culture condition. Then, TNF-α was added to group 2 and 4. Finally, apoptosis and necrosis were analyzed in all samples using flowcytometry. Result: In group 4, the mean percent of necrosis and apoptosis in TCDD treatment groups was significantly larger than other groups; (P < 0.05). Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the mean percent of cell death in TNF-α administered group and TCDD administered group (P > 0.05). However, the mean percent of cell death in co-administered group with TCDD and TNF-α was significantly lower than other groups; (P < 0.05). Conclusion: TNF-α could significantly inhibit effects of TCDD on lymphocytes apoptosis. Combination effects of TNF-α and TCDD on lymphocyte increase cell survival. PMID:26605245

  2. Highly selective CB(1) cannabinoid receptor ligands and novel CB(1)/VR(1) vanilloid receptor "hybrid" ligands.

    PubMed

    Di Marzo, V; Bisogno, T; De Petrocellis, L; Brandi, I; Jefferson, R G; Winckler, R L; Davis, J B; Dasse, O; Mahadevan, A; Razdan, R K; Martin, B R

    2001-02-23

    Anandamide and the metabolically stabler analogs, (R)-1'-methyl-2'-hydroxy-ethyl-arachidonamide (Met-AEA) and N-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzyl)-arachidonamide (arvanil), are CB(1) cannabinoid and VR(1) vanilloid receptors agonists. We synthesized 1',1'-dimethylheptyl-arvanil (O-1839) and six other AEA analogs obtained by addition of either a hydroxy, cyano, or bromo group on the C-20 atom of 1,1'-dimethylpentyl-Met-AEA (O-1811, O-1812 and O-1860, respectively) or 1,1'-dimethylpentyl-arvanil (O-1856, O-1895 and O-1861, respectively). The compounds were tested for their (i) affinity for CB(1) and CB(2) receptors, (ii) capability to activate VR1 receptors, (iii) inhibitory effect on the anandamide hydrolysis and on the anandamide membrane transporter, and (iv) cannabimimetic activity in the mouse 'tetrad' of in vivo assays. O-1812 is the first ligand ever proven to be highly (500- to 1000-fold) selective for CB(1) vs both VR(1) and CB(2) receptors, while O-1861 is the first true "hybrid" agonist of CB(1)/VR(1) receptors and a compound with potential therapeutic importance. The activities of the seven compounds in vivo did not correlate with their activities at either CB(1) or VR(1) receptors, thus suggesting the existence of other brain sites of action mediating some of their neurobehavioral actions in mice.

  3. Transgenic mouse lines expressing rat AH receptor variants - A new animal model for research on AH receptor function and dioxin toxicity mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjanvirta, Raimo

    2009-04-15

    Han/Wistar (Kuopio; H/W) rats are exceptionally resistant to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) toxicity mainly because of their mutated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene. In H/W rats, altered splicing of the AHR mRNA generates two AHR proteins: deletion (DEL) and insertion (INS) variants, with the INS isoform being predominantly expressed. To gain further insight into their functional properties, cDNAs of these and rat wild-type (rWT) isoform were transferred into C57BL/6J-derived mice by microinjection. The endogenous mouse AHR was eliminated by selective crossing with Ahr-null mice. A single mouse line was obtained for each of the three constructs. The AHR mRNA levels in tissues were generally close to those of C57BL/6 mice in INS and DEL mice and somewhat higher in rWT mice; in testis, however, all 3 constructs exhibited marked overexpression. The transgenic mouse lines were phenotypically normal except for increased testis weight. Induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes by TCDD occurred similarly to that in C57BL/6 mice, but there tended to be a correlation with AHR concentrations, especially in testis. In contrast to C57BL/6 mice, the transgenics did not display any major gender difference in susceptibility to the acute lethality and hepatotoxicity of TCDD; rWT mice were highly sensitive, DEL mice moderately resistant and INS mice highly resistant. Co-expression of mouse AHR and rWT resulted in augmented sensitivity to TCDD and abolished the natural resistance of female C57BL/6 mice, whereas mice co-expressing mouse AHR and INS were resistant. Thus, these transgenic mouse lines provide a novel promising tool for molecular studies on dioxin toxicity and AHR function.

  4. Identifying ligand-specific signalling within biased responses: focus on δ opioid receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Charfi, I; Audet, N; Bagheri Tudashki, H; Pineyro, G

    2015-01-01

    Opioids activate GPCRs to produce powerful analgesic actions but at the same time induce side effects and generate tolerance, which restrict their clinical use. Reducing this undesired response profile has remained a major goal of opioid research and the notion of ‘biased agonism’ is raising increasing interest as a means of separating therapeutic responses from unwanted side effects. However, to fully exploit this opportunity, it is necessary to confidently identify biased signals and evaluate which type of bias may support analgesia and which may lead to undesired effects. The development of new computational tools has made it possible to quantify ligand-dependent signalling and discriminate this component from confounders that may also yield biased responses. Here, we analyse different approaches to identify and quantify ligand-dependent bias and review different types of confounders. Focus is on δ opioid receptor ligands, which are currently viewed as promising agents for chronic pain management. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24665881

  5. Regulation of phagocytosis by TAM receptors and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qingxian; Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingjun

    2010-01-01

    The TAM family of receptors is preferentially expressed by professional and non-professional phagocytes, including macrophages, dendritic cells and natural killer cells in the immune system, osteoclasts in bone, Sertoli cells in testis, and retinal pigmental epithelium cells in the retina. Mutations in the Mertk single gene or in different combinations of the double or triple gene mutations in the same cell cause complete or partial impairment in phagocytosis of their preys; and as a result, either the normal apoptotic cells cannot be efficiently removed or the tissue neighbor cells die by apoptosis. This scenario of TAM regulation represents a widely adapted model system used by phagocytes in all different tissues. The present review will summarize current known functional roles of TAM receptors and their ligands, Gas 6 and protein S, in the regulation of phagocytosis. PMID:21057587

  6. [Endomorphins--endogenous ligands of the mu-opioid receptor].

    PubMed

    Perlikowska, Renata; Fichna, Jakub; Janecka, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Two endogenous opioid peptides with extremely high mu-opioid receptor affinity and selectivity, endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2, were: discovered and isolated from the mammalian brain in 1997. Endomorphins are amidated tetrapeptides, structurally different from so called typical opioids: enkephalins, dynorphins and endorphins. A protein precursor of endomorphins and a gene encoding their sequence remain unknown. Endomorphins are unable to cross the blood-brain barrier because of their low hydrophobicity. In animal models, these peptides turned out to be very potent in relieving neuropathic and inflammatory pain. In comparison with morphine, a prototype opioid receptor ligand, endomorphins produces less undesired side effects. In this article we describe the discovery of endomorphins, their cellular localization and functions in the organism, as well as their structure-activity relationships and biodegradation pathways.

  7. Probing an artificial polypeptide receptor library using a series of novel histamine H3 receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Bak, Andrzej; Daszykowski, Michal; Kaminski, Zbigniew; Kiec-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Kuder, Kamil; Fraczyk, Justyna; Kolesinska, Beata; Ciosek, Patrycja; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2014-02-01

    An artificial polypeptide receptor (APR) library was created by using the self-organization of N-lipidated peptides attached to cellulose via m-aminophenylamino-1,3,5-triazine. The response of the library was probed using a series of novel H3 receptor ligands. Since no guidelines on how to design an APRs selective vs certain receptor types exist, a diverse set of amino acids (Ala, Trp, Pro, Glu, His, Lys and Ser) were used and coupled with one of three gating fatty acids (palmitic, ricinoleic or capric). A competitive adsorption-desorption of an appropriate reporter dye was used for the indirect visualization of the interactions of guests with particular receptors. The resulted library response to individual inhibitors was then arranged in a matrix, preprocessed and analyzed using the principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) method. The most important conclusion obtained from the PCA analysis is that the library differentiates the probed compounds according to the lipophilicity of the gating unit. The PC3 with a dominant absolute contribution of the receptors containing Glu allowed for the best separation of the ligands with respect to their activity. This conclusion is in agreement with the fact that Glu 206 is a genuine ligand counterpart in the natural histamine receptor.

  8. Beta-arrestin-biased ligands at seven-transmembrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2007-08-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs), the most common molecular targets of modern drug therapy, are critically regulated by beta-arrestins, which both inhibit classic G-protein signaling and initiate distinct beta-arrestin signaling. The interplay of G-protein and beta-arrestin signals largely determines the cellular consequences of 7TMR-targeted drugs. Until recently, a drug's efficacy for beta-arrestin recruitment was believed to be proportional to its efficacy for G-protein activities. This paradigm restricts 7TMR drug effects to a linear spectrum of responses, ranging from inhibition of all responses to stimulation of all responses. However, it is now clear that 'biased ligands' can selectively activate G-protein or beta-arrestin functions and thus elicit novel biological effects from even well-studied 7TMRs. Here, we discuss the current state of beta-arrestin-biased ligand research and the prospects for beta-arrestin bias as a therapeutic target. Consideration of ligand bias might have profound influences on the way scientists approach 7TMR-targeted drug discovery.

  9. Ligand selectivity of estrogen receptors by a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guodong; Wang, Jihua

    2014-03-03

    Estrogen receptors α (ERα) and β (ERβ) have different physiological functions and expression levels in different tissues. ERα and ERβ are highly homologous and have only two residue substitutions in the binding pocket. This high similarity at the active site stimulates the interests for discovering subtype selective ligands. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) method have been carried out to analyze the basis of selectivity of three ligands (659, 818 and 041). The calculated binding free energies show that all the ligands bind more tightly to ERβ than to ERα. The dominant free energy components of selectivity for 659 are similar to that for 041, but different from that for 818. The decompositions of free energy contributions and structural analysis imply that there are eight residues primarily contributing to the selectivity for 659, five residues for 041, as well as two residues for 818. The structural analysis implies that two residue substitutions in binding packet cause the position of 659 in ERβ-659 complex to shift relative to that in ERα-659 complex and also cause the conformational changes of other residues in the binding pocket. The higher selectivity for 041 is mainly caused by three residues, Ile373 (Met421), His475 (His524) and Leu476 (Leu525). Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. MIPs are ancestral ligands for the sex peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Joon; Bartalska, Katarina; Audsley, Neil; Yamanaka, Naoki; Yapici, Nilay; Lee, Ju-Youn; Kim, Yong-Chul; Markovic, Milica; Isaac, Elwyn; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Dickson, Barry J

    2010-04-06

    Upon mating, females of many animal species undergo dramatic changes in their behavior. In Drosophila melanogaster, postmating behaviors are triggered by sex peptide (SP), which is produced in the male seminal fluid and transferred to female during copulation. SP modulates female behaviors via sex peptide receptor (SPR) located in a small subset of internal sensory neurons that innervate the female uterus and project to the CNS. Although required for postmating responses only in these female sensory neurons, SPR is expressed broadly in the CNS of both sexes. Moreover, SPR is also encoded in the genomes of insects that lack obvious SP orthologs. These observations suggest that SPR may have additional ligands and functions. Here, we identify myoinhibitory peptides (MIPs) as a second family of SPR ligands that is conserved across a wide range of invertebrate species. MIPs are potent agonists for Drosophila, Aedes, and Aplysia SPRs in vitro, yet are unable to trigger postmating responses in vivo. In contrast to SP, MIPs are not produced in male reproductive organs, and are not required for postmating behaviors in Drosophila females. We conclude that MIPs are evolutionarily conserved ligands for SPR, which are likely to mediate functions other than the regulation of female reproductive behaviors.

  11. Oxidative Stress Promotes Ligand-independent and Enhanced Ligand-dependent Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Ozsoy, Hatice Z.; Sivasubramanian, Natarajan; Wieder, Eric D.; Pedersen, Steen; Mann, Douglas L.

    2008-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 (TNFR1, p55) and 2 (TNFR2, p75) are characterized by several cysteine-rich modules in the extracellular domain, raising the possibility that redox-induced modifications of these cysteine residues might alter TNFR function. To test this possibility, we examined fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in 293T cells transfected with CFP- and YFP-tagged TNFRs exposed to the thiol oxidant diamide. Treatment with high concentrations of diamide (1 mm) resulted in an increase in the FRET signal that was sensitive to inhibition with the reducing agent dithiothreitol, suggesting that oxidative stress resulted in TNFR self-association. Treatment of cells with low concentrations of diamide (1 μm) that was not sufficient to provoke TNFR self-association resulted in increased TNF-induced FRET signals relative to the untreated cells, suggesting that oxidative stress enhanced ligand-dependent TNFR signaling. Similar findings were obtained when the TNFR1- and TNFR2-transfected cells were pretreated with a cell-impermeable oxidase, DsbA, that catalyzes disulfide bond formation between thiol groups on cysteine residues. The changes in TNFR self-association were functionally significant, because pretreating the HeLa cells and 293T cells resulted in increased TNF-induced NF-κB activation and TNF-induced expression of IκB and syndecan-4 mRNA levels. Although pretreatment with DsbA did not result in an increase in TNF binding to TNFRs, it resulted in increased TNF-induced activation of NF-κB, consistent with an allosteric modification of the TNFRs. Taken together, these results suggest that oxidative stress promotes TNFR receptor self-interaction and ligand-independent and enhanced ligand-dependent TNF signaling. PMID:18544535

  12. Molecular modeling studies demonstrate key mutations that could affect the ligand recognition by influenza AH1N1 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Salinas, Gema L; García-Machorro, J; Quiliano, Miguel; Zimic, Mirko; Briz, Verónica; Rojas-Hernández, Saul; Correa-Basurto, J

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this study was to identify neuraminidase (NA) residue mutants from human influenza AH1N1 using sequences from 1918 to 2012. Multiple alignment studies of complete NA sequences (5732) were performed. Subsequently, the crystallographic structure of the 1918 influenza (PDB ID: 3BEQ-A) was used as a wild-type structure and three-dimensional (3-D) template for homology modeling of the mutated selected NA sequences. The 3-D mutated NAs were refined using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (50 ns). The refined 3-D models were used to perform docking studies using oseltamivir. Multiple sequence alignment studies showed seven representative mutations (A232V, K262R, V263I, T264V, S367L, S369N, and S369K). MD simulations applied to 3-D NAs showed that each NA had different active-site shapes according to structural surface visualization and docking results. Moreover, Cartesian principal component analyses (cPCA) show structural differences among these NA structures caused by mutations. These theoretical results suggest that the selected mutations that are located outside of the active site of NA could affect oseltamivir recognition and could be associated with resistance to oseltamivir.

  13. Molecular Basis of Ligand Dissociation in β-Adrenergic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    González, Angel; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Pardo, Leonardo; Deupi, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    The important and diverse biological functions of β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) have promoted the search for compounds to stimulate or inhibit their activity. In this regard, unraveling the molecular basis of ligand binding/unbinding events is essential to understand the pharmacological properties of these G protein-coupled receptors. In this study, we use the steered molecular dynamics simulation method to describe, in atomic detail, the unbinding process of two inverse agonists, which have been recently co-crystallized with β1 and β2ARs subtypes, along four different channels. Our results indicate that this type of compounds likely accesses the orthosteric binding site of βARs from the extracellular water environment. Importantly, reconstruction of forces and energies from the simulations of the dissociation process suggests, for the first time, the presence of secondary binding sites located in the extracellular loops 2 and 3 and transmembrane helix 7, where ligands are transiently retained by electrostatic and Van der Waals interactions. Comparison of the residues that form these new transient allosteric binding sites in both βARs subtypes reveals the importance of non-conserved electrostatic interactions as well as conserved aromatic contacts in the early steps of the binding process. PMID:21915263

  14. Ligand and structure-based methodologies for the prediction of the activity of G protein-coupled receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzi, Stefano; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate in silico models for the quantitative prediction of the activity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands would greatly facilitate the process of drug discovery and development. Several methodologies have been developed based on the properties of the ligands, the direct study of the receptor-ligand interactions, or a combination of both approaches. Ligand-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) techniques, not requiring knowledge of the receptor structure, have been historically the first to be applied to the prediction of the activity of GPCR ligands. They are generally endowed with robustness and good ranking ability; however they are highly dependent on training sets. Structure-based techniques generally do not provide the level of accuracy necessary to yield meaningful rankings when applied to GPCR homology models. However, they are essentially independent from training sets and have a sufficient level of accuracy to allow an effective discrimination between binders and nonbinders, thus qualifying as viable lead discovery tools. The combination of ligand and structure-based methodologies in the form of receptor-based 3D-QSAR and ligand and structure-based consensus models results in robust and accurate quantitative predictions. The contribution of the structure-based component to these combined approaches is expected to become more substantial and effective in the future, as more sophisticated scoring functions are developed and more detailed structural information on GPCRs is gathered.

  15. Ligand and Structure-based Methodologies for the Prediction of the Activity of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Costanzi, Stefano; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Accurate in silico models for the quantitative prediction of the activity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands would greatly facilitate the process of drug discovery and development. Several methodologies have been developed based on the properties of the ligands, the direct study of the receptor-ligand interactions, or a combination of both approaches. Ligand-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) techniques, not requiring knowledge of the receptor structure, have been historically the first to be applied to the prediction of the activity of GPCR ligands. They are generally endowed with robustness and good ranking ability; however they are highly dependent on training sets. Structure-based techniques generally do not provide the level of accuracy necessary to yield meaningful rankings when applied to GPCR homology models. However, they are essentially independent from training sets and have a sufficient level of accuracy to allow an effective discrimination between binders and nonbinders, thus qualifying as viable lead discovery tools. The combination of ligand and structure-based methodologies in the form of receptor-based 3D-QSAR and ligand and structure-based consensus models results in robust and accurate quantitative predictions. The contribution of the structure-based component to these combined approaches is expected to become more substantial and effective in the future, as more sophisticated scoring functions are developed and more detailed structural information on GPCRs is gathered. PMID:18483766

  16. Ligand-Stabilized Conformational States of Human β2 Adrenergic Receptor: Insight into G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Hall, Spencer E.; Li, Hubert; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2008-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to exist in dynamic equilibrium between inactive- and several active-state conformations, even in the absence of a ligand. Recent experimental studies on the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) indicate that structurally different ligands with varying efficacies trigger distinct conformational changes and stabilize different receptor conformations. We have developed a computational method to study the ligand-induced rotational orientation changes in the transmembrane helices of GPCRs. This method involves a systematic spanning of the rotational orientation of the transmembrane helices (TMs) that are in the vicinity of the ligand for predicting the helical rotations that occur on ligand binding. The predicted ligand-stabilized receptor conformations are characterized by a simultaneous lowering of the ligand binding energy and a significant gain in interhelical and receptor-ligand hydrogen bonds. Using the β2AR as a model, we show that the receptor conformational state depends on the structure and efficacy of the ligand for a given signaling pathway. We have studied the ligand-stabilized receptor conformations of five different ligands, a full agonist, norepinephrine; a partial agonist, salbutamol; a weak partial agonist, dopamine; a very weak agonist, catechol; and an inverse agonist, ICI-115881. The predicted ligand-stabilized receptor models correlate well with the experimentally observed conformational switches in β2AR, namely, the breaking of the ionic lock between R1313.50 at the intracellular end of TM3 (part of the DRY motif) and E2686.30 on TM6, and the rotamer toggle switch on W2866.48 on TM6. In agreement with trp-bimane quenching experiments, we found that norepinephrine and dopamine break the ionic lock and engage the rotamer toggle switch, whereas salbutamol, a noncatechol partial agonist only breaks the ionic lock, and the weak agonist catechol only engages the rotamer toggle switch. Norepinephrine and

  17. Fcγ receptors and ligands and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Tanigaki, Keiji; Sundgren, Nathan; Khera, Amit; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W

    2015-01-16

    Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) classically modulate intracellular signaling on binding of the Fc region of IgG in immune response cells. How FcγR and their ligands affect cardiovascular health and disease has been interrogated recently in both preclinical and clinical studies. The stimulation of activating FcγR in endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and monocytes/macrophages causes a variety of cellular responses that may contribute to vascular disease pathogenesis. Stimulation of the lone inhibitory FγcR, FcγRIIB, also has adverse consequences in endothelial cells, antagonizing NO production and reparative mechanisms. In preclinical disease models, activating FcγRs promote atherosclerosis, whereas FcγRIIB is protective, and activating FcγRs also enhance thrombotic and nonthrombotic vascular occlusion. The FcγR ligand C-reactive protein (CRP) has undergone intense study. Although in rodents CRP does not affect atherosclerosis, it causes hypertension and insulin resistance and worsens myocardial infarction. Massive data have accumulated indicating an association between increases in circulating CRP and coronary heart disease in humans. However, Mendelian randomization studies reveal that CRP is not likely a disease mediator. CRP genetics and hypertension warrant further investigation. To date, studies of genetic variants of activating FcγRs are insufficient to implicate the receptors in coronary heart disease pathogenesis in humans. However, a link between FcγRIIB and human hypertension may be emerging. Further knowledge of the vascular biology of FcγR and their ligands will potentially enhance our understanding of cardiovascular disorders, particularly in patients whose greater predisposition for disease is not explained by traditional risk factors, such as individuals with autoimmune disorders.

  18. Ligands and receptors: common theme in insect storage protein transport.

    PubMed

    Burmester, T; Scheller, K

    1999-10-01

    The passage of macromolecules through biological membranes is an essential process for all multicellular organisms. Insects have developed a mechanism different from that known for all other eukaryotes investigated so far. This review discusses the function and evolution of this mechanism. Insect pupae do not feed during metamorphosis. Therefore they depend on material that has been accumulated during the larval life. At the end of this period, shortly before pupariation, a rise in titer of ecdysteroid hormones induces the incorporation of a large fraction of storage proteins (hexamerins) from the body fluid into the fat body cells. The transport of hexamerins across the cell-membrane is mediated by a specific ecdysteroid-controlled receptor. It is synthesized as a precursor protein that is subsequently processed into the active receptor. This receptor protein is very unusual because it is closely related to its own hexamerin ligand. Sequence comparison shows that the hexamerins and hexamerin receptors diverged early in insect evolution and derive from a common hemocyanin ancestor.

  19. Ligands and Receptors: Common Theme in Insect Storage Protein Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmester, T.; Scheller, K.

    The passage of macromolecules through biological membranes is an essential process for all multicellular organisms. Insects have developed a mechanism different from that known for all other eukaryotes investigated so far. This review discusses the function and evolution of this mechanism. Insect pupae do not feed during metamorphosis. Therefore they depend on material that has been accumulated during the larval life. At the end of this period, shortly before pupariation, a rise in titer of ecdysteroid hormones induces the incorporation of a large fraction of storage proteins (hexamerins) from the body fluid into the fat body cells. The transport of hexamerins across the cell-membrane is mediated by a specific ecdysteroid-controlled receptor. It is synthesized as a precursor protein that is subsequently processed into the active receptor. This receptor protein is very unusual because it is closely related to its own hexamerin ligand. Sequence comparison shows that the hexamerins and hexamerin receptors diverged early in insect evolution and derive from a common hemocyanin ancestor.

  20. Highly Pathogenic Influenza A(H5Nx) Viruses with Altered H5 Receptor-Binding Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongbo; de Vries, Erik; McBride, Ryan; Dekkers, Jojanneke; Peng, Wenjie; Bouwman, Kim M.; Nycholat, Corwin; Verheije, M. Helene; Paulson, James C.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Emergence and intercontinental spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5Nx) virus clade 2.3.4.4 is unprecedented. H5N8 and H5N2 viruses have caused major economic losses in the poultry industry in Europe and North America, and lethal human infections with H5N6 virus have occurred in Asia. Knowledge of the evolution of receptor-binding specificity of these viruses, which might affect host range, is urgently needed. We report that emergence of these viruses is accompanied by a change in receptor-binding specificity. In contrast to ancestral clade 2.3.4 H5 proteins, novel clade 2.3.4.4 H5 proteins bind to fucosylated sialosides because of substitutions K222Q and S227R, which are unique for highly pathogenic influenza virus H5 proteins. North American clade 2.3.4.4 virus isolates have retained only the K222Q substitution but still bind fucosylated sialosides. Altered receptor-binding specificity of virus clade 2.3.4.4 H5 proteins might have contributed to emergence and spread of H5Nx viruses. PMID:27869615

  1. Biased ligands at G-protein-coupled receptors: promise and progress.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Crombie, Aimee L; Soergel, David G; Lark, Michael W

    2014-07-01

    Drug discovery targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is no longer limited to seeking agonists or antagonists to stimulate or block cellular responses associated with a particular receptor. GPCRs are now known to support a diversity of pharmacological profiles, a concept broadly referred to as functional selectivity. In particular, the concept of ligand bias, whereby a ligand stabilizes subsets of receptor conformations to engender novel pharmacological profiles, has recently gained increasing prominence. This review discusses how biased ligands may deliver safer, better tolerated, and more efficacious drugs, and highlights several biased ligands that are in clinical development. Biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and the μ opioid receptor illustrate the translation of the biased ligand concept from basic biology to clinical drug development.

  2. Ligand Binding Mechanism in Steroid Receptors: From Conserved Plasticity to Differential Evolutionary Constraints.

    PubMed

    Edman, Karl; Hosseini, Ali; Bjursell, Magnus K; Aagaard, Anna; Wissler, Lisa; Gunnarsson, Anders; Kaminski, Tim; Köhler, Christian; Bäckström, Stefan; Jensen, Tina J; Cavallin, Anders; Karlsson, Ulla; Nilsson, Ewa; Lecina, Daniel; Takahashi, Ryoji; Grebner, Christoph; Geschwindner, Stefan; Lepistö, Matti; Hogner, Anders C; Guallar, Victor

    2015-12-01

    Steroid receptor drugs have been available for more than half a century, but details of the ligand binding mechanism have remained elusive. We solved X-ray structures of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors to identify a conserved plasticity at the helix 6-7 region that extends the ligand binding pocket toward the receptor surface. Since none of the endogenous ligands exploit this region, we hypothesized that it constitutes an integral part of the binding event. Extensive all-atom unbiased ligand exit and entrance simulations corroborate a ligand binding pathway that gives the observed structural plasticity a key functional role. Kinetic measurements reveal that the receptor residence time correlates with structural rearrangements observed in both structures and simulations. Ultimately, our findings reveal why nature has conserved the capacity to open up this region, and highlight how differences in the details of the ligand entry process result in differential evolutionary constraints across the steroid receptors.

  3. Molecular design based on receptor-independent pharmacophore: application to estrogen receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Ataul; Nagar, Shuchi; Das, Suvadra; Mukherjee, Arup; Saha, Achintya

    2008-07-01

    Estrogens, a group of steroid hormones, act primarily by regulating gene expression after binding with estrogen receptor (ER), a nuclear ligand-activated transcription factor, translocates to the nucleus after dimer formation, enhances the gene transcription. Estrogen Receptor Modulators (ERMs) have selective agonist and antagonist effects to different tissues, and the purpose of research on ERMs is to identify new potent and less toxic drug molecules. The present study has been focused on finding the structural requirements of ER ligand, using receptor-independent pharmacophore space modeling studies that can explore 3D structural features and configurations, responsible for the biological activity of structurally diverse compounds. The studies show (R=0.945, RMSD=2.186, Deltacost=677.354) the importance of hydrogen bond acceptors in the aromatic rings and a planner hydrophobic region in the molecular architecture along with critical geometrical distance between features are effectively crucial for binding with ER.

  4. The emerging roles of AhR in physiology and immunity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Whitelaw, Murray L

    2013-09-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is traditionally defined as a transcriptional regulator involved in adaptive xenobiotic response, however, emerging evidence supports physiological functions of AhR in normal cell development and immune response. The role of AhR in immunomodulation is multi-dimensional. On the one hand, activation of AhR by TCDD and other ligands leads to profound immunosuppression, potentially via skewed Th1/Th2 cell balance toward Th1 dominance, and boosted Treg cell differentiation. On the other hand, activation of AhR can also induce Th17 cell polarization and increase the severity of autoimmune disease. In addition to T lymphocytes, the AhR also appears to play a vital role in B cell maturation, and regulates the activity of macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils following lipopolysaccharide challenge or influenza virus infection. In these scenarios, activation of AhR is associated with decreased host response and reduced survival. Furthermore, gene knock out studies suggest that AhR is indispensable for the postnatal maintenance of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and skin-resident dendritic epidermal gamma delta T cells, providing a potential link between AhR and gut immunity and wound healing. It is well accepted that the magnitude and the type of immune response is dependent on the local cytokine milieu and the AhR appears to be one of the key factors involved in the fine turning of this cytokine balance.

  5. Binding of aromatic amines to the rat hepatic Ah receptor in vitro and in vivo and the 8S and 4S estrogen receptor of rat uterus and rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Cikryt, P.; Kaiser, T.; Gottlicher, M. )

    1990-08-01

    Studies on structurally related aromatic amines with different carcinogenic properties have shown that 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) and 2-acetylaminophenanthrene (AAP) inhibit the binding of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin to the Ah receptor in vitro. The apparent inhibitor constants (K{sub i}) are 2.3 {mu}M for 2-AAF and 2.7 {mu}M for AAP. In contrast, 4-acetylaminofluorene, an isomer of 2-AAF, and trans-4-acetylaminostilbene do not bind to the rat hepatic cytosolic Ah receptor. Pretreating female Wistar rats with 2-AAF or AAP leads to the induction of the P-450 isoenzymes that are under the control of the Ah receptor. Ornithine decarboxylase activity is induced by all aromatic amines tested irrespective of their Ah receptor affinity. The aromatic amines used as model compounds do not inhibit the binding of 17-{beta}-estradiol to the 8S and 4S estrogen receptor of rat uterus or rat liver in a competition assay analyzed using sucrose density gradient centrifugation. On the other hand, the aromatic amines bind to varying extents to another estrogen-binding protein of rat liver whose function and identity is still unknown. The study demonstrates that structurally related aromatic amines in their unmetabolized form interact differentially with a cellular target protein, the Ah receptor, in vitro as well as in vivo. However, a relationship between these effects and the postulated promoting properties of 2-AAF remains to be established.

  6. Exploration of Bivalent Ligands Targeting Putative Mu Opioid Receptor and Chemokine Receptor CCR5 Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Arnatt, Christopher K.; Falls, Bethany A.; Yuan, Yunyun; Raborg, Thomas J.; Masvekar, Ruturaj R.; El-Hage, Nazira; Selley, Dana E.; Nicola, Anthony V.; Knapp, Pamela E.; Hauser, Kurt F.; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Modern antiretroviral therapies have provided HIV-1 infected patients longer lifespans and better quality of life. However, several neurological complications are now being seen in these patients due to HIV-1 associated injury of neurons by infected microglia and astrocytes. In addition, these effects can be further exacerbated with opiate use and abuse. One possible mechanism for such potentiation effects of opiates is the interaction of the mu opioid receptor (MOR) with the chemokine receptor CCR5 (CCR5), a known HIV-1 co-receptor, to form MOR-CCR5 heterodimer. In an attempt to understand this putative interaction and its relevance to neuroAIDS, we designed and synthesized a series of bivalent ligands targeting the putative CCR5-MOR heterodimer. To understand how these bivalent ligands may interact with the heterodimer, biological studies including calcium mobilization inhibition, binding affinity, HIV-1 invasion, and cell fusion assays were applied. In particular, HIV-1 infection assays using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, macrophages, and astrocytes revealed a notable synergy in activity for one particular bivalent ligand. Further, a molecular model of the putative CCR5-MOR heterodimer was constructed, docked with the bivalent ligand, and molecular dynamics simulations of the complex was performed in a membrane-water system to help understand the biological observation. PMID:27720326

  7. Ah receptor, CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 gene polymorphisms are not involved in the risk of recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Y; Sata, F; Yamada, H; Suzuki, K; Sasaki, S; Kondo, T; Gong, Y Y; Kato, E H; Shimada, S; Morikawa, M; Minakami, H; Kishi, R

    2004-10-01

    The etiology of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) remains unclear, but it may be related to a possible genetic predisposition together with involvement of environmental factors. We examined the relation between RPL and polymorphisms in four genes, human aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1, which are involved in the metabolism of a wide range of environmental toxins and carcinogens. All cases and controls were women resident in Sapporo, Japan and the surrounding area. The Ah receptor, CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 genotypes were assessed in 113 Japanese women with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) and 203 ethnically matched women experiencing at least one live birth and no spontaneous abortion (control). No significant differences in Ah receptor, CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 genotype frequencies were found between the women with RPL and the controls [Ah receptor: Arg/Arg (reference); Arg/Lys and Lys/Lys, odds ratio (OR)=0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.40-1.11, CYP1A1: m1m1 (reference); m1m2 and m2m2, OR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.53-1.40, CYP1A2: C/C and C/A (reference); A/A, OR = 1.16; 95% CI = 0.71-1.88, CYP1B1: Leu/Leu (reference); Leu/Val and Val/Val, OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 0.68-2.02]. The present study suggests that the Ah receptor, CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 gene polymorphisms are not major genetic regulators in RPL.

