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Sample records for ah receptor variants

  1. Transgenic mouse lines expressing rat AH receptor variants - A new animal model for research on AH receptor function and dioxin toxicity mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjanvirta, Raimo

    2009-04-15

    Han/Wistar (Kuopio; H/W) rats are exceptionally resistant to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) toxicity mainly because of their mutated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene. In H/W rats, altered splicing of the AHR mRNA generates two AHR proteins: deletion (DEL) and insertion (INS) variants, with the INS isoform being predominantly expressed. To gain further insight into their functional properties, cDNAs of these and rat wild-type (rWT) isoform were transferred into C57BL/6J-derived mice by microinjection. The endogenous mouse AHR was eliminated by selective crossing with Ahr-null mice. A single mouse line was obtained for each of the three constructs. The AHR mRNA levels in tissues were generally close to those of C57BL/6 mice in INS and DEL mice and somewhat higher in rWT mice; in testis, however, all 3 constructs exhibited marked overexpression. The transgenic mouse lines were phenotypically normal except for increased testis weight. Induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes by TCDD occurred similarly to that in C57BL/6 mice, but there tended to be a correlation with AHR concentrations, especially in testis. In contrast to C57BL/6 mice, the transgenics did not display any major gender difference in susceptibility to the acute lethality and hepatotoxicity of TCDD; rWT mice were highly sensitive, DEL mice moderately resistant and INS mice highly resistant. Co-expression of mouse AHR and rWT resulted in augmented sensitivity to TCDD and abolished the natural resistance of female C57BL/6 mice, whereas mice co-expressing mouse AHR and INS were resistant. Thus, these transgenic mouse lines provide a novel promising tool for molecular studies on dioxin toxicity and AHR function.

  2. Characterization of Drug-Resistant Influenza Virus A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) Variants Selected In Vitro with Laninamivir

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Mélanie; Abed, Yacine; Desrochers, François-Marc; Hamilton, Stephanie; Luttick, Angela; Tucker, Simon P.; Pryor, Melinda J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) play a major role for managing influenza virus infections. The widespread oseltamivir resistance among 2007-2008 seasonal A(H1N1) viruses and community outbreaks of oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 strains highlights the need for additional anti-influenza virus agents. Laninamivir is a novel long-lasting NAI that has demonstrated in vitro activity against influenza A and B viruses, and its prodrug (laninamivir octanoate) is in phase II clinical trials in the United States and other countries. Currently, little information is available on the mechanisms of resistance to laninamivir. In this study, we first performed neuraminidase (NA) inhibition assays to determine the activity of laninamivir against a set of influenza A viruses containing NA mutations conferring resistance to one or many other NAIs. We also generated drug-resistant A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) viruses under in vitro laninamivir pressure. Laninamivir demonstrated a profile of susceptibility that was similar to that of zanamivir. More specifically, it retained activity against oseltamivir-resistant H275Y and N295S A(H1N1) variants and the E119V A(H3N2) variant. In vitro, laninamivir pressure selected the E119A NA substitution in the A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 A(H1N1) background, whereas E119K and G147E NA changes along with a K133E hemagglutinin (HA) substitution were selected in the A/Quebec/144147/2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 strain. In the A/Brisbane/10/2007 A(H3N2) background, a large NA deletion accompanied by S138A/P194L HA substitutions was selected. This H3N2 variant had altered receptor-binding properties and was highly resistant to laninamivir in plaque reduction assays. Overall, we confirmed the similarity between zanamivir and laninamivir susceptibility profiles and demonstrated that both NA and HA changes can contribute to laninamivir resistance in vitro. PMID:24957832

  3. Newspapers and newspaper ink contain agonists for the ah receptor.

    PubMed

    Bohonowych, Jessica E S; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T; Denison, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [(3)H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed.

  4. Newspapers and Newspaper Ink Contain Agonists for the Ah Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bohonowych, Jessica E. S.; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T.; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [3H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed. PMID:18203687

  5. The constitutively active Ah receptor (CA-AhR) mouse as a model for dioxin exposure - effects in reproductive organs.

    PubMed

    Brunnberg, Sara; Andersson, Patrik; Poellinger, Lorenz; Hanberg, Annika

    2011-12-01

    The dioxin/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates most toxic effects of dioxins. In utero/lactational exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) impairs fetal/neonatal development and the developing male reproductive tract are among the most sensitive tissues. TCDD causes antiestrogenic responses in rodent mammary gland and uterus and in human breast cancer cell lines in the presence of estrogen. Also, more recently an estrogen-like effect of TCDD/AhR has been suggested in the absence of estrogen. A transgenic mouse expressing a constitutively active AhR (CA-AhR) was developed as a model mimicking a situation of constant exposure to AhR agonists. Male and female reproductive tissues of CA-AhR mice were characterized for some of the effects commonly seen after dioxin exposure. Sexually mature CA-AhR female mice showed decreased uterus weight, while an uterotrophic assay in immature CA-AhR mice resulted in increased uterus weight. In immature mice, both TCDD-exposure and CA-AhR increased the expression of the estrogen receptor target gene Cathepsin D. When co-treated with 17β-estradiol no increase in Cathepsin D levels occurred in either TCDD-exposed or CA-AhR mice. In sexually mature male CA-AhR mice the weights of testis and ventral prostate were decreased and the epididymal sperm reserve was reduced. The results of the present study are in accordance with previous studies on dioxin-exposed rodents in that an activated AhR (here CA-AhR) leads to antiestrogenic effects in the presence of estrogen, but to estrogenic effects in the absence of estrogen. These results suggest the CA-AhR mouse model as a useful tool for studies of continuous low activity of the AhR from early development, resembling the human exposure situation.

  6. Human infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant virus in the United States, 2011-2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND. During August 2011-April 2012, 13 human infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant (H3N2v) virus were identified in the United States; 8 occurred in the prior 2 years. This virus differs from previous variant influenza viruses in that it contains the matrix (M) gene from the Influenza A(H...

  7. Identification of a novel mechanism of regulation of Ah (dioxin) receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Junsei; Ema, Masatsugu; Sogawa, Kazuhiro; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki

    1999-01-01

    Ah receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates pleiotropic effects of environmental pollutants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on host animals. In addition to induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes, the liganded AhR complex was found to activate gene expression of a factor designated AhR repressor (AhRR), which inhibits AhR function by competing with AhR for dimerizing with Arnt and binding to the XRE sequence. Thus, AhR and AhRR form a regulatory circuit in the xenobiotic signal transduction pathway and provide a novel mechanism of regulation of AhR function that may determine tissue-specific sensitivity to environmental pollutants. PMID:9887096

  8. Analysis of Ah receptor pathway activation by brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Brown, David J; Van Overmeire, Ilse; Goeyens, Leo; Denison, Michael S; De Vito, Michael J; Clark, George C

    2004-06-01

    Brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) are used as additives in plastics to decrease the rate of combustion of these materials, leading to greater consumer safety. As the use of plastics has increased, the production and use of flame-retardants has also grown. Many BFRs are persistent and have been detected in environmental samples, raising concerns about the biological/toxicological risk associated with their use. Most BFRs appear to be non-toxic, however there is still some concern that these compounds, or possible contaminants in BFRs mixtures could interact with cellular receptors. In this study we have examined the interaction of decabromodiphenyl ether, Firemaster BP4A (tetrabromobisphenol A), Firemaster PHT4 (tetrabromophthalic anhydride), hexabromobenzene, pentabromotoluene, decabromobiphenyl, Firemaster BP-6 (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl) and possible contaminants of BFR mixtures with the Ah receptor. Receptor binding and activation was examined using the Gel Retardation Assay and increased expression of dioxin responsive genes was detected using the reporter gene based CALUX assay. The results demonstrate the ability of BFRs to activate the AhR signal transduction pathway at moderate to high concentrations as assessed using both assays. AhR-dependent activation by BFRs may be due in part to contaminants present in commercial/technical mixtures. This was suggested by our comparative analysis of Firemaster BP-6 versus its primary component 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl. Some technical mixtures of brominated flame-retardants contain brominated biphenyls, dioxins or dibenzofurans as contaminants. When tested in the CALUX assay these compounds were found to be equivalent to, or more active than their chlorinated analogues. Relative effective potency values were determined from dose response curves for these brominated HAHs.

  9. Modeling of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) ligand binding domain and its utility in virtual ligand screening to predict new AhR ligands

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, William; Koch, Daniel; O’Donnell, Edmond; Khalil, Sammy M.; Kerkvliet, Nancy; Tanguay, Robert; Abagyan, Ruben; Kolluri, Siva Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor; the AhR Per-AhR/Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain binds ligands. We developed homology models of the AhR PAS domain to characterize previously observed intra- and inter-species differences in ligand binding using Molecular Docking. In silico structure-based virtual ligand screening using our model resulted in the identification of pinocembrin and 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone, which promoted nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation of AhR and AhR-dependent induction of endogenous target genes. PMID:19719119

  10. Neuraminidase Receptor Binding Variants of Human Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses Resulting from Substitution of Aspartic Acid 151 in the Catalytic Site: a Role in Virus Attachment?▿

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi Pu; Gregory, Victoria; Collins, Patrick; Kloess, Johannes; Wharton, Stephen; Cattle, Nicholas; Lackenby, Angie; Daniels, Rodney; Hay, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the receptor binding characteristics of human H3N2 viruses have been evident from changes in the agglutination of different red blood cells (RBCs) and the reduced growth capacity of recently isolated viruses, particularly in embryonated eggs. An additional peculiarity of viruses circulating in 2005 to 2009 has been the poor inhibition of hemagglutination by postinfection ferret antisera for many viruses isolated in MDCK cells, including homologous reference viruses. This was shown not to be due to an antigenic change in hemagglutinin (HA) but was shown to be the result of a mutation in aspartic acid 151 of neuraminidase (NA) to glycine, asparagine, or alanine, which caused an oseltamivir-sensitive agglutination of RBCs. The D151G substitution was shown to cause a change in the specificity of NA such that it acquired the capacity to bind receptors, which were refractory to enzymatic cleavage, without altering its ability to remove receptors for HA. Thus, the inhibition of NA-dependent agglutination by the inclusion of oseltamivir carboxylate in the assay was effective in restoring the anti-HA specificity of the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay for monitoring antigenic changes in HA. Since the NA-dependent binding activity did not affect virus neutralization, and virus populations in clinical specimens possessed, at most, low levels of the “151 mutant,” the biological significance of this feature of NA in, for example, immune evasion is unclear. It is apparent, however, that an important role of aspartic acid 151 in the activity of NA may be to restrict the specificity of the NA interaction and its receptor-destroying activity to complement that of HA receptor binding. PMID:20410266

  11. Transgenic Overexpression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor (AhRR) and AhR-Mediated Induction of CYP1A1, Cytokines, and Acute Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Christoph F.A.; Chang, W.L. William; Kado, Sarah; McCulloh, Kelly; Vogel, Helena; Wu, Dalei; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; Yang, GuoXiang; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Matsumura, Fumio; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR) is known to repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling, but very little is known regarding the role of the AhRR in vivo. Objective: This study tested the role of AhRR in vivo in AhRR overexpressing mice on molecular and toxic end points mediated through a prototypical AhR ligand. Methods: We generated AhRR-transgenic mice (AhRR Tg) based on the genetic background of C57BL/6J wild type (wt) mice. We tested the effect of the prototypical AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1 and cytokines in various tissues of mice. We next analyzed the infiltration of immune cells in adipose tissue of mice after treatment with TCDD using flow cytometry. Results: AhRR Tg mice express significantly higher levels of AhRR compared to wt mice. Activation of AhR by TCDD caused a significant increase of the inflammatory cytokines Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-10, and CXCL chemokines in white epididymal adipose tissue from both wt and AhRR Tg mice. However, the expression of IL-1β, CXCL2 and CXCL3 were significantly lower in AhRR Tg versus wt mice following TCDD treatment. Exposure to TCDD caused a rapid accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages in white adipose tissue of wt and AhRR Tg mice. Furthermore we found that male AhRR Tg mice were protected from high-dose TCDD-induced lethality associated with a reduced inflammatory response and liver damage as indicated by lower levels of TCDD-induced alanine aminotransferase and hepatic triglycerides. Females from both wt and AhRR Tg mice were less sensitive than male mice to acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Conclusion: In conclusion, the current study identifies AhRR as a previously uncharacterized regulator of specific inflammatory cytokines, which may protect from acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Citation: Vogel CF, Chang WL, Kado S, McCulloh K, Vogel H, Wu D, Haarmann-Stemmann T, Yang GX, Leung PS, Matsumura F

  12. Altered adrenergic response and specificity of the receptors in rat ascites hepatoma AH130.

    PubMed

    Sanae, F; Miyamoto, K; Koshiura, R

    1989-11-15

    Adenylate cyclase activation through adrenergic receptors in rat ascites hepatoma (AH) 130 cells in response to adrenergic drugs was studied, and receptor binding and displacement were compared with those of normal rat hepatocytes. Epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) activated AH130 adenylate cyclase about half as much as isoproterenol (IPN) but equaled IPN after treatment with the alpha-antagonist phentolamine or islet-activating protein (IAP). The three catecholamines in hepatocytes were similar regardless of phentolamine or IAP. These catecholamines activated adenylate cyclase in order of IPN greater than NE greater than Epi in AH130 cells but IPN greater than Epi greater than NE in hepatocytes. We then used the alpha 1-selective ligand [3H]prazosin, the alpha 2-selective ligand [3H]clonidine, and the beta-ligand [125I]iodocyanopindolol [( 125I]ICYP), and found that AH130 cells had few prazosin-binding sites, about eight times as many clonidine-binding sites with high affinity, and many more ICYP-binding sites than in hepatocytes. The dissociation constant (Ki) of the beta 1-selective drug metoprolol by Hofstee plots for AH130 cells was lower than that for hepatocytes. The inhibition of specific ICYP binding by the beta 2-selective agonist salbutamol for AH130 cells gave only one Ki value which was much higher than both high and low Ki values of the drug for hepatocytes. These findings indicate that the alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors in hepatocytes are predominantly alpha 1-type and beta 2-type, but that those in AH130 cells are predominantly alpha 2-type and beta 1-type, and the low adrenergic response of AH130 cells is due to the dominant appearance of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, linked with the inhibitory guanine-nucleotide binding regulatory protein, instead of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors, and beta 1-adrenergic receptors with low affinity for the hormone.

  13. The activation mechanism of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by molecular chaperone HSP90

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Noriko; Fukuda, Kana; Nagata, Yuhtaroh; Okada, Hirotaka; Haga, Asami; Hatakeyama, Shiori; Yoshida, Shiho; Okamoto, Tomoya; Hosaka, Miki; Sekine, Kazuhiro; Ohtaka, Kei; Yamamoto, Soh; Otaka, Michiro; Grave, Ewa; Itoh, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that associates with the molecular chaperone HSP90 in the cytoplasm. The activation mechanism of the AhR is not yet fully understood. It has been proposed that after binding of ligands such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 3methylcholanthrene (3-MC), or β-naphthoflavone (β-NF), the AhR dissociates from HSP90 and translocates to the nucleus. It has also been hypothesized that the AhR translocates to the nucleus and forms a complex with HSP90 and other co-chaperones. There are a few reports about the direct association or dissociation of AhR and HSP90 due to difficulties in purifying AhR. We constructed and purified the PAS domain from AhR. Binding of the AhR-PAS domain to β-NF affinity resin suggested that it possesses ligand-binding affinity. We demonstrated that the AhR-PAS domain binds to HSP90 and the association is not affected by ligand binding. The ligand 17-DMAG inhibited binding of HSP90 to GST-PAS. In an immunoprecipitation assay, HSP90 was co-immunoprecipitated with AhR both in the presence or absence of ligand. Endogenous AhR decreased in the cytoplasm and increased in the nucleus of HeLa cells 15 min after treatment with ligand. These results suggested that the ligand-bound AhR is translocated to nucleus while in complex with HSP90. We used an in situ proximity ligation assay to confirm whether AhR was translocated to the nucleus alone or together with HSP90. HSP90 was co-localized with AhR after the nuclear translocation. It has been suggested that the ligand-bound AhR was translocated to the nucleus with HSP90. Activated AhR acts as a transcription factor, as shown by the transcription induction of the gene CYP1A1 8 h after treatment with β-NF. PMID:25349783

  14. AH6809, a prostaglandin DP-receptor blocking drug on human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Keery, R. J.; Lumley, P.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of AH6809 (6-isopropoxy-9-oxoxanthene-2-carboxylic acid) has been studied upon the anti-aggregatory and aggregatory actions of various agents on human platelets in whole blood. 2. Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), BW245C, 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2, PGI2 and 5'-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) all inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood. The anti-aggregatory activity of PGD2, BW245C and 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 but not PGI2 or NECA was antagonized by AH6809. NECA was antagonized by AH6809. 3. The antagonism of the anti-aggregatory activity of PGD2 by AH6809 was concentration-related and could be overcome by increasing the concentration of PGD2. Analysis of the data yielded an apparent pA2 for AH6809 of 5.35. 4. At approximately 10 fold higher concentrations than those required to antagonize the action of PGD2, AH6809 also antagonized the aggregatory effect of U-46619 in whole blood (pA2 = 4.45). However, concentrations of AH6809 up to 300 microM were without effect upon either ADP- or platelet activating factor (Paf)-induced aggregation (pA2 less than 3.5). 5. The potency of AH6809 against PGD2 and U-46619 was increased in a resuspended platelet preparation suggesting that the drug is extensively bound to plasma proteins. However, in resuspended platelets the specificity of AH6809 relative to that seen in whole blood was reduced since aggregation by ADP and Paf was also slightly antagonized. 6. In conclusion, AH6809 appears to be a weak but specific DP-receptor blocking drug on human platelets and should prove to be a useful drug tool for defining the involvement of endogenous PGD2 in platelet aggregation and classifying the mode of action of anti-aggregatory prostanoids. PMID:2460179

  15. Retinoids repress Ah receptor CYP1A1 induction pathway through the SMRT corepressor.

    PubMed

    Fallone, Frédérique; Villard, Pierre-Henri; Sérée, Eric; Rimet, Odile; Nguyen, Quock Binh; Bourgarel-Rey, Véronique; Fouchier, Francis; Barra, Yves; Durand, Alain; Lacarelle, Bruno

    2004-09-17

    CYP1A1 isoform is mainly regulated by the transcription factor AhR and to a lesser extent by the nuclear receptor RAR. The effect of a coexposure with 3MC, a AhR ligand, and RA, a RAR ligand, which are, respectively, strong and weak CYP1A1 inducers, is poorly known. We showed in Caco-2 cells that addition of RA significantly decreased 3MC-induced CYP1A1 expression by -55% for mRNA level and -30% for promoter and enzymatic activities. We further showed that RA decreased AhR protein level. Moreover, a physical interaction between AhR and the RAR-corepressor SMRT has been described in vitro. Using the corepressor inhibitor TSA, transfected-cells with SMRT cDNA, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, we demonstrated that RA addition repressed AhR function through a marked AhR/SMRT physical interaction. This interaction explains the decrease of 3MC-induced CYP1A1 expression. This new mechanism involving the repression of AhR-induced CYP1A1 expression by retinoids allows better knowledge of the CYP1A1 regulation.

  16. Studies on the role of the Ah receptor in hexachloro-benzene-induced porphyria

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Many of the effects of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) resemble those of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), whose effects are initiated by its binding to the AH receptor, the regulatory gene product of the Ah locus. I investigated the ability of HCB to interact with the AH receptor and the involvement of this protein in HCB-induced porphyria. The induction of two cytochrome P450 isozymes regulated by the Ah locus was also examined in light of their possible role in the pathogenesis of HCB- and TCDD-induced porphyria. HCB competitively inhibited the in vitro specific binding of ({sup 3}H)-TCDD to the rat hepatic Ah receptor (K{sub I} = 2.1 {mu}M) without affecting the solubility of ({sup 3}H)TCDD. Following the administration of HCB to rats, the number of ({sup 3}H)TCDD specific binding sites was reduced by up to 40%. HCB induced cytochromes P450b, P450e, P450c, and P450d, confirming that it is a mixed-type P450 inducer. The presence of porphyria in mice was assessed by measuring urinary and hepatic porphyrins and hepatic uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity.

  17. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR links atopic dermatitis and air pollution via induction of the neurotrophic factor artemin.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Takanori; Ogawa, Eisaku; Kobayashi, Eri H; Suzuki, Takafumi; Funayama, Ryo; Nagashima, Takeshi; Fujimura, Taku; Aiba, Setsuya; Nakayama, Keiko; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is increasing worldwide in correlation with air pollution. Various organic components of pollutants activate the transcription factor AhR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor). Through the use of AhR-CA mice, whose keratinocytes express constitutively active AhR and that develop atopic-dermatitis-like phenotypes, we identified Artn as a keratinocyte-specific AhR target gene whose product (the neurotrophic factor artemin) was responsible for epidermal hyper-innervation that led to hypersensitivity to pruritus. The activation of AhR via air pollutants induced expression of artemin, alloknesis, epidermal hyper-innervation and inflammation. AhR activation and ARTN expression were positively correlated in the epidermis of patients with atopic dermatitis. Thus, AhR in keratinocytes senses environmental stimuli and elicits an atopic-dermatitis pathology. We propose a mechanism of air-pollution-induced atopic dermatitis via activation of AhR.

  18. A comparison of adrenergic receptors of rat ascites hepatoma AH130 cells with those of normal rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sanae, F; Miyamoto, K; Koshiura, R

    1988-04-01

    The pharmacological specificity of adrenergic receptors in the plasma membrane of rat ascites hepatoma AH130 cells was compared with that in normal rat hepatocytes. The number of [125I]iodocyanopindolol-binding sites was much greater in AH130 cells than in the hepatocytes. We characterized the alpha-adrenergic receptor subtypes using the alpha 1-selective ligand [3H]prazosin and the alpha 2-selective ligand [3H]clonidine. AH130 cells had fewer prazosin-binding sites than the hepatocytes and about 8 times as many clonidine-binding sites of high affinity. The results showed that the adrenergic receptors in AH130 cells have pharmacological properties that are very different from those of the receptors in normal rat hepatocytes.

  19. ANALYSIS OF AH RECEPTOR-ARNT AND AH RECEPTOR-ARNT2 COMPLEXES IN VITRO AND IN CELL CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Edward J.; Pollenz, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    ARNT and ARNT2 proteins are expressed in mammalian and aquatic species and exhibit a high level of amino acid identity in the bHLH/PAS domains involved in protein interactions and DNA binding. Since the analysis of ARNT2 function at the protein level has been limited, ARNT2 function in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediated signaling was evaluated and compared to ARNT. In vitro, ARNT and ARNT2 dimerized equally with the AHR in the presence of TCDD and ARNT2 out-competed ARNT for binding to the AHR when expressed in excess. In contrast, activation of the AHR with 3-methylcholanthrene or benzo[a]pyrene resulted in predominant formation of AHR•ARNT complexes. ARNT2 expressed in Hepa-1 cell culture lines with reduced ARNT protein resulted in minimal induction of endogenous CYP1A1 protein compared to cells expressing ARNT and mutation of the putative proline residue at amino acid 352 to histidine failed to produce an ARNT2 that could function in AHR-mediated signaling. However, the expression of ARNT2 in wild type Hepa-1 cells reduced TCDD-mediated induction of endogenous CYP1A1 protein by 30%, even though AHR•ARNT2 complexes could not be detected in nuclear extracts. Western blot analysis of numerous mouse tissues and various cell culture line showed that both endogenous ARNT and ARNT2 could be detected in cells derived from kidney, CNS and retinal epithelium. Thus, ARNT2 has the ability to dimerize with the liganded AHR in vitro.and is influenced by the activating ligand yet appears to be limited in its ability to influence AHR mediated signaling in cell culture. PMID:18096572

  20. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway as a regulatory pathway for cell adhesion and matrix metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Tiffany; Murphy, K.A.; White, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an orphan receptor in the basic-helix-loop-helix PAS family of transcriptional regulators. Although the endogenous regulator of this pathway has not been identified, the AhR is known to bind and be activated by a variety of compounds ranging from environmental contaminants to flavanoids. The function of this receptor is still unclear; however, animal models indicate that the AhR is important for normal development. One hypothesis is that the AhR senses cellular stress and initiates the cellular response by altering gene expression and inhibiting cell cycle progression and that activation of the AhR by exogenous environmental chemicals results in the dysregulation of this normal function. In this review we will examine the role of the AhR in the regulation of genes and proteins involved in cell adhesion and matrix remodeling, and discuss the implications of these changes in development and disease. In addition, we will discuss evidence suggesting that the AhR pathway is responsive to changes in matrix composition as well as cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:18940186

  1. Cancer-promoting and Inhibiting Effects of Dietary Compounds: Role of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR)

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Joann B.; Ghotbaddini, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic aromatic amines and dioxin-like compounds are environmental carcinogens shown to initiate cancer in a number of tissue types including prostate and breast. These environmental carcinogens elicit their effects through interacting with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand activated transcription factor. Naturally occurring compounds found in fruits and vegetables shown to have anti-carcinogenic effects also interact with the AhR. This review explores dietary and environmental exposure to chemical carcinogens and beneficial natural compounds whose effects are elicited by the AhR. PMID:25258701

  2. Analysis of Coinfections with A/H1N1 Strain Variants among Pigs in Poland by Multitemperature Single-Strand Conformational Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Lepek, Krzysztof; Pajak, Beata; Rabalski, Lukasz; Urbaniak, Kinga; Kucharczyk, Krzysztof; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Szewczyk, Boguslaw

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring and control of infections are key parts of surveillance systems and epidemiological risk prevention. In the case of influenza A viruses (IAVs), which show high variability, a wide range of hosts, and a potential of reassortment between different strains, it is essential to study not only people, but also animals living in the immediate surroundings. If understated, the animals might become a source of newly formed infectious strains with a pandemic potential. Special attention should be focused on pigs, because of the receptors specific for virus strains originating from different species, localized in their respiratory tract. Pigs are prone to mixed infections and may constitute a reservoir of potentially dangerous IAV strains resulting from genetic reassortment. It has been reported that a quadruple reassortant, A(H1N1)pdm09, can be easily transmitted from humans to pigs and serve as a donor of genetic segments for new strains capable of infecting humans. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a simple, cost-effective, and rapid method for evaluation of IAV genetic variability. We describe a method based on multitemperature single-strand conformational polymorphism (MSSCP), using a fragment of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene, for detection of coinfections and differentiation of genetic variants of the virus, difficult to identify by conventional diagnostic. PMID:25961024

  3. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent regulation of pulmonary miRNA by chronic cigarette smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sarah; de Souza, Angela Rico; Zago, Michela; Iu, Matthew; Guerrina, Necola; Gomez, Alvin; Matthews, Jason; Baglole, Carolyn J

    2017-01-12

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor historically known for its toxic responses to man-made pollutants such as dioxin. More recently, the AhR has emerged as a suppressor of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis from cigarette smoke by mechanisms that may involve the regulation of microRNA. However, little is known about the AhR regulation of miRNA expression in the lung in response to inhaled toxicants. Therefore, we exposed Ahr(-/-) and Ahr(+/-) mice to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks and evaluated lung miRNA expression by PCR array. There was a dramatic regulation of lung miRNA by the AhR in the absence of exogenous ligand. In response to cigarette smoke, there were more up-regulated miRNA in Ahr(-/-) mice compared to Ahr(+/-) mice, including the cancer-associated miRNA miR-96. There was no significant change in the expression of the AhR regulated proteins HuR and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). There were significant increases in the anti-oxidant gene sulfiredoxin 1 (Srxn1) and FOXO3a- predicted targets of miR-96. Collectively, these data support a prominent role for the AhR in regulating lung miRNA expression. Further studies to elucidate a role for these miRNA may further uncover novel biological function for the AhR in respiratory health and disease.

  4. Ablating the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in CD11c+ cells perturbs intestinal epithelium development and intestinal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chng, Song Hui; Kundu, Parag; Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Teo, Wei Ling; Kawajiri, Kaname; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Mak, Tak Wah; Pettersson, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Diet and microbiome derived indole derivatives are known to activate the ligand induced transcription factor, the Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR). While the current understanding of AhR biology has confirmed its role in mucosal lymphocytes, its function in intestinal antigen presenting cells (APCs) is poorly understood. Here, we report that Cre-mediated deletion of AhR in CD11c-expressing cells in C57/BL6 mice is associated with altered intestinal epithelial morphogenesis in vivo. Moreover, when co-cultured with AhR-deficient DCs ex vivo, intestinal organoids showed reduced SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 and increased Mucin 2 expression, which correlates with reduced Paneth cells and increased goblet cell differentiation, similar to the data obtained in vivo. Further, characterization of intestinal APC subsets, devoid of AhR, revealed an expression pattern associated with aberrant intrinsic Wnt pathway regulation. At a functional level, the loss of AhR in APCs resulted in a dysfunctional epithelial barrier, associated with a more aggressive chemically induced colitis compared to wild type animals. Our results are consistent with a model whereby the AhR signalling pathway may participate in the regulation of innate immunity through intestinal epithelium development and mucosal immunity. PMID:27068235

  5. Ablating the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in CD11c+ cells perturbs intestinal epithelium development and intestinal immunity.

    PubMed

    Chng, Song Hui; Kundu, Parag; Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Teo, Wei Ling; Kawajiri, Kaname; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Mak, Tak Wah; Pettersson, Sven

    2016-04-12

    Diet and microbiome derived indole derivatives are known to activate the ligand induced transcription factor, the Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR). While the current understanding of AhR biology has confirmed its role in mucosal lymphocytes, its function in intestinal antigen presenting cells (APCs) is poorly understood. Here, we report that Cre-mediated deletion of AhR in CD11c-expressing cells in C57/BL6 mice is associated with altered intestinal epithelial morphogenesis in vivo. Moreover, when co-cultured with AhR-deficient DCs ex vivo, intestinal organoids showed reduced SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 and increased Mucin 2 expression, which correlates with reduced Paneth cells and increased goblet cell differentiation, similar to the data obtained in vivo. Further, characterization of intestinal APC subsets, devoid of AhR, revealed an expression pattern associated with aberrant intrinsic Wnt pathway regulation. At a functional level, the loss of AhR in APCs resulted in a dysfunctional epithelial barrier, associated with a more aggressive chemically induced colitis compared to wild type animals. Our results are consistent with a model whereby the AhR signalling pathway may participate in the regulation of innate immunity through intestinal epithelium development and mucosal immunity.

  6. Tissue specificity of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated responses and relative sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to an AhR agonist.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Tendler, Brett J; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2012-06-15

    Sturgeons are endangered in some parts of the world. Due to their benthic nature and longevity sturgeon are at greater risk of exposure to bioaccumulative contaminants such as dioxin-like compounds that are associated with sediments. Despite their endangered status, little research has been conducted to characterize the relative responsiveness of sturgeon to dioxin-like compounds. In an attempt to study the biological effects and possible associated risks of exposure to dioxin-like compounds in sturgeon, the molecular and biochemical responses of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to a model aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist, β-naphthoflavone (βNF) were investigated. White sturgeon were injected intraperitoneally with one of three doses of βNF (0, 50, or 500mg/kg, bw). Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were used as a reference species since their responses have been well characterized in the past. Three days following injection with βNF, fish were euthanized and livers, gills, and intestines collected for biochemical and molecular analyses. White sturgeon exposed to βNF had significantly greater ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity in liver (up to 37-fold), gill (up to 41-fold), and intestine (up to 36-fold) than did unexposed controls. Rainbow trout injected with βNF exhibited EROD activity that was significantly greater in liver (88-fold), than that of controls, but was undetectable in gills or intestine. Abundance of CYP1A transcript displayed a comparable pattern of tissue-specific induction with intestine (up to 189-fold), gills (up to 53-fold), and liver (up to 21-fold). Methoxyresorufin O-deethylase (MROD) and pentoxyresorufin O-deethylase (PROD) activities were undetectable in unexposed white sturgeon tissues while exposed tissues displayed MROD activity that was only moderately greater than the activity that could be detected. Differential inducibility among liver, gill, and intestine following exposure to an AhR agonist is

  7. Imidazolines stimulate release of insulin from RIN-5AH cells independently from imidazoline I1 and I2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Olmos, G; Kulkarni, R N; Haque, M; MacDermot, J

    1994-09-01

    The effect on insulin release of efaroxan, an alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist and a highly potent drug at imidazoline I1 receptors, and the effects of seven other imidazoline compounds selective for the imidazoline I1 or I2 receptors, were studied in the rat insulinoma cell line RIN-5AH. The cells released insulin in response to glucose (0.3-10 mM), and efaroxan (100 microM) potentiated glucose-induced insulin release. (-)-Adrenaline completely displaced the binding of [125I]p-iodoclonidine to membranes of RIN-5AH cells, indicating that these cells do not express imidazoline I1 receptors. Cirazoline and idazoxan (100 microM), both highly potent drugs at imidazoline I2 receptors, and the guanidines guanoxan and amiloride (200 microM), also promoted insulin release from RIN-5AH cells. Irreversible blockade of imidazoline I2 receptors with 10 microM clorgyline did not prevent the stimulatory effects of cirazoline or idazoxan; however, these compounds completely reversed the inhibition by diazoxide (250 microM), an opener of ATP-dependent K+ channels (K+ATP channels), of glucose-induced insulin release. These data indicate that the imidazoline/guanidine compounds promote insulin release from RIN-5AH cells, by interacting with a novel binding site related to K+ATP channels that does not represent any of the known imidazoline I1 or I2 receptors.

  8. Development of Species-Specific Ah Receptor-Responsive Third Generation CALUX Cell Lines with Increased Sensitivity and Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Jennifer C.; He, Guochun; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Zhao, Jing; Wirth, Ed; Fulton, Michael H.; Denison, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The Ah receptor (AhR)-responsive CALUX (chemically-activated luciferase expression) cell bioassay is commonly used for rapid screening of samples for the presence of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin), dioxin-like compounds, and AhR agonists/antagonists. By increasing the number of AhR DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements), we previously generated a novel third generation (G3) recombinant AhR-responsive mouse CALUX cell line (H1L7.5c3) with significantly enhanced sensitivity and response to DLCs compared to existing AhR-CALUX cell bioassays. However, the elevated background luciferase activity of these cells and the absence of comparable G3 cell lines derived from other species have limited their utility for screening purposes. Here, we describe the development and characterization of species-specific G3 recombinant AhR-responsive CALUX cell lines (rat, human, and guinea pig) that exhibit significantly improved sensitivity and dramatically increased TCDD induction response. The low background luciferase activity, low minimal detection limit (0.1 pM TCDD) and enhanced induction response of the rat G3 cell line (H4L7.5c2) over the H1L7.5c3 mouse G3 cells, identifies them as a more optimal cell line for screening purposes. The utility of the new G3 CALUX cell lines were demonstrated by screening sediment extracts and a small chemical compound library for the presence of AhR agonists. The increased sensitivity and response of these new G3 CALUX cell lines will facilitate species-specific analysis of DLCs and AhR agonists in samples with low levels of contamination and/or in small sample volumes. PMID:26366531

  9. Identification and expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhR1 and AhR2) provide insight in an evolutionary context regarding sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Sturgeons are ancient fishes, which are endangered in many parts of the world. Due to their benthic nature and longevity, sturgeon are at great risk of exposure to bioaccumulative contaminants such as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Despite their endangered status, little research has been conducted to characterize the relative sensitivity of sturgeons to DLCs. Proper assessment of risk of DLCs posed to these fishes therefore, requires a better understanding of this sensitivity and the factors that are driving it. Adverse effects associated with exposure to DLCs are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). This study identified and characterized two distinct AhRs, AhR1 and AhR2, in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) for the first time as a first step in studying the relative sensitivities of sturgeons to DLCs. Furthermore, tissue-specific expression of both AhRs under basal conditions and in response to exposure to the model DLC, β-naphthoflavone (βNF), was determined. The sequence of amino acids of AhR1 of white sturgeon had greater similarity to AhRs of tetrapods, including amphibians, birds, and mammals, than to AhR1s of other fishes. The sequence of amino acids in the ligand binding domain of the AhR1 had greater than 80% similarity to AhRs known to bind DLCs and was less similar to AhRs not known to bind DLCs. AhR2 of white sturgeon had greatest similarity to AhR2 of other fishes. Profiles of expression of AhR1 and AhR2 in white sturgeon were distinct from those known in other fishes and appear more similar to profiles observed in birds. Expressions of both AhR1 and AhR2 of white sturgeon were greatest in liver and heart, which are target organs for DLCs. Furthermore, abundances of transcripts of AhR1 and AhR2 in all tissues from white sturgeon were greater than controls (up to 35-fold) following exposure to βNF. Based upon both AhRs having similar abundances of transcript in target organs of DLC toxicity, both AhRs being up-regulated following

  10. The Nuclear Receptor AhR Controls Bone Homeostasis by Regulating Osteoclast Differentiation via the RANK/c-Fos Signaling Axis

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, Takashi; Arakaki, Rieko; Mori, Hiroki; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Kudo, Yasusei; Tanaka, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway plays a key role in receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)–mediated osteoclastogenesis. However, the mechanism underlying the regulation of AhR expression in osteoclasts and the signaling pathway through which AhR controls osteoclastogenesis remain unclear. We found that the expression of AhR in bone marrow–derived osteoclasts was upregulated by RANKL at an earlier stage than was the expression of signature osteoclast genes such as those encoding cathepsin K and NFAT, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1. In response to RANKL, bone marrow macrophages isolated from AhR−/− mice exhibited impaired phosphorylation of Akt and MAPK as well as NF-κB, whereas their response to M-CSF remained unchanged. Osteoclast differentiation mediated by the AhR signaling pathway was also regulated in an RANKL/c-Fos–dependent manner. Furthermore, ligand activation of AhR by the smoke toxin benzo[a]pyrene accelerated osteoclast differentiation in a receptor-dependent manner, and AhR-dependent regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in osteoclasts was observed. Moreover, AhR−/− mice exhibited impaired bone healing with delayed endochondral ossification. Taken together, the present results suggest that the RANKL/AhR/c-Fos signaling axis plays a critical role in osteoclastogenesis, thereby identifying the potential of AhR in treating pathological, inflammatory, or metabolic disorders of the bone. PMID:27849171

  11. Antiviral Susceptibility of Variant Influenza A(H3N2)v Viruses Isolated in the United States from 2011 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sleeman, K.; Mishin, V. P.; Guo, Z.; Garten, R. J.; Balish, A.; Fry, A. M.; Villanueva, J.; Stevens, J.

    2014-01-01

    Since 2011, outbreaks caused by influenza A(H3N2) variant [A(H3N2)v] viruses have become a public health concern in the United States. The A(H3N2)v viruses share the A(H1N1)pdm09 M gene containing the marker of M2 blocker resistance, S31N, but do not contain any known molecular markers associated with resistance to neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs). Using a fluorescent NA inhibition (NI) assay, the susceptibilities of recovered A(H3N2)v viruses (n = 168) to FDA-approved (oseltamivir and zanamivir) and other (peramivir, laninamivir, and A-315675) NAIs were assessed. All A(H3N2)v viruses tested, with the exception of a single virus strain, A/Ohio/88/2012, isolated from an untreated patient, were susceptible to the NAIs tested. The A/Ohio/88/2012 virus contained two rare substitutions, S245N and S247P, in the NA and demonstrated reduced inhibition by oseltamivir (31-fold) and zanamivir (66-fold) in the NI assay. Using recombinant NA (recNA) proteins, S247P was shown to be responsible for the observed altered NAI susceptibility, in addition to an approximately 60% reduction in NA enzymatic activity. The S247P substitution has not been previously reported as a molecular marker of reduced susceptibility to the NAIs. Using cell culture assays, the investigational antiviral drugs nitazoxanide, favipiravir, and fludase were shown to inhibit the replication of A(H3N2)v viruses, including the virus with the S247P substitution in the NA. This report demonstrates the importance of continuous monitoring of susceptibility of zoonotic influenza viruses to available and investigational antiviral drugs. PMID:24449767

  12. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a marker of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) function in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Mattingly, C J; McLachlan, J A; Toscano, W A

    2001-08-01

    We developed an inducible in vivo reporter system to examine expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) during development in zebrafish (Danio rerio). AhR is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the toxic actions of environmental contaminants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Induction of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) is an early biomarker of AhR activation. A 1905 base pair region of the human CYP1A1 promoter/enhancer region was regulated by AhR in zebrafish liver cells after exposure to TCDD (10 nM) in a transient transfection assay. This regulatory region was fused to the cDNA sequence encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) of jellyfish (Aequorea victoria). Transgenic zebrafish were generated to express this AhR-regulated GFP construct. Injected fish exposed to TCDD exhibited induction of GFP in the eye, nose, and vertebrae of zebrafish embryos (48 and 72 hr after fertilization) compared to vehicle controls (DMSO), which did not express GFP. To investigate whether AhR-regulated GFP expression correlated with sites of TCDD toxicity, we exposed wild-type zebrafish to DMSO or TCDD and examined them for morphologic abnormalities. By 5 days after fertilization, TCDD-exposed fish exhibited gross dysmorphogenesis in cranio-facial and vertebral development.

  13. Benzimidazoisoquinolines: A New Class of Rapidly Metabolized Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) Ligands that Induce AhR-Dependent Tregs and Prevent Murine Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Punj, Sumit; Kopparapu, Prasad; Jang, Hyo Sang; Phillips, Jessica L.; Pennington, Jamie; Rohlman, Diana; O’Donnell, Edmond; Iversen, Patrick L.; Kolluri, Siva Kumar; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays multiple roles in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses. The ability of certain AhR ligands to induce regulatory T cells (Tregs) has generated interest in developing AhR ligands for therapeutic treatment of immune-mediated diseases. To this end, we designed a screen for novel Treg-inducing compounds based on our understanding of the mechanisms of Treg induction by the well-characterized immunosuppressive AhR ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). We screened a ChemBridge small molecule library and identified 10-chloro-7H-benzimidazo[2,1-a]benzo[de]Iso-quinolin-7-one (10-Cl-BBQ) as a potent AhR ligand that was rapidly metabolized and not cytotoxic to proliferating T cells. Like TCDD,10-Cl-BBQ altered donor CD4+ T cell differentiation during the early stages of a graft versus host (GVH) response resulting in expression of high levels of CD25, CTLA-4 and ICOS, as well as several genes associated with Treg function. The Treg phenotype required AhR expression in the donor CD4+ T cells. Foxp3 was not expressed in the AhR-induced Tregs implicating AhR as an independent transcription factor for Treg induction. Structure-activity studies showed that unsubstituted BBQ as well as 4, 11-dichloro-BBQ were capable of inducing AhR-Tregs. Other substitutions reduced activation of AhR. Daily treatment with 10-Cl-BBQ during the GVH response prevented development of GVH disease in an AhR-dependent manner with no overt toxicity. Together, our data provide strong support for development of select BBQs that activate the AhR to induce Tregs for treatment of immune-mediated diseases. PMID:24586378

  14. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent regulation of pulmonary miRNA by chronic cigarette smoke exposure

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Sarah; de Souza, Angela Rico; Zago, Michela; Iu, Matthew; Guerrina, Necola; Gomez, Alvin; Matthews, Jason; Baglole, Carolyn J.

    2017-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor historically known for its toxic responses to man-made pollutants such as dioxin. More recently, the AhR has emerged as a suppressor of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis from cigarette smoke by mechanisms that may involve the regulation of microRNA. However, little is known about the AhR regulation of miRNA expression in the lung in response to inhaled toxicants. Therefore, we exposed Ahr−/− and Ahr+/− mice to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks and evaluated lung miRNA expression by PCR array. There was a dramatic regulation of lung miRNA by the AhR in the absence of exogenous ligand. In response to cigarette smoke, there were more up-regulated miRNA in Ahr−/− mice compared to Ahr+/− mice, including the cancer-associated miRNA miR-96. There was no significant change in the expression of the AhR regulated proteins HuR and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). There were significant increases in the anti-oxidant gene sulfiredoxin 1 (Srxn1) and FOXO3a- predicted targets of miR-96. Collectively, these data support a prominent role for the AhR in regulating lung miRNA expression. Further studies to elucidate a role for these miRNA may further uncover novel biological function for the AhR in respiratory health and disease. PMID:28079158

  15. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) inhibits vanadate-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in TRAMP prostates

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Wayne A.; Lin, Tien-Min; Peterson, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) are basic helix-loop-helix/per-arnt-sim (PAS) family transcription factors. During angiogenesis and tumor growth, HIF-1α dimerizes with ARNT, inducing expression of many genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). ARNT also dimerizes with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). AhR-null (Ahr−/−) transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice develop prostate tumors with greater frequency than AhR wild-type (Ahr+/+) TRAMP mice, even though prevalence of prostate epithelial hyperplasia is not inhibited. This suggests that Ahr inhibits prostate carcinogenesis. In TRAMP mice, prostatic epithelial hyperplasia results in stabilized HIF-1α, inducing expression of VEGF, a prerequisite for tumor growth and angiogenesis. Since ARNT is a common dimerization partner of AhR and HIF-1α, we hypothesized that the AhR inhibits prostate tumor formation by competing with HIF-1α for ARNT, thereby limiting VEGF production. Prostates from Ahr+/+, Ahr+/− and Ahr−/− C57BL/6J TRAMP mice were cultured in the presence of graded concentrations of vanadate, an inducer of VEGF through the HIF-1α–ARNT pathway. Vanadate induced VEGF protein in a dose-dependent fashion in Ahr+/− and Ahr−/− TRAMP cultures, but not in Ahr+/+ cultures. However, vanadate induced upstream proteins in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-signaling cascade to a similar extent in TRAMPs of each Ahr genotype, evidenced by v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (Akt) phosphorylation. These findings suggest that AhR sequesters ARNT, decreasing interaction with HIF-1α reducing VEGF production. Since VEGF is required for tumor vascularization and growth, these studies further suggest that reduction in VEGF correlates with inhibited prostate carcinogenesis in Ahr+/+ TRAMP mice. PMID:18359762

  16. The constitutively active Ah receptor (CA-Ahr) mouse as a potential model for dioxin exposure--effects in vital organs.

    PubMed

    Brunnberg, Sara; Andersson, Patrik; Lindstam, Maria; Paulson, Ivar; Poellinger, Lorenz; Hanberg, Annika

    2006-07-25

    The dioxin/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates most, if not all, toxic effects of dioxins and functions as a ligand-activated transcription factor regulating transcription of a battery of genes. In order to study the mechanisms behind the toxicity of ligands of the Ah receptor we have created a transgenic mouse model expressing a constitutively active Ah receptor (CA-AhR). The mutant Ah receptor is expressed and functionally active in all organs studied. The purpose of the present study was to characterize histopathologically, the phenotype of the CA-AhR with regard to the liver, kidney, lung, heart, spleen and thymus of male and female transgenic CA-AhR mice. Moreover, cell-specific activity of the CA-AhR using up-regulation of the AhR target gene CYP1A1 as a marker, was also examined. The relative weight of liver, kidney and heart were increased while relative thymus weight was decreased. Furthermore, slight morphological lesions of the liver, kidney and spleen was seen. Expression of CYP1A1 was found in cells corresponding to endothelial cells in all of the organs studied. In some tissues additional cell types, such as hepatocytes, renal tubuli cell and Clara cells expressed CYP1A1. Both the effects on organ weights and the cellular expression of CYP1A1 in CA-AhR mice correspond well to observations in TCDD-exposed mice. In conclusion, this characterization further support that the CA-AhR mouse is a useful model for life-long continuous low-level activity of the AhR, i.e. the dioxin exposure situation of humans of the general population.

  17. Ligand-dependent interactions of the Ah receptor with coactivators in a mammalian two-hybrid assay

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shu; Rowlands, Craig; Safe, Stephen

    2008-03-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a high affinity ligand for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). In this study, we investigated structure-dependent differences in activation of the AhR by a series of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. TCDD, 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (PeCDD), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF), and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) induced CYP1A1-dependent activities in HEK293 human embryonic kidney, Panc1 pancreatic cancer, and Hepa1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cell lines. There was a structure-dependent difference in the efficacy of TCDF and PCB126 in HEK293 and Panc1 cells since induced CYP1A1 mRNA levels were lower than observed for the other congeners. A mammalian two-hybrid assay in cells transfected with GAL4-coactivator and AhR-VP16 chimeras was used to investigate structure-dependent interactions of these chimeras in Panc1, HEK293, and Hepa1c1c7 cells. The reporter construct pGAL4-luc contains five tandem GAL4 response elements linked to the luciferase gene and the GAL4-coactivator chimeras express several coactivators including steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1), SRC-2 and SRC-3, the mediator coactivator TRAP220, coactivator associated arginine methyl transferase 1 (CARM-1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator 1 (PGC-1). Results of the mammalian two-hybrid studies clearly demonstrate that activation of pGAL4-luc in cells transfected with VP-AhR and GAL4-coactivator chimeras is dependent on the structure of the HAH congener, cell context, and coactivator, suggesting that the prototypical HAH congeners used in this study exhibit selective AhR modulator activity.

  18. A novel prostate cancer therapeutic strategy using icaritin-activated arylhydrocarbon-receptor to co-target androgen receptor and its splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Feng; Indran, Inthrani R.; Zhang, Zhi Wei; Tan, M.H.Eileen; Li, Yu; Lim, Z.L.Ryan; Hua, Rui; Yang, Chong; Soon, Fen-Fen; Li, Jun; Xu, H.Eric; Cheung, Edwin; Yong, Eu-Leong

    2015-01-01

    Persistent androgen receptor (AR) signaling is the key driving force behind progression and development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In many patients, AR COOH-terminal truncated splice variants (ARvs) play a critical role in contributing to the resistance against androgen depletion therapy. Unfortunately, clinically used antiandrogens like bicalutamide (BIC) and enzalutamide (MDV), which target the ligand binding domain, have failed to suppress these AR variants. Here, we report for the first time that a natural prenylflavonoid, icaritin (ICT), can co-target both persistent AR and ARvs. ICT was found to inhibit transcription of key AR-regulated genes, such as KLK3 [prostate-specific antigen (PSA)] and ARvs-regulated genes, such as UBE2C and induce apoptosis in AR-positive prostate cancer (PC) cells. Mechanistically, ICT promoted the degradation of both AR and ARvs by binding to arylhydrocarbon-receptor (AhR) to mediate ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation. Therefore, ICT impaired AR transactivation in PC cells. Knockdown of AhR gene restored AR stability and partially prevented ICT-induced growth suppression. In clinically relevant murine models orthotopically implanted with androgen-sensitive and CRPC cells, ICT was able to target AR and ARvs, to inhibit AR signaling and tumor growth with no apparent toxicity. Our results provide a mechanistic framework for the development of ICT, as a novel lead compound for AR-positive PC therapeutics, especially for those bearing AR splice variants. PMID:25908644

  19. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 is a novel target gene of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xingguo; Vispute, Saurabh G.; Liu, Jie; Cheng, Christine; Kharitonenkov, Alexei; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-07-01

    The toxic effects of dioxins, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), mainly through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) are well documented. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 plays critical roles in metabolic adaptation to fasting by increasing lipid oxidation and ketogenesis in the liver. The present study was performed to determine whether activation of the AhR induces Fgf21 expression. In mouse liver, TCDD increased Fgf21 mRNA in both dose- and time-dependent manners. In addition, TCDD markedly increased Fgf21 mRNA expression in cultured mouse and human hepatocytes. Moreover, TCDD increased mRNA (in liver) and protein levels (in both liver and serum) of Fgf21 in wild-type mice, but not in AhR-null mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that TCDD increased AhR protein binding to the Fgf21 promoter (− 105/+ 1 base pair). Fgf21-null mice administered 200 μg/kg of TCDD died within 20 days, whereas wild-type mice receiving the same treatment were still alive at one month after administration. This indicates that TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression protects against TCDD toxicity. Diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) pretreatment attenuated TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression in mouse liver and white adipose tissue, which may explain a previous report that DEHP pretreatment decreases TCDD-induced wasting. In conclusion, Fgf21 appears to be a target gene of AhR-signaling pathway in mouse and human liver. - Highlights: • TCDD induced Fgf21 expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Fgf21 induction by TCDD is AhR-dependent. • DEHP attenuated TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression.

  20. Segregation of Virulent Influenza A(H1N1) Variants in the Lower Respiratory Tract of Critically Ill Patients during the 2010–2011 Seasonal Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Piralla, Antonio; Pariani, Elena; Rovida, Francesca; Campanini, Giulia; Muzzi, Alba; Emmi, Vincenzo; Iotti, Giorgio A.; Pesenti, Antonio; Conaldi, Pier Giulio; Zanetti, Alessandro; Baldanti, Fausto

    2011-01-01

    Background Since its appearance in 2009, the pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus circulated worldwide causing several severe infections. Methods Respiratory samples from patients with 2009 influenza A(H1N1) and acute respiratory distress attending 24 intensive care units (ICUs) as well as from patients with lower respiratory tract infections not requiring ICU admission and community upper respiratory tract infections in the Lombardy region (10 million inhabitants) of Italy during the 2010–2011 winter-spring season, were analyzed. Results In patients with severe ILI, the viral load was higher in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) with respect to nasal swab (NS), (p<0.001) suggesting a higher virus replication in the lower respiratory tract. Four distinct virus clusters (referred to as cluster A to D) circulated simultaneously. Most (72.7%, n = 48) of the 66 patients infected with viruses belonging to cluster A had a severe (n = 26) or moderate ILI (n = 22). Amino acid mutations (V26I, I116M, A186T, D187Y, D222G/N, M257I, S263F, I286L/M, and N473D) were observed only in patients with severe ILI. D222G/N variants were detected exclusively in BAL samples. Conclusions Multiple virus clusters co-circulated during the 2010–2011 winter-spring season. Severe or moderate ILI were associated with specific 2009 influenza A(H1N1) variants, which replicated preferentially in the lower respiratory tract. PMID:22194826

  1. Detection of the TCDD Binding-Fingerprint within the Ah Receptor Ligand Binding Domain by Structurally Driven Mutagenesis and Functional Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Song, Yujuan; Zhao, Jing; Bonati, Laura; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent, basic helix–loop–helix Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS)-containing transcription factor that can bind and be activated by structurally diverse chemicals, including the toxic environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Our previous three-dimensional homology model of the mouse AhR (mAhR) PAS B ligand binding domain allowed identification of the binding site and its experimental validation. We have extended this analysis by conducting comparative structural modeling studies of the ligand binding domains of six additional high-affinity mammalian AhRs. These results, coupled with site-directed mutagenesis and AhR functional analysis, have allowed detection of the “TCDD binding-fingerprint” of conserved residues within the ligand binding cavity necessary for high-affinity TCDD binding and TCDD-dependent AhR transformation DNA binding. The essential role of selected residues was further evaluated using molecular docking simulations of TCDD with both wild-type and mutant mAhRs. Taken together, our results dramatically improve our understanding of the molecular determinants of TCDD binding and provide a basis for future studies directed toward rationalizing the observed species differences in AhR sensitivity to TCDD and understanding the mechanistic basis for the dramatic diversity in AhR ligand structure. PMID:19456125

  2. The AhR Ligand, TCDD, Regulates Androgen Receptor Activity Differently in Androgen-Sensitive versus Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghotbaddini, Maryam; Powell, Joann B.

    2015-01-01

    The reported biological effects of TCDD include induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, wasting syndrome and tumor promotion. TCDD elicits most of its effects through binding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). TCDD induced degradation of AhR has been widely reported and requires ubiquitination of the protein. The rapid depletion of AhR following TCDD activation serves as a mechanism to modulate AhR mediated gene induction. In addition to inducing AhR degradation, TCDD has been reported to induce degradation of hormone receptors. The studies reported here, evaluate the effect of TCDD exposure on androgen receptor (AR) expression and activity in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and castration-resistant C4-2 prostate cancer cells. Our results show that TCDD exposure does not induce AhR or AR degradation in C4-2 cells. However, both AhR and AR are degraded in LNCaP cells following TCDD exposure. In addition, TCDD enhances AR phosphorylation and induces expression of AR responsive genes in LNCaP cells. Our data reveals that TCDD effect on AR expression and activity differs in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell models. PMID:26154658

  3. Melanocortin 1 receptor variants and skin cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiali; Kraft, Peter; Colditz, Graham A; Wong, Jason; Hunter, David J

    2006-10-15

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene variants are associated with red hair and fair skin color. We assessed the associations of common MC1R genotypes with the risks of 3 types of skin cancer simultaneously in a nested case-control study within the Nurses' Health Study (219 melanoma, 286 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 300 basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cases, and 873 controls). We found that the 151Cys, 160Trp and 294His variants were significantly associated with red hair, fair skin color and childhood tanning tendency. The MC1R variants, especially the 151Cys variant, were associated with increased risks of the 3 types of skin cancer, after controlling for hair color, skin color and other skin cancer risk factors. Carriers of the 151Cys variant had an OR of 1.65 (95% CI, 1.04-2.59) for melanoma, 1.67 (1.12-2.49) for SCC and 1.56 (1.03-2.34) for BCC. Women with medium or olive skin color carrying 1 nonred hair color allele and 1 red hair color allele had the highest risk of melanoma. A similar interaction pattern was observed for red hair and carrying at least 1 red hair color allele on melanoma risk. We also observed that the 151Cys variant contributed additional melanoma risk among red-haired women. The information on MC1R status modestly improved the risk prediction; the increase was significant for melanoma and BCC (p, 0.004 and 0.05, respectively). These findings indicated that the effects of the MC1R variants on skin cancer risk were independent from self-reported phenotypic pigmentation.

  4. Mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR and induce CYP1A genes expression in human hepatocytes and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kubešová, Kateřina; Dořičáková, Aneta; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-07-25

    The effects of four copper(II) mixed-ligand complexes [Cu(qui1)(L)]NO3·H2O (1-3) and [Cu(qui2)(phen)]NO3 (4), where qui1=2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone, Hqui2=2-(4-amino-3,5-dichlorophenyl)-N-propyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone-7-carboxamide, L=1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (1), 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen) (2), bathophenanthroline (bphen) (3), on transcriptional activities of steroid receptors, nuclear receptors and xenoreceptors have been studied. The complexes (1-4) did not influence basal or ligand-inducible activities of glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor, thyroid receptor, pregnane X receptor and vitamin D receptor, as revealed by gene reporter assays. The complexes 1 and 2 dose-dependently induced luciferase activity in stable gene reporter AZ-AhR cell line, and this induction was reverted by resveratrol, indicating involvement of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in the process. The complexes 1, 2 and 3 induced CYP1A1 mRNA in LS180 cells and CYP1A1/CYP1A2 in human hepatocytes through AhR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay EMSA showed that the complexes 1 and 2 transformed AhR in its DNA-binding form. Collectively, we demonstrate that the complexes 1 and 2 activate AhR and induce AhR-dependent genes in human hepatocytes and cancer cell lines. In conclusion, the data presented here might be of toxicological importance, regarding the multiple roles of AhR in human physiology and pathophysiology.

  5. Whole-Genome Characterization of a Novel Human Influenza A(H1N2) Virus Variant, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Born, Priscila Silva; Matos, Aline Rocha; Motta, Fernando Couto; Caetano, Braulia Costa; Debur, Maria do Carmo; Riediger, Irina Nastassja; Brown, David; Siqueira, Marilda M.

    2017-01-01

    We report the characterization of a novel reassortant influenza A(H1N2) virus not previously reported in humans. Recovered from a a pig farm worker in southeast Brazil who had influenza-like illness, this virus is a triple reassortant containing gene segments from subtypes H1N2 (hemagglutinin), H3N2 (neuraminidase), and pandemic H1N1 (remaining genes). PMID:27983507

  6. Functionality of aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhR1 and AhR2) of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and implications for the risk assessment of dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Farmahin, Reza; Wiseman, Steve; Kennedy, Sean W; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-07-15

    Worldwide, populations of sturgeons are endangered, and it is hypothesized that anthropogenic chemicals, including dioxin-like compounds (DLCs), might be contributing to the observed declines in populations. DLCs elicit their toxic action through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which is believed to regulate most, if not all, adverse effects associated with exposure to these chemicals. Currently, risk assessment of DLCs in fishes uses toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) developed for the World Health Organization (WHO) that are based on studies of embryo-lethality with salmonids. However, there is a lack of knowledge of the sensitivity of sturgeons to DLCs, and it is uncertain whether TEFs developed by the WHO are protective of these fishes. Sturgeons are evolutionarily distinct from salmonids, and the AhRs of sturgeons differ from those of salmonids. Therefore, this study investigated the sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to DLCs in vitro via the use of luciferase reporter gene assays using COS-7 cells transfected with AhR1 or AhR2 of white sturgeon. Specifically, activation and relative potencies (RePs) of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachloro-dibenzofuran, 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzofuran, 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl, 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl, and 2,3,3',4,4'-pentachlorobiphenyl were determined for each AhR. It was demonstrated that white sturgeon expresses AhR1s and AhR2s that are both activated by DLCs with EC50 values for 2,3,7,8-TCDD that are lower than those of any other AhR of vertebrates tested to date. Both AhRs of white sturgeon had RePs for polychlorinated dibenzofurans more similar to TEFs for birds, while RePs for polychlorinated biphenyls were most similar to TEFs for fishes. Measured concentrations of select DLCs in tissues of white sturgeon from British Columbia, Canada, were used to calculate toxic equivalents (TEQs) by use of TEFs for fishes used by the WHO and TCDD

  7. Characterizing the role of endothelin-1 in the progression of cardiac hypertrophy in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Amie K.; Goens, M. Beth; Nunez, Bethany A.; Walker, Mary K. . E-mail: mkwalker@unm.edu

    2006-04-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor characterized to play a role in detection and adaptation to environmental stimuli. Genetic deletion of AhR results in hypertension, and cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, associated with elevated plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), thus AhR appears to contribute to cardiovascular homeostasis. In these studies, we tested the hypothesis that ET-1 mediates cardiovascular pathology in AhR null mice via ET{sub A} receptor activation. First, we determine the time courses of cardiac hypertrophy, and of plasma and tissue ET-1 expression in AhR wildtype and null mice. AhR null mice exhibited increases in heart-to-body weight ratio and age-related expression of cardiac hypertrophy markers, {beta}-myosin heavy chain ({beta}-MHC), and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), which were significant at 2 months. Similarly, plasma and tissue ET-1 expression was significantly elevated at 2 months and increased further with age. Second, AhR null mice were treated with ET{sub A} receptor antagonist, BQ-123 (100 nmol/kg/day), for 7, 28, or 58 days and blood pressure, cardiac fibrosis, and cardiac hypertrophy assessed, respectively. BQ-123 for 7 days significantly reduced mean arterial pressure in conscious, catheterized mice. BQ-123 for 28 days significantly reduced the histological appearance of cardiac fibrosis. Treatment for 58 days significantly reduced cardiac mass, assessed by heart weight, echocardiography, and {beta}-MHC and ANF expression; and reduced cardiac fibrosis as determined by osteopontin and collagen I mRNA expression. These findings establish ET-1 and the ET{sub A} receptor as primary determinants of hypertension and cardiac pathology in AhR null mice.

  8. Predicting the sensitivity of fishes to dioxin-like compounds: possible role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand binding domain.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve; Hecker, Markus

    2013-03-01

    Dioxin-like compounds are chronically toxic to most vertebrates. However, dramatic differences in sensitivity to these chemicals exist both within and among vertebrate classes. A recent study found that in birds, critical amino acid residues in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand binding domain are predictive of sensitivity to dioxin-like compounds in a range of species. It is currently unclear whether similar predictive relationships exist for fishes, a group of animals at risk of exposure to dioxin-like compounds. Effects of dioxin-like compounds are mediated through the AhR in fishes and birds. However, AhR dynamics are more complex among fishes. Fishes possess AhRs that can be grouped within at least three distinct clades (AhR1, AhR2, AhR3) with each clade possibly containing multiple isoforms. AhR2 has been shown to be the active form in most teleosts, with AhR1 not binding dioxin-like compounds. The role of AhR3 in dioxin-like toxicity has not been established to date and this clade is only known to be expressed in some cartilaginous fishes. Furthermore, multiple mechanisms of sensitivity to dioxin-like compounds that are not relevant in birds could exist among fishes. Although, at this time, deficiencies exist for the development of such a predictive relationship for application to fishes, successfully establishing such relationships would offer a substantial improvement in assessment of risks of dioxin-like compounds for this class of vertebrates. Elucidation of such relationships would provide a mechanistic foundation for extrapolation among species to allow the identification of the most sensitive fishes, with the ultimate goal of the prediction of risk posed to endangered species that are not easily studied.

  9. CNTF variants with increased biological potency and receptor selectivity define a functional site of receptor interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Saggio, I; Gloaguen, I; Poiana, G; Laufer, R

    1995-01-01

    Human CNTF is a neurocytokine that elicits potent neurotrophic effects by activating a receptor complex composed of the ligand-specific alpha-receptor subunit (CNTFR alpha) and two signal transducing proteins, which together constitute a receptor for leukemia inhibitory factor (LIFR). At high concentrations, CNTF can also activate the LIFR and possibly other cross-reactive cytokine receptors in the absence of CNTFR alpha. To gain a better understanding of its structure-function relationships and to develop analogs with increased receptor specificity, the cytokine was submitted to affinity maturation using phage display technology. Variants with greatly increased CNTFR alpha affinity were selected from a phage-displayed library of CNTF variants carrying random amino acid substitutions in the putative D helix. Selected variants contained substitutions of the wild-type Gln167 residue, either alone or in combination with neighboring mutations. These results provide evidence for an important functional role of the mutagenized region in CNTFR alpha binding. Affinity enhancing mutations conferred to CNTF increased potency to trigger biological effects mediated by CNTFR alpha and enhanced neurotrophic activity on chicken ciliary neurons. In contrast, the same mutations did not potentiate the CNTFR alpha-independent receptor actions of CNTF. These CNTF analogs thus represent receptor-specific superagonists, which should help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic actions of the neurocytokine. PMID:7621819

  10. Amino Acids in Hemagglutinin Antigenic Site B Determine Antigenic and Receptor Binding Differences between A(H3N2)v and Ancestral Seasonal H3N2 Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoquan; Ilyushina, Natalia A; Lugovtsev, Vladimir Y; Bovin, Nicolai V; Couzens, Laura K; Gao, Jin; Donnelly, Raymond P; Eichelberger, Maryna C; Wan, Hongquan

    2017-01-15

    Influenza A H3N2 variant [A(H3N2)v] viruses, which have caused human infections in the United States in recent years, originated from human seasonal H3N2 viruses that were introduced into North American swine in the mid-1990s, but they are antigenically distinct from both the ancestral and current circulating H3N2 strains. A reference A(H3N2)v virus, A/Minnesota/11/2010 (MN/10), and a seasonal H3N2 strain, A/Beijing/32/1992 (BJ/92), were chosen to determine the molecular basis for the antigenic difference between A(H3N2)v and the ancestral viruses. Viruses containing wild-type and mutant MN/10 or BJ/92 hemagglutinins (HAs) were constructed and probed for reactivity with ferret antisera against MN/10 and BJ/92 in hemagglutination inhibition assays. Among the amino acids that differ between the MN/10 and BJ/92 HAs, those in antigenic site A had little impact on the antigenic phenotype. Within antigenic site B, mutations at residues 156, 158, 189, and 193 of MN/10 HA to those in BJ/92 switched the MN/10 antigenic phenotype to that of BJ/92. Mutations at residues 156, 157, 158, 189, and 193 of BJ/92 HA to amino acids present in MN/10 were necessary for BJ/92 to become antigenically similar to MN/10. The HA amino acid substitutions responsible for switching the antigenic phenotype also impacted HA binding to sialyl receptors that are usually present in the human respiratory tract. Our study demonstrates that antigenic site B residues play a critical role in determining both the unique antigenic phenotype and receptor specificity of A(H3N2)v viruses, a finding that may facilitate future surveillance and risk assessment of novel influenza viruses.

  11. Melanocortin 1 receptor variants: functional role and pigmentary associations.

    PubMed

    Dessinioti, Clio; Antoniou, Christina; Katsambas, Andreas; Stratigos, Alexander J

    2011-01-01

    The significance of human cutaneous pigmentation lies in its protective role against sun-induced DNA damage and photocarcinogenesis. Fair skin and red hair are characterized by a low eumelanin to pheomelanin ratio, and have been associated with increased risk of skin cancer. Cutaneous pigmentation is a complex genetic trait, with more than 120 genes involved in its regulation, among which the melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R) plays a key role. Although a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified in pigmentation genes, very few SNPs have been examined in relation to human pigmentary phenotypes and skin cancer risk. Recent GWAS have identified new candidate determinants of pigmentation traits, but MC1R remains the best characterized genetic determinant of human skin and hair pigmentation as well as the more firmly validated low-penetrance skin cancer susceptibility gene. In this review, we will address how the melanocortin system regulates pigmentation, the effect of MC1R variants on the physiologic function of the MC1 receptor, and how specific MC1R variants are associated with distinct human pigmentation phenotypes.

  12. Variants in the vitamin D receptor gene and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wjst, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Background Early lifetime exposure to dietary or supplementary vitamin D has been predicted to be a risk factor for later allergy. Twin studies suggest that response to vitamin D exposure might be influenced by genetic factors. As these effects are primarily mediated through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), single base variants in this gene may be risk factors for asthma or allergy. Results 951 individuals from 224 pedigrees with at least 2 asthmatic children were analyzed for 13 SNPs in the VDR. There was no preferential transmission to children with asthma. In their unaffected sibs, however, one allele in the 5' region was 0.5-fold undertransmitted (p = 0.049), while two other alleles in the 3' terminal region were 2-fold over-transmitted (p = 0.013 and 0.018). An association was also seen with bronchial hyperreactivity against methacholine and with specific immunoglobulin E serum levels. Conclusion The transmission disequilibrium in unaffected sibs of otherwise multiple-affected families seem to be a powerful statistical test. A preferential transmission of vitamin D receptor variants to children with asthma could not be confirmed but raises the possibility of a protective effect for unaffected children. PMID:15651992

  13. Amino Acid Substitutions That Affect Receptor Binding and Stability of the Hemagglutinin of Influenza A/H7N9 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Schrauwen, Eefje J. A.; Burke, David F.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Herfst, Sander; Fouchier, Ron A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-binding preference and stability of hemagglutinin have been implicated as crucial determinants of airborne transmission of influenza viruses. Here, amino acid substitutions previously identified to affect these traits were tested in the context of an A/H7N9 virus. Some combinations of substitutions, most notably G219S and K58I, resulted in relatively high affinity for α2,6-linked sialic acid receptor and acid and temperature stability. Thus, the hemagglutinin of the A/H7N9 virus may adopt traits associated with airborne transmission. PMID:26792744

  14. Highly Pathogenic Influenza A(H5Nx) Viruses with Altered H5 Receptor-Binding Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongbo; de Vries, Erik; McBride, Ryan; Dekkers, Jojanneke; Peng, Wenjie; Bouwman, Kim M.; Nycholat, Corwin; Verheije, M. Helene; Paulson, James C.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Emergence and intercontinental spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5Nx) virus clade 2.3.4.4 is unprecedented. H5N8 and H5N2 viruses have caused major economic losses in the poultry industry in Europe and North America, and lethal human infections with H5N6 virus have occurred in Asia. Knowledge of the evolution of receptor-binding specificity of these viruses, which might affect host range, is urgently needed. We report that emergence of these viruses is accompanied by a change in receptor-binding specificity. In contrast to ancestral clade 2.3.4 H5 proteins, novel clade 2.3.4.4 H5 proteins bind to fucosylated sialosides because of substitutions K222Q and S227R, which are unique for highly pathogenic influenza virus H5 proteins. North American clade 2.3.4.4 virus isolates have retained only the K222Q substitution but still bind fucosylated sialosides. Altered receptor-binding specificity of virus clade 2.3.4.4 H5 proteins might have contributed to emergence and spread of H5Nx viruses. PMID:27869615

  15. Binding of aromatic amines to the rat hepatic Ah receptor in vitro and in vivo and the 8S and 4S estrogen receptor of rat uterus and rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Cikryt, P.; Kaiser, T.; Gottlicher, M. )

    1990-08-01

    Studies on structurally related aromatic amines with different carcinogenic properties have shown that 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) and 2-acetylaminophenanthrene (AAP) inhibit the binding of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin to the Ah receptor in vitro. The apparent inhibitor constants (K{sub i}) are 2.3 {mu}M for 2-AAF and 2.7 {mu}M for AAP. In contrast, 4-acetylaminofluorene, an isomer of 2-AAF, and trans-4-acetylaminostilbene do not bind to the rat hepatic cytosolic Ah receptor. Pretreating female Wistar rats with 2-AAF or AAP leads to the induction of the P-450 isoenzymes that are under the control of the Ah receptor. Ornithine decarboxylase activity is induced by all aromatic amines tested irrespective of their Ah receptor affinity. The aromatic amines used as model compounds do not inhibit the binding of 17-{beta}-estradiol to the 8S and 4S estrogen receptor of rat uterus or rat liver in a competition assay analyzed using sucrose density gradient centrifugation. On the other hand, the aromatic amines bind to varying extents to another estrogen-binding protein of rat liver whose function and identity is still unknown. The study demonstrates that structurally related aromatic amines in their unmetabolized form interact differentially with a cellular target protein, the Ah receptor, in vitro as well as in vivo. However, a relationship between these effects and the postulated promoting properties of 2-AAF remains to be established.

  16. Ah receptor, CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 gene polymorphisms are not involved in the risk of recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Y; Sata, F; Yamada, H; Suzuki, K; Sasaki, S; Kondo, T; Gong, Y Y; Kato, E H; Shimada, S; Morikawa, M; Minakami, H; Kishi, R

    2004-10-01

    The etiology of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) remains unclear, but it may be related to a possible genetic predisposition together with involvement of environmental factors. We examined the relation between RPL and polymorphisms in four genes, human aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1, which are involved in the metabolism of a wide range of environmental toxins and carcinogens. All cases and controls were women resident in Sapporo, Japan and the surrounding area. The Ah receptor, CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 genotypes were assessed in 113 Japanese women with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) and 203 ethnically matched women experiencing at least one live birth and no spontaneous abortion (control). No significant differences in Ah receptor, CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 genotype frequencies were found between the women with RPL and the controls [Ah receptor: Arg/Arg (reference); Arg/Lys and Lys/Lys, odds ratio (OR)=0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.40-1.11, CYP1A1: m1m1 (reference); m1m2 and m2m2, OR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.53-1.40, CYP1A2: C/C and C/A (reference); A/A, OR = 1.16; 95% CI = 0.71-1.88, CYP1B1: Leu/Leu (reference); Leu/Val and Val/Val, OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 0.68-2.02]. The present study suggests that the Ah receptor, CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 gene polymorphisms are not major genetic regulators in RPL.

  17. Outbreak of Influenza A(H3N2) Variant Virus Infections Among Persons Attending Agricultural Fairs Housing Infected Swine - Michigan and Ohio, July-August 2016.

    PubMed

    Schicker, Rebekah S; Rossow, John; Eckel, Seth; Fisher, Nicolas; Bidol, Sally; Tatham, Lilith; Matthews-Greer, Janice; Sohner, Kevin; Bowman, Andrew S; Avrill, James; Forshey, Tony; Blanton, Lenee; Davis, C Todd; Schiltz, John; Skorupski, Susan; Berman, LaShondra; Jang, Yunho; Bresee, Joseph S; Lindstrom, Stephen; Trock, Susan C; Wentworth, David; Fry, Alicia M; de Fijter, Sietske; Signs, Kimberly; DiOrio, Mary; Olsen, Sonja J; Biggerstaff, Matthew

    2016-10-28

    On August 3, 2016, the Ohio Department of Health Laboratory reported to CDC that a respiratory specimen collected on July 28 from a male aged 13 years who attended an agricultural fair in Ohio during July 22-29, 2016, and subsequently developed a respiratory illness, tested positive by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) for influenza A(H3N2) variant* (H3N2v). The respiratory specimen was collected as part of routine influenza surveillance activities. The next day, CDC was notified of a child aged 9 years who was a swine exhibitor at an agricultural fair in Michigan who became ill on July 29, 2016, and tested positive for H3N2v virus at the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Laboratory. Investigations by Michigan and Ohio health authorities identified 18 human infections linked to swine exhibits at agricultural fairs. To minimize transmission of influenza viruses from infected swine to visitors, agricultural fair organizers should consider prevention measures such as shortening the time swine are on the fairgrounds, isolating ill swine, maintaining a veterinarian on call, providing handwashing stations, and prohibiting food and beverages in animal barns. Persons at high risk for influenza-associated complications should be discouraged from entering swine barns.

  18. Indole and Tryptophan Metabolism: Endogenous and Dietary Routes to Ah Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Troy D.; Murray, Iain A.

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor recognized for its role in xenobiotic metabolism. The physiologic function of AHR has expanded to include roles in immune regulation, organogenesis, mucosal barrier function, and the cell cycle. These functions are likely dependent upon ligand-mediated activation of the receptor. High-affinity ligands of AHR have been classically defined as xenobiotics, such as polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins. Identification of endogenous AHR ligands is key to understanding the physiologic functions of this enigmatic receptor. Metabolic pathways targeting the amino acid tryptophan and indole can lead to a myriad of metabolites, some of which are AHR ligands. Many of these ligands exhibit species selective preferential binding to AHR. The discovery of specific tryptophan metabolites as AHR ligands may provide insight concerning where AHR is activated in an organism, such as at the site of inflammation and within the intestinal tract. PMID:26041783

  19. Role of androgen receptor splice variants in prostate cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Qiu, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most lethal cancers in western countries. Androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathway plays a key role in PCa progression. Despite the initial effectiveness of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for treatment of patients with advanced PCa, most of them will develop resistance to ADT and progress to metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Constitutively transcriptional activated AR splice variants (AR-Vs) have emerged as critical players in the development and progression of mCRPC. Among AR-Vs identified to date, AR-V7 (a.k.a. AR3) is one of the most abundant and frequently found in both PCa cell lines and in human prostate tissues. Most of functional studies have been focused on AR-V7/AR3 and revealed its role in regulation of survival, growth, differentiation and migration in prostate cells. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of regulation of expression and activity of AR-Vs in mCRPC. PMID:28239558

  20. Association between endothelin receptor B nonsynonymous variants and melanoma risk.

    PubMed

    Soufir, Nadem; Meziani, Roubila; Lacapère, Jean-Jacques; Bertrand, Guylene; Fumeron, Frederic; Bourillon, Agnes; Gérard, Bénédicte; Descamps, Vincent; Crickx, Béatrice; Ollivaud, Laurence; Archimbaud, Alain; Lebbe, Céleste; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Saiag, Philippe; Grandchamp, Bernard

    2005-09-07

    The endothelin signaling pathway plays a crucial role in melanocyte differentiation and migration. In this study, we investigated whether germline mutations of endothelin receptor B (EDNRB), a gene involved in Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), could also predispose for malignant melanoma (MM). The coding region of EDNRB was sequenced in 137 MM patients and in 130 ethnically matched Caucasian control subjects. Six nonsynonymous EDNRB variants were found in 15 patients (11%), but only two were found in four control subjects (3%, odds ratio [OR] = 3.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.25 to 12; P = .012). Overall, 14 out of 15 MM patients carried EDNRB mutations reported in HSCR, some of which had previously been shown to lead to loss of function. In multivariable logistic regression analysis including skin type, eye and hair color, number of nevi, and dorsal lentigines (freckles), the association between EDNRB mutations and MM risk remained statistically significant (OR = 19.9, 95% CI = 1.34 to 296.2; P = .03). Our data strongly suggest that EDNRB is involved in predisposition for two different multigenic disorders, HSCR and melanoma.

  1. A novel variant of androgen receptor is associated with idiopathic azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Mou, Lisha; Gui, Yaoting

    2016-10-01

    A variety of genetic variants can lead to abnormal human spermatogenesis. The androgen receptor (AR) is an important steroid hormone receptor that is critical for male sexual differentiation and the maintenance of normal spermatogenesis. In the present study, each exon of AR in 776 patients diagnosed with idiopathic azoospermia (IA) and 709 proven fertile men were sequenced using use panel re‑sequencing methods to examine whether AR is involved in the pathogenesis of IA. Two synonymous variants and seven missense variants were detected. Of the missense variants, a luciferase assay demonstrated that the R630W variant reduced the transcriptional regulatory function of AR. This novel variant (p. R630W) of AR is the first to be identified in association with IA, thereby highlighting the importance of AR during spermatogenesis.

  2. A novel variant of androgen receptor is associated with idiopathic azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Lisha; Gui, Yaoting

    2016-01-01

    A variety of genetic variants can lead to abnormal human spermatogenesis. The androgen receptor (AR) is an important steroid hormone receptor that is critical for male sexual differentiation and the maintenance of normal spermatogenesis. In the present study, each exon of AR in 776 patients diagnosed with idiopathic azoospermia (IA) and 709 proven fertile men were sequenced using use panel re-sequencing methods to examine whether AR is involved in the pathogenesis of IA. Two synonymous variants and seven missense variants were detected. Of the missense variants, a luciferase assay demonstrated that the R630W variant reduced the transcriptional regulatory function of AR. This novel variant (p. R630W) of AR is the first to be identified in association with IA, thereby highlighting the importance of AR during spermatogenesis. PMID:27498682

  3. Dose- and time-dependent expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) in PCB-, B[a]P-, and TBT-exposed intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Hwang, Un-Ki; Seo, Jung Soo; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator (ARNT) genes from the copepod Tigriopus japonicus (Tj) were cloned to examine their potential functions in the invertebrate putative AhR-CYP signaling pathway. The amino acid sequences encoded by the Tj-AhR and Tj-ARNT genes showed high similarity to homologs of Daphnia and Drosophila, ranging from 68% and 70% similarity for the AhR genes to 56% for the ARNT genes. To determine whether Tj-AhR and Tj-ARNT are modulated by environmental pollutants, transcriptional expression of Tj-AhR and Tj-ARNT was analyzed in response to exposure to five concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB 126) (control, 10, 50, 100, 500 μg L(-1)), benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) (control, 5, 10, 50, 100 μg L(-1)), and tributyltin (TBT) (control, 1, 5, 10, 20 μg L(-1)) 24h after exposure. A time-course experiment (0, 3, 6, 12, 24h) was performed to analyze mRNA expression patterns after exposure to PCB, B[a]P, and TBT. T. japonicus exhibited dose-dependent and time-dependent upregulation of Tj-AhR and Tj-ARNT in response to pollutant exposure, and the degree of expression was dependent on the pollutant, suggesting that pollutants such as PCB, B[a]P, and TBT modulate expression of Tj-AhR and Tj-ARNT genes in the putative AhR-CYP signaling pathway.

  4. Evolutionary Pressure of a Receptor Competitor Selects Different Subgroup A Avian Leukosis Virus Escape Variants with Altered Receptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Melder, Deborah C.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Federspiel, Mark J.

    2003-01-01

    A complex interaction between the retroviral envelope glycoproteins and a specific cell surface protein initiates viral entry into cells. The avian leukosis-sarcoma virus (ALV) group of retroviruses provides a useful experimental system for studying the retroviral entry process and the evolution of receptor usage. In this study, we demonstrate that evolutionary pressure on subgroup A ALV [ALV(A)] entry exerted by the presence of a competitive inhibitor, a soluble form of the ALV(A) Tva receptor linked to a mouse immunoglobulin G tag (quail sTva-mIgG), can select different populations of escape variants. This escape population contained three abundant ALV(A) variant viruses, all with mutations in the surface glycoprotein hypervariable regions: a previously identified variant containing the Y142N mutation in the hr1 region; a new variant with two mutations, W141G in hr1 and K261E in vr3; and another new variant with two mutations, W145R in hr1 and K261E. The W141G K261E and W145R K261E viruses escape primarily by lowering their binding affinities for the quail Tva receptor competitive inhibitor while retaining wild-type levels of binding affinity for the chicken Tva receptor. A secondary phenotype of the new variants was an alteration in receptor interference patterns from that of wild-type ALV(A), indicating that the mutant glycoproteins are possibly interacting with other cellular proteins. One result of these altered interactions was that the variants caused a transient period of cytotoxicity. We could also directly demonstrate that the W141G K261E variant glycoproteins bound significant levels of a soluble form of the TvbS3 ALV receptor in a binding assay. Alterations in the normally extreme specificity of the ALV(A) glycoproteins for Tva may represent an evolutionary first step toward expanding viral receptor usage in response to inefficient viral entry. PMID:12970435

  5. Estrogen Receptor Mutants/Variants in Human Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    tumors. Cloning and sequencing of the larger RT-PCR products identified three different types: a complete duplication of exon 6 occurring in 7.5 % of...generation of the exon deleted ER variant mRNAs and the truncated clone 4 type ER variant mRNA5 is likely to occur via an alternative splicing...Task 5). These include the clone 4 ER truncated variant and variants deleted in exon 2, exon 3, exons 2-3, exon 5 or exon 7. The next question addressed

  6. Ah Receptor-mediated impairment of interrenal steroidogenesis involves StAR protein and P450scc gene attenuation in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Renaud, Rick; Leatherland, John F; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2005-04-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation on interrenal steroidogenesis in rainbow trout. To this end, fish were fed AhR agonist (beta-naphthoflavone (BNF): 10 mg/kg body mass/day) and antagonist (alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF): 10 mg/kg body mass/day) either singly or in combination (ABNF) for 5 days to elucidate the mechanisms involved in AhR-mediated depression of cortisol production. Liver AhR protein expression was significantly elevated only with ABNF, but not with BNF and ANF compared to the control group. However, all three treatments (BNF, ANF, and ABNF) significantly elevated cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) gene and protein expression in the kidney and liver, respectively. Also, these three treatment groups had significantly depressed ACTH-stimulated cortisol production in vitro compared to the control group. This attenuation of interrenal steroidogenesis corresponded with a lower mRNA abundance of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein and cytochrome P450 cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), but not 11beta-hydroxylase. Furthermore, in vitro incubation of head kidney pieces with 7-3H-pregnenolone failed to show any treatment effects on pathways downstream of P450scc, except for a significantly higher conversion to progesterone in the BNF and ANF groups. Plasma cortisol and glucose levels showed no significant change between the treated groups and control, but liver and brain glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein expression was higher in the BNF group, and ANF abolished this response. Taken together, both BNF and ANF impaired cortisol production, and the mechanism may involve attenuation of StAR and P450scc, the rate limiting steps in steroidogenesis. Overall, endocrine disruption by xenobiotics acting via AhR includes impaired cortisol biosynthesis and abnormal cortisol target tissue GR responses in rainbow trout.

  7. The Ah regulatory gene product. Survey of nineteen polycyclic aromatic compounds' and fifteen benzo[a]pyrene metabolites' capacity to bind to the cytosolic receptor.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, S W; Nebert, D W

    1982-01-01

    The capacity of 19 polycyclic aromatic compounds and 15 benzo[a]pyrene metabolites to displace [1,6-3H]2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxine ([3H]TCDD) from the mouse liver cytosolic Ah receptor was examined. We compared our data with various parameters taken from previously published results: the capacity of seven polycyclic hydrocarbons to induce aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity in human cell cultures, the capacity of 10 polycyclic hydrocarbons to induce azo dye N-demethylase activity in rat liver, the capacity of 6 polycyclic hydrocarbons to shorten zoxazolamine paralysis times in the intact rat, and the capacity of 15 benzo[a]pyrene metabolites to induce AHH activity in rat hepatoma H-4-II-E cultures. An excellent correlation is seen between the capacity to displace the radioligand from the Ah receptor and the capacity to induce these monooxygenase activities. differences in the rate of cellular uptake and formation of alkali-extractable metabolites of dibenzo[a,h]anthracene, 3-methylcholanthrene, and benzo[a]anthracene in Hepa-1 mouse hepatoma cell cultures do not account for differences in the capacity of these three polycyclic hydrocarbons to displace [3H]TCDD from the Ah receptor.

  8. Identification of the Ah-Receptor Structural Determinants for Ligand Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yongna

    2012-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a transcription factor that responds to diverse ligands and plays a critical role in toxicology, immune function, and cardiovascular physiology. The structural basis of the AHR for ligand promiscuity and preferences is critical for understanding AHR function. Based on the structure of a closely related protein HIF2α, we modeled the AHR ligand binding domain (LBD) bound to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and identified residues that control ligand preferences by shape and H-bond potential. Mutations to these residues, particularly Q377 and G298, resulted in robust and opposite changes in the potency of TCDD and BaP and up to a 20-fold change in the ratio of TCDD/BaP efficacy. The model also revealed a flexible “belt” structure; molecular dynamic (MD) simulation suggested that the “belt” and several other structural elements in the AHR-LBD are more flexible than HIF2α and likely contribute to ligand promiscuity. Molecular docking of TCDD congeners to a model of human AHR-LBD ranks their binding affinity similar to experimental ranking of their toxicity. Our study reveals key structural basis for prediction of toxicity and understanding the AHR signaling through diverse ligands. PMID:22659362

  9. Ah Receptor Signaling Controls the Expression of Cardiac Development and Homeostasis Genes

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Xiang; Kurita, Hisaka; Ko, Chia-I.; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital abnormality and one of the leading causes of newborn death throughout the world. Despite much emerging scientific information, the precise etiology of this disease remains elusive. Here, we show that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) regulates the expression of crucial cardiogenesis genes and that interference with endogenous AHR functions, either by gene ablation or by agonist exposure during early development, causes overlapping structural and functional cardiac abnormalities that lead to altered fetal heart physiology, including higher heart rates, right and left ventricle dilation, higher stroke volume, and reduced ejection fraction. With striking similarity between AHR knockout (Ahr−/−) and agonist-exposed wild type (Ahr+/+) embryos, in utero disruption of endogenous AHR functions converge into dysregulation of molecular mechanisms needed for attainment and maintenance of cardiac differentiation, including the pivotal signals regulated by the cardiogenic transcription factor NKH2.5, energy balance via oxidative phosphorylation and TCA cycle and global mitochondrial function and homeostasis. Our findings suggest that AHR signaling in the developing mammalian heart is central to the regulation of pathways crucial for cellular metabolism, cardiogenesis, and cardiac function, which are potential targets of environmental factors associated with CHD. PMID:26139165

  10. DDE and PCB 153 independently induce aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Gaspar-Ramírez, Octavio; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Salgado-Bustamante, Mariana; González-Amaro, Roberto; Hernandez-Castro, Berenice; Pérez-Maldonado, Ivan N

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that compounds inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines enhance AhR expression. The aim of this study was 2-fold: (1) to determine if two pro-inflammatory compounds, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexa-chlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), independently affect AhR gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC); and (2) if affected, to determine whether the mechanism involved was due to AhR activation or to a pro-inflammatory effect of the chemicals. PBMC isolated from healthy individuals were incubated in the presence of DDE (10 µg/ml) and PCB 153 (20 ng/ml) over time and AhR and CYP1A1 expression was assessed with a real-time PCR technique. The results indicated there was over-expression of the AhR mRNA in PBMC when the cells were treated with DDE and PCB 153. No changes in expression levels of CYP1A1 mRNA were found. Importantly, when the cells were exposed to DDE and PCB 153 in the presence of an antagonist of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, the over-expression of AhR was abolished; as expected, the expression of CYP1A1 was unaffected. In conclusion, these studies demonstrated for the first time an increment of AhR expression "in vitro" in PBMC treated with two pro-inflammatory environmental pollutants, DDE and PCB153. Moreover, the over-expression of AhR was dependent of TNFα induced by DDE and PCB 153 and was independent of AhR activation.

  11. Functional interaction of nuclear receptor coactivator 4 with aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kollara, Alexandra; Brown, Theodore J. . E-mail: brown@mshri.on.ca

    2006-07-28

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcriptional activity is enhanced by interaction with p160 coactivators. We demonstrate here that NcoA4, a nuclear receptor coactivator, interacts with and amplifies AhR action. NcoA4-AhR and NcoA4-ARNT interactions were demonstrated by immunoprecipitation in T47D breast cancer and COS cells and was independent of ligand. Overexpression of NcoA4 enhanced AhR transcriptional activity 3.2-fold in the presence of dioxin, whereas overexpression of a splice variant, NcoA4{beta}, as well as a variant lacking the C-terminal region enhanced AhR transcriptional activity by only 1.6-fold. Enhanced AhR signaling by NcoA4 was independent of the LXXLL and FXXLF motifs or of the activation domain. NcoA4 protein localized to cytoplasm in the absence of dioxin and in both the cytoplasm and nucleus following dioxin treatment. NcoA4-facilitation of AhR activity was abolished by overexpression of androgen receptor, suggesting a potential competition of AhR and androgen receptor for NcoA4. These findings thus demonstrate a functional interaction between NcoA4 and AhR that may alter AhR activity to affect disease development and progression.

  12. Lack of Association of CD55 Receptor Genetic Variants and Severe Malaria in Ghanaian Children

    PubMed Central

    Schuldt, Kathrin; Ehmen, Christa; Sievertsen, Juergen; Evans, Jennifer; May, Juergen; Ansong, Daniel; Muntau, Birgit; Ruge, Gerd; Timmann, Christian; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Horstmann, Rolf D.; Thye, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    In a recent report, the cellular receptor CD55 was identified as a molecule essential for the invasion of human erythrocytes by Plasmodium falciparum, the causal agent of the most severe form of malaria. As this invasion process represents a critical step during infection with the parasite, it was hypothesized that genetic variants in the gene could affect severe malaria (SM) susceptibility. We performed high-resolution variant discovery of rare and common genetic variants in the human CD55 gene. Association testing of these variants in over 1700 SM cases and unaffected control individuals from the malaria-endemic Ashanti Region in Ghana, West Africa, were performed on the basis of single variants, combined rare variant analyses, and reconstructed haplotypes. A total of 26 genetic variants were detected in coding and regulatory regions of CD55. Five variants were previously unknown. None of the single variants, rare variants, or haplotypes showed evidence for association with SM or P. falciparum density. Here, we present the first comprehensive analysis of variation in the CD55 gene in the context of SM and show that genetic variants present in a Ghanaian study group appear not to influence susceptibility to the disease. PMID:28104671

  13. Molecular Mechanism of Dioxin Action: Molecular Cloning of the Ah Receptor Using a DNA Recognition Site Probe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-13

    analysis of AhR binding to the DRE (see attached manuscript an the following brief description of these results) and have bequn the library screening . Although...relatively rapidly as to whether they represent AhR clones or not. As mentioned above, we have only recently begun the library screening . We have obtained a...DNA oligonucleotides, identify the DRE oligonucleotide with the highest binding affinity, optimize the screening protocol and begin the actual library

  14. Association of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Related Gene Variants with the Severity of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Takashi X.; Nishitani, Shota; Iwanaga, Ryoichiro; Matsuzaki, Junko; Kawasaki, Chisato; Tochigi, Mamoru; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Kato, Nobumasa; Shinohara, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to environmental chemicals, such as dioxin, is known to have adverse effects on the homeostasis of gonadal steroids, thereby potentially altering the sexual differentiation of the brain to express autistic traits. Dioxin-like chemicals act on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), polymorphisms, and mutations of AhR-related gene may exert pathological influences on sexual differentiation of the brain, causing autistic traits. To ascertain the relationship between AhR-related gene polymorphisms and autism susceptibility, we identified genotypes of them in patients and controls and determined whether there are different gene and genotype distributions between both groups. In addition, to clarify the relationships between the polymorphisms and the severity of autism, we compared the two genotypes of AhR-related genes (rs2066853, rs2228099) with the severity of autistic symptoms. Although no statistically significant difference was found between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patients and control individuals for the genotypic distribution of any of the polymorphisms studied herein, a significant difference in the total score of severity was observed in rs2228099 polymorphism, suggesting that the polymorphism modifies the severity of ASD symptoms but not ASD susceptibility. Moreover, we found that a significant difference in the social communication score of severity was observed. These results suggest that the rs2228099 polymorphism is possibly associated with the severity of social communication impairment among the diverse ASD symptoms. PMID:27899901

  15. Multiple loss-of-function variants of taste receptors in modern humans

    PubMed Central

    Fujikura, K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the knowledge of interindividual taste differences, the underlying genetic backgrounds have remained to be fully elucidated. Much of the taste variation among different mammalian species can be explained by pseudogenization of taste receptors. Here I investigated whether the most recent disruptions of taste receptor genes segregate with their intact forms in modern humans by analyzing 14 ethnically diverse populations. The results revealed an unprecedented prevalence of 25 segregating loss-of-function (LoF) taste receptor variants, identifying one of the most pronounced cases of functional population diversity in the human genome. LoF variant frequency in taste receptors (2.10%) was considerably higher than the overall LoF frequency in human genome (0.16%). In particular, molecular evolutionary rates of candidate sour (14.7%) and bitter (1.8%) receptors were far higher in humans than those of sweet (0.02%), salty (0.05%), and umami (0.17%) receptors compared with other carnivorous mammals, although not all of the taste receptors were identified. Many LoF variants are population-specific, some of which arose even after population differentiation, not before divergence of the modern and archaic human. I conclude that modern humans might have been losing some sour and bitter receptor genes because of high-frequency LoF variants. PMID:26307445

  16. Possible role of rare variants in Trace amine associated receptor 1 in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    John, Jibin; Kukshal, Prachi; Bhatia, Triptish; Chowdari, K V; Nimgaonkar, V L; Deshpande, S N; Thelma, B K

    2017-02-24

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a chronic mental illness with behavioral abnormalities. Recent common variant based genome wide association studies and rare variant detection using next generation sequencing approaches have identified numerous variants that confer risk for SZ, but etiology remains unclear propelling continuing investigations. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a rare heterozygous variant (c.545G>T; p.Cys182Phe) in Trace amine associated receptor 1 gene (TAAR1 6q23.2) in three affected members in a small SZ family. The variant predicted to be damaging by 15 prediction tools, causes breakage of a conserved disulfide bond in this G-protein-coupled receptor. On screening this intronless gene for additional variant(s) in ~800 sporadic SZ patients, we identified six rare protein altering variants (MAF<0.001) namely p.Ser47Cys, p.Phe51Leu, p.Tyr294Ter, p.Leu295Ser in four unrelated north Indian cases (n=475); p.Ala109Thr and p.Val250Ala in two independent Caucasian/African-American patients (n=310). Five of these variants were also predicted to be damaging. Besides, a rare synonymous variant was observed in SZ patients. These rare variants were absent in north Indian healthy controls (n=410) but significantly enriched in patients (p=0.036). Conversely, three common coding SNPs (rs8192621, rs8192620 and rs8192619) and a promoter SNP (rs60266355) tested for association with SZ in the north Indian cohort were not significant (P>0.05). TAAR1 is a modulator of monoaminergic pathways and interacts with AKT signaling pathways. Substantial animal model based pharmacological and functional data implying its relevance in SZ are also available. However, this is the first report suggestive of the likely contribution of rare variants in this gene to SZ.

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mediate transcriptional activation of the ATP binding cassette transporter ABCB6 gene via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).

    PubMed

    Chavan, Hemantkumar; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2012-09-14

    Liver is endowed with a mechanism to induce hepatic cytochromes P450 (CYP450s) in response to therapeutic drugs and environmental contaminants, leading to increased detoxification and elimination of the xenobiotics. Each CYP450 is composed of an apoprotein moiety and a heme prosthetic group, which is required for CYP450 activity. Thus, under conditions of CYP450 induction, there is a coordinate increase in heme biosynthesis to compensate for the increased expression of CYP450s. ABCB6, a mitochondrial ATP binding cassette transporter, which regulates coproporphyrinogen transport from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria to complete heme biosynthesis, represents a previously unrecognized rate-limiting step in heme biosynthesis. However, it is not known if exposure to drugs and environmental contaminants induces ABCB6 expression, to assure an adequate and apparently coordinated supply of heme for the generation of functional cytochrome holoprotein. In the present study, we demonstrate that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the widely distributed environmental toxicants shown to induce porphyrin accumulation causing hepatic porphyria, up-regulate ABCB6 expression in both mice and humans. Using siRNA technology and Abcb6 knock-out mice, we demonstrate that PAH-mediated increase in hepatic porphyrins is compromised in the absence of ABCB6. Moreover, in vivo studies in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knock-out mice demonstrate that PAH induction of ABCB6 is mediated by AhR. Promoter activation studies combined with electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrate direct interactions between the AhR binding sites in the ABCB6 promoter and the AhR receptor, implicating drug activation mechanisms for ABCB6 similar to those found in inducible cytochrome P450s. These studies are the first to describe direct transcriptional activation of both mouse and human ABCB6 by xenobiotics.

  18. Functional characterisation of the R2452W ryanodine receptor variant associated with malignant hyperthermia susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Roesl, Cornelia; Sato, Keisaku; Schiemann, Anja; Pollock, Neil; Stowell, Kathryn M

    2014-09-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic disorder that manifests in susceptible individuals exposed to volatile anaesthetics. Over 400 variants in the ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) have been reported but relatively few have been definitively associated with susceptibility to MH. This is largely due to the technical challenges of demonstrating abnormal Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This study focuses on the R2452W variant and its functional characterisation with the aim of classifying this variant as MH causative. HEK293 cells were transiently transfected with full-length human wildtype or R2452W mutant RYR1 cDNA. In addition, B-lymphoblastoid cells from blood and myoblasts propagated from in vitro contracture tests were extracted from patients positive for the R2452W variant. All cell lines generated were loaded with the ratiometric dye Fura-2 AM, stimulated with the RYR1-specific agonist 4-chloro-m-cresol and Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum was monitored by fluorescence emission. All cells expressing the RYR1 R2452W variant show a significantly higher Ca(2+) release in response to the agonist, 4-chloro-m-cresol, compared to cells expressing RYR1 WT. These results indicate that the R2452W variant results in a hypersensitive ryanodine receptor 1 and suggest that the R2452W variant in the ryanodine receptor 1 is likely to be causative of MH.

  19. Isolation and characterization of alternatively spliced variants of the mouse sigma1 receptor gene, Sigmar1

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ling; Pasternak, David A.; Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Lu, Zhigang; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2017-01-01

    The sigma1 receptor acts as a chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum, associates with multiple proteins in various cellular systems, and involves in a number of diseases, such as addiction, pain, cancer and psychiatric disorders. The sigma1 receptor is encoded by the single copy SIGMAR1 gene. The current study identifies five alternatively spliced variants of the mouse sigma1 receptor gene using a polymerase chain reaction cloning approach. All the splice variants are generated by exon skipping or alternative 3’ or 5’ splicing, producing the truncated sigma1 receptor. Similar alternative splicing has been observed in the human SIGMAR1 gene based on the molecular cloning or genome sequence prediction, suggesting conservation of alternative splicing of SIGMAR1 gene. Using quantitative polymerase chain reactions, we demonstrate differential expression of several splice variants in mouse tissues and brain regions. When expressed in HEK293 cells, all the splice variants fail to bind sigma ligands, implicating that each truncated region in these splice variants is important for ligand binding. However, co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) study in HEK293 cells co-transfected with tagged constructs reveals that all the splice variants maintain their ability to physically associate with a mu opioid receptor (mMOR-1), providing useful information to correlate the motifs/sequences necessary for their physical association. Furthermore, a competition Co-IP study showed that all the variants can disrupt in a dose-dependent manner the dimerization of the original sigma1 receptor with mMOR-1, suggesting a potential dominant negative function and providing significant insights into their function. PMID:28350844

  20. In Vivo Dioxin Favors Interleukin-22 Production by Human CD4+ T Cells in an Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR)-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Brembilla, Nicolò Costantino; Ramirez, Jean-Marie; Chicheportiche, Rachel; Sorg, Olivier; Saurat, Jean-Hilaire; Chizzolini, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Background The transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates the effects of a group of chemicals known as dioxins, ubiquitously present in our environment. However, it is poorly known how the in vivo exposure to these chemicals affects in humans the adaptive immune response. We therefore assessed the functional phenotype of T cells from an individual who developed a severe cutaneous and systemic syndrome after having been exposed to an extremely high dose of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Methodology/Principal Findings T cells of the TCDD-exposed individual were studied for their capacity to produce cytokines in response to polyclonal and superantigenic stimulation, and for the expression of chemokine receptors involved in skin homing. The supernatants from T cells of the exposed individual contained a substantially increased amount of interleukin (IL)-22 but not of IL-17A, interferon (IFN)-γ or IL-10 when compared to nine healthy controls. In vitro experiments confirmed a direct, AhR-dependent, enhancing effect of TCDD on IL-22 production by CD4+ T cells. The increased production of IL-22 was not dependent on AhR occupancy by residual TCDD molecules, as demonstrated in competition experiments with the specific AhR antagonist CH-223191. In contrast, it was due to an increased frequency of IL-22 single producing cells accompanied by an increased percentage of cells expressing the skin-homing chemokine receptors CCR6 and CCR4, identified through a multiparameter flow cytometry approach. Of interest, the frequency of CD4+CD25hiFoxP3+ T regulatory cells was similar in the TCDD-exposed and healthy individuals. Conclusions/Significance This case strongly supports the contention that human exposure to persistent AhR ligands in vivo induce a long-lasting effect on the human adaptive immune system and specifically polarizes CD4+ T cells to produce IL-22 and not other T cell cytokines with no effect on T regulatory cells. PMID:21525997

  1. Hormonal therapy with megestrol in inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma characterized by variant oestrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Villa, E; Ferretti, I; Grottola, A; Buttafoco, P; Buono, M G; Giannini, F; Manno, M; Bertani, H; Dugani, A; Manenti, F

    2001-04-06

    Variant liver oestrogen receptor transcripts in hepatocellular carcinoma are associated with aggressive clinical course and unresponsiveness to tamoxifen. To evaluate the impact on survival and on tumour growth of megestrol (progestin drug acting at post-receptorial level) we enrolled 45 patients with HCC characterized by variant liver oestrogen receptors in a prospective, randomized study with megestrol vs. placebo. Presence of variant oestrogen receptors was determined by RT/PCR. 24 patients were randomized to no treatment and 21 to therapy with megestrol 160 mg day(-1). Results were analysed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox methods. Survival of hepatocellular carcinoma characterized by variant oestrogen receptors was extremely poor (median survival 7 months); megestrol significantly improved survival (18 months) (P = 0.0090). Tumour growth at one year was significantly slowed down in megestrol-treated patients (P = 0.0212). Bilirubin levels, presence of portal thrombosis, HBV aetiology and treatment were identified at univariate analysis as factors significantly associated with survival; at multivariate analysis, only megestrol therapy (P = 0.0003), presence of HBV infection (P = 0.0009) and presence of portal vein thrombosis (P = 0.0051) were factors independently related with survival. (1) Megestrol slows down the aggressive tumour growth of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma characterized by variant estrogen receptors and (2) is also able to favourably influence the course of disease, more than doubling median survival.

  2. Trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine effective against influenza A(H3N2) variant viruses in children during the 2014/15 season, Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Norio; Shinjoh, Masayoshi; Kawakami, Chiharu; Yamaguchi, Yoshio; Yoshida, Makoto; Baba, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Mayumi; Kono, Mio; Sekiguchi, Shinichiro; Kimiya, Takahisa; Mitamura, Keiko; Fujino, Motoko; Komiyama, Osamu; Yoshida, Naoko; Tsunematsu, Kenichiro; Narabayashi, Atsushi; Nakata, Yuji; Sato, Akihiro; Taguchi, Nobuhiko; Fujita, Hisayo; Toki, Machiko; Myokai, Michiko; Ookawara, Ichiro; Takahashi, Takao

    2016-10-20

    The 2014/15 influenza season in Japan was characterised by predominant influenza A(H3N2) activity; 99% of influenza A viruses detected were A(H3N2). Subclade 3C.2a viruses were the major epidemic A(H3N2) viruses, and were genetically distinct from A/New York/39/2012(H3N2) of 2014/15 vaccine strain in Japan, which was classified as clade 3C.1. We assessed vaccine effectiveness (VE) of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in children aged 6 months to 15 years by test-negative case-control design based on influenza rapid diagnostic test. Between November 2014 and March 2015, a total of 3,752 children were enrolled: 1,633 tested positive for influenza A and 42 for influenza B, and 2,077 tested negative. Adjusted VE was 38% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 28 to 46) against influenza virus infection overall, 37% (95% CI: 27 to 45) against influenza A, and 47% (95% CI: -2 to 73) against influenza B. However, IIV was not statistically significantly effective against influenza A in infants aged 6 to 11 months or adolescents aged 13 to 15 years. VE in preventing hospitalisation for influenza A infection was 55% (95% CI: 42 to 64). Trivalent IIV that included A/New York/39/2012(H3N2) was effective against drifted influenza A(H3N2) virus, although vaccine mismatch resulted in low VE.

  3. Agonist pharmacology of two Drosophila GABA receptor splice variants.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, A. M.; Sattelle, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. The Drosophila melanogaster gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunits, RDLac and DRC 17-1-2, form functional homo-oligomeric receptors when heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The subunits differ in only 17 amino acids, principally in regions of the N-terminal domain which determine agonist pharmacology in vertebrate ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors. A range of conformationally restricted GABA analogues were tested on the two homo-oligomers and their agonists pharmacology compared with that of insect and vertebrate iontropic GABA receptors. 2. The actions of GABA, isoguvacine and isonipecotic acid on RDLac and DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers were compared, by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp. All three compounds were full agonists of both receptors, but were 4-6 fold less potent agonists of DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers than of RDLac. However, the relative potencies of these agonists on each receptor were very similar. 3. A more complete agonist profile was established for RDLac homo-oligomers. The most potent agonists of these receptors were GABA, muscimol and trans-aminocrotonic acid (TACA), which were approximately equipotent. RDLac homo-oligomers were fully activated by a range of GABA analogues, with the order of potency: GABA > ZAPA ((Z)-3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]prop-2-enoic acid) > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid > or = isonipecotic acid > or = cis-aminocrotonic acid (CACA) > beta-alanine. 3-Aminopropane sulphonic acid (3-APS), a partial agonist of RDLac homo-oligomers, was the weakest agonist tested and 100 fold less potent than GABA. 4. SR95531, an antagonist of vertebrate GABAA receptors, competitively inhibited the GABA responses of RDLac homo-oligomers, which have previously been found to insensitive to bicuculline. However, its potency (IC50 500 microM) was much reduced when compared to GABAA receptors. 5. The agonist pharmacology of Drosophila RDLac homo-oligomers exhibits aspects of the characteristic pharmacology of

  4. Identification of androgen receptor variants in testis from humans and other vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Laurentino, S S; Pinto, P I S; Tomás, J; Cavaco, J E; Sousa, M; Barros, A; Power, D M; Canário, A V M; Socorro, S

    2013-06-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The existence of alternatively spliced variants is well recognised for several members of this superfamily, most of them having functional importance. For example, several testicular oestrogen receptor variants have been suggested to play a role in the regulation of spermatogenesis. However, information on AR variants is mostly related to cancer and androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) cases. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of AR variants in the testis from humans and other vertebrates. Four AR variants [ARΔ2(Stop) , ARΔ2(23Stop) , ARΔ3 and ARΔ4(120)] were identified in human testis. ARΔ2(Stop) and ARΔ3, with exon 2 or 3 deleted, respectively, were also expressed in human liver, lung, kidney and heart. In addition, ARΔ2(Stop) was expressed in rat and gilthead seabream testis, while an ARΔ3 was detected in African clawed frog testis. This is the first report revealing the existence of AR variants in the testis of evolutionarily distant vertebrate species and in nonpathological tissues. These data suggest the functional importance of these novel AR forms and demonstrate a complexity in AR signalling that is not exclusive of pathological conditions.

  5. Trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine effective against influenza A(H3N2) variant viruses in children during the 2014/15 season, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Norio; Shinjoh, Masayoshi; Kawakami, Chiharu; Yamaguchi, Yoshio; Yoshida, Makoto; Baba, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Mayumi; Kono, Mio; Sekiguchi, Shinichiro; Kimiya, Takahisa; Mitamura, Keiko; Fujino, Motoko; Komiyama, Osamu; Yoshida, Naoko; Tsunematsu, Kenichiro; Narabayashi, Atsushi; Nakata, Yuji; Sato, Akihiro; Taguchi, Nobuhiko; Fujita, Hisayo; Toki, Machiko; Myokai, Michiko; Ookawara, Ichiro; Takahashi, Takao

    2016-01-01

    The 2014/15 influenza season in Japan was characterised by predominant influenza A(H3N2) activity; 99% of influenza A viruses detected were A(H3N2). Subclade 3C.2a viruses were the major epidemic A(H3N2) viruses, and were genetically distinct from A/New York/39/2012(H3N2) of 2014/15 vaccine strain in Japan, which was classified as clade 3C.1. We assessed vaccine effectiveness (VE) of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in children aged 6 months to 15 years by test-negative case–control design based on influenza rapid diagnostic test. Between November 2014 and March 2015, a total of 3,752 children were enrolled: 1,633 tested positive for influenza A and 42 for influenza B, and 2,077 tested negative. Adjusted VE was 38% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 28 to 46) against influenza virus infection overall, 37% (95% CI: 27 to 45) against influenza A, and 47% (95% CI: -2 to 73) against influenza B. However, IIV was not statistically significantly effective against influenza A in infants aged 6 to 11 months or adolescents aged 13 to 15 years. VE in preventing hospitalisation for influenza A infection was 55% (95% CI: 42 to 64). Trivalent IIV that included A/New York/39/2012(H3N2) was effective against drifted influenza A(H3N2) virus, although vaccine mismatch resulted in low VE. PMID:27784529

  6. Folate receptor gene variants and neural tube defect occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Finnell, R.; Greer, K.; Lammer, E.

    1994-09-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence shows that periconceptional use of folic acid supplements may prevent 40-50% of neural tube defects (NTDs). The FDA has subsequently recommended folic acid supplementation of all women of childbearing potential, even though the mechanism by which folic acid prevents NTDs is unknown. We investigated genetic variation of a candidate gene, the 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MeTHF) receptor, that may mediate this preventive effect. The receptor concentrates folate within cells and we have localized its mRNA to neuroepithelial cells during neurulation. Our hypothesis is that dysfunctional 5-MeTHF receptors inadequately concentrate folate intracellularly, predisposing infants to NTDs. We have completed SSCP analysis on 3 of the 4 coding exons of the 5-MeTHF receptor gene of 474 infants participating in a large population-based epidemiological case-control study of NTDs in California; genotyping of another 500 infants is ongoing. Genomic DNA was extracted from residual blood spots from newborn screening samples of cases and controls. Genotyping was done blinded to case status. Polymorphisms have been detected for exons 4 and 5; fourteen percent of the infants have exon 5 polymorphisms. Data will be presented on the prevalence of 5-MeTHF receptor polymorphisms among cases and controls. Relationships among the polymorphisms and NTD occurrence may shed light on how folic acid supplementation prevents NTDs.

  7. Cloning and functional expression of alternative spliced variants of the ρ1 γ-aminobutyrate receptor

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Vazquez, Ana E.; Panicker, Mitradas M.; Miledi, Ricardo

    1998-01-01

    The ρ1 γ-aminobutyrate receptor (GABAρ1) is expressed predominantly in the retina and forms homomeric GABA-gated Cl− channels that are clearly different from the multisubunit GABAA receptors. In contrast to these, GABAρ1 receptors desensitize very little and are not blocked by bicuculline. In addition to GABAρ1, two new variants were identified in human retina cDNA libraries. Cloning and sequence analysis showed that both variants contain large deletions in the putative extracellular domain of the receptor. These deletions extend from a common 5′ site to different 3′ sites. The cDNA with the largest deletion, named GABAρ1Δ450, contains a complete ORF identical to that of GABAρ1 but missing 450 nt. This cDNA encodes a protein of 323 aa, identical to the GABAρ1, but has a deletion of 150 aa in the amino-terminal extracellular domain. GABAρ1Δ450 mRNA injected into Xenopus oocytes did not produce functional GABA receptors. The second GABAρ1 variant (GABAρ1Δ51) contains a 51-nt deletion. In Xenopus oocytes, GABAρ1Δ51 led to the expression of GABA receptors that had the essential GABAρ1 characteristics of low desensitization and bicuculline resistance. Therefore, alternative splicing increases the coding potential of this gene family expressed in the human retina, but the functional diversity created by the alternative spliced forms is still not understood. PMID:9520485

  8. Estrogen Receptor Mutants/Variants in Human Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    Recherche Louis- Charles Simard, Montreal, Canada. Four nor- mal human breast tissues from reduction mammoplasties of pre- menopausal women were obtained...to hormone resistance. Cancer Res 1990; 50: 6208-17. 22. Karnik PS, Kulkarni S, Lui XP, Budd GT, Bukowski RM. Estrogen receptor mutations in

  9. Establishment of Sf9 transformants constitutively expressing PBAN receptor variants: application to functional evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To facilitate further evaluation of pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR) functionality and regulation, we generated cultured insect cell lines stably expressing a number of fluorescent Bombyx mori PBANR (BommoPBANR) and Pseudaletia separata PBANR (PsesePBANR) variants incl...

  10. The Role of AhR in Breast Cancer Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    other cell types, galangin is a potent inhibitor of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), an environmental carcinogen-responsive transcription factor...constitutively active AhR. Constitutive and environmental chemical-inducible AhR activity was profoundly suppressed by galangin as was cell growth...However, the failure of a-naphthoflavone or FhAhRR transfection to block growth indicated that galangin -mediated AhR inhibition was either insufficient

  11. Secretin-receptor and secretin-receptor-variant expression in gastrinomas: Correlation with clinical and tumoral features and secretin and calcium provocative test results.

    PubMed Central

    Long, Scott H.; Berna, Marc J.; Thill, Michelle; Pace, Andrea; Pradhan, Tapas K.; Hoffmann, K. Martin; Serrano, Jose; Jensen, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Context/Objectives The diagnosis of Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) requires secretin testing in 60%. Even with secretin the diagnosis may be difficult because variable responses occur and 6–30% have negative testing. The basis for variability or negative responses is unclear. It is unknown if the tumor density of secretin receptors or the presence of a secretin-receptor-variant, which can act as a dominant-negative, are important. The aim of this study was to investigate these possibilities. Patients/Methods Secretin-receptor and variant mRNA expression was determined in gastrinomas using real-time-PCR from 54 ZES patients. Results were correlated with Western blotting, secretin-receptor immunohistochemistry, with gastrin-provocative-test results and tumoral/clinical/laboratory features. Results Secretin-receptor mRNA was detectible in all gastrinomas but varied 132-fold with a mean of 0.89±0.12 molecules/β-actin. Secretin-receptor PCR results correlated closely with Western blotting (r=0.95,p<0.0001) and receptor-immunohistochemistry (p=0.0015, r=0.71). The variant was detected in all gastrinomas but levels varied 102-fold and were 72-fold lower than the total. Secretin-receptor levels correlated with variant levels, Δsecretin, but not Δcalcium and with tumor location, but not growth, extent or clinical responses. Variant levels did not correlate with the Δsecretin. Detailed analysis provides no evidence variant expression modified the secretin-receptor response or accounted for negative tests. Conclusions Secretin-receptor and secretin-receptor-variant expression occur in all gastrinomas. Because the expression of the total but not variant correlated with the secretin results and no evidence for dominant negative activity of the variant was found, our results suggest the total-secretin-receptor density is an important determinant of the secretin test response. PMID:17711922

  12. Humoral Immune Pressure Selects for HIV-1 CXC-chemokine Receptor 4-using Variants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nina; Gonzalez, Oscar A; Registre, Ludy; Becerril, Carlos; Etemad, Behzad; Lu, Hong; Wu, Xueling; Lockman, Shahin; Essex, Myron; Moyo, Sikhulile; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Sagar, Manish

    2016-06-01

    Although both C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)- and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4)-using HIV-1 strains cause AIDS, the emergence of CXCR4-utilizing variants is associated with an accelerated decline in CD4+ T cells. It remains uncertain if CXCR4-using viruses hasten disease or if these variants only emerge after profound immunological damage. We show that exclusively CXCR4- as compared to cocirculating CCR5-utilizing variants are less sensitive to neutralization by both contemporaneous autologous plasma and plasma pools from individuals that harbor only CCR5-using HIV-1. The CXCR4-utilizing variants, however, do not have a global antigenic change because they remain equivalently susceptible to antibodies that do not target coreceptor binding domains. Studies with envelope V3 loop directed antibodies and chimeric envelopes suggest that the neutralization susceptibility differences are potentially influenced by the V3 loop. In vitro passage of a neutralization sensitive CCR5-using virus in the presence of autologous plasma and activated CD4+ T cells led to the emergence of a CXCR4-utilizing virus in 1 of 3 cases. These results suggest that in some but not necessarily all HIV-1 infected individuals humoral immune pressure against the autologous virus selects for CXCR4-using variants, which potentially accelerates disease progression. Our observations have implications for using antibodies for HIV-1 immune therapy.

  13. Population susceptibility to a variant swine-origin influenza virus A(H3N2) in Vietnam, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Hoa, L N M; Bryant, J E; Choisy, M; Nguyet, L A; Bao, N T; Trang, N H; Chuc, N T K; Toan, T K; Saito, T; Takemae, N; Horby, P; Wertheim, H; Fox, A

    2015-10-01

    A reassortant swine-origin A(H3N2) virus (A/swine/BinhDuong/03-9/2010) was detected through swine surveillance programmes in southern Vietnam in 2010. This virus contains haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes from a human A(H3N2) virus circulating around 2004-2006, and the internal genes from triple-reassortant swine influenza A viruses (IAVs). To assess population susceptibility to this virus we measured haemagglutination inhibiting (HI) titres to A/swine/BinhDuong/03-9/2010 and to seasonal A/Perth/16/2009 for 947 sera collected from urban and rural Vietnamese people during 2011-2012. Seroprevalence (HI ⩾ 40) was high and similar for both viruses, with 62·6% [95% confidence interval (CI) 59·4-65·7] against A/Perth/16/2009 and 54·6% (95% CI 51·4-57·8%) against A/swine/BinhDuong/03-9/2010, and no significant differences between urban and rural participants. Children aged <5 years lacked antibodies to the swine origin H3 virus despite high seroprevalence for A/Perth/16/2009. These results reveal vulnerability to infection to this contemporary swine IAV in children aged <5 years; however, cross-reactive immunity in adults would likely limit epidemic emergence potential.

  14. Charge heterogeneity: Basic antibody charge variants with increased binding to Fc receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hintersteiner, Beate; Lingg, Nico; Zhang, Peiqing; Woen, Susanto; Hoi, Kong Meng; Stranner, Stefan; Wiederkum, Susanne; Mutschlechner, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Loibner, Hans; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We identified active isoforms of the chimeric anti-GD2 antibody, ch14.18, a recombinant antibody produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells, which is already used in clinical trials.1,2,3 We separated the antibody by high resolution ion-exchange chromatography with linear pH gradient elution into acidic, main and basic charge variants on a preparative scale yielding enough material for an in-depth study of the sources and the effects of microheterogeneity. The binding affinity of the charge variants toward the antigen and various cell surface receptors was studied by Biacore. Effector functions were evaluated using cellular assays for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Basic charge variants showed increased binding to cell surface receptor FcγRIIIa, which plays a major role in regulating effector functions. Furthermore, increased binding of the basic fractions to the neonatal receptor was observed. As this receptor mediates the prolonged half-life of IgG in human serum, this data may well hint at an increased serum half-life of these basic variants compared to their more acidic counterparts. Different glycoform patterns, C-terminal lysine clipping and N-terminal pyroglutamate formation were identified as the main structural sources for the observed isoform pattern. Potential differences in structural stability between individual charge variant fractions by nano differential scanning calorimetry could not been detected. Our in-vitro data suggests that the connection between microheterogeneity and the biological activity of recombinant antibody therapeutics deserves more attention than commonly accepted. PMID:27559765

  15. Genetic variability of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated regulation of the human UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A4 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Erichsen, Thomas J.; Ehmer, Ursula; Kalthoff, Sandra; Lankisch, Tim O.; Mueller, Tordis M.; Munzel, Peter A.; Manns, Michael P.; Strassburg, Christian P.

    2008-07-15

    UDP glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) play an important role for drug detoxification and toxicity. UGT function is genetically modulated by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which lead to the expression of functionally altered protein, or altered expression levels. UGT1A4 activity includes anticonvulsants, antidepressants and environmental mutagens. In this study the induction of the human UGT1A4 gene and a potential influence of genetic variation in its promoter region were analyzed. SNPs at bp - 219 and - 163 occurred in 9% among 109 blood donors reducing UGT1A4 transcription by 40%. UGT1A4 transcription was dioxin inducible. Reporter gene experiments identified 2 xenobiotic response elements (XRE), which were functionally confirmed by mutagenesis analyses, and binding was demonstrated by electromobility shift assays. Constitutive human UGT1A4 gene expression and induction was aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent, and reduced in the presence of SNPs at bp - 219 and - 163. AhR-mediated regulation of the human UGT1A4 gene by two XRE and a modulation by naturally occurring genetic variability by SNPs is demonstrated, which indicates gene-environment interaction with potential relevance for drug metabolism.

  16. Evaluation of the ecotoxicity of sediments from Yangtze river estuary and contribution of priority PAHs to ah receptor--mediated activities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Chen, Ling; Shao, Ying; Zhang, Lili; Floehr, Tilman; Xiao, Hongxia; Yan, Yan; Eichbaum, Kathrin; Hollert, Henner; Wu, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    In this study, in vitro bioassays were performed to assess the ecotoxicological potential of sediments from Yangtze River estuary. The cytotoxicity and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated toxicity of sediment extracts with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver cells were determined by neutral red retention and 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase assays. The cytotoxicity and AhR-mediated activity of sediments from the Yangtze River estuary ranged from low level to moderate level compared with the ecotoxicity of sediments from other river systems. However, Yangtze River releases approximately 14 times greater water discharge compared with Rhine, a major river in Europe. Thus, the absolute pollution mass transfer of Yangtze River may be detrimental to the environmental quality of estuary and East China Sea. Effect-directed analysis was applied to identify substances causing high dioxin-like activities. To identify unknown substances contributing to dioxin-like potencies of whole extracts, we fractionated crude extracts by open column chromatography. Non-polar paraffinic components (F1), weakly and moderately polar components (F2), and highly polar substances (F3) were separated from each crude extract of sediments. F2 showed the highest dioxin-like activities. Based on the results of mass balance calculation of chemical toxic equivalent concentrations (TEQs), our conclusion is that priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons indicated a low portion of bio-TEQs ranging from 1% to 10% of crude extracts. Further studies should be conducted to identify unknown pollutants.

  17. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) contamination and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist activity of Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplements: implications for daily intake of dioxins and PCBs.

    PubMed

    Bourdon, J A; Bazinet, T M; Arnason, T T; Kimpe, L E; Blais, J M; White, P A

    2010-11-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) rich oils derived primarily from fish are frequently consumed as supplements. Due to the tendency of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to accumulate in exposed organisms, n-3 PUFA supplements can contain sufficient POPs to present a risk to consumers. Here we investigated PCB concentrations and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist activity in 17 n-3 PUFA supplements available in Canada. PCBs ranged from <0.8 to 793 ng g(-1) oil, with salmon- and seal-derived products yielding the highest values. AhR agonist activity from a reporter gene assay ranged from 1.3 to 72.2 pg TEQ g(-1) oil, with salmon and tuna yielding the highest values. When consumed at the recommended doses and as a supplement to the average Canadian diet, seal-derived oil can contribute to exceedance of the tolerable daily intake of 20 ng PCBs kg-BW(-1)day(-1), and salmon-, tuna-, and sea herring-derived oils can contribute to exceedance of the tolerable daily intake limit of 2.3 pg TEQ kg-BW(-1)day(-1). The beneficial properties of fish and n-3 PUFA supplements, and the results of this study suggest that it is prudent to consume supplements derived from small, cold-water fatty fish. Further research will be necessary to draw firm conclusions.

  18. Liver X Receptor Genes Variants Modulate ALS Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mouzat, Kevin; Molinari, Nicolas; Kantar, Jovana; Polge, Anne; Corcia, Philippe; Couratier, Philippe; Clavelou, Pierre; Juntas-Morales, Raul; Pageot, Nicolas; Lobaccaro, Jean -Marc A; Raoul, Cedric; Lumbroso, Serge; Camu, William

    2017-02-27

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is one of the most severe motor neuron (MN) disorders in adults. Phenotype of ALS patients is highly variable and may be influenced by modulators of energy metabolism. Recent works have implicated the liver X receptors α and β (LXRs), either in the propagation process of ALS or in the maintenance of MN survival. LXRs are nuclear receptors activated by oxysterols, modulating cholesterol levels, a suspected modulator of ALS severity. In a cohort of 438 ALS patients and 330 healthy controls, the influence of LXR genes on ALS risk and phenotype was studied using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The two LXRα SNPs rs2279238 and rs7120118 were shown to be associated with age at onset in ALS patients. Consistently, homozygotes were twice more correlated than were heterozygotes to delayed onset. The onset was thus delayed by 3.9 years for rs2279238 C/T carriers and 7.8 years for T/T carriers. Similar results were obtained for rs7120118 (+2.1 years and +6.7 years for T/C and C/C genotypes, respectively). The LXRβ SNP rs2695121 was also shown to be associated with a 30% increase of ALS duration (p = 0.0055, FDR = 0.044). The tested genotypes were not associated with ALS risk. These findings add further evidence to the suspected implication of LXR genes in the disease process of ALS and might open new perspectives in ALS therapeutics.

  19. Expression of ARNT, ARNT2, HIF1 alpha, HIF2 alpha and Ah receptor mRNAs in the developing mouse.

    PubMed

    Jain, S; Maltepe, E; Lu, M M; Simon, C; Bradfield, C A

    1998-04-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix-PAS (bHLH-PAS) protein ARNT is a dimeric partner of the Ah receptor (AHR) and hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha(HIF1 alpha). These dimers mediate biological responses to xenobiotic exposure and low oxygen tension. The recent cloning of ARNT and HIF1(homologues (ARNT2 and HIF2 alpha) indicates that at least six distinct bHLH-PAS heterodimeric combinations can occur in response to a number of environmental stimuli. In an effort to understand the biological relevance of this combinatorial complexity, we characterized their relative expression at a number of developmental time points by parallel in situ hybridization of adjacent tissue sections. Our results reveal that in general there is limited redundancy in the expression of these six transcription factors and that each of these bHLH-PAS members displays a unique pattern of developmental expression emerging as early as embryonic day 9.5.

  20. Polymorphic variants in the dopamine receptor D2 in women with endometriosis-related infertility.

    PubMed

    Szczepańska, Malgorzata; Mostowska, Adrianna; Wirstlein, Przemyslaw; Skrzypczak, Jana; Misztal, Matthew; Jagodziński, Paweł P

    2015-08-01

    Data suggests that dopamine receptor DRD2 gene variants may contribute to hyperprolactinemia and that they may be risk factors for endometriosis-related infertility. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether nucleotide variants of the DRD2 gene may be associated with infertility related to endometriosis. Five DRD2 SNPs, rs1800497, rs6277, rs2283265, rs4245146 and rs4648317, which are located in different blocks of linkage disequilibrium, were studied in 151 cases and 381 controls. No significant differences between DRD2 rs1800497, rs6277, rs2283265, rs4245146 and rs4648317 genotype, allele nor haplotype frequencies were observed in women with endometriosis-related infertility compared with the control group. The present results did not confirm DRD2 gene variants to be genetic risk factors for endometriosis-related infertility.

  1. Genetic variants of the unsaturated fatty acid receptor GPR120 relating to obesity in dogs.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Masahiro; Gin, Azusa; Onozawa, Eri; Daimon, Mana; Yamada, Hana; Oda, Hitomi; Mori, Akihiro; Momota, Yutaka; Azakami, Daigo; Yamamoto, Ichiro; Mochizuki, Mariko; Sako, Toshinori; Tamura, Katsutoshi; Ishioka, Katsumi

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 120 is an unsaturated fatty acid receptor, which is associated with various physiological functions. It is reported that the genetic variant of GPR120, p.Arg270His, is detected more in obese people, and this genetic variation functionally relates to obesity in humans. Obesity is a common nutritional disorder also in dogs, but the genetic factors have not ever been identified in dogs. In this study, we investigated the molecular structure of canine GPR120 and searched for candidate genetic variants which may relate to obesity in dogs. Canine GPR120 was highly homologous to those of other species, and seven transmembrane domains and two N-glycosylation sites were conserved. GPR120 mRNA was expressed in lung, jejunum, ileum, colon, hypothalamus, hippocampus, spinal cord, bone marrow, dermis and white adipose tissues in dogs, as those in mice and humans. Genetic variants of GPR120 were explored in client-owned 141 dogs, resulting in that 5 synonymous and 4 non-synonymous variants were found. The variant c.595C>A (p.Pro199Thr) was found in 40 dogs, and the gene frequency was significantly higher in dogs with higher body condition scores, i.e. 0.320 in BCS4-5 dogs, 0.175 in BCS3 dogs and 0.000 in BCS2 dogs. We conclude that c.595C>A (p.Pro199Thr) is a candidate variant relating to obesity, which may be helpful for nutritional management of dogs.