  8. Functionalized Congener Approach to the Design of Ligands for G Protein–Coupled Receptors (GPCRs)

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Functionalized congeners, in which a chemically functionalized chain is incorporated at an insensitive site on a pharmacophore, have been designed from the agonist and antagonist ligands of various G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). These chain extensions enable a conjugation strategy for detecting and characterizing GPCR structure and function and pharmacological modulation. The focus in many studies of functionalized congeners has been on two families of GPCRs: those responding to extracellular purines and pyrimidines—i.e., adenosine receptors (ARs) and P2Y nucleotide receptors. Functionalized congeners of small-molecule as ligands for other GPCRs and non-G protein coupled receptors have also been designed. For example, among biogenic amine neurotransmitter receptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists and adrenergic receptor ligands have been studied with a functionalized congener approach. Adenosine A1, A2A, and A3 receptor functionalized congeners have yielded macromolecular conjugates, irreversibly binding AR ligands for receptor inactivation and crosslinking, radioactive probes that use prosthetic groups, immobilized ligands for affinity chromatography, and dual-acting ligands that function as binary drugs. Poly(amidoamine) dendrimers have served as nanocarriers for covalently conjugated AR functionalized congeners. Rational methods of ligand design derived from molecular modeling and templates have been included in these studies. Thus, the design of novel ligands, both small molecules and macromolecular conjugates, for studying the chemical and biological properties of GPCRs have been developed with this approach, has provided researchers with a strategy that is more versatile than the classical medicinal chemical approaches. PMID:19405524

  9. Flavonoids as GABAA receptor ligands: the whole story?

    PubMed Central

    Wasowski, Cristina; Marder, Mariel

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are the most widely prescribed class of psychoactive drugs in current therapeutic use, despite the important unwanted side effects that they produce, such as sedation, myorelaxation, ataxia, amnesia, and ethanol and barbiturate potentiation and tolerance. They exert their therapeutic effects via binding to the benzodiazepine binding site of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors, and allosterically modulating the chloride flux through the ion channel complex. First isolated from plants used as tranquilizers in folkloric medicine, some natural flavonoids have been shown to possess selective affinity for the benzodiazepine binding site with a broad spectrum of central nervous system effects. Since the initial search for alternative benzodiazepine ligands amongst the flavonoids, a list of successful synthetic derivatives has been generated with enhanced activities. This review provides an update on research developments that have established the activity of natural and synthetic flavonoids on GABA type A receptors. Flavonoids are prominent drugs in the treatment of mental disorders, and can also be used as tools to study modulatory sites at GABA type A receptors and to develop GABA type A selective agents further. PMID:27186113

  10. Structure of the homodimeric androgen receptor ligand-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Marta; Prekovic, Stefan; Gallastegui, Nerea; Helsen, Christine; Abella, Montserrat; Zielinska, Karolina; Gay, Marina; Vilaseca, Marta; Taulès, Marta; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; van Royen, Martin E.; Claessens, Frank; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva

    2017-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a crucial role in normal physiology, development and metabolism as well as in the aetiology and treatment of diverse pathologies such as androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS), male infertility and prostate cancer (PCa). Here we show that dimerization of AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is induced by receptor agonists but not by antagonists. The 2.15-Å crystal structure of homodimeric, agonist- and coactivator peptide-bound AR-LBD unveils a 1,000-Å2 large dimerization surface, which harbours over 40 previously unexplained AIS- and PCa-associated point mutations. An AIS mutation in the self-association interface (P767A) disrupts dimer formation in vivo, and has a detrimental effect on the transactivating properties of full-length AR, despite retained hormone-binding capacity. The conservation of essential residues suggests that the unveiled dimerization mechanism might be shared by other nuclear receptors. Our work defines AR-LBD homodimerization as an essential step in the proper functioning of this important transcription factor. PMID:28165461

  11. Non-peptide ligand binding to the formyl peptide receptor FPR2--A comparison to peptide ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Stepniewski, Tomasz M; Filipek, Slawomir

    2015-07-15

    Ligands of the FPR2 receptor initiate many signaling pathways including activation of phospholipase C, protein kinase C, the mitogen-activated protein kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway. The possible actions include also calcium flux, superoxide generation, as well as migration and proliferation of monocytes. FPR2 activation may induce a pro- and anti-inflammatory effect depending on the ligand type. It is also found that this receptor is involved in tumor growth. Most of currently known FPR2 ligands are agonists since they were designed based on N-formyl peptides, which are natural agonists of formyl receptors. Since the non-peptide drugs are indispensable for effective treatment strategies, we performed a docking study of such ligands employing a generated dual template homology model of the FPR2 receptor. The study revealed different binding modes of particular classes of these drugs. Based on the obtained docking poses we proposed a detailed location of three hydrophobic pockets in orthosteric binding site of FPR2. Our model emphasizes the importance of aromatic stacking, especially with regard to residues His102(3.29) and Phe257(6.51), for binding of FPR2 ligands. We also identified other residues important for non-peptide ligand binding in the binding site of FPR2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A structural chemogenomics analysis of aminergic GPCRs: lessons for histamine receptor ligand design.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, A J; Kuhne, S; de Esch, I J P; Leurs, R; de Graaf, C

    2013-09-01

    Chemogenomics focuses on the discovery of new connections between chemical and biological space leading to the discovery of new protein targets and biologically active molecules. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a particularly interesting protein family for chemogenomics studies because there is an overwhelming amount of ligand binding affinity data available. The increasing number of aminergic GPCR crystal structures now for the first time allows the integration of chemogenomics studies with high-resolution structural analyses of GPCR-ligand complexes. In this study, we have combined ligand affinity data, receptor mutagenesis studies, and amino acid sequence analyses to high-resolution structural analyses of (hist)aminergic GPCR-ligand interactions. This integrated structural chemogenomics analysis is used to more accurately describe the molecular and structural determinants of ligand affinity and selectivity in different key binding regions of the crystallized aminergic GPCRs, and histamine receptors in particular. Our investigations highlight interesting correlations and differences between ligand similarity and ligand binding site similarity of different aminergic receptors. Apparent discrepancies can be explained by combining detailed analysis of crystallized or predicted protein-ligand binding modes, receptor mutation studies, and ligand structure-selectivity relationships that identify local differences in essential pharmacophore features in the ligand binding sites of different receptors. We have performed structural chemogenomics studies that identify links between (hist)aminergic receptor ligands and their binding sites and binding modes. This knowledge can be used to identify structure-selectivity relationships that increase our understanding of ligand binding to (hist)aminergic receptors and hence can be used in future GPCR ligand discovery and design. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Residues within the transmembrane domain of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor involved in ligand binding and receptor activation: modelling the ligand-bound receptor.

    PubMed

    Coopman, K; Wallis, R; Robb, G; Brown, A J H; Wilkinson, G F; Timms, D; Willars, G B

    2011-10-01

    The C-terminal regions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) bind to the N terminus of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), facilitating interaction of the ligand N terminus with the receptor transmembrane domain. In contrast, the agonist exendin-4 relies less on the transmembrane domain, and truncated antagonist analogs (e.g. exendin 9-39) may interact solely with the receptor N terminus. Here we used mutagenesis to explore the role of residues highly conserved in the predicted transmembrane helices of mammalian GLP-1Rs and conserved in family B G protein coupled receptors in ligand binding and GLP-1R activation. By iteration using information from the mutagenesis, along with the available crystal structure of the receptor N terminus and a model of the active opsin transmembrane domain, we developed a structural receptor model with GLP-1 bound and used this to better understand consequences of mutations. Mutation at Y152 [transmembrane helix (TM) 1], R190 (TM2), Y235 (TM3), H363 (TM6), and E364 (TM6) produced similar reductions in affinity for GLP-1 and exendin 9-39. In contrast, other mutations either preferentially [K197 (TM2), Q234 (TM3), and W284 (extracellular loop 2)] or solely [D198 (TM2) and R310 (TM5)] reduced GLP-1 affinity. Reduced agonist affinity was always associated with reduced potency. However, reductions in potency exceeded reductions in agonist affinity for K197A, W284A, and R310A, while H363A was uncoupled from cAMP generation, highlighting critical roles of these residues in translating binding to activation. Data show important roles in ligand binding and receptor activation of conserved residues within the transmembrane domain of the GLP-1R. The receptor structural model provides insight into the roles of these residues.

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF VDR ANTAGONISTS AMONG NUCLEAR RECEPTOR LIGANDS USING VIRTUAL SCREENING

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Kelly; Nandhikonda, Premchendar; Bogart, Jonathan W.; Feleke, Belaynesh; Sidhu, Preetpal; Yuan, Nina; Preston, Joshua; Goy, Robin; Han, Lanlan; Silvaggi, Nicholas R; Singh, Rakesh K.; Bikle, Daniel D.; Cook, James M.; Arnold, Leggy A.

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we described the development of two virtual screens to identify new vitamin D receptor (VDR) antagonists among nuclear receptor (NR) ligands. Therefore, a database of 14330 nuclear receptor ligands and their NR affinities was assembled using the online available “Binding Database”. Two different virtual screens were carried out in conjunction with a reported VDR crystal structure applying a stringent and less stringent pharmacophore model to filter docked NR ligand conformations. The pharmacophore models were based on the spatial orientation of the hydroxyl functionalities of VDR’s natural ligands 1,25(OH2)D3 and 25(OH2)D3. The first virtual screen identified 32 NR ligands with a calculate free energy of VDR binding of more than −6.0 kJ/mol. All but nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) are VDR ligands, which inhibited the interaction between VDR and coactivator peptide SRC2-3 with an IC50 value of 15.8 µM. The second screen identified 162 NR ligands with a calculate free energy of VDR binding of more than −6.0 kJ/mol. More than half of these ligands were developed to bind VDR followed by ERα/β ligands (26%), TRα/β ligands (7%) and LxRα/β ligands (7%). The binding between VDR and ERα ligand H6036 as well as TRα/β ligand triiodothyronine and a homoserine analog thereof was confirmed by fluorescence polarization. PMID:25419525

  15. Ligand binding by recombinant domains from insect ecdysone receptors.

    PubMed

    Graham, L D; Johnson, W M; Pawlak-Skrzecz, A; Eaton, R E; Bliese, M; Howell, L; Hannan, G N; Hill, R J

    2007-06-01

    The ligand binding domains (LBDs) from the EcR and USP proteins of four insect pests (Lucilia cuprina, Myzus persicae, Bemisia tabaci, Helicoverpa armigera) were purified as recombinant heterodimers. The K(d) values for [(3)H]-ponasterone A binding by LBD heterodimers that included the hinge regions (i.e., DE/F heterodimers) ranged 0.7-2.5 nM, with K(i) values for ecdysteroid and dibenzoylhydrazine ligands ranging from 0.1 nM to >448 microM. The K(d) and K(i) values for a recombinant H. armigera LBD heterodimer that lacked D-regions (i.e., an E/F heterodimer) were approximately 4 times higher than those for its DE/F counterpart. Rate constants were estimated for the L. cuprina LBD heterodimer. A fluorescein-inokosterone conjugate (K(i)~40 nM) was used to develop a novel binding assay based on fluorescence polarization. This assay, which ranked the affinity of competitor ecdysteroids in the same order as the [(3)H]-ponasterone A binding assay, is well suited to high-throughput screening. Ponasterone A had a higher affinity than muristerone A for the recombinant hemipteran LBD heterodimers, whereas the reverse was true for the recombinant dipteran one. The same preference was observed when these ligands were tested as inducers of ecdysone receptor-controlled gene expression in transfected mammalian cells. The binding data obtained in vitro using recombinant LBD heterodimers reflects the ability of agonists to induce transgene expression in recombinant mammalian cells, and can also reflect their efficacy as larvicides.

  16. Quantifying the rebinding effect in multivalent chemical ligand-receptor systems.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marcus; Bujotzek, Alexander; Haag, Rainer

    2012-08-07

    Multivalent ligand-receptor systems often show an enhancement in binding compared to the constituent monovalent systems. This "cooperativity effect" is often attributed to the favorable spatial preorganisation of the ligands by the connecting spacer that leads to a reduction of entropy loss at ligand binding. A different factor that has been proposed to contribute to the cooperativity effect is "rebinding": As soon as a single ligand-receptor complex dissociates, the presence of another ligand "on coat-tails" will increase the probability of another binding event, which in turn will drive the system to a state where all ligands are bound. In this article, we derive a first quantitative description of the rebinding effect. In order to model the inherent memory effect of a spacer-connected system, we pursue a mathematical approach based on Markov state models and conformation dynamics. The theoretical investigations are illustrated by studying different prototypic ligand-receptor systems.

  17. Novel photoaffinity ligands for the GA-receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Suttle, J.C.; Hultstrand, J.F.; Tanaka, F.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that certain N-substituted phthalimides (NSPs) exhibit GA-like activity in a range of specific bioassays and that bioactive NSPs compete with ({sup 3}H)-GA{sub 4} for soluble binding sites in cucumber homogenates. As such, these compounds may prove useful in the purification and characterization of GA receptor proteins. To this end, five azido-NSPs have been synthesized and are currently being screened for biological activity and photochemical stability. Three azido-NSPs elicit {alpha}-amylase production in barley half-seeds and stimulate tissue elongation in d{sub 5} maize, lettuce, sunflower, and soybean. Further evaluations are in progress and these data as well as the utility of these compounds as photo-affinity ligands will be discussed.

  18. The tryptophan-derived endogenous arylhydrocarbon receptor ligand 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) is a nanomolar UVA-photosensitizer in epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Joshua D.; Cabello, Christopher M.; Qiao, Shuxi; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous UVA-chromophores may act as sensitizers of oxidative stress underlying cutaneous photoaging and photocarcinogenesis, but the molecular identity of non-DNA key chromophores displaying UVA-driven photodyamic activity in human skin remains largely undefined. Here we report that 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ), a tryptophan photoproduct and endogenous high affinity aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist, acts as a nanomolar photosensitizer potentiating UVA-induced oxidative stress irrespective of AhR ligand activity. In human HaCaT and primary epidermal keratinocytes, photodynamic induction of apoptosis was elicited by the combined action of solar simulated UVA and FICZ, whereas exposure to the isolated action of UVA or FICZ did not impair viability. In a human epidermal tissue reconstruct, FICZ/UVA-cotreatment caused pronounced phototoxicity inducing keratinocyte cell death, and FICZ photodynamic activity was also substantiated in a murine skin exposure model. Array analysis revealed pronounced potentiation of cellular heat shock, ER stress, and oxidative stress response gene expression observed only upon FICZ/UVA-cotreatment. FICZ photosensitization caused intracellular oxidative stress, and comet analysis revealed introduction of formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive oxidative DNA lesions suppressible by antioxidant cotreatment. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the endogenous AhR ligand FICZ displays nanomolar photodynamic activity representing a molecular mechanism of UVA-induced photooxidative stress potentially operative in human skin. PMID:25431849

  19. Functional phylogenetics reveals contributions of pleiotropic peptide action to ligand-receptor coevolution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The evolution of peptidergic signaling has been accompanied by a significant degree of ligand-receptor coevolution. Closely related clusters of peptide signaling molecules are observed to activate related groups of receptors, implying that genes encoding these ligands may orchestrate an array of fu...

  20. Autocrine ligand binding to cell receptors. Mathematical analysis of competition by solution "decoys".

    PubMed Central

    Forsten, K E; Lauffenburger, D A

    1992-01-01

    Autocrine ligands have been demonstrated to regulate cell proliferation, cell adhesion, and cell migration in a number of different systems and are believed to be one of the underlying causes of malignant cell transformation. Binding of these ligands to their cellular receptors can be compromised by diffusive transport of ligand away from the secreting cell. Exogenous addition of antibodies or solution receptors capable of competing with cellular receptors for these autocrine ligands has been proposed as a means of inhibiting autocrine-stimulated cell behavioral responses. Such "decoys" complicate cellular binding by offering alternative binding targets, which may also be capable of aiding or abating transport of the ligand away from the cell surface. We present a mathematical model incorporating autocrine ligand production and the presence of competing cellular and solution receptors. We elucidate effects of key system parameters including ligand diffusion rate, binding rate constants, cell density, and secretion rate on the ability of solution receptors to inhibit cellular receptor binding. Both plated and suspension cell systems are considered. An approximate analytical expression relating the key parameters to the critical concentration of solution "decoys" required for inhibition is derived and compared to the numerical calculations. We find that in order to achieve essentially complete inhibition of surface receptor binding, the concentration of decoys may need to be as much as four to eight orders of magnitude greater than the equilibrium disociation constant for ligand binding to surface receptors. PMID:1312367

  1. Imaging of a glioma using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Starosta-Rubinstein, S.; Ciliax, B.J.; Penney, J.B.; McKeever, P.; Young, A.B.

    1987-02-01

    Two types of benzodiazepine receptors have been demonstrated in mammalian tissues, one which is localized on neuronal elements in brain and the other, on glial cells and in peripheral tissues such as kidney. In vivo administration of /sup 3/H-labeled PK 11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide) or (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam with 5 mg of clonazepam per kg to rats with intracranial C6 gliomas resulted in high levels of tritiated-drug binding to the tumor as shown by quantitative autoradiography. Pharmacological studies indicated that the bound drugs labeled the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site. Binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine site was confirmed primarily to malignant cells with little binding to adjacent normal brain tissue or to necrotic tissue. Tumor cell binding was completely inhibited by preadministration of the peripheral benzodiazepine blocking agent PK 11195 at 5 mg/kg. The centrally selective benzodiazepine ligand clonazepam had no effect on PK 11195 binding to the tumor cells. When binding to other tumor cell lines grown in nude mice and nude athymic rats was evaluated, little or no peripheral benzodiazepine binding was detected on human pheochromocytoma (RN1) and neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC, SK-N-SH) tumor cells, respectively. However, high densities of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites were observed on tumors derived from a human glioma cell line (ATCC HTB 14, U-87 MG). The presence of high concentrations of specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors on glial tumors suggests that human primary central nervous system tumors could be imaged and diagnosed using peripheral benzodiazepine ligands labeled with positron- or gamma-emitting isotopes.

  2. Development and validation of a novel protein-ligand fingerprint to mine chemogenomic space: application to G protein-coupled receptors and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Weill, Nathanael; Rognan, Didier

    2009-04-01

    The present study introduces a novel low-dimensionality fingerprint encoding both ligand and target properties which is suitable to mine protein-ligand chemogenomic space. Whereas ligand properties have been represented by standard descriptors, protein cavities are encoded by a fixed length bit string describing pharmacophoric properties of a definite number of binding site residues. In order to simplify the cavity fingerprint, the concept was applied here to a unique family of targets (G protein-coupled receptors) with a homogeneous cavity description. Particular attention was given to set up data sets of really diverse protein-ligand pairs covering as exhaustively as possible both ligand and target spaces. Several machine learning classification algorithms were trained on two sets of roughly 200000 receptor-ligand fingerprints with a different definition of inactive decoys. Cross-validated models show excellent precision (>0.9) in distinguishing true from false pairs with a particular preference for support vector machine classifiers. When applied to two external test sets of GPCR ligands, the most predictive models were not those performing the best in the previous cross-validation. The ability to recover true GPCR ligands (ligand prediction mode) or true GPCRs (receptor prediction mode) depends on multiple parameters: the molecular complexity of the ligands, the chemical space from which ligand decoys are selected to generate false protein-ligand pairs, and the target space under consideration. In most cases, predicting ligands is easier than predicting receptors. Although receptor profiling is possible, it probably requires a more detailed description of the ligand-binding site. Noteworthy, protein-ligand fingerprints outperform the corresponding ligand fingerprints in mining the GPCR-ligand space. Since they can be applied to a much larger number of receptors than ligand-based fingerprints, protein-ligand fingerprints represent a novel and promising way to

  3. Prolonged signaling at the parathyroid hormone receptor by peptide ligands targeted to a specific receptor conformation

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Makoto; Ferrandon, Sebastien; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Potts, John T.; Gardella, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor that plays critical roles in bone and mineral ion metabolism. Ligand binding to the PTHR involves interactions to both the amino-terminal extracellular (N) domain, and transmembrane/extracellular loop, or juxtamembrane (J) regions of the receptor. Recently, we found that PTH(1–34), but not PTH-related protein, PTHrP(1–36), or M-PTH(1–14) (M = Ala/Aib1,Aib3,Gln10,Har11,Ala12,Trp14,Arg19), binds to the PTHR in a largely GTPγS-resistant fashion, suggesting selective binding to a novel, high-affinity conformation (R0), distinct from the GTPγS-sensitive conformation (RG). We examined the effects in vitro and in vivo of introducing the M substitutions, which enhance interaction to the J domain, into PTH analogs extended C-terminally to incorporate residues involved in the N domain interaction. As compared with PTH(1–34), M-PTH(1–28) and M-PTH(1–34) bound to R0 with higher affinity, produced more sustained cAMP responses in cells, formed more stable complexes with the PTHR in FRET and subcellular localization assays, and induced more prolonged calcemic and phosphate responses in mice. Moreover, after 2 weeks of daily injection in mice, M-PTH(1–34) induced larger increases in trabecular bone volume and greater increases in cortical bone turnover, than did PTH(1–34). Thus, the putative R0 PTHR conformation can form highly stable complexes with certain PTH ligand analogs and thereby mediate surprisingly prolonged signaling responses in bone and/or kidney PTH target cells. Controlling, via ligand analog design, the selectivity with which a PTH ligand binds to R0, versus RG, may be a strategy for optimizing signaling duration time, and hence therapeutic efficacy, of PTHR agonist ligands. PMID:18946036

  4. Development of radioiodinated receptor ligands for cerebral single photon emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    In the last decade the use of radiolabeled ligands for the imaging of cerebral receptors by emission computed tomography (ECT) has seen rapid growth. The opportunity to routinely perform cerebral single photon emission tomography (SPET) with iodine-123-labeled ligands depends on the availability of receptor ligands into which iodine can be introduced without decreasing the required high target receptor specificity. The use of iodine-123-labeled receptor-specific ligands also depends on the availability of high purity iodine-123 at reasonable costs and the necessary imaging instrumentation. In this paper, the development and current stage of evaluation of various iodine-123-labeled ligands for SPET imaging of dopaminergic, serotonergic and muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor classes are discussed.

  5. Development of radioiodinated receptor ligands for cerebral single photon emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.

    1992-03-01

    In the last decade the use of radiolabeled ligands for the imaging of cerebral receptors by emission computed tomography (ECT) has seen rapid growth. The opportunity to routinely perform cerebral single photon emission tomography (SPET) with iodine-123-labeled ligands depends on the availability of receptor ligands into which iodine can be introduced without decreasing the required high target receptor specificity. The use of iodine-123-labeled receptor-specific ligands also depends on the availability of high purity iodine-123 at reasonable costs and the necessary imaging instrumentation. In this paper, the development and current stage of evaluation of various iodine-123-labeled ligands for SPET imaging of dopaminergic, serotonergic and muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor classes are discussed.

  6. From α4β2 Nicotinic Ligands to the Discovery of σ1 Receptor Ligands: Pharmacophore Analysis and Rational Design.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Han-Kun; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2012-12-13

    Comparative analyses of the pharmacophoric elements required for σ1 and nicotinic ligands led to the identification of a potent and selective σ1 ligand (15). Compound 15 displayed high selectivity for the σ1 receptor (Ki, σ1 = 4.1 nM, Ki, σ2 = 1312 nM) with moderate binding affinity for the DAT (Ki = 373 nM) and NET (Ki = 203 nM) in the PDSP broad screening panel of common CNS neurotransmitter transporters and receptors. The key finding in this present work is that a subtle structural modifica tion could be used as a tool to switch a ligand's selectivity between nAChRs and sigma receptors.

  7. Ligand Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Growth in Plants.

    PubMed

    Haruta, Miyoshi; Sussman, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Growth and development of multicellular organisms are coordinately regulated by various signaling pathways involving the communication of inter- and intracellular components. To form the appropriate body patterns, cellular growth and development are modulated by either stimulating or inhibiting these pathways. Hormones and second messengers help to mediate the initiation and/or interaction of the various signaling pathways in all complex multicellular eukaryotes. In plants, hormones include small organic molecules, as well as larger peptides and small proteins, which, as in animals, act as ligands and interact with receptor proteins to trigger rapid biochemical changes and induce the intracellular transcriptional and long-term physiological responses. During the past two decades, the availability of genetic and genomic resources in the model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, has greatly helped in the discovery of plant hormone receptors and the components of signal transduction pathways and mechanisms used by these immobile but highly complex organisms. Recently, it has been shown that two of the most important plant hormones, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA), act through signaling pathways that have not yet been recognized in animals. For example, auxins stimulate cell elongation by bringing negatively acting transcriptional repressor proteins to the proteasome to be degraded, thus unleashing the gene expression program required for increasing cell size. The "dormancy" inducing hormone, ABA, binds to soluble receptor proteins and inhibits a specific class of protein phosphatases (PP2C), which activates phosphorylation signaling leading to transcriptional changes needed for the desiccation of the seeds prior to entering dormancy. While these two hormone receptors have no known animal counterparts, there are also many similarities between animal and plant signaling pathways. For example, in plants, the largest single gene family in the genome is the protein kinase

  8. Phosphorylation and Intramolecular Stabilization of the Ligand Binding Domain in the Nuclear Receptor Steroidogenic Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Desclozeaux, Marion; Krylova, Irina N.; Horn, Florence; Fletterick, Robert J.; Ingraham, Holly A.

    2002-01-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is an orphan nuclear receptor with no known ligand. We showed previously that phosphorylation at serine 203 located N′-terminal to the ligand binding domain (LBD) enhanced cofactor recruitment, analogous to the ligand-mediated recruitment in ligand-dependent receptors. In this study, results of biochemical analyses and an LBD helix assembly assay suggest that the SF-1 LBD adopts an active conformation, with helices 1 and 12 packed against the predicted alpha-helical bundle, in the apparent absence of ligand. Fine mapping of the previously defined proximal activation function in SF-1 showed that the activation function mapped fully to helix 1 of the LBD. Limited proteolyses demonstrate that phosphorylation of S203 in the hinge region mimics the stabilizing effects of ligand on the LBD. Moreover, similar effects were observed in an SF-1/thyroid hormone LBD chimera receptor, illustrating that the S203 phosphorylation effects are transferable to a heterologous ligand-dependent receptor. Our collective data suggest that the hinge together with helix 1 is an individualized specific motif, which is tightly associated with its cognate LBD. For SF-1, we find that this intramolecular association and hence receptor activity are further enhanced by mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, thus mimicking many of the ligand-induced changes observed for ligand-dependent receptors. PMID:12242296

  9. Labeling of receptor ligands and other compounds with halogen radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J. . Edward Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology)

    1989-08-01

    Major advances have been made in all the areas. Specifically, patient studies have been carried out. This work has shown that the uptake of fluorine-18 labeled 16{alpha}-fluoroestradiol-17{beta} correlates well with receptor levels measured in vivo and also that the uptake of the tracer is blocked in humans by the administration of the antiestrogen tamoxifen. An image from this work was designated Image of the Year by Dr. Wagner, Jr., following his summary of the 1987 Society of Nuclear Medicine Meeting. We have also evaluated the brain uptake of both estrogen and progesterone, and this work was awarded the Berson-Yalow Award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine in 1988. This publication represents a new application of radiolabeled sex hormones. Hines and coworkers have suggested that hormone levels in the brain are important for sexual differentiation of human behavior. We have shown that both 16{alpha}-(F-18)-fluoroestradiol-17{beta} and 21-(F-18)-fluoro-16{alpha}-ethyl-19-norprogesterone (FENP) accumulate in the hypothalamus and pituitary tissues of primates and humans; and in primates this uptake can be blocked by administration of nonradioactive competing ligands. This presents an opportunity for studying sex hormone receptors in mammalian brain.

  10. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: location of the ligand binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, E.; Wheatley, M.; Curtis, C.; Birdsall, N.

    1987-05-01

    The key to understanding the pharmacological specificity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR's) is the location within the receptor sequence of the amino acid residues responsible for ligand binding. To approach this problem, they have purified mAChR's from rat brain to homogeneity by sequential ion-exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography and molecular weight fractionation. Following labelling of the binding site with an alkylating affinity label, /sup 3/H-propylbenzilycholine mustard aziridinium ion (/sup 3/H-PrBCM), the mAChR was digested with a lysine-specific endoproteinase, and a ladder of peptides of increasing molecular weight, each containing the glycosylated N-terminus, isolated by chromatography on wheat-germ agglutinin sepharose. The pattern of labelling showed that a residue in the peptides containing transmembrane helices 2 and/or 3 of the mAChR was alkylated. The linkage was cleaved by 1 M hydroxylamine, showing that /sup 3/H-PrBCM was attached to an acidic residue, whose properties strongly suggested it to be embedded in a hydrophobic intramembrane region of the mAChR. Examination of the cloned sequence of the mAChR reveals several candidate residues, the most likely of which is homologous to an aspartic acid residue thought to protonate the retinal Schiff's base in the congeneric protein rhodopsin.

  11. Argos inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor signalling by ligand sequestration.

    PubMed

    Klein, Daryl E; Nappi, Valerie M; Reeves, Gregory T; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Lemmon, Mark A

    2004-08-26

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has critical functions in development and in many human cancers. During development, the spatial extent of EGFR signalling is regulated by feedback loops comprising both well-understood activators and less well-characterized inhibitors. In Drosophila melanogaster the secreted protein Argos functions as the only known extracellular inhibitor of EGFR, with clearly identified roles in multiple stages of development. Argos is only expressed when the Drosophila EGFR (DER) is activated at high levels, and downregulates further DER signalling. Although there is ample genetic evidence that Argos inhibits DER activation, the biochemical mechanism has not been established. Here we show that Argos inhibits DER signalling without interacting directly with the receptor, but instead by sequestering the DER-activating ligand Spitz. Argos binds tightly to the EGF motif of Spitz and forms a 1:1 (Spitz:Argos) complex that does not bind DER in vitro or at the cell surface. Our results provide an insight into the mechanism of Argos function, and suggest new strategies for EGFR inhibitor design.

  12. Cell-based assays for screening androgen receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Carmela; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Rainey, William E

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR, NR3C4), mediates the majority of androgen effects on target cells. The AR is activated following ligand binding that result in activation of target gene transcription. Several cell based model systems have been developed that allow sensitive detection and monitoring of steroids or other compounds with AR bioactivity. Most cell based AR reporter models use transgenic gene constructs that include an androgen response element (ARE) that controls reporter gene expression. The DNA cis-regulatory elements that respond to AR share sequence similarity with cis-regulatory elements for glucocorticoid (GR, NR3C1), mineralocorticoid (MR, NR3C2) and progesterone (PGR, NR3C3) receptors, which has compromised AR selectivity for some models. In recent years, the sensitivity and selectivity of AR bioassays have been significantly improved through careful selection of cell models, utilization of improved reporter genes and the use of yeast two hybrid AR systems. This review summarizes and compares the currently available androgen-responsive cell model systems. PMID:26036905

  13. Somatostatin receptor ligands in the treatment of acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Gadelha, Monica R; Wildemberg, Luiz Eduardo; Bronstein, Marcello D; Gatto, Federico; Ferone, Diego

    2017-02-01

    First-generation somatostatin receptors ligands (SRL) are the mainstay in the medical treatment of acromegaly, however the percentage of patients controlled with these drugs significantly varies in the different studies. Many factors are involved in the resistance to SRL. In this review, we update the physiology of somatostatin and its receptors (sst), the use of SRL in the treatment of acromegaly and the factors involved in the response to these drugs. The SRL act through interaction with the sst, which up to now have been characterized as five subtypes. The first-generation SRL, octreotide and lanreotide, are considered sst2 specific and have biochemical response rates varying from 20 to 70%. Tumor volume reduction can be found in 36-75% of patients. Several factors may determine the response to these drugs, such as sst, AIP, E-cadherin, ZAC1, filamin A and β-arrestin expression in the somatotropinomas. In patients resistant to first-generation SRL, alternative medical treatment options include: SRL high dose regimens, SRL in combination with cabergoline or pegvisomant, or the use of pasireotide. Pasireotide is a next-generation SRL with a broader pattern of interaction with sst. In the light of the recent increase of treatment options in acromegaly and the deeper knowledge of the determinants of response to the current first-line therapy, a shift from a trial-and-error treatment to a personalized one could be possible.

  14. Effect of ligand density, receptor density, and nanoparticle size on cell targeting

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Drew R.; Poloukhtine, Andrei; Popik, Vladimir; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the presentation of multiple ligands on a nanoparticle surface can improve cell targeting; however, little work has been done to determine whether an optimal ligand density exists. We have recently developed a site-specific bioconjugation strategy that allows for distinct control of ligand density on a nanoparticle through the combined utilization of expressed protein ligation (EPL) and copper-free click chemistry. This EPL-Click conjugation strategy was applied to create superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles labeled with HER2/neu targeting affibodies at differing ligand densities. It was discovered that an intermediate ligand density provided statistically significant improvements in cell binding compared with higher and lower ligand densities. This intermediate optimal ligand density was conserved across nanoparticles with differing hydrodynamic diameters, different HER2/neu targeting ligands and also to cells with lower receptor densities. Additionally, an intermediate optimal ligand density was also evident when nanoparticles were labeled with folic acid. PMID:22687896

  15. Effects of scorched food leachates with or without activated charcoal pretreatment on AhR activation in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Kinoshita, Makoto; Fujimori, Shin; Ishikawa, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor activated by xenobiotics, including dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although AhR is also activated by some dietary constituents, it has not been completely clarified in what circumstances AhR ligands are ingested in our daily life. Because PAHs are formed by the incomplete combustion of organic materials, we hypothesized that scorched foods might contain and leach out AhR ligands sufficient to stimulate AhR in vitro. To test this hypothesis, scorched foods (bread, cheese, etc.) were mixed vigorously with water, and the supernatants were retrieved as samples. The samples were added to HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was analyzed by RT-PCR in different cell lines treated with the samples. We further tested whether pretreatment of the samples with activated charcoal would alter their AhR-stimulating activity. All the supernatant samples tested induced AhR-dependent reporter gene activity and CYP1A1 mRNA expression. In some samples, these inductions were inhibited by pretreatment with activated charcoal. Our findings indicate that scorched food leachates stimulate AhR in cultured cells and that activated charcoal adsorbs the AhR-stimulating substances in some leachates. Thus, people who habitually eat scorched foods are exposed to AhR ligands on a regular basis. Further studies are needed to elucidate whether burnt foods actually exert biological effects on our health.

  16. Discriminative stimulus effects of the imidazoline I2 receptor ligands BU224 and phenyzoline in rats

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yanyan; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2015-01-01

    Although imidazoline I2 receptor ligands have been used as discriminative stimuli, the role of efficacy of I2 receptor ligands as a critical determinant in drug discrimination has not been explored. This study characterized the discriminative stimulus effects of selective imidazoline I2 receptor ligands BU224 (a low-efficacy I2 receptor ligand) and phenyzoline (a higher efficacy I2 receptor ligand) in rats. Two groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate 5.6 mg/kg BU224 or 32 mg/kg phenyzoline (i.p.) from their vehicle in a two-lever food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure, respectively. All rats acquired the discriminations after an average of 18 (BU224) and 56 (phenyzoline) training sessions, respectively. BU224 and phenyzoline completely substituted for one another symmetrically. Several I2 receptor ligands (tracizoline, CR4056, RS45041, and idazoxan) all occasioned > 80% drug-associated lever responding in both discriminations. The I2 receptor ligand 2-BFI and a monoamine oxidase inhibitor harmane occasioned > 80% drug-associated lever responding in rats discriminating BU224. Other drugs that occasioned partial or less substitution to BU224 cue included clonidine, methamphetamine, ketamine, morphine, methadone and agmatine. Clonidine, methamphetamine and morphine also only produced partial substitution to phenyzoline cue. Naltrexone, dopamine D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol and serotonin (5-HT) 2A receptor antagonist MDL100907 failed to alter the discriminative stimulus effects of BU224 or phenyzoline. Combined, these results are the first to demonstrate that BU224 and phenyzoline can serve as discriminative stimuli and that the low-efficacy I2 receptor ligand BU224 shares similar discriminative stimulus effects with higher-efficacy I2 receptor ligands such as phenyzoline and 2-BFI. PMID:25617792

  17. Development of a photoactivatable allosteric ligand for the m1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Davie, Briana J; Sexton, Patrick M; Capuano, Ben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Scammells, Peter J

    2014-10-15

    The field of G protein-coupled receptor drug discovery has benefited greatly from the structural and functional insights afforded by photoactivatable ligands. One G protein-coupled receptor subfamily for which photoactivatable ligands have been developed is the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor family, though, to date, all such ligands have been designed to target the orthosteric (endogenous ligand) binding site of these receptors. Herein we report the synthesis and pharmacological investigation of a novel photoaffinity label, MIPS1455 (4), designed to bind irreversibly to an allosteric site of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor; a target of therapeutic interest for the treatment of cognitive deficits. MIPS1455 may be a valuable molecular tool for further investigating allosteric interactions at this receptor.

  18. Acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic ligands: biochemical and genetic aspects in Torpedo californica and Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the biochemical and genetic aspects of the acetylcholine receptor proteins and cholinergic ligands in Drosophila melanogaster and Torpedo californica. Included are (1) a comparative study of nicotinic ligand-induced cation release from acetylcholine receptors isolated from Torpedo californica and from Drosophila melanogaster, (2) solution studies of the cholinergic ligands, nikethamide and ethamivan, aimed at measuring internal molecular rotational barriers in solvents of different polarity; and (3) the isolation and characterization of the gene(s) for the acetylcholine receptor in Drosophila melasogaster. Acetylcholine receptor proteins isolated from Drosphila melanogaster heads were found to behave kinetically similar (with regards to cholinergic ligand-induced /sup 155/Eu:/sup 3 +/ displacement from prelabeled proteins) to receptor proteins isolated from Torpedo californica electric tissue, providing additional biochemical evidence for the existence of a Drosophila acetylcholine receptor.

  19. Design and synthesis of dual 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Ofori, Edward; Zhu, Xue Y; Etukala, Jagan R; Peprah, Kwakye; Jordan, Kamanski R; Adkins, Adia A; Bricker, Barbara A; Kang, Hye J; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Ablordeppey, Seth Y

    2016-08-15

    5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors have been at the center of discussions recently due in part to their major role in the etiology of major central nervous system diseases such as depression, sleep disorders, and schizophrenia. As part of our search to identify dual targeting ligands for these receptors, we have carried out a systematic modification of a selective 5HT7 receptor ligand culminating in the identification of several dual 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor ligands. Compound 16, a butyrophenone derivative of tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ), was identified as the most potent agent with low nanomolar binding affinities to both receptors. Interestingly, compound 16 also displayed moderate affinity to other clinically relevant dopamine receptors. Thus, it is anticipated that compound 16 may serve as a lead for further exploitation in our quest to identify new ligands with the potential to treat diseases of CNS origin.

  20. Fluorescent Approaches for Understanding Interactions of Ligands with G Protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Rajashri; Zuber, Jeffrey; Connelly, Sara M.; Mathew, Elizabeth; Dumont, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for a wide variety of signaling responses in diverse cell types. Despite major advances in the determination of structures of this class of receptors, the underlying mechanisms by which binding of different types of ligands specifically elicits particular signaling responses remains unclear. The use of fluorescence spectroscopy can provide important information about the process of ligand binding and ligand dependent conformational changes in receptors, especially kinetic aspects of these processes, that can be difficult to extract from x-ray structures. We present an overview of the extensive array of fluorescent ligands that have been used in studies of GPCRs and describe spectroscopic approaches for assaying binding and probing the environment of receptor-bound ligands with particular attention to examples involving yeast pheromone receptors. In addition, we discuss the use of fluorescence spectroscopy for detecting and characterizing conformational changes in receptors induced by the binding of ligands. Such studies have provided strong evidence for diversity of receptor conformations elicited by different ligands, consistent with the idea that GPCRs are not simple on and off switches. This diversity of states constitutes an underlying mechanistic basis for biased agonism, the observation that different stimuli can produce different responses from a single receptor. It is likely that continued technical advances will allow fluorescence spectroscopy to play an important role in continued probing of structural transitions in GPCRs. PMID:24055822

  1. Cellular approaches to the interaction between cannabinoid receptor ligands and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Oz, Murat; Al Kury, Lina; Keun-Hang, Susan Yang; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Galadari, Sehamuddin

    2014-05-15

    Cannabinoids are among the earliest known drugs to humanity. Cannabis plant contains various phytochemicals that bind to cannabinoid receptors. In addition, synthetic and endogenously produced cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) constitute other classes of cannabinoid receptor ligands. Although many pharmacological effects of these cannabinoids are mediated by the activation of cannabinoid receptors, recent studies indicate that cannabinoids also modulate the functions of various integral membrane proteins including ion channels, receptors, neurotransmitter transporters, and enzymes by mechanism(s) not involving the activation of known cannabinoid receptors. Currently, the mechanisms of these effects were not fully understood. However, it is likely that direct actions of cannabinoids are closely linked to their lipophilic structures. This report will focus on the actions of cannabinoids on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and will examine the results of recent studies in this field. In addition some mechanistic approaches will be provided. The results discussed in this review indicate that, besides cannabinoid receptors, further molecular targets for cannabinoids exist and that these targets may represent important novel sites to alter neuronal excitability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Ligand Interactions: Structural Cross Talk between Ligands and the Extracellular Domain

    PubMed Central

    West, Graham M.; Willard, Francis S.; Sloop, Kyle W.; Showalter, Aaron D.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in pancreatic β-cells potentiates insulin production and is a current therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Like other class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the GLP-1R contains an N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. N-terminal truncations on the peptide agonist generate antagonists capable of binding to the extracellular domain, but not capable of activating full length receptor. The main objective of this study was to use Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) to identify how the amide hydrogen bonding network of peptide ligands and the extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R) were altered by binding interactions and to then use this platform to validate direct binding events for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands. The HDX studies presented here for two glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) peptide ligands indicates that the antagonist exendin-4[9-39] is significantly destabilized in the presence of nonionic detergents as compared to the agonist exendin-4. Furthermore, HDX can detect stabilization of exendin-4 and exendin-4[9-39] hydrogen bonding networks at the N-terminal helix [Val19 to Lys27] upon binding to the N-terminal extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R). In addition we show hydrogen bonding network stabilization on nGLP-1R in response to ligand binding, and validate direct binding events with the extracellular domain of the receptor for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands. PMID:25180755

  3. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligands in Cigarette Smoke Induce Production of Interleukin-22 to Promote Pancreatic Fibrosis in Models of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jing; Zhao, Qinglan; Sharma, Vishal; Nguyen, Linh P; Lee, Yvonne N; Pham, Kim L; Edderkaoui, Mouad; Pandol, Stephen J; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2016-12-01

    Cigarette smoke has been identified as an independent risk factor for chronic pancreatitis (CP). Little is known about the mechanisms by which smoking promotes development of CP. We assessed the effects of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands found in cigarette smoke on immune cell activation in humans and pancreatic fibrosis in animal models of CP. We obtained serum samples from patients with CP treated at Stanford University hospital and healthy individuals (controls) and isolated CD4(+) T cells. Levels of interleukin-22 (IL22) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and smoking histories were collected. T cells from healthy nonsmokers and smokers were stimulated and incubated with AhR agonists (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or benzo[a]pyrene) or antagonists and analyzed by flow cytometry. Mice were given intraperitoneal injections of caerulein or saline, with or without lipopolysaccharide, to induce CP. Some mice were given intraperitoneal injections of AhR agonists at the start of caerulein injection, with or without an antibody against IL22 (anti-IL22) starting 2 weeks after the first caerulein injection, or recombinant mouse IL22 or vehicle (control) intraperitoneally 4 weeks after the first caerulein injection. Mice were exposed to normal air or cigarette smoke for 6 h/d for 7 weeks and expression of AhR gene targets was measured. Pancreata were collected from all mice and analyzed by histology and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Pancreatic stellate cells and T cells were isolated and studied using immunoblot, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent analyses. Mice given AhR agonists developed more severe pancreatic fibrosis (based on decreased pancreas size, histology, and increased expression of fibrosis-associated genes) than mice not given agonists after caerulein injection. In mice given saline instead of caerulein, AhR ligands did not induce fibrosis. Pancreatic T cells

  4. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  5. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  6. Biased ligands for better cardiovascular drugs: dissecting G-protein-coupled receptor pharmacology.

    PubMed

    DeWire, Scott M; Violin, Jonathan D

    2011-07-08

    Drug discovery efforts targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) have been immensely successful in creating new cardiovascular medicines. Currently marketed GPCR drugs are broadly classified as either agonists that activate receptors or antagonists that prevent receptor activation by endogenous stimuli. However, GPCR couple to a multitude of intracellular signaling pathways beyond classical G-protein signals, and these signals can be independently activated by biased ligands to vastly expand the potential for new drugs at these classic targets. By selectively engaging only a subset of a receptor's potential intracellular partners, biased ligands may deliver more precise therapeutic benefit with fewer side effects than current GPCR-targeted drugs. In this review, we discuss the history of biased ligand research, the current understanding of how biased ligands exert their unique pharmacology, and how research into GPCR signaling has uncovered previously unappreciated capabilities of receptor pharmacology. We focus on several receptors to illustrate the approaches taken and discoveries made, and how these are steadily illuminating the intricacies of GPCR pharmacology. Discoveries of biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and of separable pharmacology suggesting the potential value of biased ligands targeting the β-adrenergic receptors and nicotinic acid receptor GPR109a highlight the powerful clinical promise of this new category of potential therapeutics.

  7. Dose- and time-dependent expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) in PCB-, B[a]P-, and TBT-exposed intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Hwang, Un-Ki; Seo, Jung Soo; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator (ARNT) genes from the copepod Tigriopus japonicus (Tj) were cloned to examine their potential functions in the invertebrate putative AhR-CYP signaling pathway. The amino acid sequences encoded by the Tj-AhR and Tj-ARNT genes showed high similarity to homologs of Daphnia and Drosophila, ranging from 68% and 70% similarity for the AhR genes to 56% for the ARNT genes. To determine whether Tj-AhR and Tj-ARNT are modulated by environmental pollutants, transcriptional expression of Tj-AhR and Tj-ARNT was analyzed in response to exposure to five concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB 126) (control, 10, 50, 100, 500 μg L(-1)), benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) (control, 5, 10, 50, 100 μg L(-1)), and tributyltin (TBT) (control, 1, 5, 10, 20 μg L(-1)) 24h after exposure. A time-course experiment (0, 3, 6, 12, 24h) was performed to analyze mRNA expression patterns after exposure to PCB, B[a]P, and TBT. T. japonicus exhibited dose-dependent and time-dependent upregulation of Tj-AhR and Tj-ARNT in response to pollutant exposure, and the degree of expression was dependent on the pollutant, suggesting that pollutants such as PCB, B[a]P, and TBT modulate expression of Tj-AhR and Tj-ARNT genes in the putative AhR-CYP signaling pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Targeting Ligand-Dependent and Ligand-Independent Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    sub 10nM range efficacy. Our primary objective was to establish a series of compounds blocking the AR ligand-dependent and ligand-independent gene ...of AR driven genes to be more comprehensive and more in line with what is currently known about AR-driven signaling in prostate cancer. We have...developed a robust panel of genes for AR signaling that is reflective of the clinical findings in both ligand dependent and ligand-independent androgen

  9. Protective response of the Ah receptor to ANIT-induced biliary epithelial cell toxicity in see-through medaka.

    PubMed

    Volz, David C; Kullman, Seth W; Howarth, Deanna L; Hardman, Ron C; Hinton, David E

    2008-04-01

    The adaptive role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ah receptor or AHR) in protecting against disease-related conditions remains unclear in nonmammalian models, particularly teleosts. Therefore, this study focused on the potential role of AHR in response to biliary epithelial cell toxicity and hepatobiliary alteration in medaka. See-through medaka (STII strain) were exposed for 96 h using the biliary toxicant alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) as a reagent, and fish were evaluated daily using histological and ultrastructural analysis, and by imaging directly through the body wall of living fish. Brightfield and transmission electron microscopy showed that a single ANIT dose (40 mg/kg) specifically induced swelling and apoptosis of bile preductular epithelial cells (BPDECs) as early as 6 h after initial exposure. Following ANIT-induced BPDEC toxicity, in vivo imaging of STII medaka showed significant gallbladder discoloration from 48-72 h. Collectively, these pathologic data suggested that ANIT exposure resulted in acute hepatobiliary changes, lasting < 96 h following initial exposure. We then tested the potential role of AHR in response to ANIT-induced hepatobiliary alteration. Overall, we demonstrated that (1) transient AHR activation and cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) induction in livers occurred during ANIT-induced hepatobiliary impairment, (2) pretreatment with an AHR agonist partially protected against acute hepatobiliary alteration, and (3) using a luciferase-based reporter assay, the bile pigment bilirubin weakly activated mouse AHR and binding to medaka-specific CYP1A promoter, resulting in AHR element-driven transcription. Given that bile acids and pigments are present in mammalian and fish liver, these studies collectively suggest that bile-induced AHR activation may be conserved between teleosts and rodents.

  10. Trace amine-associated receptors and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Zucchi, R; Chiellini, G; Scanlan, T S; Grandy, D K

    2006-01-01

    Classical biogenic amines (adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin and histamine) interact with specific families of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The term ‘trace amines' is used when referring to p-tyramine, β-phenylethylamine, tryptamine and octopamine, compounds that are present in mammalian tissues at very low (nanomolar) concentrations. The pharmacological effects of trace amines are usually attributed to their interference with the aminergic pathways, but in 2001 a new gene was identified, that codes for a GPCR responding to p-tyramine and β-phenylethylamine but not to classical biogenic amines. Several closely related genes were subsequently identified and designated as the trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs). Pharmacological investigations in vitro show that many TAAR subtypes may not respond to p-tyramine, β-phenylethylamine, tryptamine or octopamine, suggesting the existence of additional endogenous ligands. A novel endogenous thyroid hormone derivative, 3-iodothyronamine, has been found to interact with TAAR1 and possibly other TAAR subtypes. In vivo, micromolar concentrations of 3-iodothyronamine determine functional effects which are opposite to those produced on a longer time scale by thyroid hormones, including reduction in body temperature and decrease in cardiac contractility. Expression of all TAAR subtypes except TAAR1 has been reported in mouse olfactory epithelium, and several volatile amines were shown to interact with specific TAAR subtypes. In addition, there is evidence that TAAR1 is targeted by amphetamines and other psychotropic agents, while genetic linkage studies show a significant association between the TAAR gene family locus and susceptibility to schizophrenia or bipolar affective disorder. PMID:17088868

  11. Ligand binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor investigated by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Kröger, D; Hucho, F; Vogel, H

    1999-08-01

    Ligand binding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is studied by surface plasmon resonance. Biotinylated bungarotoxin, immobilized on a streptavidin-coated gold film, binds nicotinic acetylcholine receptor both in detergent-solubilized and in lipid vesicle-reconstituted form with high specificity. In the latter case, nonspecific binding to the sensor surface is significantly reduced by reconstituting the receptor into poly(ethylene glycol)-lipid-containing sterically stabilized vesicles. By preincubation of a bulk nicotinic acetylcholine receptor sample with the competing ligands carbamoylcholine and decamethonium bromide, the subsequent specific binding of the receptor to the surface-immobilized bungarotoxin is reduced, depending on the concentration of competing ligand. This competition assay allows the determination of the dissociation constants of the acetylcholine receptor-carbamoylcholine complex. A K(D) = 3.5 × 10(-)(6) M for the detergent-solubilized receptor and a K(D) = 1.4 × 10(-)(5) M for the lipid vesicle-reconstituted receptor are obtained. For decamethonium bromide, a K(D) = 4.5 × 10(-)(5) M is determined for the detergent-solubilized receptor. This approach is of general importance for investigating ligand-receptor interactions in case of small ligand molecules by mass-sensitive techniques.

  12. Ah Receptor-mediated impairment of interrenal steroidogenesis involves StAR protein and P450scc gene attenuation in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Renaud, Rick; Leatherland, John F; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2005-04-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation on interrenal steroidogenesis in rainbow trout. To this end, fish were fed AhR agonist (beta-naphthoflavone (BNF): 10 mg/kg body mass/day) and antagonist (alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF): 10 mg/kg body mass/day) either singly or in combination (ABNF) for 5 days to elucidate the mechanisms involved in AhR-mediated depression of cortisol production. Liver AhR protein expression was significantly elevated only with ABNF, but not with BNF and ANF compared to the control group. However, all three treatments (BNF, ANF, and ABNF) significantly elevated cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) gene and protein expression in the kidney and liver, respectively. Also, these three treatment groups had significantly depressed ACTH-stimulated cortisol production in vitro compared to the control group. This attenuation of interrenal steroidogenesis corresponded with a lower mRNA abundance of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein and cytochrome P450 cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), but not 11beta-hydroxylase. Furthermore, in vitro incubation of head kidney pieces with 7-3H-pregnenolone failed to show any treatment effects on pathways downstream of P450scc, except for a significantly higher conversion to progesterone in the BNF and ANF groups. Plasma cortisol and glucose levels showed no significant change between the treated groups and control, but liver and brain glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein expression was higher in the BNF group, and ANF abolished this response. Taken together, both BNF and ANF impaired cortisol production, and the mechanism may involve attenuation of StAR and P450scc, the rate limiting steps in steroidogenesis. Overall, endocrine disruption by xenobiotics acting via AhR includes impaired cortisol biosynthesis and abnormal cortisol target tissue GR responses in rainbow trout.

  13. Extracellular loop 2 in the FSH receptor is crucial for ligand mediated receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Dupakuntla, Madhavi; Pathak, Bhakti; Roy, Binita Sur; Mahale, Smita D

    2012-10-15

    The present study aims to determine the role of the specific residues of the extracellular loops (ELs) of the FSH receptor (FSHR) in hormone binding and receptor activation. By substituting the sequences of each of the ELs of human FSHR with those of the luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LH/CGR), we generated three mutant constructs where the three ELs were individually replaced. A fourth construct had all the three substituted ELs. The receptor expression and hormone binding ability of the mutants were comparable to that of the wild type. Hormone-induced signaling and internalization were lower in the EL2 substitution mutant (EL2M). In this mutant, the EL2 of FSHR was substituted with the corresponding loop of LH/CGR. Interestingly, homology modeling revealed a change in the orientation of EL2 in the mutant receptor. Thus, disruption of EL2 affected overall receptor function, suggesting the role of FSHR specific residues of the loop in ligand mediated signaling.

  14. Computational studies of ligand-receptor interactions in bitter taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Miguet, Laurence; Zhang, Ziding; Grigorov, Martin G

    2006-01-01

    Phenylthiocarbamide tastes intensely bitter to some individuals, but others find it completely tasteless. Recently, it was suggested that phenylthiocarbamide elicits bitter taste by interacting with a human G protein-coupled receptor (hTAS2R38) encoded by the PTC gene. The phenylthiocarbamide nontaster trait was linked to three single nucleotide polymorphisms occurring in the PTC gene. Using the crystal structure of bovine rhodopsin as template, we generated the 3D structure of hTAS2R38 bitter taste receptor. We were able to map on the receptor structure the amino acids affected by the genetic polymorphisms and to propose molecular functions for two of them that explained the emergence of the nontaster trait. We used molecular docking simulations to find that phenylthiocarbamide exhibited a higher affinity for the target receptor than the structurally similar molecule 6-n-propylthiouracil, in line with recent experimental studies. A 3D model was constructed for the hTAS2R16 bitter taste receptor as well, by applying the same protocol. We found that the recently published experimental ligand binding affinity data for this receptor correlated well with the binding scores obtained from our molecular docking calculations.

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma ligands and ischemia and reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2004-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that are related to retinoid, steroid and thyroid hormone receptors. The PPAR subfamily comprises of three members, PPAR-alpha, PPAR-beta and PPAR-gamma. PPAR-gamma has recently been implicated as a regulator of cellular proliferation and inflammatory responses. There is good evidence that ligands of PPAR-gamma, including certain thiazolinediones, reduce tissue injury associated with ischemia and reperfusion. The potential utility of PPAR-gamma ligands in ischemia and reperfusion will be discussed in this review.

  16. Triclosan activates aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent apoptosis and affects Cyp1a1 and Cyp1b1 expression in mouse neocortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Szychowski, Konrad A; Wnuk, Agnieszka; Kajta, Małgorzata; Wójtowicz, Anna K

    2016-11-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an antimicrobial agent that is used extensively in personal care and in sanitizing products, such as soaps, toothpastes, and hair products. A number of studies have revealed the presence of TCS in human tissues, such as fat, liver and brain, in addition to blood and breast milk. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of TCS on AhR and Cyp1a1/Cyp1b1 signaling in mouse neocortical neurons in primary cultures. In addition to the use of selective ligands and siRNAs, expression levels of mRNA and proteins as well as caspase-3 activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release have been measured. We also studied the involvement of the AhR in TCS-induced LDH release and caspase-3 activation as well as the effect of TCS on ROS generation. Cultures of neocortical neurons were prepared from Swiss mouse embryos on day 15/16 of gestation. The cells were cultured in phenol red-free Neurobasal medium with B27 and glutamine, and the neurons were exposed to 1 and 10µM TCS. Our experiments showed that the expression of AhR and Cyp1a1 mRNA decreased in cells exposed to 10µM TCS for 3 or 6h. In the case of Cyp1b1, mRNA expression remained unchanged compared with the control group following 3h of exposure to TCS, but after 6h, the mRNA expression of Cyp1b1 was decreased. Our results confirmed that the AhR is involved in the TCS mechanism of action, and our data demonstrated that after the cells were transfected with AhR siRNA, the cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic properties of TCS were decreased. The decrease in Cyp1a1 mRNA and protein expression levels accompanied by a decrease in its activity. The stimulation of Cyp1a1 activity produced by the application of an AhR agonist (βNF) was attenuated by TCS, whereas the addition of AhR antagonist (αNF) reversed the inhibitory effects of TCS. In our experiments, TCS diminished Cyp1b1 mRNA and enhanced its protein expression. In case of Cyp1a1 we observed

  17. Reliability theory for receptor-ligand bond dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tees, David F. J.; Woodward, John T.; Hammer, David A.

    2001-05-01

    Cell adhesion in the presence of hydrodynamic forces is a critical factor in inflammation, cancer metastasis, and blood clotting. A number of assays have recently been developed to apply forces to small numbers of the receptor-ligand bonds responsible for adhesion. Examples include assays using hydrodynamic shear in flow chambers or elastic probe deflection assays such as the atomic force microscope or the biomembrane force probe. One wishes to use the data on the time distribution of dissociation from these assays to derive information on the force dependence of reaction rates, an important determinant of cell adhesive behavior. The dissociation process can be described using the theory developed for reliability engineering of electronic components and networks. We use this framework along with the Bell model for the reverse reaction rate (kr=kr0exp[r0 f/kT], where f is the applied force and kr0 and r0 are Bell model parameters) to write closed form expressions for the probability distribution of break-up with multiple independent or interacting bonds. These expressions show that the average lifetime of n bonds scales with the nth harmonic number multiplied by the lifetime of a single bond. Results from calculation and simulations are used to describe the effect of experimental procedures in forced unbinding assays on the estimation of parameters for the force dependence of reverse reaction rates.

  18. PPAR-γ receptor ligands: novel therapy for pituitary adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Heaney, Anthony P.; Fernando, Manory; Melmed, Shlomo

    2003-01-01

    Pituitary tumors cause considerable morbidity due to local invasion, hypopituitarism, or hormone hypersecretion. In many cases, no suitable drug therapies are available, and surgical excision is currently the only effective treatment. We show here abundant expression of nuclear hormone receptor PPAR-γ in all of 39 human pituitary tumors. PPAR-γ activating thiazolidinediones (TZDs) rosiglitazone and troglitazone induced G0-G1 cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human, rat somatolactotroph, and murine gonadotroph pituitary tumor cells, and suppressed in vitro hormone secretion. In vivo development and growth of murine somatolactotroph and gonadotroph tumors, generated by subcutaneous injection of prolactin-secreting (PRL-secreting) and growth hormone–secreting (GH-secreting) GH3 cells, luteinizing hormone–secreting (LH-secreting) LβT2 cells, and α-T3 cells, was markedly suppressed in rosiglitazone-treated mice, and serum GH, PRL, and LH levels were attenuated in all treated animals (P < 0.009). These results demonstrate that PPAR-γ is an important molecular target in pituitary adenoma cells and PPAR-γ ligands inhibit tumor cell growth and GH, PRL, and LH secretion in vitro and in vivo. TZDs are proposed as novel oral medications for managing pituitary tumors. PMID:12727930

  19. Monitoring ligand-receptor interactions by photonic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jeney, Sylvia; Mor, Flavio; Koszali, Roland; Forró, László; Moy, Vincent T.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a method for the acquisition of single molecule force measurements of ligandreceptor interactions using the photonic force microscope (PFM). Biotin-functionalized beads, manipulated with an optical trap, and a streptavidin-functionalized coverslip were used to measure the effect of different pulling forces on the lifetime of individual streptavidin-biotin complexes. By optimizing the design of the optical trap and selection of the appropriate bead size, pulling forces in excess of 50 pN were achieved. Based on the amplitude of three dimensional (3D) thermal position fluctuations of the attached bead, we were able to select for a bead-coverslip interaction that was mediated by a single streptavidin-biotin complex. Moreover, the developed experimental system was greatly accelerated by automation of data acquisition and analysis. In force-dependent kinetic measurements carried out between streptavidin and biotin, we observed that the streptavidin-biotin complex exhibited properties of a catch bond with the lifetime increasing 10 fold when the pulling force increased from 10 to 20 pN. We also show that silica beads were more appropriate than polystyrene beads for the force measurements as polystyrene tethers, longer than 200 nm, could be extracted from the beads. PMID:20516583

  20. Cell surface receptors for signal transduction and ligand transport - a design principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Resat, Haluk; Wiley, H. S.