  2. Lack of association between dopamine D2 receptor gene Cys311 variant and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihisa; Fukushima, Noboru; Takahashi, Makoto; Kameda, Kensuke; Ihda, Shin

    1996-04-09

    Itokawa et al. reported identifying one missense nucleotide mutation from C to G resulting in a substitution of serine with cysteine at codon 311 in the third intracellular loop of the dopamine D2 receptor in schizophrenics. Arinami et al. reported finding a positive association between the Cys311 variant and schizophrenia. In response to the report by Arinami et al. we examined 106 unrelated Japanese schizophrenics and 106 normal controls to determine if there is any association of the Cys311 variant with schizophrenia. However, we found no statistically significant differences in allelic frequencies of Cys311 between schizophrenia and normal controls. The present results as well as those of all previous studies except for that of Arinami et al. indicated that an association between the dopamine D2 receptor gene and schizophrenia is unlikely to exist. 24 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Registered report: androgen receptor splice variants determine taxane sensitivity in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xiaochuan; Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn; Fung, Juan José; Kosaka, Alan H; Tan, Fraser; Perfito, Nicole; Lomax, Joelle; Iorns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of recent papers in the field of prostate cancer. This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from "Androgen Receptor Splice Variants Determine Taxane Sensitivity in Prostate Cancer" by Thadani-Mulero and colleagues (2014) published in Cancer Research in 2014. The experiment that will be replicated is reported in Fig. 6A. Thadani-Mulero and colleagues generated xenografts from two prostate cancer cell lines; LuCaP 86.2, which expresses predominantly the ARv567 splice variant of the androgen receptor (AR), and LuCaP 23.1, which expresses the full length AR as well as the ARv7 variant. Treatment of the tumors with the taxane docetaxel showed that the drug inhibited tumor growth of the LuCaP 86.2 cells but not of the LuCaP 23.1 cells, indicating that expression of splice variants of the AR can affect sensitivity to docetaxel. The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative is a collaboration between the Prostate Cancer Foundation, the Movember Foundation and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by PeerJ.

  4. Clustered coding variants in the glutamate receptor complexes of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Frank, René A W; McRae, Allan F; Pocklington, Andrew J; van de Lagemaat, Louie N; Navarro, Pau; Croning, Mike D R; Komiyama, Noboru H; Bradley, Sophie J; Challiss, R A John; Armstrong, J Douglas; Finn, Robert D; Malloy, Mary P; MacLean, Alan W; Harris, Sarah E; Starr, John M; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Howard, Eleanor K; Hunt, Sarah E; Coffey, Alison J; Ranganath, Venkatesh; Deloukas, Panos; Rogers, Jane; Muir, Walter J; Deary, Ian J; Blackwood, Douglas H; Visscher, Peter M; Grant, Seth G N

    2011-04-29

    Current models of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder implicate multiple genes, however their biological relationships remain elusive. To test the genetic role of glutamate receptors and their interacting scaffold proteins, the exons of ten glutamatergic 'hub' genes in 1304 individuals were re-sequenced in case and control samples. No significant difference in the overall number of non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) was observed between cases and controls. However, cluster analysis of nsSNPs identified two exons encoding the cysteine-rich domain and first transmembrane helix of GRM1 as a risk locus with five mutations highly enriched within these domains. A new splice variant lacking the transmembrane GPCR domain of GRM1 was discovered in the human brain and the GRM1 mutation cluster could perturb the regulation of this variant. The predicted effect on individuals harbouring multiple mutations distributed in their ten hub genes was also examined. Diseased individuals possessed an increased load of deleteriousness from multiple concurrent rare and common coding variants. Together, these data suggest a disease model in which the interplay of compound genetic coding variants, distributed among glutamate receptors and their interacting proteins, contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.

  5. The I427T neuraminidase (NA) substitution, located outside the NA active site of an influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 variant with reduced susceptibility to NA inhibitors, alters NA properties and impairs viral fitness.

    PubMed

    Tu, Véronique; Abed, Yacine; Barbeau, Xavier; Carbonneau, Julie; Fage, Clément; Lagüe, Patrick; Boivin, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Emergence of pan neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI)-resistant variants constitutes a serious clinical concern. An influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 variant containing the I427T/Q313R neuraminidase (NA) substitutions was previously identified in a surveillance study. Although these changes are not part of the NA active site, the variant showed reduced susceptibility to many NAIs. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of resistance for the I427T/Q313R substitution and its impact on the NA enzyme and viral fitness. Recombinant wild-type (WT), I427T/Q313R and I427T A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses were generated by reverse genetics and tested for their drug susceptibilities, enzymatic properties and replication kinetics in vitro as well as their virulence in mice. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed for NA structural analysis. The I427T substitution, which was responsible for the resistance phenotype observed in the double (I427T/Q313R) mutant, induced 17-, 56-, 7-, and 14-fold increases in IC50 values against oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir and laninamivir, respectively. The I427T substitution alone or combined to Q313R significantly reduced NA affinity. The I427T/Q313R and to a lesser extent I427T recombinant viruses displayed reduced viral titers vs WT in vitro. In experimentally-infected mice, the mortality rates were 62.5%, 0% and 14.3% for the WT, I417T/Q313R and I427T viruses, respectively. There were about 2.5- and 2-Log reductions in mean lung viral titers on day 5 post-infection for the I427T/Q313R and I427T mutants, respectively, compared to WT. Results from simulations revealed that the I427T change indirectly altered the stability of the catalytic R368 residue of the NA enzyme causing its reduced binding to the substrate/inhibitor. This study demonstrates that the I427T/Q313R mutant, not only alters NAI susceptibility but also compromises NA properties and viral fitness, which could explain its infrequent detection in clinic.

  6. Human 5–HT4 and 5–HT7 Receptor Splice Variants: Are they Important?

    PubMed Central

    Coupar, Ian M; Desmond, Paul V; Irving, Helen R

    2007-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are encoded by >300 genes in the human genome, are by far the largest class of targets for modern drugs. These macromolecules display inherent adaptability of function, which is partly due to the production of different forms of the receptor protein. These are commonly called ‘isoforms’ or ‘splice variants’ denoting the molecular process of their production/assembly. Not all GPCRs are expressed as splice variants, but certain subclasses of 5–HT receptors are for example, the 5–HT4 and 5–HT7 receptors. There are at least 11 human 5–HT4 and three h5–HT7 receptor splice variants. This review describestheir discoveries, nomenclature and structures. The discovery that particular splice variants are tissue specific (or prominent) has highlighted their potential as future drug targets. In particular, this review examines the functional relevance of different 5–HT4 and 5–HT7 receptor splice variants. Examples are given to illustrate that splice variants have differential modulatory influences on signalling processes. Differences in agonist potency and efficacies and also differences in desensitisation rates to 5–HT occur with both 5–HT4 and 5–HT7 receptor splice variants. The known and candidate signalling systems that allow for splice variant specific responses include GPCR interacting proteins (GIPs) and GPCR receptor kinases (GRKs) which are examined.Finally, the relevance of 5–HT receptor splice variants to clinical medicine and to the pharmaceutical industry is discussed. PMID:19305739

  7. No evidence for association of dopamine D2 receptor variant (Ser311/Cys311) with major psychosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Tsukasa; Macciardi, F.M.; Badri, F.

    1996-07-26

    We investigated a variant of the dopamine D2 receptor gene (Ser311/Cys311 substitution) in Caucasian patients with schizophrenia (n = 273), delusional disorder (n = 62), bipolar I affective disorder (n = 63), and controls (n = 255). No evidence for association between the receptor variant and any of the diseases was found, even when patients with younger age-of-onset (<25 years) were compared with controls. Futhermore, in a subgroup of schizophrenia patients whom we assessed for negative symptoms, those with the Cys allele did not differ from the remainder of the group. Also, the bipolar affective disorder patients with psychotic features did not show evidence for association with the receptor variant. Thus, our results do not provide evidence for an association between this D2 receptor variant and schizophrenia, or delusional disorder, or bipolar affective disorder. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Hepatic microsomal cytochrome p450s and chlorinated hydrocarbons in largha and ribbon seals from Hokkaido, Japan: differential response of seal species to Ah receptor agonist exposure.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Issei; Sakakibara, Akihito; Iwata, T Hisato; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Akahori, Fumiaki; Kazusaka, Akio; Fujita, Shoichi

    2002-04-01

    From 16 largha seals (Phoca largha) and 15 ribbon seals (Phoca fasciata) in the coastal waters of Hokkaido, Japan, blubber chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) levels and hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) catalytic activities and their immunochemically detected protein content levels were measured. Concentrations of DDTs (2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene,p,p'-DDE; 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethane, p,p'-DDD; dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, p,p'-DDT), polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCBs), and chlordane compounds (oxychlordane, chlordanes, and nonachlors) in both species were in the range of 290 to 5,300, 420 to 4,000, and 130 to 1,500 ng/g lipid weight, respectively. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists, non-ortho (IUPAC 77 and 126) and mono-ortho (IUPAC 105, 118, and 156) coplanar PCB congeners, were also detected, and the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) toxic equivalents (TEQs) were 4.9 to 120 pg TEQ/g lipid weight. Cross-reactive proteins with polyclonal antibodies against rat CYP1A1 and CYP3A2 were notably detected in seal liver microsomes. Interestingly, a polyclonal antibody against rat CYP2B1 recognized proteins only at trace levels. In largha seals, both levels of alkoxyresorufin- (methoxy-, ethoxy-, pentoxy-, and benzyloxyresorufin) O-dealkylase (AROD) activities and proteins detected by polyclonal antibodies against rat CYP1A1 were significantly correlated with the concentrations of individual coplanar PCB congeners, total TEQs, and total PCBs. Threshold concentrations for TEQs in blubber of the largha seal to induce hepatic CYP1A protein and EROD activity were estimated to be 8.5 and 19 pg TEQ/g fat weight, respectively. In ribbon seals, similar correlations were not detected, although the TEQ levels were not significantly lower than those in largha seals. These results suggest that AROD activity and CYP1A1 protein in the liver of the largha seal could be a biomarker for the exposure to AhR agonists such as coplanar PCB

  9. In vivo and in vitro Ah-receptor activation by commercial and fractionated pentabromodiphenylether using zebrafish (Danio rerio) and the DR-CALUX assay.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, R V; Murk, A J; Leonards, P E G; Grinwis, G C M; van den Berg, M; Vos, J G

    2006-10-12

    The present study addresses the toxicity of a commercial pentabrominated diphenylether (PeBDE) flame retardant mixture, DE-71, in a model aquatic vertebrate. Four weeks' exposure of juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio) to water-borne DE-71 resulted in dose-dependent induction of CYP1A immunoreactivity, predominantly in the endocardium and the endothelium of larger blood vessels, such as ventral aorta and branchial arteries, as well as the larger hepatic and pancreatic blood vessels. To investigate the impact of possible contaminating PBDD/Fs in the DE-71 product, the study was repeated after DE-71 had been fractionated into a non-planar (cleaned PBDEs) and a planar fraction (PBDD/Fs). Zebrafish were exposed under similar conditions to the planar and cleaned DE-71 fractions, and to uncleaned DE-71. In addition, the above fractions were chemically analyzed and tested in a reporter gene assay (DR-CALUX) for their aromatic hydrocarbon-receptor (AhR) stimulating potencies. A relatively strong CALUX response was detected from the planar DE-71 fraction (19.7ng TCDD equivalent (TEQ)/g DE-71), coinciding with a strong induction of CYP1A immunoreactivity in zebrafish. CYP1A immunoreactivity in zebrafish exposed to uncleaned DE-71 was intense, although the CALUX response was 10-fold less compared to the planar fraction. Only weak CYP1A immunoreactivity was found in fish exposed to cleaned DE-71, and none in control animals; no CALUX response was detected in cleaned DE-71. The present findings indicate that chemical impurities of the commercial PeBDE product account for AhR-mediated effects. Analytical isolation of a planar fraction from the commercial product increased the in vitro (DR-CALUX) signal 10 times. Immunohistochemistry showed a strong tissue specific reaction to DE-71 in vivo at these relatively low TEQ levels regardless of chemical pretreatment of the mix, reflecting the sensitivity of CYP1A induction in juvenile zebrafish to AhR agonists.

  10. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A.; Larach, Daniel B.; Hancock-Cerutti, William F.; Millar, John S.; Cuchel, Marina; DerOhannessian, Stephanie; Kontush, Anatol; Surendran, Praveen; Saleheen, Danish; Trompet, Stella; Jukema, J. Wouter; De Craen, Anton; Deloukas, Panos; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris; Majumder, Abdullah al Shafi; Alam, Dewan S.; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Abecasis, Goncalo; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Erdmann, Jeanette; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schmidt, Ruth Frikke; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Liu, Dajiang J.; Perola, Markus; Blankenberg, Stefan; Salomaa, Veikko; Männistö, Satu; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Ferrieres, Jean; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ferrario, Marco; Kee, Frank; Willer, Cristen J.; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Butterworth, Adam S.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Peloso, Gina M.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Danesh, John; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from the homozygous subject, and in mice. Large population-based studies revealed that subjects who are heterozygous carriers of the P376L variant have significantly increased levels of plasma HDL-C. P376L carriers have a profound HDL-related phenotype and an increased risk of CHD (odds ratio = 1.79, which is statistically significant). PMID:26965621

  11. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Larach, Daniel B; Hancock-Cerutti, William F; Millar, John S; Cuchel, Marina; DerOhannessian, Stephanie; Kontush, Anatol; Surendran, Praveen; Saleheen, Danish; Trompet, Stella; Jukema, J Wouter; De Craen, Anton; Deloukas, Panos; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris; Majumder, Abdullah al Shafi; Alam, Dewan S; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Abecasis, Goncalo; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Erdmann, Jeanette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schmidt, Ruth Frikke; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Liu, Dajiang J; Perola, Markus; Blankenberg, Stefan; Salomaa, Veikko; Männistö, Satu; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Ferrieres, Jean; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ferrario, Marco; Kee, Frank; Willer, Cristen J; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Peloso, Gina M; Stitziel, Nathan O; Danesh, John; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-03-11

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from the homozygous subject, and in mice. Large population-based studies revealed that subjects who are heterozygous carriers of the P376L variant have significantly increased levels of plasma HDL-C. P376L carriers have a profound HDL-related phenotype and an increased risk of CHD (odds ratio = 1.79, which is statistically significant).

  12. Distinct combinations of variant ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate thermosensation and hygrosensation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Zachary A; Silbering, Ana F; Ni, Lina; Klein, Mason; Budelli, Gonzalo; Bell, Rati; Abuin, Liliane; Ferrer, Anggie J; Samuel, Aravinthan DT; Benton, Richard; Garrity, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Ionotropic Receptors (IRs) are a large subfamily of variant ionotropic glutamate receptors present across Protostomia. While these receptors are most extensively studied for their roles in chemosensory detection, recent work has implicated two family members, IR21a and IR25a, in thermosensation in Drosophila. Here we characterize one of the most evolutionarily deeply conserved receptors, IR93a, and show that it is co-expressed and functions with IR21a and IR25a to mediate physiological and behavioral responses to cool temperatures. IR93a is also co-expressed with IR25a and a distinct receptor, IR40a, in a discrete population of sensory neurons in the sacculus, a multi-chambered pocket within the antenna. We demonstrate that this combination of receptors is required for neuronal responses to dry air and behavioral discrimination of humidity differences. Our results identify IR93a as a common component of molecularly and cellularly distinct IR pathways important for thermosensation and hygrosensation in insects. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17879.001 PMID:27656904

  13. Role of AhR/ARNT system in skin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Furue, Masutaka; Takahara, Masakazu; Nakahara, Takeshi; Uchi, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that binds to structurally diverse synthetic and naturally occurring chemicals including dioxins, flavonoids, tryptophan photoproducts, and Malassezia metabolites. Upon binding to its ligands, cytoplasmic AhR translocates to the nucleus, heterodimerizes with aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), and mediates numerous biological and toxicological effects by inducing the transcription of various AhR-responsive genes. AhR ligation controls oxidation/antioxidation, epidermal barrier function, photo-induced response, melanogenesis, and innate immunity. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of skin homeostasis mediated by the AhR/ARNT system.

  14. Prevalence and distribution of avian influenza a(H5N1) virus clade variants in live bird markets of Vietnam, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Diep T; Bryant, Juliet E; Davis, C Todd; Nguyen, Long V; Pham, Long T; Loth, Leo; Inui, Ken; Nguyen, Tung; Jang, Yunho; To, Thanh L; Nguyen, Tho D; Hoang, Diep T; Do, Hoa T; Nguyen, Trang T; Newman, Scott; Jennifer Siembieda; Pham, Dong V

    2014-12-01

    Active surveillance for avian influenza (Al) viruses in poultry sold at live bird markets (LBMs) was conducted in 44 of 63 provinces throughout Vietnam over two periods from September 2011 to February 2012 and October 2012 to June 2013. The study objectives were to assess the prevalence of avian influenza type A, H5, and H5N1 subtype viruses and characterize the geographical and temporal distribution of H5N1 virus genetic variants across the country. Monthly sampling was conducted in 394 LBMs located in 372 communes. A total of 9790 oropharyngeal swabs from poultry were screened for influenza A virus by real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR Virus isolation was attempted on all positive samples in embryonated chicken eggs, and the HA1 region of each H5 virus isolate was sequenced. Market prevalence of H5 subtype virus was 32.2% (127/394) over the cumulative 15 mo of surveillance. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that clade 1.1 viruses persisted in the south, whereas three genetically distinct subgroups of dade 2.3.2.1 were found simultaneously in northern, central, and southern Vietnam. Clade 2.3.2.1c viruses first appeared in July 2012 and spread rapidly to the center and south of Vietnam in late 2012, where they were predominant among clade 2.3.2.1 viruses and were detected in both active LBM surveillance and poultry outbreaks. Given the overlapping geographic distribution of dade variants and the antigenic divergence previously described for these dades, current AI poultry vaccines used in Vietnam may require bivalent formulations containing representatives of both dade 1.1 and dade 2.3.2.1 viruses.

  15. Co-expression of the human cannabinoid receptor coding region splice variants (hCB₁) affects the function of hCB₁ receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Bagher, Amina M; Laprairie, Robert B; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2013-12-05

    The human type 1 cannabinoid (hCB1) receptor is expressed at high levels in the central nervous system. mRNA variants of the coding region of this receptor, human cannabinoid hCB1a and hCB1b receptors, have been identified, their biological function remains unclear. The present study demonstrated that the three human cannabinoid hCB1 coding region variants are expressed in the human and monkey (Macaca fascicularis) brain. Western blot analyses of homogenates from different regions of the monkey brain demonstrated that proteins with the expected molecular weights of the cannabinoid CB1, CB1a and CB1b receptors were co-expressed throughout the brain. Given the co-localization of these receptors, we hypothesized that physical interactions between the three splice variants may affect cannabinoid pharmacology. The human cannabinoid hCB1, hCB1a, and hCB1b receptors formed homodimers and heterodimers, as determined by BRET in transiently transfected HEK 293A cells. We found that the co-expression of the human cannabinoid hCB1 and each of the splice variants increased cell surface expression of the human cannabinoid hCB1 receptor and increased Gi/o-dependent ERK phosphorylation in response to cannabinoid agonists. Therefore, the human cannabinoid hCB1 coding region splice variants play an important physiological role in the activity of the endocannabinoid system.

  16. Structure, tissue distribution and estrogen regulation of splice variants of the sea bream estrogen receptor α gene.

    PubMed

    Pinto, P I S; Teodósio, R; Socorro, S; Power, D M; Canário, A V M

    2012-07-15

    Estrogen actions are mainly mediated by specific nuclear estrogen receptors (ERs), for which different genes and a diversity of transcript variants have been identified, mainly in mammals. In this study, we investigated the presence of ER splice variants in the teleost fish gilthead sea bream (Sparus auratus), by comparison with the genomic organization of the related species Takifugu rubripes. Two exon2-deleted ERα transcript variants were isolated from liver cDNA of estradiol-treated fish. The ΔE2 variant lacks ERα exon 2, generating a premature termination codon and a putative C-terminal truncated receptor, while the ΔE2,3* variant contains an in-frame deletion of exon 2 and part of exon 3 and codes for a putative ERα protein variant lacking most of the DNA-binding domain. Both variants were expressed at very low levels in several female and male sea bream tissues, and their expression was highly inducible in liver by estradiol-17β treatment with a strong positive correlation with the typical wild-type (wt) ERα response in this tissue. These findings identify novel estrogen responsive splice variants of fish ERα, and provide the basis for future studies to investigate possible modulation of wt-ER actions by splice variants.

  17. Differential agonist sensitivity of glycine receptor alpha2 subunit splice variants.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paul S; Harvey, Robert J; Smart, Trevor G

    2004-09-01

    1. The glycine receptor (GlyR) alpha2A and alpha2B splice variants differ by a dual, adjacent amino acid substitution from alpha2A(V58,T59) to alpha2B(I58,A59) in the N-terminal extracellular domain. 2. Comparing the effects of the GlyR agonists, glycine, beta-alanine and taurine, on the GlyR alpha2 isoforms, revealed a significant increase in potency for all three agonists at the alpha2B variant. 3. The sensitivities of the splice variants to the competitive antagonist, strychnine, and to the biphasic modulator Zn(2+), were comparable. In contrast, the allosteric inhibitor picrotoxin was more potent on GlyR alpha2A compared to GlyR alpha2B receptors. 4. Coexpression of alpha2A or alpha2B subunits with the GlyR beta subunit revealed that the higher agonist potencies observed with the alpha2B homomer were retained for the alpha2Bbeta heteromer. 5. The identical sensitivity to strychnine combined with a reduction in the maximum current induced by the partial agonist taurine at the GlyR alpha2A homomer, suggested that the changed sensitivity to agonists is in accordance with a modulation of agonist efficacy rather than agonist affinity. 6. An effect on agonist efficacy was also supported by using a structural model of the GlyR, localising the region of splice variation to the proposed docking region between GlyR loop 2 and the TM2-3 loop, an area associated with channel activation. 7. The existence of a spasmodic mouse phenotype linked to a GlyR alpha1(A52S) mutation, the equivalent position to the source of the alpha2 splice variation, raises the possibility that the GlyR alpha2 splice variants may be responsible for distinct roles in neuronal function.

  18. Anatomical and functional correlation of the endomorphins with mu opioid receptor splice variants.

    PubMed

    Abbadie, C; Rossi, G C; Orciuolo, A; Zadina, J E; Pasternak, G W

    2002-09-01

    The present study characterizes the relationship between the endogenous mu opioid peptides endomorphin-1 (EM-1) and endomorphin-2 (EM-2) and several splice variants of the cloned mu opioid receptor (MOR-1) encoded by the mu opioid receptor gene (Oprm). Confocal laser microscopy revealed that fibers containing EM-2-like immunoreactivity (-LI) were distributed in close apposition to fibers showing MOR-1-LI (exon 4-LI) and to MOR-1C-LI (exons 7/8/9-LI) in the superficial laminae of the lumbar spinal cord. We also observed colocalization of EM-2-LI and MOR-1-LI in a few fibers of lamina II, and colocalization of EM-2-LI and MOR-1C-LI in laminae I-II, and V-VI. To assess the functional relevance of the MOR-1 variants in endomorphin analgesia, we examined the effects of antisense treatments that targeted individual exons within the Oprm1 gene on EM-1 and EM-2 analgesia in the tail flick test. This antisense mapping study implied mu opioid receptor mechanisms for the endomorphins are distinct from those of morphine or morphine-6beta-glucuronide (M6G).

  19. Altered cell surface expression of human MC1R variant receptor alleles associated with red hair and skin cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Kimberley A; Newton, Richard A; Smit, Darren J; Leonard, J Helen; Stow, Jennifer L; Sturm, Richard A

    2005-08-01

    The human melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R) encodes a G-protein coupled receptor that is primarily expressed on melanocytes, where it plays a key role in pigmentation regulation. Variant alleles are associated with red hair colour and fair skin, known as the RHC phenotype, as well as skin cancer risk. The R151C, R160W and D294H alleles, designated 'R', are strongly associated with the RHC phenotype and have been proposed to result in loss of function receptors due to impaired G-protein coupling. We recently provided evidence that the R151C and R160W variants can efficiently couple to G-proteins in response to alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone. The possibility that altered cellular localization of the R151C and R160W variant receptors could underlie their association with RHC was therefore considered. Using immunofluorescence and ligand binding studies, we found that melanocytic cells exogenously or endogenously expressing MC1R show strong surface localization of the wild-type and D294H alleles but markedly reduced cell surface expression of the R151C and R160W receptors. In additional exogenous expression studies, the R variant D84E and the rare I155T variant, also demonstrated a significant reduction in plasma membrane receptor numbers. The V60L, V92M and R163Q weakly associated RHC alleles, designated 'r', were expressed with normal or intermediate cell surface receptor levels. These results indicate that reduced receptor coupling activity may not be the only contributing factor to the genetic association between the MC1R variants and the RHC phenotype, with MC1R polymorphisms now linked to a change in receptor localization.

  20. The insulin-sensitivity sulphonylurea receptor variant is associated with thyrotoxic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Rolim, Ana Luiza R; Lindsey, Susan C; Kunii, Ilda S; Crispim, Felipe; Moisés, Regina Célia M S; Maciel, Rui M B; Dias-da-Silva, Magnus R

    2014-10-01

    Thyrotoxicosis is the most common cause of the acquired flaccid muscle paralysis in adults called thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) and is characterised by transient hypokalaemia and hypophosphataemia under high thyroid hormone levels that is frequently precipitated by carbohydrate load. The sulphonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1 (ABCC8)) is an essential regulatory subunit of the β-cell ATP-sensitive K(+) channel that controls insulin secretion after feeding. Additionally, the SUR1 Ala1369Ser variant appears to be associated with insulin sensitivity. We examined the ABCC8 gene at the single nucleotide level using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to determine its allelic variant frequency and calculated the frequency of the Ala1369Ser C-allele variant in a cohort of 36 Brazilian TPP patients in comparison with 32 controls presenting with thyrotoxicosis without paralysis (TWP). We verified that the frequency of the alanine 1369 C-allele was significantly higher in TPP patients than in TWP patients (61.1 vs 34.4%, odds ratio (OR)=3.42, P=0.039) and was significantly more common than the minor allele frequency observed in the general population from the 1000 Genomes database (61.1 vs 29.0%, OR=4.87, P<0.005). Additionally, the C-allele frequency was similar between TWP patients and the general population (34.4 vs 29%, OR=1.42, P=0.325). We have demonstrated that SUR1 alanine 1369 variant is associated with allelic susceptibility to TPP. We suggest that the hyperinsulinaemia that is observed in TPP may be linked to the ATP-sensitive K(+)/SUR1 alanine variant and, therefore, contribute to the major feedforward precipitating factors in the pathophysiology of TPP.

  1. The Ah receptor nuclear translocator gene (ARNT) is located on q21 of human chromosome 1 and on mouse chromosome 3 near Cf-3

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.; Brooks, B.A.; Heinzmann, C. ); Mohandas, T. )

    1993-09-01

    The authors have mapped the Ah (aryl hydrocarbon) receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) gene to a conserved linkage group located on mouse chromosome 3 and human chromosome 1. EcoRi-digested DNA from a panel of 17 human x mouse somatic cell hybrids was probed with a cDNA fragment of the human ARNT gene. Six of the 17 independent mouse x human hybrids were positive for human bands. Human chromosome 1 showed complete cosegregation with the gene, whereas discordant segregation was observed for all other human chromosomes. The human gene was localized to 1q21 by using DNA from mouse x human hybrid clones that retain translocations involving human chromosome 1, by segregation analysis in nine informative CEPH families, and by in situ hybridization. The mouse homologue was mapped to mouse chromosome 3 using a panel of 16 hamster x mouse somatic cell hybrids. Six of 16 mouse x hamster hybrids were positive for mouse bands, showing complete concordance with mouse chromosome 3. The mouse Arnt gene was regionally mapped on chromosome 3, using linkage analysis in an interspecific backcross. The results indicate that the mouse gene resides about 40 cM from the centromere and about 10 cM proximal to Cf-3, the gene for tissue factor. 41 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Isolation and characterization of new exon 11-associated N-terminal splice variants of the human mu opioid receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Hurd, Yasmin L; Pasternak, Gavril W; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2009-02-01

    Alternative splicing of the mu opioid receptor genes to create multiple mu receptor subtypes has been demonstrated in animals and humans. Previously, we identified a number of C-terminal variants in mice, rats and human, followed by several N-terminal variants associated with a new upstream exon in mice (exon 11). Behavioral studies in exon 11 knockout mice suggest an important role for the exon 11 variants in the analgesic actions of heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide, but not morphine or methadone. We now have identified a homologous human exon 11 and three similar human exon 11-associated variants, suggesting conservation of exon 11 and its associated variants across species. hMOR-1i has an additional 93 amino acids at the tip of the N-terminus but is otherwise identical to hMOR-1. When expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, the additional 93 amino acids in hMOR-1i had little effect on opioid binding, but significantly altered agonist-induced G-protein activation. hMOR-1G1 and hMOR-1G2 predicted six transmembrane domain variants, similar to those seen in mice. The regional expression of these exon 11-associated variants, as determined by RT-PCR, varied markedly, implying region-specific alternative splicing. The presence of exon 11-associated variants in humans raises questions regarding their potential role in heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide actions in people as they do in mice.

  3. Structure-function relationships of brazzein variants with altered interactions with the human sweet taste receptor.

    PubMed

    Singarapu, Kiran K; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M

    2016-03-01

    Brazzein (Brz) is a small (54 amino acid residue) sweet tasting protein with physical and taste properties superior to other non-carbohydrate sweeteners. In an investigation of sequence-dependent functional properties of the protein, we used NMR spectroscopy to determine the three-dimensional structures and dynamic properties of two Brz variants: one with a single-site substitution (D40K), which is three-fold sweeter than wild-type Brz, and one with a two-residue insertion between residues 18 and 19 (ins18 RI19 ), which is devoid of sweetness. Although the three-dimensional folds of the two variants were very similar to wild-type Brz, they exhibited local conformational and dynamic differences. The D40K substitution abolished the strong inter-stand H-bond between the side chains of residues Gln46 and Asp40 present in wild-type Brz and increased the flexibility of the protein especially at the mutation site. This increased flexibility presumably allows this site to interact more strongly with the G-protein coupled human sweet receptor. On the other hand, the Arg-Ile insertion within Loop9-19 leads to distortion of this loop and stiffening of the adjacent site whose flexibility appears to be required for productive interaction with the sweet receptor.

  4. Niclosamide enhances abiraterone treatment via inhibition of androgen receptor variants in castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengfei; Armstrong, Cameron; Zhu, Yezi; Lou, Wei; Gao, Allen C.

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence from both clinical and experimental studies suggests that androgen receptor variants, particularly androgen receptor variant 7 (AR-V7), are critical in the induction of resistance to enzalutamide and abiraterone. In this study, we investigated the role of AR-V7 in the cross-resistance of enzalutamide and abiraterone and examined if inhibition of AR-V7 can improve abiraterone treatment response. We found that enzalutamide-resistant cells are cross-resistant to abiraterone, and that AR-V7 confers resistance to abiraterone. Knock down of AR-V7 by siRNA in abiraterone resistant CWR22Rv1 and C4-2B MDVR cells restored their sensitivity to abiraterone, indicating that AR-V7 is involved in abiraterone resistance. Abiraterone resistant prostate cancer cells generated by chronic treatment with abiraterone showed enhanced AR-V7 protein expression. Niclosamide, an FDA-approved antihelminthic drug that has been previously identified as a potent inhibitor of AR-V7, re-sensitizes resistant cells to abiraterone treatment in vitro and in vivo. In summary, this preclinical study suggests that overexpression of AR-V7 contributes to resistance to abiraterone, and supports the development of combination of abiraterone with niclosamide as a potential treatment for advanced castration resistant prostate cancer. PMID:27049719

  5. Niclosamide enhances abiraterone treatment via inhibition of androgen receptor variants in castration resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengfei; Armstrong, Cameron; Zhu, Yezi; Lou, Wei; Gao, Allen C

    2016-05-31

    Considerable evidence from both clinical and experimental studies suggests that androgen receptor variants, particularly androgen receptor variant 7 (AR-V7), are critical in the induction of resistance to enzalutamide and abiraterone. In this study, we investigated the role of AR-V7 in the cross-resistance of enzalutamide and abiraterone and examined if inhibition of AR-V7 can improve abiraterone treatment response. We found that enzalutamide-resistant cells are cross-resistant to abiraterone, and that AR-V7 confers resistance to abiraterone. Knock down of AR-V7 by siRNA in abiraterone resistant CWR22Rv1 and C4-2B MDVR cells restored their sensitivity to abiraterone, indicating that AR-V7 is involved in abiraterone resistance. Abiraterone resistant prostate cancer cells generated by chronic treatment with abiraterone showed enhanced AR-V7 protein expression. Niclosamide, an FDA-approved antihelminthic drug that has been previously identified as a potent inhibitor of AR-V7, re-sensitizes resistant cells to abiraterone treatment in vitro and in vivo. In summary, this preclinical study suggests that overexpression of AR-V7 contributes to resistance to abiraterone, and supports the development of combination of abiraterone with niclosamide as a potential treatment for advanced castration resistant prostate cancer.

  6. Association of vitamin D receptor gene variants with polycystic ovary syndrome: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Touraj; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Farahani, Hamid; Mirakhorli, Mojgan; Dabiri, Reza; Nobakht, Hossein; Asadi, Asadollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D and insulin play an important role in susceptibility to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and therefore vitamin D receptor (VDR), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and insulin receptor (INSR) gene variants might be involved in the pathogenesis of PCOS. Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the possible associations between polymorphisms in VDR, PTH, and INSR genes and the risk of PCOS. Materials and Methods: VDR, PTH, and INSR gene variants were genotyped in 35 women with PCOS and 35 controls using Polymerase chain reaction – Restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Furthermore, serum levels of glucose and insulin were measured in all participants. Results: No significant differences were observed for the VDR FokI, VDR Tru9I, VDR TaqI, PTH DraII, INSR NsiI, and INSR PmlI gene polymorphisms between the women with PCOS and controls. However, after adjustment for confounding factors, the VDR BsmI “Bb” genotype and the VDR ApaI "Aa" genotype were significantly under transmitted to the patients (p= 0.016; OR= 0.250; 95% CI= 0.081-0.769, and p= 0.017; OR= 0.260; 95% CI= 0.086-0.788, respectively). Furthermore, in the women with PCOS, insulin levels were lower in the participants with the INSR NsiI "NN" genotype compared with those with the "Nn + nn" genotypes (P= 0.045). Conclusion: The results showed an association between the VDR gene BsmI and ApaI polymorphisms and PCOS risk. These data also indicated that the INSR "NN" genotype was a marker of decreased insulin in women with PCOS. Our findings, however, do not lend support to the hypothesis that PTH gene DraII variant plays a role in susceptibility to PCOS. PMID:27141540

  7. Niclosamide inhibits androgen receptor variants expression and overcomes enzalutamide resistance in castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yezi; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Schwartz, Chad T.; Evans, Christopher P.; Gao, Allen C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Enzalutamide, a second-generation antiandrogen, was recently approved for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in patients who no longer respond to docetaxel. Despite these advances that provide temporary respite, resistance to enzalutamide occurs frequently. AR splice variants such as AR-V7 have recently been shown to drive castration resistant growth and resistance to enzalutamide. This study was designed to identify inhibitors of AR variants and test its ability to overcome resistance to enzalutamide. Experimental Design The drug screening was conducted using luciferase activity assay to determine the activity of AR-V7 after treatment with the compounds in the Prestwick Chemical Library, which contains about 1120 FDA-approved drugs. The effects of the identified inhibitors on AR-V7 activity and enzalutamide sensitivity were characterized in CRPC and enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Results Niclosamide, an FDA-approved anti-helminthic drug, was identified as a potent AR-V7 inhibitor in prostate cancer cells. Niclosamide significantly downregulated AR-V7 protein expression by protein degradation through a proteasome dependent pathway. Niclosamide also inhibited AR-V7 transcription activity and reduced the recruitment of AR-V7 to the PSA promoter. Niclosamide inhibited prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, the combination of niclosamide and enzalutamide resulted in significantly inhibition of enzalutamide-resistant tumor growth, suggesting that Niclosamide enhances enzalutamide therapy and overcomes enzalutamide resistance in castration resistant prostate cancer cells. Conclusions Niclosamide was identified as a novel inhibitor of AR variants. Our findings offer preclinical validation of niclosamide as a promising inhibitor of androgen receptor variants to treat, either alone or in combination with current antiandrogen therapies, advanced prostate cancer patients

  8. An Antagonistic Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Variant Inhibits VEGF-Stimulated Receptor Autophosphorylation and Proliferation of Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemeister, Gerhard; Schirner, Michael; Reusch, Petra; Barleon, Bernhard; Marme, Dieter; Martiny-Baron, Georg

    1998-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogen with a unique specificity for endothelial cells and a key mediator of aberrant endothelial cell proliferation and vascular permeability in a variety of human pathological situations, such as tumor angiogenesis, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis. VEGF is a symmetric homodimeric molecule with two receptor binding interfaces lying on each pole of the molecule. Herein we report on the construction and recombinant expression of an asymmetric heterodimeric VEGF variant with an intact receptor binding interface at one pole and a mutant receptor binding interface at the second pole of the dimer. This VEGF variant binds to VEGF receptors but fails to induce receptor activation. In competition experiments, the heterodimeric VEGF variant antagonizes VEGF-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation and proliferation of endothelial cells. A 15-fold excess of the heterodimer was sufficient to inhibit VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell proliferation by 50%, and a 100-fold excess resulted in an almost complete inhibition. By using a rational approach that is based on the structure of VEGF, we have shown the feasibility to construct a VEGF variant that acts as an VEGF antagonist.

  9. Religion priming differentially increases prosocial behavior among variants of the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Joni Y; Kim, Heejung S; Mojaverian, Taraneh; Kelley, Lauren D S; Park, In Young; Janusonis, Skirmantas

    2013-02-01

    Building on gene-environment interaction (G × E) research, this study examines how the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene interacts with a situational prime of religion to influence prosocial behavior. Some DRD4 variants tend to be more susceptible to environmental influences, whereas other variants are less susceptible. Thus, certain life environments may be associated with acts of prosociality for some DRD4 variants but not others. Given that religion can act as an environmental influence that increases prosocial behavior, environmental input in the form of religion priming may have G × E effects. Results showed that participants with DRD4 susceptibility variants were more prosocial when implicitly primed with religion than not primed with religion, whereas participants without DRD4 susceptibility variants were not impacted by priming. This research has implications for understanding why different people may behave prosocially for different reasons and also integrates G × E research with experimental psychology.

  10. Characterization of a novel five-transmembrane domain cholecystokinin-2 receptor splice variant identified in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Claire; Escrieut, Chantal; Clerc, Pascal; Gigoux, Véronique; Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude; Fourmy, Daniel

    2012-02-26

    The cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK2R), is expressed in cancers where it contributes to tumor progression. The CCK2R is over-expressed in a sub-set of tumors, allowing its use in tumor targeting with a radiolabel ligand. Since discrepancies between mRNA levels and CCK2R binding sites were noticed, we searched for abnormally spliced variants in tumors from various origins having been previously reported to frequently express cholecystokinin receptors, such as medullary thyroid carcinomas, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas, and gastroenteropancreatic tumors. A variant of the CCK2R coding for a putative five-transmembrane domains receptor has been cloned. This variant represented as much as 6% of CCK2R levels. Ectopic expression in COS-7 cells revealed that this variant lacks biological activity due to its sequestration in endoplasmic reticulum. When co-expressed with the CCK2R, this variant diminished membrane density of the CCK2R and CCK2R-mediated activity (phospholipase-C and ERK activation). In conclusion, a novel splice variant acting as a dominant negative on membrane density of the CCK2R may be of importance for the pathophysiology of certain tumors and for their in vivo CCK2R-targeting.

  11. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  12. Rare human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4 subunit (CHRNA4) variants affect expression and function of high-affinity nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    McClure-Begley, T D; Papke, R L; Stone, K L; Stokes, C; Levy, A D; Gelernter, J; Xie, P; Lindstrom, J; Picciotto, M R

    2014-03-01

    Nicotine, the primary psychoactive component in tobacco smoke, produces its behavioral effects through interactions with neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). α4β2 nAChRs are the most abundant in mammalian brain, and converging evidence shows that this subtype mediates the rewarding and reinforcing effects of nicotine. A number of rare variants in the CHRNA4 gene that encode the α4 nAChR subunit have been identified in human subjects and appear to be underrepresented in a cohort of smokers. We compared three of these variants (α4R336C, α4P451L, and α4R487Q) to the common variant to determine their effects on α4β2 nAChR pharmacology. We examined [(3)H]epibatidine binding, interacting proteins, and phosphorylation of the α4 nAChR subunit with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in HEK 293 cells and voltage-clamp electrophysiology in Xenopus laevis oocytes. We observed significant effects of the α4 variants on nAChR expression, subcellular distribution, and sensitivity to nicotine-induced receptor upregulation. Proteomic analysis of immunopurified α4β2 nAChRs incorporating the rare variants identified considerable differences in the intracellular interactomes due to these single amino acid substitutions. Electrophysiological characterization in X. laevis oocytes revealed alterations in the functional parameters of activation by nAChR agonists conferred by these α4 rare variants, as well as shifts in receptor function after incubation with nicotine. Taken together, these experiments suggest that genetic variation at CHRNA4 alters the assembly and expression of human α4β2 nAChRs, resulting in receptors that are more sensitive to nicotine exposure than those assembled with the common α4 variant. The changes in nAChR pharmacology could contribute to differences in responses to smoked nicotine in individuals harboring these rare variants.

  13. Association of genetic variants in the receptor for advanced glycation end products gene with diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weihong; Yang, Jingyun; Sui, Wenda; Qu, Bin; Huang, Ping; Chen, Youxin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a major sight-threatening diabetic complication. Previous studies have examined the association of DR with multiple genetic variants in the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) gene, with inconsistent results. Objective: To perform a systematic literature search and conduct meta-analyses to examine the association of genetic variants in RAGE with DR. Data sources: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, Google Scholar, and HuGE. Study eligibility criteria and participants: Studies were on human subjects; the studies were case–control ones and included subjects who had DR and those who did not have DR; and the studies provided genotype data for genetic variants in RAGE, separately for subjects who had and did not have DR, or provided odds ratios (ORs) and the 95% confidence intervals (CIs), or provided sufficient data for the calculation of OR and the 95% CI. Study appraisal and synthesis methods: We used OR as a measure of association, and used random-effects model in all the meta-analyses. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed using I2, and publication bias was evaluated using Egger test. Results: A total of 13 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in our analyses. We found that Gly82Ser was significantly associated with DR (OR = 2.40, 95% CI: 1.46–3.97; P = 0.001) using a recessive model. -374T/A also showed significant association with DR under a dominant model (OR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.03–1.43; P = 0.023). We did not find a significant association of DR with other genetic variants in RAGE. Limitations: The number of included studies is small for some genetic variants; duration of diabetes varied across studies; most studies were conducted in Asia; and it is not clear whether the observed association can be generalized to other ethnicities; and we could not control for other potential confounding factors. Conclusions and implications of key findings: We found that Gly82Ser in RAGE

  14. Variant Ionotropic Receptors in the Malaria Vector Mosquito Anopheles gambiae Tuned to Amines and Carboxylic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Pitts, R. Jason; Derryberry, Stephen L.; Zhang, Zhiwei; Zwiebel, Laurence J.

    2017-01-01

    The principal Afrotropical human malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, remains a significant threat to global health. A critical component in the transmission of malaria is the ability of An. gambiae females to detect and respond to human-derived chemical kairomones in their search for blood meal hosts. The basis for host odor responses resides in olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) that express chemoreceptors encoded by large gene families, including the odorant receptors (ORs) and the variant ionotropic receptors (IRs). While ORs have been the focus of extensive investigation, functional IR complexes and the chemical compounds that activate them have not been identified in An. gambiae. Here we report the transcriptional profiles and functional characterization of three An. gambiae IR (AgIr) complexes that specifically respond to amines or carboxylic acids - two classes of semiochemicals that have been implicated in mediating host-seeking by adult females but are not known to activate An. gambiae ORs (AgOrs). Our results suggest that AgIrs play critical roles in the detection and behavioral responses to important classes of host odors that are underrepresented in the AgOr chemical space. PMID:28067294

  15. Differential expression and HIV-1 regulation of μ-opioid receptor splice variants across human central nervous system cell types.

    PubMed

    Dever, Seth M; Xu, Ruqiang; Fitting, Sylvia; Knapp, Pamela E; Hauser, Kurt F

    2012-06-01

    The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) is known to undergo extensive alternative splicing as numerous splice variants of MOR have been identified. However, the functional significance of MOR variants, as well as how splice variants other than MOR-1 might differentially regulate human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS), or elsewhere, has largely been ignored. Our findings suggest that there are specific differences in the MOR variant expression profile among CNS cell types, and that the expression levels of these variants are differentially regulated by HIV-1. While MOR-1A mRNA was detected in astroglia, microglia, and neurons, MOR-1 and MOR-1X were only found in astroglia. Expression of the various forms of MOR along with the chimeric G protein qi5 in HEK-293T cells resulted in differences in calcium/NFAT signaling with morphine treatment, suggesting that MOR variant expression might underlie functional differences in MOR-effector coupling and intracellular signaling across different cell types. Furthermore, the data suggest that the expression of MOR-1 and other MOR variants may also be differentially regulated in the brains of HIV-infected subjects with varying levels of neurocognitive impairment. Overall, the results reveal an unexpected finding that MOR-1 may not be the predominant form of MOR expressed by some CNS cell types and that other splice variants of MOR-1, with possible differing functions, may contribute to the diversity of MOR-related processes in the CNS.

  16. Salivary duct carcinoma: the predominance of apocrine morphology, prevalence of histologic variants, and androgen receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lindsay; Thompson, Lester D R; Seethala, Raja R; Weinreb, Ilan; Assaad, Adel M; Tuluc, Madalina; Ud Din, Nasir; Purgina, Bibianna; Lai, Chi; Griffith, Christopher C; Chiosea, Simion I

    2015-05-01

    Salivary duct carcinoma (SDC) is a prototypic aggressive salivary gland carcinoma. Our aim is to determine the prevalence of histologic variants (micropapillary, basal-like) and androgen receptor (AR) expression in a large multi-institutional series of SDC. AR status was determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Most SDCs were characterized by an apocrine phenotype and AR expression. Cases with a nonapocrine phenotype and AR-negative status were studied by additional IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization for ETV6 or MYB/NFIB. The diagnosis of SDC was confirmed in 187 of 199 (94%) cases. Variant morphologies were identified in 12 cases: micropapillary (n=6), sarcomatoid (n=3), mucinous (n=2), and basal-like (n=1). AR IHC was performed in 183 cases, of which 179 (97.8%) showed AR expression. On the basis of morphologic appearance and results of additional studies, 12 cases were reclassified as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (n=4), epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma with high-grade transformation (HGT) (n=2), myoepithelial carcinoma (n=2), mammary analogue secretory carcinoma, high grade (ETV6 translocated; n=1), adenoid cystic carcinoma with HGT (n=1), acinic cell carcinoma with HGT (n=1), and adenosquamous carcinoma (n=1). AR-negative SDC is extremely rare, and the majority of such cases are more accurately classified as other entities. HGTs of other salivary carcinomas and squamous cell carcinoma are the most common mimics of SDC. SDCs with variant morphologies still show at least a minor component of conventional apocrine appearance. Thus, apocrine morphology defines SDC.

  17. Variants in the Dopamine-4-Receptor Gene Promoter Are Not Associated with Sensation Seeking in Skiers

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Cynthia J.; Rajala, Amelia K.; Carlson, Scott R.; Rupert, Jim L.

    2014-01-01

    Sensation seeking is a personality trait that has been associated with disinhibited behaviours including substance use and gambling, but also with high-risk sport practices including skydiving, paragliding, and downhill skiing. Twin studies have shown that sensation seeking is moderately heritable, and candidate genes encoding components involved in dopaminergic transmission have been investigated as contributing to this type of behaviour. To determine whether variants in the regulatory regions of the dopamine-4-receptor gene (DRD4) influenced sport-specific sensation seeking, we analyzed five polymorphisms (−1106T/C, −906T/C, −809G/A, −291C/T, 120-bp duplication) in the promoter region of the gene in a cohort of skiers and snowboarders (n = 599) that represented a broad range of sensation seeking behaviours. We grouped subjects by genotype at each of the five loci and compared impulsive sensation seeking and domain-specific (skiing) sensation seeking between groups. There were no significant associations between genotype(s) and general or domain-specific sensation seeking in the skiers and snowboarders, suggesting that while DRD4 has previously been implicated in sensation seeking, the promoter variants investigated in this study do not contribute to sensation seeking in this athlete population. PMID:24691022

  18. Autism gene variant causes hyperserotonemia, serotonin receptor hypersensitivity, social impairment and repetitive behavior.

    PubMed

    Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Muller, Christopher L; Iwamoto, Hideki; Sauer, Jennifer E; Owens, W Anthony; Shah, Charisma R; Cohen, Jordan; Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Jessen, Tammy; Thompson, Brent J; Ye, Ran; Kerr, Travis M; Carneiro, Ana M; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Sanders-Bush, Elaine; McMahon, Douglas G; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Daws, Lynette C; Sutcliffe, James S; Blakely, Randy D

    2012-04-03

    Fifty years ago, increased whole-blood serotonin levels, or hyperserotonemia, first linked disrupted 5-HT homeostasis to Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs). The 5-HT transporter (SERT) gene (SLC6A4) has been associated with whole blood 5-HT levels and ASD susceptibility. Previously, we identified multiple gain-of-function SERT coding variants in children with ASD. Here we establish that transgenic mice expressing the most common of these variants, SERT Ala56, exhibit elevated, p38 MAPK-dependent transporter phosphorylation, enhanced 5-HT clearance rates and hyperserotonemia. These effects are accompanied by altered basal firing of raphe 5-HT neurons, as well as 5HT(1A) and 5HT(2A) receptor hypersensitivity. Strikingly, SERT Ala56 mice display alterations in social function, communication, and repetitive behavior. Our efforts provide strong support for the hypothesis that altered 5-HT homeostasis can impact risk for ASD traits and provide a model with construct and face validity that can support further analysis of ASD mechanisms and potentially novel treatments.

  19. Variants in the dopamine-4-receptor gene promoter are not associated with sensation seeking in skiers.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Cynthia J; Rajala, Amelia K; Carlson, Scott R; Rupert, Jim L

    2014-01-01

    Sensation seeking is a personality trait that has been associated with disinhibited behaviours including substance use and gambling, but also with high-risk sport practices including skydiving, paragliding, and downhill skiing. Twin studies have shown that sensation seeking is moderately heritable, and candidate genes encoding components involved in dopaminergic transmission have been investigated as contributing to this type of behaviour. To determine whether variants in the regulatory regions of the dopamine-4-receptor gene (DRD4) influenced sport-specific sensation seeking, we analyzed five polymorphisms (-1106T/C, -906T/C, -809G/A, -291C/T, 120-bp duplication) in the promoter region of the gene in a cohort of skiers and snowboarders (n = 599) that represented a broad range of sensation seeking behaviours. We grouped subjects by genotype at each of the five loci and compared impulsive sensation seeking and domain-specific (skiing) sensation seeking between groups. There were no significant associations between genotype(s) and general or domain-specific sensation seeking in the skiers and snowboarders, suggesting that while DRD4 has previously been implicated in sensation seeking, the promoter variants investigated in this study do not contribute to sensation seeking in this athlete population.

  20. Isoform/variant mRNAs for sex steroid hormone receptors in humans.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Shuji; Shoda, Tomoko; Kato, Junzo; Hoshi, Kazuhiko

    2003-04-01

    The open reading frames of human sex steroid hormone receptors (hSSHRs) are composed of eight exons. In addition, the presence of various exons - including 5'-untranslated exons, alternative coding exons and novel 'intronic' exons - has been demonstrated in the genes encoding hSSHRs. The isoform/variant hSSHR mRNAs generated from thes e exons can be tentatively classified into seven types. In type 1, different mRNAs are generated with the use of alternative transcription start sites. In type 2, one or more exons are skipped. In type 3, one or more exons are duplicated. In type 4, distinct mRNAs containing different 5'-untranslated exon(s) are synthesized. In type 5, distinct mRNAs possessing different coding exon(s) are generated. In type 6, mRNA is synthesized by intronic exons and coding exons 4/5-8. In type 7, mRNA with insertion of intronic exon(s) is generated. Here, we review the isoform/variant hSSHR mRNAs and the structure of the genes encoding them.

  1. A novel splice variant of folate receptor 4 predominantly expressed in regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are required for proper maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. Folate receptor 4 (FR4) is expressed at high levels in transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β)-induced Tregs and natural Tregs. Moreover, antibody-mediated targeting of FR4 is sufficient to mediate Treg depletion. Results In this study, we describe a novel FR4 transcript variant, FR4D3, in which exon 3 is deleted. The mRNA of FR4D3 encodes a FR4 variant truncated by 189 bp. FR4D3 was found to be predominantly expressed in CD4+CD25+ Treg cells. Overexpression of FR4D3 in CD4+CD25+ Treg cells in vitro stimulated proliferation, which may modulate the ability of these cells to bind and incorporate folic acid. Conclusions Our results suggested that high levels of FR4D3 may be critical to support the substantial proliferative capacity of Treg cells. PMID:22694797

  2. Real-time optical recording of β1-adrenergic receptor activation reveals supersensitivity of the Arg389 variant to carvedilol

    PubMed Central

    Rochais, Francesca; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Bünemann, Moritz; Lohse, Martin J.; Engelhardt, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Antagonists of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) have become a main therapeutic regimen for the treatment of heart failure even though the mechanisms of their beneficial effects are still poorly understood. Here, we used fluorescent resonance energy transfer–based (FRET-based) approaches to directly monitor activation of the β1-AR and downstream signaling. While the commonly used β-AR antagonists metoprolol, bisoprolol, and carvedilol displayed varying degrees of inverse agonism on the Gly389 variant of the receptor (i.e., actively switching off the β1-AR), surprisingly, only carvedilol showed very specific and marked inverse agonist effects on the more frequent Arg389 variant. These specific effects of carvedilol on the Arg389 variant of the β1-AR were also seen for control of beating frequency in rat cardiac myocytes expressing the 2 receptor variants. This FRET sensor permitted direct observation of activation of the β1-AR in living cells in real time. It revealed that β1-AR variants dramatically differ in their responses to diverse beta blockers, with possible consequences for their clinical use. PMID:17200720

  3. Expression of multiple membrane-associated phospholipase A1 beta transcript variants and lysophosphatidic acid receptors in Ewing tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Schmiedel, Benjamin Joachim; Hutter, Christoph; Hesse, Manuela; Staege, Martin Sebastian

    2011-10-01

    The prognosis for patients with advanced stages of Ewing family tumors (EFT) is very poor. EFT express high levels of phosphatidic acid specific membrane-associated phospholipase A1 beta (lipase I, LIPI). LIPI is a cancer/testis antigen and the high tumor specificity suggests that LIPI might be an attractive target for new diagnostic and/or therapeutic developments. By using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we observed simultaneous presence of multiple LIPI transcript variants in EFT. We cloned and sequenced these transcript variants from EFT cell lines. Sequence analysis indicated that all transcript variants were derived by alternative splicing. Homology modeling of corresponding protein structures suggested that different transcript variants differ in their regulatory lid domains. In addition, expression of receptors for lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was analyzed in a panel of EFT cell lines by RT-PCR. We observed that EFT cell lines expressed high levels of LPA receptors. Different LIPI transcript variants present in EFT might be involved in the pathogenesis of EFT by signaling via these LPA receptors.

  4. Serotonin (5-HT) receptor 5A sequence variants affect human plasma triglyceride levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Smith, E. M.; Baye, T. M.; Eckert, J. V.; Abraham, L. J.; Moses, E. K.; Kissebah, A. H.; Martin, L. J.

    2010-01-01

    Neurotransmitters such as serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) work closely with leptin and insulin to fine-tune the metabolic and neuroendocrine responses to dietary intake. Losing the sensitivity to excess food intake can lead to obesity, diabetes, and a multitude of behavioral disorders. It is largely unclear how different serotonin receptor subtypes respond to and integrate metabolic signals and which genetic variations in these receptor genes lead to individual differences in susceptibility to metabolic disorders. In an obese cohort of families of Northern European descent (n = 2,209), the serotonin type 5A receptor gene, HTR5A, was identified as a prominent factor affecting plasma levels of triglycerides (TG), supported by our data from both genome-wide linkage and targeted association analyses using 28 publicly available and 12 newly discovered single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), of which 3 were strongly associated with plasma TG levels (P < 0.00125). Bayesian quantitative trait nucleotide (BQTN) analysis identified a putative causal promoter SNP (rs3734967) with substantial posterior probability (P = 0.59). Functional analysis of rs3734967 by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed distinct binding patterns of the two alleles of this SNP with nuclear proteins from glioma cell lines. In conclusion, sequence variants in HTR5A are strongly associated with high plasma levels of TG in a Northern European population, suggesting a novel role of the serotonin receptor system in humans. This suggests a potential brain-specific regulation of plasma TG levels, possibly by alteration of the expression of HTR5A. PMID:20388841

  5. Melanocortin-1 receptor gene variants determine the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer independently of fair skin and red hair.

    PubMed

    Bastiaens, M T; ter Huurne, J A; Kielich, C; Gruis, N A; Westendorp, R G; Vermeer, B J; Bavinck, J N

    2001-04-01

    Melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene variants are associated with fair skin and red hair and, independently of these, with cutaneous malignant melanoma. The association of MC1R gene variants with nonmelanoma skin cancer is largely unknown. A total of 838 subjects were included in the present study: 453 patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer and 385 subjects with no skin cancer. The coding sequence of the human MC1R gene was tested using single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis followed by sequencing of unknown variants. Risk of skin cancer dependent on the various MC1R gene variants was estimated using the exposure odds ratio. We investigated whether subjects with MC1R variant alleles were at increased risk of developing nonmelanoma skin cancer and, if so, whether this increased risk was mediated by fair skin and red hair. A total of 27 MC1R gene variants were found. The number of carriers of one, two, or three MC1R gene variants was 379 (45.2%), 208 (24.8%), and 7 (0.9%), respectively. A strong association between MC1R gene variants and fair skin and red hair was established, especially the variants Arg151Cys and Arg160Trp (P < .0001). Carriers of two variant alleles were at increased risk for developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (odds ratio 3.77; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.11-6.78), nodular basal cell carcinoma (odds ratio 2.26; 95% CI 1.45-3.52), and superficial multifocal basal cell carcinoma (odds ratio 3.43; 95% CI 1.92-6.15), compared with carriers of two wild-type alleles. Carriers of one variant allele had half the risk. The highest relative risks of nonmelanoma skin cancer were found in carriers of the Asp84Glu, His260Pro, and Asp294His variant alleles, and the risk was only slightly lower for carriers of the Val60Leu, Val92Met, Arg142His, Arg151Cys, and Arg160Trp variant alleles. When subjects were stratified by skin type and hair color, analysis showed that these factors did not materially change the relative risks. These findings

  6. Natural variants of cytotoxic epitopes are T-cell receptor antagonists for antiviral cytotoxic T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoletti, Antonio; Sette, Alessandro; Chisari, Francis V.; Penna, Amalia; Levrero, Massimo; Carli, Marco De; Fiaccadori, Franco; Ferrari, Carlo

    1994-06-01

    IT has been suggested that mutations within immunodominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes may be exploited by viruses to evade protective immune responses critical for clearance1-4. Viral escape could originate from passive mechanisms, such as mutations within crucial CTL epitopes, either affecting major histocompatibility complex binding or T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognition. Additionally, it has recently been shown that substitutions of TCR contact sites can yield analogue peptides that can still interact with the T-cell receptor but be unable to deliver a full stimulatory signal, thus inducing anergy5 or acting as an antagonist for the TCR6-8. We report here that hepatitis B virus isolates derived from two chronically infected patients display variant epitopes that act as natural TCR antagonists with the capacity to inhibit the CTL response to the wild-type epitope. During natural infection, TCR antagonist mutations of CTL epitopes could contribute to the development of viral persistence, especially if the antiviral CTL response is monospecific or the epitope is strongly immunodominant.

  7. Effects of genetic variants of CCR5 chemokine receptors on oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tanyel, C R; Cincin, Z B; Gokcen-Rohlig, B; Bektas-Kayhan, K; Unur, M; Cakmakoglu, B

    2013-11-18

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of genetic variants of the chemokine C-C motif receptor (CCR5) in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). A total of 127 patients diagnosed with OSCC and 104 healthy individuals were included in the study. The polymorphisms CCR5 59029 and CCR5-delta32 were assessed with the polymerase chain reaction-restricted fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method from peripheral blood samples of both groups. There was a statistically significant difference between the control and patient groups for CCR5 59029 A/G genotypes (P < 0.01). Individuals carrying the CCR5 59029 G allele (GG +AG genotypes) had a 2.84-fold increased risk for OSCC (P < 0.0001), and the CCR5 59029 AA genotype frequency was higher in the control group than in the patient group (P < 0.0001). The CCR5-delta 32 genotype frequencies did not differ significantly between controls and cases (P > 0.05). CCR5 59029 GG and CCR5-delta32 DD + ID genotype frequencies were significantly increased in Grade II-III OSCC patients compared with Grade I-II OSCC patients. In conclusion, these results suggested that the G allele of the CCR5 59029 polymorphism might be a risk factor due to the loss of receptor function that might cause increased inflammation leading to the development of OSCC.

  8. An imaging agent to detect androgen receptor and its active splice variants in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Yusuke; Tien, Amy H.; Pan, Jinhe; Leung, Jacky K.; Banuelos, Carmen A.; Jian, Kunzhong; Wang, Jun; Mawji, Nasrin R.; Fernandez, Javier Garcia; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Andersen, Raymond J.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2016-01-01

    Constitutively active splice variants of androgen receptor (AR-Vs) lacking ligand-binding domain (LBD) are a mechanism of resistance to androgen receptor LBD–targeted (AR LBD–targeted) therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). There is a strong unmet clinical need to identify prostate cancer patients with AR-V–positive lesions to determine whether they will benefit from further AR LBD–targeting therapies or should receive taxanes or investigational drugs like EPI-506 or galeterone. Both EPI-506 (NCT02606123) and galeterone (NCT02438007) are in clinical trials and are proposed to have efficacy against lesions that are positive for AR-Vs. AR activation function-1 (AF-1) is common to the N-terminal domains of full-length AR and AR-Vs. Here, we provide proof of concept for developing imaging compounds that directly bind AR AF-1 to detect both AR-Vs and full-length AR. 123I-EPI-002 had specific binding to AR AF-1, which enabled direct visualization of CRPC xenografts that express full-length AR and AR-Vs. Our findings highlight the potential of 123I-EPI-002 as an imaging agent for the detection of full-length AR and AR-Vs in CRPC. PMID:27525313

  9. Lipid rafts of mouse liver contain nonextended and extended acetylcholinesterase variants along with M3 muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, María Fernanda; Cabezas-Herrera, Juan; Campoy, F Javier; Muñoz-Delgado, Encarnación; Vidal, Cecilio J

    2017-02-01

    The observation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) type H (AChEH), which is the predominant AChE variant in visceral organs and immune cells, in lipid rafts of muscle supports functional reasons for the raft targeting of glypiated AChEH The search for these reasons revealed that liver AChE activity is mostly confined to rafts and that the liver is able to make N-extended AChE variants and target them to rafts. These results prompted us to test whether AChE and muscarinic receptors existed in the same raft. Isolation of flotillin-2-rich raft fractions by their buoyancy in sucrose gradients, followed by immunoadsorption and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry application, gave the following results: 1) most hepatic AChE activity emanates from AChE-H mRNA, and its product, glypiated AChEH, accumulates in rafts; 2) N-extended N-AChE readthrough variant, nonglypiated N-AChEH, and N-AChE tailed variant were all identified in liver rafts; and 3) M3 AChRs were observed in rafts, and coprecipitation of raft-confined N-AChE and M3 receptors by using anti-M3 antibodies showed that enzyme and receptor reside in the same raft unit. A raft domain that harbors tightly packed muscarinic receptor and AChE may represent a molecular device that, by means of which, the intensity and duration of cholinergic inputs are regulated.-Montenegro, M. F., Cabezas-Herrera, J., Campoy, F. J., Muñoz-Delgado, E., Vidal, C. J. Lipid rafts of mouse liver contain nonextended and extended acetylcholinesterase variants along with M3 muscarinic receptors.

  10. Studies on responsiveness of hepatoma cells to catecholamines. III. Difference between the receptor-adenylate cyclase regulating systems in AH130 cells and cultured normal rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Sanae, F; Matsunaga, T; Miyamoto, K; Koshiura, R

    1986-10-01

    The responsiveness to three beta-adrenergic agonists, isoproterenol (IPN), epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) in AH13O cells was examined compared with that in normal rat liver cells which were cultured for 24 hr after collagenase digestion. As regards to the activation of adenylate cyclase in the cell homogenates, the relative affinity of the three agonists was in order of IPN greater than NE greater than Epi in AH130 cells and IPN greater than Epi greater than NE in cultured normal liver cells. While the efficacies of the three agonists were similar in cultured liver cells, those of NE and Epi were markedly lower than that of IPN in AH13O cells and were increased to the similar level of IPN by pretreatment with phentolamine, but not with prazosin. Clonidine inhibited the activation of adenylate cyclase by IPN in AH13O cells. When cells were preincubated with islet-activating protein (IAP), the activity of adenylate cyclase in the presence or absence of agonist in both cell lines increased. In IAP-treated AH13O cells, the efficacies of NE and Epi became close to that of IPN. Adenylate cyclase in IAP-treated AH13O cells was activated by GTP in a dose-dependent manner, but that in IAP-treated cultured liver cells was not. In the presence of IPN, biphasic (activatory and inhibitory) effects of GTP on the cyclase were observed, and the inhibitory phase was eliminated by the IAP-treatment in both cell lines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Contribution of Priority PAHs and POPs to Ah Receptor-Mediated Activities in Sediment Samples from the River Elbe Estuary, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Otte, Jens C.; Keiter, Steffen; Faßbender, Christopher; Higley, Eric B.; Rocha, Paula Suares; Brinkmann, Markus; Wahrendorf, Dierk-Steffen; Manz, Werner; Wetzel, Markus A.; Braunbeck, Thomas; Giesy, John P.; Hecker, Markus; Hollert, Henner

    2013-01-01

    The estuary of the River Elbe between Hamburg and the North Sea (Germany) is a sink for contaminated sediment and suspended particulate matter (SPM). One major concern is the effect of human activities on the hydrodynamics, particularly the intensive dredging activities in this area that may result in remobilization of sediment-bound pollutants. The aim of this study was to identify pollutants contributing to the toxicological risk associated with re-suspension of sediments in the Elbe Estuary by use of an effect-directed analysis that combines chemical and biological analyses in with specific fractionation techniques. Sediments were collected from sites along the Elbe Estuary and a site from a small harbor basin of the Elbe Estuary that is known to be polluted. The sixteen priority EPA-PAHs were quantified in organic extracts of sediments. In addition, dioxin equivalents of sediments were investigated by use of the 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase assay with RTL-W1 cells and the Ah receptor-mediated luciferase transactivation assay with H4IIE-luc cells. Quantification of the 16 priority PAHs revealed that sediments were moderately contaminated at all of the sites in the Elbe River Estuary (<0.02–0.906 µg/g dw). Sediments contained relatively small concentrations of dioxin equivalents (Bio-TEQ) with concentrations ranging from 15.5 to 322 pg/g dw, which were significantly correlated with dioxin equivalents calculated based on toxicity reference values and concentrations of PAH. The concentration of Bio-TEQ at the reference site exceeded 200,000 pg/g dw. In a potency balance the 16 PAHs explained between 47 and 118% of the Bio-TEQ in the luciferase assay, which can be explained by the constant input of PAHs bound to SPM from the upper course of the Elbe River into its estuary. Successful identification of a significant portion of dioxin-like activity to priority PAHs in complex environmental samples such as sediments has rarely been reported. PMID:24146763

  12. Triclosan activates aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent apoptosis and affects Cyp1a1 and Cyp1b1 expression in mouse neocortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Szychowski, Konrad A; Wnuk, Agnieszka; Kajta, Małgorzata; Wójtowicz, Anna K

    2016-11-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an antimicrobial agent that is used extensively in personal care and in sanitizing products, such as soaps, toothpastes, and hair products. A number of studies have revealed the presence of TCS in human tissues, such as fat, liver and brain, in addition to blood and breast milk. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of TCS on AhR and Cyp1a1/Cyp1b1 signaling in mouse neocortical neurons in primary cultures. In addition to the use of selective ligands and siRNAs, expression levels of mRNA and proteins as well as caspase-3 activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release have been measured. We also studied the involvement of the AhR in TCS-induced LDH release and caspase-3 activation as well as the effect of TCS on ROS generation. Cultures of neocortical neurons were prepared from Swiss mouse embryos on day 15/16 of gestation. The cells were cultured in phenol red-free Neurobasal medium with B27 and glutamine, and the neurons were exposed to 1 and 10µM TCS. Our experiments showed that the expression of AhR and Cyp1a1 mRNA decreased in cells exposed to 10µM TCS for 3 or 6h. In the case of Cyp1b1, mRNA expression remained unchanged compared with the control group following 3h of exposure to TCS, but after 6h, the mRNA expression of Cyp1b1 was decreased. Our results confirmed that the AhR is involved in the TCS mechanism of action, and our data demonstrated that after the cells were transfected with AhR siRNA, the cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic properties of TCS were decreased. The decrease in Cyp1a1 mRNA and protein expression levels accompanied by a decrease in its activity. The stimulation of Cyp1a1 activity produced by the application of an AhR agonist (βNF) was attenuated by TCS, whereas the addition of AhR antagonist (αNF) reversed the inhibitory effects of TCS. In our experiments, TCS diminished Cyp1b1 mRNA and enhanced its protein expression. In case of Cyp1a1 we observed

  13. Co-Expression of Wild-Type P2X7R with Gln460Arg Variant Alters Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Aprile-Garcia, Fernando; Metzger, Michael W.; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Stadler, Herbert; Acuña, Matías; Liberman, Ana C.; Senin, Sergio A.; Gerez, Juan; Hoijman, Esteban; Refojo, Damian; Mitkovski, Mišo; Panhuysen, Markus; Stühmer, Walter; Holsboer, Florian; Deussing, Jan M.; Arzt, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor is a member of the P2X family of ligand-gated ion channels. A single-nucleotide polymorphism leading to a glutamine (Gln) by arginine (Arg) substitution at codon 460 of the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has been associated with mood disorders. No change in function (loss or gain) has been described for this SNP so far. Here we show that although the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant per se is not compromised in its function, co-expression of wild-type P2X7R with P2X7R-Gln460Arg impairs receptor function with respect to calcium influx, channel currents and intracellular signaling in vitro. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation and FRET studies show that the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant physically interacts with P2X7R-WT. Specific silencing of either the normal or polymorphic variant rescues the heterozygous loss of function phenotype and restores normal function. The described loss of function due to co-expression, unique for mutations in the P2RX7 gene so far, explains the mechanism by which the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant affects the normal function of the channel and may represent a mechanism of action for other mutations. PMID:26986975

  14. Acquired resistance to Ah receptor agonists in a population of Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) inhabiting a marine superfund site: in vivo and in vitro studies on the inducibility of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bello, S M; Franks, D G; Stegeman, J J; Hahn, M E

    2001-03-01

    New Bedford Harbor (NBH), MA, is a federal Superfund site that is heavily contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs), including some potent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. A population of Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) continues to inhabit this site, despite accumulating extraordinarily high concentrations of PCBs (272 microg/g dry weight). To determine if NBH killifish have developed resistance to HAHs that act through the AhR, we examined the inducibility of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1), UDP glucuronosyl transferase (UGT), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in fish from NBH and a reference site, Scorton Creek (SC, Cape Cod, MA; PCB concentrations 0.177 microg/g dry weight). 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) induced CYP1A1 mRNA, protein, and activity in SC fish in all tissues examined (liver, heart, gut, gill, kidney, spleen, and gonad). In contrast, NBH fish expressed low levels of CYP1A1 and showed no induction of CYP1A1 mRNA, protein, or activity by TCDF, or induction that was lower in magnitude or required higher doses of inducer. p-Nitrophenol UGT activity was not induced by TCDF in either population, while GST activity with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as substrate was induced only in NBH fish in one experiment. Inducibility of CYP1A1 by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or beta-naphthoflavone (BNF) was measured in primary hepatocyte cultures prepared from SC and NBH fish. TCDD induced CYP1A1 activity (ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase) to the same degree in hepatocytes from both populations, demonstrating the functionality of the AhR signaling pathway in NBH fish. However, hepatocytes from NBH fish were 14-fold less sensitive to TCDD than were those from SC fish. The nonhalogenated AhR agonist BNF also induced CYP1A1 in cells from both populations, although with only a 3-fold difference in sensitivity (NBH < SC). These results indicate that chronic exposure to high

  15. A toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) variant is associated with asthma severity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Qin-Fu; Zhao, Yu-Miao; Li, Dan-Dan; Shi, Xiao-Ya; Zhao, Jun-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a complex airways disease resulting from the input of both biological and environmental factors. Previous studies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which produces a protein involved in regulating T cell populations, have presented conflicting results regarding its role in asthma severity. In the current study, individuals with asthma were genotyped for variants of TLR4, and the genotypes were compared with asthma severity and T cell subpopulations. TLR4 rs11536879 (A>G) and rs1927907 (G>A) genotypes were determined in 350 asthma patients using TaqMan. Asthma severity was graded by clinical symptoms, and blood markers and lung function measures were also collected. T cell subpopulations were identified from peripheral blood by flow cytometry. No significant correlations were observed between genotypes at TLR4 rs11536879 or rs1927907 and eosinophil counts, total serum IgE, serum hypersensitive C-reactive protein, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%), or FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) in asthma patients (P > 0.05). However, the GG genotype of rs1927907 was correlated with higher asthma severity (P < 0.05). No associations were detected between genotypes at rs11536879 or rs1927907 and CD4+CD25high regulatory T cell counts in peripheral blood from asthmatic patients (P > 0.05), but the rs1927907 genotype was associated with TLR4 expression on the surface of CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells (P < 0.05). Therefore, the TLR4 variant rs1927907 appears to be related to asthma severity and TLR4 expression on the surface of CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells, suggesting the potential influence of TLR4 on T cell population balances. PMID:26221339

  16. Vitamin D Receptor TaqI Gene Variant in Exon 9 and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Risk

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Morteza; Abdi Rad, Isa; Hosseini Jazani, Nima; Nanbakhsh, Fariba

    2013-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is known as a metabolic disorder. The results of recent studies implied that vitamin D receptor (VDR) genetic variants may impact PCOS and insulin resistance in women with PCOS. The aim of the present study was to determine the VDR TaqI gene variant in exon 9 (T/C) (rs731236) in normal controls and patients with PCOS for the first time in Iranian Azeri women. Materials and Methods: In this case control study between April 2011 and June 2012, a total of 76 women aged 18-40 years (38 patients with PCOS and 38 healthy women as normal controls) participated. Genotypes of VDR TaqI in exon 9 (T/C) (rs731236) were determined using the PCR-RFLP method. Results: The frequencies of VDR TaqI T anc C alleles were 0.605 and 0.395 in cases and 0.697 and 0.303 in controls. Also, the genotypic frequencies of VDR TaqI were 16) (42.11), 14(36.84), and 8(21.05) in cases, and 17(44.74), 19(50), and 2(5.26) in controls for TT, TC and CC genotypes respectively. There was no difference in genotype and allele frequencies between PCOS and controls (p value>0.05) with the exception of the CC genotype (p value=0.04). Conclusion: This report, a first of its own kind in Iranian Azeri patients, suggests that the CC genotype of VDR TaqI in exon 9 (rs731236) is associated with PCOS. PMID:24520473

  17. Racial Variation in Toll-like Receptor Variants Among Women With Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Brandie D.; Darville, Toni; Ferrell, Robert E.; Ness, Roberta B.; Haggerty, Catherine L.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Racial disparities exist in gynecological diseases. Variations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes may alter signaling following microbial recognition. Methods. We explored genotypic differences in 6 functional variants in 4 TLR genes (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR6) and the adaptor molecule TIRAP between 205 African American women and 51 white women with clinically suspected pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). A permutated P < .007 was used to assess significance. Associations between race and endometritis and/or upper genital tract infection (UGTI) were explored. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results. The TT genotype for TLR1 rs5743618, the GG genotype for TLR1 rs4833095, the CC genotype for TLR2 rs3804099, the TLR6 rs5743810 T allele, and the CC genotype for TIRAP rs8177374 significantly differed between races (P < .007). African American race was associated with endometritis and/or UGTI (OR, 4.2 [95% CI, 2.0–8.7]; P = .01). Among African Americans, the TLR6 rs5743810 T allele significantly decreased endometritis and/or UGTI (OR, 0.4 [95% CI, .2–.9]; P = .04). Additionally, rs5743618, rs4833095, and rs8177374 increased endometritis and/or UGTI, albeit not significantly. Conclusions. Among women with PID, TLR variants that increase inflammation are associated with African American race and may mediate the relationship between race and endometritis and/or UGTI. PMID:23255565

  18. NF-κB and Androgen Receptor Variant Expression Correlate with Human BPH progression

    PubMed Central

    Austin, David C; Strand, Douglas W; Love, Harold L; Franco, Omar E; Jang, Alex; Grabowska, Magdalena M; Miller, Nicole L; Hameed, Omar; Clark, Peter E; Fowke, Jay H; Matusik, Robert J; Jin, Ren J; Hayward, Simon W

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common, chronic progressive disease. Inflammation is associated with prostatic enlargement and resistance to 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI) therapy. Activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway is linked to both inflammation and ligand-independent prostate cancer progression. Methods NF-κB activation and androgen receptor variant (AR-V) expression were quantified in transition zone tissue samples from patients with a wide range of AUASS from incidental BPH in patients treated for low grade, localized peripheral zone prostate cancer to advanced disease requiring surgical intervention. To further investigate these pathways, human prostatic stromal and epithelial cell lines were transduced with constitutively active or kinase dead forms of IKK2 to regulate canonical NF-κB activity. The effects on AR full length (AR-FL) and androgen-independent AR-V expression as well as cellular growth and differentiation were assessed. Results Canonical NF-κB signaling was found to be upregulated in late versus early stage BPH, and to be strongly associated with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Elevated expression of AR-variant 7 (AR-V7), but not other AR variants, was found in advanced BPH samples. Expression of AR-V7 significantly correlated with the patient AUASS and TRUS volume. Forced activation of canonical NF-κB in human prostatic epithelial and stromal cells resulted in elevated expression of both AR-FL and AR-V7, with concomitant ligand-independent activation of AR reporters. Activation of NF-κB and over expression of AR-V7 in human prostatic epithelial cells maintained cell viability in the face of 5ARI treatment. Conclusion Activation of NF-κB and AR-V7 in the prostate is associated with increased disease severity. AR-V7 expression is inducible in human prostate cells by forced activation of NF-κB resulting in resistance to 5ARI treatment, suggesting a potential mechanism by which patients may

  19. Dopamine D4 receptor, but not the ADHD-associated D4.7 variant, forms functional heteromers with the dopamine D2S receptor in the brain

    PubMed Central

    González, Sergio; Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Peper, Marcela; Lorenzo, Ramiro; Moreno, Estefanía; Ciruela, Francisco; Borycz, Janusz; Ortiz, Jordi; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; McCormick, Peter J.; Volkow, Nora D.; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Floran, Benjamin; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of the dopamine D4 receptor have been consistently associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However the functional significance of the risk polymorphism (variable number of tandem repeats in exon 3) is still unclear. Here we show that whereas the most frequent 4-repeat (D4.4) and the 2-repeat (D4.2) variants form functional heteromers with the short isoform of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2S), the 7-repeat risk allele (D4.7) does not. D2 receptor activation in the D2S-D4 receptor heteromer potentiates D4 receptor-mediated MAPK signaling in transfected cells and in the striatum, which did not occur in cells expressing D4.7 or in the striatum of knock-in mutant mice carrying the 7 repeats of the human D4.7 in the third intracellular loop of the D4 receptor. In the striatum D4 receptors are localized in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals, where they selectively modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission by interacting with D2S receptors. This interaction shows the same qualitative characteristics than the D2S-D4 receptor heteromer-mediated MAPK signaling and D2S receptor activation potentiates D4 receptor-mediated inibition of striatal glutamate release. It is therefore postulated that dysfunctional D2S-D4.7 heteromers may impair presynaptic dopaminergic control of corticostriatal glutamatergic neurotransmission and explain functional deficits associated with ADHD. PMID:21844870

  20. Expression of profibrotic growth factors and their receptors by mouse lung macrophages and fibroblasts under conditions of acute viral inflammation in influenza A/H5N1 virus.

    PubMed

    Anikina, A G; Shkurupii, V A; Potapova, O V; Kovner, A V; Shestopalov, A M

    2014-04-01

    Morphological signs of early interstitial fibrosis, developing under conditions of acute viral inflammation (postinfection days 1-14), were observed in C57Bl/6 mice infected with influenza A/H5N1 A/goose/Krasnoozerskoye/627/05 virus. The development of fibrosis was confirmed by an increase in the number of lung cells expressing TNF-α. These changes were recorded in the presence of a many-fold increase in the counts of macrophages and fibroblasts expressing FGF, EGF, and their receptors.

  1. Serotonin 5-HT2A receptor gene variants influence antidepressant response to repeated total sleep deprivation in bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Barbini, Barbara; Bernasconi, Alessandro; Fulgosi, Mara Cigala; Colombo, Cristina; Dallaspezia, Sara; Gavinelli, Chiara; Marino, Elena; Pirovano, Adele; Radaelli, Daniele; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2008-12-12

    5-HT2A receptor density in prefrontal cortex was associated with depression and suicide. 5-HT2A receptor gene polymorphism rs6313 was associated with 5-HT2A receptor binding potential, with the ability of individuals to use environmental support in order to prevent depression, and with sleep improvement after antidepressant treatment with mirtazapine. Studies on response to antidepressant drugs gave inconsistent results. Here we studied the effect of rs6313 on response to repeated total sleep deprivation (TSD) in 80 bipolar depressed inpatients treated with three consecutive TSD cycles (each one made of 36 h awake followed by a night of undisturbed sleep). All genotype groups showed comparable acute effects of the first TSD, but patients homozygotes for the T variant had better perceived and observed benefits from treatment than carriers of the C allele. These effects became significant after the first recovery night and during the following days, leading to a 36% higher final response rate (Hamilton depression rating<8). The higher density of postsynaptic excitatory 5-HT2A receptors in T/T homozygotes could have led to higher behavioural effects of increased 5-HT neurotransmission due to repeated TSD. Other possible mechanisms involve allostatic/homeostatic adaptation to sleep loss, and a different effect of the allele variants on epigenetic influences. Results confirm the interest for individual gene variants of the serotonin pathway in shaping clinical characteristics of depression and antidepressant response.

  2. Evolution of the hemagglutinin expressed by human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses circulating between 2008-2009 and 2013-2014 in Germany.

    PubMed

    Wedde, Marianne; Biere, Barbara; Wolff, Thorsten; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the evolution of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses circulating in Germany between 2008-2009 and 2013-2014. The phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) genes of both subtypes revealed similar evolution of the HA variants that were also seen worldwide with minor exceptions. The analysis showed seven distinct HA clades for A(H1N1)pdm09 and six HA clades for A(H3N2) viruses. Herald strains of both subtypes appeared sporadically since 2008-2009. Regarding A(H1N1)pdm09, herald strains of HA clade 3 and 4 were detected late in the 2009-2010 season. With respect to A(H3N2), we found herald strains of HA clade 3, 4 and 7 between 2009 and 2012. Those herald strains were predominantly seen for minor and not for major HA clades. Generally, amino acid substitutions were most frequently found in the globular domain, including substitutions near the antigenic sites or the receptor binding site. Differences between both influenza A subtypes were seen with respect to the position of the indicated substitutions in the HA. For A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, we found more substitutions in the stem region than in the antigenic sites. In contrast, in A(H3N2) viruses most changes were identified in the major antigenic sites and five changes of potential glycosylation sites were identified in the head of the HA monomer. Interestingly, we found in seasons with less influenza activity a relatively high increase of substitutions in the head of the HA in both subtypes. This might be explained by the fact that mutations under negative selection are subsequently compensated by secondary mutations to restore important functions e.g. receptor binding properties. A better knowledge of basic evolution strategies of influenza viruses will contribute to the refinement of predictive mathematical models for identifying novel antigenic drift variants.

  3. Angiotensin II receptor 1 gene variants are associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema risk.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tianbo; Ren, Yongchao; Zhu, Xikai; Li, Xun; Ouyang, Yongri; He, Xue; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Yuan; Kang, Longli; Yuan, Dongya

    2016-11-22

    Previous studies demonstrated that Angiotensin II Receptor 1 (AGTR1) may play an important role in the development of high-altitude pulmonary edema. We envisaged a role for AGTR1 gene variants in the pathogenesis of HAPE and investigated their potential associations with HAPE in a Han Chinese population. We genotyped seven AGTR1 polymorphisms in 267 patients with diagnosed HAPE and 304 controls and evaluated their association with risk of HAPE. Statistically significant associations were found for the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs275651 (p = 0.017; odds ratio [OR] = 0.65) and rs275652 (p = 0.016; OR = 0.64). Another SNP rs10941679 showed a marginally significant association after adjusting for age and sex in the additive genetic model (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.01-2.04, p = 0.040). Haplotype analysis confirmed that the haplotype "AG" was associated with a 35% reduction in the risk of developing HAPE, while the haplotype "AA" increased the risk of developing HAPE by 44%. These results provide the first evidence linking genetic variations in AGTR1 with HAPE risk in Han Chinese individuals.

  4. Expression and function of a variant T cell receptor complex lacking CD3-gamma

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    A T cell line termed DIL2 has been derived from an infant with a polyclonal T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 cell surface expression defect. Indirect immunofluorescence showed that the expression of certain TCR/CD3 epitopes (like those detected by WT31 and BMA031 monoclonals) was strongly reduced (around five-fold) on DIL2, whereas other epitopes (like those detected by SP34 and Leu4) were only around two-fold lower than in normal T cell lines. Specific immunoprecipitates of surface- radioiodinated DIL2 cells contained TCR-alpha, TCR-beta, CD3-delta, CD3- epsilon and TCR-zeta chains, but lacked CD3-gamma. This structural TCR/CD3 variant was, however, capable of transducing certain activation signals, since normal proliferation and a low but significant calcium flux was observed in DIL2 cells after engagement with specific antibodies. Our data suggest that a functional TCR/CD3 complex can be expressed on the surface of T cells in the absence of CD3-gamma. PMID:1713248

  5. MED1 mediates androgen receptor splice variant induced gene expression in the absence of ligand

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Sprenger, Cynthia; Wu, Pin-Jou; Sun, Shihua; Uo, Takuma; Haugk, Kathleen; Epilepsia, Kathryn Soriano; Plymate, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The appearance of constitutively active androgen receptor splice variants (AR-Vs) has been proposed as one of the causes of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, the underlying mechanism of AR-Vs in CRPC transcriptional regulation has not been defined. A distinct transcriptome enriched with cell cycle genes, e.g. UBE2C, has been associated with AR-Vs, which indicates the possibility of an altered transcriptional mechanism when compared to full-length wild-type AR (ARfl). Importantly, a recent study reported the critical role of p-MED1 in enhancing UBE2C expression through a locus looping pattern, which only occurs in CRPC but not in androgen-dependent prostate cancer (ADPC). To investigate the potential correlation between AR-V and MED1, in the present study we performed protein co-immunoprecipitation, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and cell proliferation assays and found that MED1 is necessary for ARv567es induced UBE2C up-regulation and subsequent prostate cancer cell growth. Furthermore, p-MED1 is bound to ARv567es independent of full-length AR; p-MED1 has higher recruitment to UBE2C promoter and enhancer regions in the presence of ARv567es. Our data indicate that p-MED1 serves as a key mediator in ARv567es induced gene expression and suggests a mechanism by which AR-Vs promote the development and progression of CRPC. PMID:25481872

  6. No evidence of association between dopamine D4 receptor variants and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, L.C.C.; Castle, D.; Murray, R.

    1994-09-15

    Disturbance in the dopamine neurotransmitter system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of affective disorder. In this study, we examine the possibility that functional variants of the recently cloned dopamine D4 receptor gene contribute to the genetic component of manic depression. The polymorphism, a 48 bp tandem repeat coding for part of the third cytoplasmic loop, was detected using a PCR based method. In a first sample of 57 patients and 59 controls, we found allele 7 to be in excess in the patients. In contrast, allele 3 was less frequent in patients. A second, larger sample of 90 patients and 91 controls was utilized to test these hypotheses. Data from the two samples were then pooled together for further analyses. We calculated the power of our samples, and if the frequency of 7 repeat allele obtained from sample 1 is true, i.e., 25% (28/114) for patients and 14% (16/188) for controls, then the power of the combined sample is 62% at 5% (two-tailed) significance level. However, both observations were not replicated; we therefore conclude that variations in this repeat of the DRD4 gene do not contribute to the genetic component of manic depression. 51 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Angiotensin II receptor 1 gene variants are associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xikai; Li, Xun; Ouyang, Yongri; He, Xue; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Yuan; Kang, Longli; Yuan, Dongya

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that Angiotensin II Receptor 1 (AGTR1) may play an important role in the development of high-altitude pulmonary edema. We envisaged a role for AGTR1 gene variants in the pathogenesis of HAPE and investigated their potential associations with HAPE in a Han Chinese population. We genotyped seven AGTR1 polymorphisms in 267 patients with diagnosed HAPE and 304 controls and evaluated their association with risk of HAPE. Statistically significant associations were found for the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs275651 (p = 0.017; odds ratio [OR] = 0.65) and rs275652 (p = 0.016; OR = 0.64). Another SNP rs10941679 showed a marginally significant association after adjusting for age and sex in the additive genetic model (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.01-2.04, p = 0.040). Haplotype analysis confirmed that the haplotype “AG” was associated with a 35% reduction in the risk of developing HAPE, while the haplotype “AA” increased the risk of developing HAPE by 44%. These results provide the first evidence linking genetic variations in AGTR1 with HAPE risk in Han Chinese individuals. PMID:27732943

  8. FOXA1 regulates androgen receptor variant activity in models of castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakjang, Sirintra; Chaytor, Lewis; Grey, James; Robson, Craig N.; Gaughan, Luke

    2015-01-01

    Retention of androgen receptor (AR) signalling in castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) highlights the requirement for the development of more effective AR targeting therapies. A key mechanism of resistance to anti-androgens is through expression of constitutively active AR variants (AR-Vs) that are refractory to next-generation therapies, including Enzalutamide and Abiraterone. By maintaining an androgenic gene signature, AR-Vs drive tumour survival and progression in castrate conditions. Critically, however, our understanding of the mechanics of AR-V-driven transcription is limited, particularly with respect to dependency on pioneer factor function. Here we show that depletion of FOXA1 in the CWR22Rv1 CRPC cell line abrogates the oncogenic potential of AR-Vs. Gene expression profiling reveals that approximately 41% of the AR-V transcriptome requires FOXA1 and that depletion of FOXA1 attenuates AR-V binding at a sub-set of analysed co-regulated genes. Interestingly, AR-V levels are elevated in cells depleted of FOXA1 as a consequence of attenuated negative feedback on the AR gene, but is insufficient to maintain cell growth as evidenced by marked anti-proliferative effects in FOXA1 knockdown cells. In all, our data suggests that AR-Vs are dependent on FOXA1 for sustaining a pro-proliferative gene signature and agents targeting FOXA1 may represent novel therapeutic options for CRPC patients. PMID:26336819

  9. FOXA1 regulates androgen receptor variant activity in models of castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, Dominic; Wade, Mark; Nakjang, Sirintra; Chaytor, Lewis; Grey, James; Robson, Craig N; Gaughan, Luke

    2015-10-06

    Retention of androgen receptor (AR) signalling in castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) highlights the requirement for the development of more effective AR targeting therapies. A key mechanism of resistance to anti-androgens is through expression of constitutively active AR variants (AR-Vs) that are refractory to next-generation therapies, including Enzalutamide and Abiraterone. By maintaining an androgenic gene signature, AR-Vs drive tumour survival and progression in castrate conditions. Critically, however, our understanding of the mechanics of AR-V-driven transcription is limited, particularly with respect to dependency on pioneer factor function. Here we show that depletion of FOXA1 in the CWR22Rv1 CRPC cell line abrogates the oncogenic potential of AR-Vs. Gene expression profiling reveals that approximately 41% of the AR-V transcriptome requires FOXA1 and that depletion of FOXA1 attenuates AR-V binding at a sub-set of analysed co-regulated genes. Interestingly, AR-V levels are elevated in cells depleted of FOXA1 as a consequence of attenuated negative feedback on the AR gene, but is insufficient to maintain cell growth as evidenced by marked anti-proliferative effects in FOXA1 knockdown cells. In all, our data suggests that AR-Vs are dependent on FOXA1 for sustaining a pro-proliferative gene signature and agents targeting FOXA1 may represent novel therapeutic options for CRPC patients.

  10. Deleterious Rare Variants Reveal Risk for Loss of GABAA Receptor Function in Patients with Genetic Epilepsy and in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Ciria C.; Klassen, Tara L.; Jackson, Laurel G.; Gurba, Katharine; Hu, Ningning; Macdonald, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic epilepsies (GEs) account for approximately 50% of all seizure disorders, and familial forms include mutations in single GABAA receptor subunit genes (GABRs). In 144 sporadic GE cases (GECs), exome sequencing of 237 ion channel genes identified 520 GABR variants. Among these variants, 33 rare variants in 11 GABR genes were present in 24 GECs. To assess functional risk of variants in GECs, we selected 8 variants found in GABRA, 3 in GABRB, and 3 in GABRG and compared them to 18 variants found in the general population for GABRA1 (n = 9), GABRB3 (n = 7), and GABRG2 (n = 2). To identify deleterious variants and gain insight into structure-function relationships, we studied the gating properties, surface expression and structural perturbations of the 32 variants. Significant reduction of GABAA receptor function was strongly associated with variants scored as deleterious and mapped within the N-terminal and transmembrane domains. In addition, 12 out of 17 variants mapped along the β+/α- GABA binding interface, were associated with reduction in channel gating and were predicted to cause structural rearrangements of the receptor by in silico simulations. Missense or nonsense mutations of GABRA1, GABRB3 and GABRG2 primarily impair subunit biogenesis. In contrast, GABR variants affected receptor function by impairing gating, suggesting that different mechanisms are operating in GABR epilepsy susceptibility variants and disease-causing mutations. The functional impact of single GABR variants found in individuals with sporadic GEs warrants the use of molecular diagnosis and will ultimately improve the treatment of genetic epilepsies by using a personalized approach. PMID:27622563

  11. Analysis of the effects of rare variants on splicing identifies alterations in GABAA receptor genes in autism spectrum disorder individuals

    PubMed Central

    Piton, Amélie; Jouan, Loubna; Rochefort, Daniel; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Lachapelle, Karine; Dion, Patrick A; Gauthier, Julie; Rouleau, Guy A

    2013-01-01

    A large-scale sequencing screen of X-linked synaptic genes in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or schizophrenia (SCZ), two common neurodevelopmental disorders, identified many variants most of which have no easily predictable effect on gene function. In this report, we evaluated the impact of these rare missense and silent variants on gene splicing. For this purpose, we used complementary in silico analyses, in vitro minigene-based assays and RNA prepared from lymphoblastoid cells derived from patients with these mutations. Our goal was to identify the variants which might either create or disrupt an acceptor splice site, a donor splice site or an exonic splicing enhancer, thus leading to aberrant splicing that could be involved in the pathogenesis of ASD or SCZ. We identified truncating mutations in distinct X-linked gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor subunit-encoding genes, GABRQ and GABRA3, in two different families. Furthermore, missense and silent variants in nuclear RNA export factor 5 and histone deacetylase 6 were shown to partially disrupt the protein. While genes from the GABAergic pathway have previously been thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of ASD, this is the first report of ASD patients with truncating mutations in GABA receptors genes. PMID:23169495

  12. JP-45/JSRP1 variants affect skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling by decreasing the sensitivity of the dihydropyridine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Toshimichi; Delbono, Osvaldo; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria L.; Girard, Thierry; Urwyler, Albert; Treves, Susan; Zorzato, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    JP-45 (also JP45; encoded by JSRP1) is an integral protein constituent of the skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum junctional face membrane interacting with Cav1.1 (the α.1 subunit of the voltage sensing dihydropyridine receptor, DHPR) and the luminal calcium-binding protein calsequestrin. Two JSRP1 variants have been found in the human population: c.323C>T (p.P108L) in exon 5 and c.449G>C (p.G150A) in exon 6, but nothing is known concerning the incidence of these polymorphisms in the general population or in patients with neuromuscular diseases nor the impact of the polymorphisms on excitation-contraction coupling. In the present report we investigated the frequencies of these two JSRP1 polymorphisms in the Swiss Malignant Hyperthermia population and studied the functional impact of the variants on excitation -contraction coupling. Our results show that the polymorphisms are equally distributed among Malignant Hyperthermia Negative, Malignant Hyperthermia Equivocal and Malignant Hyperthermia Susceptible individuals. Interestingly however, the presence of either one of these JP-45 variants decreased the sensitivity of the dihydropyridine receptor to activation. The presence of a JSRP1 variant may explain the variable phenotype seen in patients with malignant hyperthermia carrying the same mutation and more importantly, may counteract the hypersensitivity of excitation-contraction coupling caused by mutations in the RYR1 gene. PMID:22927026

  13. Cloning and functional expression of intracellular loop variants of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) RDL GABA receptor.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Wells, Jennina; Hawkins, Joseph; Colombo, Claudia; Bermudez, Isabel; Jones, Andrew K

    2016-06-08

    The insect GABA receptor, RDL (resistance to dieldrin), plays central roles in neuronal signalling and is the target of several classes of insecticides. To study the GABA receptor from an important pollinator species, we cloned Rdl cDNA from the honey bee, Apis mellifera. Three Rdl variants were identified, arising from differential use of splice acceptor sites in the large intracellular loop between transmembrane regions 3 and 4. These variants were renamed from previously, as Amel_RDLvar1, Amel_RDLvar2 and Amel_RDLvar3. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, the three variants showed no difference in sensitivity to the agonist, GABA, with EC50s of 29μM, 20μM and 29μM respectively. Also, the potencies of the antagonists, fipronil and imidacloprid, were similar on all three variants. Fipronil IC50 values were 0.18μM, 0.31μM and 0.20μM whereas 100μM imidacloprid reduced the GABA response by 17%, 24% and 31%. The possibility that differential splicing of the RDL intracellular loop may represent a species-specific mechanism leading to insensitivity to insecticides is discussed.

  14. Association of vitamin D receptor gene 3'-variants with Hashimoto's thyroiditis in the Croatian population.

    PubMed

    Stefanić, M; Papić, S; Suver, M; Glavas-Obrovac, L; Karner, I

    2008-04-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is the most frequent autoimmune thyroid disease with strong genetic background. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) endocrine system affects immunosuppressive, regulatory and tolerogenic decisions required for induction and maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance. With respect to the biological function of the VDR and functionally plausible gene-expression data, we sought to test whether particular 3'-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and haplotypes previously directly or indirectly associated with VDR mRNA 3'-allelic imbalance phenotype and differences in total VDR mRNA expression are implicated in HT susceptibility. Thus, 145 Croatian HT patients and 145 age-, sex- and ethnically matched euthyroid controls were genotyped for VDR rs1544410 (BsmI), rs7975232 (ApaI) and rs731236 (TaqI) polymorphisms by polymerase chain reaction-RFLP method. Covariate-adjusted single-locus and haplotype-phenotype regression analyses were performed. Permutation corrections (P(c)) and Akaike Information Criteria were used for model comparisons. The best-fit [global P(c) = 7.2 x 10(-4)]BsmI-TaqI BT haplotype was found significantly more often in subjects without HT [12.2% vs. 3.7%; odds ratio (OR, 95% confidence intervals) = 0.28 (0.14-0.56), P(c) = 8 x 10(-4)], whereas the bT haplotype was significantly more frequent in individuals with HT [45.7% vs. 61.8%; OR = 1.91 (1.37-2.65), P(c) = 4 x 10(-4)]. Two extended BsmI-ApaI-TaqI RFLP haplotypes, the common baT [35.7 vs. 47.3%, OR = 1.63 (1.17-2.27), P(c) = 0.012] and rare BaT variants [6.5 vs. 1.2%, OR = 0.17 (0.06-0.55), P(c) = 1.2 x 10(-3)] were associated with HT, representing predisposing and protective haplotypes, respectively. In single-RFLP association analyses, only rs1544410 polymorphism was associated with HT phenotype (allelic P(c) = 0.0078) and appeared to function under the recessive model, with decreased risk of HT among the BB homozygotes [OR = 0.39 (0.21-0.7), P(c) = 0.0052] when

  15. Involvement of exon 11-associated variants of the mu opioid receptor MOR-1 in heroin, but not morphine, actions.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying-Xian; Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Rossi, Grace C; Matulonis, Joshua E; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2009-03-24

    Heroin remains a major drug of abuse and is preferred by addicts over morphine. Like morphine, heroin has high affinity and selectivity for mu-receptors, but its residual analgesia in exon 1 MOR-1 knockout mice that do not respond to morphine suggests a different mechanism of action. MOR-1 splice variants lacking exon 1 have been observed in mice, humans, and rats, raising the possibility that they might be responsible for the residual heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide (M6G) analgesia in the exon 1 knockout mice. To test this possibility, we disrupted exon 11 of MOR-1, which eliminates all of the variants that do not contain exon 1. Morphine and methadone analgesia in the exon 11 knockout mouse was normal, but the analgesic actions of heroin, M6G, and fentanyl were markedly diminished in the radiant heat tail-flick and hot-plate assays. Similarly, the ability of M6G to inhibit gastrointestinal transit was greatly diminished in these exon 11 knockout mice, whereas the ability of morphine was unchanged. These findings identify receptors selectively involved with heroin and M6G actions and confirm the relevance of the exon 11-associated variants and raise important issues regarding the importance of atypical truncated G-protein-coupled receptors.

  16. Identification and characterization of a truncated variant of the 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) receptor produced by alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Guest, P C; Salim, K; Skynner, H A; George, S E; Bresnick, J N; McAllister, G

    2000-09-08

    We have identified an alternatively spliced 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A receptor (5-HT(2A)-R) transcript by PCR of human brain cDNA using degenerate oligonucleotide primers to transmembrane (TM) domains 3 and 7 of the 5-HT(2)-R subfamily. The variant contains a 118-bp insertion at the exon II/III boundary of the 5-HT(2A)-R, which produces a frame shift in the coding sequence and a premature stop codon. PCR analysis showed that the truncated receptor (5-HT(2A-tr)) and native 5-HT(2A)-R were co-expressed in most brain tissues, with the highest levels being found in hippocampus, corpus collosum, amygdala and caudate nucleus. Western blot analysis of HEK-293 cells transfected transiently with a 5-HT(2A-tr) construct showed that a 30-kDa protein was expressed on cell membranes. Co-transfection studies showed no effect of the 5-HT(2A-tr) variant on 3H-ketanserin binding to the native 5-HT(2A)-R or on functional coupling of the 5-HT(2A)-R to 5-HT-stimulated Ca(2+) mobilization. The functional significance of the 5-HT(2A-tr) variant and other truncated receptors remains to be established.

  17. Retinoic acid receptor α1 variants, RARα1ΔB and RARα1ΔBC, define a new class of nuclear receptor isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Parrado, Antonio; Despouy, Gilles; Kraïba, Radhia; Pogam, Carole Le; Dupas, Stéphane; Choquette, Maryline; Robledo, Macarena; Larghero, Jérôme; Bui, Hung; Gall, Isabelle Le; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Chomienne, Christine; Padua, Rose Ann

    2001-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) binds and activates retinoid X receptor (RXR)/retinoic acid receptor (RAR) heterodimers, which regulate the transcription of genes that have retinoic acid response elements (RARE). The RAR isotypes (α, β and γ) are comprised of six regions designated A–F. Two isoforms of RARα, 1 and 2, have been identified in humans, which have different A regions generated by differential promoter usage and alternative splicing. We have isolated two new splice variants of RARα1 from human B lymphocytes. In one of these variants, exon 2 is juxtaposed to exon 5, resulting in an altered reading frame and a stop codon. This variant, designated RARα1ΔB, does not code for a functional receptor. In the second variant, exon 2 is juxtaposed to exon 6, maintaining the reading frame. This isoform, designated RARα1ΔBC, retains most of the functional domains of RARα1, but omits the transactivation domain AF-1 and the DNA-binding domain. Consequently, it does not bind nor transactivate RARE on its own. Nevertheless, RARα1ΔBC interacts with RXRα and, as an RXRα/RARα1ΔBC heterodimer, transactivates the DR5 RARE upon all-trans-RA binding. The use of RAR- and RXR-specific ligands shows that, whereas transactivation of the DR5 RARE through the RXRα/RARα1 heterodimer is mediated only by RAR ligands, transactivation through the RXRα/RARα1ΔBC heterodimer is mediated by RAR and RXR ligands. Whilst RARα1 has a broad tissue distribution, RARα1ΔBC has a more heterogeneous distribution, but with significant expression in myeloid cells. RARα1ΔBC is an infrequent example of a functional nuclear receptor which deletes the DNA-binding domain. PMID:11812818

  18. Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene variants are associated with an increased risk for cutaneous melanoma which is largely independent of skin type and hair color.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, C; ter Huurne, J; Berkhout, M; Gruis, N; Bastiaens, M; Bergman, W; Willemze, R; Bavinck, J N

    2001-08-01

    Individuals carrying melanocortin 1 receptor gene variants have an increased risk for the development of cutaneous melanoma. Melanocortin 1 receptor gene variants are also associated with other risk factors for melanoma such as fair skin and red hair. We evaluated the relationship of melanocortin 1 receptor gene variants, fair skin, red hair and the development of melanoma in 123 patients with cutaneous melanoma and 385 control subjects. To analyze the association between melanocortin 1 receptor gene variants and skin type or hair color we also made use of 453 patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer. We analyzed the coding sequence of the melanocortin 1 receptor gene region by single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis, followed by DNA sequence analysis. Risk of melanoma dependent on the various melanocortin 1 receptor variant alleles was estimated by exposure odds ratios. The analyses of all different melanocortin 1 receptor gene variants combined, showed that the presence of melanocortin 1 receptor gene variants amounted to a higher melanoma risk, which, in stratified analyses, was independent of skin type and hair color. The odds ratios after adjusting for skin type were 3.6 (95% CI 1.7-7.2) for two variants and 2.7 (95% CI 1.5-5.1) for one variant, respectively. Compound heterozygotes and homozygotes for the Val60Leu, Val92Met, Arg142His, Arg151Cys, Arg160Trp, Arg163Gln, and His260Pro variants had odds ratios of about 4 to develop melanoma, whereas heterozygotes for these variants had half the risk. The presence of the melanocortin 1 receptor gene variant Asp84Glu appeared to impose the highest risk for cutaneous melanoma with odds ratios of 16.1 (95% CI 2.3-139.0) and 8.1 (95% CI 1.2-55.9) in compound heterozygotes and heterozygotes, respectively. The broad confidence intervals, when the different variants were analyzed separately, however, do not allow drawing definite conclusions about the magnitude of these risks. Of the more frequently occurring

  19. Genetic analysis of melanocortin 1 receptor red hair color variants in a Russian population of Eastern Siberia.

    PubMed

    Motorina, Anna V; Palkina, Nadezhda V; Komina, Anna V; Ruksha, Tatiana G; Artyukhov, Ivan P; Kozlov, Vasily V

    2016-10-13

    The melanocortin 1 receptor is a Gs protein-coupled receptor implicated in melanogenesis regulation. The receptor gene is highly polymorphic, which accounts for the association of several of its single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with an increased risk of melanoma. The present study aimed to evaluate the distribution of melanocortin 1 receptor gene variants R151C, R160W, and D294H within the Russian population of Eastern Siberia and its association with melanoma development. Melanoma patients (n=95) admitted to Krasnoyarsk Territorial Oncological Center and healthy controls (n=334) were enrolled in the study. A clinical examination of patients was performed to evaluate the phenotypic features of melanoma patients. SNPs were analyzed by real-time PCR. Clinical examination indicated a more frequent occurrence of fair skin type, blue eyes, blonde and red hair, and more frequent localization of freckles on the neck, trunk, and extremities in the melanoma group of patients. The R151C melanocortin 1 receptor gene variant was found in 18% of melanoma patients and associated with an increased likelihood of melanoma development (odds ratio=6.4; 95% confidence interval: 2.8-14.3; P=0.0001). The two remaining variant alleles of the melanocortin 1 receptor gene occurred with low frequency both in controls and in the melanoma group. The R160W SNP was identified neither in controls nor in melanoma patients. The D294H heterozygous variant was observed in 0.3% of individuals in the control group and in 1.1% of the patients in the melanoma group. Such an asymmetric distribution of the melanocortin 1 receptor within red hair color genotypes in the population under study compared with other populations may be because of Russian genetic homogeneity. Carriers of the mutant R151C allele should exercise caution in terms of exposure to the sun to avoid the risk of melanoma development.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution

  20. N-Glycan-dependent and -independent Quality Control of Human δ Opioid Receptor N-terminal Variants*

    PubMed Central

    Lackman, Jarkko J.; Markkanen, Piia M. H.; Hogue, Mireille; Bouvier, Michel; Petäjä-Repo, Ulla E.

    2014-01-01

    Quality control (QC) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) scrutinizes newly synthesized proteins and directs them either to ER export or ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Here, we demonstrate that the human δ-opioid receptor (hδOR) is subjected to ERQC in both N-glycan-dependent and -independent manners. This was shown by investigating the biosynthesis and trafficking of wild-type and non-N-glycosylated F27C variants in metabolic pulse-chase assays coupled with flow cytometry and cell surface biotinylation. Both QC mechanisms distinguished the minute one-amino acid difference between the variants, targeting a large fraction of hδOR-Cys27 to ERAD. However, the N-glycan-independent QC was unable to compensate the N-glycan-dependent pathway, and some incompletely folded non-N-glycosylated hδOR-Cys27 reached the cell surface in conformation incompatible with ligand binding. The turnover of receptors associating with the molecular chaperone calnexin (CNX) was significantly slower for the hδOR-Cys27, pointing to an important role of CNX in the hδOR N-glycan-dependent QC. This was further supported by the fact that inhibiting the co-translational interaction of hδOR-Cys27 precursors with CNX led to their ERAD. Opioid receptor pharmacological chaperones released the CNX-bound receptors to ER export and, furthermore, were able to rescue the Cys27 variant from polyubiquitination and retrotranslocation to the cytosol whether carrying N-glycans or not. Taken together, the hδOR appears to rely primarily on the CNX-mediated N-glycan-dependent QC that has the capacity to assist in folding, whereas the N-glycan-independent mechanism constitutes an alternative, although less accurate, system for directing misfolded/incompletely folded receptors to ERAD, possibly in altered cellular conditions. PMID:24798333

  1. Cloning and Characterization of Spliced Variants of the Porcine G Protein Coupled Receptor 120

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tongxing; Peng, Jie; Ren, Jiao; Wei, Hong-kui; Peng, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) receptor GPR120 exerts a significant impact on systemic nutrient homeostasis in human and rodents. However, the porcine GPR120 (pGPR120) has not been well characterized. In the current study, we found that pGPR120 had 3 spliced variants. Transcript 1 encoded 362-amino acids (aa) wild type pGPR120-WT, which shared 88% homology with human short form GPR120. Transcript 1 was the mainly expressed transcript of pGPR120. It was expressed predominantly in ileum, jejunum, duodenum, spleen, and adipose. Transcript 3 (coding 320-aa isoform) was detected in spleen, while the transcript 2 (coding 310-aa isoform) was only slightly expressed in spleen. A selective agonist for human GPR120 (TUG-891) and PUFAs activated SRE-luc and NFAT-luc reporter in HEK293T cells transfected with construct for pGPR120-WT but not pGPR120-V2. However, 320-aa isoform was not a dominant negative isoform. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation levels in cells transfected with construct for pGPR120-WT were well activated by PUFAs, especially n-3 PUFA. These results showed that although pGPR120 had 3 transcripts, transcript 1 which encoded pGPR120-WT was the mainly expressed transcript. TUG-891 and PUFAs, especially n-3 PUFA, well activated pGPR120-WT. The current study contributed to dissecting the molecular regulation mechanisms of n-3 PUFA in pigs. PMID:26075265

  2. Essential role of PSM/SH2-B variants in insulin receptor catalytic activation and the resulting cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Manchao; Deng, Youping; Tandon, Ruchi; Bai, Cheng; Riedel, Heimo

    2008-01-01

    The positive regulatory role of PSM/SH2-B downstream of various mitogenic receptor tyrosine kinases or gene disruption experiments in mice support a role of PSM in the regulation of insulin action. Here, four alternative PSM splice variants and individual functional domains were compared for their role in the regulation of specific metabolic insulin responses. We found that individual PSM variants in 3T3-L1 adipocytes potentiated insulin-mediated glucose and amino acid transport, glycogenesis, lipogenesis, and key components in the metabolic insulin response including p70 S6 kinase, glycogen synthase, glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), Akt, Cbl, and IRS-1. Highest activity was consistently observed for PSM alpha, followed by beta, delta, and gamma with decreasing activity. In contrast, dominant-negative peptide mimetics of the PSM Pro-rich, pleckstrin homology (PH), or src homology 2 (SH2) domains inhibited any tested insulin response. Potentiation of the insulin response originated at the insulin receptor (IR) kinase level by PSM variant-specific regulation of the Km (ATP) whereas the Vmax remained unaffected. IR catalytic activation was inhibited by peptide mimetics of the PSM SH2 or dimerization domain (DD). Either peptide should disrupt the complex of a PSM dimer linked to IR via SH2 domains as proposed for PSM activation of tyrosine kinase JAK2. Either peptide abolished downstream insulin responses indistinguishable from PSM siRNA knockdown. Our results implicate an essential role of the PSM variants in the activation of the IR kinase and the resulting metabolic insulin response. PSM variants act as internal IR ligands that in addition to potentiating the insulin response stimulate IR catalytic activation even in the absence of insulin.

  3. Cell class-specific regulation of neocortical dendrite and spine growth by AMPA receptor splice and editing variants.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Mohammad I K; Ma-Högemeier, Zhan-Lu; Riedel, Christian; Conrads, Claudius; Veitinger, Thomas; Habijan, Tim; Schulz, Jan-Niklas; Krause, Martin; Wirth, Marcus J; Hollmann, Michael; Wahle, Petra

    2011-10-01

    Glutamatergic transmission converging on calcium signaling plays a key role in dendritic differentiation. In early development, AMPA receptor (AMPAR) transcripts are extensively spliced and edited to generate subunits that differ in their biophysical properties. Whether these subunits have specific roles in the context of structural differentiation is unclear. We have investigated the role of nine GluA variants and revealed a correlation between the expression of flip variants and the period of major dendritic growth. In interneurons, only GluA1(Q)-flip increased dendritic length and branching. In pyramidal cells, GluA2(Q)-flop, GluA2(Q)-flip, GluA3(Q)-flip and calcium-impermeable GluA2(R)-flip promoted dendritic growth, suggesting that flip variants with slower desensitization kinetics are more important than receptors with elevated calcium permeability. Imaging revealed significantly higher calcium signals in pyramidal cells transfected with GluA2(R)-flip as compared with GluA2(R)-flop, suggesting a contribution of voltage-activated calcium channels. Indeed, dendritic growth induced by GluA2(R)-flip in pyramidal cells was prevented by blocking NMDA receptors (NMDARs) or voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs), suggesting that they act downstream of AMPARs. Intriguingly, the action of GluA1(Q)-flip in interneurons was also dependent on NMDARs and VGCCs. Cell class-specific effects were not observed for spine formation, as GluA2(Q)-flip and GluA2(Q)-flop increased spine density in pyramidal cells as well as in interneurons. The results suggest that AMPAR variants expressed early in development are important determinants for activity-dependent dendritic growth in a cell type-specific and cell compartment-specific manner.

  4. A Coding IRAK2 Protein Variant Compromises Toll-like receptor (TLR) Signaling and Is Associated with Colorectal Cancer Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Flannery, Sinead M.; Dickhöfer, Sabine; Huhn, Stefanie; George, Julie; Kubarenko, Andriy V.; Lascorz, Jesus; Bevier, Melanie; Willemsen, Joschka; Pichulik, Tica; Schafmayer, Clemens; Binder, Marco; Manoury, Bénédicte; Paludan, Søren R.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta; Bowie, Andrew G.; Försti, Asta; Weber, Alexander N. R.

    2014-01-01

    Within innate immune signaling pathways, interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) fulfill key roles downstream of multiple Toll-like receptors and the interleukin-1 receptor. Although human IRAK4 deficiency was shown to lead to severe immunodeficiency in response to pyogenic bacterial infection during childhood, little is known about the role of human IRAK2. We here identified a non-synonymous IRAK2 variant, rs35060588 (coding R214G), as hypofunctional in terms of NF-κB signaling and Toll-like receptor-mediated cytokine induction. This was due to reduced ubiquitination of TRAF6, a key step in signal transduction. IRAK2 rs35060588 occurs in 3–9% of individuals in different ethnic groups, and our studies suggested a genetic association of rs35060588 with colorectal cancer survival. This for the first time implicates human IRAK2 in a human disease and highlights the R214G IRAK2 variant as a potential novel and broadly applicable biomarker for disease or as a therapeutic intervention point. PMID:24973222

  5. A coding IRAK2 protein variant compromises Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and is associated with colorectal cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Flannery, Sinead M; Dickhöfer, Sabine; Huhn, Stefanie; George, Julie; Kubarenko, Andriy V; Lascorz, Jesus; Bevier, Melanie; Willemsen, Joschka; Pichulik, Tica; Schafmayer, Clemens; Binder, Marco; Manoury, Bénédicte; Paludan, Søren R; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta; Bowie, Andrew G; Försti, Asta; Weber, Alexander N R

    2014-08-15

    Within innate immune signaling pathways, interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) fulfill key roles downstream of multiple Toll-like receptors and the interleukin-1 receptor. Although human IRAK4 deficiency was shown to lead to severe immunodeficiency in response to pyogenic bacterial infection during childhood, little is known about the role of human IRAK2. We here identified a non-synonymous IRAK2 variant, rs35060588 (coding R214G), as hypofunctional in terms of NF-κB signaling and Toll-like receptor-mediated cytokine induction. This was due to reduced ubiquitination of TRAF6, a key step in signal transduction. IRAK2 rs35060588 occurs in 3-9% of individuals in different ethnic groups, and our studies suggested a genetic association of rs35060588 with colorectal cancer survival. This for the first time implicates human IRAK2 in a human disease and highlights the R214G IRAK2 variant as a potential novel and broadly applicable biomarker for disease or as a therapeutic intervention point.

  6. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent activation of estrogen receptor-dependent transcription by 3-methylcholanthrene.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Jonathan M; Waxman, David J

    2006-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that stimulates transcription directed by xenobiotic response elements upstream of target genes. Recently, AhR ligands were reported to induce formation of an AhR-estrogen receptor (ER) complex, which can bind to estrogen response elements (EREs) and stimulate transcription of ER target genes. Presently, we investigate the effect of the AhR ligands 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (BZ126) on ERE-regulated luciferase reporter activity and endogenous ER target gene expression. In MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, 3MC induced transcription of ER reporter genes containing native promoter sequences of the ER-responsive genes complement 3 and pS2 and heterologous promoters regulated by isolated EREs. Dose-response studies revealed that the concentration of 3MC required to half-maximally activate transcription (EC(50)) was >100-fold higher for an ER reporter (27-57 muM) than for an AhR reporter (86-250 nM) in both MCF-7 cells and in human endometrial cancer Ishikawa cells. 3MC also stimulated expression of the endogenous ER target genes amphiregulin, cathepsin D and progesterone receptor, albeit to a much lower extent than was achieved following stimulation with 17beta-estradiol. In Ishikawa cells, 3MC, but not BZ126 or TCDD, stimulated ERalpha-dependent reporter activity but did not induce expression of endogenous ER target genes. Finally, studies carried out in the AhR-positive rat hepatoma cell line 5L and the AhR-deficient variant BP8 demonstrated that ER reporter activity could be induced by 3MC in a manner that was independent of AhR and thus distinct from the AhR-ER 'hijacking' mechanism described recently. 3MC may thus elicit estrogenic activity by multiple mechanisms.

  7. Tetrapeptide Endomorphin Analogs Require Both Full Length and Truncated Splice Variants of the Mu Opioid Receptor Gene Oprm1 for Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Gina F; Lu, Zhigang; Rossi, Grace; Narayan, Ankita; Hunkele, Amanda; Marx, Sarah; Xu, Jin; Pintar, John; Majumdar, Susruta; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2016-12-21

    The mu opioid receptor gene undergoes extensive alternative splicing. Mu opioids can be divided into three classes based on the role of different groups of splice variants. Morphine and methadone require only full length seven transmembrane (7TM) variants for analgesia, whereas IBNtxA (3'-iodobenzyol-6β-naltrexamide) needs only truncated 6TM variants. A set of endomorphin analogs fall into a third group that requires both 6TM and 7TM splice variants. Unlike morphine, endomorphin 1 and 2, DAPP (Dmt,d-Ala-Phe-Phe-NH2), and IDAPP (3'-iodo-Dmt-d-Ala-Phe-Phe-NH2) analgesia was lost in an exon 11 knockout mouse lacking 6TM variants. Restoring 6TM variant expression in a knockout mouse lacking both 6TM and 7TM variants failed to rescue DAPP or IDAPP analgesia. However, re-establishing 6TM expression in an exon 11 knockout mouse that still expressed 7TM variants did rescue the response, consistent with the need for both 6TM and 7TM variants. In receptor binding assays, (125)I-IDAPP labeled more sites (Bmax) than (3)H-DAMGO ([d-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly(ol)(5)]-enkephalin) in wild-type mice. In exon 11 knockout mice, (125)I-IDAPP binding was lowered to levels similar to (3)H-DAMGO, which remained relatively unchanged compared to wild-type mice. (125)I-IDAPP binding was totally lost in an exon 1/exon 11 knockout model lacking all Oprm1 variant expression, confirming that the drug was not cross labeling non-mu opioid receptors. These findings suggested that (125)I-IDAPP labeled two populations of mu binding sites in wild-type mice, one corresponding to 7TM variants and the second dependent upon 6TM variants. Together, these data indicate that endomorphin analogs represent a unique, genetically defined, and distinct class of mu opioid analgesic.

  8. Variants of the chemokine receptor CCR5 are associated with severe bronchiolitis caused by respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Hull, Jeremy; Rowlands, Kate; Lockhart, Elizabeth; Moore, Catrin; Sharland, Mike; Kwiatkowski, Dominic

    2003-09-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis is characterized by intense inflammation of the airways, and high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines can be found in respiratory secretions of affected infants. Important among these chemokines are RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell-expressed and -secreted) and macrophage inflammatory-protein alpha, MIP-1alpha, both of which show correlation with severe RSV bronchiolitis. It is not clear whether high levels of these chemokines are important in disease pathogenesis, and this study addresses this question by studying genetic variants of their major receptor, CC chemokine receptor 5. Results from both a case-control and family-based genetic-association analysis show that the -2459G and -2554T variants are associated with severe RSV bronchiolitis (P=.01). It is proposed that these CCR5 variants influence the inflammatory response, and these data provide further evidence of the important role that host genetic variability plays in the determination of disease severity in RSV bronchiolitis.

  9. A naturally occurring GIP receptor variant undergoes enhanced agonist-induced desensitization, which impairs GIP control of adipose insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Sameer; Patel, Rajesh T; Bruno, Joanne; Panhwar, Muhammad Siyab; Wen, Jennifer; McGraw, Timothy E

    2014-10-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), an incretin hormone secreted from gastrointestinal K cells in response to food intake, has an important role in the control of whole-body metabolism. GIP signals through activation of the GIP receptor (GIPR), a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Dysregulation of this pathway has been implicated in the development of metabolic disease. Here we demonstrate that GIPR is constitutively trafficked between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments of both GIP-stimulated and unstimulated adipocytes. GIP induces a downregulation of plasma membrane GIPR by slowing GIPR recycling without affecting internalization kinetics. This transient reduction in the expression of GIPR in the plasma membrane correlates with desensitization to the effects of GIP. A naturally occurring variant of GIPR (E354Q) associated with an increased incidence of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in humans responds to GIP stimulation with an exaggerated downregulation from the plasma membrane and a delayed recovery of GIP sensitivity following cessation of GIP stimulation. This perturbation in the desensitization-resensitization cycle of the GIPR variant, revealed in studies of cultured adipocytes, may contribute to the link of the E354Q variant to metabolic disease.

  10. Significance of the variant and full-length forms of the very low density lipoprotein receptor in brain.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Yamamoto, M; Kumamaru, E

    2001-12-20

    The very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) is a newly described receptor which binds to apolipoprotein E (apoE) specifically. The authors designed a synthetic peptide of 17 amino acids representing the N-terminus of the putative first ligand binding domain of human VLDLR, this being a unique domain for VLDLR. When the synthetic peptide was used as the antigen, two different monoclonal antibodies were obtained (anti-VLDLR1 and anti-VLDLR2). Expressional cloning revealed that anti-VLDLR1 recognized the variant form of VLDLR which lacks 84 bp of O-linked sugar domain and anti-VLDLR2 recognized the full length form of VLDLR. The variant VLDLR was expressed in neuroblasts as well as matrix cells and Cajal-Retzius cells in the early stages of the developing human brain; later its expression was sequentially found in glioblasts, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and finally in myelin. The expression of a full length form of VLDLR was detected in senile plaques and some neurons and satellite glia in aged and Alzheimer brains. This suggests that the variant VLDLR is important for the developing human brain and the full length VLDLR has modified functions in aged and Alzheimer brains.

  11. Analysis of C3b/C4b receptor (CR1) polymorphic variants by tryptic peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Nickells, M W; Seya, T; Holers, V M; Atkinson, J P

    1986-06-01

    The human C3b/C4b receptor (CR1) binds the major activation and opsonic fragments of the third (C3) and fourth (C4) components of complement. CR1 is a single chain integral membrane glycoprotein widely distributed on peripheral blood cells. Four codominantly inherited allelic variants with Mrs of 160,000, 190,000, 220,000 and 250,000 have been described. To address the structural basis for this unusual polymorphism, CR1 from donors expressing three of the four allelic variants was purified from surface labeled (125I) erythrocytes by iC3-Sepharose affinity chromatography and the variants compared by tryptic peptide mapping (TPM). The TPMs of each variant contained the same major peaks and minor peak areas and were nearly identical to one another. Tryptic peptide mappings of the 190,000 Mr erythrocyte CR1, which was purified prior to iodination, were similar to those derived from surface iodinated CR1. The TPMs of erythrocyte and granulocyte CR1 from the same donor differed by a single peak of increased prominence in the granulocyte map. These results indicate a conservation in amino acid sequence for those peptides detected. In view of these data and those of other studies of the structure and genetics of CR1 and related proteins, it is suggested in this paper that the allelic variation relates to CR1, being composed of repeating amino acid sequences.

  12. A Role for Toll-like Receptor 3 Variants in Host Susceptibility to Enteroviral Myocarditis and Dilated Cardiomyopathy*

    PubMed Central

    Gorbea, Carlos; Makar, Kimberly A.; Pauschinger, Matthias; Pratt, Gregory; Bersola, Jeathrina L. F.; Varela, Jacquelin; David, Ryan M.; Banks, Lori; Huang, Chien-Hua; Li, Hua; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Vallejo, Jesús G.; Bowles, Neil E.

    2010-01-01

    The innate antiviral response is mediated, at least in part, by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLR3 signaling is activated in response to viral infection, and the absence of TLR3 in mice significantly increases mortality after infection with enteroviruses that cause myocarditis and/or dilated cardiomyopathy. We screened TLR3 in patients diagnosed with enteroviral myocarditis/cardiomyopathy and identified a rare variant in one patient as well as a significantly increased occurrence of a common polymorphism compared with controls. Expression of either variant resulted in significantly reduced TLR3-mediated signaling after stimulation with synthetic double-stranded RNA. Furthermore, Coxsackievirus B3 infection of cell lines expressing mutated TLR3 abrogated activation of the type I interferon pathway, leading to increased viral replication. TLR3-mediated type I interferon signaling required cellular autophagy and was suppressed by 3-methyladenine and bafilomycin A1, by inhibitors of lysosomal proteolysis, and by reduced expression of Beclin 1, Atg5, or microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3β (MAP1LC3β). However, TLR3-mediated signaling was restored upon exogenous expression of Beclin 1 or a variant MAP1LC3β fusion protein refractory to RNA interference. These data suggest that individuals harboring these variants may have a blunted innate immune response to enteroviral infection, leading to reduced viral clearance and an increased risk of cardiac pathology. PMID:20472559

  13. Cannabinoid receptor type 2 functional variant influences liver damage in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Francesca; Bellini, Giulia; Alisi, Anna; Alterio, Arianna; Maione, Sabatino; Perrone, Laura; Locatelli, Franco; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Nobili, Valerio

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a spectrum of disease ranging from simple steatosis to inflammatory steatohepatitis (NASH) with different degrees of fibrosis that can ultimately progress to cirrhosis. Accumulating evidence suggests the involvement of the endocannabinoid-system in liver disease and related complications. In particular, hepatoprotective properties for Cannabinoid Receptor type 2 (CB2) have been shown both through experimental murine models of liver injury and association study between a CB2 functional variant, Q63R, and liver enzymes in Italian obese children with steatosis.Here, in order to clarify the role of CB2 in severity of childhood NAFLD, we have investigated the association of the CB2 Q63R variant, with histological parameters of liver disease severity in 118 Italian children with histologically-proven NAFLD.CB2 Q63R genotype was assigned performing a TaqMan assay and a general linear model analysis was used to evaluate the association between the polymorphism and the histological parameters of liver damage.We have found that whereas CB2 Q63R variant is not associated with steatosis or fibrosis, it is associated with the severity of the inflammation (p = 0.002) and the presence of NASH (p = 0.02).Our findings suggest a critical role for CB2 Q63R variant in modulating hepatic inflammation state in obese children and in the consequent increased predisposition of these patients to liver damage.

  14. Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 Functional Variant Influences Liver Damage in Children with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Francesca; Bellini, Giulia; Alisi, Anna; Alterio, Arianna; Maione, Sabatino; Perrone, Laura; Locatelli, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a spectrum of disease ranging from simple steatosis to inflammatory steatohepatitis (NASH) with different degrees of fibrosis that can ultimately progress to cirrhosis. Accumulating evidence suggests the involvement of the endocannabinoid-system in liver disease and related complications. In particular, hepatoprotective properties for Cannabinoid Receptor type 2 (CB2) have been shown both through experimental murine models of liver injury and association study between a CB2 functional variant, Q63R, and liver enzymes in Italian obese children with steatosis. Here, in order to clarify the role of CB2 in severity of childhood NAFLD, we have investigated the association of the CB2 Q63R variant, with histological parameters of liver disease severity in 118 Italian children with histologically-proven NAFLD. CB2 Q63R genotype was assigned performing a TaqMan assay and a general linear model analysis was used to evaluate the association between the polymorphism and the histological parameters of liver damage. We have found that whereas CB2 Q63R variant is not associated with steatosis or fibrosis, it is associated with the severity of the inflammation (p = 0.002) and the presence of NASH (p = 0.02). Our findings suggest a critical role for CB2 Q63R variant in modulating hepatic inflammation state in obese children and in the consequent increased predisposition of these patients to liver damage. PMID:22927922

  15. JP-45/JSRP1 variants affect skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling by decreasing the sensitivity of the dihydropyridine receptor.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Toshimichi; Delbono, Osvaldo; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria L; Girard, Thierry; Urwyler, Albert; Treves, Susan; Zorzato, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    JP-45 (also JP45; encoded by JSRP1) is an integral protein constituent of the skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum junctional face membrane interacting with Ca(v) 1.1 (the α.1 subunit of the voltage-sensing dihydropyridine receptor, DHPR) and the luminal calcium-binding protein calsequestrin. Two JSRP1 variants have been found in the human population: c.323C>T (p.P108L) in exon 5 and c.449G>C (p.G150A) in exon 6, but nothing is known concerning the incidence of these polymorphisms in the general population or in patients with neuromuscular diseases nor the impact of the polymorphisms on excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. In the present report, we investigated the frequencies of these two JSRP1 polymorphisms in the Swiss malignant hyperthermia population and studied the functional impact of the variants on EC coupling. Our results show that the polymorphisms are equally distributed among malignant hyperthermia negative, malignant hyperthermia equivocal, and malignant hyperthermia susceptible individuals. Interestingly, however, the presence of either one of these JP-45 variants decreased the sensitivity of the DHPR to activation. The presence of a JSRP1 variant may explain the variable phenotype seen in patients with malignant hyperthermia carrying the same mutation and, more importantly, may counteract the hypersensitivity of EC coupling caused by mutations in the RYR1 gene.

  16. A risk variant for alcoholism in the NMDA receptor affects amygdala activity during fear conditioning in humans.

    PubMed

    Cacciaglia, Raffaele; Nees, Frauke; Pohlack, Sebastian T; Ruttorf, Michaela; Winkelmann, Tobias; Witt, Stephanie H; Nieratschker, Vanessa; Rietschel, Marcella; Flor, Herta

    2013-09-01

    People at high risk for alcoholism show deficits in aversive learning, as indicated by impaired electrodermal responses during fear conditioning, a basic form of associative learning that depends on the amygdala. A positive family history of alcohol dependence has also been related to decreased amygdala responses during emotional processing. In the present study we report reduced amygdala activity during the acquisition of conditioned fear in healthy carriers of a risk variant for alcoholism (rs2072450) in the NR2A subunit-containing N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor. These results indicate that rs2072450 might confer risk for alcohol dependence through deficient fear acquisition indexed by a diminished amygdala response during aversive learning, and provide a neural basis for a weak behavioral inhibition previously documented in individuals at high risk for alcohol dependence. Carriers of the risk variant additionally exhibit dampened insula activation, a finding that further strengthens our data, given the importance of this brain region in fear conditioning.