    2007-06-01

    Although many different receptors undergo endocytosis, the system-level design principles that govern the evolution of receptor dynamics are far from fully understood. We have constructed a generalized mathematical model to understand how receptor internalization dynamics encodes receptor function and regulation. Parametric analysis of the response of receptor systems to ligand inputs reveals that receptors can be categorized a being: i) avidity-controlled where the response control depends primarily on the extracelluar ligand capture efficiency, ii) consumption-controlled where the ability to internalize surface-bound ligand is the primary control parameter, and iii) dual-sensitivity where both the avidity and consumption parameters are important. We show that the transferrin and low-density lipoprotein receptors are avidity-controlled, the vitellogenin receptor is consumption-controlled and epidermal growth factor receptor is a dual-sensitivity receptor. Significantly, we show that ligand-induced endocytosis is a mechanism to anhance the accuracy of signaling receptors rather than serving to attenuate signaling. Our analysis reveals that the location of a receptor system in the avidity-consumption parameter space can be used to understand both its function and its regulations.

  1. Computational approaches for ligand discovery and design in class-A G protein- coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, David; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    Our structural understanding of the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors, a group of targets of utmost pharmacological importance, has improved dramatically in the last few years. This was directly translated in an increase of both the number and the relevance of computer-assisted drug design efforts devoted to these receptors. The field, which had been greatly influenced by ligand-based methods, has experienced a radical transformation with a number of successful structure-based ligand design and ligand discovery studies. This revolution has been accompanied by the exponential increase of computational resources, and as a result the scenario in GPCR structural and chemical studies is now more complex and richer than ever. Virtual screens, both structure- and ligand-based, co-exist with accurate computational characterizations of the receptor conformational dynamics and of the energy landscapes of receptor-ligand interactions. We here provide an integrated and updated view of the different computational techniques applied to the ligand design of GPCRs. Particular emphasis is put on the studies that take into account the novel structural information of GPCRs, together with those that consider the enormous amount of chemical information accumulated on these receptors in the last decades. Indeed, we propose that proper combinations of the different computational techniques: ligand-based, structure-based and molecular dynamics studies, should be performed to better integrate all available information whenever possible. With this in mind, a major impact of computational technologies in the ligand design on GPCRs is expected in the forthcoming years.

  2. The Ah regulatory gene product. Survey of nineteen polycyclic aromatic compounds' and fifteen benzo[a]pyrene metabolites' capacity to bind to the cytosolic receptor.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, S W; Nebert, D W

    1982-01-01

    The capacity of 19 polycyclic aromatic compounds and 15 benzo[a]pyrene metabolites to displace [1,6-3H]2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxine ([3H]TCDD) from the mouse liver cytosolic Ah receptor was examined. We compared our data with various parameters taken from previously published results: the capacity of seven polycyclic hydrocarbons to induce aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity in human cell cultures, the capacity of 10 polycyclic hydrocarbons to induce azo dye N-demethylase activity in rat liver, the capacity of 6 polycyclic hydrocarbons to shorten zoxazolamine paralysis times in the intact rat, and the capacity of 15 benzo[a]pyrene metabolites to induce AHH activity in rat hepatoma H-4-II-E cultures. An excellent correlation is seen between the capacity to displace the radioligand from the Ah receptor and the capacity to induce these monooxygenase activities. differences in the rate of cellular uptake and formation of alkali-extractable metabolites of dibenzo[a,h]anthracene, 3-methylcholanthrene, and benzo[a]anthracene in Hepa-1 mouse hepatoma cell cultures do not account for differences in the capacity of these three polycyclic hydrocarbons to displace [3H]TCDD from the Ah receptor.

  3. Ah Receptor Signaling Controls the Expression of Cardiac Development and Homeostasis Genes

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Xiang; Kurita, Hisaka; Ko, Chia-I.; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital abnormality and one of the leading causes of newborn death throughout the world. Despite much emerging scientific information, the precise etiology of this disease remains elusive. Here, we show that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) regulates the expression of crucial cardiogenesis genes and that interference with endogenous AHR functions, either by gene ablation or by agonist exposure during early development, causes overlapping structural and functional cardiac abnormalities that lead to altered fetal heart physiology, including higher heart rates, right and left ventricle dilation, higher stroke volume, and reduced ejection fraction. With striking similarity between AHR knockout (Ahr−/−) and agonist-exposed wild type (Ahr+/+) embryos, in utero disruption of endogenous AHR functions converge into dysregulation of molecular mechanisms needed for attainment and maintenance of cardiac differentiation, including the pivotal signals regulated by the cardiogenic transcription factor NKH2.5, energy balance via oxidative phosphorylation and TCA cycle and global mitochondrial function and homeostasis. Our findings suggest that AHR signaling in the developing mammalian heart is central to the regulation of pathways crucial for cellular metabolism, cardiogenesis, and cardiac function, which are potential targets of environmental factors associated with CHD. PMID:26139165

  4. DDE and PCB 153 independently induce aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Gaspar-Ramírez, Octavio; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Salgado-Bustamante, Mariana; González-Amaro, Roberto; Hernandez-Castro, Berenice; Pérez-Maldonado, Ivan N

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that compounds inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines enhance AhR expression. The aim of this study was 2-fold: (1) to determine if two pro-inflammatory compounds, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexa-chlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), independently affect AhR gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC); and (2) if affected, to determine whether the mechanism involved was due to AhR activation or to a pro-inflammatory effect of the chemicals. PBMC isolated from healthy individuals were incubated in the presence of DDE (10 µg/ml) and PCB 153 (20 ng/ml) over time and AhR and CYP1A1 expression was assessed with a real-time PCR technique. The results indicated there was over-expression of the AhR mRNA in PBMC when the cells were treated with DDE and PCB 153. No changes in expression levels of CYP1A1 mRNA were found. Importantly, when the cells were exposed to DDE and PCB 153 in the presence of an antagonist of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, the over-expression of AhR was abolished; as expected, the expression of CYP1A1 was unaffected. In conclusion, these studies demonstrated for the first time an increment of AhR expression "in vitro" in PBMC treated with two pro-inflammatory environmental pollutants, DDE and PCB153. Moreover, the over-expression of AhR was dependent of TNFα induced by DDE and PCB 153 and was independent of AhR activation.

  5. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-04-28

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand.

  6. Helix 8 of the ligand binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is essential for ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qiong; Waxse, Bennett; Riquelme, Denise; Zhang, Jiabao; Aguilera, Greti

    2015-06-15

    Membrane association of estrogen receptors (ER) depends on cysteine palmitoylation and two leucines in the ligand binding domain (LBD), conserved in most steroid receptors. The role of this region, corresponding to helix 8 of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) LBD, on membrane association of GR was studied in 4B cells, expressing endogenous GR, and Cos-7 cells transfected EGFP-GR constructs. 4B cells preloaded with radiolabeled palmitic acid showed no radioactivity incorporation into immunoprecipitated GR. Moreover, mutation C683A (corresponding to ER palmitoylation site) did not affect corticosterone-induced membrane association of GR. Mutations L687-690A, L682A, E680G and K685G prevented membrane and also nuclear localization through reduced ligand binding. L687-690A mutation decreased association of GR with heat shock protein 90 and transcriptional activity, without overt effects on receptor protein stability. The data demonstrate that palmitoylation does not mediate membrane association of GR, but that the region 680-690 (helix 8) is critical for ligand binding and receptor function.

  7. From α4β2 Nicotinic Ligands to the Discovery of σ1 Receptor Ligands: Pharmacophore Analysis and Rational Design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Comparative analyses of the pharmacophoric elements required for σ1 and nicotinic ligands led to the identification of a potent and selective σ1 ligand (15). Compound 15 displayed high selectivity for the σ1 receptor (Ki, σ1 = 4.1 nM; Ki, σ2 = 1312 nM) with moderate binding affinity for the DAT (Ki = 373 nM) and NET (Ki = 203 nM) in the PDSP broad screening panel of common CNS neurotransmitter transporters and receptors. The key finding in this present work is that a subtle structural modification could be used as a tool to switch a ligand’s selectivity between nAChRs and sigma receptors. PMID:23641311

  8. Challenges Predicting Ligand-Receptor Interactions of Promiscuous Proteins: The Nuclear Receptor PXR

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, Sean; Kortagere, Sandhya; Iyer, Manisha; Reschly, Erica J.; Lill, Markus A.; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of some genes involved in xenobiotic detoxification and apoptosis is performed via the human pregnane X receptor (PXR) which in turn is activated by structurally diverse agonists including steroid hormones. Activation of PXR has the potential to initiate adverse effects, altering drug pharmacokinetics or perturbing physiological processes. Reliable computational prediction of PXR agonists would be valuable for pharmaceutical and toxicological research. There has been limited success with structure-based modeling approaches to predict human PXR activators. Slightly better success has been achieved with ligand-based modeling methods including quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis, pharmacophore modeling and machine learning. In this study, we present a comprehensive analysis focused on prediction of 115 steroids for ligand binding activity towards human PXR. Six crystal structures were used as templates for docking and ligand-based modeling approaches (two-, three-, four- and five-dimensional analyses). The best success at external prediction was achieved with 5D-QSAR. Bayesian models with FCFP_6 descriptors were validated after leaving a large percentage of the dataset out and using an external test set. Docking of ligands to the PXR structure co-crystallized with hyperforin had the best statistics for this method. Sulfated steroids (which are activators) were consistently predicted as non-activators while, poorly predicted steroids were docked in a reverse mode compared to 5α-androstan-3β-ol. Modeling of human PXR represents a complex challenge by virtue of the large, flexible ligand-binding cavity. This study emphasizes this aspect, illustrating modest success using the largest quantitative data set to date and multiple modeling approaches. PMID:20011107

  9. Ligand-independent pathway that controls stability of interferon alpha receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jianghuai; Plotnikov, Alexander; Banerjee, Anamika; Suresh Kumar, K.G.; Ragimbeau, Josiane; Marijanovic, Zrinka; Baker, Darren P.; Pellegrini, Sandra; Fuchs, Serge Y.

    2008-03-07

    Ligand-specific negative regulation of cytokine-induced signaling relies on down regulation of the cytokine receptors. Down regulation of the IFNAR1 sub-unit of the Type I interferon (IFN) receptor proceeds via lysosomal receptor proteolysis, which is triggered by ubiquitination that depends on IFNAR1 serine phosphorylation. While IFN-inducible phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and degradation requires the catalytic activity of the Tyk2 Janus kinase, here we found the ligand- and Tyk2-independent pathway that promotes IFNAR1 phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and degradation when IFNAR1 is expressed at high levels. A major cellular kinase activity that is responsible for IFNAR1 phosphorylation in vitro does not depend on either ligand or Tyk2 activity. Inhibition of ligand-independent IFNAR1 degradation suppresses cell proliferation. We discuss the signaling events that might lead to ubiquitination and degradation of IFNAR1 via ligand-dependent and independent pathways and their potential physiologic significance.

  10. Lighting up G protein-coupled purinergic receptors with engineered fluorescent ligands.

    PubMed

    Ciruela, Francisco; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2015-11-01

    The use of G protein-coupled receptors fluorescent ligands is undergoing continuous expansion. In line with this, fluorescent agonists and antagonists of high affinity for G protein-coupled adenosine and P2Y receptors have been shown to be useful pharmacological probe compounds. Fluorescent ligands for A1R, A2AR, and A3R (adenosine receptors) and P2Y2R, P2Y4R, P2Y6R, and P2Y14R (nucleotide receptors) have been reported. Such ligands have been successfully applied to drug discovery and to GPCR characterization by flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and scanning confocal microscopy. Here we summarize recently reported and readily available representative fluorescent ligands of purinergic receptors. In addition, we pay special attention on the use of this family of fluorescent ligands revealing two main aspects of purinergic receptor biology, namely ligand binding and receptor oligomerization. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Fluorescent Tools in Neuropharmacology'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synergistic Regulation of Coregulator/Nuclear Receptor Interaction by Ligand and DNA.

    PubMed

    de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Zheng, Jie; Novick, Scott; Shang, Jinsai; Hughes, Travis S; Brust, Richard; Munoz-Tello, Paola; Gardner, William J; Marciano, David P; Kong, Xiangming; Griffin, Patrick R; Kojetin, Douglas J

    2017-10-03

    Nuclear receptor (NR) transcription factors bind various coreceptors, small-molecule ligands, DNA response element sequences, and transcriptional coregulator proteins to affect gene transcription. Small-molecule ligands and DNA are known to influence receptor structure, coregulator protein interaction, and function; however, little is known on the mechanism of synergy between ligand and DNA. Using quantitative biochemical, biophysical, and solution structural methods, including (13)C-detected nuclear magnetic resonance and hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry, we show that ligand and DNA cooperatively recruit the intrinsically disordered steroid receptor coactivator-2 (SRC-2/TIF2/GRIP1/NCoA-2) receptor interaction domain to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-retinoid X receptor alpha (PPARγ-RXRα) heterodimer and reveal the binding determinants of the complex. Our data reveal a thermodynamic mechanism by which DNA binding propagates a conformational change in PPARγ-RXRα, stabilizes the receptor ligand binding domain dimer interface, and impacts ligand potency and cooperativity in NR coactivator recruitment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibition of osteoclast formation by 3-methylcholanthrene, a ligand for arylhydrocarbon receptor: suppression of osteoclast differentiation factor in osteogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Naruse, M; Otsuka, E; Naruse, M; Ishihara, Y; Miyagawa-Tomita, S; Hagiwara, H

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effects of 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), a ligand for arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), on osteoclastogenesis. Osteoclast-like cells, in cocultures with mouse spleen cells and clonal osteogenic stromal ST2 cells, are formed from spleen cells by a combination of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) produced by ST2 cells in response to 1alpha,25(OH)(2) Vitamin D(3). 3MC dose-dependently inhibited the formation of mono- and multinuclear osteoclast-like cells. However, 3MC did not inhibit the formation of osteoclast-like cells from mouse spleen cells which was supported by the exogenous soluble RANKL and M-CSF. 3MC did not affect the formation of an actin ring and pits on slices of dentine by osteoclast-like cells, both of which are typical indices of osteoclast activity. These results suggest that 3MC affects osteoclast-supporting cells such as ST2 cells but not osteoclast precursor cells and mature osteoclastic cells. When we measured the expression levels of RANKL mRNA in ST2 cells, 3MC dose-dependently decreased the level of this mRNA. However, 3MC did not affect levels of mRNAs for osteoprotegerin (OPG), M-CSF, and the receptor of 1alpha,25(OH)(2) Vitamin D(3) in ST2 cells. Furthermore, soluble RANKL was able to counteract the inhibitory effect of 3MC on the formation of osteoclast-like cells. Our findings indicate that 3MC inhibits osteoclastogenesis via the inhibition of RANKL expression in osteoblastic cells.

  13. Sigma-1 receptor ligands: potential in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2004-01-01

    The sigma receptor was originally proposed to be a subtype of the opioid receptor. However, it is now clear that sigma receptors are unique non-opioid, non-phencyclidine brain proteins. Two types of sigma receptor exist, the sigma-1 receptor and the sigma-2 receptor. sigma-1 receptors have been cloned and their distribution, physiological functions and roles in signal transduction were recently characterised. Certain sex hormones in the brain (neurosteroids) are known to interact with sigma-1 receptors. sigma-1 receptors regulate glutamate NMDA receptor function and the release of neurotransmitters such as dopamine. They are thus proposed to be involved in learning and memory as well as in certain neuropsychiatric disorders. Selective sigma-1 receptor ligands have been suggested to represent a new class of therapeutic agents for neuropsychiatric disorders, although none have yet been introduced into therapeutic use. Early studies showed that psychotomimetic benzomorphans, as well as several antipsychotics, can bind to sigma-1 receptors. As a result of these findings, sigma-1 receptor ligands have been proposed as being of potential use in the treatment of schizophrenia. Nevertheless, the relationship of sigma-1 receptors to the underlying pathogenesis of schizophrenia is still unclear. sigma-1 receptor ligands have failed to improve acute psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia in clinical trials, but, interestingly, a few studies have shown an improvement in negative symptoms in schizophrenic patients. A number of preclinical studies have shown that selective agonists of sigma-1 receptors affect higher-ordered brain functions such as learning and memory, cognition and mood. These studies indicate that sigma-1 receptor agonists may exert therapeutic effects in depression and senile dementia. Indeed, the sigma-1 receptor agonist igmesine, has been shown to improve depression in a clinical trial. The most distinctive feature of the action of sigma-1 receptor ligands is

  14. Conservation and Divergence of Ligand Recognition and Signal Transduction Mechanisms in Toll-Like Receptors.

    PubMed

    Ohto, Umeharu

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a central role in innate immunity as pathogen sensors. During the last decade, structural analyses of TLRs have revealed the mechanisms of ligand recognition and signal transduction. Each TLR recognizes its cognate ligand in a different manner, whereas signal transduction is achieved by a common mechanism. In this review, the mechanisms of ligand recognition and signal transduction by TLRs are summarized based on recent structural information.

  15. Potential applications for sigma receptor ligands in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    van Waarde, Aren; Rybczynska, Anna A; Ramakrishnan, Nisha K; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Elsinga, Philip H; Dierckx, Rudi A J O

    2015-10-01

    Sigma receptors (sigma-1 and sigma-2) represent two independent classes of proteins. Their endogenous ligands may include the hallucinogen N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and sphingolipid-derived amines which interact with sigma-1 receptors, besides steroid hormones (e.g., progesterone) which bind to both sigma receptor subpopulations. The sigma-1 receptor is a ligand-regulated molecular chaperone with various ion channels and G-protein-coupled membrane receptors as clients. The sigma-2 receptor was identified as the progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1). Although sigma receptors are over-expressed in tumors and up-regulated in rapidly dividing normal tissue, their ligands induce significant cell death only in tumor tissue. Sigma ligands may therefore be used to selectively eradicate tumors. Multiple mechanisms appear to underlie cell killing after administration of sigma ligands, and the signaling pathways are dependent both on the type of ligand and the type of tumor cell. Recent evidence suggests that the sigma-2 receptor is a potential tumor and serum biomarker for human lung cancer and an important target for inhibiting tumor invasion and cancer progression. Current radiochemical efforts are focused on the development of subtype-selective radioligands for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Right now, the mostpromising tracers are [18F]fluspidine and [18F]FTC-146 for sigma-1 receptors and [11C]RHM-1 and [18F]ISO-1 for the sigma-2 subtype. Nanoparticles coupled to sigma ligands have shown considerable potential for targeted delivery of antitumor drugs in animal models of cancer, but clinical studies exploring this strategy in cancer patients have not yet been reported. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  16. Computational Exploration of a Protein Receptor Binding Space with Student Proposed Peptide Ligands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Matthew D.; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W.; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M.

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective "in silico" method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The…

  17. Computational Exploration of a Protein Receptor Binding Space with Student Proposed Peptide Ligands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Matthew D.; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W.; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M.

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective "in silico" method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The…

  18. Computer-aided design of a novel ligand for retinoic acid receptor in cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Carlos H. T. P.; Leopoldino, Andreia M.; Silva, Eloiza H. T.; Espinoza, V. A. A.; Taft, C. A.

    The isotypes of RAR and RXR are retinoic acid and retinoid X acid receptors, respectively, whose ligand-binding domain contains the ligand-dependent activation function, with distinct pharmacological targets for retinoids, involved in the treatment of various cancers and skin diseases. Due to the major challenge which cancer treatment and cure still imposes after many decades to the international scientific community, there is actually considerable interest in new ligands with increased bioactivity. We have focused on the retinoid acid receptor, which is considered an interesting target for drug design. In this work, we carried out density functional geometry optimizations and different docking procedures. We performed screening in a large database (hundreds of thousands of molecules which we optimized at the AM1 level) yielding a set of potential bioactive ligands. A new ligand was selected and optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G* level. A flexible docking program was used to investigate the interactions between the receptor and the new ligand. The result of this work is compared with several crystallographic ligands of RAR. Our theoretically more bioactive new ligand indicates stronger and more hydrogen bonds as well as hydrophobic interactions with the receptor.

  19. Molecular Mechanism of Dioxin Action: Molecular Cloning of the Ah Receptor Using a DNA Recognition Site Probe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-13

    analysis of AhR binding to the DRE (see attached manuscript an the following brief description of these results) and have bequn the library screening . Although...relatively rapidly as to whether they represent AhR clones or not. As mentioned above, we have only recently begun the library screening . We have obtained a...DNA oligonucleotides, identify the DRE oligonucleotide with the highest binding affinity, optimize the screening protocol and begin the actual library

  20. Molecular modeling study of the differential ligand-receptor interaction at the μ, δ and κ opioid receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filizola, Marta; Carteni-Farina, Maria; Perez, Juan J.

    1999-07-01

    3D models of the opioid receptors μ, δ and κ were constructed using BUNDLE, an in-house program to build de novo models of G-protein coupled receptors at the atomic level. Once the three opioid receptors were constructed and before any energy refinement, models were assessed for their compatibility with the results available from point-site mutations carried out on these receptors. In a subsequent step, three selective antagonists to each of three receptors (naltrindole, naltrexone and nor-binaltorphamine) were docked onto each of the three receptors and subsequently energy minimized. The nine resulting complexes were checked for their ability to explain known results of structure-activity studies. Once the models were validated, analysis of the distances between different residues of the receptors and the ligands were computed. This analysis permitted us to identify key residues tentatively involved in direct interaction with the ligand.

  1. Structure-based design of a superagonist ligand for the vitamin D nuclear receptor.

    PubMed

    Hourai, Shinji; Rodrigues, Luis Cezar; Antony, Pierre; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo; Ciesielski, Fabrice; Magnier, Benjamin Claude; Schoonjans, Kristina; Mouriño, Antonio; Rochel, Natacha; Moras, Dino

    2008-04-01

    Vitamin D nuclear receptor (VDR), a ligand-dependent transcriptional regulator, is an important target for multiple clinical applications, such as osteoporosis and cancer. Since exacerbated increase of calcium serum level is currently associated with VDR ligands action, superagonists with low calcium serum levels have been developed. Based on the crystal structures of human VDR (hVDR) bound to 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and superagonists-notably, KH1060-we designed a superagonist ligand. In order to optimize the aliphatic side chain conformation with a subsequent entropy benefit, we incorporated an oxolane ring and generated two stereo diasteromers, AMCR277A and AMCR277B. Only AMCR277A exhibits superagonist activity in vitro, but is as calcemic in vivo as the natural ligand. The crystal structures of the complexes between the ligand binding domain of hVDR and these ligands provide a rational approach to the design of more potent superagonist ligands for potential clinical application.

  2. Lysine Methylation of Progesterone Receptor at Activation Function 1 Regulates both Ligand-independent Activity and Ligand Sensitivity of the Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hwa Hwa; Sze, Siu Kwan; Woo, Amanda Rui En; Sun, Yang; Sim, Kae Hwan; Dong, Xue Ming; Lin, Valerie C-L.

    2014-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) exists in two isoforms, PRA and PRB, and both contain activation functions AF-1 and AF-2. It is believed that AF-1 is primarily responsible for the ligand-independent activity, whereas AF-2 mediates ligand-dependent PR activation. Although more than a dozen post-translational modifications of PR have been reported, no post-translational modification on AF-1 or AF-2 has been reported. Using LC-MS/MS-based proteomic analysis, this study revealed AF-1 monomethylation at Lys-464. Mutational analysis revealed the remarkable importance of Lys-464 in regulating PR activity. Single point mutation K464Q or K464A led to ligand-independent PR gel upshift similar to the ligand-induced gel upshift. This upshift was associated with increases in both ligand-dependent and ligand-independent PR phosphorylation and PR activity due to the hyperactivation of AF-1. In contrast, mutation of Lys-464 to the bulkier phenylalanine to mimic the effect of methylation caused a drastic decrease in PR activity. Importantly, PR-K464Q also showed heightened ligand sensitivity, and this was associated with increases in its functional interaction with transcription co-regulators NCoR1 and SRC-1. These results suggest that monomethylation of PR at Lys-464 probably has a repressive effect on AF-1 activity and ligand sensitivity. PMID:24415758

  3. Lysine methylation of progesterone receptor at activation function 1 regulates both ligand-independent activity and ligand sensitivity of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hwa Hwa; Sze, Siu Kwan; Woo, Amanda Rui En; Sun, Yang; Sim, Kae Hwan; Dong, Xue Ming; Lin, Valerie C-L

    2014-02-28

    Progesterone receptor (PR) exists in two isoforms, PRA and PRB, and both contain activation functions AF-1 and AF-2. It is believed that AF-1 is primarily responsible for the ligand-independent activity, whereas AF-2 mediates ligand-dependent PR activation. Although more than a dozen post-translational modifications of PR have been reported, no post-translational modification on AF-1 or AF-2 has been reported. Using LC-MS/MS-based proteomic analysis, this study revealed AF-1 monomethylation at Lys-464. Mutational analysis revealed the remarkable importance of Lys-464 in regulating PR activity. Single point mutation K464Q or K464A led to ligand-independent PR gel upshift similar to the ligand-induced gel upshift. This upshift was associated with increases in both ligand-dependent and ligand-independent PR phosphorylation and PR activity due to the hyperactivation of AF-1. In contrast, mutation of Lys-464 to the bulkier phenylalanine to mimic the effect of methylation caused a drastic decrease in PR activity. Importantly, PR-K464Q also showed heightened ligand sensitivity, and this was associated with increases in its functional interaction with transcription co-regulators NCoR1 and SRC-1. These results suggest that monomethylation of PR at Lys-464 probably has a repressive effect on AF-1 activity and ligand sensitivity.

  4. Discriminative stimulus effects of the novel imidazoline I2 receptor ligand CR4056 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yanyan; He, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether a novel imidazoline I2 receptor ligand CR4056 could serve as a discriminative stimulus and whether it shares similar discriminative stimulus effects with other reported I2 receptor ligands. Eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate 10.0 mg/kg CR4056 (i.p.) from vehicle in a two-lever food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Once rats acquired the discrimination, substitution and combination studies were conducted to elucidate the underlying receptor mechanisms. All rats acquired CR4056 discrimination after an average of 26 training sessions. Several I2 receptor ligands (phenyzoline, tracizoline, RS45041, and idazoxan, 3.2–75 mg/kg, i.p.) all occasioned > 80% CR4056-associated lever responding. Other drugs that occasioned partial or no CR4056-associated lever responding included methamphetamine, ketamine, the endogenous imidazoline ligand agmatine, the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor harmane, the α2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine, the μ-opioid receptor agonists morphine and methadone, and the selective I2 receptor ligands BU224 and 2-BFI. The α1 adrenoceptor antagonist WB4101, α2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine and μ-opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone failed to alter the stimulus effects of CR4056. Together, these results show that CR4056 can serve as a discriminative stimulus in rats, which demonstrates high pharmacological specificity and appears to be mediated by imidazoline I2 receptors. PMID:25308382

  5. Expression and Purification of Functional Ligand-binding Domains of T1R3 Taste Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nie,Y.; Hobbs, J.; Vigues, S.; Olson, W.; Conn, G.; Munger, S.

    2006-01-01

    Chemosensory receptors, including odor, taste, and vomeronasal receptors, comprise the largest group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the mammalian genome. However, little is known about the molecular determinants that are critical for the detection and discrimination of ligands by most of these receptors. This dearth of understanding is due in part to difficulties in preparing functional receptors suitable for biochemical and biophysical analyses. Here we describe in detail two strategies for the expression and purification of the ligand-binding domain of T1R taste receptors, which are constituents of the sweet and umami taste receptors. These class C GPCRs contain a large extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) that is the site of interaction with most ligands and that is amenable to expression as a separate polypeptide in heterologous cells. The NTD of mouse T1R3 was expressed as two distinct fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and purified by column chromatography. Spectroscopic analysis of the purified NTD proteins shows them to be properly folded and capable of binding ligands. This methodology should not only facilitate the characterization of T1R ligand interactions but may also be useful for dissecting the function of other class C GPCRs such as the large family of orphan V2R vomeronasal receptors.

  6. Ligands raise the constraint that limits constitutive activation in G protein-coupled opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Vezzi, Vanessa; Onaran, H Ongun; Molinari, Paola; Guerrini, Remo; Balboni, Gianfranco; Calò, Girolamo; Costa, Tommaso

    2013-08-16

    Using a cell-free bioluminescence resonance energy transfer strategy we compared the levels of spontaneous and ligand-induced receptor-G protein coupling in δ (DOP) and μ (MOP) opioid receptors. In this assay GDP can suppress spontaneous coupling, thus allowing its quantification. The level of constitutive activity was 4-5 times greater at the DOP than at the MOP receptor. A series of opioid analogues with a common peptidomimetic scaffold displayed remarkable inversions of efficacy in the two receptors. Agonists that enhanced coupling above the low intrinsic level of the MOP receptor were inverse agonists in reducing the greater level of constitutive coupling of the DOP receptor. Yet the intrinsic activities of such ligands are identical when scaled over the GDP base line of both receptors. This pattern is in conflict with the predictions of the ternary complex model and the "two state" extensions. According to this theory, the order of spontaneous and ligand-induced coupling cannot be reversed if a shift of the equilibrium between active and inactive forms raises constitutive activation in one receptor type. We propose that constitutive activation results from a lessened intrinsic barrier that restrains spontaneous coupling. Any ligand, regardless of its efficacy, must enhance this constraint to stabilize the ligand-bound complexed form.

  7. Ligands Raise the Constraint That Limits Constitutive Activation in G Protein-coupled Opioid Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Vezzi, Vanessa; Onaran, H. Ongun; Molinari, Paola; Guerrini, Remo; Balboni, Gianfranco; Calò, Girolamo; Costa, Tommaso

    2013-01-01

    Using a cell-free bioluminescence resonance energy transfer strategy we compared the levels of spontaneous and ligand-induced receptor-G protein coupling in δ (DOP) and μ (MOP) opioid receptors. In this assay GDP can suppress spontaneous coupling, thus allowing its quantification. The level of constitutive activity was 4–5 times greater at the DOP than at the MOP receptor. A series of opioid analogues with a common peptidomimetic scaffold displayed remarkable inversions of efficacy in the two receptors. Agonists that enhanced coupling above the low intrinsic level of the MOP receptor were inverse agonists in reducing the greater level of constitutive coupling of the DOP receptor. Yet the intrinsic activities of such ligands are identical when scaled over the GDP base line of both receptors. This pattern is in conflict with the predictions of the ternary complex model and the “two state” extensions. According to this theory, the order of spontaneous and ligand-induced coupling cannot be reversed if a shift of the equilibrium between active and inactive forms raises constitutive activation in one receptor type. We propose that constitutive activation results from a lessened intrinsic barrier that restrains spontaneous coupling. Any ligand, regardless of its efficacy, must enhance this constraint to stabilize the ligand-bound complexed form. PMID:23836900

  8. Insights into Bombesin receptors and ligands: highlighting recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Álvarez, Irene; Moreno, Paola; Mantey, Samuel A.; Nakamura, Taichi; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Moody, Terry W.; Coy, David H.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    This following article is written for Prof. Abba Kastin’s Festschrift, to add to the tribute to his important role in the advancement of the role of peptides in physiological, as well as pathophysiological processes. There have been many advances during the 35 years of his prominent role in the Peptide field, not only as editor of the journal Peptides, but also as a scientific investigator and editor of two volumes of the Handbook of Biological Active Peptides [146,147]. Similar to the advances with many different peptides, during this 35 year period, there have been much progress made in the understanding of the pharmacology, cell biology and the role of (Bombesin) Bn receptors and their ligands in various disease states, since the original isolation of bombesin from skin of the European frog Bombina bombina in 1970 [76]. This paper will briefly review some of these advances over the time period of Prof Kastin 35 years in the peptide field concentrating on the advances since 2007 when many of the results from earlier studies were summarized [128,129]. It is appropriate to do this because there have been 280 articles published in Peptides during this time on Bombesin-related peptides and it accounts for almost 5% of all publications. Furthermore, 22 Bn publications we have been involved in have been published in either Peptides [14,39,55,58,81,92,93,119,152,216,225,226,231,280,302,309,355,361,362] or in the Prof Kastin’s Handbook of Biological Active Peptides [137,138,331]. PMID:25976083

  9. Effect-directed analysis of Ah receptor-mediated activities caused by PAHs in suspended particulate matter sampled in flood events.