  17. Fc gamma receptor III on human neutrophils. Allelic variants have functionally distinct capacities.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, J E; Edberg, J C; Kimberly, R P

    1990-01-01

    As a model system to explore the functional consequences of structural variants of human Fc gamma receptors (Fc gamma R), we have investigated Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis in relation to the NA1-NA2 polymorphism of Fc gamma RIII (CD16) on neutrophils (Fc gamma RIIIPMN). The neutrophil-specific NA antigen system is a biallelic polymorphism with codominant expression demonstrating a gene dose effect with the anti-NA1 MAb CLB-gran 11 in a large donor population. To explore the impact of this allelic variation of Fc gamma RIIIPMN on phagocytosis, we used two Fc gamma RIII-dependent probes, IgG-sensitized erythrocytes (EA) and concanavalin. A-treated erythrocytes (E-ConA). Comparison of Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis by PMN from NA1 subjects and from NA2 subjects showed lower levels of phagocytosis of both probes by the NA2 individuals. The difference was most pronounced with lightly opsonized EA: at the lowest level of sensitization the phagocytic index was 72% lower for NA2 donors, whereas at the highest level of sensitization it was 21% lower (P less than 0.003). Blockade of Fc gamma RII with MAb IV.3 Fab amplified by threefold the difference between NA1 and NA2 donors. NA1 and NA2 individuals had identical phagocytic capacities for the non-Fc gamma RIII probes, serum-treated and heat-treated zymosan. These individuals did not show differential quantitative cell surface expression of Fc gamma RIIIPMN measured by a panel of anti-CD16 MAb (3G8, CLB FcR-gran 1, VEP13, BW209/2) and by Scatchard analysis of 125I-IgG dimer binding. The difference in Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis was not explicable on the basis of differential collaboration of Fc gamma RIIIPMN alleles with Fc gamma RII, since (a) the difference in phagocytic capacity between NA1 and NA2 individuals was readily apparent with the E-ConA probe (which is independent of Fc gamma RII) and (b) the difference in phagocytosis of EA was magnified by Fc gamma RII blockade. The demonstration that allelic

  18. Dopamine D{sub 3} receptor gene: Organization transcript variants, and polymorphism associated with schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Griffon, N.; Pilon, C.; Martres, M.P.

    1996-02-16

    DNA fragments from a genomic library were used to establish the partial structure of the human dopamine D{sub 3} receptor gene (DRD3). Its coding sequence contains 6 exons and stretches over 40,000 base pairs. The complete DRD3 transcript and three shorter variants, in which the second and/or third exon are deleted, were detected in similar proportions in brains from four controls and three psychiatric patients. The Msp I polymorphism was localized in the fifth intron of the gene, 40,000 base pairs downstream the Bal I polymorphism and a PCR-based method was developed for genotyping this polymorphism. The distributions of the Msp I and Bal I genotypes were not independent in 297 individuals ({chi}{sup 2} = 10.5, df = 4, P = 0.03), but only a weak association was found between allele 1 of the Bal I polymorphism and allele 2 of the Msp I polymorphism ({chi}{sup 2} = 3.99, df = 1, P = 0.04). The previously reported association between homozygosity at both alleles of the Bal I polymorphism and schizophrenia was presently maintained in an extended sample, comprising 119 DSM-III-R chronic schizophrenics and 85 controls ({chi}{sup 2}= 5.3, df = 1, P = 0.02) and found more important in males than in females. The presence of the Bal I allele 2 is associated with an early age at onset, particularly in males (df = 35, t value = 2.6, P = 0.014). In the same sample, allelic frequencies, genotype counts, and proportion of homozygotes for the Msp I polymorphism did not differ between schizophrenics and controls ({chi}{sup 2}= 0.06, df = 1, P = 0.80, {chi}{sup 2} = 0.22, df = 1, P = 0.90 and {chi}{sup 2} = 0.16, df = 1, P = 0.69, respectively). The large distance of the Msp I polymorphism from the Bal I polymorphism and its localization in the 3{prime} part of the gene may explain the discrepant results obtained with the two polymorphisms. 36 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Preferential association of a functional variant in complement receptor 2 with antibodies to double-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian; Giles, Brendan M; Taylor, Rhonda L; Yette, Gabriel A; Lough, Kara M; Ng, Han Leng; Abraham, Lawrence J; Wu, Hui; Kelly, Jennifer A; Glenn, Stuart B; Adler, Adam J; Williams, Adrienne H; Comeau, Mary E; Ziegler, Julie T; Marion, Miranda; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Alarcón, Graciela S; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Dam; Lee, Hye-Soon; Criswell, Lindsey A; Freedman, Barry I; Gilkeson, Gary S; Guthridge, Joel M; Jacob, Chaim O; James, Judith A; Kamen, Diane L; Merrill, Joan T; Sivils, Kathy Moser; Niewold, Timothy B; Petri, Michelle A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Reveille, John D; Scofield, R Hal; Stevens, Anne M; Vilá, Luis M; Vyse, Timothy J; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Harley, John B; Langefeld, Carl D; Gaffney, Patrick M; Brown, Elizabeth E; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P; Ulgiati, Daniela; Tsao, Betty P; Boackle, Susan A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; OMIM 152700) is characterised by the production of antibodies to nuclear antigens. We previously identified variants in complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) that were associated with decreased risk of SLE. This study aimed to identify the causal variant for this association. Methods Genotyped and imputed genetic variants spanning CR2 were assessed for association with SLE in 15 750 case-control subjects from four ancestral groups. Allele-specific functional effects of associated variants were determined using quantitative real-time PCR, quantitative flow cytometry, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-PCR. Results The strongest association signal was detected at rs1876453 in intron 1 of CR2 (pmeta=4.2×10−4, OR 0.85), specifically when subjects were stratified based on the presence of dsDNA autoantibodies (case-control pmeta=7.6×10−7, OR 0.71; case-only pmeta=1.9×10−4, OR 0.75). Although allele-specific effects on B cell CR2 mRNA or protein levels were not identified, levels of complement receptor 1 (CR1/CD35) mRNA and protein were significantly higher on B cells of subjects harbouring the minor allele (p=0.0248 and p=0.0006, respectively). The minor allele altered the formation of several DNA protein complexes by EMSA, including one containing CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), an effect that was confirmed by ChIP-PCR. Conclusions These data suggest that rs1876453 in CR2 has long-range effects on gene regulation that decrease susceptibility to lupus. Since the minor allele at rs1876453 is preferentially associated with reduced risk of the highly specific dsDNA autoantibodies that are present in preclinical, active and severe lupus, understanding its mechanisms will have important therapeutic implications. PMID:25180293

  20. Cysteine 27 Variant of the δ-Opioid Receptor Affects Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing through Altered Endocytic Trafficking ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sarajärvi, Timo; Tuusa, Jussi T.; Haapasalo, Annakaisa; Lackman, Jarkko J.; Sormunen, Raija; Helisalmi, Seppo; Roehr, Johannes T.; Parrado, Antonio R.; Mäkinen, Petra; Bertram, Lars; Soininen, Hilkka; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Petäjä-Repo, Ulla E.; Hiltunen, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    Agonist-induced activation of the δ-opioid receptor (δOR) was recently shown to augment β- and γ-secretase activities, which increased the production of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), known to accumulate in the brain tissues of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Previously, the δOR variant with a phenylalanine at position 27 (δOR-Phe27) exhibited more efficient receptor maturation and higher stability at the cell surface than did the less common cysteine (δOR-Cys27) variant. For this study, we expressed these variants in human SH-SY5Y and HEK293 cells expressing exogenous or endogenous amyloid precursor protein (APP) and assessed the effects on APP processing. Expression of δOR-Cys27, but not δOR-Phe27, resulted in a robust accumulation of the APP C83 C-terminal fragment and the APP intracellular domain, while the total soluble APP and, particularly, the β-amyloid 40 levels were decreased. These changes upon δOR-Cys27 expression coincided with decreased localization of APP C-terminal fragments in late endosomes and lysosomes. Importantly, a long-term treatment with a subset of δOR-specific ligands or a c-Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor suppressed the δOR-Cys27-induced APP phenotype. These data suggest that an increased constitutive internalization and/or concurrent signaling of the δOR-Cys27 variant affects APP processing through altered endocytic trafficking of APP. PMID:21464208

  1. A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Gary K; Vachon, Celine M; Canzian, Federico; Dunning, Alison; Millikan, Robert C; Wang, Xianshu; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ahmed, Shahana; Ambrosone, Christine B; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berg, Christine D; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J; Brauch, Hiltrud; Buring, Julie E; Carey, Lisa A; Carpenter, Jane E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chasman, Daniel I; Clarke, Christine L; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Deming, Sandra L; Diasio, Robert B; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M; Driver, W Ryan; Dünnebier, Thomas; Durcan, Lorraine; Eccles, Diana; Edlund, Christopher K; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Feigelson, Heather S; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fostira, Florentia; Försti, Asta; Fountzilas, George; Gerty, Susan M; Giles, Graham G; Godwin, Andrew K; Goodfellow, Paul; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hamann, Ute; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Holbrook, Andrea; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Jennifer J; Hunter, David J; Ingles, Sue A; Irwanto, Astrid; Ivanovich, Jennifer; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nicola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Kolonel, Laurence N; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kulkarni, Swati; Lambrechts, Diether; Lee, Adam M; Marchand, Loïc Le; Lesnick, Timothy; Liu, Jianjun; Lindstrom, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Martin, Nicholas G; Miron, Penelope; Montgomery, Grant W; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stephan; Nyante, Sarah; Olswold, Curtis; Palmer, Julie; Pathak, Harsh; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Perou, Charles M; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pooler, Loreall C; Press, Michael F; Pylkäs, Katri; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rosenberg, Lynn; Ross, Eric; Rüdiger, Thomas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Sawyer, Elinor; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Schumacher, Fredrick; Severi, Gianluca; Sheng, Xin; Signorello, Lisa B; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Stevens, Kristen N; Southey, Melissa C; Tapper, William J; Tomlinson, Ian; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Wauters, Els; Weaver, JoEllen; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Van Den Berg, David; Wan, Peggy; Xia, Lucy Y; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Siddiq, Afshan; Slager, Susan L; Stram, Daniel O; Easton, Douglas; Kraft, Peter; Henderson, Brian E; Couch, Fergus J

    2011-10-30

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10(-10)). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10(-9)), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10(-9)). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations.

  2. Whole genome sequencing of an African American family highlights toll like receptor 6 variants in Kawasaki disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Levy, Eric; Ribeiro dos Santos, Andre M.; Yang, Hai; Hibberd, Martin L.; Tremoulet, Adriana H.; Harismendy, Olivier; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Burns, Jane C.

    2017-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common acquired pediatric heart disease. We analyzed Whole Genome Sequences (WGS) from a 6-member African American family in which KD affected two of four children. We sought rare, potentially causative genotypes by sequentially applying the following WGS filters: sequence quality scores, inheritance model (recessive homozygous and compound heterozygous), predicted deleteriousness, allele frequency, genes in KD-associated pathways or with significant associations in published KD genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and with differential expression in KD blood transcriptomes. Biologically plausible genotypes were identified in twelve variants in six genes in the two affected children. The affected siblings were compound heterozygous for the rare variants p.Leu194Pro and p.Arg247Lys in Toll-like receptor 6 (TLR6), which affect TLR6 signaling. The affected children were also homozygous for three common, linked (r2 = 1) intronic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in TLR6 (rs56245262, rs56083757 and rs7669329), that have previously shown association with KD in cohorts of European descent. Using transcriptome data from pre-treatment whole blood of KD subjects (n = 146), expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses were performed. Subjects homozygous for the intronic risk allele (A allele of TLR6 rs56245262) had differential expression of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) as a function of genotype (p = 0.0007) and a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate at diagnosis. TLR6 plays an important role in pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition, and sequence variations may affect binding affinities that in turn influence KD susceptibility. This integrative genomic approach illustrates how the analysis of WGS in multiplex families with a complex genetic disease allows examination of both the common disease–common variant and common disease–rare variant hypotheses. PMID:28151979

  3. Toll-like receptor 4 variant D299G is associated with susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zareparsi, Sepideh; Buraczynska, Monika; Branham, Kari E H; Shah, Sapna; Eng, Donna; Li, Mingyao; Pawar, Hemant; Yashar, Beverly M; Moroi, Sayoko E; Lichter, Paul R; Petty, Howard R; Richards, Julia E; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Elner, Victor M; Swaroop, Anand

    2005-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a genetically heterogeneous disease that leads to progressive and irreversible vision loss among the elderly. Inflammation, oxidative damage, cholesterol metabolism and/or impaired function of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) have been implicated in AMD pathogenesis. We examined toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) as a candidate gene for AMD susceptibility because: (i) the TLR4 gene is located on chromosome 9q32-33, a region exhibiting evidence of linkage to AMD in three independent reports; (ii) the TLR4-D299G variant is associated with reduced risk of atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease with subendothelial accumulation; (iii) the TLR4 is not only a key mediator of proinflammatory signaling pathways but also linked to regulation of cholesterol efflux and (iv) the TLR4 participates in phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments by the RPE. We examined D299G and T399I variants of TLR4 in a sample of 667 unrelated AMD patients and 439 unrelated controls, all of Caucasian ancestry. Multiple logistic regression demonstrated an increased risk of AMD in carriers of the G allele at TLR4 residue 299 (odds ratio=2.65, P=0.025), but lack of an independent effect by T399I variant. TLR4-D299G showed an additive effect on AMD risk (odds ratio=4.13, P=0.002) with allelic variants of apolipoprotein E (APOE) and ATP-binding cassette transporter-1 (ABCA1), two genes involved in cholesterol efflux. Interestingly, the effect of TLR4, APOE and ABCA1 variants on AMD susceptibility was opposite to that of association with atherosclerosis risk. Our data provide evidence of a link between multiple diverse mechanisms underlying AMD pathogenesis.

  4. Receptor dimerization is not a factor in the signalling activity of a transforming variant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII).

    PubMed Central

    Chu, C T; Everiss, K D; Wikstrand, C J; Batra, S K; Kung, H J; Bigner, D D

    1997-01-01

    The type-III deletion variant of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) is frequently found in glioblastomas and other malignant human tumours. Although EGFRvIII confers ligand-independent oncogenic transformation of cell lines, the mechanism by which it promotes aberrant cellular proliferation is unknown. Using cell lines expressing comparable numbers of either wild-type receptor (EGFRwt) or EGFRvIII, we compared several parameters of receptor activation: dimerization, tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of intracellular signalling proteins. Like activated EGFRwt, EGFRvIII was phosphorylated and bound constitutively to the Shc adapter protein. Indeed, EGFRvIII-associated Shc had a higher phosphotyrosine content than Shc associated with stimulated EGFRwt. EGFRwt dimerized in response to either EGF or transforming growth factor alpha. Higher cross-linker concentrations and incubation at higher temperatures (37 degrees C) allowed detection of EGFRwt dimers even in the absence of exogenous ligand. In contrast, EGFRvIII failed to dimerize under any conditions studied. Moreover, neither mitogen-activated protein kinase nor phospholipase Cgamma were phosphorylated in EGFRvIII-expressing cells. We conclude that the deletion of 267 amino acids from the 621-amino-acid N-terminal domain of EGFR does not result simply in a constitutively activated receptor, but alters the spectrum of signalling cascades utilized. Furthermore the ligand-independent transforming activity of EGFRvIII is independent of receptor dimerization. PMID:9210410

  5. The expression of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and splice variants of its receptor in human gastroenteropancreatic carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Busto, Rebeca; Schally, Andrew V.; Varga, Jozsef L.; Garcia-Fernandez, M. Olga; Groot, Kate; Armatis, Patricia; Szepeshazi, Karoly

    2002-01-01

    Splice variants (SVs) of receptors for growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) have been found in primary human prostate cancers and diverse human cancer cell lines. GHRH antagonists inhibit growth of various experimental human cancers, including pancreatic and colorectal, xenografted into nude mice or cultured in vitro, and their antiproliferative action could be mediated in part through SVs of GHRH receptors. In this study we examined the expression of mRNA for GHRH and for SVs of its receptors in tumors of human pancreatic, colorectal, and gastric cancer cell lines grown in nude mice. mRNA for both GHRH and SV1 isoform of GHRH receptors was expressed in tumors of pancreatic (SW1990, PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2, Capan-1, Capan-2, and CFPAC1), colonic (COLO 320DM and HT-29), and gastric (NCI-N87, HS746T, and AGS) cancer cell lines; mRNA for SV2 was also present in Capan-1, Capan-2, CFPAC1, HT-29, and NCI-N87 tumors. In proliferation studies in vitro, the growth of pancreatic, colonic, and gastric cancer cells was stimulated by GHRH(1–29)NH2 and inhibited by GHRH antagonist JV-1–38. The stimulation of some gastroenteropancreatic cancer cells by GHRH was followed by an increase in cAMP production, and GHRH antagonist JV-1–38 competitively inhibited this effect. Our study indicates the presence of an autocrine/paracrine stimulatory loop based on GHRH and SV1 of GHRH receptors in human pancreatic, colorectal, and gastric cancers. The finding of SV1 receptor in human cancers provides an approach to an antitumor therapy based on the blockade of this receptor by specific GHRH antagonists. PMID:12186980

  6. A splicing variant of the androgen receptor detected in a metastatic prostate cancer exhibits exclusively cytoplasmic actions.

    PubMed

    Jagla, Monika; Fève, Marie; Kessler, Pascal; Lapouge, Gaëlle; Erdmann, Eva; Serra, Sebastian; Bergerat, Jean-Pierre; Céraline, Jocelyn

    2007-09-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that displays genomic actions characterized by binding to androgen-response elements in the promoter of target genes as well as nongenomic actions that do not require nuclear translocation and DNA binding. In this study, we report exclusive cytoplasmic actions of a splicing variant of the AR detected in a metastatic prostate cancer. This AR variant, named AR23, results from an aberrant splicing of intron 2, wherein the last 69 nucleotides of the intronic sequence are retained, leading to the insertion of 23 amino acids between the two zinc fingers in the DNA-binding domain. We show that the nuclear entry of AR23 upon dihydrotestosterone (DHT) stimulation is impaired. Alternatively, DHT-activated AR23 forms cytoplasmic and perinuclear aggregates that partially colocalize with the endoplasmic reticulum and are devoid of genomic actions. However, in LNCaP cells, this cytoplasmic DHT-activated AR23 remains partially active as evidenced by the activation of transcription from androgen-responsive promoters, the stimulation of NF-kappaB transcriptional activity and by the decrease of AP-1 transcriptional activity. Our data reveal novel cytoplasmic actions for this splicing AR variant, suggesting a contribution in prostate cancer progression.

  7. Adenosine A(2A) receptor gene (ADORA2A) variants may increase autistic symptoms and anxiety in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Christine M; Agelopoulos, Konstantin; Huy, Ellen; Rothermundt, Matthias; Krakowitzky, Petra; Meyer, Jobst; Deckert, Jürgen; von Gontard, Alexander; Hohoff, Christa

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are heterogeneous disorders presenting with increased rates of anxiety. The adenosine A(2A) receptor gene (ADORA2A) is associated with panic disorder and is located on chromosome 22q11.23. Its gene product, the adenosine A(2A) receptor, is strongly expressed in the caudate nucleus, which also is involved in ASD. As autistic symptoms are increased in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and large 22q11.2 deletions and duplications have been observed in ASD individuals, in this study, 98 individuals with ASD and 234 control individuals were genotyped for eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ADORA2A. Nominal association with the disorder was observed for rs2236624-CC, and phenotypic variability in ASD symptoms was influenced by rs3761422, rs5751876 and rs35320474. In addition, association of ADORA2A variants with anxiety was replicated for individuals with ASD. Findings point toward a possible mediating role of ADORA2A variants on phenotypic expression in ASD that need to be replicated in a larger sample.

  8. Antimitotic activity of DY131 and the estrogen-related receptor beta 2 (ERRβ2) splice variant in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heckler, Mary M.; Zeleke, Tizita Zewde; Divekar, Shailaja D.; Fernandez, Aileen I.; Tiek, Deanna M.; Woodrick, Jordan; Farzanegan, Alexander; Roy, Rabindra; Üren, Aykut; Mueller, Susette C.; Riggins, Rebecca B.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in women, and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) lacks clinically actionable therapeutic targets. Death in mitosis is a tumor suppressive mechanism that occurs in cancer cells experiencing a defective M phase. The orphan estrogen-related receptor beta (ERRβ) is a key reprogramming factor in murine embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. In primates, ERRβ is alternatively spliced to produce several receptor isoforms. In cellular models of glioblastoma, short form (ERRβsf) and beta2 (ERRβ2) splice variants differentially regulate cell cycle progression in response to the synthetic agonist DY131, with ERRβ2 driving arrest in G2/M. The goals of the present study are to determine the cellular function(s) of ligand-activated ERRβ splice variants in breast cancer and evaluate the potential of DY131 to serve as an antimitotic agent, particularly in TNBC. DY131 inhibits growth in a diverse panel of breast cancer cell lines, causing cell death that involves the p38 stress kinase pathway and a bimodal cell cycle arrest. ERRβ2 facilitates the block in G2/M, and DY131 delays progression from prophase to anaphase. Finally, ERRβ2 localizes to centrosomes and DY131 causes mitotic spindle defects. Targeting ERRβ2 may therefore be a promising therapeutic strategy in breast cancer. PMID:27363015

  9. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Leonard C.; Simon, Lukas M.; Lindsay, Cory R.; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E.; Chen, Edward S.; Ma, Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Human platelets express 2 thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR4. Recently, we reported 3.7-fold increased PAR4-mediated aggregation kinetics in platelets from black subjects compared with white subjects. We now show that platelets from blacks (n = 70) express 14% more PAR4 protein than those from whites (n = 84), but this difference is not associated with platelet PAR4 function. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified 3 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAR4 gene (F2RL3) associated with PAR4-induced platelet aggregation. Among these single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs773902 determines whether residue 120 in transmembrane domain 2 is an alanine (Ala) or threonine (Thr). Compared with the Ala120 variant, Thr120 was more common in black subjects than in white subjects (63% vs 19%), was associated with higher PAR4-induced human platelet aggregation and Ca2+ flux, and generated greater inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in transfected cells. A second, less frequent F2RL3 variant, Phe296Val, was only observed in blacks and abolished the enhanced PAR4-induced platelet aggregation and 1,4,5-triphosphate generation associated with PAR4-Thr120. PAR4 genotype did not affect vorapaxar inhibition of platelet PAR1 function, but a strong pharmacogenetic effect was observed with the PAR4-specific antagonist YD-3 [1-benzyl-3(ethoxycarbonylphenyl)-indazole]. These findings may have an important pharmacogenetic effect on the development of new PAR antagonists. PMID:25293779

  10. Variants near CCK receptors are associated with electrophysiological responses to prepulse startle stimuli in a Mexican American cohort

    PubMed Central

    Norden-Krichmar, Trina M.; Gizer, Ian R.; Phillips, Evelyn; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2016-01-01

    Neurophysiological measurements of the response to prepulse and startle stimuli have been suggested to represent an important endophenotype for both substance dependence and other select psychiatric disorders. We have previously shown, in young adult Mexican Americans (MA), that presentation of a short delay acoustic prepulse, prior to the startle stimuli can elicit a late negative component at about 400 msec (N4S), in the event-related potential (ERP), recorded from frontal cortical areas. In the present study we investigated whether genetic factors associated with this endophenotype could be identified. The study included 420 (age 18 – 30 years) MA men (n=170) and women (n=250). DNA was genotyped using an Affymetrix Axiom Exome1A chip. An association analysis revealed that the CCKAR and CCKBR (cholecystokinin A and B receptor) genes each had a nearby variant that showed suggestive significance with the amplitude of the N4S component to prepulse stimuli. The neurotransmitter cholecystokinin (CCK), along with its receptors, CCKAR and CCKBR, have been previously associated with psychiatric disorders, suggesting that variants near these genes may play a role in the prepulse/startle response in this cohort. PMID:26608796

  11. Relationship Between Genotype Variants Follicle-stimulating Hormone Receptor Gene Polymorphisms (FSHR) and Morphology of Oocytes Prior to ICSI Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Gashi, Zafer; Elezaj, Shkelzen; Zeqiraj, Afrim; Grabanica, Driton; Shabani, Isak; Gruda, Bujar; Gashi, Fitore

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated association of Asn680Ser FSHR polymorphism with the ovarian response in 104 women of Albanian ethnic population enrolled in ICSI program. The reason of infertility in all cases has been identified as male factor. Methods: Analysis of the Asn680Ser polymorphism was performed using TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assay. Clinical and endocrinologic parameters were analyzed based on the genotype, age, BMI, oocyte yield, number of transferred embryos and pregnancy rate. Results: The frequencies of the Asn680 Ser genotype variants were as follows: Asn/Asn 22.1%, Asn/Ser 47.1%, and Ser/Ser 30.8%, respectively. BMI was significantly higher in the Ser/Ser group as compared to those from the Asn/Ser or the Asn/Asn group (p= 0.0010). The genotype variants Ser/Ser indicates a higher rate of oocyte retrieval (25.9%) in the immature form, metaphase I (MI) as opposed to the other two groups (Asn/Asn 23.7 % vs. Asn/Ser 21.9%), which was statistically significant (p = 0.3020). Conclusions: FSH receptor polymorphism is associated with different ovarian response to controlled ovarian stimulation (COS), but is not an important factor in increasing the degree of pregnancy. Polymorphisms of the FSH receptor is associated with normal morphology and genetic maturation (metaphase II) oocytes in dependence of genotypic variation polymorphisms. PMID:27994298

  12. Envelope determinants for dual-receptor specificity in feline leukemia virus subgroup A and T variants.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Heather H; Anderson, Maria M; Hankenson, F Claire; Johnston, Lily; Kotwaliwale, Chitra V; Overbaugh, Julie

    2006-02-01

    Gammaretroviruses, including the subgroups A, B, and C of feline leukemia virus (FeLV), use a multiple-membrane-spanning transport protein as a receptor. In some cases, such as FeLV-T, a nonclassical receptor that includes both a transport protein (Pit1) and a soluble cofactor (FeLIX) is required for entry. To define which regions confer specificity to classical versus nonclassical receptor pathways, we engineered mutations found in either FeLV-A/T or FeLV-T, individually and in combination, into the backbone of the transmissible form of the virus, FeLV-A. The receptor specificities of these viruses were tested by measuring infection and binding to cells expressing the FeLV-A receptor or the FeLV-T receptors. FeLV-A receptor specificity was maintained when changes at amino acid position 6, 7, or 8 of the mature envelope glycoprotein were introduced, although differences in infection efficiency were observed. When these N-terminal mutations were introduced together with a C-terminal 4-amino-acid insertion and an adjacent amino acid change, the resulting viruses acquired FeLV-T receptor specificity. Additionally, a W-->L change at amino acid position 378, although not required, enhanced infectivity for some viruses. Thus, we have found that determinants in the N and C termini of the envelope surface unit can direct entry via the nonclassical FeLV-T receptor pathway. The region that has been defined as the receptor binding domain of gammaretroviral envelope proteins determined entry via the FeLV-A receptor independently of the presence of the N- and C-terminal FeLV-T receptor determinants.

  13. The Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Q63R Variant Modulates the Relationship between Childhood Obesity and Age at Menarche

    PubMed Central

    Torella, Marco; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Nobili, Bruno; Perrone, Laura; Maione, Sabatino; Rossi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Background The ovary is an important site where gene variants modulate pubertal timing. The cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) is expressed in the ovary, plays a role in folliculogenesis and ovulation, and can be modulated by estrogens. Obesity is strictly associated with early menarche and is characterized by sex hormone and endocannabinoid derangement. Aim In this study, we investigated the role of the CB2 receptor in determining the age at menarche in obese girls. Methods We studied a cohort of 240 obese girls (age 11.9±3 years; BMI z-score 2.8±0.8). The age at menarche (if it had already occurred) was recorded at the time of the visit or via phonecall. The CNR2 rs35761398 polymorphism, which leads to the CB2 Q63R variant, was detected by the TaqMan assay. Results In total, 105 patients were homozygous for the R63-coding allele (RR), 113 were QR and 22 were QQ. Variance analysis revealed a significantly earlier age of menarche in subjects carrying the Q63 allele, which was also found after adjusting for BMI z-score (11±1.2 vs. 11.6±1.2 years, p = 0.0003). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that patients homozygous for the Q allele had a 2.2-fold higher risk (odds ratio = 2.2; CI1.1–3.4; p = 0.02) of presenting with an early menarche (age at menarche <12 years). Conclusion We demonstrated for the first time the association between the CB2 Q63R functional variant and the age at menarche in a cohort of Italian obese girls. PMID:26447698

  14. Calcium-independent inhibition of PCSK9 by affinity-improved variants of the LDL receptor EGF(A) domain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingnan; Zhou, Lijuan; Kong-Beltran, Monica; Li, Wei; Moran, Paul; Wang, Jianyong; Quan, Clifford; Tom, Jeffrey; Kolumam, Ganesh; Elliott, J Michael; Skelton, Nicholas J; Peterson, Andrew S; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2012-10-05

    LDL (low-density lipoprotein) receptor (LDLR) binds to its negative regulator proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) through the first EGF (epidermal growth factor-like) domain [EGF(A)]. The isolated EGF(A) domain is a poor antagonist due to its low affinity for PCSK9. To improve binding affinity, we used a phage display approach by randomizing seven PCSK9 contact residues of EGF(A), including the Ca(2+)-coordinating Asp310. The library was panned in Ca(2+)-free solution, and 26 unique clones that bind to PCSK9 were identified. Four selected variants demonstrated improved inhibitory activities in a PCSK9-LDLR competition binding ELISA. The Fc fusion protein of variant EGF66 bound to PCSK9 with a K(d) value of 71 nM versus 935 nM of wild type [EGF(A)-Fc] and showed significantly improved potency in inhibiting LDLR degradation in vitro and in vivo. The five mutations in EGF66 could be modeled in the EGF(A) structure without perturbation of the EGF domain fold, and their contribution to affinity improvement could be rationalized. The most intriguing change was the substitution of the Ca(2+)-coordinating Asp310 by a Lys residue, whose side-chain amine may have functionally replaced Ca(2+). EGF66-Fc and other EGF variants having the Asp310Lys change bound to PCSK9 in a Ca(2+)-independent fashion. The findings indicate that randomization of an important Ca(2+)-chelating residue in conjunction with "selection pressure" applied by Ca(2+)-free phage selection conditions can yield variants with an alternatively stabilized Ca(2+) loop and with increased binding affinities. This approach may provide a new paradigm for the use of diversity libraries to improve affinities of members of the Ca(2+)-binding EGF domain subfamily.

  15. Cannabinoid Receptor 2-63 QQ Variant Is Associated with Persistently Normal Aminotransferase Serum Levels in Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; Zampino, Rosa; Sagnelli, Caterina; Bellini, Giulia; Marrone, Aldo; Stanzione, Maria; Capoluongo, Nicolina; Boemio, Adriana; Minichini, Carmine; Adinolfi, Luigi Elio; Maione, Sabatino; Giudice, Emanuele Miraglia Del; Sagnelli, Evangelista; Rossi, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim To evaluate in anti-HCV-positive patients the clinical impact of the rs35761398 variant of the CNR2 gene leading to the substitution of Gln (Q) of codon 63 of the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) with Arg (R). Patients and Methods 253 consecutive anti-HCV-/HCV-RNA-positive patients were enrolled, of whom 53 were HCV carriers with persistently normal ALT (PNALT group) and 200 had a history of steadily abnormal serum ALT values (abnormal ALT group). All patients were naive for antiviral therapy and were screened for the CNR2 rs35761398 polymorphism by a TaqMan assay. Results Subjects in the PNALT group, compared with those in the abnormal ALT group were older (58.5±12 vs. 50.7±12.4 years, p = 0.001), more frequently female (66% vs. 42%, p = 0.003), with lower body massindex (BMI) (24.5±3.1 vs. 26.6±4.6, p = 0.003), and more frequently with HCV genotype 2 (43.1% vs 17.7%, p = 0.0002) and CB2-63 QQ variant (34% vs. 11%, p = 0.0001). Considering all 253 patients, no difference in the demographic, biochemical, or virological data was observed between patients in the different CB2-63 variants. The logistic regression analysis identified CB2-63 QQ, HCV genotype 2, older age and lower BMI as independent predictors of PNALT (p<0.00001). Discussion The CB2-63 QQ variant in HCV patients was independently associated with the PNALT status. PMID:24940753

  16. A Novel Androgen Receptor Splice Variant Is Upregulated during Prostate Cancer Progression and Promotes Androgen-depletion-resistant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiyong; Yang, Xi; Sun, Feng; Jiang, Richeng; Linn, Douglas E.; Chen, Hege; Chen, Hegang; Kong, Xiangtian; Melamed, Jonathan; Tepper, Clifford G.; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Brodie, Angela M. H.; Edwards, Joanne; Qiu, Yun

    2009-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a key role in progression to incurable androgen-ablation resistant prostate cancer (PCA). We have identified three novel AR splice variants lacking the ligand binding domain (designated as AR3, AR4 and AR5) in hormone insensitive PCA cells. AR3, one of the major splice variants expressed in human prostate tissues, is constitutively active and its transcriptional activity is not regulated by androgens or antiandrogens. Immunohistochemistry analysis on tissue microarrays containing 429 human prostate tissue samples shows that AR3 is significantly upregulated during PCA progression and AR3 expression level is correlated with the risk of tumor recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Overexpression of AR3 confers ablation-independent growth of PCA cells while specific knock-down of AR3 expression (without altering AR level) in hormone resistant PCA cells attenuates their growth under androgen-depleted conditions in both cell culture and xenograft models, suggesting an indispensable role of AR3 in ablation-independent growth of PCA cells. Furthermore, AR3 may play a distinct yet essential role in ablation-independent growth through regulating a unique set of genes including AKT1, which are not regulated by the prototype AR. Our data suggest that aberrant expression of AR splice variants may be a novel mechanism underlying ablation-independence during PCA progression and AR3 may serve as a prognostic marker to predict patient outcome in response to hormonal therapy. Given that these novel AR splice variants are not inhibited by currently available anti-androgen drugs, development of new drugs targeting these AR isoforms may potentially be effective for treatment of ablation-resistant PCA. PMID:19244107

  17. Expression, assembly and function of novel C-terminal truncated variants of the mouse P2X7 receptor: re-evaluation of P2X7 knockouts

    PubMed Central

    Masin, Marianela; Young, Christopher; Lim, KoiNi; Barnes, Sara J; Xu, Xing Jian; Marschall, Viola; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Mooney, Elizabeth R; Gorecki, Dariusz C; Murrell-Lagnado, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Splice variants of P2X7 receptor transcripts contribute to the diversity of receptor-mediated responses. Here, we investigated expression and function of C-terminal truncated (ΔC) variants of the mP2X7 receptor, which are predicted to escape inactivation in one strain of P2X7−/− mice (Pfizer KO). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression in wild-type (WT) and Pfizer KO tissue was investigated by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and Western blot analysis. ΔC variants were also cloned and expressed in HEK293 cells to investigate their assembly, trafficking and function. KEY RESULTS RT-PCR indicates expression of a ΔC splice variant in brain, salivary gland (SG) and spleen from WT and Pfizer KO mice. An additional ΔC hybrid transcript, containing sequences of P2X7 upstream of exon 12, part of exon 13 followed in-frame by the sequence of the vector used to disrupt the P2X7 gene, was also identified in the KO mice. By blue native (BN) PAGE analysis and the use of cross linking reagents followed by SDS-PAGE, P2X7 trimers, dimers and monomers were detected in the spleen and SG of Pfizer KO mice. The molecular mass was reduced compared with P2X7 in WT mice tissue, consistent with a ΔC variant. When expressed in HEK293 cells the ΔC variants were inefficiently trafficked to the cell surface and agonist-evoked whole cell currents were small. Co-expressed with P2X7A, the ΔC splice variant acted in a dominant negative fashion to inhibit function. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Pfizer KO mice are not null for P2X7 receptor expression but express ΔC variants with reduced function. PMID:21838754

  18. A commonly carried genetic variant in the delta opioid receptor gene, OPRD1, is associated with smaller regional brain volumes: replication in elderly and young populations.

    PubMed

    Roussotte, Florence F; Jahanshad, Neda; Hibar, Derrek P; Sowell, Elizabeth R; Kohannim, Omid; Barysheva, Marina; Hansell, Narelle K; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Toga, Arthur W; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-04-01

    Delta opioid receptors are implicated in a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders. These receptors play a key role in the reinforcing properties of drugs of abuse, and polymorphisms in OPRD1 (the gene encoding delta opioid receptors) are associated with drug addiction. Delta opioid receptors are also involved in protecting neurons against hypoxic and ischemic stress. Here, we first examined a large sample of 738 elderly participants with neuroimaging and genetic data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. We hypothesized that common variants in OPRD1 would be associated with differences in brain structure, particularly in regions relevant to addictive and neurodegenerative disorders. One very common variant (rs678849) predicted differences in regional brain volumes. We replicated the association of this single-nucleotide polymorphism with regional tissue volumes in a large sample of young participants in the Queensland Twin Imaging study. Although the same allele was associated with reduced volumes in both cohorts, the brain regions affected differed between the two samples. In healthy elderly, exploratory analyses suggested that the genotype associated with reduced brain volumes in both cohorts may also predict cerebrospinal fluid levels of neurodegenerative biomarkers, but this requires confirmation. If opiate receptor genetic variants are related to individual differences in brain structure, genotyping of these variants may be helpful when designing clinical trials targeting delta opioid receptors to treat neurological disorders.

  19. Low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 variant interacts with saturated fatty acids in Puerto Ricans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low density lipoprotein related receptor protein 1 (LRP1) is a multi-functional endocytic receptor that is highly expressed in adipocytes and the hypothalamus. Animal models and in vitro studies support a role for LRP1 in adipocyte metabolism and leptin signaling, but genetic polymorphisms have not ...

  20. Antigenic drift of the pandemic 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus in A ferret model.

    PubMed

    Guarnaccia, Teagan; Carolan, Louise A; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Lee, Raphael T C; Job, Emma; Reading, Patrick C; Petrie, Stephen; McCaw, James M; McVernon, Jodie; Hurt, Aeron C; Kelso, Anne; Mosse, Jennifer; Barr, Ian G; Laurie, Karen L

    2013-01-01

    Surveillance data indicate that most circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza viruses have remained antigenically similar since they emerged in humans in 2009. However, antigenic drift is likely to occur in the future in response to increasing population immunity induced by infection or vaccination. In this study, sequential passaging of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus by contact transmission through two independent series of suboptimally vaccinated ferrets resulted in selection of variant viruses with an amino acid substitution (N156K, H1 numbering without signal peptide; N159K, H3 numbering without signal peptide; N173K, H1 numbering from first methionine) in a known antigenic site of the viral HA. The N156K HA variant replicated and transmitted efficiently between naïve ferrets and outgrew wildtype virus in vivo in ferrets in the presence and absence of immune pressure. In vitro, in a range of cell culture systems, the N156K variant rapidly adapted, acquiring additional mutations in the viral HA that also potentially affected antigenic properties. The N156K escape mutant was antigenically distinct from wildtype virus as shown by binding of HA-specific antibodies. Glycan binding assays demonstrated the N156K escape mutant had altered receptor binding preferences compared to wildtype virus, which was supported by computational modeling predictions. The N156K substitution, and culture adaptations, have been detected in human A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses with N156K preferentially reported in sequences from original clinical samples rather than cultured isolates. This study demonstrates the ability of the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus to undergo rapid antigenic change to evade a low level vaccine response, while remaining fit in a ferret transmission model of immunization and infection. Furthermore, the potential changes in receptor binding properties that accompany antigenic changes highlight the importance of routine characterization of clinical samples in human A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza surveillance.

  1. Positive association between a DNA sequence variant in the serotonin 2A receptor gene and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Inayama, Y.; Yoneda, H.; Sakai, T.

    1996-02-16

    Sixty-two patients with schizophrenia and 96 normal controls were investigated for genetic association with restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in the serotonin receptor genes. A positive association between the serotonin 2A receptor gene (HTR2A) and schizophrenia was found, but not between schizophrenia and the serotonin 1A receptor gene. The positive association we report here would suggest that the DNA region with susceptibility to schizophrenia lies in the HTR2A on the long arm of chromosome 13. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Sun Exposure, Vitamin D Receptor Genetic Variants, and Risk of Breast Cancer in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Satagopan, Jaya; Sima, Camelia S.; Orlow, Irene; Mujumdar, Urvi; Coble, Joseph; Roy, Pampa; Yoo, Sarah; Sandler, Dale P.; Alavanja, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic evidence suggests a negative relation between sunlight exposure and breast cancer risk. The hypothesized mechanism is sunlight-induced cutaneous synthesis of vitamin D. Objectives: Our goal was to examine sun exposure and its interaction with vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene variants on breast cancer risk. Methods: We examined sun exposure and breast cancer incidence among 31,021 private pesticide applicators’ wives, including 578 cases, enrolled in the prospective Agricultural Health Study cohort and followed 8.6 years on average. We estimated interactions between sun exposure, VDR variants, and breast cancer in a nested case–control study comprising 293 cases and 586 matched controls. Information on sun exposure was obtained by questionnaire at cohort enrollment. Relative risks were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression for the cohort data and conditional logistic regression for the nested case–control data. Results: We observed a small decrease in breast cancer risk in association with usual sun exposure of ≥ 1 hr/day (versus < 1 hr/day) 10 years before the start of follow-up among all participants [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.8; 95% CI: 0.6, 1.0]. The association appeared to be slightly stronger in relation to estrogen receptor–positive tumors (HR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.5, 0.9) than estrogen receptor–negative tumors (HR = 1.1; 95% CI: 0.6, 2.1). The HR for joint exposure ≥ 1 hr/day of sunlight and one VDR haplotype was less than expected given negative HRs for each individual exposure (interaction p-value = 0.07). Conclusion: Our results suggest that sun exposure may be associated with reduced risk of breast cancer, but we did not find clear evidence of modification by VDR variants. Larger studies are warranted, particularly among populations in whom low levels of usual sun exposure can be more precisely characterized. Citation: Engel LS, Satagopan J, Sima CS, Orlow I, Mujumdar U, Coble J, Roy P, Yoo S, Sandler DP

  3. Characterization of melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor variant alleles in twins with red hair.

    PubMed

    Box, N F; Wyeth, J R; O'Gorman, L E; Martin, N G; Sturm, R A

    1997-10-01

    The association between MSHR coding region variation and hair colour in humans has been examined by genotyping 25 red haired and 62 non-red Caucasians, all of whom were 12 years of age and members of a twin pair study. Twelve amino acid substitutions were seen at 11 different sites, nine of these being newly described MSHR variants. The previously reported Val92Met allele shows no association with hair colour, but the three alleles Arg151Cys, Arg160Trp and Asp294His were associated with red hair and one Val60Leu variant was most frequent in fair/blonde and light brown hair colours. Variant MSHR genotypes are associated with lighter skin types and red hair (P < 0.001). However, comparison of the MSHR genotypes in dizygotic twin pairs discordant for red hair colour indicates that the MSHR gene cannot be solely responsible for the red hair phenotype, since five of 13 pairs tested had both haplotypes identical by state (with three of the five having both identical by descent). Rather, it is likely that additional modifier genes exist, making variance in the MSHR gene necessary but not always sufficient, for red hair production.

  4. Induction of AhR-Mediated Gene Transcription by Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toshio; Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Okinaga, Hiroko; Teramoto, Tamio

    2014-01-01

    Background Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is classically known to be activated by xenobiotics such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although it has been reported that PAHs are contained in roasted coffee beans, in general coffee beverages are not considered to be AhR activators. We tested whether exposure to coffee would activate AhR in cultured cells. Methods HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene were treated with coffee samples. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was quantitated by RT-PCR and Western blotting in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells, after treatment with coffee. In order to obtain sensitive and reproducible results, all the experiments were performed with the cells placed in either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or pure serum, instead of routinely-used culture medium, whose intrinsic AhR-stimulating activity turned out to be so strong as to interfere with the analyses. Results All the coffee samples tested robustly stimulated AhR-mediated transcription in the reporter gene assays. Of note, to what extent coffee and other AhR agonists activated AhR was different, depending on whether the experiments were done in PBS or serum. CYP1A1 mRNA was induced by coffee, in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells placed in either PBS or serum. CYP1A1 protein expression, which was not detected in these cells incubated in PBS, was also increased by coffee in cells placed in serum. Conclusions By using culture medium-free experimental settings, we have shown that coffee is a strong AhR activator. Our observation may help elucidate as-yet-unrecognized effects of coffee on human health. PMID:25007155

  5. Further association study on dopamine D2 receptor variant S311C in Schizophrenia and affective disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Arinami, Tadao; Hamaguchi, Hideo; Itokawa, Masanari; Aoki, Junichi; Shibuya, Haruo

    1996-04-09

    The dopamine D2 receptor gene is a candidate gene for schizophrenia because the potency of certain neuroleptics correlates with their affinity for this receptor. Case-control studies in 291 schizophrenics, 78 patients with affective disorders, and 579 controls on an association of a molecular variant of S311C of the dopamine D2 receptor with psychiatric disorders were conducted. The frequency of individuals with S311C was significantly higher in schizophrenics with the absence of negative symptoms (17.1%, P < 0.00001), but similar in schizophrenics with the presence of negative symptoms (5.7%, P = 0.46) when compared with the controls (4.1%). The frequency of S311C was significantly higher in familiar schizophrenics from one local area but not in those from other areas. It was significant that S311C was frequently present in patients with mood-incongruent psychotic affective disorders (33.3%, P < 0.0001), but not in those with other affective disorders. These data suggest that S311C might be one of the genetic factors for symptomatic dimensions of delusions and hallucinations and might be involved in underlying clinical heterogeneity in schizophrenia and affective disorders. 48 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Decreased agonist, but not antagonist, binding to the naturally occurring Thr92Lys variant of the h5-HT7(a) receptor.

    PubMed

    Brüss, Michael; Kiel, Sibylle; Bönisch, Heinz; Kostanian, Arevat; Göthert, Manfred

    2005-08-01

    In the present study on transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells, we aimed at establishing whether expression of the naturally occurring Thr92Lys variation of the Gs-coupled h5-HT7(a) receptor leads to changes of ligand binding properties, of agonist-evoked cAMP formation and/or of antagonist-mediated blockade of the latter. Binding of [3H]5-carboxamidotryptamine ([3H]5-CT) to membranes and stimulated [3H]cAMP accumulation in whole cells were determined. Saturation binding experiments in membranes of transiently transfected cells expressing either the wild-type or the variant receptor revealed a single binding site in both cases and no difference in Bmax between both receptor isoforms. In competition binding experiments in membranes of stably transfected cells, the Thr92Lys variant exhibited a 2.8-11 times lower binding affinity of the ligands 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-CT, 5-methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin-4yl)-1H-indole (RU24969), (+/-)-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) and sumatriptan compared to the wild-type receptor. However, the variant did not differ from the wild-type with respect to the binding properties of the antagonists (R)-3-(2-(2-(4-methylpiperidin-1-yl)ethyl)-pyrrolodine-1-sulfonyl)phenol hydrochloride (SB-269970), risperidone, mesulergine and clozapine. In agreement with the decreased binding affinity of 5-HT, 5-CT, RU24969 and 8-OH-DPAT for the variant receptor, these agonists were less potent in stimulating [3H]cAMP accumulation in cells stably expressing the Thr92Lys h5-HT7(a) receptor. Sumatriptan did not stimulate cAMP accumulation in spite of its affinity for both receptor isoforms pointing to a putative weak antagonistic property of this drug at the h5-HT7 receptor. SB-269970 and clozapine were equipotent at both the variant and the wild-type receptor in producing a rightward shift of the 5-HT concentration-response curve for its stimulant effect on [3H]cAMP accumulation. In view of, e.g., the

  7. AR intragenic deletions linked to androgen receptor splice variant expression and activity in models of prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Hwang, T H; Oseth, L A; Hauge, A; Vessella, R L; Schmechel, S C; Hirsch, B; Beckman, K B; Silverstein, K A; Dehm, S M

    2012-11-08

    Reactivation of the androgen receptor (AR) during androgen depletion therapy (ADT) underlies castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPCa). Alternative splicing of the AR gene and synthesis of constitutively active COOH-terminally truncated AR variants lacking the AR ligand-binding domain has emerged as an important mechanism of ADT resistance in CRPCa. In a previous study, we demonstrated that altered AR splicing in CRPCa 22Rv1 cells was linked to a 35-kb intragenic tandem duplication of AR exon 3 and flanking sequences. In this study, we demonstrate that complex patterns of AR gene copy number imbalances occur in PCa cell lines, xenografts and clinical specimens. To investigate whether these copy number imbalances reflect AR gene rearrangements that could be linked to splicing disruptions, we carried out a detailed analysis of AR gene structure in the LuCaP 86.2 and CWR-R1 models of CRPCa. By deletion-spanning PCR, we discovered a 8579-bp deletion of AR exons 5, 6 and 7 in the LuCaP 86.2 xenograft, which provides a rational explanation for synthesis of the truncated AR v567es AR variant in this model. Similarly, targeted resequencing of the AR gene in CWR-R1 cells led to the discovery of a 48-kb deletion in AR intron 1. This intragenic deletion marked a specific CWR-R1 cell population with enhanced expression of the truncated AR-V7/AR3 variant, a high level of androgen-independent AR transcriptional activity and rapid androgen independent growth. Together, these data demonstrate that structural alterations in the AR gene are linked to stable gain-of-function splicing alterations in CRPCa.

  8. Truncated Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Coactivator 1α Splice Variant Is Severely Altered in Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johri, Ashu; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Chandra, Abhishek; Hennessey, Thomas; Sharma, Abhijeet; Orobello, Sara; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Yang, Lichuan; Beal, M. Flint

    2011-01-01

    Background Reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α) gene expression has been observed in striatal cell lines, transgenic mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD), and brain tissue from HD patients. As this protein is a key transcription regulator of the expression of many mitochondrial proteins, these observations strongly support the role of aberrant mitochondrial function in the pathogenesis of HD. The PGC1α protein undergoes posttranslational modifications that affect its transcriptional activity. The N-truncated splice variant of PGC1α (NT-PGC1α) is produced in tissues, but the role of truncated splice variants of PGC1α in HD and in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression has not been elucidated. Objective To examine the expression and modulation of expression of NT-PGC1α levels in HD. Methods and Results We found that the NT-PGC1α protein, a splice variant of ∼38 kDa, but not full-length PGC1α is severely and consistently altered in human HD brain, human HD myoblasts, mouse HD models, and HD striatal cells. NT-PGC1α levels were significantly upregulated in HD cells and mouse brown fat by physiologically relevant stimuli that are known to upregulate PGC1α gene expression. This resulted in an increase in mitochondrial gene expression and cytochrome c content. Conclusion Our data suggest that NT-PGC1α is an important component of the PGC1α transcriptional network, which plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of HD. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:21757867

  9. Contributions of aryl hydrocarbon receptor genetic variants to the risk of glioma and PAH-DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Gu, Aihua; Ji, Guixiang; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Ailin; You, Yongping; Liu, Ning; Luo, Chengzhang; Yan, Wei; Zhao, Peng

    2012-08-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene is involved in the response to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure. To investigate the hypothesis that the genetic variants in the AHR gene might be a causal genetic susceptibility to PAH-DNA adduct formation and glioma risk, we conducted a case-control study of 384 glioma cases and 384 cancer-free controls to explore the association between six common single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the AHR gene and glioma risk. Using PAH-DNA adducts as biomarkers, we then evaluated the association between PAH-DNA adduct levels and glioma risk based on a tissue microarray including 11 controls and 77 glioma patients. We further explored the contributions of the glioma risk-associated AHR polymorphisms to the levels of PAH-DNA adducts in glioma tissues based on 77 glioma patients. We found that PAH-DNA adduct staining existed in normal brain tissues and grades I-IV gliomas, and the staining intensity was significantly associated with the glioma grade. Two AHR polymorphisms (rs2066853 and rs2158041) demonstrated significant association with glioma risk. Intriguingly, we also found statistically significant associations between these two variants and PAH-DNA adduct levels in glioma tissue. These data suggest the contributions of AHR rs2066853 and rs2158041 to glioma risk and the PAH-DNA adduct levels, which shed new light on gene-environment interactions in the etiology of glioma. Further studies with a larger sample size and ethnically diverse populations are required to elucidate the potential biological mechanism for, as well as the impact of, the susceptibility to glioma due to genetic variants of AHR.

  10. Genetic predisposition of variants in TLR2 and its co-receptors to severe malaria in Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Subhendu; Kar, Avishek; Tripathy, Sagnika; Mohapatra, Manoj K; Dhangadamajhi, Gunanidhi

    2016-02-01

    Although the role of TLRs signalling in malaria pathogenesis is well established, contribution of individual TLR to clinical outcome of malaria still remains inconclusive. Given the importance of TLR2 and its co-receptors in recognising distinct structural forms of key malaria toxins and mediating innate immune response, it is essential to delineate their genetic contribution. Variants in TLR1 (I602S) and TLR6 (P249S) were genotyped by PCR-RFLP methods, and TLR2 (I/D) was genotyped by PCR in 200 samples each from uncomplicated malaria (UM) and severe malaria (SM). Further, SM was categorised into its sub-clinical groups (CM and NCSM or SOD and MODS) and analysed. The results showed the PP genotype of TLR6 (P249S) to be significantly more common in UM (P < 0.0001), whereas the 'SS' genotype was the risk factor for SM including its sub-clinical categories. The TLR1 (602S) and TLR2 (D) variants were significantly high in patients with CM; however, negative LD was observed between TLR2 and TLR6 in NCSM and MODS. Haplotype analysis showed significantly high frequency of I-I-S haplotype in all forms of subclinical SM and was associated with low parasite load in SM (P = 0.013). The haplotypes I-D-S and S-I-P were significantly high in SOD and CM, respectively. The TLR6 '249S' variant appeared to be the dominant determinant for genetic predisposition to SM and that its association with either TLR2 'D' or TLR1 '602S' modulates for CM development. The present study opens up several new avenues for their exploration and validation in future studies in different global settings for malaria.

  11. The inhibition of lung cancer cell migration by AhR-regulated autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chi-Hao; Li, Ching-Hao; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Lee, Chen-Chen; Liao, Po-Lin; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Shih-Hsuan; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2017-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is highly expressed in multiple organs and tissues. Whereas AhR mediates the metabolism of xenobiotic and endogenous compounds, its novel function in cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) remains controversial. Autophagy also participates in tumour progression through its functions in cell homeostasis and facilitates adaptation to EMT progression. In the present study, we found that AhR-regulated autophagy positively modulates EMT in non-small cell lung cancer cells. The motility of A549, H1299, and CL1-5 cells were correlated with different AhR expression levels. Invasive potential and cell morphology also changed when AhR protein expression was altered. Moreover, AhR levels exerted a contrasting effect on autophagy potential. Autophagy was higher in CL1-5 and H1299 cells with lower AhR levels than in A549 cells. Both AhR overexpression and autophagy inhibition decreased CL1-5 metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, AhR promoted BNIP3 ubiquitination for proteasomal degradation. AhR silencing in A549 cells also reduced BNIP3 ubiquitination. Taken together, these results provide a novel insight into the cross-linking between AhR and autophagy, we addressed the mechanistic BNIP3 modulation by endogenous AhR, which affect cancer cell EMT progression. PMID:28195146

  12. Toll-Like Receptor (TLR)-Associated Sequence Variants and Prostate Cancer Risk among Men of African Descent

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Erica N.; Jones, Dominique; Kidd, Nayla C.; Yeyeodu, Susan; Brock, Guy; Ragin, Camille; Jackson, Maria; McFarlane-Anderson, Norma; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall; Kimbro, K. Sean; Kidd, LaCreis R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent advances demonstrate a relationship between chronic/recurrent inflammation and prostate cancer (PCA). Among inflammatory regulators, toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a critical role in innate immune responses. However, it remains unclear whether variant TLR genes influence PCA risk among men of African descent. Therefore, we evaluated the impact of 32 TLR-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on PCA risk among African-Americans and Jamaicans. METHODS SNP profiles of 814 subjects were evaluated using Illumina’s Veracode genotyping platform. Single and combined effects of SNPs in relation to PCA risk were assessed using age-adjusted logistic regression and entropy-based multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) models. RESULTS Seven sequence variants detected in TLR6, TOLLIP, IRAK4, IRF3 were marginally related to PCA. However, none of these effects remained significant after adjusting for multiple hypothesis testing. Nevertheless, MDR modeling revealed a complex interaction between IRAK4 rs4251545 and TLR2 rs1898830 as a significant predictor of PCA risk among U.S. men (permutation testing p-value = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS MDR identified an interaction between IRAK4 and TLR2 as the best two factor model for predicting PCA risk among men of African descent. However, these findings require further assessment and validation. PMID:23657238

  13. Functional Characterization of the α5(Asn398) Variant Associated with Risk for Nicotine Dependence in the α3β4α5 Nicotinic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; McCollum, Megan; Bracamontes, John; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2011-01-01

    Smoking is a major cause for premature death. Work aimed at identifying genetic factors that contribute to nicotine addiction has revealed several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are linked to smoking-related behaviors such as nicotine dependence and level of smoking. One of these SNPs leads to an aspartic acid-to-asparagine substitution in the nicotinic receptor α5 subunit at amino acid position 398 [rs16969968; α5(Asn398)]. The α5 subunit is expressed both in the brain and in the periphery. In the brain, it associates with the α4 and β2 subunits to form α4β2α5 receptors. In the periphery, the α5 subunit combines with the α3 and β4 subunits to form the major ganglionic postsynaptic nicotinic receptor subtype. The α3β4α5 receptor regulates a variety of autonomic responses such as control of cardiac rate, blood pressure, and perfusion. In this paradigm, the α5(Asn398) variant may act by regulating autonomic responses that may affect nicotine intake by humans. Here, we have investigated the effect of the α5(Asn398) variant on the function of the α3β4α5 receptor. The wild-type or variant α5 subunits were coexpressed with the α3 and β4 subunits in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The properties of the receptors were studied using whole-cell and single-channel electrophysiology. The data indicate that the introduction of the α5(Asn398) mutation has little effect on the pharmacology of receptor activation, receptor desensitization, or single-channel properties. We propose that the effect of the α5(Asn398) variant on nicotine use is not mediated by an action on the physiological or pharmacological properties of the α3β4α5 subtype. PMID:21856741

  14. Mouse RAGE Variant 4 Is a Dominant Membrane Receptor that Does Not Shed to Generate Soluble RAGE

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yunqian; Horwitz, Naftali; Lakatta, Edward G.; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multi-ligand, immunoglobulin-like receptor that has been implicated in aging-associated diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated that both human and murine Ager genes undergo extensive alternative splicing that generates multiple putative transcripts encoding different receptor isoforms. Except for the soluble isoform (esRAGE), the majority of putative RAGE isoforms remain unstudied. Profiling of murine Ager transcripts showed that variant transcript 4 (mRAGE_v4), the second most abundant transcript in lungs and multiple other tissues, encodes a receptor that lacks nine residues located within the C2 extracellular section close to the trans-membrane domain. We therefore characterized mRAGEV4 isoreceptor in comparison with the full-length mRAGE (mRAGEFL). Although differing in only nine residues, mRAGEFL and mRAGEV4 display very different cellular behaviors. While mRAGEFL undergoes constitutive, extensive shedding in the cell to generate sRAGE, mRAGEV4 hardly sheds. In addition, we found that while mRAGEFL can localize to both the plasma membrane and the endosome, mRAGEV4 is exclusively localized to the plasma membrane. These very different cellular localization patterns suggest that, in addition to their roles in sRAGE production, mRAGEFL and mRAGEV4 may play distinct, spatiotemporal roles in signaling and innate immune responses. Compared to mice, humans do not have the v4 transcript. Although hRAGE, like mRAGEFL, also localizes to the plasma membrane and the endosome, its rate of constitutive shedding is significantly lower. These observations provide valuable information regarding RAGE biology, and serve as a reference by which to create mouse models relating to human diseases. PMID:27655067

  15. Differential activation of human constitutive androstane receptor and its SV23 and SV24 splice variants by rilpivirine and etravirine

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Devinder; Lau, Aik Jiang; Sherman, Matthew A; Chang, Thomas K H

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Rilpivirine and etravirine are second-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) indicated for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates the expression of genes involved in various biological processes, including the transport and biotransformation of drugs. We investigated the effect of rilpivirine and etravirine on the activity of the wild-type human CAR (hCAR-WT) and its hCAR-SV23 and hCAR-SV24 splice variants, and compared it with first-generation NNRTIs (efavirenz, nevirapine, and delavirdine). Experimental Approach Receptor activation, ligand-binding domain (LBD) transactivation, and co-activator recruitment were investigated in transiently transfected, NNRTI-treated HepG2 cells. Nuclear translocation of green fluorescent protein-tagged hCAR-WT and CYP2B6 gene expression were assessed in NNRTI-treated human hepatocytes. Key Results Rilpivirine and etravirine activated hCAR-WT, but not hCAR-SV23 or hCAR-SV24, and without transactivating the LBD or recruiting steroid receptor coactivators SRC-1, SRC-2, or SRC-3. Among the first-generation NNRTIs investigated, only efavirenz activated hCAR-WT, hCAR-SV23, and hCAR-SV24, but none of them transactivated the LBD of these receptors or substantively recruited SRC-1, SRC-2, or SRC-3. Rilpivirine, etravirine, and efavirenz triggered nuclear translocation of hCAR-WT and increased hCAR target gene (CYP2B6) expression. Conclusion and Implications NNRTIs activate hCAR-WT, hCAR-SV23, and hCAR-SV24 in a drug-specific and isoform-selective manner. The activation occurs by a mechanism that does not appear to involve binding to the LBD or recruitment of SRC-1, SRC-2, or SRC-3. PMID:25363652

  16. The RNA helicase DDX39B and its paralog DDX39A regulate androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7 generation.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Daisuke; Nakao, Shoichi; Nakayama, Kazuhide; Araki, Shinsuke; Nakayama, Yusuke; Aparicio, Samuel; Hara, Takahito; Nakanishi, Atsushi

    2017-01-29

    Mounting evidence suggests that constitutively active androgen receptor (AR) splice variants, typified by AR-V7, are associated with poor prognosis and resistance to androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer patients. However, mechanisms governing the generation of AR splice variants are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the dynamics of AR splice variant generation using the JDCaP prostate cancer model that expresses AR splice variants under androgen depletion. Microarray analysis of JDCaP xenografts before and after expression of AR splice variants suggested that dysregulation of RNA processing pathways is likely involved in AR splice variant generation. To explore factors contributing to generation of AR-V7 mRNA, we conducted a focused RNA interference screen in AR-V7-positive JDCaP-hr cells using an shRNA library targeting spliceosome-related genes. This screen identified DDX39B as a regulator of AR-V7 mRNA expression. Simultaneous knockdown of DDX39B and its paralog DDX39A drastically and selectively downregulated AR-V7 mRNA expression in multiple AR-V7-positive prostate cancer cell lines. DDX39B was upregulated in relapsed JDCaP xenografts expressing AR splice variants, suggesting its role in expression of AR splice variants. Taken together, our findings offer insight into the mechanisms of AR splice variant generation and identify DDX39 as a potential drug target for the treatment of AR splice variant-positive prostate cancer.

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in human subjects with function-altering melanocortin-4 receptor variants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In rodents, hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression appears to be regulated by melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activity. The impact of MC4R genetic variation on circulating BDNF in humans is unknown. The objective of this study is to compare BDNF concentrations of subjects wi...

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphism variants within tva and tvb receptor genes in Chinese chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian leukosis is an immunosuppressive neoplastic disease caused by avian leukosis viruses (ALV), which causes tremendous economic losses in the worldwide poultry industry. The susceptibility or resistance of chicken cells to subgroup A ALV and subgroup B, D, and E ALV are determined by the receptor...

  19. Broad-spectrum analgesic efficacy of IBNtxA is mediated by exon 11-associated splice variants of the mu-opioid receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Pan, Ying-Xian; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Tuttle, Alexander H; Majumdar, Susruta; Pidakala, John; Pasternak, Gavril W; Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2014-10-01

    μ-Opioids remain vastly important for the treatment of pain, and would represent ideal analgesics if their analgesic effects could be separated from their many side effects. A recently synthesized compound, iodobenzoylnaltrexamide (IBNtxA), acting at 6-transmembrane (6-TM) splice variants of the μ-opioid receptor gene, was shown to have potent analgesic actions against acute, thermal pain accompanied by a vastly improved side-effect profile compared to 7-TM-acting drugs such as morphine. Whether such analgesia can be seen in longer-lasting and nonthermal algesiometric assays is not known. The current study demonstrates potent and efficacious IBNtxA inhibition of a wide variety of assays, including inflammatory and neuropathic hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain. We further demonstrate the dependence of such analgesia on 6-TM μ-opioid receptor variants using isobolographic analysis and the testing of Oprm1 (the μ-opioid receptor gene) exon 11 null mutant mice. Finally, the effect of nerve damage (spared nerve injury) and inflammatory injury (complete Freund's adjuvant) on expression of μ-opioid receptor variant genes in pain-relevant central nervous system loci was examined, revealing a downregulation of the mMOR-1D splice variant in the dorsal root ganglion after spared nerve injury. These findings are supportive of the potential value of 6-TM-acting drugs as novel analgesics.

  20. Broad spectrum analgesic efficacy of IBNtxA is mediated by exon 11-associated splice variants of the mu-opioid receptor gene

    PubMed Central

    Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Pan, Ying-Xian; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Tuttle, Alexander H.; Majumdar, Susruta; Pidakala, John

    2014-01-01

    Mu-opioids remain vastly important for the treatment of pain, and would represent ideal analgesics if their analgesic effects could be separated from their many side effects. A recently synthesized compound, iodobenzoylnaltrexamide (IBNtxA), acting at 6-transmembrane (6-TM) splice variants of the mu-opioid receptor gene, was shown to have potent analgesic actions against acute, thermal pain accompanied by a vastly improved side-effect profile compared to 7-TM-acting drugs such as morphine. Whether such analgesia can be seen in longer-lasting and non-thermal algesiometric assays is not known. The current study demonstrates potent and efficacious IBNtxA inhibition of a wide variety of assays, including inflammatory and neuropathic hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain. We further demonstrate the dependence of such analgesia on 6-TM mu-opioid receptor variants using isobolographic analysis and the testing of Oprm1 (the mu-opioid receptor gene) exon 11 null mutant mice. Finally, the effect of nerve damage (spared nerve injury) and inflammatory injury (complete Freund’s adjuvant) on expression of mu-opioid receptor variant genes in pain-relevant central nervous system loci was examined, revealing a downregulation of the mMOR-1D splice variant in the dorsal root ganglion after spared nerve injury. These findings are supportive of the potential value of 6-TM-acting drugs as novel analgesics. PMID:25093831

  1. Characterization of the fundamental properties of the N-terminal truncation (Δ exon 1) variant of estrogen receptor α in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yujiro; Ishii, Hirotaka; Morita, Akio; Sakuma, Yasuo; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2015-10-15

    The estrogen receptor α (ERα) directs transactivation of target genes, and splice variants have been shown to exhibit altered activation properties. We previously documented the complicated alternative promoter usage and splicing patterns of the rat ERα gene; however, the information was restricted to a few specific organs. Therefore, we re-examined the rat mRNA profiles of ERα, including the generation of the exon 1-skipping, ERα46 transcript in a wider variety of rat organs and further characterized the fundamental functional properties of rat ERα46 variants. With the use of RT-PCR, we discovered unique distribution and splicing patterns for promoter-specific ERα isoforms, as well as the extensive expression of the Δ exon 1 variant in the rat. Similar to wild-type ERα, an immunocytochemical analysis showed a predominant localization of ERα46 proteins in the nuclei of transfected cells. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that ERα46 variants stimulated the transcriptional activity of an estrogen response element-driven promoter in response to estrogen. In addition, the variants exhibited distinct transactivation and reactivity to 4-hydroxytamoxifen in different cell types. Although the alternative splicing patterns are species-specific, the profiles of the alternative use of promoters, and the fundamental properties of the rat ERα46 variant are similar to those of human and mouse homologs. Therefore, the present study provides fundamental and useful information for further research into the regulation and functions of ERα gene variants.

  2. Vaccine-elicited antibody that neutralizes H5N1 influenza and variants binds the receptor site and polymorphic sites

    DOE PAGES

    Winarski, Katie L.; Thornburg, Natalie J.; Yu, Yingchun; ...

    2015-07-13

    Antigenic drift of circulating seasonal influenza viruses necessitates an international vaccine effort to reduce the impact on human health. A critical feature of the seasonal vaccine is that it stimulates an already primed immune system to diversify memory B cells to recognize closely related, but antigenically distinct, influenza glycoproteins (hemagglutinins). Influenza pandemics arise when hemagglutinins to which no preexisting adaptive immunity exists acquire the capacity to infect humans. Hemagglutinin 5 is one subtype to which little preexisting immunity exists and is only a few acquired mutations away from the ability to transmit efficiently between ferrets, and possibly humans. In thismore » paper, we describe the structure and molecular mechanism of neutralization by H5.3, a vaccine-elicited antibody that neutralizes hemagglutinin 5 viruses and variants with expanded host range. H5.3 binds in the receptor-binding site, forming contacts that recapitulate many of the sialic acid interactions, as well as multiple peripheral interactions, yet is not sensitive to mutations that alter sialic acid binding. H5.3 is highly specific for a subset of H5 strains, and this specificity arises from interactions to the periphery of the receptor-binding site. Finally, H5.3 is also extremely potent, despite retaining germ line-like conformational flexibility.« less

  3. Vaccine-elicited antibody that neutralizes H5N1 influenza and variants binds the receptor site and polymorphic sites

    SciTech Connect

    Winarski, Katie L.; Thornburg, Natalie J.; Yu, Yingchun; Sapparapu, Gopal; Crowe, James. E.; Spiller, Benjamin W.

    2015-07-13

    Antigenic drift of circulating seasonal influenza viruses necessitates an international vaccine effort to reduce the impact on human health. A critical feature of the seasonal vaccine is that it stimulates an already primed immune system to diversify memory B cells to recognize closely related, but antigenically distinct, influenza glycoproteins (hemagglutinins). Influenza pandemics arise when hemagglutinins to which no preexisting adaptive immunity exists acquire the capacity to infect humans. Hemagglutinin 5 is one subtype to which little preexisting immunity exists and is only a few acquired mutations away from the ability to transmit efficiently between ferrets, and possibly humans. In this paper, we describe the structure and molecular mechanism of neutralization by H5.3, a vaccine-elicited antibody that neutralizes hemagglutinin 5 viruses and variants with expanded host range. H5.3 binds in the receptor-binding site, forming contacts that recapitulate many of the sialic acid interactions, as well as multiple peripheral interactions, yet is not sensitive to mutations that alter sialic acid binding. H5.3 is highly specific for a subset of H5 strains, and this specificity arises from interactions to the periphery of the receptor-binding site. Finally, H5.3 is also extremely potent, despite retaining germ line-like conformational flexibility.

  4. Vaccine-elicited antibody that neutralizes H5N1 influenza and variants binds the receptor site and polymorphic sites

    PubMed Central

    Winarski, Katie L.; Thornburg, Natalie J.; Yu, Yingchun; Sapparapu, Gopal; Crowe, James. E.; Spiller, Benjamin W.

    2015-01-01

    Antigenic drift of circulating seasonal influenza viruses necessitates an international vaccine effort to reduce the impact on human health. A critical feature of the seasonal vaccine is that it stimulates an already primed immune system to diversify memory B cells to recognize closely related, but antigenically distinct, influenza glycoproteins (hemagglutinins). Influenza pandemics arise when hemagglutinins to which no preexisting adaptive immunity exists acquire the capacity to infect humans. Hemagglutinin 5 is one subtype to which little preexisting immunity exists and is only a few acquired mutations away from the ability to transmit efficiently between ferrets, and possibly humans. Here, we describe the structure and molecular mechanism of neutralization by H5.3, a vaccine-elicited antibody that neutralizes hemagglutinin 5 viruses and variants with expanded host range. H5.3 binds in the receptor-binding site, forming contacts that recapitulate many of the sialic acid interactions, as well as multiple peripheral interactions, yet is not sensitive to mutations that alter sialic acid binding. H5.3 is highly specific for a subset of H5 strains, and this specificity arises from interactions to the periphery of the receptor-binding site. H5.3 is also extremely potent, despite retaining germ line-like conformational flexibility. PMID:26170302

  5. Hippocampal bursts caused by changes in NMDA receptor-dependent excitation in a mouse model of variant CJD.

    PubMed

    Ratté, Stéphanie; Prescott, Steven A; Collinge, John; Jefferys, John G R

    2008-10-01

    Prion diseases are heterogeneous in clinical presentation, suggesting that different prion diseases have distinct pathophysiological changes. To understand the pathophysiology specific to variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD), in vitro electrophysiological studies were performed in a mouse model in which human-derived vCJD prions were transmitted to transgenic mice expressing human instead of murine prion protein. Paired-pulse stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals evoked hypersynchronous bursting in the hippocampus of vCJD-inoculated mice; comparable bursts were never observed in control or Prnp knockout mice, or in mice inoculated with a strain of prion associated with classical CJD. Furthermore, NMDA receptor-mediated excitation was increased in vCJD-inoculated mice. Using pharmacological experiments and computer simulations, we demonstrate that the increase in NMDA receptor-mediated excitation is necessary and sufficient to explain the distinctive bursting pattern in vCJD. These pathophysiological changes appear to result from a prion strain-specific gain-of-function and may explain some of the distinguishing clinical features of vCJD.

  6. Differential Regulation of 6- and 7-Transmembrane Helix Variants of μ-Opioid Receptor in Response to Morphine Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Convertino, Marino; Samoshkin, Alexander; Viet, Chi T.; Gauthier, Josee; Li Fraine, Steven P.; Sharif-Naeini, Reza; Schmidt, Brian L.; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacological effect of opioids originates, at the cellular level, by their interaction with the μ-opioid receptor (mOR) resulting in the regulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and inwardly rectifying K+ channels that ultimately modulate the synaptic transmission. Recently, an alternative six trans-membrane helix isoform of mOR, (6TM-mOR) has been identified, but its function and signaling are still largely unknown. Here, we present the structural and functional mechanisms of 6TM-mOR signaling activity upon binding to morphine. Our data suggest that despite the similarity of binding modes of the alternative 6TM-mOR and the dominant seven trans-membrane helix variant (7TM-mOR), the interaction with morphine generates different dynamic responses in the two receptors, thus, promoting the activation of different mOR-specific signaling pathways. We characterize a series of 6TM-mOR-specific cellular responses, and observed that they are significantly different from those for 7TM-mOR. Morphine stimulation of 6TM-mOR does not promote a cellular cAMP response, while it increases the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and reduces the cellular K+ conductance. Our findings indicate that 6TM-mOR has a unique contribution to the cellular opioid responses. Therefore, it should be considered as a relevant target for the development of novel pharmacological tools and medical protocols involving the use of opioids. PMID:26554831

  7. Stable expression and functional characterisation of the diamondback moth ryanodine receptor G4946E variant conferring resistance to diamide insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Troczka, Bartlomiej J.; Williams, Alan J.; Williamson, Martin S.; Field, Linda M.; Lüemmen, Peter; Davies, T.G. Emyr

    2015-01-01

    Diamides, such as flubendiamide and chlorantraniliprole, belong to a new chemical class of insecticides that act as conformation-sensitive activators of insect ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Both compounds are registered for use against lepidopteran species such as the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, a notorious global pest of cruciferous crops. Recently acquired resistance to diamide insecticides in this species is thought to be due to a target-site mutation conferring an amino acid substitution (G4946E), located within the trans-membrane domain of the RyR, though the exact role of this mutation has not yet been fully determined. To address this we have cloned a full-length cDNA encoding the P. xylostella RyR and established clonal Sf9 cell lines stably expressing either the wildtype RyR or the G4946E variant, in order to test the sensitivity to flubendiamide and chlorantraniliprole on the recombinant receptor. We report that the efficacy of both diamides was dramatically reduced in clonal Sf9 cells stably expressing the G4946E modified RyR, providing clear functional evidence that the G4946E RyR mutation impairs diamide insecticide binding. PMID:26424584

  8. Delayed puberty and estrogen resistance in a woman with estrogen receptor α variant.

    PubMed

    Quaynor, Samuel D; Stradtman, Earl W; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Shen, Yiping; Chorich, Lynn P; Schreihofer, Derek A; Layman, Lawrence C

    2013-07-11

    Although androgen resistance has been characterized in men with a normal chromosome complement and mutations in the androgen-receptor gene, a mutation in the gene encoding estrogen receptor α (ESR1) was previously described only in one man and not, to our knowledge, in a woman. We now describe an 18-year-old woman without breast development and with markedly elevated serum levels of estrogens and bilateral multicystic ovaries. She was found to have a homozygous loss-of-function ESR1 mutation in a completely conserved residue that interferes with estrogen signaling. Her clinical presentation was similar to that in the mouse orthologue knockout. This case shows that disruption of ESR1 causes profound estrogen resistance in women. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).

  9. Membrane-proximal binding of STAT3 revealed by cancer-associated receptor variants.

    PubMed

    Ulaganathan, Vijay K; Ullrich, Axel

    2016-05-01

    In cancer biology, somatic mutations in the extracellular (ligand binding) and cytosolic (functional/catalytic) domains are pursued with great interest. However, in our recent publication we report that germline mutations in the membrane-proximal region of type I receptors are able to modulate the amplitude of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling in cells. This unexpected finding has implications for the prognosis of heritable cancer.

  10. The Estrogen Receptor and Its Variants as Risk Factors in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-11-01

    d’Urologia, Winnipeg. Manitoba,. R3EOW3, Canada.Hospitals Vail d’Hebr6n, 5lnstirut de Biologia Molecular . CSIC. Barcelona.Span.’Presenting author The... molecular biology. Endocr. Rev. 20: 321-344. 1999. Theillet. C. In breast cancer. amplification of the steroid receptor coactivator gene 3. Montano...dried and exposed for 2 h to a Molecular expression was significantly increased in breast cancer cells carrying Imager-FX Imaging screen (Bio-Rad

  11. AhR-mediated and antiestrogenic activity of humic substances.

    PubMed

    Janosek, J; Bittner, M; Hilscherová, K; Bláha, L; Giesy, J P; Holoubek, I

    2007-04-01

    Humic substances (HS) were for decades regarded as inert in the ecosystems with respect to their possible toxicity. However, HS have been recently shown to elicit various adverse effects generally attributed to xenobiotics. In our study, we used MVLN and H4IIE-luc cell lines stably transfected with luciferase gene under control of estrogen receptor (ER) and Ah receptor (AhR; receptor connected with so-called dioxin-like toxicity) for assessment of anti/estrogenic and AhR-mediated effects of 12 commercially available humic substances. Out of those, five humic acids were shown to induce AhR-mediated activity with relative potencies related to TCDD 2.6 x 10(-8)-7.4 x 10(-8). Organic extracts of HS solutions also elicited high activities what means that lipophilic molecules are responsible for a great part of effect. However, relatively high activity remaining in extracted solution suggests also presence of polar AhR-agonists. Contribution of persistent organic compounds to the observed effects was ruled out by H(2)SO(4) treatment. Eight out of twelve HS elicited significant antiestrogenic effects with IC(50) ranging from 40 to 164 mg l(-1). The possible explanations of the antiestrogenic effect include sorption of 17-beta-estradiol (E2) on HS, changes in membrane permeability for E2 or another specific mechanism.

  12. Genetic Variants of Retinoic Acid Receptor-Related Orphan Receptor Alpha Determine Susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuwei; Liu, Yulan; Liu, Yin; Zhang, Yanjie; Su, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) plays a key role in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism and insulin expression that are implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the effects of genetic variants in the RORA gene on the susceptibility to T2DM remain unknown. Nine tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were screened by using the SNaPshot method in 427 patients with T2DM and 408 normal controls. Association between genotypes and haplotypes derived from these SNPs with T2DM was analyzed using different genetic models. Allele and genotype frequencies at rs10851685 were significantly different between T2DM patients and control subjects (allele: p = 0.009, Odds ratios (OR) = 1.36 [95% Confidence intervals (CI) = 1.08–1.72]; genotype: p = 0.029). The minor allele T, at rs10851685, was potentially associated with an increased risk of T2DM in the dominant model, displaying OR of 1.38 (95% CI: 1.04–1.82, p = 0.025) in subjects with genotypes TA+TT vs. AA. In haplotype analysis, we observed that haplotypes GGTGTAACT, GGTGTAACC, and GATATAACT were significantly associated with increased risk of T2DM, while haplotypes GATGAAGTT, AGTGAAGTT, and AATGAAATT were protective against T2DM. These data suggest that the genetic variation in RORA might determine a Chinese Han individual’s susceptibility to T2DM. PMID:27556492

  13. Human Infections with Novel Reassortant Influenza A(H3N2)v Viruses, United States, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom, Stephen; Garten, Rebecca; Balish, Amanda; Shu, Bo; Emery, Shannon; Berman, LaShondra; Barnes, Nathelia; Sleeman, Katrina; Gubareva, Larisa; Villanueva, Julie

    2012-01-01

    During July–December 2011, a variant virus, influenza A(H3N2)v, caused 12 human cases of influenza. The virus contained genes originating from swine, avian, and human viruses, including the M gene from influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Influenza A(H3N2)v viruses were antigenically distinct from seasonal influenza viruses and similar to proposed vaccine virus A/Minnesota/11/2010. PMID:22516540

  14. MET receptor variant R970C favors calpain-dependent generation of a fragment promoting epithelial cell scattering.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Rémi; Baranzelli, Anne; Muharram, Ghaffar; Catherine, Leroy; Lesaffre, Marie; Vinchent, Audrey; Kherrouche, Zoulika; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Cortot, Alexis B; Tulasne, David

    2017-01-04

    The receptor tyrosine kinase MET and its ligand, the hepatocyte growth factor, are essential to embryonic development, whereas deregulation of MET signaling is associated with tumorigenesis leading to various cancers, including lung carcinoma. Mutations in the MET kinase domain lead to constitutive kinase activity and are associated with tumorigenesis. In lung cancer, however, some mutations are found in the juxtamembrane domain, and their functional consequences are unknown. Because the juxtamembrane domain of MET is targeted by several proteolytic cleavages, involved in its degradation during cell death or under steady-state conditions, we evaluated the influence of these mutations on the MET proteolytic cleavages. In stably transfected epithelial cells expressing MET, the juxtamembrane mutations R970C, P991S, and T992I were found not to modify the known caspase or presenilin-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis. Yet when overexpressed, the R970C variant caused generation of an as yet undescribed 45-kDa fragment (p45 MET). This fragment was found in the confluent lung cancer cell line NCI-H1437 carrying the R970C mutation and at a lesser extent in cell lines expressing WT MET, suggesting that R970C mutation favors this cleavage. Generation of p45 MET required the activity of the calpain proteases, confirming the involvement of proteolysis. Ectopic expression of reconstituted p45 MET in epithelial cell lines favored cell scattering and invasion indicating active role of this fragment in HGF/SF induced responses. Hence, although the juxtamembrane mutations of MET do not affect its known proteolytic cleavages, the R970C MET variant favors calpain dependent proteolytic cleavage in lung cancer cells.

  15. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) Intron 1 Variants Are Major Risk Factors for Graves' Disease in Three European Caucasian Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Jurecka-Lubieniecka, Beata; Franaszczyk, Maria; Kula, Dorota; Krajewski, Paweł; Karamat, Muhammad A.; Simmonds, Matthew J.; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Gough, Stephen C. L.; Jarząb, Barbara; Bednarczuk, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    Background The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) gene is an established susceptibility locus for Graves' disease (GD), with recent studies refining association to two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs179247 and rs12101255, within TSHR intron 1. Methodology and Principal Findings We aimed to validate association of rs179247 and rs12101255 in Polish and UK Caucasian GD case-control subjects, determine the mode of inheritance and to see if association correlates with specific GD clinical manifestations. We investigated three case-control populations; 558 GD patients and 520 controls from Warsaw, Poland, 196 GD patients and 198 controls from Gliwice, Poland and 2504 GD patients from the UK National collection and 2784 controls from the 1958 British Birth cohort. Both rs179247 (P = 1.2×10−2–6.2×10−15, OR = 1.38–1.45) and rs12101255 (P = 1.0×10−4–3.68×10−21, OR = 1.47–1.87) exhibited strong association with GD in all three cohorts. Logistic regression suggested association of rs179247 is secondary to rs12101255 in all cohorts. Inheritance modeling suggested a co-dominant mode of inheritance in all cohorts. Genotype-phenotype correlations provided no clear evidence of association with any specific clinical characteristics. Conclusions We have validated association of TSHR intron 1 SNPs with GD in three independent European cohorts and have demonstrated that the aetiological variant within the TSHR is likely to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs12101255. Fine mapping is now required to determine the exact location of the aetiological DNA variants within the TSHR. PMID:21124799

  16. Oxytocin Receptor Gene Variant Interacts with Intervention Delivery Format in Predicting Intervention Outcomes for Youth with Conduct Problems.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Andrea L; Lochman, John E; Dishion, Thomas; Powell, Nicole P; Boxmeyer, Caroline; Qu, Lixin

    2017-03-16

    Coping Power is an evidence-based preventive intervention program for youth with aggressive behavior problems that has traditionally been delivered in small group formats. Because of concerns about iatrogenic effects secondary to aggregation of high risk youth, the current study examined whether genetic risk may moderate intervention outcome when youth were randomly assigned to group versus individual formats of an intervention. The oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) has been associated with social behavior and may influence susceptibility to social reinforcement in general and deviant peer influence in particular. One variant of OXTR (rs2268493) was examined in 197 fourth-grade African-American children (64% male) who were randomly assigned to Group Coping Power or Individual Coping Power (Lochman et al. 2015). Longitudinal assessments of teacher- and parent-reported behavior were collected through a 1-year follow-up. Growth curve analyses revealed a genotype by delivery format interaction. Youth with the A/A genotype demonstrated reductions in externalizing problems over the course of the intervention regardless of intervention format. In contrast, carriers of the G allele receiving the group-based intervention showed little improvement during the intervention and a worsening of symptoms during the follow-up year, while those receiving the individual format demonstrated reductions in externalizing problems. Given the associations between this OXTR variant and social bonding, carriers of the G allele may be more sensitive to social rewards from deviant peers in the group setting. This study suggests that genetic factors may be useful in predicting which type of intervention will be most effective for a particular individual.

  17. Association of Amine-Receptor DNA Sequence Variants with Associative Learning in the Honeybee.

    PubMed

    Lagisz, Malgorzata; Mercer, Alison R; de Mouzon, Charlotte; Santos, Luana L S; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2016-03-01

    Octopamine- and dopamine-based neuromodulatory systems play a critical role in learning and learning-related behaviour in insects. To further our understanding of these systems and resulting phenotypes, we quantified DNA sequence variations at six loci coding octopamine-and dopamine-receptors and their association with aversive and appetitive learning traits in a population of honeybees. We identified 79 polymorphic sequence markers (mostly SNPs and a few insertions/deletions) located within or close to six candidate genes. Intriguingly, we found that levels of sequence variation in the protein-coding regions studied were low, indicating that sequence variation in the coding regions of receptor genes critical to learning and memory is strongly selected against. Non-coding and upstream regions of the same genes, however, were less conserved and sequence variations in these regions were weakly associated with between-individual differences in learning-related traits. While these associations do not directly imply a specific molecular mechanism, they suggest that the cross-talk between dopamine and octopamine signalling pathways may influence olfactory learning and memory in the honeybee.

  18. Mechanistic Insight into NMDA Receptor Dysregulation by Rare Variants in the GluN2A and GluN2B Agonist Binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Swanger, Sharon A; Chen, Wenjuan; Wells, Gordon; Burger, Pieter B; Tankovic, Anel; Bhattacharya, Subhrajit; Strong, Katie L; Hu, Chun; Kusumoto, Hirofumi; Zhang, Jing; Adams, David R; Millichap, John J; Petrovski, Slavé; Traynelis, Stephen F; Yuan, Hongjie

    2016-12-01

    Epilepsy and intellectual disability are associated with rare variants in the GluN2A and GluN2B (encoded by GRIN2A and GRIN2B) subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), a ligand-gated ion channel with essential roles in brain development and function. By assessing genetic variation across GluN2 domains, we determined that the agonist binding domain, transmembrane domain, and the linker regions between these domains were particularly intolerant to functional variation. Notably, the agonist binding domain of GluN2B exhibited significantly more variation intolerance than that of GluN2A. To understand the ramifications of missense variation in the agonist binding domain, we investigated the mechanisms by which 25 rare variants in the GluN2A and GluN2B agonist binding domains dysregulated NMDAR activity. When introduced into recombinant human NMDARs, these rare variants identified in individuals with neurologic disease had complex, and sometimes opposing, consequences on agonist binding, channel gating, receptor biogenesis, and forward trafficking. Our approach combined quantitative assessments of these effects to estimate the overall impact on synaptic and non-synaptic NMDAR function. Interestingly, similar neurologic diseases were associated with both gain- and loss-of-function variants in the same gene. Most rare variants in GluN2A were associated with epilepsy, whereas GluN2B variants were associated with intellectual disability with or without seizures. Finally, discerning the mechanisms underlying NMDAR dysregulation by these rare variants allowed investigations of pharmacologic strategies to correct NMDAR function.

  19. Computational studies on receptor-ligand interactions between novel buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) variants and muramyl dipeptide (MDP).

    PubMed

    Brahma, Biswajit; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Mishra, Purusottam; De, Bidhan Chandra; Kumar, Sushil; Maharana, Jitendra; Vats, Ashutosh; Ahlawat, Sonika; Datta, Tirtha Kumar; De, Sachinandan

    2016-04-01

    Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2), a member of intracellular NOD-like receptors (NLRs) family, recognizes the bacterial peptidoglycan, muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and initiates host immune response. The precise ligand recognition mechanism of NOD2 has remained elusive, although studies have suggested leucine rich repeat (LRR) region of NOD2 as the possible binding site of MDP. In this study, we identified multiple transcripts of NOD2 gene in buffalo (buNOD2) and at least five LRR variants (buNOD2-LRRW (wild type), buNOD2-LRRV1-V4) were found to be expressed in buffalo peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The newly identified buNOD2 transcripts were shorter in lengths as a result of exon-skipping and frame-shift mutations. Among the variants, buNOD2-LRRW, V1, and V3 were expressed more frequently in the animals studied. A comparative receptor-ligand interaction study through modeling of variants, docking, and molecular dynamics simulation revealed that the binding affinity of buNOD2-LRRW towards MDP was greater than that of the shorter variants. The absence of a LRR segment in the buNOD2 variants had probably affected their affinity toward MDP. Notwithstanding a high homology among the variants, the amino acid residues that interact with MDP were located on different LRR motifs. The binding free energy calculation revealed that the amino acids Arg850(LRR4) and Glu932(LRR7) of buNOD2-LRRW, Lys810(LRR3) of buNOD2-LRRV1, and Lys830(LRR3) of buNOD2-LRRV3 largely contributed towards MDP recognition. The knowledge of MDP recognition and binding modes on buNOD2 variants could be useful to understand the regulation of NOD-mediated immune response as well as to develop next generation anti-inflammatory compounds.

  20. Systematic and functional characterization of novel androgen receptor variants arising from alternative splicing in the ligand-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Uo, T; Dvinge, H; Sprenger, C C; Bradley, R K; Nelson, P S; Plymate, S R

    2017-01-01

    The presence of intact ligand-binding domain (LBD) ensures the strict androgen-dependent regulation of androgen receptor (AR): binding of androgen induces structural reorganization of LBD resulting in release of AR from HSP90, suppression of nuclear export which otherwise dominates over import and nuclear translocation of AR as a transcription factor. Thus, loss or defects of the LBD abolish constraint from un-liganded LBD as exemplified by constitutively active AR variants (AR-Vs), which are associated with emerging resistance mechanism to anti-AR therapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Recent analysis of the AR splicing landscapes revealed mCRPC harboring multiple AR-Vs with diverse patterns of inclusion/exclusion of exons (exons 4–8) corresponding to LBD to produce namely exon-skipping variants. In silico construction for these AR-Vs revealed four novel AR-Vs having unique features: Exclusion of specified exons introduces a frameshift in variants v5es, v6es and v7es. ARv56es maintains the reading frame resulting in the inclusion of the C-terminal half of the LBD. We systematically characterized these AR-Vs regarding their subcellular localization, affinity for HSP90 and transactivation capability. Notably, ARv5es was free from HSP90, exclusively nuclear, and constitutively active similarly as previously reported for v567es. In contrast, v6es and v7es were similar in that they are cytoplasmic, transcriptionally inactive and bind HSP90, ARv56es was present in both nucleus and cytoplasm, does not bind HSP90 and is transcriptionally inactive. Converting these transcriptionally inactive AR-Vs into active forms, we identified the two separate elements that allosterically suppress otherwise constitutively active AR-Vs; one in exon 5 for v6es and v7es and the other in exon 8 for v56es. Our findings identify a novel constitutively active AR-V, ARv5es and establish a method to predict potential activities of AR-Vs carrying impaired LBD. PMID:27694897

  1. Developmental toxicity of 4-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in zebrafish is differentially dependent on AH receptor isoforms and hepatic cytochrome P4501A metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Incardona, John P. . E-mail: john.incardona@noaa.gov; Day, Heather L.; Collier, Tracy K.; Scholz, Nathaniel L.

    2006-12-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) derived from fossil fuels are ubiquitous contaminants and occur in aquatic habitats as highly variable and complex mixtures of compounds containing 2 to 6 rings. For aquatic species, PAHs are generally accepted as acting through either of two modes of action: (1) 'dioxin-like' toxicity mediated by activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), which controls a battery of genes involved in PAH metabolism, such as cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and (2) 'nonpolar narcosis', in which tissue uptake is dependent solely on hydrophobicity and toxicity is mediated through non-specific partitioning into lipid bilayers. As part of a systematic analysis of mechanisms of PAH developmental toxicity in zebrafish, we show here that three tetracyclic PAHs (pyrene, chrysene, and benz[a]anthracene) activate the AHR pathway tissue-specifically to induce distinct patterns of CYP1A expression. Using morpholino knockdown of ahr1a, ahr2, and cyp1a, we show that distinct embryolarval syndromes induced by exposure to two of these compounds are differentially dependent on tissue-specific activation of AHR isoforms or metabolism by CYP1A. Exposure of embryos with and without circulation (silent heart morphants) resulted in dramatically different patterns of CYP1A induction, with circulation required to deliver some compounds to internal tissues. Therefore, biological effects of PAHs cannot be predicted simply by quantitative measures of AHR activity or a compound's hydrophobicity. These results indicate that current models of PAH toxicity in fish are greatly oversimplified and that individual PAHs are pharmacologically active compounds with distinct and specific cellular targets.

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphism variants within tva and tvb receptor genes in Chinese chickens.

    PubMed

    Liao, C T; Chen, S Y; Chen, W G; Liu, Y; Sun, B L; Li, H X; Zhang, H M; Qu, H; Wang, J; Shu, D M; Xie, Q M

    2014-10-01

    Avian leukosis is an immunosuppressive neoplastic disease caused by avian leukosis viruses (ALV), which causes tremendous economic losses in the worldwide poultry industry. The susceptibility or resistance of chicken cells to subgroup A ALV and subgroup B, D, and E ALV are determined by the receptor genes tumor virus locus A (tva) and tumor virus locus B (tvb), respectively. Four genetic resistant loci (tva(r1), tva(r2), tva(r3), and tva(r4)) in tva receptor gene and a genetic resistant locus tvb(r) in the tvb receptor gene have been identified in inbred lines of White Leghorn. To evaluate the genetic resistance to subgroup A, B, D, and E ALV, genetic variations within resistant loci in tva and tvb genes were screened in Chinese local chicken breeds and commercial broiler lines. Here, the heterozygote tva(s1/r1) and the resistant genotype tva(r2/r2), tva(r3/r3), and tva(r4/r4) were detected in Chinese chickens by direct sequencing. The heterozygote tva(s1/r1) was detected in Huiyang Bearded chicken (HYBC), Rizhaoma chicken, and commercial broiler line 13 to 15 (CB13 to CB15), with the frequencies at 0.08, 0.18, 0.17, 0.25, and 0.15, respectively. The resistant genotype tva(r2/r2) was detected in Jiningbairi chicken (JNBRC), HYBC, and CB15, with the frequencies at 0.03, 0.08, and 0.06, respectively, whereas tva(r3/r3) and tva(r4/r4) were detected in 19 and 17 of the 25 Chinese chickens tested, with the average frequencies at 0.13 and 0.20, respectively. Furthermore, the resistant genotype tvb(r/r) was detected in JNBRC, CB07, CB12, CB14, and CB15 by pyrosequencing assay, with the frequencies at 0.03, 0.03, 0.11, 0.09, and 0.15, respectively. These results demonstrated that the potential for genetic improvement of resistance to subgroup A, B, D, and E ALV were great both in Chinese local chickens and commercial broilers. This study provides valuable insight into the selective breeding for chickens genetically resistant to ALV.

  3. Identification of a new dysfunctional platelet P2Y12 receptor variant associated with bleeding diathesis

    PubMed Central

    Lecchi, Anna; Razzari, Cristina; Paoletta, Silvia; Dupuis, Arnaud; Nakamura, Lea; Ohlmann, Philippe; Gachet, Christian; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Zieger, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Defects of the platelet P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R) for adenosine diphosphate (ADP) are associated with increased bleeding risk. The study of molecular abnormalities associated with inherited qualitative defects of the P2Y12R protein is useful to unravel structure-function relationships of the receptor. We describe the case of 2 brothers, sons of first cousins, with lifelong history of abnormal bleeding, associated with dysfunctional P2Y12R and a previously undescribed missense mutation in the encoding gene. ADP (4-20 µM)–induced aggregation of patients’ platelets was markedly reduced and rapidly reversible. Other agonists induced borderline-normal aggregation. Inhibition of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation and prostaglandin E1–induced increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) by ADP was impaired, whereas inhibition of cAMP increase by epinephrine was normal. [3H]PSB-0413, a selective P2Y12R antagonist, bound to a normal number of binding sites; however, its affinity, and that of the agonists ADP and 2-methylthio-adenosine-5′-diphosphate, was reduced. Patients’ DNA showed a homozygous c.847T>A substitution that changed the codon for His-187 to Gln (p.His187Gln). Crystallographic data and molecular modeling studies indicated that His187 in transmembrane 5 is important for agonist and nucleotide antagonist binding and located in a region undergoing conformational changes. These studies delineate a region of P2Y12R required for normal function after ADP binding. PMID:25428217

  4. Variants in toll-like receptor 9 gene influence susceptibility to tuberculosis in a Mexican population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection begins with the recognition of mycobacterial structural components by toll like receptors (TLRs) and other pattern recognition receptors. Our objective was to determine the influence of TLRs polymorphisms in the susceptibility to develop tuberculosis (TB) in Amerindian individuals from a rural area of Oaxaca, Mexico with high TB incidence. Methods We carried out a case–control association community based study, genotyping 12 polymorphisms of TLR2, TLR4, TLR6 and TLR9 genes in 90 patients with confirmed pulmonary TB and 90 unrelated exposed but asymptomatic household contacts. Results We found a significant increase in the frequency of the allele A of the TLR9 gene polymorphism rs352139 (A>G) in the group of TB patients (g.f. = 0.522) when compared with controls (g.f. = 0.383), (Pcorr = 0.01, OR = 1.75). Under the recessive model (A/G + A/A vs G/G) this polymorphism was also significantly associated with TB (Pcorr = 0.01, OR= 2.37). The association of the SNP rs352139 was statistically significant after adjustment by age, gender and comorbidities by regression logistic analysis (Dominant model: p value = 0.016, OR = 2.31; Additive model: p value = 0.023, OR = 1.68). The haplotype GAA of TLR9 SNPs was also associated with TB susceptibility (Pcorr = 0.02). Differences in the genotype or allele frequencies of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 polymorphisms between TB patients and healthy contacts were not detected. Conclusions Our study suggests that the allele A of the intronic polymorphism rs352139 on TLR9 gene might contribute to the risk of developing TB in Mexican Amerindians. PMID:24053111

  5. Suppression of cytokine-mediated complement factor gene expression through selective activation of the Ah receptor with 3',4'-dimethoxy-α-naphthoflavone.

    PubMed

    Murray, Iain A; Flaveny, Colin A; Chiaro, Christopher R; Sharma, Arun K; Tanos, Rachel S; Schroeder, Jennifer C; Amin, Shantu G; Bisson, William H; Kolluri, Siva K; Perdew, Gary H

    2011-03-01

    We have characterized previously a class of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligand termed selective AHR modulators (SAhRMs). SAhRMs exhibit anti-inflammatory properties, including suppression of cytokine-mediated acute phase genes (e.g., Saa1), through dissociation of non-dioxin-response element (DRE) AHR activity from DRE-dependent xenobiotic gene expression. The partial AHR agonist α-naphthoflavone (αNF) mediates the suppressive, non-DRE dependent effects on SAA1 expression and partial DRE-mediated CYP1A1 induction. These observations suggest that αNF may be structurally modified to a derivative exhibiting only SAhRM activity. A screen of αNF derivatives identifies 3',4'-dimethoxy-αNF (DiMNF) as a candidate SAhRM. Competitive ligand binding validates DiMNF as an AHR ligand, and DRE-dependent reporter assays with quantitative mRNA analysis of AHR target genes reveal minimal agonist activity associated with AHR binding. Consistent with loss of agonist activity, DiMNF fails to promote AHR binding to DRE probes as determined through electromobility shift assay. Importantly, mRNA analysis indicates that DiMNF retains the suppressive capacity of αNF regarding cytokine-mediated SAA1 expression in Huh7 cells. Interestingly, predictive docking modeling suggests that DiMNF adopts a unique orientation within the AHR ligand binding pocket relative to αNF and may facilitate the rational design of additional SAhRMs. Microarray studies with a non-DRE binding but otherwise functional AHR mutant identified complement factor C3 as a potential SAhRM target. We confirmed this observation in Huh7 cells using 10 μM DiMNF, which significantly repressed C3 mRNA and protein. These data expand the classes of AHR ligands exerting DRE-independent anti-inflammatory SAhRM activity, suggesting SAhRMs may have application in the amelioration of inflammatory disorders.

  6. Analysis of the entire ryanodine receptor type 1 and alpha 1 subunit of the dihydropyridine receptor (CACNA1S) coding regions for variants associated with malignant hyperthermia in Australian families.

    PubMed

    Gillies, R L; Bjorksten, A R; Du Sart, D; Hockey, B M

    2015-03-01

    Defects in the genes coding for the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) and alpha 1 subunit of the dihydropyridine receptor (CACNA1S) have been identified as causative for malignant hyperthermia (MH). Sixty-two MH susceptible individuals presenting to the same diagnostic centre had copy deoxyribonucleic acid, derived from muscle ribonucleic acid, sequenced to identify variants with the potential to be responsible for the MH phenotype in both RYR1 and CACNA1S. These genetic findings were combined with clinical episode details and in vitro contracture test results to improve our understanding of the Australian MH cohort. Twelve novel variants were identified in RYR1 and six in CACNA1S. Known RYR1 causative mutations were identified in six persons and novel variants in RYR1 and CACNA1S in a further 17 persons. Trends indicated higher mutation identification in those with more definitive clinical episodes and stronger in vitro contracture test responses.

  7. Neutral endopeptidase-resistant C-type natriuretic peptide variant represents a new therapeutic approach for treatment of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3-related dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Daniel J; Dvorak-Ewell, Melita; Bullens, Sherry; Lorget, Florence; Bell, Sean M; Peng, Jeff; Castillo, Sianna; Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; O'Neill, Charles A; Krejci, Pavel; Wilcox, William R; Rimoin, David L; Bunting, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common form of human dwarfism, is caused by an activating autosomal dominant mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 gene. Genetic overexpression of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), a positive regulator of endochondral bone growth, prevents dwarfism in mouse models of ACH. However, administration of exogenous CNP is compromised by its rapid clearance in vivo through receptor-mediated and proteolytic pathways. Using in vitro approaches, we developed modified variants of human CNP, resistant to proteolytic degradation by neutral endopeptidase, that retain the ability to stimulate signaling downstream of the CNP receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor B. The variants tested in vivo demonstrated significantly longer serum half-lives than native CNP. Subcutaneous administration of one of these CNP variants (BMN 111) resulted in correction of the dwarfism phenotype in a mouse model of ACH and overgrowth of the axial and appendicular skeletons in wild-type mice without observable changes in trabecular and cortical bone architecture. Moreover, significant growth plate widening that translated into accelerated bone growth, at hemodynamically tolerable doses, was observed in juvenile cynomolgus monkeys that had received daily subcutaneous administrations of BMN 111. BMN 111 was well tolerated and represents a promising new approach for treatment of patients with ACH.

  8. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol-aglycone Downregulation of the Full-length and Splice Variants of Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bo; Liu, Xichun; Li, Jing; Liu, Shuang; Qi, Yanfeng; Xiong, Zhenggang; Zhang, Allen; Wiese, Thomas; Fu, Xueqi; Gu, Jingkai; Rennie, Paul S.; Sartor, Oliver; Lee, Benjamin R.; Ip, Clement; Zhao, Lijuan; Zhang, Haitao; Dong, Yan

    2012-01-01

    As a public health problem, prostate cancer engenders huge economic and life-quality burden. Developing effective chemopreventive regimens to alleviate the burden remains a major challenge. Androgen signaling is vital to the development and progression of prostate cancer. Targeting androgen signaling via blocking the production of the potent ligand dihydrotestosterone has been shown to decrease prostate cancer incidence. However, the potential of increasing the incidence of high-grade prostate cancers has been a concern. Mechanisms of disease progression after the intervention may include increased expression of androgen receptor (AR) in prostate tissue and expression of the constitutively-active AR splice variants (AR-Vs) lacking the ligand-binding domain. Thus, novel agents targeting the receptor, preferentially both the full-length and AR-Vs, are urgently needed. In the present study, we show that ginsenoside 20(S)-protopanaxadiol-aglycone (PPD) effectively downregulates the expression and activity of both the full-length AR and AR-Vs. The effects of PPD on AR and AR-Vs are manifested by an immediate drop in proteins followed by a reduction in transcripts, attributed to PPD induction of proteasome-mediated degradation and inhibition of the transcription of the AR gene. We further show that although PPD inhibits the growth as well as AR expression and activity in LNCaP xenograft tumors, the morphology and AR expression in normal prostates are not affected. This study is the first to show that PPD suppresses androgen signaling through downregulating both the full-length AR and AR-Vs, and provides strong rationale for further developing PPD as a promising agent for the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:22907191

  9. Dopamine transporter DAT and receptor DRD2 variants affect risk of lethal cocaine abuse: a gene–gene–environment interaction

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, D; Pinsonneault, J K; Papp, A C; Zhu, H; Lemeshow, S; Mash, D C; Sadee, W

    2013-01-01

    Epistatic gene–gene interactions could contribute to the heritability of complex multigenic disorders, but few examples have been reported. Here, we focus on the role of aberrant dopaminergic signaling, involving the dopamine transporter DAT, a cocaine target, and the dopamine D2 receptor, which physically interacts with DAT. Splicing polymorphism rs2283265 of DRD2, encoding D2 receptors, were shown to confer risk of cocaine overdose/death (odds ratio ∼3) in subjects and controls from the Miami Dade County Brain Bank.1 Risk of cocaine-related death attributable to the minor allele of rs2283265 was significantly enhanced to OR=7.5 (P=0.0008) in homozygous carriers of the main 6-repeat allele of DAT rs3836790, a regulatory VNTR in intron8 lacking significant effect itself. In contrast, carriers of the minor 5-repeat DAT allele showed no significant risk (OR=1.1, P=0.84). DAT rs3836790 and DRD2 rs2283265 also interacted by modulating DAT protein activity in the ventral putamen of cocaine abusers. In high-linkage disequilibrium with the VNTR, DAT rs6347 in exon9 yielded similar results. Assessing the impact of DAT alone, a rare DAT haplotype formed by the minor alleles of rs3836790 and rs27072, a regulatory DAT variant in the 3′-UTR, occurred in nearly one-third of the cocaine abusers but was absent in African American controls, apparently conferring strong risk. These results demonstrate gene–gene–drug interaction affecting risk of fatal cocaine intoxication. PMID:23340505

  10. Rational development and characterization of humanized anti-EGFR variant III chimeric antigen receptor T cells for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura A; Scholler, John; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Kosaka, Akemi; Patel, Prachi R; McGettigan, Shannon E; Nace, Arben K; Dentchev, Tzvete; Thekkat, Pramod; Loew, Andreas; Boesteanu, Alina C; Cogdill, Alexandria P; Chen, Taylor; Fraietta, Joseph A; Kloss, Christopher C; Posey, Avery D; Engels, Boris; Singh, Reshma; Ezell, Tucker; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Ramones, Melissa H; Li, Na; Zhou, Li; Plesa, Gabriela; Seykora, John T; Okada, Hideho; June, Carl H; Brogdon, Jennifer L; Maus, Marcela V

    2015-02-18

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are synthetic molecules designed to redirect T cells to specific antigens. CAR-modified T cells can mediate long-term durable remissions in B cell malignancies, but expanding this platform to solid tumors requires the discovery of surface targets with limited expression in normal tissues. The variant III mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) results from an in-frame deletion of a portion of the extracellular domain, creating a neoepitope. We chose a vector backbone encoding a second-generation CAR based on efficacy of a murine scFv-based CAR in a xenograft model of glioblastoma. Next, we generated a panel of humanized scFvs and tested their specificity and function as soluble proteins and in the form of CAR-transduced T cells; a low-affinity scFv was selected on the basis of its specificity for EGFRvIII over wild-type EGFR. The lead candidate scFv was tested in vitro for its ability to direct CAR-transduced T cells to specifically lyse, proliferate, and secrete cytokines in response to antigen-bearing targets. We further evaluated the specificity of the lead CAR candidate in vitro against EGFR-expressing keratinocytes and in vivo in a model of mice grafted with normal human skin. EGFRvIII-directed CAR T cells were also able to control tumor growth in xenogeneic subcutaneous and orthotopic models of human EGFRvIII(+) glioblastoma. On the basis of these results, we have designed a phase 1 clinical study of CAR T cells transduced with humanized scFv directed to EGFRvIII in patients with either residual or recurrent glioblastoma (NCT02209376).

  11. Functional Characterization of MC1R-TUBB3 Intergenic Splice Variants of the Human Melanocortin 1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Cecilia; Olivares, Conchi; Castejón-Griñán, Maria; Abrisqueta, Marta; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R) expressed in melanocytes is a major determinant of skin pigmentation. It encodes a Gs protein-coupled receptor activated by α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH). Human MC1R has an inefficient poly(A) site allowing intergenic splicing with its downstream neighbour Tubulin-β-III (TUBB3). Intergenic splicing produces two MC1R isoforms, designated Iso1 and Iso2, bearing the complete seven transmembrane helices from MC1R fused to TUBB3-derived C-terminal extensions, in-frame for Iso1 and out-of-frame for Iso2. It has been reported that exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) might promote an isoform switch from canonical MC1R (MC1R-001) to the MC1R-TUBB3 chimeras, which might lead to novel phenotypes required for tanning. We expressed the Flag epitope-tagged intergenic isoforms in heterologous HEK293T cells and human melanoma cells, for functional characterization. Iso1 was expressed with the expected size. Iso2 yielded a doublet of Mr significantly lower than predicted, and impaired intracellular stability. Although Iso1- and Iso2 bound radiolabelled agonist with the same affinity as MC1R-001, their plasma membrane expression was strongly reduced. Decreased surface expression mostly resulted from aberrant forward trafficking, rather than high rates of endocytosis. Functional coupling of both isoforms to cAMP was lower than wild-type, but ERK activation upon binding of αMSH was unimpaired, suggesting imbalanced signaling from the splice variants. Heterodimerization of differentially labelled MC1R-001 with the splicing isoforms analyzed by co-immunoprecipitation was efficient and caused decreased surface expression of binding sites. Thus, UVR-induced MC1R isoforms might contribute to fine-tune the tanning response by modulating MC1R-001 availability and functional parameters.

  12. The cistrome and gene signature of androgen receptor splice variants in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ji; Lonergan, Peter E.; Nacusi, Lucas P.; Wang, Liguo; Schmidt, Lucy J.; Sun, Zhifu; Van der Steen, Travis; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Kosari, Farhad; Vasmatzis, George; Klee, George G.; Balk, Steven P.; Huang, Haojie; Wang, Chunxi; Tindall, Donald J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Spliced variant forms of androgen receptor (AR-Vs) have been identified recently in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines and clinical samples. We identified the cistrome and gene signature of AR-Vs in CRPC cell lines and determined the clinical significance of AR-Vs regulated genes. Materials and Methods The CRPC cell line 22Rv1, which expresses both full length androgen receptor (AR-FL) and AR-Vs endogenously, was used as the research model. We established 22Rv1-ARFL−/ARVs+ and 22Rv1- ARFL−/ARVs− through RNA interference. ChIP-seq and microarray techniques were used to identify cistrome and gene expression profiles of AR-Vs in the absence of androgen. Results AR-Vs binding sites were identified in 22Rv1-ARFL−/ARVs+. A set of genes was found to be regulated uniquely by AR-Vs, but not by full-length AR in the absence of androgen. Integrated analysis revealed that some genes are modulated by AR-Vs directly. Unsupervised clustering analysis showed that the AR-Vs gene signature can differentiate not only benign from malignant prostate tissue, but also localized prostate cancer from metastatic CRPC specimens. Some genes that were modulated uniquely by AR-Vs also correlated with histological grade and biochemical failure. Conclusions We conclude that AR-Vs can bind to DNA independently of full-length AR in the absence of androgen and modulate a unique set of genes that is not regulated by AR-FL. The AR-Vs gene signature correlates with disease progression, and distinguishes between primary cancer and CRPC specimens, as well as benign and malignant prostate specimens. PMID:25132238

  13. Identification and analysis of function of a novel splicing variant of mouse receptor activator of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Satomi; Kitazawa, Riko; Ishii, Junko; Kondo, Takeshi; Hakozaki, Akihiro; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Haraguch, Ryuma; Mori, Kiyoshi; Kitazawa, Sohei

    2011-04-01

    Receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family expressed in osteoclast precursors, and RANK-RANK ligand (RANKL) signaling is a key system for differentiation, activation and survival of osteoclasts. Here, we report the identification of a novel alternative splicing variant of mouse RANK gene (vRANK) that contains a new intervening exon between exon 1 and exon 2 of mouse full-length RANK (fRANK) mRNA. Since this novel exon contains the stop codon, vRANK encodes truncated amino acids that have a portion of the signal peptide of fRANK and an additional 19 amino acids that show no homology to previously reported domains. By transient transfection studies with vRANK-GFP and -Flag expressing constructs, vRANK was found localized mostly in the cytoplasm and partly in the cell membrane, but was not secreted into the culture supernatant. Under the stimulation of various factors, the expression of vRANK mRNA was almost parallel to that of fRANK in RAW264.7 cells not treated with M-CSF. Overexpression of vRANK, on the other hand, decreased TRACP (a marker of osteoclasts) mRNA expression as well as the number of TRACP-positive multinucleated giant cells. While the mRNA expression levels of NFATc1 (a master transcriptional factor of the osteoclast differentiation program) were not affected, apoptotic cells increased significantly in vRAN K-transfected cells treated with sRANKL. Taken together, these results suggest that vRANK is a novel osteoclast suppressor that reduces the number of RANKL-induced mature osteoclasts mainly by negating the anti-apoptotic effect of RANKL.

  14. GBM heterogeneity as a function of variable epidermal growth factor receptor variant III activity

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Olle R.; McKinney, Andrew; Engler, Jane R.; Koshkakaryan, Gayane; Gong, Henry; Robinson, Aaron E.; Ewald, Andrew J.; Huillard, Emmanuelle; James, C. David; Molinaro, Annette M.; Shieh, Joseph T.; Phillips, Joanna J.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) due to a deletion of exons 2-7 of EGFR (EGFRvIII) is a common alteration in glioblastoma (GBM). While this alteration can drive gliomagenesis, tumors harboring EGFRvIII are heterogeneous. To investigate the role for EGFRvIII activation in tumor phenotype we used a neural progenitor cell-based murine model of GBM driven by EGFR signaling and generated tumor progenitor cells with high and low EGFRvIII activation, pEGFRHi and pEGFRLo. In vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro studies suggested a direct association between EGFRvIII activity and increased tumor cell proliferation, decreased tumor cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, and altered progenitor cell phenotype. Time-lapse confocal imaging of tumor cells in brain slice cultures demonstrated blood vessel co-option by tumor cells and highlighted differences in invasive pattern. Inhibition of EGFR signaling in pEGFRHi promoted cell differentiation and increased cell-matrix adhesion. Conversely, increased EGFRvIII activation in pEGFRLo reduced cell-matrix adhesion. Our study using a murine model for GBM driven by a single genetic driver, suggests differences in EGFR activation contribute to tumor heterogeneity and aggressiveness. PMID:27738329

  15. No association of dopamine D2 receptor molecular variant Cys311 and schizophrenia in Chinese patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chia-Hsiang Chen; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Hai-Gwo Hwu

    1996-07-26

    A serine-to-cysteine mutation of dopamine D2 receptor at codon 311 (Cys311) was found to have higher frequency in schizophrenic patients than in normal controls in Japanese by Arinami et al. The Cys311 allele was found to be associated with patients with younger age-of-onset, positive family history, and more positive symptoms. To investigate the possible involvement of Cys311 in schizophrenia in the Chinese population, 114 unrelated Taiwanese Chinese schizophrenic patients with positive family history and 88 normal controls were genotyped for Cys311. Four patients and 5 normal controls were heterozygotes of Ser311/Cys311; no homozygotes of Cys311 were identified in either group. The allele frequencies of Cys311 in Chinese schizophrenic patients and normal controls were 2% and 3%, respectively. No significant difference was detected between the two groups. Our results do not support the argument that the Cys311 allele of DRD2 poses a genetic risk for certain types of schizophrenia in Chinese populations. 18 refs.

  16. A case of cervical cancer expressed three mRNA variant of Hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor

    PubMed Central

    Villegas-Ruíz, Vanessa; Salcedo, Mauricio; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; de Oca, Edén V Montes; Román-Basaure, Edgar; Mantilla-Morales, Alejandra; Dávila-Borja, Víctor M; Juárez-Méndez, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second malignancy in Mexico, little is known about the prognostic factors associated with this disease. Several cellular components are important in their transformation and progression. Alternative mRNA splice is an important mechanism for generating protein diversity, nevertheless, in cancer unknown mRNA diversity is expressed. Hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor (HMMR, RHAMM, CD168) is a family member of proteins, hyaluronan acid dependent, and has been associated with different malignant processes such as: angiogenesis, cell invasiveness, proliferation, metastasis and poor outcome in some tumors. In the present study we identified expression of HMMR in cervical cancer by means of RT-PCR and sequencing. Our results indicate co-expression of two HMMR variants in all samples, and one case expressed three alternative HMMR splice transcripts. These results showed the heterogeneity of mRNA transcripts of HMMR that could express in cancer and the expression of HMMR could be marker of malignancy in CC. PMID:24966934

  17. Truncated somatostatin receptor variant sst5TMD4 confers aggressive features (proliferation, invasion and reduced octreotide response) to somatotropinomas

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Raúl M.; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Neto, Leonardo Vieira; Taboada, Giselle F.; Hormaechea-Agulla, Daniel; Kasuki, Leandro; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Moreno-Carazo, Alberto; Gálvez, María Ángeles; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Kineman, Rhonda D.; Culler, Michael D.; Gahete, Manuel D.; Gadelha, Mônica R.; Castaño, Justo P.

    2015-01-01

    The GH/IGF1 response of somatotropinomas to somatostatin analogues (SSA) is associated with their pattern of somatostatin receptor (sst1–sst5) expression. Recently, we demonstrated that expression of a truncated sst5-variant (sst5TMD4) can influence the secretory response of somatotropinomas to SSA-therapy; however, its potential relationship with aggressive features (e.g. invasion/proliferation) is still unknown. Here, we show that sst5TMD4 is present in 50% of non-functioning pituitary-adenomas (NFPA) (n = 30) and 89% of somatotropinomas (n = 36), its expression levels being highest in somatotropinomas > > NFPAs > > > normal pituitaries (negligible expression; n = 8). In somatotropinomas, sst5TMD4 mRNA and protein levels correlated positively, and its expression was directly associated with tumor invasiveness (cavernous/sphenoid sinus), and inversely correlated with age and GH/IGF1 reduction after 3–6 months with octreotide-LAR therapy. GNAS+ somatotropinomas expressed lower sst5TMD4 levels. ROC analysis revealed sst5TMD4 expression as the only marker, within all sst-subtypes, capable to predict tumor invasiveness in somatotropinomas. sst5TMD4 overexpression increased cell viability in cultured somatotropinoma (n = 5). Hence, presence of sst5TMD4 associates with increased aggressive features and worse prognosis in somatotropinomas, thereby providing a potentially useful tool to refine somatotropinoma diagnosis, predict outcome of clinical response to SSA-therapy and develop new therapeutic targets. PMID:25637790

  18. Droplet Digital PCR Based Androgen Receptor Variant 7 (AR-V7) Detection from Prostate Cancer Patient Blood Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yafeng; Luk, Alison; Young, Francis P; Lynch, David; Chua, Wei; Balakrishnar, Bavanthi; de Souza, Paul; Becker, Therese M

    2016-08-04

    Androgen receptor splice variant V7 (AR-V7) was recently identified as a valuable predictive biomarker in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Here, we report a new, sensitive and accurate screen for AR-V7 mRNA expression directly from circulating tumor cells (CTCs): We combined EpCAM-based immunomagnetic CTC isolation using the IsoFlux microfluidic platform with droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) to analyze total AR and AR-V7 expression from prostate cancer patients CTCs. We demonstrate that AR-V7 is reliably detectable in enriched CTC samples with as little as five CTCs, even considering tumor heterogeneity, and confirm detection of AR-V7 in CTC samples from advanced prostate cancer (PCa) patients with AR-V7 detection limited to castrate resistant disease status in our sample set. Sensitive molecular analyses of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) or circulating tumor nucleic acids present exciting strategies to detect biomarkers, such as AR-V7 from non-invasive blood samples, so-called blood biopsies.

  19. A Variant in the Neuropeptide Receptor npr-1 is a Major Determinant of Caenorhabditis elegans Growth and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Erik C.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Gerke, Justin P.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The mechanistic basis for how genetic variants cause differences in phenotypic traits is often elusive. We identified a quantitative trait locus in Caenorhabditis elegans that affects three seemingly unrelated phenotypic traits: lifetime fecundity, adult body size, and susceptibility to the human pathogen Staphyloccus aureus. We found a QTL for all three traits arises from variation in the neuropeptide receptor gene npr-1. Moreover, we found that variation in npr-1 is also responsible for differences in 247 gene expression traits. Variation in npr-1 is known to determine whether animals disperse throughout a bacterial lawn or aggregate at the edges of the lawn. We found that the allele that leads to aggregation is associated with reduced growth and reproductive output. The altered gene expression pattern caused by this allele suggests that the aggregation behavior might cause a weak starvation state, which is known to reduce growth rate and fecundity. Importantly, we show that variation in npr-1 causes each of these phenotypic differences through behavioral avoidance of ambient oxygen concentrations. These results suggest that variation in npr-1 has broad pleiotropic effects mediated by altered exposure to bacterial food. PMID:24586193

  20. Association analysis of bitter receptor genes in five isolated populations identifies a significant correlation between TAS2R43 variants and coffee liking.

    PubMed

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Traglia, Michela; Robino, Antonietta; Willems, Sara M; Pistis, Giorgio; d'Adamo, Pio; Amin, Najaf; d'Eustacchio, Angela; Navarini, Luciano; Sala, Cinzia; Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia; Toniolo, Daniela; Gasparini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Coffee, one of the most popular beverages in the world, contains many different physiologically active compounds with a potential impact on people's health. Despite the recent attention given to the genetic basis of its consumption, very little has been done in understanding genes influencing coffee preference among different individuals. Given its markedly bitter taste, we decided to verify if bitter receptor genes (TAS2Rs) variants affect coffee liking. In this light, 4066 people from different parts of Europe and Central Asia filled in a field questionnaire on coffee liking. They have been consequently recruited and included in the study. Eighty-eight SNPs covering the 25 TAS2R genes were selected from the available imputed ones and used to run association analysis for coffee liking. A significant association was detected with three SNP: one synonymous and two functional variants (W35S and H212R) on the TAS2R43 gene. Both variants have been shown to greatly reduce in vitro protein activity. Surprisingly the wild type allele, which corresponds to the functional form of the protein, is associated to higher liking of coffee. Since the hTAS2R43 receptor is sensible to caffeine, we verified if the detected variants produced differences in caffeine bitter perception on a subsample of people coming from the FVG cohort. We found a significant association between differences in caffeine perception and the H212R variant but not with the W35S, which suggests that the effect of the TAS2R43 gene on coffee liking is mediated by caffeine and in particular by the H212R variant. No other significant association was found with other TAS2R genes. In conclusion, the present study opens new perspectives in the understanding of coffee liking. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of the TAS2R43 gene in coffee hedonics and to identify which other genes and pathways are involved in its genetics.

  1. The emerging roles of AhR in physiology and immunity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Whitelaw, Murray L

    2013-09-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is traditionally defined as a transcriptional regulator involved in adaptive xenobiotic response, however, emerging evidence supports physiological functions of AhR in normal cell development and immune response. The role of AhR in immunomodulation is multi-dimensional. On the one hand, activation of AhR by TCDD and other ligands leads to profound immunosuppression, potentially via skewed Th1/Th2 cell balance toward Th1 dominance, and boosted Treg cell differentiation. On the other hand, activation of AhR can also induce Th17 cell polarization and increase the severity of autoimmune disease. In addition to T lymphocytes, the AhR also appears to play a vital role in B cell maturation, and regulates the activity of macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils following lipopolysaccharide challenge or influenza virus infection. In these scenarios, activation of AhR is associated with decreased host response and reduced survival. Furthermore, gene knock out studies suggest that AhR is indispensable for the postnatal maintenance of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and skin-resident dendritic epidermal gamma delta T cells, providing a potential link between AhR and gut immunity and wound healing. It is well accepted that the magnitude and the type of immune response is dependent on the local cytokine milieu and the AhR appears to be one of the key factors involved in the fine turning of this cytokine balance.

  2. Region-specific expression and hormonal regulation of the first exon variants of rat prolactin receptor mRNA in rat brain and anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Nogami, H; Hoshino, R; Ogasawara, K; Miyamoto, S; Hisano, S

    2007-08-01

    Recent studies have revealed the occurrence of five first exon variants of the rat prolactin receptor mRNA, suggesting that multiple promoters direct prolactin receptor transcription in response to different regulatory factors. In the present study, regional expression of these first exon variants, as well as two prolactin receptor subtypes generated by alternative splicing, was examined in the brains and anterior pituitary glands of female rats. Expression of the long-form was detected in the choroid plexus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebral cortex and anterior pituitary gland, whereas the short form was detected only in the choroid plexus. E1-3 mRNA, a first exon variant, was detected in the choroid plexus, hypothalamus, and anterior pituitary gland, whereas E1-4 was detected only in the choroid plexus. Other variants were not detectable by the polymerase chain reaction protocol employed in this study. Ovariectomy increased the short form in the choroid plexus and the E1-3 expression in the choroid plexus and pituitary gland, but changes in the long-form and E1-4 expression were minimal. Replacement of oestrogens and prolactin suggest that oestrogens down-regulate E1-3 expression in the choroid plexus and pituitary gland, and that the negative effect of oestrogen is mediated by prolactin in the pituitary gland. The present results revealed the region-specific promoter usage in prolactin receptor mRNA transcription, as well as the involvement of oestrogens in the regulation of E1-3 mRNA expression in the brain and pituitary gland.

  3. Variants of the Adiponectin (ADIPOQ) and Adiponectin Receptor 1 (ADIPOR1) Genes and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kaklamani, Virginia G.; Wisinski, Kari B.; Sadim, Maureen; Gulden, Cassandra; Do, Albert; Offit, Kenneth; Baron, John A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Mantzoros, Christos; Pasche, Boris

    2008-01-01

    Context Current epidemiological evidence suggests an association between obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and colorectal cancer risk. Adiponectin is a hormone secreted by the adipose tissue, and serum levels are inversely correlated with obesity and hyperinsulinemia. While there is evidence of an association between circulating adiponectin levels and colorectal cancer risk, no association between genes of the adiponectin pathway and colorectal cancer have been reported to date. Objective To determine the association of 10 haplotype-tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the adiponectin (ADIPOQ) and adiponectin receptor 1 (ADIPOR1) genes with colorectal cancer risk. Design, Setting, and Patients Two case-control studies including patients with a diagnosis of colorectal cancer and controls were recruited between 2000 and 2007. Case-control study 1 included a total of 441 patients with a diagnosis of colorectal cancer and 658 controls; both groups were of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry and from New York, New York. Case-control study 2 included 199 patients with a diagnosis of colorectal cancer and 199 controls from Chicago, Illinois, matched 1:1 for sex, age, and ethnicity. Main Outcome Measures ADIPOQ and ADIPOR1 SNP frequency among cases and controls. Results In study 1, after adjustment for age, sex, and SNPs from the same gene, 3 ADIPOQ SNPs and 1 ADIPOR1 SNP were associated with colorectal cancer risk: rs266729 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55–0.95) and rs822396 (AOR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.14–1.00) were associated with decreased risk whereas rs822395 (AOR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.09–2.84) and rs1342387 (AOR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.18–2.72) were associated with increased risk. In study 2, after adjustment for age, sex, race, and SNPs from the same gene, the ADIPOQ SNP rs266729 was associated with a decreased colorectal cancer risk of similar magnitude as in study 1 (AOR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.34–0.78). Combined analysis of both studies shows an

  4. GABAB-receptor splice variants GB1a and GB1b in rat brain: developmental regulation, cellular distribution and extrasynaptic localization.

    PubMed

    Fritschy, J M; Meskenaite, V; Weinmann, O; Honer, M; Benke, D; Mohler, H

    1999-03-01

    GABAB (gamma-aminobutyric acid)-receptors have been implicated in central nervous system (CNS) functions, e.g. cognition and pain perception, and dysfunctions including spasticity and absence epilepsy. To permit an analysis of the two known GABAB-receptor splice variants GABAB-R1a (GB1a) and GABAB-R1b (GB1b), their distribution pattern has been differentiated in the rat brain, using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry with isoform-specific antisera. During postnatal maturation, the expression of the two splice variants was differentially regulated with GB1a being preponderant at birth. In adult brain, GB1b-immunoreactivity (-IR) was predominant, and the two isoforms largely accounted for the pattern of GABAB-receptor binding sites in the brain. Receptor heterogeneity was pronounced in the hippocampus, where both isoforms occurred in CA1, but only GB1b in CA3. Similarly, in the cerebellum, GB1b was exclusively found in Purkinje cells in a zebrin-like pattern. The staining was most pronounced in Purkinje cell dendrites and spines. Using electron microscopy, over 80% of the spine profiles in which a synaptic contact with a parallel fibre was visible contained GB1b-IR at extrasynaptic sites. This subcellular localization is unrelated to GABAergic inputs, indicating that the role of GABAB-receptors in vivo extends beyond synaptic GABAergic neurotransmission and may, in the cerebellum, involve taurine as a ligand.

  5. A species-specific amino acid difference in the macaque CD4 receptor restricts replication by global circulating HIV-1 variants representing viruses from recent infection.