    PubMed

    Wölz, J; Brack, W; Moehlenkamp, C; Claus, E; Braunbeck, Th; Hollert, H

    2010-07-15

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM) sampled during a flood event in the year 2004 at the rivers Neckar and Rhine (Southwest Germany) was assessed for aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activities using EROD induction in the rainbow trout liver cell line RTL-W1. All EROD inductions were normalized to the positive control TCDD and given as bio-TEQ values. Since all samples indicated elevated AhR-mediated toxicities, an effect-directed analysis (EDA) was applied to identify substances causing the effects. In three primary fractions (F1 to F3) non-polar aliphatics, non-polar aromatic substances and more polar substances were separated. Fraction F2, co-eluting with non-polar polyaromatic substances (PACs) including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) gave highest AhR-agonistic effects and, thus, were sub-fractionated into seven secondary fractions (F2-1 to F2-7). Fraction F2-1, co-eluting with PCBs and PCDD/Fs, did not cause AhR-agonist activities. F2-2 to F2-4 containing PACs of less than 16 aromatic C-atoms produced minor activities. Highest inductions were detected with fraction F2-5 to F2-7, containing substances of more than 16 aromatic C-atoms (bio-TEQs up to approximately 4500 pg/g). Concentrations and relative potencies (REPs) of priority EPA-PAHs allowed the calculation of chemical toxicity equivalent concentrations (chem-TEQ values). Based on the chem-TEQs, EPA-PAHs explained between 5 and 58% of crude extract bio-TEQs from both rivers. Whereas fractions F2-1 to F2-4 indicated no biological activities, EPA-PAHs in fraction F2-5 to F2-7 accounted for 2 to 137% of AhR-related activities. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Oestrogen receptor beta ligand: a novel treatment to enhance endogenous functional remyelination.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Daniel K; Mangiardi, Mario; Song, Bingbing; Patel, Rhusheet; Du, Sienmi; Sofroniew, Michael V; Voskuhl, Rhonda R; Tiwari-Woodruff, Seema K

    2010-10-01

    Demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, are characterized by inflammatory demyelination and neurodegeneration of the central nervous system. Therapeutic strategies that induce effective neuroprotection and enhance intrinsic repair mechanisms are central goals for future therapy of multiple sclerosis. Oestrogens and oestrogen receptor ligands are promising treatments to prevent multiple sclerosis-induced neurodegeneration. In the present study we investigated the capacity of oestrogen receptor β ligand treatment to affect callosal axon demyelination and stimulate endogenous myelination in chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis using electrophysiology, electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and tract-tracing methods. Oestrogen receptor β ligand treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice prevented both histopathological and functional abnormalities of callosal axons despite the presence of inflammation. Specifically, there were fewer demyelinated, damaged axons and more myelinated axons with intact nodes of Ranvier in oestrogen receptor β ligand-treated mice. In addition, oestrogen receptor β ligand treatment caused an increase in mature oligodendrocyte numbers, a significant increase in myelin sheath thickness and axon transport. Functional analysis of callosal axon conduction showed a significant improvement in compound action potential amplitudes, latency and in axon refractoriness. These findings show a direct neuroprotective effect of oestrogen receptor β ligand treatment on oligodendrocyte differentiation, myelination and axon conduction during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

  11. ReLiance: a machine learning and literature-based prioritization of receptor--ligand pairings.

    PubMed

    Iacucci, Ernesto; Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Popovic, Dusan; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; De Moor, Bart; Schneider, Reinhard; Moreau, Yves

    2012-09-15

    The prediction of receptor-ligand pairings is an important area of research as intercellular communications are mediated by the successful interaction of these key proteins. As the exhaustive assaying of receptor-ligand pairs is impractical, a computational approach to predict pairings is necessary. We propose a workflow to carry out this interaction prediction task, using a text mining approach in conjunction with a state of the art prediction method, as well as a widely accessible and comprehensive dataset. Among several modern classifiers, random forests have been found to be the best at this prediction task. The training of this classifier was carried out using an experimentally validated dataset of Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) receptor-ligand pairs. New examples, co-cited with the training receptors and ligands, are then classified using the trained classifier. After applying our method, we find that we are able to successfully predict receptor-ligand pairs within the GPCR family with a balanced accuracy of 0.96. Upon further inspection, we find several supported interactions that were not present in the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIPdatabase). We have measured the balanced accuracy of our method resulting in high quality predictions stored in the available database ReLiance. http://homes.esat.kuleuven.be/~bioiuser/ReLianceDB/index.php yves.moreau@esat.kuleuven.be; ernesto.iacucci@gmail.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Pharmacophore modeling improves virtual screening for novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Stephanie N.; Garcia, Zulma; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Bevan, David R.

    2015-05-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in regulating various metabolic and immune processes. The PPAR family of receptors possesses a large binding cavity that imparts promiscuity of ligand binding not common to other nuclear receptors. This feature increases the challenge of using computational methods to identify PPAR ligands that will dock favorably into a structural model. Utilizing both ligand- and structure-based pharmacophore methods, we sought to improve agonist prediction by grouping ligands according to pharmacophore features, and pairing models derived from these features with receptor structures for docking. For 22 of the 33 receptor structures evaluated we observed an increase in true positive rate (TPR) when screening was restricted to compounds sharing molecular features found in rosiglitazone. A combination of structure models used for docking resulted in a higher TPR (40 %) when compared to docking with a single structure model (<20 %). Prediction was also improved when specific protein-ligand interactions between the docked ligands and structure models were given greater weight than the calculated free energy of binding. A large-scale screen of compounds using a marketed drug database verified the predictive ability of the selected structure models. This study highlights the steps necessary to improve screening for PPARγ ligands using multiple structure models, ligand-based pharmacophore data, evaluation of protein-ligand interactions, and comparison of docking datasets. The unique combination of methods presented here holds potential for more efficient screening of compounds with unknown affinity for PPARγ that could serve as candidates for therapeutic development.

  13. Pharmacophore modeling improves virtual screening for novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma ligands

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Stephanie N.; Garcia, Zulma; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Bevan, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in regulating various metabolic and immune processes. The PPAR family of receptors possesses a large binding cavity that imparts promiscuity of ligand binding not common to other nuclear receptors. This feature increases the challenge of using computational methods to identify PPAR ligands that will dock favorably into a structural model. Utilizing both ligand- and structure-based pharmacophore methods, we sought to improve agonist prediction by grouping ligands according to pharmacophore features, and pairing models derived from these features with receptor structures for docking. For 22 of the 33 receptor structures evaluated we observed an increase in true positive rate (TPR) when screening was restricted to compounds sharing molecular features found in rosiglitazone. A combination of structure models used for docking resulted in a higher TPR (40%) when compared to docking with a single structure model (less than 20%). Prediction was also improved when specific protein-ligand interactions between the docked ligands and structure models were given greater weight than the calculated free energy of binding. A large-scale screen of compounds using a marketed drug database verified the predictive ability of the selected structure models. This study highlights the steps necessary to improve screening for PPARγ ligands using multiple structure models, ligand-based pharmacophore data, evaluation of protein-ligand interactions, and comparison of docking datasets. The unique combination of methods presented here holds potential for more efficient screening of compounds with unknown affinity for PPARγ that could serve as candidates for therapeutic development. PMID:25616366

  14. Histamine H4 receptor ligands: future applications and state of art.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Michelle Fidelis; dos Santos Fernandes, João Paulo

    2015-04-01

    Histamine is a chemical transmitter found practically in whole organism and exerts its effects through the interaction with H1 to H4 histaminergic receptors. Specifically, H4 receptors are found mainly in immune cells and blood-forming tissues, thus are involved in inflammatory and immune processes, as well as some actions in central nervous system. Therefore, H4 receptor ligands can have applications in the treatment of chronic inflammatory and immune diseases and may be novel therapeutic option in these conditions. Several H4 receptor ligands have been described from early 2000's until nowadays, being imidazole, indolecarboxamide, 2-aminopyrimidine, quinazoline, and quinoxaline scaffolds the most explored and discussed in this review. Moreover, several studies of molecular modeling using homology models of H4 receptor and QSAR data of the ligands are summarized. The increasing and promising therapeutic applications are leading these compounds to clinical trials, which probably will be part of the next generation of blockbuster drugs.

  15. Ligand Activation of TAM Family Receptors-Implications for Tumor Biology and Therapeutic Response

    PubMed Central

    Davra, Viralkumar; Kimani, Stanley G.; Calianese, David; Birge, Raymond B.

    2016-01-01

    The TAM family of receptors (i.e., Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk), and their ligands Growth arrest specific factor 6 (Gas6) and Protein S (Pros1) contribute to several oncogenic processes, such as cell survival, invasion, migration, chemo-resistance, and metastasis, whereby expression often correlates with poor clinical outcomes. In recent years, there has been great interest in the study of TAM receptors in cancer, stemming both from their roles as oncogenic signaling receptors, as well as their roles in tumor immunology. As a result, several classes of TAM inhibitors that include small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, decoy receptors, as well as novel strategies to target TAM ligands are being developed. This paper will review the biology of TAM receptors and their ligands with a focus on cancer, as well as evidence-based data for the continued pursuit of TAM/Gas6 inhibitors in clinical practice. PMID:27916840

  16. Distinct second extracellular loop structures of the brain cannabinoid CB(1) receptor: implication in ligand binding and receptor function.

    PubMed

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Rudd, James; Ding, Tomas T

    2011-02-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) second extracellular loop (E2) is known to play an important role in receptor structure and function. The brain cannabinoid (CB(1)) receptor is unique in that it lacks the interloop E2 disulfide linkage to the transmembrane (TM) helical bundle, a characteristic of many GPCRs. Recent mutation studies of the CB(1) receptor, however, suggest the presence of an alternative intraloop disulfide bond between two E2 Cys residues. Considering the oxidation state of these Cys residues, we determine the molecular structures of the 17-residue E2 in the dithiol form (E2(dithiol)) and in the disulfide form (E2(disulfide)) of the CB(1) receptor in a fully hydrated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, using a combination of simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulation approaches. We characterize the CB(1) receptor models with these two E2 forms, CB(1)(E2(dithiol)) and CB(1)(E2(disulfide)), by analyzing interaction energy, contact number, core crevice, and cross correlation. The results show that the distinct E2 structures interact differently with the TM helical bundle and uniquely modify the TM helical topology, suggesting that E2 of the CB(1) receptor plays a critical role in stabilizing receptor structure, regulating ligand binding, and ultimately modulating receptor activation. Further studies on the role of E2 of the CB(1) receptor are warranted, particularly comparisons of the ligand-bound form with the present ligand-free form.

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mediate transcriptional activation of the ATP binding cassette transporter ABCB6 gene via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).

    PubMed

    Chavan, Hemantkumar; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2012-09-14

    Liver is endowed with a mechanism to induce hepatic cytochromes P450 (CYP450s) in response to therapeutic drugs and environmental contaminants, leading to increased detoxification and elimination of the xenobiotics. Each CYP450 is composed of an apoprotein moiety and a heme prosthetic group, which is required for CYP450 activity. Thus, under conditions of CYP450 induction, there is a coordinate increase in heme biosynthesis to compensate for the increased expression of CYP450s. ABCB6, a mitochondrial ATP binding cassette transporter, which regulates coproporphyrinogen transport from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria to complete heme biosynthesis, represents a previously unrecognized rate-limiting step in heme biosynthesis. However, it is not known if exposure to drugs and environmental contaminants induces ABCB6 expression, to assure an adequate and apparently coordinated supply of heme for the generation of functional cytochrome holoprotein. In the present study, we demonstrate that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the widely distributed environmental toxicants shown to induce porphyrin accumulation causing hepatic porphyria, up-regulate ABCB6 expression in both mice and humans. Using siRNA technology and Abcb6 knock-out mice, we demonstrate that PAH-mediated increase in hepatic porphyrins is compromised in the absence of ABCB6. Moreover, in vivo studies in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knock-out mice demonstrate that PAH induction of ABCB6 is mediated by AhR. Promoter activation studies combined with electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrate direct interactions between the AhR binding sites in the ABCB6 promoter and the AhR receptor, implicating drug activation mechanisms for ABCB6 similar to those found in inducible cytochrome P450s. These studies are the first to describe direct transcriptional activation of both mouse and human ABCB6 by xenobiotics.

  18. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) Mediate Transcriptional Activation of the ATP Binding Cassette Transporter ABCB6 Gene via the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR)*

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Hemantkumar; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2012-01-01

    Liver is endowed with a mechanism to induce hepatic cytochromes P450 (CYP450s) in response to therapeutic drugs and environmental contaminants, leading to increased detoxification and elimination of the xenobiotics. Each CYP450 is composed of an apoprotein moiety and a heme prosthetic group, which is required for CYP450 activity. Thus, under conditions of CYP450 induction, there is a coordinate increase in heme biosynthesis to compensate for the increased expression of CYP450s. ABCB6, a mitochondrial ATP binding cassette transporter, which regulates coproporphyrinogen transport from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria to complete heme biosynthesis, represents a previously unrecognized rate-limiting step in heme biosynthesis. However, it is not known if exposure to drugs and environmental contaminants induces ABCB6 expression, to assure an adequate and apparently coordinated supply of heme for the generation of functional cytochrome holoprotein. In the present study, we demonstrate that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the widely distributed environmental toxicants shown to induce porphyrin accumulation causing hepatic porphyria, up-regulate ABCB6 expression in both mice and humans. Using siRNA technology and Abcb6 knock-out mice, we demonstrate that PAH-mediated increase in hepatic porphyrins is compromised in the absence of ABCB6. Moreover, in vivo studies in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knock-out mice demonstrate that PAH induction of ABCB6 is mediated by AhR. Promoter activation studies combined with electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrate direct interactions between the AhR binding sites in the ABCB6 promoter and the AhR receptor, implicating drug activation mechanisms for ABCB6 similar to those found in inducible cytochrome P450s. These studies are the first to describe direct transcriptional activation of both mouse and human ABCB6 by xenobiotics. PMID:22761424

  19. Sigma receptor ligands: possible application as therapeutic drugs and as radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2006-01-01

    Sigma receptors are classified into sigma(1) and sigma(2) subtypes. These subtypes display a different tissue distribution and a distinct physiological and pharmacological profile in the central and peripheral nervous system. The characterization of these subtypes and the discovery of new specific sigma receptor ligands demonstrated that sigma receptors are novel targets for the therapeutic treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases (schizophrenia, depression, and cognition), brain ischemia, and cocaine addiction. Furthermore, imaging of sigma(1) receptors in the human brain using specific PET radioligands has started. In addition, the two sigma receptor subtypes are also expressed on tumor cells, where they could be of prognostic relevance. The ability of sigma(2) receptor agonists to inhibit tumor cell proliferation through mechanisms that might involve apoptosis, intracellular Ca(2+), and sphingolipids has promoted the development of sigma(2) receptor agonists as novel therapeutic drugs for treating cancer. Consequently, sigma(2) receptor ligands have been demonstrated to be potentially useful tumor imaging ligands. In this article, we focus on the sigma receptor ligands as therapeutic agents and as radiopharmaceuticals.

  20. An ELISA Based Binding and Competition Method to Rapidly Determine Ligand-receptor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Syedbasha, Mohameedyaseen; Linnik, Janina; Santer, Deanna; O'Shea, Daire; Barakat, Khaled; Joyce, Michael; Khanna, Nina; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Houghton, Michael; Egli, Adrian

    2016-03-14

    A comprehensive understanding of signaling pathways requires detailed knowledge regarding ligand-receptor interaction. This article describes two fast and reliable point-by-point protocols of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the investigation of ligand-receptor interactions: the direct ligand-receptor interaction assay (LRA) and the competition LRA. As a case study, the ELISA based analysis of the interaction between different lambda interferons (IFNLs) and the alpha subunit of their receptor (IL28RA) is presented: the direct LRA is used for the determination of dissociation constants (KD values) between receptor and IFN ligands, and the competition LRA for the determination of the inhibitory capacity of an oligopeptide, which was designed to compete with the IFNLs at their receptor binding site. Analytical steps to estimate KD and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values are described. Finally, the discussion highlights advantages and disadvantages of the presented method and how the results enable a better molecular understanding of ligand-receptor interactions.

  1. Direct identification of ligand-receptor interactions on living cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Frei, Andreas P; Jeon, Ock-Youm; Kilcher, Samuel; Moest, Hansjoerg; Henning, Lisa M; Jost, Christian; Plückthun, Andreas; Mercer, Jason; Aebersold, Ruedi; Carreira, Erick M; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2012-10-01

    Many cellular responses are triggered by proteins, drugs or pathogens binding to cell-surface receptors, but it can be challenging to identify which receptors are bound by a given ligand. Here we describe TRICEPS, a chemoproteomic reagent with three moieties--one that binds ligands containing an amino group, a second that binds glycosylated receptors on living cells and a biotin tag for purifying the receptor peptides for identification by quantitative mass spectrometry. We validated this ligand-based, receptor-capture (LRC) technology using insulin, transferrin, apelin, epidermal growth factor, the therapeutic antibody trastuzumab and two DARPins targeting ErbB2. In some cases, we could also determine the approximate ligand-binding sites on the receptors. Using TRICEPS to label intact mature vaccinia viruses, we identified the cell surface proteins AXL, M6PR, DAG1, CSPG4 and CDH13 as binding factors on human cells. This technology enables the identification of receptors for many types of ligands under near-physiological conditions and without the need for genetic manipulations.

  2. Design, synthesis and X-ray crystallographic study of new nonsecosteroidal vitamin D receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Demizu, Yosuke; Takahashi, Takeo; Kaneko, Fumiya; Sato, Yukiko; Okuda, Haruhiro; Ochiai, Eiji; Horie, Kyohei; Takagi, Ken-Ichiro; Kakuda, Shinji; Takimoto-Kamimura, Midori; Kurihara, Masaaki

    2011-10-15

    We designed and synthesized nonsecosteroidal vitamin D receptor (VDR) ligands that formed H-bonds with six amino acid residues (Tyr143, Ser233, Arg270, Ser274, His301 and His393) of the VDR ligand-binding domain. The ligand YR335 exhibited potent transcriptional activity, which was comparable to those of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and YR301. The crystal structure of the complex formed between YR335 and the VDR ligand-binding domain was solved, which revealed that YR335 formed H-bonds with the six amino acid residues mentioned above.

  3. C-type lectin-like receptors of the dectin-1 cluster: ligands and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Plato, Anthony; Willment, Janet A; Brown, Gordon D

    2013-04-01

    Innate immunity is constructed around genetically encoded receptors that survey the intracellular and extracellular environments for signs of invading microorganisms. These receptors recognise the invader and through complex intracellular networks of molecular signaling, they destroy the threat whilst instructing effective adaptive immune responses. Many of these receptors, like the Toll-like receptors in particular, are well-known for their ability to mediate downstream responses upon recognition of exogenous or endogenous ligands; however, the emerging family known as the C-type lectin-like receptors contains many members that have a huge impact on immune and homeostatic regulation. Of particular interest here are the C-type lectin-like receptors that make up the Dectin-1 cluster and their intracellular signaling motifs that mediate their functions. In this review, we aim to draw together current knowledge of ligands, motifs and signaling pathways, present downstream of Dectin-1 cluster receptors, and discuss how these dictate their role within biological systems.

  4. Bivalent Ligands Targeting Chemokine Receptor Dimerization: Molecular Design and Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Arnatt, Christopher Kent; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that chemokine receptors may form functional dimers with unique pharmacological profiles. A common practice to characterize such G protein-coupled receptor dimerization processes is to apply bivalent ligands as chemical probes which can interact with both receptors simultaneously. Currently, two chemokine receptor dimers have been studied by applying bivalent compounds: the CXCR4-CXCR4 homodimer and the CCR5-MOR heterodimer. These bivalent compounds have revealed how dimerization influences receptor function and may lead to novel therapeutics. Future design of bivalent ligands for chemokine receptor dimers may be aided with the recently available CXCR4 homodimer, and CCR5 monomer crystal structures by more accurately simulating chemokine receptors and their dimers. PMID:25159160

  5. Structural and functional characterization of a novel type of ligand-independent RXR-USP receptor.

    PubMed

    Iwema, Thomas; Billas, Isabelle M L; Beck, Yannick; Bonneton, François; Nierengarten, Hélène; Chaumot, Arnaud; Richards, Geoff; Laudet, Vincent; Moras, Dino

    2007-08-22

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) and Ultraspiracle (USP) play a central role as ubiquitous heterodimerization partners of many nuclear receptors. While it has long been accepted that a wide range of ligands can activate vertebrate/mollusc RXRs, the existence and necessity of specific endogenous ligands activating RXR-USP in vivo is still matter of intense debate. Here we report the existence of a novel type of RXR-USP with a ligand-independent functional conformation. Our studies involved Tribolium USP (TcUSP) as representative of most arthropod RXR-USPs, with high sequence homology to vertebrate/mollusc RXRs. The crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of TcUSP was solved in the context of the functional heterodimer with the ecdysone receptor (EcR). While EcR exhibits a canonical ligand-bound conformation, USP adopts an original apo structure. Our functional data demonstrate that TcUSP is a constitutively silent partner of EcR, and that none of the RXR ligands can bind and activate TcUSP. These findings together with a phylogenetic analysis suggest that RXR-USPs have undergone remarkable functional shifts during evolution and give insight into receptor-ligand binding evolution and dynamics.

  6. Structural adaptability in the ligand-binding pocket of the ecdysone hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Billas, Isabelle M L; Iwema, Thomas; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Mitschler, André; Rochel, Natacha; Moras, Dino

    2003-11-06

    The ecdysteroid hormones coordinate the major stages of insect development, notably moulting and metamorphosis, by binding to the ecdysone receptor (EcR); a ligand-inducible nuclear transcription factor. To bind either ligand or DNA, EcR must form a heterodimer with ultraspiracle (USP), the homologue of retinoid-X receptor. Here we report the crystal structures of the ligand-binding domains of the moth Heliothis virescens EcR-USP heterodimer in complex with the ecdysteroid ponasterone A and with a non-steroidal, lepidopteran-specific agonist BYI06830 used in agrochemical pest control. The two structures of EcR-USP emphasize the universality of heterodimerization as a general mechanism common to both vertebrates and invertebrates. Comparison of the EcR structures in complex with steroidal and non-steroidal ligands reveals radically different and only partially overlapping ligand-binding pockets that could not be predicted by molecular modelling and docking studies. These findings offer new perspectives for the design of insect-specific, environmentally safe insecticides. The concept of a ligand-dependent binding pocket in EcR provides an insight into the moulding of nuclear receptors to their ligand, and has potential applications for human nuclear receptors.

  7. [Human erythrocyte glycophorin C as the receptor for EBA-140 Plasmodium falciparum merozoite ligand].

    PubMed

    Rydzak, Joanna; Kmiecik, Alicja M; Jaśkiewicz, Ewa

    2013-12-23

    Erythrocyte invasion by the blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum parasites is a multistep process involving specific interactions between parasites and red blood cells. Several proteins are involved in this process, including EBL ligands. The structure of the EBA-140 ligand, a member of the EBL protein family, provides a full description of its molecular interactions with the erythrocyte receptor. The crystal structure of the EBA-140 Region II in a complex with sialolactose revealed that the binding region is monomeric. Two glycan binding pockets, one in each F1 or F2 domain, were identified. Stark differences in the receptor binding for the F1 and F2 domains suggests that each domain performs a distinct function. Although both domains are required for effective glycan binding, it seems that the interaction may be mediated solely by the F1 domain. The structure of the binding region and the interaction with glycan are unique to the EBA-140 ligand and not shared by other EBL ligands. The EBA-140 ligand binds specifically to human erythrocytes through the membrane sialoglycoprotein glycophorin C. The receptor site for the EBA-140 ligand was suggested to be a cluster of N-and O-linked sialylated glycans on the GPC molecule, whose conformation is dependent on the polypeptide chain region composed of amino acid residues 36-63. Precise definition of the binding site for the EBA-140 ligand on glycophorin C may be important with respect to human erythrocyte invasion inhibition strategies based on a receptor.

  8. Modulation of Retinoic Acid Receptor-related Orphan Receptor α and γ Activity by 7-Oxygenated Sterol Ligands*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongjun; Kumar, Naresh; Solt, Laura A.; Richardson, Timothy I.; Helvering, Leah M.; Crumbley, Christine; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben D.; Stayrook, Keith R.; Zhang, Xi; Novick, Scott; Chalmers, Michael J.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ (RORα (NR1F1) and RORγ (NR1F3)) are orphan nuclear receptors and perform critical roles in regulation of development, metabolism, and immune function. Cholesterol and cholesterol sulfate have been suggested to be RORα ligands, but the physiological significance is unclear. To date, no endogenous RORγ ligands have been described. Here, we demonstrate that 7-oxygenated sterols function as high affinity ligands for both RORα and RORγ by directly binding to their ligand-binding domains (Ki ∼20 nm), modulating coactivator binding, and suppressing the transcriptional activity of the receptors. One of the 7-oxygenated sterols, 7α-hydroxycholesterol (7α-OHC), serves as a key intermediate in bile acid metabolism, and we show that 7α-OHC modulates the expression of ROR target genes, including Glc-6-Pase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, in an ROR-dependent manner. Furthermore, glucose output from hepatocytes is suppressed by 7α-OHC functioning as an RORα/γ ligand. Thus, RORα and RORγ are ligand-regulated members of the NR superfamily and may serve as sensors for 7-oxygenated sterols. PMID:19965867

  9. Revealing a steroid receptor ligand as a unique PPAR[gamma] agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shengchen; Han, Ying; Shi, Yuzhe; Rong, Hui; Zheng, Songyang; Jin, Shikan; Lin, Shu-Yong; Lin, Sheng-Cai; Li, Yong

    2012-06-28

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) regulates metabolic homeostasis and is a molecular target for anti-diabetic drugs. We report here the identification of a steroid receptor ligand, RU-486, as an unexpected PPAR{gamma} agonist, thereby uncovering a novel signaling route for this steroid drug. Similar to rosiglitazone, RU-486 modulates the expression of key PPAR{gamma} target genes and promotes adipocyte differentiation, but with a lower adipogenic activity. Structural and functional studies of receptor-ligand interactions reveal the molecular basis for a unique binding mode for RU-486 in the PPAR{gamma} ligand-binding pocket with distinctive properties and epitopes, providing the molecular mechanisms for the discrimination of RU-486 from thiazolidinediones (TZDs) drugs. Our findings together indicate that steroid compounds may represent an alternative approach for designing non-TZD PPAR{gamma} ligands in the treatment of insulin resistance.

  10. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor structures: ligand specificity, molecular switch and interactions with regulators.

    PubMed

    Zoete, Vincent; Grosdidier, Aurelien; Michielin, Olivier

    2007-08-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) compose a family of nuclear receptors that mediate the effects of lipidic ligands at the transcriptional level. In this review, we highlight advances in the understanding of the PPAR ligand binding domain (LBD) structure at the atomic level. The overall structure of PPARs LBD is described, and important protein ligand interactions are presented. Structure-activity relationships between isotypes structures and ligand specificity are addressed. It is shown that the numerous experimental three-dimensional structures available, together with in silico simulations, help understanding the role played by the activating function-2 (AF-2) in PPARs activation and its underlying molecular mechanism. The relation between the PPARs constitutive activity and the intrinsic stability of the active conformation is discussed. Finally, the interactions of PPARs LBD with co-activators or co-repressors, as well as with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) are described and considered in relation to PPARs activation.

  11. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Ligand Binding to a Muscarinic G-protein Coupled Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kappel, Kalli; Miao, Yinglong; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating the detailed process of ligand binding to a receptor is pharmaceutically important for identifying druggable binding sites. With the ability to provide atomistic detail, computational methods are well poised to study these processes. Here, accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) is proposed to simulate processes of ligand binding to a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), in this case the M3 muscarinic receptor, which is a target for treating many human diseases, including cancer, diabetes and obesity. Long-timescale aMD simulations were performed to observe the binding of three chemically diverse ligand molecules: antagonist tiotropium (TTP), partial agonist arecoline (ARc), and full agonist acetylcholine (ACh). In comparison with earlier microsecond-timescale conventional MD simulations, aMD greatly accelerated the binding of ACh to the receptor orthosteric ligand-binding site and the binding of TTP to an extracellular vestibule. Further aMD simulations also captured binding of ARc to the receptor orthosteric site. Additionally, all three ligands were observed to bind in the extracellular vestibule during their binding pathways, suggesting that it is a metastable binding site. This study demonstrates the applicability of aMD to protein-ligand binding, especially the drug recognition of GPCRs. PMID:26537408

  12. Molecular modeling of sigma 1 receptor ligands: a model of binding conformational and electrostatic considerations.

    PubMed

    Gund, Tamara M; Floyd, Jie; Jung, Dawoon

    2004-01-01

    We have performed molecular modeling studies on several sigma 1 specific ligands, including PD144418, spipethiane, haloperidol, pentazocine, and others to develop a pharmacophore for sigma 1 receptor-ligand binding, under the assumption that all the compounds interact at the same receptor binding site. The modeling studies have investigated the conformational and electrostatic properties of the ligands. Superposition of active molecules gave the coordinates of the hypothetical 5-point sigma 1 pharmacophore, as follows: R1 (0.85, 7.26, 0.30); R2 (5.47, 2.40, -1.51); R3 (-2.57, 4.82, -7.10); N (-0.71, 3.29, -6.40); carbon centroid (3.16, 4.83, -0.60), where R1, R2 were constructed onto the aromatic ring of each compound to represent hydrophobic interactions with the receptor; and R3 represents a hydrogen bond between the nitrogen atom and the receptor. Additional analyses were used to describe secondary binding sites to electronegative groups such as oxygen or sulfur atom. Those coordinates are (2.34, 5.08, -4.18). The model was verified by fitting other sigma 1 receptor ligands. This model may be used to search conformational databases for other possibly active ligands. In conjunction with rational drug design techniques the model may be useful in design and synthesis of novel sigma 1 ligands of high selectivity and potency. Calculations were performed using Sybyl 6.5.