    PubMed

    Humes, Daryl; Emery, Sandra; Laws, Elizabeth; Overbaugh, Julie

    2012-12-01

    HIV-1 replicates poorly in macaque cells, and this had hindered the advancement of relevant nonhuman primate model systems for HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis. Several host restriction factors have been identified that contribute to this species-specific restriction to HIV-1 replication, but these do not fully explain the poor replication of most strains of HIV-1 in macaque cells. Only select HIV-1 envelope variants, typically those derived from viruses that have been adapted in cell culture, result in infectious chimeric SIVs encoding HIV-1 envelope (SHIVs). Here we demonstrate that most circulating HIV-1 variants obtained directly from infected individuals soon after virus acquisition do not efficiently mediate entry using the macaque CD4 receptor. The infectivity of these viruses is ca. 20- to 50-fold lower with the rhesus and pig-tailed macaque versus the human CD4 receptor. In contrast, culture-derived HIV-1 envelope variants that facilitate efficient replication in macaques showed similar infectivity with macaque and human CD4 receptors (within ∼2-fold). The ability of an envelope to mediate entry using macaque CD4 correlated with its ability to mediate entry of cells expressing low levels of the human CD4 receptor and with soluble CD4 sensitivity. Species-specific differences in the functional capacity of the CD4 receptor to mediate entry mapped to a single amino acid difference at position 39 that is under strong positive selection, suggesting that the evolution of CD4 may have been influenced by its function as a viral receptor. These results also suggest that N39 in human CD4 may be a critical residue for interaction of transmitted HIV-1 variants. These studies provide important insights into virus-host cell interactions that have hindered the development of relevant nonhuman primate models for HIV-1 infection and provide possible markers, such as sCD4 sensitivity, to identify potential HIV-1 variants that could be exploited for development of better

  6. Variants in triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 are associated with both behavioral variant frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Margarita; Lopera, Francisco; Siniard, Ashley; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Carvajal, Julian; Muñoz, Claudia; Ramirez-Restrepo, Manuel; Myers, Amanda J.; Caselli, Richard J.; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Reiman, Eric M.; Huentelman, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that rare genetic variants within the TREM2 gene are associated with increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease. TREM2 mutations are the genetic basis for a condition characterized by polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy (PLOSL) and an early-onset dementia syndrome. TREM2 is important in the phagocytosis of apoptotic neuronal cells by microglia in the brain. Loss of function might lead to an impaired clearance and accumulation of necrotic debris and subsequent neurodegeneration. In this study, we investigated a consanguineous family segregating autosomal recessive behavioral variant FTLD from Antioquia, Colombia. Exome sequencing identified a nonsense mutation in TREM2 (p.Trp198X) segregating with disease. Next, using a cohort of clinically characterized and neuropathologically verified sporadic AD cases and controls we report replication of the AD risk association at rs75932628 within TREM2. These data suggest that mutational burden in TREM2 may serve as a risk factor for neurodegenerative disease in general and that potentially this class of TREM2 variant carriers with dementia should be considered a molecularly distinct form of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:23582655

  7. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in pigs, Réunion Island.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Eric; Pascalis, Hervé; Temmam, Sarah; Hervé, Séverine; Saulnier, Aure; Turpin, Magali; Barbier, Nicolas; Hoarau, Johny; Quéguiner, Stéphane; Gorin, Stéphane; Foray, Coralie; Roger, Matthieu; Porphyre, Vincent; André, Paul; Thomas, Thierry; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Dellagi, Koussay; Simon, Gaëlle

    2012-10-01

    During 2009, pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus affected humans on Réunion Island. Since then, the virus has sustained circulation among local swine herds, raising concerns about the potential for genetic evolution of the virus and possible retransmission back to humans of variants with increased virulence. Continuous surveillance of A(H1N1)pdm09 infection in pigs is recommended.

  8. MicroRNA-3148 Modulates Allelic Expression of Toll-Like Receptor 7 Variant Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Daisuke; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Kamen, Diane L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Scofield, R. Hal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Freedman, Barry I.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Sivils, Kathy Moser; James, Judith A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Niewold, Timothy B.; Merrill, Joan T.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Stevens, Anne M.; Boackle, Susan A.; Cantor, Rita M.; Chen, Weiling; Grossman, Jeniffer M.; Hahn, Bevra H.; Harley, John B.; Alarcόn-Riquelme, Marta E.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Tsao, Betty P.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that the G allele of rs3853839 at 3′untranslated region (UTR) of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) was associated with elevated transcript expression and increased risk for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in 9,274 Eastern Asians [P = 6.5×10−10, odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.27 (1.17–1.36)]. Here, we conducted trans-ancestral fine-mapping in 13,339 subjects including European Americans, African Americans, and Amerindian/Hispanics and confirmed rs3853839 as the only variant within the TLR7-TLR8 region exhibiting consistent and independent association with SLE (P meta = 7.5×10−11, OR = 1.24 [1.18–1.34]). The risk G allele was associated with significantly increased levels of TLR7 mRNA and protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and elevated luciferase activity of reporter gene in transfected cells. TLR7 3′UTR sequence bearing the non-risk C allele of rs3853839 matches a predicted binding site of microRNA-3148 (miR-3148), suggesting that this microRNA may regulate TLR7 expression. Indeed, miR-3148 levels were inversely correlated with TLR7 transcript levels in PBMCs from SLE patients and controls (R2 = 0.255, P = 0.001). Overexpression of miR-3148 in HEK-293 cells led to significant dose-dependent decrease in luciferase activity for construct driven by TLR7 3′UTR segment bearing the C allele (P = 0.0003). Compared with the G-allele construct, the C-allele construct showed greater than two-fold reduction of luciferase activity in the presence of miR-3148. Reduced modulation by miR-3148 conferred slower degradation of the risk G-allele containing TLR7 transcripts, resulting in elevated levels of gene products. These data establish rs3853839 of TLR7 as a shared risk variant of SLE in 22,613 subjects of Asian, EA, AA, and Amerindian/Hispanic ancestries (Pmeta = 2.0×10−19, OR = 1.25 [1.20–1.32]), which confers allelic effect on transcript turnover via differential binding to the

  9. MicroRNA-3148 modulates allelic expression of toll-like receptor 7 variant associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yun; Zhao, Jian; Sakurai, Daisuke; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P; Kamen, Diane L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Jacob, Chaim O; Scofield, R Hal; Langefeld, Carl D; Kelly, Jennifer A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Alarcón, Graciela S; Vyse, Timothy J; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Freedman, Barry I; Gaffney, Patrick M; Sivils, Kathy Moser; James, Judith A; Gregersen, Peter K; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Niewold, Timothy B; Merrill, Joan T; Criswell, Lindsey A; Stevens, Anne M; Boackle, Susan A; Cantor, Rita M; Chen, Weiling; Grossman, Jeniffer M; Hahn, Bevra H; Harley, John B; Alarcόn-Riquelme, Marta E; Brown, Elizabeth E; Tsao, Betty P

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that the G allele of rs3853839 at 3'untranslated region (UTR) of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) was associated with elevated transcript expression and increased risk for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in 9,274 Eastern Asians [P = 6.5×10(-10), odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.27 (1.17-1.36)]. Here, we conducted trans-ancestral fine-mapping in 13,339 subjects including European Americans, African Americans, and Amerindian/Hispanics and confirmed rs3853839 as the only variant within the TLR7-TLR8 region exhibiting consistent and independent association with SLE (Pmeta = 7.5×10(-11), OR = 1.24 [1.18-1.34]). The risk G allele was associated with significantly increased levels of TLR7 mRNA and protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and elevated luciferase activity of reporter gene in transfected cells. TLR7 3'UTR sequence bearing the non-risk C allele of rs3853839 matches a predicted binding site of microRNA-3148 (miR-3148), suggesting that this microRNA may regulate TLR7 expression. Indeed, miR-3148 levels were inversely correlated with TLR7 transcript levels in PBMCs from SLE patients and controls (R(2) = 0.255, P = 0.001). Overexpression of miR-3148 in HEK-293 cells led to significant dose-dependent decrease in luciferase activity for construct driven by TLR7 3'UTR segment bearing the C allele (P = 0.0003). Compared with the G-allele construct, the C-allele construct showed greater than two-fold reduction of luciferase activity in the presence of miR-3148. Reduced modulation by miR-3148 conferred slower degradation of the risk G-allele containing TLR7 transcripts, resulting in elevated levels of gene products. These data establish rs3853839 of TLR7 as a shared risk variant of SLE in 22,613 subjects of Asian, EA, AA, and Amerindian/Hispanic ancestries (Pmeta  = 2.0×10(-19), OR = 1.25 [1.20-1.32]), which confers allelic effect on transcript turnover via differential binding to the epigenetic factor

  10. Dopamine D2 receptor gene variants and response to rasagiline in early Parkinson's disease: a pharmacogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Masellis, Mario; Collinson, Shannon; Freeman, Natalie; Tampakeras, Maria; Levy, Joseph; Tchelet, Amir; Eyal, Eli; Berkovich, Elijahu; Eliaz, Rom E; Abler, Victor; Grossman, Iris; Fitzer-Attas, Cheryl; Tiwari, Arun; Hayden, Michael R; Kennedy, James L; Lang, Anthony E; Knight, Jo

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of early Parkinson's disease with dopaminergic agents remains the mainstay of symptomatic therapy for this incurable neurodegenerative disorder. However, clinical responses to dopaminergic drugs vary substantially from person to person due to individual-, drug- and disease-related factors that may in part be genetically determined. Using clinical data and DNA samples ascertained through the largest placebo-controlled clinical trial of the monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, rasagiline (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00256204), we examined how polymorphisms in candidate genes associate with the clinical response to rasagiline in early Parkinson's disease. Variants in genes that express proteins involved in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of rasagiline, and genes previously associated with the risk to develop Parkinson's disease were genotyped. The LifeTechnologies OpenArray NT genotyping platform and polymerase chain reaction-based methods were used to analyse 204 single nucleotide polymorphisms and five variable number tandem repeats from 30 candidate genes in 692 available DNA samples from this clinical trial. The peak symptomatic response to rasagiline, the rate of symptom progression, and their relation to genetic variation were examined controlling for placebo effects using general linear and mixed effects models, respectively. Single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs2283265 and rs1076560, in the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2) were found to be significantly associated with a favourable peak response to rasagiline at 12 weeks in early Parkinson's disease after controlling for multiple testing. From a linear regression, the betas were 2.5 and 2.38, respectively, with false discovery rate-corrected P-values of 0.032. These polymorphisms were in high linkage disequilibrium with each other (r(2) = 0.96) meaning that the same clinical response signal was identified by each of them. No polymorphisms were associated with slowing the rate of worsening in

  11. The melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r) variants do not account for the co-occurrence of Parkinson's disease and malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Elincx-Benizri, Sandra; Inzelberg, Rivka; Greenbaum, Lior; Cohen, Oren S; Yahalom, Gilad; Laitman, Yael; Djaldetti, Ruth; Orlev, Yael; Scope, Alon; Azizi, Esther; Friedman, Eitan; Hassin-Baer, Sharon

    2014-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by loss of melanin-positive dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Malignant melanoma (MM), a melanocyte-derived neoplasm, occurs with higher than expected frequency among PD patients. Red-haired individuals exhibit a threefold risk for developing MM than dark-haired people; PD risk also increases with lighter hair color. One plausible explanation for the associations between MM, hair color, and PD is the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene that plays a key role in hair and skin pigmentation as well as in MM predisposition. We hypothesized that specific MC1R variants may predispose to both MM and PD. Genotyping of the MC1R gene was performed for 16 PD patients with MM (PD+ MM+) and for three sets of age, sex, and ethnically matched controls, including 36 patients with PD (PD+ MM-), 37 with MM (PD- MM+) and 37 with neither diagnosis (PD- MM-). No association was found between MC1R variants and the co-occurrence of PD and MM. The risk for MM was higher in carriers of two MC1R variants versus with no MC1R variant (odds ratio (OR)=5.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-14.4, p=0.003). The risk for PD in carriers of two MC1R variants was markedly lower (OR=0.213, 95% CI 0.063-0.725) compared with individuals with no MC1R variant (p=0.013). In this study, MC1R variants were not associated with both MM and PD. Further studies in larger cohorts are necessary to confirm these preliminary results.

  12. Activation of AhR-mediated toxicity pathway by emerging pollutants polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides (PCDPSs) are a group of environmental pollutants for which limited toxicological information is available. This study tested the hypothesis that PCDPSs could activate the mammalian aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated toxicity pathways. Eight...

  13. Characterization of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) Variant Activation by Coal Fly Ash Particles and Associations with Altered Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) Expression and Asthma.

    PubMed

    Deering-Rice, Cassandra E; Stockmann, Chris; Romero, Erin G; Lu, Zhenyu; Shapiro, Darien; Stone, Bryan L; Fassl, Bernhard; Nkoy, Flory; Uchida, Derek A; Ward, Robert M; Veranth, John M; Reilly, Christopher A

    2016-11-25

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are activated by environmental particulate materials. We hypothesized that polymorphic variants of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) would be uniquely responsive to insoluble coal fly ash compared with the prototypical soluble agonist capsaicin. Furthermore, these changes would manifest as differences in lung cell responses to these agonists and perhaps correlate with changes in asthma symptom control. The TRPV1-I315M and -T469I variants were more responsive to capsaicin and coal fly ash. The I585V variant was less responsive to coal fly ash particles due to reduced translation of protein and an apparent role for Ile-585 in activation by particles. In HEK-293 cells, I585V had an inhibitory effect on wild-type TRPV1 expression, activation, and internalization/agonist-induced desensitization. In normal human bronchial epithelial cells, IL-8 secretion in response to coal fly ash treatment was reduced for cells heterozygous for TRPV1-I585V. Finally, both the I315M and I585V variants were associated with worse asthma symptom control with the effects of I315M manifesting in mild asthma and those of the I585V variant manifesting in severe, steroid-insensitive individuals. This effect may be due in part to increased transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) expression by lung epithelial cells expressing the TRPV1-I585V variant. These findings suggest that specific molecular interactions control TRPV1 activation by particles, differential activation, and desensitization of TRPV1 by particles and/or other agonists, and cellular changes in the expression of TRPA1 as a result of I585V expression could contribute to variations in asthma symptom control.

  14. The AhR and NF-κB/Rel Proteins Mediate the Inhibitory Effect of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin on the 3' Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Regulatory Region.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Richard L; Sulentic, Courtney E W

    2015-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the murine immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain gene (Igh) involves several regulatory elements including the 3'Igh regulatory region (3'IghRR), which is composed of at least 4 enhancers (hs3A, hs1.2, hs3B, and hs4). The hs1.2 and hs4 enhancers exhibit the greatest transcriptional activity and contain binding sites for several transcription factors including nuclear factor kappaB/Rel (NF-κB/Rel) proteins and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Interestingly, the environmental immunosuppressant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which potently inhibits antibody secretion, also profoundly inhibits 3'IghRR and hs1.2 enhancer activation induced by the B-lymphocyte activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but enhances LPS-induced activation of the hs4 enhancer. Within the hs1.2 and hs4 enhancers, the AhR binding site is in close proximity or overlaps an NF-κB/Rel binding site suggesting a potential reciprocal modulation of the 3'IghRR by AhR and NF-κB/Rel. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the role of NF-κB/Rel and the AhR on the 3'IghRR and its enhancers using the AhR ligand TCDD, the AhR antagonist CH223191, and toll-like receptor agonists LPS, Resiquimod (R848), or cytosine-phosphate-guanine-oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG). Utilizing the CH12.LX B-lymphocyte cell line and variants expressing either a 3'IghRR-regulated transgene reporter or an inducible IκBα (inhibitor kappa B-alpha protein) superrepressor (IκBαAA), we demonstrate an AhR- and NF-κB/Rel-dependent modulation of 3'IghRR and hs4 activity. Additionally, in mouse splenocytes or CH12.LX cells, binding within the hs1.2 and hs4 enhancer of the AhR and the NF-κB/Rel proteins RelA and RelB was differentially altered by the cotreatment of LPS and TCDD. These results suggest that the AhR and NF-κB/Rel protein binding profile within the 3'IghRR mediates the inhibitory effects of TCDD on Ig expression and therefore antibody levels.

  15. The AhR and NF-κB/Rel Proteins Mediate the Inhibitory Effect of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin on the 3′ Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Regulatory Region

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury, Richard L.; Sulentic, Courtney E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the murine immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain gene (Igh) involves several regulatory elements including the 3′Igh regulatory region (3′IghRR), which is composed of at least 4 enhancers (hs3A, hs1.2, hs3B, and hs4). The hs1.2 and hs4 enhancers exhibit the greatest transcriptional activity and contain binding sites for several transcription factors including nuclear factor kappaB/Rel (NF-κB/Rel) proteins and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Interestingly, the environmental immunosuppressant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which potently inhibits antibody secretion, also profoundly inhibits 3′IghRR and hs1.2 enhancer activation induced by the B-lymphocyte activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but enhances LPS-induced activation of the hs4 enhancer. Within the hs1.2 and hs4 enhancers, the AhR binding site is in close proximity or overlaps an NF-κB/Rel binding site suggesting a potential reciprocal modulation of the 3′IghRR by AhR and NF-κB/Rel. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the role of NF-κB/Rel and the AhR on the 3′IghRR and its enhancers using the AhR ligand TCDD, the AhR antagonist CH223191, and toll-like receptor agonists LPS, Resiquimod (R848), or cytosine-phosphate-guanine-oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG). Utilizing the CH12.LX B-lymphocyte cell line and variants expressing either a 3′IghRR-regulated transgene reporter or an inducible IκBα (inhibitor kappa B-alpha protein) superrepressor (IκBαAA), we demonstrate an AhR- and NF-κB/Rel-dependent modulation of 3′IghRR and hs4 activity. Additionally, in mouse splenocytes or CH12.LX cells, binding within the hs1.2 and hs4 enhancer of the AhR and the NF-κB/Rel proteins RelA and RelB was differentially altered by the cotreatment of LPS and TCDD. These results suggest that the AhR and NF-κB/Rel protein binding profile within the 3′IghRR mediates the inhibitory effects of TCDD on Ig expression and therefore antibody levels. PMID:26377645

  16. Molecular mechanism of transcriptional repression of AhR repressor involving ANKRA2, HDAC4, and HDAC5

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, Motohiko; Mimura, Junsei; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki

    2007-12-14

    The Aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR) has been proposed to inhibit Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activity by competing with AhR for forming a heterodimer with AhR nuclear translocator (Arnt) and subsequently binding to the xenobiotic responsive elements (XRE). However, the precise mechanism of AhRR inhibitory activity remains unknown. Analysis of the inhibitory activity of AhRR on the expression of a TK promoter-driven reporter has localized a core repressor domain in the sequence of amino acid residue 555-701. The inhibitory activity of AhRR is sensitive to a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, trichostatin A. By using the yeast two-hybrid screening method with the C-terminal sequence of AhRR as bait, we identified a binding partner, Ankyrin-repeat protein2 (ANKRA2), a protein known to interact with HDAC4 and HDAC5. RNA interference experiments using ANKRA2 and AhRR siRNAs indicate that ANKRA2 is important for transcriptional repression by AhRR. We have found that under normal conditions, CYP1A1 gene is kept silent in MEF cells by AhRR/Arnt heterodimer, which binds to the XRE sequence in its promoter and recruits ANKRA2, HDAC4, and HDAC5 as co-repressors.

  17. Analytical Validation of Androgen Receptor Splice Variant 7 Detection in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) Laboratory Setting.

    PubMed

    Lokhandwala, Parvez M; Riel, Stacy L; Haley, Lisa; Lu, Changxue; Chen, Yan; Silberstein, John; Zhu, Yezi; Zheng, Gang; Lin, Ming-Tseh; Gocke, Christopher D; Partin, Alan W; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S; Luo, Jun; Eshleman, James R

    2017-01-01

    Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) often are treated with drugs that target the androgen receptor (AR) ligand-binding domain. Constitutively active AR splice variant 7 (AR-V7) lacks the ligand-binding domain and, if detected in circulating tumor cells, may be associated with resistance to these agents. We validated an AR-V7 assay in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified laboratory. Circulating tumor cells were isolated, and mRNA was reverse-transcribed into cDNA. Real-time quantitative PCR amplification of reference transcripts (beta-actin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), prostate-specific transcripts (prostate-specific membrane antigen, prostate-specific antigen, and AR-full length), and AR-V7 was performed. Specimens for validation included an AR-V7 expressing prostate cancer (LNCaP95), 38 peripheral blood controls, and 21 blood samples from CRPC patients. The assay detected as few as five LNCaP95 cells spiked into peripheral blood, showing high analytical sensitivity. Multiple inter-run and intrarun replicates of LNCaP95 cell line experiments yielded similar cycle threshold values for all genes, showing high analytical precision (AR-V7 cycle threshold CV of 0.67%). All 38 healthy control samples were negative for AR-V7, showing high diagnostic specificity (100%). The diagnostic accuracy was confirmed by concurrent testing of 21 CRPC samples in the research laboratory and the clinical diagnostic laboratory: concordance in AR-V7 status was achieved in all cases (positive in 4, negative in 17) (100% accuracy). This first validated clinical assay detects the AR-V7 with high analytical sensitivity, precision, specificity, and accuracy.

  18. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent activation of estrogen receptor-dependent transcription by 3-methycholanthrene

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, Jonathan M.; Waxman, David J. . E-mail: djw@bu.edu

    2006-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that stimulates transcription directed by xenobiotic response elements upstream of target genes. Recently, AhR ligands were reported to induce formation of an AhR-estrogen receptor (ER) complex, which can bind to estrogen response elements (EREs) and stimulate transcription of ER target genes. Presently, we investigate the effect of the AhR ligands 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (BZ126) on ERE-regulated luciferase reporter activity and endogenous ER target gene expression. In MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, 3MC induced transcription of ER reporter genes containing native promoter sequences of the ER-responsive genes complement 3 and pS2 and heterologous promoters regulated by isolated EREs. Dose-response studies revealed that the concentration of 3MC required to half-maximally activate transcription (EC{sub 5}) was >100-fold higher for an ER reporter (27-57 {mu}M) than for an AhR reporter (86-250 nM) in both MCF-7 cells and in human endometrial cancer Ishikawa cells. 3MC also stimulated expression of the endogenous ER target genes amphiregulin, cathepsin D and progesterone receptor, albeit to a much lower extent than was achieved following stimulation with 17{beta}-estradiol. In Ishikawa cells, 3MC, but not BZ126 or TCDD, stimulated ER{alpha}-dependent reporter activity but did not induce expression of endogenous ER target genes. Finally, studies carried out in the AhR-positive rat hepatoma cell line 5L and the AhR-deficient variant BP8 demonstrated that ER reporter activity could be induced by 3MC in a manner that was independent of AhR and thus distinct from the AhR-ER 'hijacking' mechanism described recently. 3MC may thus elicit estrogenic activity by multiple mechanisms.

  19. A functional variant at miR-34a binding site in toll-like receptor 4 gene alters susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zi-Cheng; Tang, Xian-Mei; Zhao, Ying-Ren; Zheng, Lei

    2014-12-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a key role in prompting the innate or immediate response. A growing body of evidence suggests that genetic variants of TLR4 gene were associated with the development of cancers. This study aimed to investigate the relationship of a functional variant (rs1057317) at microRNA-34a (miR-34a) binding site in toll-like receptor 4 gene and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. A single center-based case-control study was conducted. In this study, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing were used to genotype sequence variants of TLR4 in 426 hepatocellular carcinoma cases and 438 controls. The modification of rs1057317 on the binding of hsa-miR-34a to TLR4 messenger RNA (mRNA) was measured by luciferase activity assay. Individuals carrying the AA genotypes for the rs1057317 were associated significantly with increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma comparing with those carrying wild-type homozygous CC genotypes (adjusted odds ratio [OR] by sex and age, from 1.116 to 2.452, P = 0.013). The activity of the reporter vector was lower in the reporter vector carrying C allele than the reporter vector carrying A allele. Furthermore, the expression of TLR4 was detected in the peripheral blood mononucleated cell of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, suggesting that mRNA and protein levels of TLR4 might be associated with SNP rs1057317. Collectively, these results suggested that the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma was associated with a functional variant at miR-34a binding site in toll-like receptor 4 gene. miR-34a/TLR4 axis may play an important role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. Activation of AhR-mediated toxicity pathway by emerging ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides (PCDPSs) are a group of environmental pollutants for which limited toxicological information is available. This study tested the hypothesis that PCDPSs could activate the mammalian aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated toxicity pathways. Eighteen PCDPSs were tested in the H4IIE-luc transactivation assay, with 13/18 causing concentration-dependent AhR activation. Potencies of several congeners were similar to those of mono-ortho substituted polychlorinated biphenyls. A RNA sequencing (RNA-seq)-based transcriptomic analysis was performed on H4IIE cells treated with two PCDPS congeners, 2,2',3,3',4,5,6-hepta-CDPS, and 2,4,4',5-tetra-CDPS. Results of RNA-seq revealed a remarkable modulation on a relatively short gene list by exposure to the tested concentrations of PCDPSs, among which, Cyp1 responded with the greatest fold up-regulation. Both the identities of the modulated transcripts and the associated pathways were consistent with targets and pathways known to be modulated by other types of AhR agonists and there was little evidence for significant off-target effects within the cellular context of the H4IIE bioassay. The results suggest AhR activation as a toxicologically relevant mode of action for PCDPSs suggests the utility of AhR-related toxicity pathways for predicting potential hazards associated with PCDPS exposure in mammals and potentially other vertebrates. Polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides (PCDPSs) are a group of en

  1. Truncated G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1 splice variants are targets for highly potent opioid analgesics lacking side effects.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Susruta; Grinnell, Steven; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Burgman, Maxim; Polikar, Lisa; Ansonoff, Michael; Pintar, John; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2011-12-06

    Pain remains a pervasive problem throughout medicine, transcending all specialty boundaries. Despite the extraordinary insights into pain and its mechanisms over the past few decades, few advances have been made with analgesics. Most pain remains treated by opiates, which have significant side effects that limit their utility. We now describe a potent opiate analgesic lacking the traditional side effects associated with classical opiates, including respiratory depression, significant constipation, physical dependence, and, perhaps most important, reinforcing behavior, demonstrating that it is possible to dissociate side effects from analgesia. Evidence indicates that this agent acts through a truncated, six-transmembrane variant of the G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1. Although truncated splice variants have been reported for a number of G protein-coupled receptors, their functional relevance has been unclear. Our evidence now suggests that truncated variants can be physiologically important through heterodimerization, even when inactive alone, and can comprise new therapeutic targets, as illustrated by our unique opioid analgesics with a vastly improved pharmacological profile.

  2. Identification of a truncated splice variant of IL-18 receptor alpha in the human and rat, with evidence of wider evolutionary conservation

    PubMed Central

    Grattan, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine which stimulates activation of the nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-κB) pathway via interaction with the IL-18 receptor. The receptor itself is formed from a dimer of two subunits, with the ligand-binding IL-18Rα subunit being encoded by the IL18R1 gene. A splice variant of murine IL18r1, which has been previously described, is formed by transcription of an unspliced intron (forming a ‘type II’ IL18r1 transcript) and is predicted to encode a receptor with a truncated intracellular domain lacking the capacity to generate downstream signalling. In order to examine the relevance of this finding to human IL-18 function, we assessed the presence of a homologous transcript by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the human and rat as another common laboratory animal. We present evidence for type II IL18R1 transcripts in both species. While the mouse and rat transcripts are predicted to encode a truncated receptor with a novel 5 amino acid C-terminal domain, the human sequence is predicted to encode a truncated protein with a novel 22 amino acid sequence bearing resemblance to the ‘Box 1’ motif of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain, in a similar fashion to the inhibitory interleukin-1 receptor 2. Given that transcripts from these three species are all formed by inclusion of homologous unspliced intronic regions, an analysis of homologous introns across a wider array of 33 species with available IL18R1 gene records was performed, which suggests similar transcripts may encode truncated type II IL-18Rα subunits in other species. This splice variant may represent a conserved evolutionary mechanism for regulating IL-18 activity. PMID:25250214

  3. Genetic Variants in Toll-Like Receptors Are Not Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis Susceptibility or Anti-Tumour Necrosis Factor Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Pilar; Schijvenaars, Mascha M. V. A. P.; Toonen, Erik J. M.; Scheffer, Hans; Padyukov, Leonid; Kastbom, Alf; Klareskog, Lars; Barton, Anne; Kievit, Wietske; Rood, Maarten J.; Jansen, Tim L.; Swinkels, Dorine; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Franke, Barbara; Bendtzen, Klaus; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Several studies point to a role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated if genetic variants in TLR genes are associated with RA and response to tumour necrosis factor blocking (anti-TNF) medication. Methodology and Principal Findings 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in seven TLR genes were genotyped in a Dutch cohort consisting of 378 RA patients and 294 controls. Significantly associated variants were investigated in replication cohorts from The Netherlands, United Kingdom and Sweden (2877 RA patients and 2025 controls). 182 of the Dutch patients were treated with anti-TNF medication. Using these patients and a replication cohort (269 Swedish patients) we analysed if genetic variants in TLR genes were associated with anti-TNF outcome. In the discovery phase of the study we found a significant association of SNPs rs2072493 in TLR5 and rs3853839 in TLR7 with RA disease susceptibility. Meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts did not confirm these findings. SNP rs2072493 in TLR5 was associated with anti-TNF outcome in the Dutch but not in the Swedish population. Conclusion We conclude that genetic variants in TLRs do not play a major role in susceptibility for developing RA nor in anti-TNF treatment outcome in a Caucasian population. PMID:21179534

  4. NF-kappaB2/p52:c-Myc:hnRNPA1 pathway regulates expression of androgen receptor splice variants and enzalutamide sensitivity in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Tummala, Ramakumar; Liu, Chengfei; Lou, Wei; Evans, Christopher P.; Gao, Allen C.

    2015-01-01

    Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains dependent on androgen receptor (AR) signaling. Alternative splicing of the AR to generate constitutively active, ligand-independent variants is one of the principal mechanisms that promote the development of resistance to next-generation anti-androgens such as enzalutamide. Here, we demonstrate that the splicing factor heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding protein A1 (hnRNPA1) plays a pivotal role in the generation of AR splice variants such as AR-V7. HnRNPA1 is overexpressed in prostate tumors compared to benign prostates and its expression is regulated by NF-kappaB2/p52 and c-Myc. CRPC cells resistant to enzalutamide exhibit higher levels of NF-kappaB2/p52, c-Myc, hnRNPA1, and AR-V7. Levels of hnRNPA1 and of AR-V7 are positively correlated with each other in PCa. The regulatory circuit involving NF-kappaB2/p52, c-Myc and hnRNPA1 plays a central role in the generation of AR splice variants. Downregulation of hnRNPA1 and consequently of AR-V7 resensitizes enzalutamide-resistant cells to enzalutamide, indicating that enhanced expression of hnRNPA1 may confer resistance to AR-targeted therapies by promoting the generation of splice variants. These findings may provide a rationale for co-targeting these pathways to achieve better efficacy through AR blockade. PMID:26056150

  5. Cloning, expression and pharmacology of a truncated splice variant of the human 5-HT7 receptor (h5-HT7(b))

    PubMed Central

    Jasper, J R; Kosaka, A; To, Z P; Chang, D J; Eglen, R M

    1997-01-01

    The rat 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)7 receptor displays two splice variations, a long form, and a truncated splice isoform, arising from the introduction of a stop codon near the carboxy-terminus. The human 5-HT7 receptor gene contains at least two introns and encodes a 445 amino acid 5-HT receptor. A truncated splice variation in the human 5-HT7 receptor was isolated from a human placental cDNA library. In accordance with current NC-IUPHAR nomenclature guidelines, it is suggested that this receptor be denoted as the h5-HT7(b) receptor and the long form of the receptor as h5-HT7(a). The h5-HT7(b) receptor was stably expressed in HEK 293 cells and ligand affinities were determined by displacement of [3H]-5-carboxyamidotryptamine (5-CT; Kd=0.28±0.06 nM, Bmax=7.3±1.7 pmol mg−1 protein). The rank order of affinities (pKi) for a series of ligands was: 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT, 9.65)>5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 9.41)>methiothepin (8.87)>mesulergine (7.87)>8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 6.85)>ketanserin (6.44). The h5-HT7(b) receptor coupled positively to adenylyl cyclase in HEK 293 cells. This response was elicited by a number of agonists with the following order of potency (pEC50): 5-CT (8.7±0.11)>5-MeOT (5-methoxytryptamine; 8.1±0.20)>5-HT (7.5±0.13)>tryptamine (5.6±0.36)>8-OH-DPAT (5.3±0.28)>5-methoxytryptamine (5.0±0.06). This rank order was comparable to that observed in the radioligand binding studies. In a similar fashion to that described for the 5-HT7(a) receptor, PCR studies suggested that the 5-HT7(b) receptor mRNA is found in great abundance throughout the brain, in the small intestine and aorta. It is concluded that the h5-HT7 receptor, like the rat receptor, exists as splice variants exhibiting similar pharmacology, signal transduction and distribution. It is thus likely that there exists a complex physiological role for alternate splicing products of the 5-HT7 receptor gene. PMID:9298538

  6. Increased prevalence of the seven-repeat variant of the dopamine D4 receptor gene in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder with tics.

    PubMed

    Cruz, C; Camarena, B; King, N; Páez, F; Sidenberg, D; de la Fuente, J R; Nicolini, H

    1997-08-01

    The polymorphism characterized by a varying number of 48 bp repeats (VNTR) in the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene was examined in 61 obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) probands with and without tics. Most of the OCD patients with tics showed at least one copy of the 7-fold variant compared to those affected subjects without tics (91 vs. 48%, respectively, Yates corrected chi2 = 5.54, P = 0.018). Similarly, a higher number of copies of this common variant were detected in the group of probands displaying tics compared to those OCD's without tics (Yates corrected chi2 = 4.66, P = 0.03). Our study suggests that the seven-repeat allele of the DRD4 gene could be a factor in the phenotypic variance of tics among OCD individuals.

  7. Minireview: Toward the establishment of a link between melatonin and glucose homeostasis: association of melatonin MT2 receptor variants with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Karamitri, Angeliki; Renault, Nicolas; Clement, Nathalie; Guillaume, Jean-Luc; Jockers, Ralf

    2013-08-01

    The existence of interindividual variations in G protein-coupled receptor sequences has been recognized early on. Recent advances in large-scale exon sequencing techniques are expected to dramatically increase the number of variants identified in G protein-coupled receptors, giving rise to new challenges regarding their functional characterization. The current minireview will illustrate these challenges based on the MTNR1B gene, which encodes the melatonin MT2 receptor, for which exon sequencing revealed 40 rare nonsynonymous variants in the general population and in type 2 diabetes (T2D) cohorts. Functional characterization of these MT2 mutants revealed 14 mutants with loss of Gi protein activation that associate with increased risk of T2D development. This repertoire of disease-associated mutants is a rich source for structure-activity studies and will help to define the still poorly understood role of melatonin in glucose homeostasis and T2D development in humans. Defining the functional defects in carriers of rare MT2 mutations will help to provide personalized therapies to these patients in the future.

  8. Genetic Variants at the PDZ-Interacting Domain of the Scavenger Receptor Class B Type I Interact with Diet to Influence the Risk of Metabolic Syndrome in Obese Men and Women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The scaffolding protein PDZ domain containing 1 (PDZK1) regulates the HDL receptor scavenger receptor class B type I. However, the effect of PDZK1 genetic variants on lipids and metabolic syndrome (MetS) traits remains unknown. This study evaluated the association of 3 PDZK1 single nucleotide polymo...

  9. Escitalopram reduces attentional performance in anxious older adults with high-expression genetic variants at serotonin 2A and 1B receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lenze, Eric J.; Dixon, David; Nowotny, Petra; Lotrich, Francis E.; Doré, Peter M.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Hinrichs, Anthony L.; Butters, Meryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Older adults are among the most vulnerable to adverse cognitive effects of psychotropic medications and, therefore, the personalization of psychotropic treatment based on adverse drug reactions in this demographic is of great importance. We examined changes on neuropsychological tests of attention attributable to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in anxious older adults. We also examined whether variation in serotonin receptor genes was associated with reduced attentional performance with SSRIs. We examined change from pre- to post-treatment in two attention measures – digit span and coding – in 133 adults aged ≥60 yr with generalized anxiety disorder in a 12-wk trial of escitalopram vs. placebo. We also examined attentional change in relation to genetic variability in four central serotonin receptors: the serotonin transporter and serotonin 1A, 2A and 1B receptors. Digit span scores were significantly lowered in patients receiving escitalopram relative to placebo, indicating reduced attentional performance attributable to the SSRI. Individuals with high-transcription variants in the receptors 5-HTR2A rs6311 and 5-HTR1B rs11568817 had greater reductions in attention with SSRI treatment compared to placebo. We conclude that SSRIs reduce attention in older adults, particularly in those with high-expression genetic variants at the serotonin 2A and 1B receptors. Analysing neuropsychological changes with SSRIs in relation to genetic variation in the serotonin system may be a useful strategy for detecting subgroups of older adults who are more susceptible to side-effects of SSRIs. These results, if confirmed, could lead to the personalization of SSRI use to reduce adverse neurocognitive effects. PMID:22717018

  10. Escitalopram reduces attentional performance in anxious older adults with high-expression genetic variants at serotonin 2A and 1B receptors.

    PubMed

    Lenze, Eric J; Dixon, David; Nowotny, Petra; Lotrich, Francis E; Doré, Peter M; Pollock, Bruce G; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Butters, Meryl A

    2013-03-01

    Older adults are among the most vulnerable to adverse cognitive effects of psychotropic medications and, therefore, the personalization of psychotropic treatment based on adverse drug reactions in this demographic is of great importance. We examined changes on neuropsychological tests of attention attributable to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in anxious older adults. We also examined whether variation in serotonin receptor genes was associated with reduced attentional performance with SSRIs. We examined change from pre- to post-treatment in two attention measures - digit span and coding - in 133 adults aged ≥60 yr with generalized anxiety disorder in a 12-wk trial of escitalopram vs. placebo. We also examined attentional change in relation to genetic variability in four central serotonin receptors: the serotonin transporter and serotonin 1A, 2A and 1B receptors. Digit span scores were significantly lowered in patients receiving escitalopram relative to placebo, indicating reduced attentional performance attributable to the SSRI. Individuals with high-transcription variants in the receptors 5-HTR2A rs6311 and 5-HTR1B rs11568817 had greater reductions in attention with SSRI treatment compared to placebo. We conclude that SSRIs reduce attention in older adults, particularly in those with high-expression genetic variants at the serotonin 2A and 1B receptors. Analysing neuropsychological changes with SSRIs in relation to genetic variation in the serotonin system may be a useful strategy for detecting subgroups of older adults who are more susceptible to side-effects of SSRIs. These results, if confirmed, could lead to the personalization of SSRI use to reduce adverse neurocognitive effects.

  11. Association Analysis of Bitter Receptor Genes in Five Isolated Populations Identifies a Significant Correlation between TAS2R43 Variants and Coffee Liking

    PubMed Central

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Traglia, Michela; Robino, Antonietta; Willems, Sara M.; Pistis, Giorgio; d’Adamo, Pio; Amin, Najaf; d’Eustacchio, Angela; Navarini, Luciano; Sala, Cinzia; Karssen, Lennart C.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Toniolo, Daniela; Gasparini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Coffee, one of the most popular beverages in the world, contains many different physiologically active compounds with a potential impact on people’s health. Despite the recent attention given to the genetic basis of its consumption, very little has been done in understanding genes influencing coffee preference among different individuals. Given its markedly bitter taste, we decided to verify if bitter receptor genes (TAS2Rs) variants affect coffee liking. In this light, 4066 people from different parts of Europe and Central Asia filled in a field questionnaire on coffee liking. They have been consequently recruited and included in the study. Eighty-eight SNPs covering the 25 TAS2R genes were selected from the available imputed ones and used to run association analysis for coffee liking. A significant association was detected with three SNP: one synonymous and two functional variants (W35S and H212R) on the TAS2R43 gene. Both variants have been shown to greatly reduce in vitro protein activity. Surprisingly the wild type allele, which corresponds to the functional form of the protein, is associated to higher liking of coffee. Since the hTAS2R43 receptor is sensible to caffeine, we verified if the detected variants produced differences in caffeine bitter perception on a subsample of people coming from the FVG cohort. We found a significant association between differences in caffeine perception and the H212R variant but not with the W35S, which suggests that the effect of the TAS2R43 gene on coffee liking is mediated by caffeine and in particular by the H212R variant. No other significant association was found with other TAS2R genes. In conclusion, the present study opens new perspectives in the understanding of coffee liking. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of the TAS2R43 gene in coffee hedonics and to identify which other genes and pathways are involved in its genetics. PMID:24647340

  12. Regulation of human melanocortin 1 receptor signaling and trafficking by Thr-308 and Ser-316 and its alteration in variant alleles associated with red hair and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Laorden, Berta L; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José C

    2007-02-02

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) positively coupled to adenylyl cyclase, is a key regulator of melanocyte proliferation and differentiation and a determinant of pigmentation, skin phototype, and skin cancer risk. MC1R activation stimulates melanogenesis and increases the ratio of black, strongly photoprotective eumelanins to yellowish and poorly photoprotective pheomelanin pigments. Desensitization and internalization are key regulatory mechanisms of GPCR signaling. Agonist-induced desensitization usually depends on phosphorylation by a GPCR kinase (GRK) followed by receptor internalization in endocytic vesicles. We have shown that MC1R desensitization is mediated by two GRKs expressed in melanocytes and melanoma cells, GRK2 and GRK6. Here we show that in contrast with this dual specificity for desensitization, GRK6 but not GRK2 mediated MC1R internalization. Mutagenesis studies suggested that the targets of GRK6 are two residues located in the MC1R cytosolic C terminus, Thr-308 and Ser-316. A T308D/S316D mutant mimicking their phosphorylated state was constitutively desensitized and associated with endosomes, whereas a T308A/S316A mutant was resistant to desensitization and internalization. We studied the desensitization and internalization of three variant MC1R forms associated with red hair and increased skin cancer risk: R151C, R160W, and D294H. These variants showed a less efficient desensitization. Moreover, D294H was resistant to internalization, thus accounting for its abnormally high surface expression. Co-expression of variant and wild type MC1R modified its desensitization and internalization behavior. These data suggest that MC1R might be regulated by novel mechanisms including differential effects of GRKs and altered desensitization rates of certain allelic combinations.

  13. Simulation studies for wells AH-4bis/AH-17 and AH-18, Ahuachapan Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Monterrosa, Manuel Ernesto

    1996-01-24

    Well AH-4bis, at the Ahuachapan Geothermal Field is planned to be drilled on the same pad as the former AH-4. A simulation study was carried out for two casing dameters 13 5/8 and 9 5/8” in order to estimate its production and to know its economic feasibility. The simulation results indcate a high probability of production in the range of 7 Mwe, equivalent to 120 kg/s total mass flow rate, 1250 kJ/kg at 6 bar-a for the new well AH-4bis. Well AH- 17 is good producer, during 1991 after ten years of production, the well was shut-in due to silica scaling problems. A wellbore simulation was carried out in order to predict the new production conditions after the work-over, mainly to estimate the water flow rate in order to reduce the silica scaling. The results indicate a very low water flow rate. The match between the simulated and measured production curves after the work-over was successful. The well AH-18 is located at the southern part of the actual bore field. CEL is planning to expand the borefield at this area and it is neccessary to estimate the possible production condtions at that zone. The results indicate a high probabilty of production at that area. The power potential is estimated at 3.5 Mwe per well at WHP 6 bar-a and the wells will not require induction.

  14. Simulations studies for wells AH-4bis/AH-17 and AH-18, Ahuachapan Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Monterrosa, M.E.

    1996-12-31

    Well AH-4{sub bis} at the Ahuachapan Geothermal Field is planned to be drilled on the same pad as the former AH-4. A simulation study was carried out for two casing diameters 13 5/8 and 9 5/8 inches in order to estimate its production and to know its economic feasibility. The simulation results indicate a high probability of production in the range of 7 Mwe, equivalent to 120 kg/s total mass flow rate, 1250 kJ/kg at 6 bar-a for the new well AH-4b{sub bis}. Well AH-17 is good producer, during 1991 after ten years of production, the well was shut-in due to silica scaling problems. A wellbore simulation was carried out in order to predict the new production conditions after the work-over, mainly to estimate the water flow rate in order to reduce the silica scaling. The results indicate a very low water flow rate. The match between the simulated and measured production curves after the work-over was successful. The well AH-18 is located at the southern part of the actual bore field. CEL is planning to expand the borefield at this area and it is necessary to estimate the possible production conditions at that zone. The results indicate a high probability of production at that area. The power potential is estimated at 3.5 Mwe per well at WHP 6 bar-a and the wells will not require induction.

  15. Characterization of a FGF19 variant with altered receptor specificity revealed a central role for FGFR1c in the regulation of glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hongfei; Baribault, Helene; Vonderfecht, Steven; Lemon, Bryan; Weiszmann, Jennifer; Gardner, Jonitha; Lee, Ki Jeong; Gupte, Jamila; Mookherjee, Paramita; Wang, Minghan; Sheng, Jackie; Wu, Xinle; Li, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes and associated metabolic conditions have reached pandemic proportions worldwide, and there is a clear unmet medical need for new therapies that are both effective and safe. FGF19 and FGF21 are distinctive members of the FGF family that function as endocrine hormones. Both have potent effects on normalizing glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis, and therefore, represent attractive potential next generation therapies for combating the growing epidemics of type 2 diabetes and obesity. The mechanism responsible for these impressive metabolic effects remains unknown. While both FGF19 and FGF21 can activate FGFRs 1c, 2c, and 3c in the presence of co-receptor βKlotho in vitro, which receptor is responsible for the metabolic activities observed in vivo remains unknown. Here we have generated a variant of FGF19, FGF19-7, that has altered receptor specificity with a strong bias toward FGFR1c. We show that FGF19-7 is equally efficacious as wild type FGF19 in regulating glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism in both diet-induced obesity and leptin-deficient mouse models. These results are the first direct demonstration of the central role of the βKlotho/FGFR1c receptor complex in glucose and lipid regulation, and also strongly suggest that activation of this receptor complex alone might be sufficient to achieve all the metabolic functions of endocrine FGF molecules.

  16. Human GRK4γ142V Variant Promotes Angiotensin II Type I Receptor-Mediated Hypertension via Renal Histone Deacetylase Type 1 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zeng, Chunyu; Villar, Van Anthony M; Chen, Shi-You; Konkalmatt, Prasad; Wang, Xiaoyan; Asico, Laureano D; Jones, John E; Yang, Yu; Sanada, Hironobu; Felder, Robin A; Eisner, Gilbert M; Weir, Matthew R; Armando, Ines; Jose, Pedro A

    2016-02-01

    The influence of a single gene on the pathogenesis of essential hypertension may be difficult to ascertain, unless the gene interacts with other genes that are germane to blood pressure regulation. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase type 4 (GRK4) is one such gene. We have reported that the expression of its variant hGRK4γ(142V) in mice results in hypertension because of impaired dopamine D1 receptor. Signaling through dopamine D1 receptor and angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) reciprocally modulates renal sodium excretion and blood pressure. Here, we demonstrate the ability of the hGRK4γ(142V) to increase the expression and activity of the AT1R. We show that hGRK4γ(142V) phosphorylates histone deacetylase type 1 and promotes its nuclear export to the cytoplasm, resulting in increased AT1R expression and greater pressor response to angiotensin II. AT1R blockade and the deletion of the Agtr1a gene normalize the hypertension in hGRK4γ(142V) mice. These findings illustrate the unique role of GRK4 by targeting receptors with opposite physiological activity for the same goal of maintaining blood pressure homeostasis, and thus making the GRK4 a relevant therapeutic target to control blood pressure.

  17. Association of the insulin-receptor variant Met-985 with hyperglycemia and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in the Netherlands: A population-based study

    SciTech Connect

    `t Hart, L.M.; Maassen, J.A.; Does, F.E.E. van der

    1996-11-01

    One of the characteristics of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) is the presence of insulin. Most NIDDM patients have a normal sequence of the insulin receptor, indicating that, if insulin-receptor mutations contribute to the development of NIDDM, they will be present only in a minor fraction of the NIDDM population. The goal of the present study was to examine whether insulin-receptor mutations contribute to the development of NIDDM. We examined 161 individuals with NIDDM and 538 healthy controls from the population-based Rotterdam study for the presence of mutations in the insulin-receptor gene by SSCP. A heterozygous mutation changing valine-985 into methionine was detected in 5.6% of diabetic subjects and in 1.3% of individuals with normal oral glucose tolerance test. Adjusted for age, gender, and body-mass index, this revealed a relative risk for diabetes of 4.49 (95% confidence interval 1.59-12.25) for Met-985 carriers. When the total study group was analyzed, the prevalence of the mutation increased with increasing serum glucose levels (test for trend P < .005). We conclude that the Met-985 insulin-receptor variant associates with hyperglycemia and represents a risk factor for NIDDM. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Serotonin 2C receptor as a superhero: diversities and talents in the RNA universe for editing, variant, small RNA and other expected functional RNAs.

    PubMed

    Tohda, Michihisa

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin 2C receptor subtype (5-HT2C) has a unique profession and continues to provide exciting and critical new information. The 5-HT2C is modulated at the RNA level by several mechanisms, including editing, short variant generation, and small RNAs. Recently, these phenomena, which had been demonstrated individually, were shown to be associated with each other. At present, many reports provide information about the influence of RNA regulation on receptor protein activities and expression, which was thought to be the final functional product. However, complicated behavior at the RNA stage allows us to imagine that the RNA itself has functional roles in the RNA universe. The 5-HT2C RNA may play several roles. This review will outline previous 5-HT2C studies and prospects for future studies.

  19. Pityriazepin and other potent AhR ligands isolated from Malassezia furfur yeast.

    PubMed

    Mexia, Nikitia; Gaitanis, Georgios; Velegraki, Aristea; Soshilov, Anatoly; Denison, Michael S; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2015-04-01

    Malassezia furfur yeast strains isolated from diseased human skin preferentially biosynthesize indole alkaloids which can be detected in the human skin and are highly potent activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR-dependent gene expression. Chemical analysis of an EtOAc extract of a M. furfur strain obtained from diseased human skin and grown on l-tryptophan agar revealed several known AhR active tryptophan metabolites along with a previously unidentified compound, pityriazepin. While its structure resembled that of the known alkaloid pityriacitrin, the comprised pyridine ring had been transformed into an azepinone. The indoloazepinone scaffold of pityriazepin is extremely rare in nature and has only been reported once previously. Pityriazepin, like the other isolated compounds, was found to be a potent activator of the AhR-dependent reporter gene assay in recombinant cell lines derived from four different species, although significant species differences in relative potency were observed. The ability of pityriazepin to competitively bind to the AhR and directly stimulate AhR DNA binding classified it as a new naturally-occurring potent AhR agonist. M. furfur produces an expanded collection of extremely potent naturally occurring AhR agonists, which produce their biological effects in a species-specific manner.

  20. Search for genetic variants in the retinoid X receptor-gamma-gene by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism in patients with resistance to thyroid hormone without mutations in thyroid hormone receptor beta gene.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Stefano; Menzaghi, Claudia; Bruno, Rocco; Sentinelli, Federica; Fallarino, Mara; Fioretti, Francesca; Filetti, Sebastiano; Balsamo, Armando; Di Mario, Umberto; Baroni, Marco G

    2004-05-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is an inherited disease characterized by reduced tissue sensitivity to thyroid hormone. Approximately 90% of subjects with RTH have mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRbeta) gene. Approximately 10% of subjects diagnosed as having RTH do not carry mutation in the TRbeta gene. A possible linkage was reported with the retinoid X receptor-gamma (RXR-gamma) gene in two families. The aim of this study is to search for mutation within the RXR-gamma gene in unrelated subjects with diagnosed RTH without mutations in the TRbeta gene. Four subjects with RTH were studied, and sequence variants in the RXR-gamma gene were searched by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP). Analysis of all the 10 exons of the RXR-gamma gene, including intron-exon boundaries, promoter region and 3' untranslated region (UTR) reveled two variant bands in subjects II and III. Sequencing of these variants showed two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): 447C > T in exon 3 for patients II and IVS9 + 6A > G for patient III. Both SNPs were also present at high frequency in a group of normal subjects and in nonaffected relatives of subject III. In conclusion, in patients with RTH we have found two SNPs in the RXR-gamma gene; these SNPS are common in the general population, thus excluding a role for the RXR-gamma gene in these patients.

  1. Common variants of chemokine receptor gene CXCR3 and its ligands CXCL10 and CXCL11 associated with vascular permeability of dengue infection in peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hoh, B P; Umi-Shakina, H; Zuraihan, Z; Zaiharina, M Z; Rafidah-Hanim, S; Mahiran, M; Khairudin, N Y Nik; Benedict, L H Sim; Masliza, Z; Christopher, K C Lee; Sazaly, A B

    2015-06-01

    Dengue causes significantly more human disease than any other arboviruses. It causes a spectrum of illness, ranging from mild self-limited fever, to severe and fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever, as evidenced by vascular leakage and multifactorial hemostatic abnormalities. There is no specific treatment available till date. Evidence shows that chemokines CXCL10, CXCL11 and their receptor CXCR3 are involved in severity of dengue, but their genetic association with the susceptibility of vascular leakage during dengue infection has not been reported. We genotyped 14 common variants of these candidate genes in 176 patients infected with dengue. rs4859584 and rs8878 (CXCL10) were significantly associated with vascular permeability of dengue infection (P<0.05); while variants of CXCL11 showed moderate significance of association (P=0.0527). Haplotype blocks were constructed for genes CXCL10 and CXCL11 (5 and 7 common variants respectively). Haplotype association tests performed revealed that, "CCCCA" of gene CXCL10 and "AGTTTAC" of CXCL11 were found to be significantly associated with vascular leakage (P=0.0154 and 0.0366 respectively). In summary, our association study further strengthens the evidence of the involvement of CXCL10 and CXCL11 in the pathogenesis of dengue infection.

  2. Paroxysmal posterior variant alien hand syndrome associated with parietal lobe infarction: case presentation.

    PubMed

    Demiryürek, Bekir Enes; Gündogdu, Aslı Aksoy; Acar, Bilgehan Atılgan; Alagoz, Aybala Neslihan

    2016-10-01

    Alien hand syndrome (AHS) is an involuntary and rare neurological disorder emerges at upper extremity. AHS is a disconnection syndrome with the symptoms of losing sense of agency and sense of ownership, and presence of involuntary autonomic motor activity. There are frontal, callosal and posterior types of AHS and each of them occurs depend on the lesions of different of the brain. Posterior variant is a rarely encountered AHS type compared to others. AHS, generally regarded as persistent, but rarely maybe observed as paroxysmal. In this article, we present 71 year old patient with right posterior parietal lobe infarction and developed posterior variant AHS on left arm 1 month after discharge from the hospital. To discriminate AHS from conditions such as extrapyramidal movement disorders and epileptic seizures that take part in differential diagnosis should be kept in mind by the clinicians. Wrong and unnecessary treatments could be prevented in this way.

  3. Identification of the Functional Variant(s) that Explain the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) GWAS SNP rs6511720 Association with Lower LDL-C and Risk of CHD

    PubMed Central

    Palmen, Jutta; Kalea, Anastasia Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) SNP rs6511720 (G>T), located in intron-1 of the gene, has been identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) as being associated with lower plasma levels of LDL-C and a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Whether or not rs6511720 is itself functional or a marker for a functional variant elsewhere in the gene is not known. Methods The association of LDLR SNP rs6511720 with incidence of CHD and levels of LDL-C was determined by reference to CARDIoGRAM, C4D and Global lipids genetics consortium (GLGC) data. SNP annotation databases were used to identify possible SNP function and prioritization. Luciferase reporter assays in the liver cell line Huh7 were used to measure the effect of variant genotype on gene expression. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSAs) were used to identify the Transcription Factors (TFs) involved in gene expression regulation. Results The phenotype-genotype analysis showed that the rs6511720 minor allele is associated with lower level of LDL-C [beta = -0.2209, p = 3.85 x10-262], and lower risk of CHD [log (OR) = 0.1155, p = 1.04 x10-7]. Rs6511720 is in complete linkage. Rs6511720 is in complete linkage disequilibrium (LD) with three intron-1 SNPs (rs141787760, rs60173709, rs57217136). Luciferase reporter assays in Huh7 cells showed that the rare alleles of both rs6511720 and rs57217136 caused a significant increase in LDLR expression compared to the common alleles (+29% and +24%, respectively). Multiplex Competitor-EMSAs (MC-EMSA) identified that the transcription factor serum response element (SRE) binds to rs6511720, while retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) bind to rs57217136. Conclusion Both LDLR rs6511720 and rs57217136 are functional variants. Both these minor alleles create enhancer-binding protein sites for TFs and may contribute to increased LDLR expression, which is consequently associated with reduced

  4. A liver X receptor (LXR)-{beta} alternative splicing variant (LXRBSV) acts as an RNA co-activator of LXR-{beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Koshi; Ishida, Emi; Matsumoto, Shunichi; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Okada, Shuichi; Monden, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Tetsurou; Yamada, Masanobu; Mori, Masatomo

    2009-12-25

    We report the isolation and functional characterization of a novel transcriptional co-activator, termed LXRBSV. LXRBSV is an alternative splicing variant of liver X receptor (LXR)-{beta} LXRBSV has an intronic sequence between exons 2 and 3 in the mouse LXR-{beta} gene. The LXRBSV gene is expressed in various tissues including the liver and brain. We sub-cloned LXRBSV into pSG5, a mammalian expression vector, and LXRBSV in pSG5 augmented human Sterol Response Element Binding Protein (SREBP)-1c promoter activity in HepG2 cells in a ligand (TO901317) dependent manner. The transactivation mediated by LXRBSV is selective for LXR-{beta}. The LXRBSV protein was deduced to be 64 amino acids in length; however, a GAL4-LXRBSV fusion protein was not able to induce transactivation. Serial deletion constructs of LXRBSV demonstrated that the intronic sequence inserted in LXRBSV is required for its transactivation activity. An ATG mutant of LXRBSV was able to induce transactivation as wild type. Furthermore, LXRBSV functions in the presence of cycloheximide. Taken together, we have concluded that LXRBSV acts as an RNA transcript not as a protein. In the current study, we have demonstrated for the first time that an alternative splicing variant of a nuclear receptor acts as an RNA co-activator.

  5. Second-Generation HSP90 Inhibitor Onalespib Blocks mRNA Splicing of Androgen Receptor Variant 7 in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Welti, Jonathan; Powers, Marissa V; Yuan, Wei; Smyth, Tomoko; Seed, George; Riisnaes, Ruth; Hedayat, Somaieh; Wang, Hannah; Crespo, Mateus; Nava Rodrigues, Daniel; Figueiredo, Ines; Miranda, Susana; Carreira, Suzanne; Lyons, John F; Sharp, Swee; Plymate, Stephen R; Attard, Gerhardt; Wallis, Nicola; Workman, Paul; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-05-01

    Resistance to available hormone therapies in prostate cancer has been associated with alternative splicing of androgen receptor (AR) and specifically, the expression of truncated and constitutively active AR variant 7 (AR-V7). The transcriptional activity of steroid receptors, including AR, is dependent on interactions with the HSP90 chaperone machinery, but it is unclear whether HSP90 modulates the activity or expression of AR variants. Here, we investigated the effects of HSP90 inhibition on AR-V7 in prostate cancer cell lines endogenously expressing this variant. We demonstrate that AR-V7 and full-length AR (AR-FL) were depleted upon inhibition of HSP90. However, the mechanisms underlying AR-V7 depletion differed from those for AR-FL. Whereas HSP90 inhibition destabilized AR-FL and induced its proteasomal degradation, AR-V7 protein exhibited higher stability than AR-FL and did not require HSP90 chaperone activity. Instead, HSP90 inhibition resulted in the reduction of AR-V7 mRNA levels but did not affect total AR transcript levels, indicating that HSP90 inhibition disrupted AR-V7 splicing. Bioinformatic analyses of transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing data confirmed that the second-generation HSP90 inhibitor onalespib altered the splicing of at least 557 genes in prostate cancer cells, including AR. These findings indicate that the effects of HSP90 inhibition on mRNA splicing may prove beneficial in prostate cancers expressing AR-V7, supporting further clinical investigation of HSP90 inhibitors in malignancies no longer responsive to androgen deprivation. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2731-42. ©2016 AACR.

  6. Short SULF1/SULF2 splice variants predominate in mammary tumours with a potential to facilitate receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated cell signalling.

    PubMed

    Gill, Roop Ms; Mehra, Vedika; Milford, Emma; Dhoot, Gurtej K

    2016-10-01

    The relative roles of SULF1 and SULF2 enzymes in tumour growth are controversial, but short SULF1/SULF2 splice variants predominate in human mammary tumours despite their non-detectable levels in normal mammary tissue. Compared with the normal, the level of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activity was markedly increased in triple-positive mammary tumours during later stages of tumour progression showing increased p-EGFR, p-FGFR1 and p-cMet activity in triple-positive but not in triple-negative tumours. The abundance of catalytically inactive short SULF1/SULF2 variants permits high levels of HS sulphation and thus growth driving RTK cell signalling in primary mammary tumours. Also observed in this study, however, was increased N-sulphation detected by antibody 10E4 indicating that not only 6-O sulphation but also N-sulphation may contribute to increased RTK cell signalling in mammary tumours. The levels of such increases in not only SULF1/SULF2 but also in pEGFR, pFGFR1, p-cMet and Smad1/5/8 signalling were further enhanced following lymph node metastasis. The over-expression of Sulf1 and Sulf2 variants in mammary tumour-derived MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cell lines by transfection further confirms Sulf1-/Sulf2-mediated differential modulation of growth. The short variants of both Sulf1 and Sulf2 promoted FGF2-induced MDA-MB231 and MCF7 in vitro growth while full-length Sulf1 inhibited growth supporting in vivo mammary tumour cell signalling patterns of growth. Since a number of mammary tumours become drug resistant to hormonal therapy, Sulf1/Sulf2 inhibition could be an alternative therapeutic approach to target such tumours by down-regulating RTK-mediated cell signalling.

  7. The Enigma of the Dichotomic Pressure Response of GluN1-4a/b Splice Variants of NMDA Receptor: Experimental and Statistical Analyses.

    PubMed

    Bliznyuk, Alice; Gradwohl, Gideon; Hollmann, Michael; Grossman, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    Professional deep-water divers, exposed to hyperbaric pressure (HP) above 1.1 MPa, develop High Pressure Neurological Syndrome (HPNS), which is associated with central nervous system (CNS) hyperexcitability. It was previously reported that HP augments N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) synaptic response, increases neuronal excitability and potentially causes irreversible neuronal damage. Our laboratory has reported differential current responses under HP conditions in NMDAR subtypes that contain either GluN1-1a or GluN1-1b splice variants co-expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes with all four GluN2 subunits. Recently, we reported that the increase in ionic currents measured under HP conditions is also dependent on which of the eight splice variants of GluN1 is co-expressed with the GluN2 subunit. We now report that the NMDAR subtype that contains GluN1-4a/b splice variants exhibited "dichotomic" (either increased or decreased) responses at HP. The distribution of the results is not normal thus analysis of variance (ANOVA) test and clustering analysis were employed for statistical verification of the grouping. Furthermore, the calculated constants of alpha function distribution analysis for the two groups were similar, suggesting that the mechanism underlying the switch between an increase or a decrease of the current at HP is a single process, the nature of which is still unknown. This dichotomic response of the GluN1-4a/b splice variant may be used as a model for studying reduced response in NMDAR at HP. Successful reversal of other NMDAR subtypes response (i.e., current reduction) may allow the elimination of the reversible malfunctioning short term effects (HPNS), or even deleterious long term effects induced by increased NMDAR function during HP exposure.

  8. Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) variants confer risk of diabetes in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiang; Tucker, Katherine L; Parnell, Laurence D; Shen, Jian; Lee, Yu-Chi; Ordovás, José M; Ling, Wen-Hua; Lai, Chao-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Published data concerning associations between IRS1 variants and type 2 diabetes and related traits have been inconsistent. We examined the relationship between common variants in IRS1, type 2 diabetes, and related traits including insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and DNA damage in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study. Methods We genotyped six common IRS1 variants in an adult Puerto Rican population (n=1132) and tested for association with risk of type 2 diabetes and related traits. Results SNPs rs934167 and rs1801123 showed significant association with fasting glucose concentrations (p = 0.005 and p = 0.016, respectively) and rs934167 showed significant association with plasma insulin levels (p = 0.005). Carriers of the rs934167 minor allele had significantly higher HOMA-IR and lower QUICKI (p = 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively), and a 40% and 58% greater likelihood of being hyperglycaemic or hyperinsulinemic (OR = 1.40 and 1.58; p = 0.013 and 0.002, respectively). However, they exhibited only a marginally significant trend towards having type 2 diabetes (OR=1.27, p = 0.077). Furthermore, carriers of the haplotype C-T of the rs934167 and rs1801123 minor alleles showed consistent patterns of associations after correction for multiple testing. In addition, the G972R (rs1801278) minor allele was significantly associated with higher urinary 8-OHdG concentrations (p = 0.020) and plasma CRP levels (p = 0.035). Conclusions Our results support IRS1 variants associated with type 2 diabetes risk in adult Puerto Ricans. Moreover, we report the novel finding that IRS1 variant G972R (rs1801278) may contribute to oxidative DNA damage and inflammation. PMID:23353623

  9. Morphine regulates expression of μ-opioid receptor MOR-1A, an intron-retention carboxyl terminal splice variant of the μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1) gene via miR-103/miR-107.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhigang; Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Pasternak, Gavril W; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2014-02-01

    The μ-opioid receptor (MOR-1) gene OPRM1 undergoes extensive alternative splicing, generating an array of splice variants. Of these variants, MOR-1A, an intron-retention carboxyl terminal splice variant identical to MOR-1 except for the terminal intracellular tail encoded by exon 3b, is quite abundant and conserved from rodent to humans. Increasing evidence indicates that miroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate MOR-1 expression and that μ agonists such as morphine modulate miRNA expression. However, little is known about miRNA regulation of the OPRM1 splice variants. Using 3'-rapid amplification cDNA end and Northern blot analyses, we identified the complete 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) for both mouse and human MOR-1A and their conserved polyadenylation site, and defined the role the 3'-UTR in mRNA stability using a luciferase reporter assay. Computer models predicted a conserved miR-103/107 targeting site in the 3'-UTR of both mouse and human MOR-1A. The functional relevance of miR-103/107 in regulating expression of MOR-1A protein through the consensus miR-103/107 binding sites in the 3'-UTR was established by using mutagenesis and a miR-107 inhibitor in transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells and Be(2)C cells that endogenously express human MOR-1A. Chronic morphine treatment significantly upregulated miR-103 and miR-107 levels, leading to downregulation of polyribosome-associated MOR-1A in both Be(2)C cells and the striatum of a morphine-tolerant mouse, providing a new perspective on understanding the roles of miRNAs and OPRM1 splice variants in modulating the complex actions of morphine in animals and humans.

  10. Variants in human papillomavirus receptor and associated genes are associated with type-specific HPV infection and lesion progression of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian; Cao, Zhu; Zhang, Jianyang; Chen, Tingting; Yang, Shizhou; Huang, Yongjie; Hong, Die; Li, Yang; Chen, Xiaojing; Wang, Xinyu; Cheng, Xiaodong; Lu, Weiguo; Xie, Xing

    2016-06-28

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infects cervical epithelial cells through cellular membrane receptors, and then induces the initiation and progression of cervical cancer. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may impact the susceptibility and outcome of diseases, but it's still unknown whether variant in HPV receptor and associated genes is associated with type-specific HPV infection and cervical lesion progression. We examined 96 SNPs in 8 genes which may participate in the HPV infection process in 875 samples with HPV negative or single HPV16, 18, 52, 58 positive from 3299 cervical exfoliated cell samples, by Illumina BeadXpress VeraCode platform, and analyzed the correlation between the SNPs and type-specific HPV infection and cervical lesions progression. We found rs28384376 in EGFR and rs12034979 in HSPG2 significantly correlated to HPV16 infection; rs2575738, rs2575712, rs2575735 in SDC2 and rs6697265 in HSPG2 significantly correlated to HPV18 infection; rs10510097 in FGFR2, rs12718946 in EGFR significantly correlated to HPV52 infection; rs4947972 in EGFR, rs2981451 in FGFR2, rs2575735 in SDC2 significantly correlated to HPV58 infection. And rs3135772, rs1047057 and rs2556537 in FGFR2, rs12034979 in HSPG2, rs16894821 in SDC2 significantly correlated to cervical lesion progression induced by HPV16 infection; rs6697265 and rs6680566 in HSPG2, rs16860426 in ITGA6 by HPV18 infection; rs878949 in HSPG2, rs12718946 and rs12668175 in EGFR by HPV52 infection; no SNP by HPV58 infection. Our findings suggest that HPV receptor and associated gene variants may influence the susceptibilities to HPV type-specific infection and cervical lesion progression, which might have a potential application value in cervical cancer screening and therapy.