  13. Free energy calculations offer insights into the influence of receptor flexibility on ligand-receptor binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Dolenc, Jožica; Riniker, Sereina; Gaspari, Roberto; Daura, Xavier; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2011-08-01

    Docking algorithms for computer-aided drug discovery and design often ignore or restrain the flexibility of the receptor, which may lead to a loss of accuracy of the relative free enthalpies of binding. In order to evaluate the contribution of receptor flexibility to relative binding free enthalpies, two host-guest systems have been examined: inclusion complexes of α-cyclodextrin (αCD) with 1-chlorobenzene (ClBn), 1-bromobenzene (BrBn) and toluene (MeBn), and complexes of DNA with the minor-groove binding ligands netropsin (Net) and distamycin (Dist). Molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations reveal that restraining of the flexibility of the receptor can have a significant influence on the estimated relative ligand-receptor binding affinities as well as on the predicted structures of the biomolecular complexes. The influence is particularly pronounced in the case of flexible receptors such as DNA, where a 50% contribution of DNA flexibility towards the relative ligand-DNA binding affinities is observed. The differences in the free enthalpy of binding do not arise only from the changes in ligand-DNA interactions but also from changes in ligand-solvent interactions as well as from the loss of DNA configurational entropy upon restraining.

  14. Visualization and ligand-induced modulation of dopamine receptor dimerization at the single molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, Alina; Weisenburger, Siegfried; Banerjee, Ashutosh; Purkayastha, Nirupam; Kaindl, Jonas M.; Hübner, Harald; Wei, Luxi; Grömer, Teja W.; Kornhuber, Johannes; Tschammer, Nuska; Birdsall, Nigel J. M.; Mashanov, Gregory I.; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), including dopamine receptors, represent a group of important pharmacological targets. An increased formation of dopamine receptor D2 homodimers has been suggested to be associated with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Selective labeling and ligand-induced modulation of dimerization may therefore allow the investigation of the pathophysiological role of these dimers. Using TIRF microscopy at the single molecule level, transient formation of homodimers of dopamine receptors in the membrane of stably transfected CHO cells has been observed. The equilibrium between dimers and monomers was modulated by the binding of ligands; whereas antagonists showed a ratio that was identical to that of unliganded receptors, agonist-bound D2 receptor-ligand complexes resulted in an increase in dimerization. Addition of bivalent D2 receptor ligands also resulted in a large increase in D2 receptor dimers. A physical interaction between the protomers was confirmed using high resolution cryogenic localization microscopy, with ca. 9 nm between the centers of mass. PMID:27615810

  15. The gamma-chain cytokine/receptor system in fish: more ligands and receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiehui; Huang, Wenshu; Costa, Maria M; Secombes, Christopher J

    2011-11-01

    The mammalian gamma-chain (γC) cytokine family consists of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15 and IL-21. They signal through a receptor complex containing the common γC and a private alpha chain, and in the case of IL-2 and IL-15 an additional common IL-2/15Rβ chain. Deficiency of γC signalling in mammals prevents CD4+ T cells from developing effector functions and CD8+ T cells from developing immunological memory. Thus γC cytokines are critical for the generation and peripheral homeostasis of naïve and memory T cells. This review will give an update on the γC ligands and receptor subunits in fish, and also present some new data on the cloning and expression of a second γC and two IL-2Rβ chains in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. In recent years, aided by the availability of sequenced fish genomes and expressed sequence tag databases, five of the six mammalian γC cytokines and their cognate receptors have been discovered in fish, with only the IL-9/IL-9R homologues apparently absent. Paralogues have been discovered in diploid fish and all the receptors described in the tetraploid rainbow trout, including γC itself, IL-2Rβ, IL-4Rα, IL-13Rα1, IL-13Rα2 and IL-2/15Rα, have duplicates. As a consequence of the teleost and salmonid whole genome duplications, even more paralogues may yet be discovered. Some of the paralogues have changes in domain structures and show differential expression and modulation, suggesting the potential for a change in function. Functional characterisation of fish γC cytokines is beginning but made more difficult by the co-existence of so many paralogues of the ligands and their receptors. Initial functional studies have shown that fish γC cytokines can modulate the expression of key cytokines (e.g. interferon-γ, IL-10 and IL-22) of the adaptive immune response, and may thus have promise as adjuvants to improve vaccination efficiency in fish.

  16. Folding and stability of the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Jackson, Sophie E.

    2002-01-01

    A complex pathway involving many molecular chaperones has been proposed for the folding, assembly, and maintenance of a high-affinity ligand-binding form of steroid receptors in vivo, including the glucocorticoid receptor. To better understand this intricate folding and assembly process, we studied the folding of the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor in vitro. We found that this domain can be refolded into a compact, highly structured state in vitro in the absence of chaperones. However, the presence of zwitterionic detergent is required to maintain the domain in a soluble form. In this state, the protein is dimeric and has considerable helical structure as shown by far-UV circular dichroism. Further investigation of the properties of this in vitro refolded state show that it is stable and resistant to denaturation by heat or low concentrations of chemical denaturants. A detailed analysis of the unfolding equilibria using three different structural probes demonstrated that this state unfolds via a highly populated dimeric intermediate state. Together, these data clearly show that the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor does not require chaperones for folding per se. However, this in vitro refolded state binds the ligand dexamethasone only weakly (Kd = 45 μM) compared to the in vivo assembled receptor (Kd = 3.4 nM). We suggest that the role of Hsp90 and associated chaperones is to bind to, and stabilize, a specific conformational state of the receptor which binds ligand with high affinity. PMID:12142447

  17. Heterologous production of death ligands' and death receptors' extracellular domains: structural features and efficient systems.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Michiro

    2012-08-01

    The extracellular domains of death ligands and those of death receptors are closely related to many serious human diseases through the initiation of apoptosis. Recombinant production of the extracellular domains has been investigated due to demand for a large amount of purified samples, which are a prerequisite for their biochemical characterization and constitute the fundamentals of medical applications. This review focuses on the recombinant production of extracellular domains of the major members of death ligand and death receptor families using non-mammalian expression systems with an emphasis on Fas ligand and Fas receptor. In contrast to the efficient production of the functional extracellular domains of TRAIL, TNFα and LTα by intracellular expression systems using Escherichia coli or Pichia pastoris, that of Fas ligand requires the secretory expression systems using P. pastoris or Dictyostelium discoideum, and the productivity in P. pastoris was largely dependent on tag sequence, potential N-glycosylation site and expressed protein region. On the other hand, the exploitation of insect cell systems is generally useful for the preparation of functional extracellular domains of death receptors containing many disulfide bridges in the absence of extended secondary structure, and a Bombyx mori larvae secretion system presented a superior productivity for human Fas receptor extracellular domain. Based on the results obtained so far, further efforts should be devoted to the artificial control of death ligand - death receptor interactions in order to make a contribution to medicine, represented by the development of novel biopharmaceuticals.

  18. Structural and functional characterization of the human formyl peptide receptor ligand-binding region.

    PubMed Central

    Radel, S J; Genco, R J; De Nardin, E

    1994-01-01

    The formyl peptide (N-formyl-1-methionyl-1-leucyl-1-phenylalanine [FMLP]) receptor is involved in the activation of neutrophils and their subsequent response to chemotactic N-formylated peptides. Recently, we found that the first extracellular loop closest to the N-terminal end of the FMLP receptor exhibited the strongest ligand binding compared with that shown by other extracellular regions. By constructing amino acid substitutional variants of this domain, we have determined that residues Arg-84 and Lys-85 on this loop play major roles in ligand-binding activity. Furthermore, random rearrangement of the residues of this receptor region demonstrated that the position of these charged amino acids did not affect their involvement in ligand binding, although their presence was essential for this binding to occur. We propose that the portion of the first N-terminal extracellular loop of the FMLP receptor containing residues Arg-84 and Lys-85 contributes significantly to the active site in ligand-receptor binding. We further propose that this binding is not dependent on defined structure but rather that these charged moieties may function as important "contacts" in receptor-ligand interactions. Images PMID:8168934

  19. Characterization of receptor proteins using affinity cross-linking with biotinylated ligands.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Tomonori; Osada, Tomohiko; Desaki, Yoshitake; Hatamoto, Masahiro; Yamanaka, Yuko; Hirano, Hisashi; Takai, Ryota; Che, Fang-Sik; Kaku, Hanae; Shibuya, Naoto

    2010-02-01

    The plant genome encodes a wide range of receptor-like proteins but the function of most of these proteins is unknown. We propose the use of affinity cross-linking of biotinylated ligands for a ligand-based survey of the corresponding receptor molecules. Biotinylated ligands not only enable the analysis of receptor-ligand interactions without the use of radioactive compounds but also the isolation and identification of receptor molecules by a simple affinity trapping method. We successfully applied this method for the characterization, isolation and identification of the chitin elicitor binding protein (CEBiP). A biocytin hydrazide conjugate of N-acetylchitooctaose (GN8-Bio) was synthesized and used for the detection of CEBiP in the plasma or microsomal membrane preparations from rice and carrot cells. Binding characteristics of CEBiP analyzed by inhibition studies were in good agreement with the previous results obtained with the use of a radiolabeled ligand. The biotin-tagged CEBiP could be purified by avidin affinity chromatography and identified by LC-MALDI-MS/MS after tryptic digestion. We also used this method to detect OsFLS2, a rice receptor-like kinase for the perception of the peptide elicitor flg22, in membrane preparations from rice cells overexpressing OsFLS2. This work demonstrates the applicability of this method to the purification and identification of plant receptor proteins.

  20. New Insights in Glucocorticoid Receptor Signaling—More Than Just a Ligand-Binding Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Scheschowitsch, Karin; Leite, Jacqueline Alves; Assreuy, Jamil

    2017-01-01

    The clinical use of classical glucocorticoids (GC) is narrowed by the many side effects it causes and the resistance to GC observed in some diseases. Since the great majority of GC effects depend on the activation of a glucocorticoid receptor (GR), many research groups had focused to better understand the signaling pathways involving those receptors. Transgenic animal models and genetic modifications of the receptor brought a huge insight into GR mechanisms of action. This in turn opened a new window for the search of selective GR modulators that ideally may have agonistic and antagonistic combined effects and activate one specific signaling pathway, inducing mostly transrepression or transactivation mechanisms. Another important research field concerns to posttranslational modifications that affect the GR and consequently also affect its signaling and function. In this mini review, we discuss many of those aspects of GR signaling, as well as findings like the ligand-independent activation of GR, which add another layer of complexity in GR signaling pathways. Although several recent data have been added to the GR field, much work has yet to be done, especially to find out the biological relevance of those alternative GR signaling pathways. Improving the knowledge about alternative GR signaling pathways and understanding how these pathways intercommunicate and in which situations they are relevant might help to develop new strategies to take benefit of it and to improve GC or other compounds efficacy causing minimal side effects. PMID:28220107

  1. Modeling multivalent ligand-receptor interactions with steric constraints on configurations of cell surface receptor aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Monine, Michael; Posner, Richard; Savage, Paul; Faeder, James; Hlavacek, William S

    2008-01-01

    Signal transduction generally involves multivalent protein-protein interactions, which can produce various protein complexes and post-translational modifications. The reaction networks that characterize these interactions tend to be so large as to challenge conventional simulation procedures. To address this challenge, a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method has been developed that can take advantage of a model specification in terms of reaction rules for molecular interactions. A set of rules implicitly defines the reactions that can occur as a result of the interactions represented by the rules. With the rule-based KMC method, explicit generation of the underlying chemical reaction network implied by rules is avoided. Here, we apply and extend this method to characterize the interactions of a trivalent ligand with a bivalent cell-surface receptor. This system is also studied experimentally. We consider the following kinetic models: an equivalent-site model, an extension of this model, which takes into account steric constraints on the configurations of receptor aggregates, and finally, a model that accounts for cyclic receptor aggregates. Simulation results for the equivalent-site model are consistent with an equilibrium continuum model. Using these models, we investigate the effects of steric constraints and the formation of cyclic aggregates on the kinetics and equilibria of small and large aggregate formation and the percolation phase transition that occurs in this system.

  2. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Utility of Fluorescent Ligands Targeting the μ-Opioid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Schembri, Luke S; Stoddart, Leigh A; Briddon, Stephen J; Kellam, Barrie; Canals, Meritxell; Graham, Bim; Scammells, Peter J

    2015-12-24

    Fluorescently labeled ligands are useful pharmacological research tools for studying receptor localization, trafficking, and signaling processes via fluorescence imaging. They are also employed in fluorescent binding assays. This study is centered on the design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of fluorescent probes for the opioid receptors, for which relatively few non-peptidic fluorescent probes currently exist. The known μ-opioid receptor (MOR) partial agonist, buprenorphine, was structurally elaborated to include an amidoalkylamine linker moiety that was coupled with a range of fluorophores to afford new fluorescent probes. All compounds proved to be selective MOR antagonists. Confocal fluorescence microscopy studies revealed that the probe incorporating a sulfonated cyanine-5 fluorophore was the most appropriate for imaging studies. This ligand was subsequently employed in an automated fluorescence-based competition binding assay, allowing the pKi values of several well-known opioid ligands to be determined. Thus, this new probe will prove useful in future studies of MOR receptor pharmacology.

  3. Regulatory crosstalk and interference between the xenobiotic and hypoxia sensing pathways at the AhR-ARNT-HIF1α signaling node

    PubMed Central

    Vorrink, Sabine U.; Domann, Frederick E.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates many of the responses to toxic environmental chemicals such as TCDD or dioxin-like PCBs. To regulate gene expression, the AhR requires its binding partner, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT). ARNT is also required by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), a crucial regulator of responses to conditions of reduced oxygen. The important role of ARNT in both the AhR and HIF-1α signaling pathways establishes a meaningful foundation for a possible crosstalk between these two vitally important signaling pathways. This crosstalk might lead to interference between the two signaling pathways and thus might play a role in the variety of cellular responses after exposure to AhR ligands and reduced oxygen availability. This review focuses on studies that have analyzed the effect of low oxygen environments and hypoxiamimetic agents on AhR signaling and conversely, the effect of AhR ligands, with a special emphasis on PCBs, on HIF-1α signaling. We highlight studies that assess the role of ARNT, elucidate the mechanism of the crosstalk, and discuss the physiological implications for exposure to AhR-inducing compounds in the context of hypoxia. PMID:24824450

  4. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J.; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site. PMID:27298318

  5. Purinergic P2X receptors: structural models and analysis of ligand-target interaction.

    PubMed

    Dal Ben, Diego; Buccioni, Michela; Lambertucci, Catia; Marucci, Gabriella; Thomas, Ajiroghene; Volpini, Rosaria

    2015-01-07

    The purinergic P2X receptors are ligand-gated cation channels activated by the endogenous ligand ATP. They assemble as homo- or heterotrimers from seven cloned subtypes (P2X1-7) and all trimer subunits present a common topology consisting in intracellular N- and C- termini, two transmembrane domains and a large extracellular domain. These membrane proteins are present in virtually all mammalian tissues and regulate a large variety of responses in physio- and pathological conditions. The development of ligands that selectively activate or block specific P2X receptor subtypes hence represents a promising strategy to obtain novel pharmacological tools for the treatment of pain, cancer, inflammation, and neurological, cardiovascular, and endocrine diseases. The publication of the crystal structures of zebrafish P2X4 receptor in inactive and ATP-bound active forms provided structural data for the analysis of the receptor structure, the interpretation of mutagenesis data, and the depiction of ligand binding and receptor activation mechanism. In addition, the availability of ATP-competitive ligands presenting selectivity for P2X receptor subtypes supports the design of new potent and selective ligands with possibly improved pharmacokinetic profiles, with the final aim to obtain new drugs. This study describes molecular modelling studies performed to develop structural models of the human and rat P2X receptors in inactive and active states. These models allowed to analyse the role of some non-conserved residues at ATP binding site and to study the receptor interaction with some non-specific or subtype selective agonists and antagonists.

  6. Thiophene bioisosteres of spirocyclic σ receptor ligands: relationships between substitution pattern and σ receptor affinity.

    PubMed

    Oberdorf, Christoph; Schepmann, Dirk; Vela, Jose Miguel; Buschmann, Helmut; Holenz, Jörg; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2012-06-14

    On the basis of the 6',7'-dihydrospiro[piperidine-4,4'-thieno[3,2-c]pyran] framework, a series of more than 30 σ ligands with versatile substituents in 1-, 2'-, and 6'-position has been synthesized and pharmacologically evaluated in order to find novel structure-affinity relationships. It was found that a cyclohexylmethyl residue at the piperidine N-atom instead of a benzyl moiety led to increased σ(2) affinity and therefore to decreased σ(1)/σ(2) selectivity. Small substituents (e.g., OH, OCH(3), CN, CH(2)OH) in 6'-position adjacent to the O-atom were well tolerated by the σ(1) receptor. Removal of the substituent in 6'-position resulted in very potent but unselective σ ligands (13). A broad range of substituents with various lipophilic and H-bond forming properties was introduced in 2'-position adjacent to the S-atom without loss of σ(1) affinity. However, very polar and basic substituents in both 2'- and 6'-position decreased the σ(1) affinity considerably. It is postulated that the electron density of the thiophene moiety has a big impact on the σ(1) affinity.

  7. Structure-based discovery of selective serotonin 5-HT(1B) receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, David; Brea, José; Loza, María Isabel; Carlsson, Jens

    2014-08-05

    The development of safe and effective drugs relies on the discovery of selective ligands. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) G protein-coupled receptors are therapeutic targets for CNS disorders but are also associated with adverse drug effects. The determination of crystal structures for the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors provided an opportunity to identify subtype selective ligands using structure-based methods. From docking screens of 1.3 million compounds, 22 molecules were predicted to be selective for the 5-HT1B receptor over the 5-HT2B subtype, a requirement for safe serotonergic drugs. Nine compounds were experimentally verified as 5-HT1B-selective ligands, with up to 300-fold higher affinities for this subtype. Three of the ligands were agonists of the G protein pathway. Analysis of state-of-the-art homology models of the two 5-HT receptors revealed that the crystal structures were critical for predicting selective ligands. Our results demonstrate that structure-based screening can guide the discovery of ligands with specific selectivity profiles.

  8. Use of differential scanning fluorimetry as a high-throughput assay to identify nuclear receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis, Kara; Reed, Aaron; Rahhal, Raneen; Reinking, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Identification of ligands that interact with nuclear receptors is both a major biological problem and an important initial step in drug discovery. Several in vitro and in vivo techniques are commonly used to screen ligand candidates against nuclear receptors; however, none of the current assays allow screening without modification of either the protein and/or the ligand in a high-throughput fashion. Differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) allows unmodified potential ligands to be screened as 10µL reactions in 96-well format against partially purified protein, revealing specific interactors. As a proof of principle, we used a commercially-available nuclear receptor ligand candidate chemical library to identify interactors of the human estrogen receptor α ligand binding domain (ERα LBD). Compounds that interact specifically with ERα LBD stabilize the protein and result in an elevation of the thermal denaturation point, as monitored by the environmentally-sensitive dye SYPRO orange. We successfully identified all three compounds in the library that have previously been identified to interact with ERα, with no false positive results. PMID:22438792

  9. Versatility or promiscuity: the estrogen receptors, control of ligand selectivity and an update on subtype selective ligands.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hui Wen; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2014-08-26

    The estrogen receptors (ERs) are a group of versatile receptors. They regulate an enormity of processes starting in early life and continuing through sexual reproduction, development, and end of life. This review provides a background and structural perspective for the ERs as part of the nuclear receptor superfamily and discusses the ER versatility and promiscuity. The wide repertoire of ER actions is mediated mostly through ligand-activated transcription factors and many DNA response elements in most tissues and organs. Their versatility, however, comes with the drawback of promiscuous interactions with structurally diverse exogenous chemicals with potential for a wide range of adverse health outcomes. Even when interacting with endogenous hormones, ER actions can have adverse effects in disease progression. Finally, how nature controls ER specificity and how the subtle differences in receptor subtypes are exploited in pharmaceutical design to achieve binding specificity and subtype selectivity for desired biological response are discussed. The intent of this review is to complement the large body of literature with emphasis on most recent developments in selective ER ligands.

  10. Trifluoromethoxyl Substituted Phenylethylene Diamines as High Affinity σ Receptor Ligands with Potent Anti-Cocaine Actions

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Trudy A.; Yang, Xiaowen; Wu, Huifang; Pouw, Buddy; Matsumoto, Rae R.; Coop, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The phenylethylene diamines are a class of σ receptor ligands with excellent selectivity over other biological systems and with anti-cocaine actions that involve antagonism of σ1 receptors. In order to increase the potency of the aromatic methoxyl substituted analogues, trifluoromethoxyl groups were introduced to prevent metabolic demethylation. The para-substituted trifluoromethoxyl substituted analogues were shown to have increased σ receptor affinity and represent the most potent anti-cocaine phenylethylene diamines yet described. PMID:18461921

  11. CoMSIA and Docking Study of Rhenium Based Estrogen Receptor Ligand Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Wolohan, Peter; Reichert, David E.

    2007-01-01

    OPLS all atom force field parameters were developed in order to model a diverse set of novel rhenium based estrogen receptor ligands whose relative binding affinities (RBA) to the estrogen receptor alpha isoform (ERα) with respect to 17β-Estradiol were available. The binding properties of these novel rhenium based organometallic complexes were studied with a combination of Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) and docking. A total of 29 estrogen receptor ligands consisting of 11 rhenium complexes and 18 organic ligands were docked inside the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of ERα utilizing the program Gold. The top ranked pose was used to construct CoMSIA models from a training set of 22 of the estrogen receptor ligands which were selected at random. In addition scoring functions from the docking runs and the polar volume (PV) were also studied to investigate their ability to predict RBA ERα. A partial least-squares analysis consisting of the CoMSIA steric, electrostatic and hydrophobic indices together with the polar volume proved sufficiently predictive having a correlation coefficient, r2, of 0.94 and a cross-validated correlation coefficient, q2, utilizing the leave one out method of 0.68. Analysis of the scoring functions from Gold showed particularly poor correlation to RBA ERα which did not improve when the rhenium complexes were extracted to leave the organic ligands. The combined CoMSIA and polar volume model ranked correctly the ligands in order of increasing RBA ERα, illustrating the utility of this method as a prescreening tool in the development of novel rhenium based estrogen receptor ligands. PMID:17280694

  12. Development of sigma-1 (σ1) receptor fluorescent ligands as versatile tools to study σ1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Abate, Carmen; Riganti, Chiara; Pati, Maria Laura; Ghigo, Dario; Berardi, Francesco; Mavlyutov, Timur; Guo, Lian-Wang; Ruoho, Arnold

    2016-01-27

    Despite their controversial physiology, sigma-1 (σ1) receptors are intriguing targets for the development of therapeutic agents for central nervous system diseases. With the aim of providing versatile pharmacological tools to study σ1 receptors, we developed three σ1 fluorescent tracers by functionalizing three well characterized σ1 ligands with a fluorescent tag. A good compromise between σ1 binding affinity and fluorescent properties was reached, and the σ1 specific targeting of the novel tracers was demonstrated by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. These novel ligands were also successfully used in competition binding studies by flow cytometry, showing their utility in nonradioactive binding assays as an alternative strategy to the more classical radioligand binding assays. To the best of our knowledge these are the first σ1 fluorescent ligands to be developed and successfully employed in living cells, representing promising tools to strengthen σ1 receptors related studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Bivalent Ligands for the CB1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanan; Gilliam, Anne; Maitra, Rangan; Damaj, M. Imad; Tajuba, Julianne M.; Seltzman, Herbert H.; Thomas, Brian F.

    2011-01-01

    Dimerization or oligomerization of many G protein-coupled receptors, including the CB1 receptor, is now widely accepted and may have significant implications towards medications development targeting these receptor complexes. A library of bivalent ligands composed of two identical CB1 antagonist pharmacophores derived from SR141716 linked by spacers of various lengths were developed. The affinities of these bivalent ligands at CB1 and CB2 receptors were determined using radiolabeled binding assays. Their functional activities were measured using GTP-γ-S accumulation and intracellular calcium mobilization assays. The results suggest that the nature of the linker and its length are crucial factors for optimum interactions of these ligands at CB1 receptor binding sites. Finally, selected bivalent ligands (5d and 7b) were able to attenuate the antinociceptive effects of the cannabinoid agonist CP55,940 in a rodent tail-flick assay. These novel compounds as probes will enable further evaluation of CB1 receptor dimerization and oligomerization, its functional significance, and may prove useful in the development of new therapeutic approaches to G protein-coupled receptor mediated disorders. PMID:20845959

  14. Theoretical investigation of interaction between the set of ligands and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Prytkova, T. R.; Shmygin, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are neuron receptor proteins that provide a transmission of nerve impulse through the synapses. They are composed of a pentametric assembly of five homologous subunits (5 α7 subunits for α7nAChR, for example), oriented around the central pore. These receptors might be found in the chemical synapses of central and peripheral nervous system, and also in the neuromuscular synapses. Transmembrane domain of the one of such receptors constitutes ion channel. The conductive properties of ion channel strongly depend on the receptor conformation changes in the response of binding with some molecule, f.e. acetylcholine. Investigation of interaction between ligands and acetylcholine receptor is important for drug design. In this work we investigate theoretically the interaction between the set of different ligands (such as vanillin, thymoquinone, etc.) and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (primarily with subunit of the α7nAChR) by different methods and packages (AutodockVina, GROMACS, KVAZAR, HARLEM, VMD). We calculate interaction energy between different ligands in the subunit using molecular dynamics. On the base of obtained calculation results and using molecular docking we found an optimal location of different ligands in the subunit.

  15. Changing the insulin receptor to possess insulin-like growth factor I ligand specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, A.S.; Kjeldsen, T.; Wiberg, F.C.; Christensen, P.M.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Norris, K.; Moeller, K.B.; Moeller, N.P.H. )

    1990-08-14

    To examine the role of the N-terminal part of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor and insulin receptor in determining ligand specificity, the authors prepared an expression vector encoding a hybrid receptor where exon 1 (encoding the signal peptide and seven amino acids of the {alpha}-subunit), exon 2, and exon 3 of the insulin receptor were replaced with the corresponding IGF-I receptor cDNA (938 nucleotides). To allow direct quantitative comparison of the binding capabilities of this hybrid receptor with those of the human IGF-I receptor and the insulin receptor, all three receptors were expressed in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells as soluble molecules and partially purified before characterization. The hybrid IGF-I/insulin receptor bound IGF-I with an affinity comparable to that of the wild-type IGF-I receptor. In contrast, the hybrid receptor no longer displayed high-affinity binding of insulin. These results directly demonstrate that it is possible to change the specificity of the insulin receptor to that of the IGF-I receptor and, furthermore, that the binding specificity for IGF-I is encoded within the nucleotide sequence from 135 to 938 of the IGF-I receptor cDNA. Since the hybrid receptor only bound insulin with low affinity, the insulin binding region is likely to be located within exons 2 and 3 of the insulin receptor.

  16. Development of a unique 3D interaction model of endogenous and synthetic peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinone, Nunzia; Höltje, Hans-Dieter; Carotti, Angelo

    2000-11-01

    Different classes of Peripheral-type Benzodiazepine Receptor (PBR) ligands were examined and common structural elements were detected and used to develop a rational binding model based on energetically allowed ligand conformations. Two lipophilic regions and one electrostatic interaction site are essential features for high affinity ligand binding, while a further lipophilic region plays an important modulator role. A comparative molecular field analysis, performed over 130 PBR ligands by means of the GRID/GOLPE methodology, led to a PLS model with both high fitting and predictive values (r2 = 0.898, Q2 = 0.761). The outcome from the 3D QSAR model and the GRID interaction fields computed on the putative endogenous PBR ligands DBI (Diazepam Binding Inhibitor) and TTN (Tetracontatetraneuropeptide) was used to identify the amino acids most probably involved in PBR binding. Three amino acids, bearing lipophilic side chains, were detected in DBI (Phe49, Leu47 and Met46) and in TTN (Phe33, Leu31 and Met30) as likely residues underlying receptor binding. Moreover, a qualitative comparison of the molecular electrostatic potentials of DBI, TTN and selected synthetic ligands indicated also similar electronic properties. Convergent results from the modeling studies of synthetic and endogenous ligands suggest a common binding mode to PBRs. This may help the rational design of new high affinity PBR ligands.

  17. Ligand binding affinity and changes in the lateral diffusion of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE).

    PubMed

    Syed, Aleem; Zhu, Qiaochu; Smith, Emily A

    2016-12-01

    The effect of ligand on the lateral diffusion of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE), a receptor involved in numerous pathological conditions, remains unknown. Single particle tracking experiments that use quantum dots specifically bound to hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged RAGE (HA-RAGE) are reported to elucidate the effect of ligand binding on HA-RAGE diffusion in GM07373 cell membranes. The ligand used in these studies is methylglyoxal modified-bovine serum albumin (MGO-BSA) containing advanced glycation end products modifications. The binding affinity between soluble RAGE and MGO-BSA increases by 1.8 to 9.7-fold as the percent primary amine modification increases from 24 to 74% and with increasing negative charge on the MGO-BSA. Ligand incubation affects the HA-RAGE diffusion coefficient, the radius of confinement, and duration of confinement. There is, however, no correlation between MGO-BSA ligand binding affinity with soluble RAGE and the extent of the changes in HA-RAGE lateral diffusion. The ligand induced changes to HA-RAGE lateral diffusion do not occur when cholesterol is depleted from the cell membrane, indicating the mechanism for ligand-induced changes to HA-RAGE diffusion is cholesterol dependent. The results presented here serve as a first step in unraveling how ligand influences RAGE lateral diffusion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Gene expression profiling in Caco-2 human colon cells exposed to TCDD, benzo[a]pyrene, and natural Ah receptor agonists from cruciferous vegetables and citrus fruits.

    PubMed

    de Waard, W J; Aarts, J M M J G; Peijnenburg, A A C M; Baykus, H; Talsma, E; Punt, A; de Kok, T M C M; van Schooten, F J; Hoogenboom, L A P

    2008-03-01

    Cruciferous vegetables and citrus fruits are reported to possess health-beneficial properties, but also have been shown to contain natural aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists (NAhRAs). Binding to the AhR is widely assumed to activate the main pathway by which dioxins, like 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exert their toxicity. To establish whether or not activation of the AhR pathway by NAhRAs and dioxin-like substances results in similar cellular responses, gene expression profiles induced in Caco-2 cells were studied using microarray analysis. Cells were exposed to indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ), an acid reaction product from cruciferous vegetables, and to extracts of citrus pulp and grapefruit juice. Gene expression profiles induced by these NAhRAs were compared to those of the xenobiotic AhR agonists TCDD and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). Over 20 genes were found more than 1.5 times up- or down-regulated by TCDD, and the expression of most of these genes was modulated in the same direction and to a similar extent by B[a]P and the NAhRAs. Results were confirmed by RT-PCR, and many of these genes may be involved in dioxin-related toxic effects. In conclusion, this in vitro study showed similar effects induced by NAhRAs, TCDD and B[a]P at the transcriptome level in a human intestinal cell line.

  19. Kappa-opioid receptor-selective dicarboxylic ester-derived salvinorin A ligands.

    PubMed

    Polepally, Prabhakar R; White, Kate; Vardy, Eyal; Roth, Bryan L; Ferreira, Daneel; Zjawiony, Jordan K

    2013-05-15

    Salvinorin A, the active ingredient of the hallucinogenic plant Salvia divinorum is the most potent known naturally occurring hallucinogen and is a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist. To better understand the ligand-receptor interactions, a series of dicarboxylic ester-type of salvinorin A derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their binding affinity at κ-, δ- and μ-opioid receptors. Most of the analogues show high affinity to the κ-opioid receptor. Methyl malonyl derivative 4 shows the highest binding affinity (Ki=2nM), analogues 5, 7, and 14 exhibit significant affinity for the κ-receptor (Ki=21, 36 and 39nM).

  20. Kappa-Opioid Receptor-Selective Dicarboxylic Ester-Derived Salvinorin A Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Polepally, Prabhakar R.; White, Kate; Vardy, Eyal; Roth, Bryan L.; Ferreira, Daneel; Zjawiony, Jordan K.

    2013-01-01

    Salvinorin A, the active ingredient of the hallucinogenic plant Salvia divinorum is the most potent known naturally occurring hallucinogen and is a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist. To better understand the ligand-receptor interactions, a series of dicarboxylic ester-type of salvinorin A derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their binding affinity at κ, δ, and μ-opioid receptors. Most of the analogues show high affinity to the κ-opioid receptor. Methyl malonyl derivative 4 shows the highest binding affinity (Ki = 2 nM), analogues 5, 7, and 14 exhibit significant affinity for the κ-receptor (Ki = 21, 36 and 39 nM). PMID:23587424

  1. Design and synthesis of a piperazinylalkylisoxazole library for subtype selective dopamine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Cha, Mi Young; Choi, Byung Chul; Kang, Kyung Ho; Pae, Ae Nim; Choi, Kung Il; Cho, Yong Seo; Koh, Hun Yeong; Lee, Hee-Yoon; Jung, Daeyoung; Kong, Jae Yang

    2002-05-20

    A piperazinylbutylisoxazole libary was designed, synthesized and screened for the binding affinities to dopamine D2, D3, and D4 receptors. Several ligands were identified to possess high binding affinity and selectivity for the D3 and D4 receptors over the D2 receptor. Compounds 6s and 6t showed K(i) values of 2.6 nM and 3.9 nM for the D3 receptor with 46- and 50-fold selectivity over the D2 receptor, respectively.

  2. Multivalent ligand-receptor-mediated interaction of small filled vesicles with a cellular membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2017-07-01

    The ligand-receptor-mediated contacts of small sub-100-nm-sized lipid vesicles (or nanoparticles) with the cellular membrane are of interest in the contexts of cell-to-cell communication, endocytosis of membrane-coated virions, and drug (RNA) delivery. In all these cases, the interior of vesicles is filled by biologically relevant content. Despite the diversity of such systems, the corresponding ligand-receptor interaction possesses universal features. One of them is that the vesicle-membrane contacts can be accompanied by the redistribution of ligands and receptors between the contact and contact-free regions. In particular, the concentrations of ligands and receptors may become appreciably higher in the contact regions and their composition may there be different compared to that in the suspended state in the solution. A statistical model presented herein describes the corresponding distribution of various ligands and receptors and allows one to calculate the related change of the free energy with variation of the vesicle-engulfment extent. The results obtained are used to clarify the necessary conditions for the vesicle-assisted pathway of drug delivery.

  3. Cell receptor and surface ligand density effects on dynamic states of adhering circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangjun; Cheung, Luthur Siu-Lun; Schroeder, Joyce A; Jiang, Linan; Zohar, Yitshak

    2011-10-21

    Dynamic states of cancer cells moving under shear flow in an antibody-functionalized microchannel are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The cell motion is analyzed with the aid of a simplified physical model featuring a receptor-coated rigid sphere moving above a solid surface with immobilized ligands. The motion of the sphere is described by the Langevin equation accounting for the hydrodynamic loadings, gravitational force, receptor-ligand bindings, and thermal fluctuations; the receptor-ligand bonds are modeled as linear springs. Depending on the applied shear flow rate, three dynamic states of cell motion have been identified: (i) free motion, (ii) rolling adhesion, and (iii) firm adhesion. Of particular interest is the fraction of captured circulating tumor cells, defined as the capture ratio, via specific receptor-ligand bonds. The cell capture ratio decreases with increasing shear flow rate with a characteristic rate. Based on both experimental and theoretical results, the characteristic flow rate increases monotonically with increasing either cell-receptor or surface-ligand density within certain ranges. Utilizing it as a scaling parameter, flow-rate dependent capture ratios for various cell-surface combinations collapse onto a single curve described by an exponential formula.

  4. Design and synthesis of novel dimeric morphinan ligands for kappa and micro opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Neumeyer, John L; Zhang, Ao; Xiong, Wennan; Gu, Xiao-Hui; Hilbert, James E; Knapp, Brian I; Negus, S Stevens; Mello, Nancy K; Bidlack, Jean M

    2003-11-20

    A novel series of morphinans were synthesized, and their binding affinity at and functional selectivity for micro, delta, and kappa opioid receptors were evaluated. These dimeric ligands can be viewed as dimeric morphinans, which were formed by coupling two identical morphinan pharmacophores (cyclorphan (1) or MCL 101 (2)) with varying connecting spacers. Ligands 6 and 7 with alkyl spacers on the nitrogen position and ligands 8 and 9 in which the two morphinan pharmacophores were coupled by ether moieties at the 3-hydroxyl positions showed significant decrease in affinity at all three opioid receptors. An improvement in the affinity was achieved by introducing an ester moiety as the spacer in the dimeric morphinans. It was observed that the affinity of these ligands was sensitive to the character and length of the spacer. Compound 13 (MCL-139) with a 4-carbon ester spacer, compound 17 (MCL-144) containing a 10-carbon spacer, and compound 19 (MCL-145) with the conformationally constrained fumaryl spacer were the most potent ligands in this series, displaying excellent affinities at micro and kappa receptors (K(i) = 0.09-0.2 nM at micro and K(i) = 0.078-0.049 nM at kappa), which were comparable to the parent compound 2. Ligand 12, a compound containing only one morphinan pharmacophore and a long-chain ester group, had affinity at both micro and kappa receptors almost identical to that of the parent ligand 2. In the [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding assay, ligands 13, 17, and 19 and their parent morphinans 1 and 2 stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding mediated by the micro and kappa receptors. Compounds 13 and 17 were full kappa agonists and partial micro agonists, while compound 19 was a partial agonist at both micro and kappa receptors. These novel ligands, as well as their interesting pharmacological properties, will serve as the basis for our continuing investigation of the dimeric ligands as potential probes for the pharmacotherapy of cocaine abuse and may also open new

  5. Antihyperalgesic effects of imidazoline I2 receptor ligands in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Xu; Thorn, David A; Qiu, Yanyan; Peng, Bi-Wen; Zhang, Yanan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose A new imidazoline I2 receptor ligand, CR4056, is effective for chronic inflammatory pain and diabetic neuropathy. However, it is unclear whether other I2 receptor ligands have similar effects and whether antinociceptive tolerance develops with repeated treatment. Experimental Approach The Von Frey filament test was used to measure mechanical hyperalgesia and the plantar test to measure thermal hyperalgesia in rats injected with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) treatment or had undergone surgery to induce chronic constriction injury (CCI), models of inflammatory pain and peripheral neuropathic pain respectively. The effects of morphine and I2 receptor ligands, 2-BFI, BU224, tracizoline and CR4056, 3.2–32 mg·kg−1, i.p., on hyperalgesia or affective pain (as measured by a place escape/avoidance paradigm) were studied in separate experiments. Key Results Morphine and the I2 receptor ligands (2-BFI, BU224 and tracizoline) all dose-dependently attenuated mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in CFA-treated rats. The anti-hyperalgesic effects of 2-BFI in CFA-treated and CCI rats were attenuated by the I2 receptor antagonist idazoxan. The combination of 2-BFI and morphine produced additive effects against mechanical hyperalgesia in CFA-treated rats. Repeated treatment (daily for 7–9 days) with 2-BFI or CR4056 did not produce antinociceptive tolerance in CFA-treated or CCI rats. Morphine and the I2 receptor ligands (2-BFI, BU224 and CR4056) were all effective at attenuating place escape/avoidance behaviour in CFA-treated rats. Conclusions and Implications Imidazoline I2 receptor ligands have antihyperalgesic effects in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain and may represent a new class of pharmacotherapeutics for the management of chronic pain. PMID:24329196

  6. Ligands of the Neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mittapalli, Gopi Kumar; Roberts, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant neuropeptides in the mammalian brain and exerts a variety of physiological processes in humans via four different receptor subtypes Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5. Y2 receptor is the most abundant Y subtype receptor in the central nervous system and implicated with food intake, bone formation, affective disorders, alcohol and drugs of abuse, epilepsy, pain, and cancer. The lack of small molecule non-peptidic Y2 receptor modulators suitable as in vivo pharmacological tools hampered the progress to uncover the precise pharmacological role of Y2. Only in recent years, several potent, selective and non-peptidic Y2 antagonists have been discovered providing the tools to validate Y2 receptor as a therapeutic target. This article reviews Y2 receptor modulators mainly non-peptidic antagonists and their structure-activity relationships. PMID:24365162

  7. Programmable Multivalent Display of Receptor Ligands using Peptide Nucleic Acid Nanoscaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Englund, Ethan A.; Wang, Deyun; Fujigaki, Hidetsugu; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Micklitsch, Christopher M.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Martin-Manso, Gema; Pendrak, Michael L.; Roberts, David D.; Durell, Stewart R.; Appella, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    Multivalent effects dictate the binding affinity of multiple ligands on one molecular entity to receptors. Integrins are receptors that mediate cell attachment through multivalent binding to peptide sequences within the extracellular matrix, and overexpression promotes the metastasis of some cancers. Multivalent display of integrin antagonists enhances their efficacy, but current scaffolds have limited ranges and precision for the display of ligands. Here we present an approach to study multivalent effects across wide ranges of ligand number, density, and three-dimensional arrangement. Using L-lysine γ-substituted peptide nucleic acids, the multivalent effects of an integrin antagonist were examined over a range of 1 to 45 ligands. The optimal construct improves the inhibitory activity of the antagonist by two orders of magnitude against the binding of melanoma cells to the extracellular matrix in both in vitro and in vivo models. PMID:22233624

  8. A new Lamarckian genetic algorithm for flexible ligand-receptor docking.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, Jan; Rurainski, Alexander; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Neumann, Dirk

    2010-07-15

    We present a Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA) variant for flexible ligand-receptor docking which allows to handle a large number of degrees of freedom. Our hybrid method combines a multi-deme LGA with a recently published gradient-based method for local optimization of molecular complexes. We compared the performance of our new hybrid method to two non gradient-based search heuristics on the Astex diverse set for flexible ligand-receptor docking. Our results show that the novel approach is clearly superior to other LGAs employing a stochastic optimization method. The new algorithm features a shorter run time and gives substantially better results, especially with increasing complexity of the ligands. Thus, it may be used to dock ligands with many rotatable bonds with high efficiency.

  9. A glucocorticoid/retinoic acid receptor chimera that displays cytoplasmic/nuclear translocation in response to retinoic acid. A real time sensing assay for nuclear receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Mackem, S; Baumann, C T; Hager, G L

    2001-12-07

    Members of the nuclear receptor superfamily play key roles in a host of physiologic and pathologic processes from embryogenesis to cancer. Some members, including the retinoic acid receptor (RAR), are activated by ligand binding but are unaffected in their subcellular distribution, which is predominantly nuclear. In contrast, several members of the steroid receptor family, including the glucocorticoid receptor, are cytoplasmic and only translocate to the nucleus after ligand binding. We have constructed chimeras between RAR and glucocorticoid receptor that selectively respond to RAR agonists but display cytoplasmic localization in the absence of ligand. These chimeric receptors manifest both nuclear translocation and gene activation functions in response to physiological concentrations of RAR ligands. The ability to achieve regulated subcellular trafficking with a heterologous ligand binding domain has implications both for current models of receptor translocation and for structural-functional conservation of ligand binding domains broadly across the receptor superfamily. When coupled to the green fluorescent protein, chimeric receptors offer a powerful new tool to 1) study mechanisms of steroid receptor translocation, 2) detect dynamic and graded distributions of ligands in complex microenvironments such as embryos, and 3) screen for novel ligands of "orphan" receptors in vivo.

  10. Identification of Receptor Ligands and Receptor Subtypes Using Antagonists in a Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Cell Biosensor Separation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Harvey A.; Orwar, Owe; Scheller, Richard H.; Zare, Richard N.

    1995-08-01

    A capillary electrophoresis system with single-cell biosensors as a detector has been used to separate and identify ligands in complex biological samples. The power of this procedure was significantly increased by introducing antagonists that inhibited the cellular response from selected ligand-receptor interactions. The single-cell biosensor was based on the ligand-receptor binding and G-protein-mediated signal transduction pathways in PC12 and NG108-15 cell lines. Receptor activation was measured as increases in cytosolic free calcium ion concentration by using fluorescence microscopy with the intracellular calcium ion indicator fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester. Specifically, a mixture of bradykinin (BK) and acetylcholine (ACh) was fractionated and the components were identified by inhibiting the cellular response with icatibant (HOE 140), a selective antagonist to the BK B_2 receptor subtype (B_2BK), and atropine, an antagonist to muscarinic ACh receptor subtypes. Structurally related forms of BK were also identified based on inhibiting B_2BK receptors. Applications of this technique include identification of endogenous BK in a lysate of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Hep G2) and screening for bioactivity of BK degradation products in human blood plasma. The data demonstrate that the use of antagonists with a single-cell biosensor separation system aids identification of separated components and receptor subtypes.

  11. Ligand-binding dynamics rewire cellular signaling via Estrogen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sathish; Nwachukwu, Jerome C.; Parent, Alex A.; Cavett, Valerie; Nowak, Jason; Hughes, Travis S.; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Nettles, Kendall W.

    2013-01-01

    Ligand-binding dynamics control allosteric signaling through the estrogen receptor-α (ERα), but the biological consequences of such dynamic binding orientations are unknown. Here, we compare a set of ER ligands having dynamic binding orientation (dynamic ligands) with a control set of isomers that are constrained to bind in a single orientation (constrained ligands). Proliferation of breast cancer cells directed by constrained ligands is associated with DNA binding, coactivator recruitment and activation of the estrogen-induced gene GREB1, reflecting a highly interconnected signaling network. In contrast, proliferation driven by dynamic ligands is associated with induction of ERα-mediated transcription in a DNA-binding domain (DBD)-dependent manner. Further, dynamic ligands displayed enhanced anti-inflammatory activity. The DBD-dependent profile was predictive of these signaling patterns in a larger diverse set of natural and synthetic ligands. Thus, ligand dynamics directs unique signaling pathways, and reveals a novel role of the DBD in allosteric control of ERα-mediated signaling. PMID:23524984

  12. Photomodulation of G protein-coupled adenosine receptors by a novel light-switchable ligand.

    PubMed

    Bahamonde, María Isabel; Taura, Jaume; Paoletta, Silvia; Gakh, Andrei A; Chakraborty, Saibal; Hernando, Jordi; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gorostiza, Pau; Ciruela, Francisco

    2014-10-15

    The adenosinergic system operates through G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, which have become promising therapeutic targets for a wide range of pathological conditions. However, the ubiquity of adenosine receptors and the eventual lack of selectivity of adenosine-based drugs have frequently diminished their therapeutic potential. Accordingly, here we aimed to develop a new generation of light-switchable adenosine receptor ligands that change their intrinsic activity upon irradiation, thus allowing the spatiotemporal control of receptor functioning (i.e., receptor activation/inactivation dependent on location and timing). Therefore, we synthesized an orthosteric, photoisomerizable, and nonselective adenosine receptor agonist, nucleoside derivative MRS5543 containing an aryl diazo linkage on the N(6) substituent, which in the dark (relaxed isomer) behaved as a full adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) and partial adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) agonist. Conversely, upon photoisomerization with blue light (460 nm), it remained a full A3R agonist but became an A2AR antagonist. Interestingly, molecular modeling suggested that structural differences encountered within the third extracellular loop of each receptor could modulate the intrinsic, receptor subtype-dependent, activity. Overall, the development of adenosine receptor ligands with photoswitchable activity expands the pharmacological toolbox in support of research and possibly opens new pharmacotherapeutic opportunities.

  13. Photomodulation of G Protein-Coupled Adenosine Receptors by a Novel Light-Switchable Ligand

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The adenosinergic system operates through G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, which have become promising therapeutic targets for a wide range of pathological conditions. However, the ubiquity of adenosine receptors and the eventual lack of selectivity of adenosine-based drugs have frequently diminished their therapeutic potential. Accordingly, here we aimed to develop a new generation of light-switchable adenosine receptor ligands that change their intrinsic activity upon irradiation, thus allowing the spatiotemporal control of receptor functioning (i.e., receptor activation/inactivation dependent on location and timing). Therefore, we synthesized an orthosteric, photoisomerizable, and nonselective adenosine receptor agonist, nucleoside derivative MRS5543 containing an aryl diazo linkage on the N6 substituent, which in the dark (relaxed isomer) behaved as a full adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) and partial adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) agonist. Conversely, upon photoisomerization with blue light (460 nm), it remained a full A3R agonist but became an A2AR antagonist. Interestingly, molecular modeling suggested that structural differences encountered within the third extracellular loop of each receptor could modulate the intrinsic, receptor subtype-dependent, activity. Overall, the development of adenosine receptor ligands with photoswitchable activity expands the pharmacological toolbox in support of research and possibly opens new pharmacotherapeutic opportunities. PMID:25248077

  14. Ligand specificities of recombinant retinoic acid receptors RAR alpha and RAR beta.

    PubMed Central

    Crettaz, M; Baron, A; Siegenthaler, G; Hunziker, W

    1990-01-01

    Binding of retinoic acid (RA) to specific RA receptors alpha and beta (RAR alpha and RAR beta) was studied. Receptors were obtained in two ways: (1) full-length receptors were produced by transient expression of the respective human cDNAs in COS 1 cells; and (2) the ligand-binding domains of RAR alpha and RAR beta were produced in Escherichia coli. RA binding to the wild-type and truncated forms of the receptor was identical for both RAR alpha and RAR beta, indicating that the ligand-binding domains have retained the binding characteristics of the intact receptors. Furthermore, RA bound with the same affinity to both RAR alpha and RAR beta. Only retinoid analogues with an acidic end-group were able to actively bind to both receptors. On measuring the binding of various retinoids, we have found that the properties of the ligand-binding sites of RAR alpha and RAR beta were rather similar. Two retinoid analogues were capable of binding preferentially to either RAR alpha or RAR beta, suggesting that it may be possible to synthesize specific ligands for RAR alpha and RAR beta. PMID:2176462

  15. The unique extracellular disulfide loop of the glycine receptor is a principal ligand binding element.

    PubMed Central

    Rajendra, S; Vandenberg, R J; Pierce, K D; Cunningham, A M; French, P W; Barry, P H; Schofield, P R

    1995-01-01

    A loop structure, formed by the putative disulfide bridging of Cys198 and Cys209, is a principal element of the ligand binding site in the glycine receptor (GlyR). Disruption of the loop's tertiary structure by Ser mutations of these Cys residues either prevented receptor assembly on the cell surface, or created receptors unable to be activated by agonists or to bind the competitive antagonist, strychnine. Mutation of residues Lys200, Tyr202 and Thr204 within this loop reduced agonist binding and channel activation sensitivities by up to 55-, 520- and 190-fold, respectively, without altering maximal current sizes, and mutations of Lys200 and Tyr202 abolished strychnine binding to the receptor. Removal of the hydroxyl moiety from Tyr202 by mutation to Phe profoundly reduced agonist sensitivity, whilst removal of the benzene ring abolished strychnine binding, thus demonstrating that Tyr202 is crucial for both agonist and antagonist binding to the GlyR. Tyr202 also influences receptor assembly on the cell surface, with only large chain substitutions (Phe, Leu and Arg, but not Thr, Ser and Ala) forming functional receptors. Our data demonstrate the presence of a second ligand binding site in the GlyR, consistent with the three-loop model of ligand binding to the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. Images PMID:7621814

  16. A comprehensive ligand based mapping of the σ₂ receptor binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Derek J; Kinder, David H; Mahfouz, Tarek M

    2014-01-01

    The sigma (σ) receptor system consists of at least two major receptor subtypes: σ₁ and σ₂. Several potential therapeutic applications would benefit from structural knowledge of the σ₂ receptor but gaining this knowledge has been hampered by the difficulties associated with its isolation and, thus, characterization. Here, a ligand based approach has been adopted using the program PHASE® and a group of 41 potent and structurally diverse σ₂ ligands to develop several pharmacophore models for different families of σ₂ ligands. These pharmacophores were analyzed to identify the different binding modes to the receptor and were combined together to construct a comprehensive pharmacophore that was used to develop a structural model for the σ₂ binding pocket. A total of six binding modes were identified and could be classified as neutral or charged modes. The results presented here also indicate the significance of hydrophobic interactions to σ₂ binding and the requirement of hydrogen bonding interactions to increase the affinity for this receptor subtype. This work adds breadth to our knowledge of this receptor's binding site, and should contribute significantly to the development of novel selective σ₂ ligands.

  17. Targeting ligand-operated chaperone sigma-1 receptors in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Teruo, Hayashi; Shang-Yi, Tsai; Tomohisa, Mori; Michiko, Fujimoto; Tsung-Ping, Su

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Current conventional therapeutic drugs for the treatment of psychiatric or neurodegenerative disorders have certain limitations of use. Psychotherapeutic drugs such as typical and atypical antipsychotics, tricyclic antidepressants, and selective monoamine reuptake inhibitors, aim to normalize the hyper- or hypo-neurotransmission of monoaminergic systems. Despite their great contribution to the outcomes of psychiatric patients, these agents often exert severe side effects and require chronic treatments to promote amelioration of symptoms. Furthermore, drugs available for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders are severely limited. Areas covered This review discusses recent evidence that has shed light on sigma-1 receptor ligands, which may serve as a new class of antidepressants or neuroprotective agents. Sigma-1 receptors are novel ligand-operated molecular chaperones regulating a variety of signal transduction, ER stress, cellular redox, cellular survival, and synaptogenesis. Selective sigma-1 receptor ligands exert rapid antidepressant-like, anxiolytic, antinociceptive and robust neuroprotective actions in preclinical studies. The review also looks at recent studies which suggest that reactive oxygen species might play a crucial role as signal integrators at the downstream of Sig-1Rs Expert opinion The significant advances in sigma receptor research in the last decade have begun to elucidate the intracellular signal cascades upstream and downstream of sigma-1 receptors. The novel ligand-operated properties of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone may enable a variety of interventions by which stress-related cellular systems are pharmacologically controlled. PMID:21375464

  18. Designing multivalent proteins based on natural killer cell receptors and their ligands as immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Smits, Nicole C; Coupet, Tiffany A; Godbersen, Claire; Sentman, Charles L

    2016-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an important component of the innate immune system that play a key role in host immunity against cancer. NK cell recognition and activation is based on cell surface receptors recognizing specific ligands that are expressed on many types of tumor cells. Some of these receptors are capable of activating NK cell function while other receptors inhibit NK cell function. Therapeutic approaches to treat cancer have been developed based on preventing NK cell inhibition or using NK cell receptors and their ligands to activate NK cells or T cells to destroy tumor cells. This article describes the various strategies for targeting NK cell receptors and NK cell receptor ligands using multivalent proteins to activate immunity against cancer. NK cell receptors work in synergy to activate NK cell effector responses. Effective anti-cancer strategies will need to not only kill tumor cells but must also lead to the destruction of the tumor microenvironment. Immunotherapy based on NK cells and their receptors has the capacity to accomplish this through triggering lymphocyte cytotoxicity and cytokine production.

  19. Steroidal Bivalent Ligands for the Estrogen Receptor: Design, Synthesis, Characterization and Binding Affinities

    PubMed Central

    LaFrate, Andrew L.; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Steroidal bivalent ligands for the estrogen receptor (ER) were designed using crystal structures of ERα dimers as a template. The syntheses of several 17α-ethynylestradiol-based bivalent ligands with varying linker compositions and lengths are described. The binding affinities of these bivalent ligands for ERα and ERβ were determined. In the two series of bivalent ligands that we synthesized, there is a clear correlation between linker length and binding affinity, both of which reach a maximum at the same tether length. Further studies are underway to explore aspects of bivalent ligand and control compound binding to the ERs and their effects on ER dimer formation; these results will be reported in a subsequent publication. PMID:19394231

  20. Progesterone receptor ligand binding pocket flexibility: crystal structures of the norethindrone and mometasone furoate complexes.

    PubMed

    Madauss, Kevin P; Deng, Su-Jun; Austin, Robert J H; Lambert, Millard H; McLay, Iain; Pritchard, John; Short, Steven A; Stewart, Eugene L; Uings, Ian J; Williams, Shawn P

    2004-06-17

    Although progesterone, the natural ligand of the progesterone receptor (PR), has a hydrogen atom at the 17alpha position, other potent steroid agonists such as norethindrone and mometasone furoate have larger substituents at this position that are accommodated by the PR ligand binding pocket. Crystallographic analysis of PR ligand binding domain complexes clearly demonstrated that these moieties were accommodated by local shifts of the protein main chain and by adoption of alternative side chain rotamer conformations of ligand-proximal amino acids. These conformational changes imparted a ligand-specific volume to the binding pocket, from 490 A3 in the metribolone complex to 520 A3 in the norethindrone complex, 565 A3 in the progesterone complex, and 730 A3 in the mometasone furoate complex. Despite these marked alterations in binding pocket volume, critical interactions essential for establishment of an active AF2 conformation were maintained.

  1. Identification of a ligand-dependent switch within a muscarinic receptor.

    PubMed

    Spalding, T A; Burstein, E S; Henderson, S C; Ducote, K R; Brann, M R

    1998-08-21

    G-protein-coupled receptors spontaneously switch between active and inactive conformations. Agonists stabilize the active conformation, whereas antagonists stabilize the inactive conformation. In a systematic search for residues that participate in receptor function, several regions of the m5 muscarinic receptor were randomly mutated and tested for their functional properties. Mutations spanning one face of transmembrane 6 (TM6) were found to induce high levels of receptor activity in the absence of agonists (constitutive activity). The same face of TM6 contained several residues crucial for receptor activation by agonists and one residue identified as a contact site for both agonists and antagonists. In addition, one mutation induced agonist-like responses from the receptor when exposed to classical antagonists. These results suggest that TM6 is a switch that defines the activation state of the receptor, and that ligand interactions with TM6 stabilize the receptor in either an active or an inactive conformation.

  2. NMR and computational methods in the structural and dynamic characterization of ligand-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Ghitti, Michela; Musco, Giovanna; Spitaleri, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The recurrent failures in drug discovery campaigns, the asymmetry between the enormous financial investments and the relatively scarce results have fostered the development of strategies based on complementary methods. In this context in recent years the rigid lock-and-key binding concept had to be revisited in favour of a dynamic model of molecular recognition accounting for conformational changes of both the ligand and the receptor. The high level of complexity required by a dynamic description of the processes underlying molecular recognition requires a multidisciplinary investigation approach. In this perspective, the combination of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with molecular docking, conformational searches along with molecular dynamics simulations has given new insights into the dynamic mechanisms governing ligand receptor interactions, thus giving an enormous contribution to the identification and design of new and effective drugs. Herein a succinct overview on the applications of both NMR and computational methods to the structural and dynamic characterization of ligand-receptor interactions will be presented.

  3. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand–receptor design

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand–receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand–receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:26350224

  4. Generating "fragment-based virtual library" using pocket similarity search of ligand-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Khashan, Raed S

    2015-01-01

    As the number of available ligand-receptor complexes is increasing, researchers are becoming more dedicated to mine these complexes to aid in the drug design and development process. We present free software which is developed as a tool for performing similarity search across ligand-receptor complexes for identifying binding pockets which are similar to that of a target receptor. The search is based on 3D-geometric and chemical similarity of the atoms forming the binding pocket. For each match identified, the ligand's fragment(s) corresponding to that binding pocket are extracted, thus forming a virtual library of fragments (FragVLib) that is useful for structure-based drug design. The program provides a very useful tool to explore available databases.

  5. Biasing effects of receptor-ligand complexes on protein-unfolding statistics.

    PubMed

    Schoeler, Constantin; Verdorfer, Tobias; Gaub, Hermann E; Nash, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Protein receptor-ligand pairs are increasingly used as specific molecular handles in single-molecule protein-unfolding experiments. Further, known marker domains, also referred to as fingerprints, provide unique unfolding signatures to identify specific single-molecule interactions, when receptor-ligand pairs themselves are investigated. We show here that in cases where there is an overlap between the probability distribution associated with fingerprint domain unfolding and that associated with receptor-ligand dissociation, the experimentally measured force distributions are mutually biased. This biasing effect masks the true parameters of the underlying free energy landscape. To address this, we present a model-free theoretical framework that corrects for the biasing effect caused by such overlapping distributions.

  6. Design, Synthesis, and Structure–Activity Relationships of Highly Potent 5-HT3 Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The 5-HT3 receptor, a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC), is an important therapeutic target. During a recent fragment screen, 6-chloro-N-methyl-2-(4-methyl-1,4-diazepan-1-yl)quinazolin-4-amine (1) was identified as a 5-HT3R hit fragment. Here we describe the synthesis and structure–activity relationships (SAR) of a series of (iso)quinoline and quinazoline compounds that were synthesized and screened for 5-HT3R affinity using a [3H]granisetron displacement assay. These studies resulted in the discovery of several high affinity ligands of which compound 22 showed the highest affinity (pKi > 10) for the 5-HT3 receptor. The observed SAR is in agreement with established pharmacophore models for 5-HT3 ligands and is used for ligand–receptor binding mode prediction using homology modeling and in silico docking approaches. PMID:23006041

  7. Signal processing in the TGF-beta superfamily ligand-receptor network.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Jose M G; Jansen, Ronald; Sander, Chris

    2006-01-01

    The TGF-beta pathway plays a central role in tissue homeostasis and morphogenesis. It transduces a variety of extracellular signals into intracellular transcriptional responses that control a plethora of cellular processes, including cell growth, apoptosis, and differentiation. We use computational modeling to show that coupling of signaling with receptor trafficking results in a highly versatile signal-processing unit, able to sense by itself absolute levels of ligand, temporal changes in ligand concentration, and ratios of multiple ligands. This coupling controls whether the response of the receptor module is transient or permanent and whether or not different signaling channels behave independently of each other. Our computational approach unifies seemingly disparate experimental observations and suggests specific changes in receptor trafficking patterns that can lead to phenotypes that favor tumor progression.

  8. Tuned-Affinity Bivalent Ligands for the Characterization of Opioid Receptor Heteromers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Opioid receptors, including the μ- and δ-opioid receptors (MOR and DOR), are important targets for the treatment of pain. Although there is mounting evidence that these receptors form heteromers, the functional role of the MOR/DOR heteromer remains unresolved. We have designed and synthesized bivalent ligands as tools to elucidate the functional role of the MOR/DOR heteromer. Our ligands (L2 and L4) are comprised of a compound with low affinity at the DOR tethered to a compound with high affinity at the MOR, with the goal of producing ligands with “tuned affinity” at MOR/DOR heteromers as compared to DOR homomers. Here, we show that both L2 and L4 demonstrate enhanced affinity at MOR/DOR heteromers as compared to DOR homomers, thereby providing unique pharmacological tools to dissect the role of the MOR/DOR heteromer in pain. PMID:23585918

  9. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor: A Key Bridging Molecule of External and Internal Chemical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jijing; Feng, Yu; Fu, Hualing; Xie, Heidi Qunhui; Jiang, Joy Xiaosong; Zhao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a highly evolutionary conserved, ligand-activated transcription factor that is best known to mediate the toxicities of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds. Phenotype of AhR-null mice, together with the recent discovery of a variety of endogenous and plant-derived ligands, point to the integral roles of AhR in normal cell physiology, in addition to its roles in sensing the environmental chemicals. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about AhR signaling pathways, its ligands and AhR-mediated effects on cell specialization, host defense and detoxification. AhR-mediated health effects particularly in liver, immune, and nervous systems, as well as in tumorgenesis are discussed. Dioxin-initiated embryotoxicity and immunosuppressive effects in fish and birds are reviewed. Recent data demonstrate that AhR is a convergence point of multiple signaling pathways that inform the cell of its external and internal environments. As such, AhR pathway is a promising potential target for therapeutics targeting nervous, liver, and autoimmune diseases through AhR ligand-mediated interventions and other perturbations of AhR signaling. Additionally, using available laboratory data obtained on animal models, AhR-centered adverse outcome pathway analysis is useful in reexamining known and potential adverse outcomes of specific or mixed compounds on wildlife. PMID:26079192

  10. Photoaffinity ligand for dopamine D2 receptors: azidoclebopride

    SciTech Connect

    Niznik, H.B.; Guan, J.H.; Neumeyer, J.L.; Seeman, P.

    1985-02-01

    In order to label D2 dopamine receptors selectively and covalently by means of a photosensitive compound, azidoclebopride was synthesized directly from clebopride. The dissociation constant (KD) of clebopride for the D2 dopamine receptor (canine brain striatum) was 1.5 nM, while that for azidoclebopride was 21 nM. The affinities of both clebopride and azidoclebopride were markedly reduced in the absence of sodium chloride. In the presence of ultraviolet light, azidoclebopride inactivated D2 dopamine receptors irreversibly, as indicated by the inability of the receptors to bind (/sup 3/H)spiperone. Maximal photoinactivation of about 60% of the D2 dopamine receptors occurred at 1 microM azidoclebopride; 30% of the receptors were inactivated at 80 nM azidoclebopride (pseudo-IC50). Dopamine agonists selectively protected the D2 receptors from being inactivated by azidoclebopride, the order of potency being (-)-N-n-propylnorapomorphine greater than apomorphine greater than (+/-)-6,7-dihydroxy-2-aminotetralin greater than (+)-N-n-propylnorapomorphine greater than dopamine greater than noradrenaline greater than serotonin. Similarly, dopaminergic antagonists prevented the photoinactivation of D2 receptors by azidoclebopride with the following order of potency: spiperone greater than (+)-butaclamol greater than haloperidol greater than clebopride greater than (-)-sulpiride greater than (-)-butaclamol.

  11. Muscarinic receptors as model targets and antitargets for structure-based ligand discovery.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Andrew C; Weiss, Dahlia R; Rossi, Mario; Hu, Jianxin; Hu, Kelly; Eitel, Katrin; Gmeiner, Peter; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K; Shoichet, Brian K

    2013-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate virtually all aspects of human physiology and represent an important class of therapeutic drug targets. Many GPCR-targeted drugs resemble endogenous agonists, often resulting in poor selectivity among receptor subtypes and restricted pharmacologic profiles. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor family exemplifies these problems; thousands of ligands are known, but few are receptor subtype-selective and nearly all are cationic in nature. Using structure-based docking against the M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, we screened 3.1 million molecules for ligands with new physical properties, chemotypes, and receptor subtype selectivities. Of 19 docking-prioritized molecules tested against the M2 subtype, 11 had substantial activity and 8 represented new chemotypes. Intriguingly, two were uncharged ligands with low micromolar to high nanomolar Ki values, an observation with few precedents among aminergic GPCRs. To exploit a single amino-acid substitution among the binding pockets between the M2 and M3 receptors, we selected molecules predicted by docking to bind to the M3 and but not the M2 receptor. Of 16 molecules tested, 8 bound to the M3 receptor. Whereas selectivity remained modest for most of these, one was a partial agonist at the M3 receptor without measurable M2 agonism. Consistent with this activity, this compound stimulated insulin release from a mouse β-cell line. These results support the ability of structure-based discovery to identify new ligands with unexplored chemotypes and physical properties, leading to new biologic functions, even in an area as heavily explored as muscarinic pharmacology.

  12. Importance of the pharmacological profile of the bound ligand in enrichment on nuclear receptors: toward the use of experimentally validated decoy ligands.

    PubMed

    Lagarde, Nathalie; Zagury, Jean-François; Montes, Matthieu

    2014-10-27

    The evaluation of virtual ligand screening methods is of major importance to ensure their reliability. Taking into account the agonist/antagonist pharmacological profile should improve the quality of the benchmarking data sets since ligand binding can induce conformational changes in the nuclear receptor structure and such changes may vary according to the agonist/antagonist ligand profile. We indeed found that splitting the agonist and antagonist ligands into two separate data sets for a given nuclear receptor target significantly enhances the quality of the evaluation. The pharmacological profile of the ligand bound in the binding site of the target structure was also found to be an additional critical parameter. We also illustrate that active compound data sets for a given pharmacological activity can be used as a set of experimentally validated decoy ligands for another pharmacological activity to ensure a reliable and challenging evaluation of virtual screening methods.

  13. Functional interaction of nuclear receptor coactivator 4 with aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kollara, Alexandra; Brown, Theodore J. . E-mail: brown@mshri.on.ca

    2006-07-28

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcriptional activity is enhanced by interaction with p160 coactivators. We demonstrate here that NcoA4, a nuclear receptor coactivator, interacts with and amplifies AhR action. NcoA4-AhR and NcoA4-ARNT interactions were demonstrated by immunoprecipitation in T47D breast cancer and COS cells and was independent of ligand. Overexpression of NcoA4 enhanced AhR transcriptional activity 3.2-fold in the presence of dioxin, whereas overexpression of a splice variant, NcoA4{beta}, as well as a variant lacking the C-terminal region enhanced AhR transcriptional activity by only 1.6-fold. Enhanced AhR signaling by NcoA4 was independent of the LXXLL and FXXLF motifs or of the activation domain. NcoA4 protein localized to cytoplasm in the absence of dioxin and in both the cytoplasm and nucleus following dioxin treatment. NcoA4-facilitation of AhR activity was abolished by overexpression of androgen receptor, suggesting a potential competition of AhR and androgen receptor for NcoA4. These findings thus demonstrate a functional interaction between NcoA4 and AhR that may alter AhR activity to affect disease development and progression.

  14. Evolution of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor and its ligand.

    PubMed

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a neuropeptide inhibitor of gonadotropin secretion, which was first identified in the Japanese quail hypothalamus. GnIH peptides share a C-terminal LPXRFamide (X=L or Q) motif in most vertebrates. The receptor for GnIH (GnIHR) is the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 147 (GPR147) that inhibits cAMP production. GPR147 is also named neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptor 1 (NPFFR1), because it also binds NPFF that has a C-terminal PQRFamide motif. To understand the evolutionary history of the GnIH system in the animal kingdom, we searched for receptors structurally similar to GnIHR in the genome of six mammals (human, mouse, rat, cattle, cat, and rabbit), five birds (pigeon, chicken, turkey, budgerigar, and zebra finch), one reptile (green anole), one amphibian (Western clawed flog), six fishes (zebrafish, Nile tilapia, Fugu, coelacanth, spotted gar, and lamprey), one hemichordate (acorn worm), one echinoderm (purple sea urchin), one mollusk (California sea hare), seven insects (pea aphid, African malaria mosquito, honey bee, buff-tailed bumblebee, fruit fly, jewel wasp, and red flour beetle), one cnidarian (hydra), and constructed phylogenetic trees by neighbor joining (NJ) and maximum likelihood (ML) methods. A multiple sequence alignment of the receptors showed highly conserved seven-transmembrane domains as well as disulfide bridge sites between the first and second extracellular loops, including the receptor of hydra. Both NJ and ML analyses grouped the receptors of vertebrates into NPFFR1 and NPFFR2 (GPR74), and the receptors of insects into the receptor for SIFamide peptides that share a C-terminal YRKPPFNGSIFamide motif. Although human, quail and zebrafish GnIHR (NPFFR1) were most structurally similar to SIFamide receptor of fruit fly in the Famide peptide (FMRFamide, neuropeptide F, short neuropeptide F, drosulfakinin, myosuppressin, SIFamide) receptor families, the amino acid sequences and the peptide coding

  15. Structure-based design of estrogen receptor-beta selective ligands.

    PubMed

    Manas, Eric S; Unwalla, Rayomand J; Xu, Zhang B; Malamas, Michael S; Miller, Chris P; Harris, Heather A; Hsiao, Chulai; Akopian, Tatos; Hum, Wah-Tung; Malakian, Karl; Wolfrom, Scott; Bapat, Ashok; Bhat, Ramesh A; Stahl, Mark L; Somers, William S; Alvarez, Juan C

    2004-11-24

    We present the structure-based optimization of a series of estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) selective ligands. X-ray cocrystal structures of these ligands complexed to both ERalpha and ERbeta are described. We also discuss how molecular modeling was used to take advantage of subtle differences between the two binding cavities in order to optimize selectivity for ERbeta over ERalpha. Quantum chemical calculations are utilized to gain insight into the mechanism of selectivity enhancement. Despite only two relatively conservative residue substitutions in the ligand binding pocket, the most selective compounds have greater than 100-fold selectivity for ERbeta relative to ERalpha when measured using a competitive radioligand binding assay.

  16. A Simple Method for Improving Torsion Optimization of Ligand Molecules in Receptor Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Che, Jianwei

    2005-07-01

    A simple but effective method is introduced for optimizing ligand molecules in torsion space within receptor binding sites. The algorithm makes use of geometric constraints of ligand molecules to search for energetically favorable conformations. It is applied to a conjugate gradient (CG) method as an example. During conformational energy optimization, new line search directions are modified according to the spatial span of rotational groups in ligand molecules. Significant improvements were observed in terms of the abilities both to recover global optimal structures and to obtain lower energy ensembles. This simple algorithm allows rapid implementation and can be incorporated into other conformational energy optimization techniques.

  17. Could sigma receptor ligands be a treatment for methamphetamine addiction?

    PubMed

    Rodvelt, Kelli R; Miller, Dennis K

    2010-09-01

    Methamphetamine's effects are generally considered to be mediated via monoamine transporters; however, it has comparable affinity for sigma receptors. Sigma receptors influence the downstream dopamine systems that are targeted by methamphetamine treatment. Research investigating the effect of sigma receptor agonists on methamphetamine-associated neurochemical and behavioral properties remains controversial; however, the general trend indicates an enhancement of stimulant effects. In contrast, sigma receptor antagonists attenuate methamphetamine-induced neurotoxic and behavioral properties. Together, these studies highlight an important role for sigma receptors in methamphetamine's addictive properties and the consequences of methamphetamine intoxication. Additional research is necessary to elucidate the precise mechanisms underlying their involvement and their role as a potential target for anti-methamphetamine pharmacotherapies.

  18. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  19. Conserved residues in RF-NH₂ receptor models identify predicted contact sites in ligand-receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Bass, C; Katanski, C; Maynard, B; Zurro, I; Mariane, E; Matta, M; Loi, M; Melis, V; Capponi, V; Muroni, P; Setzu, M; Nichols, R

    2014-03-01

    Peptides in the RF-NH2 family are grouped together based on an amidated dipeptide C terminus and signal through G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) to influence diverse physiological functions. By determining the mechanisms underlying RF-NH2 signaling targets can be identified to modulate physiological activity; yet, how RF-NH2 peptides interact with GPCRs is relatively unexplored. We predicted conserved residues played a role in Drosophila melanogaster RF-NH2 ligand-receptor interactions. In this study D. melanogaster rhodopsin-like family A peptide GPCRs alignments identified eight conserved residues unique to RF-NH2 receptors. Three of these residues were in extra-cellular loops of modeled RF-NH2 receptors and four in transmembrane helices oriented into a ligand binding pocket to allow contact with a peptide. The eighth residue was unavailable for interaction; yet its conservation suggested it played another role. A novel hydrophobic region representative of RF-NH2 receptors was also discovered. The presence of rhodopsin-like family A GPCR structural motifs including a toggle switch indicated RF-NH2s signal classically; however, some features of the DMS receptors were distinct from other RF-NH2 GPCRs. Additionally, differences in RF-NH2 receptor structures which bind the same peptide explained ligand specificity. Our novel results predicted conserved residues as RF-NH2 ligand-receptor contact sites and identified unique and classic structural features. These discoveries will aid antagonist design to modulate RF-NH2 signaling.

  20. The Formyl Peptide Receptors: Diversity of Ligands and Mechanism for Recognition.

    PubMed

    He, Hui-Qiong; Ye, Richard D

    2017-03-13

    The formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors that transduce chemotactic signals in phagocytes and mediate host-defense as well as inflammatory responses including cell adhesion, directed migration, granule release and superoxide production. In recent years, the cellular distribution and biological functions of FPRs have expanded to include additional roles in homeostasis of organ functions and modulation of inflammation. In a prototype, FPRs recognize peptides containing N-formylated methionine such as those produced in bacteria and mitochondria, thereby serving as pattern recognition receptors. The repertoire of FPR ligands, however, has expanded rapidly to include not only N-formyl peptides from microbes but also non-formyl peptides of microbial and host origins, synthetic small molecules and an eicosanoid. How these chemically diverse ligands are recognized by the three human FPRs (FPR1, FPR2 and FPR3) and their murine equivalents is largely unclear. In the absence of crystal structures for the FPRs, site-directed mutagenesis, computer-aided ligand docking and structural simulation have led to the identification of amino acids within FPR1 and FPR2 that interact with several formyl peptides. This review article summarizes the progress made in the understanding of FPR ligand diversity as well as ligand recognition mechanisms used by these receptors.

  1. Tetrahydroisoquinolines functionalized with carbamates as selective ligands of D2 dopamine receptor.

    PubMed

    Parravicini, Oscar; Bogado, M Lucrecia; Rojas, Sebastián; Angelina, Emilio L; Andujar, Sebastián A; Gutierrez, Lucas J; Cabedo, Nuria; Sanz, M Jesús; López-Gresa, M Pilar; Cortes, Diego; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2017-09-02

    A series of tetrahydroisoquinolines functionalized with carbamates is reported here as highly selective ligands on the dopamine D2 receptor. These compounds were selected by means of a molecular modeling study. The studies were carried out in three stages: first an exploratory study was carried out using combined docking techniques and molecular dynamics simulations. According to these results, the bioassays were performed; these experimental studies corroborated the results obtained by molecular modeling. In the last stage of our study, a QTAIM analysis was performed in order to determine the main molecular interactions that stabilize the different ligand-receptor complexes. Our results show that the adequate use of combined simple techniques is a very useful tool to predict the potential affinity of new ligands at dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. In turn the QTAIM studies show that they are very useful to evaluate in detail the molecular interactions that stabilize the different ligand-receptor complexes; such information is crucial for the design of new ligands.

  2. Segregation of receptor-ligand complexes in cell adhesion zones: phase diagrams and the role of thermal membrane roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różycki, B.; Lipowsky, R.; Weikl, T. R.

    2010-09-01

    The adhesion zone of immune cells, the 'immunological synapse', exhibits characteristic domains of receptor-ligand complexes. The domain formation is probably caused by a length difference of the receptor-ligand complexes, and has been investigated in experiments in which T cells adhere to supported membranes with anchored ligands. For supported membranes with two types of anchored ligands, MHCp and ICAM1, which bind to the T-cell receptor (TCR) and the receptor LFA1 in the cell membrane, the coexistence of domains of the TCR-MHCp and LFA1-ICAM1 complexes in the cell adhesion zone has been observed for a wide range of ligand concentrations and affinities. For supported membranes with long and short ligands that bind to the same cell receptor CD2, in contrast, domain coexistence has been observed for a quite narrow ratio of ligand concentrations. In this paper, we determine detailed phase diagrams for cells adhering to supported membranes with a statistical-physical model of cell adhesion. We find a characteristic difference between the adhesion scenarios in which two types of ligands in a supported membrane bind (i) to the same cell receptor or (ii) to two different cell receptors, which helps us to explain the experimental observations. Our phase diagrams fully include thermal shape fluctuations of the cell membranes on nanometer scales, which lead to a critical point for the domain formation and to a cooperative binding of the receptors and ligands.

  3. Human NK cells in acute myeloid leukaemia patients: analysis of NK cell-activating receptors and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Correa, Beatriz; Morgado, Sara; Gayoso, Inmaculada; Bergua, Juan M; Casado, Javier G; Arcos, Maria Jose; Bengochea, Maria Luisa; Duran, Esther; Solana, Rafael; Tarazona, Raquel

    2011-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activation is strictly regulated to ensure that healthy cells are preserved, but tumour-transformed or virus-infected cells are recognized and eliminated. To carry out this selective killing, NK cells have an ample repertoire of receptors on their surface. Signalling by inhibitory and activating receptors by interaction with their ligands will determine whether the NK cell becomes activated and kills the target cell. Here, we show reduced expression of NKp46, NKp30, DNAM-1, CD244 and CD94/NKG2C activating receptors on NK cells from acute myeloid leukaemia patients. This reduction may be induced by chronic exposure to their ligands on leukaemic blasts. The analysis of ligands for NK cell-activating receptors showed that leukaemic blasts from the majority of patients express ligands for NK cell-activating receptors. DNAM-1 ligands are frequently expressed on blasts, whereas the expression of the NKG2D ligand MICA/B is found in half of the patients and CD48, a ligand for CD244, in only one-fourth of the patients. The decreased expression of NK cell-activating receptors and/or the heterogeneous expression of ligands for major receptors on leukaemic blasts can lead to an inadequate tumour immunosurveillance by NK cells. A better knowledge of the activating receptor repertoire on NK cells and their putative ligands on blasts together with the possibility to modulate their expression will open new possibilities for the use of NK cells in immunotherapy against leukaemia.

  4. A semisynthetic Eph receptor tyrosine kinase provides insight into ligand-induced kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Nikhil; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Himanen, Juha P.; Muir, Tom W.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY We have developed a methodology for generating milligram amounts of functional Eph tyrosine kinase receptor using the protein engineering approach of expressed protein ligation. Stimulation with ligand induces efficient autophosphorylation of the semisynthetic Eph construct. The in vitro phosphorylation of key Eph tyrosine residues upon ligand-induced activation was monitored via time-resolved, quantitative phosphoproteomics, suggesting a precise and unique order of phosphorylation of the Eph tyrosines in the kinase activation process. To our knowledge, this work represents the first reported semisynthesis of a receptor tyrosine kinase and provides a potentially general method for producing single-pass membrane proteins for structural and biochemical characterization. PMID:21439481

  5. AIP mutations impair AhR signaling in pituitary adenoma patients fibroblasts and in GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Viengchareun, Say; Hage, Mirella; Bouligand, Jérôme; Young, Jacques; Boutron, Audrey; Zizzari, Philippe; Lombès, Marc; Chanson, Philippe; Kamenický, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene predispose humans to pituitary adenomas through unknown molecular mechanisms. The best-known interacting partner of AIP is the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a transcription factor that mediates the effects of xenobiotics implicated in carcinogenesis. As 75% of AIP mutations disrupt the physical and/or functional interaction with AhR, we postulated that the tumorigenic potential of AIP mutations might result from altered AhR signaling. We evaluated the impact of AIP mutations on the AhR signaling pathway, first in fibroblasts from AIP-mutated patients with pituitary adenomas, by comparison with fibroblasts from healthy subjects, then in transfected pituitary GH3 cells. The AIP protein level in mutated fibroblasts was about half of that in cells from healthy subjects, but AhR expression was unaffected. Gene expression analyses showed significant modifications in the expression of the AhR target genes CYP1B1 and AHRR in AIP-mutated fibroblasts, both before and after stimulation with the endogenous AhR ligand kynurenine. Kynurenine increased Cyp1b1 expression to a greater extent in GH3 cells overexpressing wild type compared with cells expressing mutant AIP Knockdown of endogenous Aip in these cells attenuated Cyp1b1 induction by the AhR ligand. Both mutant AIP expression and knockdown of endogenous Aip affected the kynurenine-dependent GH secretion of GH3 cells. This study of human fibroblasts bearing endogenous heterozygous AIP mutations and transfected pituitary GH3 cells shows that AIP mutations affect the AIP protein level and alter AhR transcriptional activity in a gene- and tissue-dependent manner.

  6. The Role of AhR in Breast Cancer Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    other cell types, galangin is a potent inhibitor of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), an environmental carcinogen-responsive transcription factor...constitutively active AhR. Constitutive and environmental chemical-inducible AhR activity was profoundly suppressed by galangin as was cell growth...However, the failure of a-naphthoflavone or FhAhRR transfection to block growth indicated that galangin -mediated AhR inhibition was either insufficient

  7. Budded baculoviruses as a tool for a homogeneous fluorescence anisotropy-based assay of ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors: the case of melanocortin 4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Veiksina, Santa; Kopanchuk, Sergei; Rinken, Ago

    2014-01-01

    We present here the implementation of budded baculoviruses that display G protein-coupled receptors on their surfaces for the investigation of ligand-receptor interactions using fluorescence anisotropy (FA). Melanocortin 4 (MC4) receptors and the fluorescent ligand Cy3B-NDP-α-MSH were used as the model system. The real-time monitoring of reactions and the high assay quality allow the application of global data analysis with kinetic mechanistic models that take into account the effect of nonspecific interactions and the depletion of the fluorescent ligand during the reaction. The receptor concentration, affinity and kinetic parameters of fluorescent ligand binding as well as state anisotropies for different fluorescent ligand populations were determined. At low Cy3B-NDP-α-MSH concentrations, a one-site receptor-ligand binding model described the processes, whereas divergence from this model was observed at higher ligand concentrations, which indicated a more complex mechanism of interactions similar to those mechanisms that have been found in experiments with radioactive ligands. The information obtained from our kinetic experiments and the inherent flexibility of FA assays also allowed the estimation of binding parameters for several MC4 receptor-specific unlabelled compounds. In summary, the FA assay that was developed with budded baculoviruses led the experimental data to a level that would solve complex models of receptor-ligand interactions also for other receptor systems and would become as a valuable tool for the screening of pharmacologically active compounds.

  8. The heterodimeric sweet taste receptor has multiple potential ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Maillet, Emeline; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. This discovery has increased our understanding at the molecular level of the mechanisms underlying sweet taste. Previous experimental studies using sweet receptor chimeras and mutants show that there are at least three potential binding sites in this heterodimeric receptor. Receptor activity toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame depends on residues in the amino terminal domain of human T1R2. In contrast, receptor activity toward the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole depends on residues within the transmembrane domain of human T1R3. Furthermore, receptor activity toward the sweet protein brazzein depends on the cysteine rich domain of human T1R3. Although crystal structures are not available for the sweet taste receptor, useful homology models can be developed based on appropriate templates. The amino terminal domain, cysteine rich domain and transmembrane helix domain of T1R2 and T1R3 have been modeled based on the crystal structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1, tumor necrosis factor receptor, and bovine rhodopsin, respectively. We have used homology models of the sweet taste receptors, molecular docking of sweet ligands to the receptors, and site-directed mutagenesis of the receptors to identify potential ligand binding sites of the sweet taste receptor. These studies have led to a better understanding of the structure and function of this heterodimeric receptor, and can act as a guide for rational structure-based design of novel non-caloric sweeteners, which can be used in the fighting against obesity and diabetes.

  9. Dual Role of the Second Extracellular Loop of the Cannabinoid Receptor 1: Ligand Binding and Receptor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Kwang H.; Bertalovitz, Alexander C.; Mierke, Dale F.

    2009-01-01

    The seven transmembrane α-helices of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the hallmark of this superfamily. Intrahelical interactions are critical to receptor assembly and, for the GPCR subclass that binds small molecules, ligand binding. Most research has focused on identifying the ligand binding pocket within the helical bundle, whereas the role of the extracellular loops remains undefined. Molecular modeling of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) extracellular loop 2 (EC2), however, suggests that EC2 is poised for key interactions. To test this possibility, we employed alanine scanning mutagenesis of CB1 EC2 and identified two distinct regions critical for ligand binding, G protein coupling activity, and receptor trafficking. Receptors with mutations in the N terminus of EC2 (W255A, N256A) were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and did not bind the agonist (1R,3R,4R)-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)-phenyl]-4-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexan-1-ol (CP55940) or the inverse agonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide(SR141716A). In contrast, the C terminus of EC2 differentiates agonist and inverse agonist; the P269A, H270A, and I271A receptors exhibited diminished binding for several agonists but bound inverse agonists SR141716A, N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251), and 4-[6-methoxy-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)benzofuran-3-carbonyl]benzonitrile (LY320135) with wild-type receptor affinity. The F268A receptor involving substitution in the Cys-X-X-X-Ar motif, displayed both impaired localization and ligand binding. Other amino acid substitutions at position 268 revealed that highly hydrophobic residues are required to accomplish both functions. It is noteworthy that a F268W receptor was trafficked to the cell surface yet displayed differential binding preference for inverse agonists comparable with the P269A, H270A, and I271A receptors. The findings

  10. Expression of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ligand, growth hormone, blocks receptor signalling

    PubMed Central

    Guesdon, François; Kaabi, Yahia; Riley, Aiden H.; Wilkinson, Ian R.; Gray, Colin; James, David C.; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Sayers, Jon R.; Ross, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction between GH (growth hormone) and GHR (GH receptor). We previously demonstrated that a truncated GHR that possesses a transmembrane domain but no cytoplasmic domain blocks receptor signalling. Based on this observation we investigated the impact of tethering the receptor's extracellular domain to the cell surface using a native lipid GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchor. We also investigated the effect of tethering GH, the ligand itself, to the cell surface and demonstrated that tethering either the ecGHR (extracellular domain of GHR) or the ligand itself to the cell membrane via a GPI anchor greatly attenuates signalling. To elucidate the mechanism for this antagonist activity, we used confocal microscopy to examine the fluorescently modified ligand and receptor. GH–GPI was expressed on the cell surface and formed inactive receptor complexes that failed to internalize and blocked receptor activation. In conclusion, contrary to expectation, tethering an agonist to the cell surface can generate an inactive hormone receptor complex that fails to internalize. PMID:23013472

  11. Expression of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ligand, growth hormone, blocks receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Guesdon, François; Kaabi, Yahia; Riley, Aiden H; Wilkinson, Ian R; Gray, Colin; James, David C; Artymiuk, Peter J; Sayers, Jon R; Ross, Richard J

    2012-12-01

    We have investigated the interaction between GH (growth hormone) and GHR (GH receptor). We previously demonstrated that a truncated GHR that possesses a transmembrane domain but no cytoplasmic domain blocks receptor signalling. Based on this observation we investigated the impact of tethering the receptor's extracellular domain to the cell surface using a native lipid GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchor. We also investigated the effect of tethering GH, the ligand itself, to the cell surface and demonstrated that tethering either the ecGHR (extracellular domain of GHR) or the ligand itself to the cell membrane via a GPI anchor greatly attenuates signalling. To elucidate the mechanism for this antagonist activity, we used confocal microscopy to examine the fluorescently modified ligand and receptor. GH-GPI was expressed on the cell surface and formed inactive receptor complexes that failed to internalize and blocked receptor activation. In conclusion, contrary to expectation, tethering an agonist to the cell surface can generate an inactive hormone receptor complex that fails to internalize.

  12. A nonplanar porphyrin-based receptor molecule for chiral amine ligands

    SciTech Connect

    MUZZI,CINZIA M.; MEDFORTH,CRAIG J.; SMITH,KEVIN M.; JIA,SONG-LING; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.

    2000-03-06

    A novel porphyrin-based receptor molecule for chiral amine ligands is described in which nonplanarity of the porphyrin macrocycle is used to orient the ligand and to enhance porphyrin-ligand interactions. The porphyrin macrocycle provides a versatile platform upon which to build elaborate superstructures, and this feature coupled with a rich and well-developed synthetic chemistry has led to the synthesis of many elegant models of heme protein active sites and numerous porphyrin-based receptor molecules. One design feature which is not usually considered in the design of porphyrin-based receptor molecules is nonplanarity of the porphyrin ring, although there are a few systems such as the pyridine sensitive Venus Flytrap and the chirality-memory molecule which illustrate that nonplanar porphyrin-based receptors can display unique and interesting behavior. Given the novel properties of these receptors and the continuing interest in the effects of nonplanarity on the properties of porphyrins the authors decided to investigate in more detail the potential applications of nonplanarity in the design of porphyrin-based receptors. Herein, they describe the design, synthesis, and characterization of a new kind of nonplanar porphyrin-based receptor molecule for chiral amines.

  13. 2,4-Toluene diisocyanate suppressed the calcium signaling of ligand gated ion channel receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Shan; Chiung, Yin-Mei; Kao, Yi-Yun; Chen, Han-Ting

    2006-02-15

    Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) is widely used as a chemical intermediate in the production of polyurethane. TDI-induced asthma is related to its disturbance of acetylcholine activity in most affected workers, but the relevant mechanisms are unclear. Toluene diamine (TDA) is the main metabolite of TDI. TDI and TDA have in common the basic toluene structure. Toluene is an abused solvent affecting neuronal signal transduction by influencing the function of ligand gated ion channel receptors, including nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), P2X purinoceptors, [gamma]-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors, etc. To understand the actions of TDI and TDA on ligand gated ion channels, we investigated their effects on the changes of cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]c) while stimulating nAChR in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, P2 purinoceptors in PC12 cells, and GABAA receptors in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Our results showed that both TDI and TDA suppressed the [Ca2+]c rise induced by the potent nicotinic ligand, epibatidine, in human SH-SY5Y cells. Similar but stronger suppression of ATP-induced [Ca2+]c rise occurred in PC12 cells. TDI and TDA also partially suppressed the [Ca2+] c rise induced by GABA in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. We conclude that TDI and TDA can act on ligand gated ion channel receptors. Our findings suggest that TDI and TDA might have some neurotoxicity that will need to be investigated.

  14. Differential Effects of EGFR Ligands on Endocytic Sorting of the Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Roepstorff, Kirstine; Grandal, Michael Vibo; Henriksen, Lasse; Knudsen, Stine Louise Jeppe; Lerdrup, Mads; Grøvdal, Lene; Willumsen, Berthe Marie; van Deurs, Bo

    2009-01-01

    Endocytic downregulation is a pivotal mechanism turning off signalling from the EGF receptor (EGFR). It is well established that whereas EGF binding leads to lysosomal degradation of EGFR, transforming growth factor (TGF)-α causes receptor recycling. TGF-α therefore leads to continuous signalling and is a more potent mitogen than EGF. In addition to EGF and TGF-α, five EGFR ligands have been identified. Although many of these ligands are upregulated in cancers, very little is known about their effect on EGFR trafficking. We have compared the effect of six different ligands on endocytic trafficking of EGFR. We find that, whereas they all stimulate receptor internalization, they have very diverse effects on endocytic sorting. Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor and Betacellulin target all EGFRs for lysosomal degradation. In contrast, TGF-α and epiregulin lead to complete receptor recycling. EGF leads to lysosomal degradation of the majority but not all EGFRs. Amphiregulin does not target EGFR for lysosomal degradation but causes fast as well as slow EGFR recycling. The Cbl ubiquitin ligases, especially c-Cbl, are responsible for EGFR ubiquitination after stimulation with all ligands, and persistent EGFR phosphorylation and ubiquitination largely correlate with receptor degradation. PMID:19531065

  15. Differential effects of EGFR ligands on endocytic sorting of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Roepstorff, Kirstine; Grandal, Michael Vibo; Henriksen, Lasse; Knudsen, Stine Louise Jeppe; Lerdrup, Mads; Grøvdal, Lene; Willumsen, Berthe Marie; van Deurs, Bo

    2009-08-01

    Endocytic downregulation is a pivotal mechanism turning off signalling from the EGF receptor (EGFR). It is well established that whereas EGF binding leads to lysosomal degradation of EGFR, transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha causes receptor recycling. TGF-alpha therefore leads to continuous signalling and is a more potent mitogen than EGF. In addition to EGF and TGF-alpha, five EGFR ligands have been identified. Although many of these ligands are upregulated in cancers, very little is known about their effect on EGFR trafficking. We have compared the effect of six different ligands on endocytic trafficking of EGFR. We find that, whereas they all