  11. The immunogenetics of narcolepsy associated with A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination (Pandemrix) supports a potent gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Bomfim, I L; Lamb, F; Fink, K; Szakács, A; Silveira, A; Franzén, L; Azhary, V; Maeurer, M; Feltelius, N; Darin, N; Hallböök, T; Arnheim-Dahlström, L; Kockum, I; Olsson, T

    2017-03-23

    The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination campaign from 2009 to 2010 was associated with a sudden increase in the incidence of narcolepsy in several countries. Narcolepsy with cataplexy is strongly associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II DQB1*06:02 allele, and protective associations with the DQB1*06:03 allele have been reported. Several non-HLA gene loci are also associated, such as common variants of the T-cell receptor-α (TRA), the purinergic receptor P2RY11, cathepsin H (CTSH) and TNFSF4/OX40L/CD252. In this retrospective multicenter study, we investigated if these predisposing gene loci were also involved in vaccination-associated narcolepsy. We compared HLA- along with single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes for non-HLA regions between 42 Pandemrix-vaccinated narcolepsy cases and 1990 population-based controls. The class II gene loci associations supported previous findings. Nominal association (P-value<0.05) with TRA as well as suggestive (P-value<0.1) associations with P2RY11 and CTSH were found. These associations suggest a very strong gene-environment interaction, in which the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strain or Pandemrix vaccine can act as potent environmental triggers.Genes and Immunity advance online publication, 23 March 2017; doi:10.1038/gene.2017.1.

  12. Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin exposure alters radial arm maze performance and hippocampal morphology in female AhR mice.

    PubMed

    Powers, B E; Lin, T-M; Vanka, A; Peterson, R E; Juraska, J M; Schantz, S L

    2005-02-01

    Perinatal exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been reported to alter spatial learning in rats tested on a radial arm maze (RAM). TCDD is believed to exert most of its effects through binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). To determine whether the AhR mediates TCDD-induced alterations in spatial learning, we tested male and female AhR-knockout (AhR-/-), heterozygous (AhR+/-) and wild-type (AhR+/+) mice on the RAM. AhR+/- male and female mice were time mated, and treated dams were dosed with 5 microg TCDD/kg body weight on day 13 of gestation. When offspring reached adulthood, male and female AhR+/+, AhR+/- and AhR-/- mice from TCDD-exposed and unexposed litters were tested on the eight-arm RAM. After testing, we examined hippocampal morphology as visualized by the Timm's silver sulfide stain. TCDD-exposed female AhR+/- mice made more errors than their respective controls on the RAM and exhibited a decrease in the size of the intra- and infrapyramidal mossy fiber (IIP-MF) field of the hippocampus. None of the other TCDD-exposed groups differed from their respective control groups with regard to maze performance or hippocampal morphology. The reduction of IIP-MF field indicates a possible morphological basis for the learning deficit that was observed in the female AhR+/- mice. It is hypothesized that the effect of TCDD exposure is AhR dependent and that TCDD may alter GABAergic activity in the hippocampus of female mice during development.

  13. Adaptation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in experimental mouse models.

    PubMed

    Prokopyeva, E A; Sobolev, I A; Prokopyev, M V; Shestopalov, A M

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, three mouse-adapted variants of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were obtained by lung-to-lung passages of BALB/c, C57BL/6z and CD1 mice. The significantly increased virulence and pathogenicity of all of the mouse-adapted variants induced 100% mortality in the adapted mice. Genetic analysis indicated that the increased virulence of all of the mouse-adapted variants reflected the incremental acquisition of several mutations in PB2, PB1, HA, NP, NA, and NS2 proteins. Identical amino acid substitutions were also detected in all of the mouse-adapted variants of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, including PB2 (K251R), PB1 (V652A), NP (I353V), NA (I106V, N248D) and NS1 (G159E). Apparently, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus easily adapted to the host after serial passages in the lungs, inducing 100% lethality in the last experimental group. However, cross-challenge revealed that not all adapted variants are pathogenic for different laboratory mice. Such important results should be considered when using the influenza mice model.

  14. Human Receptor Activation by Aroclor 1260, a Polychlorinated Biphenyl Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K. Cameron; Clair, Heather B.; Al-Eryani, Laila; Prough, Russell A.; States, J. Christopher; Coslo, Denise M.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Cave, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental toxicants, present in 100% of U.S. adults and dose-dependently associated with obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). PCBs are predicted to interact with receptors previously implicated in xenobiotic/energy metabolism and NAFLD. These receptors include the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), liver-X-receptor (LXRα), and farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR). This study evaluates Aroclor 1260, a PCB mixture with congener composition mimicking that of human adipose tissue, and selected congeners, as potential ligands for these receptors utilizing human hepatoma-derived (HepG2) and primate-derived (COS-1) cell lines, and primary human hepatocytes. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) activated AhR, and PCB 126, a minor component, was a potent inducer. Aroclor 1260 activated PXR in a simple concentration-dependent manner at concentrations ≥10 μg/ml. Among the congeners tested, PCBs 138, 149, 151, 174, 183, 187, and 196 activated PXR. Aroclor 1260 activated CAR2 and CAR3 variants at lower concentrations and antagonize CAR2 activation by the CAR agonist, CITCO, at higher concentrations (≥20 μg/ml). Additionally, Aroclor 1260 induced CYP2B6 in primary hepatocytes. At subtoxic doses, Aroclor 1260 did not activate LXR or FXR and had no effect on LXR- or FXR-dependent induction by the agonists T0901317 or GW4064, respectively. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) suppressed PPARα activation by the agonist nafenopin, although none of the congeners tested demonstrated significant inhibition. The results suggest that Aroclor 1260 is a human AhR, PXR and CAR3 agonist, a mixed agonist/antagonist for CAR2, and an antagonist for human PPARα. PMID:24812009

  15. [Roles of rs 6923761 gene variant in glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor on weight, cardiovascular risk factor and serum adipokine levels in morbid obese patients].

    PubMed

    de Luis, Daniel Antonio; Pacheco, David; Aller, Rocío; Izaola, Olatz; Bachiller, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    Antecedentes: Los estudios de receptor de GLP-1 se han dirigido a la identificación de polimorfismos en el gen receptor de GLP- 1 que pueden ser un factor que contribuye en la patogénesis de la diabetes mellitus y factores de riesgo cardiovascular. Sin embargo, el papel de las variantes del receptor de GLP-1 variantes en el peso corporal, factores de riesgo cardiovasculares y adipocitoquinas sigue estando poco estudiado en pacientes con obesidad morbida. Objetivo: Nuestro objetivo fue analizar los efectos del polimorfismo del receptor de GLP-1 rs6923761 sobre el peso corporal, factores de riesgo cardiovascular y los niveles de adipocitoquinas séricas en pacientes con obesidad mórbida. Diseño: Se estudió una muestra de 175 obesos mórbidos. La glucosa en ayunas, proteína C reactiva (PCR), insulina, resistencia a la insulina ( HOMA), colesterol total, LDL- colesterol, HDL- colesterol, triglicéridos y la concentración de adipoquinas se midieron. También se determinaron el peso, índice de masa corporal, circunferencia de la cintura, masa grasa a través de bioimpedancia y la presión arterial. Resultados: Un total de 87 obesos (49,7%) tenían el genotipo GG y 88 (50,3%) de los sujetos del estudio tenían los siguientes genotipos; GA (71 obesos, el 40,6%) o AA (17 sujetos del estudio, el 9,7%) ( segundo grupo) . En el grupo con genotipo GG, los niveles de glucosa (4,4 ± 2,3 mg/dl, p < 0,05), triglicéridos (6,8 ± 4,3 mg/dl , p < 0,05), insulina (4,5 ± 2,3 UI/l , p < 0,05) y HOMA (1,5 ± 0,9 unidades, p < 0,05 ) fueron mayores que en el grupo mutante. No se detectaron diferencias en el resto de parámetros analizados Conclusión: Existe una asociación entre los parámetros metabólicos y el alelo mutante (A) del polimorfismo rs6923761 del receptor de GLP- 1 en pacientes con obesidad mórbida. Los niveles de triglicéridos, insulina y resistencia a la insulina son más elevados en los sujetos portadores del alelo A.

  16. Deciphering Dimerization Modes of PAS Domains: Computational and Experimental Analyses of the AhR:ARNT Complex Reveal New Insights Into the Mechanisms of AhR Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Corrada, Dario; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor that mediates the biochemical response to xenobiotics and the toxic effects of a number of environmental contaminants, including dioxins. Recently, endogenous regulatory roles for the AhR in normal physiology and development have also been reported, thus extending the interest in understanding its molecular mechanisms of activation. Since dimerization with the AhR Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) protein, occurring through the Helix-Loop-Helix (HLH) and PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domains, is needed to convert the AhR into its transcriptionally active form, deciphering the AhR:ARNT dimerization mode would provide insights into the mechanisms of AhR transformation. Here we present homology models of the murine AhR:ARNT PAS domain dimer developed using recently available X-ray structures of other bHLH-PAS protein dimers. Due to the different reciprocal orientation and interaction surfaces in the different template dimers, two alternative models were developed for both the PAS-A and PAS-B dimers and they were characterized by combining a number of computational evaluations. Both well-established hot spot prediction methods and new approaches to analyze individual residue and residue-pairwise contributions to the MM-GBSA binding free energies were adopted to predict residues critical for dimer stabilization. On this basis, a mutagenesis strategy for both the murine AhR and ARNT proteins was designed and ligand-dependent DNA binding ability of the AhR:ARNT heterodimer mutants was evaluated. While functional analysis disfavored the HIF2α:ARNT heterodimer-based PAS-B model, most mutants derived from the CLOCK:BMAL1-based AhR:ARNT dimer models of both the PAS-A and the PAS-B dramatically decreased the levels of DNA binding, suggesting this latter model as the most suitable for describing AhR:ARNT dimerization. These novel results open new research directions focused at elucidating basic molecular mechanisms underlying the

  17. Estrogen receptor beta and truncated variants enhance the expression of transfected MMP-1 promoter constructs in response to specific mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Joint diseases such as osteoarthritis (OA) predominantly afflict post-menopausal women, suggesting a pertinent role for female hormones. Estrogen receptor beta (ER-β) has been detected in connective tissues of the knee joint suggesting that these tissues are responsive to the hormone estrogen. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity contributes to cartilage degradation, a key factor leading to OA development in synovial joints. Two polymorphic forms of MMP-1 exist due to a deletion/insertion of the guanine residue in the promoter, and the 2G allelic variant of MMP-1 exhibits more activity than the 1G allele. Previous studies have demonstrated that the polymorphic forms of the human MMP-1 are influenced by the modulating effects of estrogen receptor isoforms. In addition to hormonal influences, physiological factors such as altered mechanical loading are also contributory features of OA. In the present study, the combined influence of biomechanical and hormonal variables on the activity of MMP-1 isoforms was evaluated. We hypothesized that the combined effects of ER-β and sheer stress will differentially activate the two allelic forms of MMP-1 in a hormone-independent manner. Methods HIG-82 synoviocytes were transiently transfected with 1G or 2G alleles (±) ER-β and subjected to either shear or equibiaxial stress. Next, 1G/2G promoter activity was measured to determine the combined influence of physiological stimuli. Truncated ER-β constructs were used to determine the importance of different domains of ER-β on 1G/2G activation. Results The 2G allele exhibited a constitutively higher activity than the 1G allele, which was further increased when the transfected cells were subject to shear stress, but not equibiaxial stress. Moreover, the combination of ER-β and shear stress further increased the activity levels of the 1G/2G allelic variants. Additionally, select AF-2 truncated ER-β variants led to increased activity levels for the 2G allele

  18. TGF-beta(1) regulation of human AT(1) receptor mRNA splice variants harboring exon 2.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mickey M; Buckenberger, Jessica A; Knoell, Daren L; Strauch, Arthur R; Elton, Terry S

    2006-04-25

    At least four alternatively spliced mRNAs can be synthesized from the human AT(1)R (hAT(1)R) gene that differ only in the inclusion or exclusion of exon 2 and/or 3. RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that splice variants harboring exon 2 accounts for at least 30% of all the hAT(1)R mRNA transcripts expressed in the human tissues investigated. Since exon 2 contains two upstream AUGs or open reading frames (uORFs), we hypothesized that these AUGs would inhibit the translation of the downstream hAT(1)R protein ORF harbored in exon 4. This study demonstrates that the inclusion of exon 2 in hAT(1)R mRNA transcripts dramatically reduces hAT(1)R protein levels (nine-fold) and significantly attenuates Ang II responsiveness ( approximately four-fold). Interestingly, only when both AUGs were mutated in combination were the hAT(1)R density and Ang II signaling levels comparable with those values obtained using mRNA splice variants that did not include exon 2. This observation is consistent with a model where the majority of the ribosomes likely translate uORF#1 and are then unable to reinitiate at the downstream hAT(1)R ORF, in part due to the presence of AUG#2 and to the short intercistronic spacing. Importantly, TGF-beta(1) treatment (4ng/ml for 4h) of fibroblasts up-regulated hAT(1)R mRNA splice variants, which harbored exon 2, six-fold. Since AT(1)R activation is closely associated with cardiovascular disease, the inclusion of exon 2 by alternative splicing represents a novel mechanism to reduce the overall production of the hAT(1)R protein and possibly limit the potential pathological effects of AT(1)R activation.

  19. Susceptibility effects of GABA receptor subunit alpha-2 (GABRA2) variants and parental monitoring on externalizing behavior trajectories: Risk and protection conveyed by the minor allele

    PubMed Central

    Trucco, Elisa M.; Villafuerte, Sandra; Heitzeg, Mary M.; Burmeister, Margit; Zucker, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors increasing susceptibility to social contexts and predicting psychopathology can help identify targets for prevention. Persistently high externalizing behavior in adolescence is predictive of psychopathology in adulthood. Parental monitoring predicts low externalizing behavior, yet youth likely vary in the degree to which they are affected by parents. Genetic variants of GABA receptor subunit alpha-2 (GABRA2) may increase susceptibility to parental monitoring, thus impacting externalizing trajectories. We had several objectives: (a) to determine whether GABRA2 (rs279827, rs279826, rs279858) moderates the relationship between a component of parental monitoring, parental knowledge, and externalizing trajectories; (b) to test the form of this interaction to assess whether GABRA2 variants reflect risk (diathesis-stress) or susceptibility (differential susceptibility) factors; and (c) to clarify GABRA2 associations on the development of problem behavior. This prospective study (N = 504) identified three externalizing trajectory classes (i.e., low, decreasing, and high) across adolescence. A GABRA2 × Parental Monitoring effect on class membership was observed, such that A-carriers were largely unaffected by parental monitoring, whereas class membership for those with the GG genotype was affected by parental monitoring. Findings support differential susceptibility in GABRA2. PMID:25797587

  20. Variants of the melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R) and P gene would be effective for estimating the population origin of an individual.

    PubMed

    Masui, Sosuke; Nakatome, Masato; Matoba, Ryoji

    2009-04-01

    The population origin of an individual is often required to be determined from specimens left at a crime scene for estimating a suspect and individual identity. The melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R) and P gene are associated with human pigmentation. Although there have been several reports that these genes are highly polymorphic in human populations, it is unclear if the allele variants can be used to estimate the population origin of an individual. We aimed to estimate the ethnic origin of a particular individual by using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Four SNPs (MC1R gene: R163Q and P gene: IVS5+1001, IVS13+113 and H615R) were genotyped in 394 volunteers from 4 ethnically defined populations using a PCR-based assay. The results revealed that the allele variants were present with high frequency in Asian populations but were low in European and African populations. On the basis of these results, we defined a specific combination of a genotype (R163Q) and a diplotype group (IVS5+1001, IVS13+113 and H615R). This study indicates that the specific combination of a genotype and a diplotype group would be effective for estimating the population origin of an individual from a list of population groups.

  1. Differential regulation of metabolic pathways by androgen receptor (AR) and its constitutively active splice variant, AR-V7, in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Ayesha A; Putluri, Vasanta; Arnold, James M; Tsouko, Efrosini; Maity, Suman; Roberts, Justin M; Coarfa, Cristian; Frigo, Daniel E; Putluri, Nagireddy; Sreekumar, Arun; Weigel, Nancy L

    2015-10-13

    Metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) is primarily an androgen-dependent disease, which is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Tumors usually develop resistance (castration-resistant PCa [CRPC]), but remain androgen receptor (AR) dependent. Numerous mechanisms for AR-dependent resistance have been identified including expression of constitutively active AR splice variants lacking the hormone-binding domain. Recent clinical studies show that expression of the best-characterized AR variant, AR-V7, correlates with resistance to ADT and poor outcome. Whether AR-V7 is simply a constitutively active substitute for AR or has novel gene targets that cause unique downstream changes is unresolved. Several studies have shown that AR activation alters cell metabolism. Using LNCaP cells with inducible expression of AR-V7 as a model system, we found that AR-V7 stimulated growth, migration, and glycolysis measured by ECAR (extracellular acidification rate) similar to AR. However, further analyses using metabolomics and metabolic flux assays revealed several differences. Whereas AR increased citrate levels, AR-V7 reduced citrate mirroring metabolic shifts observed in CRPC patients. Flux analyses indicate that the low citrate is a result of enhanced utilization rather than a failure to synthesize citrate. Moreover, flux assays suggested that compared to AR, AR-V7 exhibits increased dependence on glutaminolysis and reductive carboxylation to produce some of the TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle) metabolites. These findings suggest that these unique actions represent potential therapeutic targets.

  2. The single nucleotide variant rs12722489 determines differential estrogen receptor binding and enhancer properties of an IL2RA intronic region

    PubMed Central

    Putlyaeva, Lidia V.; Demin, Denis E.; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Fridman, Marina V.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Schwartz, Anton M.

    2017-01-01

    We studied functional effect of rs12722489 single nucleotide polymorphism located in the first intron of human IL2RA gene on transcriptional regulation. This polymorphism is associated with multiple autoimmune conditions (rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis). Analysis in silico suggested significant difference in the affinity of estrogen receptor (ER) binding site between alternative allelic variants, with stronger predicted affinity for the risk (G) allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that purified human ERα bound only G variant of a 32-bp genomic sequence containing rs12722489. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that endogenous human ERα interacted with rs12722489 genomic region in vivo and DNA pull-down assay confirmed differential allelic binding of amplified 189-bp genomic fragments containing rs12722489 with endogenous human ERα. In a luciferase reporter assay, a kilobase-long genomic segment containing G but not A allele of rs12722489 demonstrated enhancer properties in MT-2 cell line, an HTLV-1 transformed human cell line with a regulatory T cell phenotype. PMID:28234966

  3. Variants of the melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R) and P gene as indicators of the population origin of an individual.

    PubMed

    Masui, Sosuke; Nakatome, Masato; Matoba, Ryoji

    2009-05-01

    The population origin of an individual is often requested to be determined from specimens left at a crime scene for identifying a suspect and individual identity. The melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R) and P gene are associated with human pigmentation. Although several studies have reported that these genes are highly polymorphic in human populations, it is unclear if the allele variants can be used to determine the population origin of an individual. We aimed to determine the ethnic origin of an individual by using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Eighteen SNPs in the MC1R gene and P genes were genotyped in 52 individuals by the direct sequencing method, and 4 SNPs (MC1R gene: R163Q and P gene: IVS5 + 1001, IVS13 + 113, and H615R) were selected on the basis of differences in frequencies. Subsequently, we genotyped these four SNPs in 422 volunteers from six ethnically defined populations using a polymerase chain reaction-based assay. The results revealed that the allele variants were present with high frequencies in Asian populations but were low in European and African populations. On the basis of these results, we defined a specific combination of a genotype (R163Q) and a diplotype group (IVS5 + 1001, IVS13 + 113, and H615R). This study indicates that the specific combination of a genotype and a diplotype group would be effective in estimating the population origin of an individual from a list of population groups.

  4. Variants in Toll-like Receptor 1 and 4 Genes Are Associated With Chlamydia trachomatis Among Women With Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Darville, Toni; Ferrell, Robert E.; Kammerer, Candace M.; Ness, Roberta B.; Haggerty, Catherine L.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in the innate immune response. We examined whether TLR variants are associated with Chlamydia trachomatis infection among women with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Methods. We tested whether 18 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs) assayed in 4 TLR genes (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR6) and 2 adaptor molecules (TIRAP, MyD88) were associated with C. trachomatis among 205 African American women with clinically suspected PID from the PID Evaluation and Clinical Health Study. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). An empirical P value of <.004 was considered significant. Results. Women with PID who carried the TLR4 rs1927911 CC genotype had significantly increased odds of C. trachomatis (OR, 3.7; 95% CI, 1.6–8.8; P = .002). The TLR1 rs5743618TT genotype was also associated with C. trachomatis (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.3–6.2; P = .008). Conclusions. Among African American women with PID, variants in the TLR1 and TLR4 genes, which may increase signaling, were associated with increased C. trachomatis infection. PMID:22238472

  5. Clonal variants of Plasmodium falciparum exhibit a narrow range of rolling velocities to host receptor CD36 under dynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Herricks, Thurston; Avril, Marion; Janes, Joel; Smith, Joseph D; Rathod, Pradipsinh K

    2013-11-01

    Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs) has been implicated in the virulence of malaria infection. Cytoadhesive interactions are mediated by the protein family of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). The PfEMP1 family is under strong antibody and binding selection, resulting in extensive sequence and size variation of the extracellular domains. Here, we investigated cytoadhesion of pRBCs to CD36, a common receptor of P. falciparum field isolates, under dynamic flow conditions. Isogeneic parasites, predominantly expressing single PfEMP1 variants, were evaluated for binding to recombinant CD36 under dynamic flow conditions using microfluidic devices. We tested if PfEMP1 size (number of extracellular domains) or sequence variation affected the pRBC-CD36 interaction. Our analysis showed that clonal parasite variants varied ∼5-fold in CD36 rolling velocity despite extensive PfEMP1 sequence polymorphism. In addition, adherent pRBCs exhibited a characteristic hysteresis in rolling velocity at microvascular flow rates, which was accompanied by changes in pRBC shape and may represent important adaptations that favor stable binding.

  6. Inhibitory Ah Receptor-Androgen Receptor Crosstalk in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    Development of a hammerhead ribozyme against bcl-2. I. Preliminary evaluation of a potential gene therapeutic agent for hormone-refractory human prostate...therapeutic implications, N. Engl. J. Med. 285 (1971) 1182–1186. [14] T. Dorai, C.A. Olsson, A.E. Katz, R. Buttyan, Development of a hammerhead ... ribozyme against bcl-2. I. Preliminary evaluation of a potential gene therapeutic agent for hormone-refractory human prostate cancer, Prostate 32 (1997) 246

  7. Inhibitory Ah Receptor-Androgen Receptor Crosstalk in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    induced luciferase ac- cleft palate, immunotoxicity and porphyria in mice and tivity in the latter cell line. This suggests that inhibitory CYP1A1 in...Williamson, H. Asou, J.W. Said, porphyria in genetically inbred mice: partial antagonism and S. Holden, I. Miyoshi, H.P. Koeffler, Ligand for peroxisome

  8. TRAIL and TRAIL receptors splice variants during long-term interferon β treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis: evaluation as biomarkers for therapeutic response

    PubMed Central

    López-Gómez, Carlos; Oliver-Martos, Begoña; Pinto-Medel, María-Jesús; Suardiaz, Margarita; Reyes-Garrido, Virginia; Urbaneja, Patricia; Fernández, Óscar; Leyva, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to assess the effects of interferon β (IFNβ) treatment on the expression of the splice variants of the Tumour necrosis factor-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) and its receptors in different cell subpopulations (CD14+, CD4+ and CD8+) from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), and to determine whether this expression discriminated responders from non-responders to IFNβ therapy. Methods We examined mRNA expression of the TRAIL and TRAIL receptors variants in patients with MS, at baseline and after one year of IFNβ therapy, according to responsiveness to this drug. Results Long-term therapy with IFNβ increased the expression of TRAIL-α in T cell subsets exclusively from responders and decreased the expression of the isoform 2 of TRAILR-2 in monocytes from responders as well as non-responders. Lower expression of TRAIL-α, and higher expression of TRAIL-β in monocytes and T cells, was found before the onset of IFNβ therapy in patients who will subsequently become responders. Baseline expression of TRAILR-1 was also significantly higher in monocytes and CD4+ T cells from responders. Conclusions The present study shows that long-term IFNβ treatment has a direct influence on TRAIL-α and TRAILR-2 isoform 2 expression. Besides, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that the baseline expression of TRAIL-α in monocytes and T cells, and that of TRAILR-1 in monocytes and CD4+ T cells, showed a predictive value of the clinical response to IFNβ therapy, pointing to a role of TRAIL system in the mechanism of action of IFNβ in MS that will need further investigation. PMID:25736057

  9. Allelic variants of human beta-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) promoter: evolutionary relationships and predictable associations with HIV-1 disease progression.

    PubMed

    Tang, J; Rivers, C; Karita, E; Costello, C; Allen, S; Fultz, P N; Schoenbaum, E E; Kaslow, R A

    1999-09-01

    Variability in the natural history of HIV-1 infection has been repeatedly associated with genetic variants in the beta-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) locus. While CCR5 coding sequences have demonstrated relatively limited variation, sequences of its promoter appear polymorphic in all major populations. Our studies revealed five major CCR5 promoter alleles with distributions that differed widely among the four distinct ethnic groups from Kigali, Rwanda and Bronx, New York. In particular, promoter allele P*0103 (G59029-T59353-T59356-A59402-C59653) was largely restricted to black subjects. The promoter allele P*0202 (A59029-C59353-C59356-A59402-T59653) was tightly linked to the slightly less frequent CCR2b-641, a variant of the CCR2b gene, which is about 12.7 kbp upstream from the promoter region. Another closely related promoter allele P*0201 (A59029-C59353-C59356-A59402-C59653) exclusively carried the far less common CCR5-delta 32, a 32-bp deletion in the CCR5 coding sequence 2 kbp downstream from the promoter. The homozygous P*0201/*0201 genotype can be predicted as a risk factor for more rapid disease progression. Among human, chimpanzee, pig-tailed macaque, and sooty mangabey promoter allelic sequences, the apparent ancestral lineage of the promoter sequence (G59029-T59353-C59356-A59402-C59653 = human P*0102) was highly conserved across the primate species analyzed here while P*0201 and P*0202 arose more recently than the other three major alleles. Further effort to establish the mechanism by which CCR chemokine receptor polymorphisms govern the initiation and pathogenesis of primate lentivirus infection apparently requires fully detailed genotypic characterization of the affected populations.

  10. RESULTS FROM THE AHS PESTICIDE EXPOSURE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study/Pesticide Exposure Study (AHS/PES) measured exposures resulting from agricultural use of 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos for a subset of applicators in the AHS cohort. Through on-farm measurements and observations, data collected in the exposure study will...

  11. Re-evaluation of the PBAN receptor molecule: characterization of PBANR variants expressed in the pheromone glands of moths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex pheromone production in most moths is initiated following pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR) activation. PBANR was initially cloned from pheromone glands (PGs) of Helicoverpa zea and Bombyx mori. The B. mori PBANR is characterized by a relatively long C-terminus that...

  12. Effects of scorched food leachates with or without activated charcoal pretreatment on AhR activation in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Kinoshita, Makoto; Fujimori, Shin; Ishikawa, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor activated by xenobiotics, including dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although AhR is also activated by some dietary constituents, it has not been completely clarified in what circumstances AhR ligands are ingested in our daily life. Because PAHs are formed by the incomplete combustion of organic materials, we hypothesized that scorched foods might contain and leach out AhR ligands sufficient to stimulate AhR in vitro. To test this hypothesis, scorched foods (bread, cheese, etc.) were mixed vigorously with water, and the supernatants were retrieved as samples. The samples were added to HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was analyzed by RT-PCR in different cell lines treated with the samples. We further tested whether pretreatment of the samples with activated charcoal would alter their AhR-stimulating activity. All the supernatant samples tested induced AhR-dependent reporter gene activity and CYP1A1 mRNA expression. In some samples, these inductions were inhibited by pretreatment with activated charcoal. Our findings indicate that scorched food leachates stimulate AhR in cultured cells and that activated charcoal adsorbs the AhR-stimulating substances in some leachates. Thus, people who habitually eat scorched foods are exposed to AhR ligands on a regular basis. Further studies are needed to elucidate whether burnt foods actually exert biological effects on our health.

  13. AhV_aPA-induced vasoconstriction involves the IP₃Rs-mediated Ca²⁺ releasing.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fuxing; Zou, Zhisong; Niu, Liwen; Li, Xu; Teng, Maikun

    2013-08-01

    AhV_aPA, the acidic PLA₂ purified from Agkistrodon halys pallas venom, was previously reported to possess a strong enzymatic activity and can remarkably induce a further contractile response on the 60 mM K⁺-induced contraction with an EC₅₀ in 369 nM on mouse thoracic aorta rings. In the present study, we found that the p-bromo-phenacyl-bromide (pBPB), which can completely inhibit the enzymatic activity of AhV_aPA, did not significantly reduce the contractile response on vessel rings induced by AhV_aPA, indicating that the vasoconstrictor effects of AhV_aPA are independent of the enzymatic activity. The inhibitor experiments showed that the contractile response induced by AhV_aPA is mainly attributed to the Ca²⁺ releasing from Ca²⁺ store, especially sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Detailed studies showed that the Ca²⁺ release from SR is related to the activation of inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP₃Rs) rather than ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Furthermore, the vasoconstrictor effect could be strongly reduced by pre-incubation with heparin, indicating that the basic amino acid residues on the surface of AhV_aPA may be involved in the interaction between AhV_aPA and the molecular receptors. These findings offer new insights into the functions of snake PLA₂ and provide a novel pathogenesis of A. halys pallas venom.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of aryl-naloxamide opiate analgesics targeting truncated exon 11-associated μ opioid receptor (MOR-1) splice variants.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Susruta; Subrath, Joan; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Polikar, Lisa; Burgman, Maxim; Nagakura, Kuni; Ocampo, Julie; Haselton, Nathan; Pasternak, Anna R; Grinnell, Steven; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2012-07-26

    3-Iodobenzoylnaltrexamide 1 (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic acting through a novel receptor target that lack many side-effects of traditional opiates composed, in part, of exon 11-associated truncated six transmembrane domain MOR-1 (6TM/E11) splice variants. To better understand the SAR of this drug target, a number of 4,5-epoxymorphinan analogues were synthesized. Results show the importance of a free 3-phenolic group, a phenyl ring at the 6 position, an iodine at the 3'or 4' position of the phenyl ring, and an N-allyl or c-propylmethyl group to maintain high 6TM/E11 affinity and activity. 3-Iodobenzoylnaloxamide 15 (IBNalA) with a N-allyl group displayed lower δ opioid receptor affinity than its naltrexamine analogue, was 10-fold more potent an analgesic than morphine, elicited no respiratory depression or physical dependence, and only limited inhibition of gastrointestinal transit. Thus, the aryl-naloxamide scaffold can generate a potent analgesic acting through the 6TM/E11 sites with advantageous side-effect profile and greater selectivity.

  15. Mutations in the embryonal subunit of the acetylcholine receptor (CHRNG) cause lethal and Escobar variants of multiple pterygium syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Neil V; Brueton, Louise A; Cox, Phillip; Greally, Marie T; Tolmie, John; Pasha, Shanaz; Aligianis, Irene A; van Bokhoven, Hans; Marton, Tamas; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Morton, Jenny E V; Oley, Christine; Johnson, Colin A; Trembath, Richard C; Brunner, Han G; Maher, Eamonn R

    2006-08-01

    Multiple pterygium syndromes (MPSs) comprise a group of multiple-congenital-anomaly disorders characterized by webbing (pterygia) of the neck, elbows, and/or knees and joint contractures (arthrogryposis). In addition, a variety of developmental defects (e.g., vertebral anomalies) may occur. MPSs are phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous but are traditionally divided into prenatally lethal and nonlethal (Escobar) types. To elucidate the pathogenesis of MPS, we undertook a genomewide linkage scan of a large consanguineous family and mapped a locus to 2q36-37. We then identified germline-inactivating mutations in the embryonal acetylcholine receptor gamma subunit (CHRNG) in families with both lethal and nonlethal MPSs. These findings extend the role of acetylcholine receptor dysfunction in human disease and provide new insights into the pathogenesis and management of fetal akinesia syndromes.

  16. Developmental expression, differential hormonal regulation and evolution of thyroid and glucocorticoid receptor variants in a marine acanthomorph teleost (Sciaenops ocellatus).

    PubMed

    Applebaum, Scott L; Finn, Roderick Nigel; Faulk, Cynthia K; Joan Holt, G; Scott Nunez, B

    2012-03-01

    Interactions between the thyroid hormone (TH) and corticosteroid (CS) hormone axes are suggested to regulate developmental processes in vertebrates with a larval phase. To investigate this hypothesis, we isolated three nuclear receptors from a larval acanthomorph teleost, the red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), and established their orthologies as thraa, thrb-L and gra-L using phylogenomic and functional analyses. Functional characterization of the TH receptors in COS-1 cells revealed that Thraa and Thrb-L exhibit dose-dependent transactivation of a luciferase reporter in response to T3, while SoThraa is constitutively active at a low level in the absence of ligand. To test whether interactions between the TH and CS systems occur during development, we initially quantified the in vivo receptor transcript expression levels, and then examined their response to treatment with triiodothyronine (T3) or cortisol. We find that sothraa and sothrb-L are autoregulated in response to exogenous T3 only during early larval development. T3 did not affect sogra-L expression levels, nor did cortisol alter levels of sothraa or sothrb-L at any stage. While differential expression of the receptors in response to non-canonical ligand hormone was not observed under the conditions in this study, the correlation between sothraa and sogra-L transcript abundance during development suggests a coordinated function of the TH and CS systems. By comparing the findings in the present study to earlier investigations, we suggest that the up-regulation of thraa may be a specific feature of metamorphosis in acanthomorph teleosts.

  17. In vitro and in silico derived relative effect potencies of ah-receptor-mediated effects by PCDD/Fs and PCBs in rat, mouse, and guinea pig CALUX cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ghorbanzadeh, Mehdi; van Ede, Karin I; Larsson, Malin; van Duursen, Majorie B M; Poellinger, Lorenz; Lücke-Johansson, Sandra; Machala, Miroslav; Pěnčíková, Kateřina; Vondráček, Jan; van den Berg, Martin; Denison, Michael S; Ringsted, Tine; Andersson, Patrik L

    2014-07-21

    For a better understanding of species-specific relative effect potencies (REPs), responses of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) were assessed. REPs were calculated using chemical-activated luciferase gene expression assays (CALUX) derived from guinea pig, rat, and mouse cell lines. Almost all 20 congeners tested in the rodent cell lines were partial agonists and less efficacious than 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). For this reason, REPs were calculated for each congener using concentrations at which 20% of the maximal TCDD response was reached (REP20TCDD). REP20TCDD values obtained for PCDD/Fs were comparable with their toxic equivalency factors assigned by the World Health Organization (WHO-TEF), while those for PCBs were in general lower than the WHO-TEF values. Moreover, the guinea pig cell line was the most sensitive as indicated by the 20% effect concentrations of TCDD of 1.5, 5.6, and 11.0 pM for guinea pig, rat, and mouse cells, respectively. A similar response pattern was observed using multivariate statistical analysis between the three CALUX assays and the WHO-TEFs. The mouse assay showed minor deviation due to higher relative induction potential for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran and 2,3,4,6,7,8-hexachlorodibenzofuran and lower for 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptachlorodibenzofuran and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126). 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzofuran was more than two times more potent in the mouse assay as compared with that of rat and guinea pig cells, while measured REP20TCDD for PCB126 was lower in mouse cells (0.05) as compared with that of the guinea pig (0.2) and rat (0.07). In order to provide REP20TCDD values for all WHO-TEF assigned compounds, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed. The QSAR models showed that specific electronic properties and molecular surface characteristics play important roles in the AhR-mediated response. In silico derived REP20TCDD values were generally consistent with the WHO

  18. Aberrant trafficking of human melanocortin 1 receptor variants associated with red hair and skin cancer: Steady-state retention of mutant forms in the proximal golgi.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Laorden, Berta L; Herraiz, Cecilia; Valencia, Julio C; Hearing, Vincent J; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José C

    2009-09-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a Gs protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) expressed in melanocytes, is a major determinant of skin pigmentation and phototype. MC1R activation stimulates melanogenesis and increases the ratio of black, strongly photoprotective eumelanins to reddish, poorly photoprotective pheomelanins. Several MC1R alleles are associated with red hair, fair skin, increased sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation (the RHC phenotype) and increased skin cancer risk. Three highly penetrant RHC variants, R151C, R160W, and D294H are loss-of-function MC1R mutants with altered cell surface expression. In this study, we show that forward trafficking was normal for D294H. Conversely, export traffic was impaired for R151C, which accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and for R160W, which was enriched in the cis-Golgi. This is the first report of steady-state retention in a post-ER secretory compartment of a GPCR mutant found in the human population. Residues R151 and R160 are located in the MC1R second intracellular loop (il2). Two other mutations in il2, T157A preventing T157 phosphorylation and R162P disrupting a (160)RARR(163) motif, also caused intracellular retention. Moreover, T157 was phosphorylated in wild-type MC1R and a T157D mutation mimicking constitutive phosphorylation allowed normal traffic, and rescued the retention phenotype of R160W and R162P. Therefore, MC1R export is likely regulated by T157 phosphorylation and the (160)RARR(163) arginine-based motif functions as an ER retrieval signal. These elements are conserved in mammalian MC1Rs and in all five types of human melanocortin receptors. Thus, members of this GPCR subfamily might share common mechanisms for regulation of plasma membrane expression.

  19. Characterization of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) gene in chickens: functional analysis, tissue distribution, and identification of its transcript variants.

    PubMed

    Huang, G; Li, J; Fu, H; Yan, Z; Bu, G; He, X; Wang, Y

    2012-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor plays a critical role in mediating the biological actions of GLP1 in mammals and fish; however, the gene structure, expression, and functionality of GLP1 receptor (GLP1R) remain largely unknown in birds. In this study, the full-length cDNA of chicken GLP1R (cGLP1R) was first cloned from brain tissue by reverse transcription PCR. The putative cGLP1R is 459 amino acids in length and shares high amino acid sequence identity with that of human (79%), rat (80%), and Xenopus (75%). Using a pGL3-CRE luciferase reporter system, we found that cGLP1R expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells could be potently activated by cGLP1 (EC(50), 0.11 nM) but not by other structurally related peptides, indicating that cGLP1R is a functional receptor specific to cGLP1. Interestingly, in addition to identification of the transcript encoding cGLP1R of 459 amino acids, eight transcript variants, which were generated by alternative mRNA splicing and predicted to encode either C-terminally or N-terminally truncated cGLP1Rs, were also identified from chicken brain or testis. In line with this finding, multiple cGLP1R transcripts were detected to be expressed in most chicken tissues examined, including pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, and various brain regions by reverse transcription PCR. Using the dual-luciferase reporter assay system, we further found that the 5'-flanking region of cGLP1R gene displays promoter activities in cultured HepG2 and HEK293 cells, suggesting that it may control cGLP1R gene transcription in chicken tissues, including nonpancreatic tissues. Taken together, the results from the present study establish a molecular basis to investigate the roles of GLP1 in chickens.

  20. Identification, Characterization, and Natural Selection of Mutations Driving Airborne Transmission of A/H5N1 virus

    PubMed Central

    Linster, Martin; van Boheemen, Sander; de Graaf, Miranda; Schrauwen, Eefje J. A.; Lexmond, Pascal; Mänz, Benjamin; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Baumann, Jan; van Riel, Debby; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Herfst, Sander

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Recently, A/H5N1 influenza viruses were shown to acquire airborne transmissibility between ferrets upon targeted mutagenesis and virus passage. The critical genetic changes in airborne A/Indonesia/5/05 were not yet identified. Here, five substitutions proved to be sufficient to determine this airborne transmission phenotype. Substitutions in PB1 and PB2 collectively caused enhanced transcription and virus replication. One substitution increased HA thermostability and lowered the pH of membrane fusion. Two substitutions independently changed HA binding preference from α2,3 linked to α2,6 linked sialic acid receptors. The loss of a glycosylation site in HA enhanced overall binding to receptors. The acquired substitutions emerged early during ferret passage as minor variants and became dominant rapidly. Identification of substitutions that are essential for airborne transmission of avian influenza viruses between ferrets and their associated phenotypes advances our fundamental understanding of virus transmission and will increase the value of future surveillance programs and public health risk assessments. PMID:24725402

  1. Identification, characterization, and natural selection of mutations driving airborne transmission of A/H5N1 virus.

    PubMed

    Linster, Martin; van Boheemen, Sander; de Graaf, Miranda; Schrauwen, Eefje J A; Lexmond, Pascal; Mänz, Benjamin; Bestebroer, Theo M; Baumann, Jan; van Riel, Debby; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Fouchier, Ron A M; Herfst, Sander

    2014-04-10

    Recently, A/H5N1 influenza viruses were shown to acquire airborne transmissibility between ferrets upon targeted mutagenesis and virus passage. The critical genetic changes in airborne A/Indonesia/5/05 were not yet identified. Here, five substitutions proved to be sufficient to determine this airborne transmission phenotype. Substitutions in PB1 and PB2 collectively caused enhanced transcription and virus replication. One substitution increased HA thermostability and lowered the pH of membrane fusion. Two substitutions independently changed HA binding preference from α2,3-linked to α2,6-linked sialic acid receptors. The loss of a glycosylation site in HA enhanced overall binding to receptors. The acquired substitutions emerged early during ferret passage as minor variants and became dominant rapidly. Identification of substitutions that are essential for airborne transmission of avian influenza viruses between ferrets and their associated phenotypes advances our fundamental understanding of virus transmission and will increase the value of future surveillance programs and public health risk assessments.

  2. Decreasing sensitivity to RANTES (regulated on activation, normally T cell-expressed and -secreted) neutralization of CC chemokine receptor 5-using, non-syncytium-inducing virus variants in the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Koning, Fransje A; Kwa, David; Boeser-Nunnink, Brigitte; Dekker, Jos; Vingerhoed, Jose; Hiemstra, Harry; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2003-09-15

    In approximately half of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected individuals, the development of CXC chemokine receptor 4-using, syncytium-inducing (SI) virus variants precedes a rapid progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In other individuals, only CC chemokine receptor 5-using (R5), non-SI (NSI) virus variants are present throughout infection. These individuals may be either long-term survivors (LTSs) or rapid progressors. The basis for this variable disease progression in individuals with only R5 virus variants is not yet fully understood. In this study, the beta-chemokine sensitivity of biological HIV-1 clones isolated from 13 individuals who harbored only R5, NSI virus variants (7 LTSs and 6 progressors) was investigated. We found a statistically significant decrease in sensitivity of virus variants to RANTES (regulated on activation, normally T cell-expressed and -secreted) neutralization during the course of progressive infection, but not during follow-up of LTSs. Our data suggest that a role exists for RANTES neutralization sensitivity of HIV-1 in AIDS pathogenesis.

  3. Variants in Neuropeptide Y Receptor 1 and 5 Are Associated with Nutrient-Specific Food Intake and Are Under Recent Selection in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Elbers, Clara C.; de Kovel, Carolien G. F.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Meijboom, Juliaan R.; Bauer, Florianne; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Trynka, Gosia; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    There is a large variation in caloric intake and macronutrient preference between individuals and between ethnic groups, and these food intake patterns show a strong heritability. The transition to new food sources during the agriculture revolution around 11,000 years ago probably created selective pressure and shaped the genome of modern humans. One major player in energy homeostasis is the appetite-stimulating hormone neuropeptide Y, in which the stimulatory capacity may be mediated by the neuropeptide Y receptors 1, 2 and 5 (NPY1R, NPY2R and NPY5R). We assess association between variants in the NPY1R, NPY2R and NPY5R genes and nutrient intake in a cross-sectional, single-center study of 400 men aged 40 to 80 years, and we examine whether genomic regions containing these genes show signatures of recent selection in 270 HapMap individuals (90 Africans, 90 Asians, and 90 Caucasians) and in 846 Dutch bloodbank controls. Our results show that derived alleles in NPY1R and NPY5R are associated with lower carbohydrate intake, mainly because of a lower consumption of mono- and disaccharides. We also show that carriers of these derived alleles, on average, consume meals with a lower glycemic index and glycemic load and have higher alcohol consumption. One of these variants shows the hallmark of recent selection in Europe. Our data suggest that lower carbohydrate intake, consuming meals with a low glycemic index and glycemic load, and/or higher alcohol consumption, gave a survival advantage in Europeans since the agricultural revolution. This advantage could lie in overall health benefits, because lower carbohydrate intake, consuming meals with a low GI and GL, and/or higher alcohol consumption, are known to be associated with a lower risk of chronic diseases. PMID:19759915

  4. The RNA-binding protein Sam68 regulates expression and transcription function of the androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7

    PubMed Central

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Markert, Elke; Zhou, Yan; Robson, Craig N.; Elliott, David J.; Lindberg, Johan; Leung, Hing Y.; Rajan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant (CR) prostate cancer (PCa) partly arises due to persistence of androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in the absence of cognate ligand. An emerging mechanism underlying the CRPCa phenotype and predicting response to therapy is the expression of the constitutively-active AR-V7 splice variant generated by AR cryptic exon 3b inclusion. Here, we explore the role of the RNA-binding protein (RBP) Sam68 (encoded by KHDRBS1), which is over-expressed in clinical PCa, on AR-V7 expression and transcription function. Using a minigene reporter, we show that Sam68 controls expression of exon 3b resulting in an increase in endogenous AR-V7 mRNA and protein expression in RNA-binding-dependent manner. We identify a novel protein-protein interaction between Sam68 and AR-V7 mediated by a common domain shared with full-length AR, and observe these proteins in the cell nucleoplasm. Using a luciferase reporter, we demonstrate that Sam68 co-activates ligand-independent AR-V7 transcriptional activity in an RNA-binding-independent manner, and controls expression of the endogenous AR-V7-specific gene target UBE2C. Our data suggest that Sam68 has separable effects on the regulation of AR-V7 expression and transcriptional activity, through its RNA-binding capacity. Sam68 and other RBPs may control expression of AR-V7 and other splice variants as well as their downstream functions in CRPCa. PMID:26310125

  5. Human fear acquisition deficits in relation to genetic variants of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 and the serotonin transporter.

    PubMed

    Heitland, Ivo; Groenink, Lucianne; Bijlsma, Elisabeth Y; Oosting, Ronald S; Baas, Johanna M P

    2013-01-01

    The ability to identify predictors of aversive events allows organisms to appropriately respond to these events, and failure to acquire these fear contingencies can lead to maladaptive contextual anxiety. Recently, preclinical studies demonstrated that the corticotropin-releasing factor and serotonin systems are interactively involved in adaptive fear acquisition. Here, 150 healthy medication-free human subjects completed a cue and context fear conditioning procedure in a virtual reality environment. Fear potentiation of the eyeblink startle reflex (FPS) was measured to assess both uninstructed fear acquisition and instructed fear expression. All participants were genotyped for polymorphisms located within regulatory regions of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1 - rs878886) and the serotonin transporter (5HTTLPR). These polymorphisms have previously been linked to panic disorder and anxious symptomology and personality, respectively. G-allele carriers of CRHR1 (rs878886) showed no acquisition of fear conditioned responses (FPS) to the threat cue in the uninstructed phase, whereas fear acquisition was present in C/C homozygotes. Moreover, carrying the risk alleles of both rs878886 (G-allele) and 5HTTLPR (short allele) was associated with increased FPS to the threat context during this phase. After explicit instructions regarding the threat contingency were given, the cue FPS and context FPS normalized in all genotype groups. The present results indicate that genetic variability in the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1, especially in interaction with the 5HTTLPR, is involved in the acquisition of fear in humans. This translates prior animal findings to the human realm.

  6. Rank-based genome-wide analysis reveals the association of Ryanodine receptor-2 gene variants with childhood asthma among human populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The standard approach to determine unique or shared genetic factors across populations is to identify risk alleles in one population and investigate replication in others. However, since populations differ in DNA sequence information, allele frequencies, effect sizes, and linkage disequilibrium patterns, SNP association using a uniform stringent threshold on p values may not be reproducible across populations. Here, we developed rank-based methods to investigate shared or population-specific loci and pathways for childhood asthma across individuals of diverse ancestry. We performed genome-wide association studies on 859,790 SNPs genotyped in 527 affected offspring trios of European, African, and Hispanic ancestry using publically available asthma database in the Genotypes and Phenotypes database. Results Rank-based analyses showed that there are shared genetic factors for asthma across populations, more at the gene and pathway levels than at the SNP level. Although the top 1,000 SNPs were not shared, 11 genes (RYR2, PDE4D, CSMD1, CDH13, ROBO2, RBFOX1, PTPRD, NPAS3, PDE1C, SEMA5A, and CTNNA2) mapped by these SNPs were shared across populations. Ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2, a statin response-related gene) showed the strongest association in European (p value = 2.55 × 10−7) and was replicated in African (2.57 × 10−4) and Hispanic (1.18 × 10−3) Americans. Imputation analyses based on the 1000 Genomes Project uncovered additional RYR2 variants associated with asthma. Network and functional ontology analyses revealed that RYR2 is an integral part of dermatological or allergic disorder biological networks, specifically in the functional classes involving inflammatory, eosinophilic, and respiratory diseases. Conclusion Our rank-based genome-wide analysis revealed for the first time an association of RYR2 variants with asthma and replicated previously discovered PDE4D asthma gene across human populations. The replication of top

  7. Association of estrogen receptor beta variants and serum levels of estradiol with risk of colorectal cancer: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endogenous estrogens may play a vital role in colorectal tumorigenesis. Estrogen receptor beta is the predominant subtype which mediates the biological effect of estrogens, while loss of expression of estrogen receptor beta has been indicated as a common step in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Epidemiological studies have revealed several functional polymorphisms of estrogen receptor beta (ESR2) for cancer risk, but relevant study in CRC is limited, particularly in men. This study aimed to investigate the association of circulating estradiol and variations of ESR2 with CRC risk in men. Methods We initiated a case–control study consisting of 390 patients with CRC and 445 healthy controls in men only. We genotyped ESR2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs1256049 and rs4986938 and measured serum estradiol concentration using chemilluminescence immunoassay. Multivariable logistic regression model was performed to evaluate the associations between these variables and CRC risk. Results ESR2 rs1256049 CT/TT genotypes were associated with reduced risk of CRC (odds ratio [OR], 0.7, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.5–1.0), while rs4986938 CT/TT genotypes were associated with increased risk of CRC (OR, 1.5, 95% CI, 1.0–2.1). In addition, the CRC risk increased with the number of risk genotypes of these two SNPs in a dose–response manner (Ptrend, 0.003). Specifically, subjects carrying risk genotypes of both SNPs had the highest risk of CRC (OR, 2.0, 95% CI, 1.3–3.3.). Moreover, serum estradiol concentration alone was associated with risk of CRC in men (OR, 1.2, 95% CI, 1.0–1.3). However, individuals presenting both rs4986938 CT/TT genotypes and high level of serum estradiol had a high risk of CRC (OR, 2.3, 95% CI, 1.4–3.9), compared with those presenting CC genotype and low level of serum estradiol. The similar joint results were not observed for SNP rs1256049. Conclusions These results suggest that endogenous estrogen and genetic

  8. Newly emerging mutations in the matrix genes of the human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses reduce the detection sensitivity of real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Rong; Kuo, Chuan-Yi; Huang, Hsiang-Yi; Wu, Fu-Ting; Huang, Yi-Lung; Cheng, Chieh-Yu; Su, Yu-Ting; Chang, Feng-Yee; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Liu, Ming-Tsan

    2014-01-01

    New variants of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses were detected in Taiwan between 2012 and 2013. Some of these variants were not detected in clinical specimens using a common real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay that targeted the conserved regions of the viral matrix (M) genes. An analysis of the M gene sequences of the new variants revealed that several newly emerging mutations were located in the regions where the primers or probes of the real-time RT-PCR assay bind; these included three mutations (G225A, T228C, and G238A) in the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, as well as one mutation (C163T) in the A(H3N2) virus. These accumulated mismatch mutations, together with the previously identified C154T mutation of the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus and the C153T and G189T mutations of the A(H3N2) virus, result in a reduced detection sensitivity for the real-time RT-PCR assay. To overcome the loss of assay sensitivity due to mismatch mutations, we established a real-time RT-PCR assay using degenerate nucleotide bases in both the primers and probe and successfully increased the sensitivity of the assay to detect circulating variants of the human influenza A viruses. Our observations highlight the importance of the simultaneous use of different gene-targeting real-time RT-PCR assays for the clinical diagnosis of influenza.

  9. Clinical Significance of Ryanodine Receptor 1 Gene (RYR1) Variants: Proceedings of the 2013 MHAUS Scientific Conference

    PubMed Central

    Riazi, Sheila; Kraeva, Natalia; Muldoon, Sheila M.; Dowling, James; Ho, Clara; Petre, Maria-Alexandra; Parness, Jerome; Dirksen, Robert T.; Rosenberg, Henry

    2014-01-01

    The Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States (MHAUS) and the Department of Anesthesia at the University of Toronto sponsored a Scientific Conference on November 1–2, 2013 in Toronto, Canada. The multidisciplinary group of experts, including clinicians, geneticists and physiologists involved in research related to malignant hyperthermia (MH), shared new insights into the pathophysiology of type-1 ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1)-linked diseases, as well as the relationship between MH and “awake MH” conditions, such as exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) and exertional heat illness (EHI). In addition, the molecular genetics of MH, and clinical issues related to the diagnosis and management of RYR1-linked disorders, were presented. The conference also honored Dr. David H. MacLennan for his contributions to our understanding of the genetics, pathogenesis and treatment of MH and other RYR1-related myopathies. This report represents a summary of the proceedings of this conference. PMID:25189431

  10. Association of insulin receptor genetic variants with polycystic ovary syndrome in a population of women from Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Hanzu, Felicia A; Radian, Serban; Attaoua, Redha; Ait-El-Mkadem, Samira; Fica, Simona; Gheorghiu, Monica; Coculescu, Mihai; Grigorescu, Florin

    2010-11-01

    To assess the role of the insulin receptor gene in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) we performed a case-control study in a female population (n=226) from Central Europe by examining the genetic associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs8107575, rs2245648, rs2245649, rs2963, rs2245655, and rs2962) and inferred haplotypes around exon 9 of this gene. The ancestral T allele of single nucleotide polymorphism rs2963 or the corresponding haplotype (GGTC-C) showed association with PCOS with odds ratio 2.99, 95% confidence interval 1.4-6.3, independent of obesity but related to the presence of Acanthosis nigricans and insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, or hyperandrogeny, thus providing a frame for future fine mapping of the susceptibility loci in PCOS.

  11. Highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) mutants transmissible by air are susceptible to human and animal neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Du, Lanying; Li, Ye; Zhao, Guangyu; Wang, Lili; Zou, Peng; Lu, Lu; Zhou, Yusen; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-10-15

    A laboratory-generated reassortant H5 hemagglutinin (HA)/influenza A(H1N1) strain containing 4 mutations in influenza A(H5N1) HA has become transmissible by air among mammals. Here, we constructed 15 influenza A(H5N1) pseudoviruses containing a single mutation or a combination of mutations and showed that the pseudoviruses were susceptible to neutralizing antibodies from patients with influenza A(H5N1) infection and from mice immunized with a vaccine containing the conserved HA1 sequence of influenza A(H5N1). These results indicate that antibodies in patients currently infected by influenza A(H5N1) and antibodies induced by vaccines containing conserved sequences in HA1 of wild-type influenza A(H5N1) are highly effective in cross-neutralizing future influenza A(H5N1) mutants with airborne transmissibility, suggesting that human influenza pandemics caused by these influenza A(H5N1) variants can be prevented.

  12. Cellulase variants

    DOEpatents

    Blazej, Robert; Toriello, Nicholas; Emrich, Charles; Cohen, Richard N.; Koppel, Nitzan

    2015-07-14

    This invention provides novel variant cellulolytic enzymes having improved activity and/or stability. In certain embodiments the variant cellulotyic enzymes comprise a glycoside hydrolase with or comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to one or more of residues F64, A226, and/or E246 in Thermobifida fusca Cel9A enzyme. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a family 9 glycoside hydrolase. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a theme B family 9 glycoside hydrolase.

  13. Endogenous Acute Phase Serum Amyloid A Lacks Pro-Inflammatory Activity, Contrasting the Two Recombinant Variants That Activate Human Neutrophils through Different Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Karin; Björkman, Lena; Ahlin, Sofie; Olsson, Maja; Sjöholm, Kajsa; Karlsson, Anna; Bylund, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Most notable among the acute phase proteins is serum amyloid A (SAA), levels of which can increase 1000-fold during infections, aseptic inflammation, and/or trauma. Chronically elevated SAA levels are associated with a wide variety of pathological conditions, including obesity and rheumatic diseases. Using a recombinant hybrid of the two human SAA isoforms (SAA1 and 2) that does not exist in vivo, numerous in vitro studies have given rise to the notion that acute phase SAA is a pro-inflammatory molecule with cytokine-like properties. It is however unclear whether endogenous acute phase SAA per se mediates pro-inflammatory effects. We tested this in samples from patients with inflammatory arthritis and in a transgenic mouse model that expresses human SAA1. Endogenous human SAA did not drive production of pro-inflammatory IL-8/KC in either of these settings. Human neutrophils derived from arthritis patients displayed no signs of activation, despite being exposed to severely elevated SAA levels in circulation, and SAA-rich sera also failed to activate cells in vitro. In contrast, two recombinant SAA variants (the hybrid SAA and SAA1) both activated human neutrophils, inducing L-selectin shedding, production of reactive oxygen species, and production of IL-8. The hybrid SAA was approximately 100-fold more potent than recombinant SAA1. Recombinant hybrid SAA and SAA1 activated neutrophils through different receptors, with recombinant SAA1 being a ligand for formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2). We conclude that even though recombinant SAAs can be valuable tools for studying neutrophil activation, they do not reflect the nature of the endogenous protein. PMID:23626589

  14. Associations between common arginine vasopressin 1b receptor and glucocorticoid receptor gene variants and HPA axis responses to psychosocial stress in a child psychiatric population.

    PubMed

    van West, Dirk; Del-Favero, Jurgen; Deboutte, Dirk; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Claes, Stephan

    2010-08-30

    On the one hand, a suitable response to daily stressors is crucial for adequate functioning in any natural environment. On the other hand, depending on the individual's genetic makeup, prolonged stress that is accompanied by an inappropriate level of responsiveness may lead to physiological and psychiatric disorders. Several psychiatric conditions have been linked with stress and alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity. While stress is a general phenomenon, illness is only seen in a proportion of individuals, suggesting that genetic factors may play a role in the ability to cope with stress. In children, relatively little research has been conducted to determine the impact of genetic factors on the variability in HPA axis functioning. In the present exploratory investigation, 106 prepubertal children were studied to estimate the impact of four glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) polymorphisms (NR3C1-1 [rs10482605], ER22/23EK [rs6190], N363S [rs6195], N766N [rs6196]) and five arginine vasopressin (AVP) receptor 1b gene (AVPR1b) polymorphisms (AVPR1b_s1 [rs28536160], AVPR1b_s2 [rs28373064], AVPR1b_s3 [rs33976516], AVPR1b_s4 [rs33985287], AVPR1b_s5 [rs33933482]) on cortisol responses after a psychosocial stress test (public speaking task). ER22/23EK carriers had significantly lower cortisol responses to psychosocial stress compared with noncarriers. These findings provide evidence for the relevance of the ER22/23EK polymorphism in childhood HPA axis regulation. However, the small number of ER22/23EK subjects does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions about the genotypic effect.

  15. Gender-Related Survival Differences Associated With Polymorphic Variants of Estrogen Receptor Beta (ERβ) in Patients with Metastatic Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Press, Oliver A.; Zhang, Wu; Gordon, Michael A.; Yang, Dongyun; Haiman, Christopher A.; Azuma, Mizutomo; Iqbal, Syma; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen replacement therapy in women has demonstrated a protective effect in the development of colonic carcinomas. Gender-related differences in the development of colonic carcinomas have also been reported. Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is expressed in colon carcinomas and has demonstrated prognostic value in colon cancer patients. This study investigated an ERβ 3’ non-coding polymorphism associated with transcriptional activity to determine clinical outcome in patients with metastatic colon cancer. Genomic DNA from 318 metastatic colon cancer patients, 177 males and 141 females, were collected from 1992 to 2003. These patients were analyzed for CA repeat polymorphism of the ERβ gene. Gender-related survival differences were associated with an ERβ (CA)n repeat polymorphism (P for interaction=0.003, the likelihood ratio test). Female patients with any short <22 (CA)n repeat alleles had shorter overall survival compared to female patients that had both long ≥22 (CA)n repeat alleles. In the male patients the opposite overall survival difference was found. This study supports the role of an ERβ (CA)n repeat polymorphism as a prognostic marker in metastatic colon cancer; however, this prognostic factor had opposite implications based on gender. PMID:20548329

  16. The functional c.-2G>C variant of the mineralocorticoid receptor modulates blood pressure, renin, and aldosterone levels.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Nienke; Caprio, Massimiliano; Blaya, Carolina; Fumeron, Frédéric; Sartorato, Paola; Ronconi, Vanessa; Giacchetti, Gilberta; Mantero, Franco; Fernandes-Rosa, Fabio L; Simian, Christophe; Peyrard, Sévrine; Zitman, Frans G; Penninx, Brenda W J H; de Kloet, E Ron; Azizi, Michel; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Derijk, Roel H; Zennaro, Maria-Christina

    2010-11-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is essential in the regulation of volemia and blood pressure. Rare mutations in the MR gene cause type 1 pseudohypoaldosteronism and hypertension. In this study we characterized the common MR polymorphism c.-2G>C (rs2070951) in vitro and tested its influence on parameters related to blood pressure regulation and the renin-angiotensin system. In vitro studies showed that the G allele was associated with decreased MR protein levels and reduced transcriptional activation compared with the C allele. Association studies were performed with several outcome variables in 3 independent cohorts: a mild hypertensive group subjected to a salt-sensitivity test, a healthy normotensive group included in a crossover study to receive both a high and low Na/K diet, and a large cohort (The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety), in which blood pressure was measured. Subjects with the GG genotype had significantly higher plasma renin levels both in the mild hypertensive group and in normal volunteers compared with homozygous C carriers. The GG genotype was also correlated with higher plasma aldosterone levels in healthy subjects. In both the mild hypertensive group and The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety cohort the genotype GG was associated with higher systolic blood pressure in males. In conclusion, the G allele of the common functional genetic polymorphism c.-2G>C in the MR gene associates with increased activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis and with increased blood pressure, probably related to decreased MR expression.

  17. The new truncated somatostatin receptor variant sst5TMD4 is associated to poor prognosis in breast cancer and increases malignancy in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Durán-Prado, M; Gahete, M D; Hergueta-Redondo, M; Martínez-Fuentes, A J; Córdoba-Chacón, J; Palacios, J; Gracia-Navarro, F; Moreno-Bueno, G; Malagón, M M; Luque, R M; Castaño, J P

    2012-04-19

    Somatostatin receptors (sst1-5) are present in different types of tumors, where they inhibit key cellular processes such as proliferation and invasion. Although ssts are densely expressed in breast cancer, especially sst2, their role and therapeutic potential remain uncertain. Recently, we identified a new truncated sst5 variant, sst5TMD4, which is related to the abnormal response of certain pituitary tumors to treatment with somatostatin analogs. Here, we investigated the possible role of sst5TMD4 in breast cancer. This study revealed that sst5TMD4 is absent in normal mammary gland, but is abundant in a subset of poorly differentiated human breast tumors, where its expression correlated to that of sst2. Moreover, in the MCF-7 breast cancer model cell, sst5TMD4 expression increased malignancy features such as invasion and proliferation abilities (both in cell cultures and nude mice). This was likely mediated by sst5TMD4-induced increase in phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and p-Akt levels, and cyclin D3 and Arp2/3 complex expression, which also led to mesenchymal-like phenotype. Interestingly, sst5TMD4 interacts physically with sst2 and thereby alters its signaling, enabling disruption of sst2 inhibitory feedback and providing a plausible basis for our findings. These results suggest that sst5TMD4 could be involved in the pathophysiology of certain types of breast tumors.

  18. The -521 C/T variant in the dopamine-4-receptor gene (DRD4) is associated with skiing and snowboarding behavior.

    PubMed

    Thomson, C J; Hanna, C W; Carlson, S R; Rupert, J L

    2013-03-01

    Sensation seeking is the tendency to seek out new and thrilling experiences and to take risks for the sake of such experiences. A single-nucleotide polymorphism, -521 C/T (rs1800955) in the promoter region of the dopamine-4-receptor gene (DRD4), is associated with approach-related traits including novelty seeking and extraversion, in some, but not all studies. To our knowledge, no studies have been conducted on the genetics of risk-taking behavior in sports. Using a joint-analysis approach, we measured sensation seeking in two cohorts of experienced male and female skiers and snowboarders (n = 503) using a sports-specific tool developed for this study, the Contextual Sensation Seeking Questionnaire for Skiing and Snowboarding (CSSQ-S), and a more general trait measure, the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire impulsive sensation-seeking subscale. We detected, and then replicated a significant association between the DRD4 -521CC genotype and sports-specific sensation seeking as measured using the CSSQ-S (P < 0.001). These data suggest that the DRD4 -521 C/T polymorphism contributes to a "risk-taking phenotype" in skiers and snowboarders, but the variant was not associated with impulsive sensation seeking (P = 0.9).

  19. Inhibition of NF-kappa B signaling restores responsiveness of castrate resistant prostate cancer cells to anti-androgen treatment by decreasing androgen receptor variants expression

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Renjie; Yamashita, Hironobu; Yu, Xiuping; Wang, Jingbin; Franco, Omar E.; Wang, Yufen; Hayward, Simon W.; Matusik, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor splicing variants (ARVs) which lack the ligand-binding domain (LBD) are associated with the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), including resistance to the new generation of high affinity anti-androgens. However, the mechanism by which ARVs expression is regulated is not fully understood. In this study, we show that activation of classical NF-κB signaling increases the expression of ARVs in prostate cancer (PCa) cells and converts androgen sensitive PCa cells to become androgen insensitive; while, downregulation of NF-κB signaling inhibits ARVs expression and restores responsiveness of CRPC to anti-androgen therapy. In addition, we demonstrated that combination of anti-androgen with NF-κB targeted therapy inhibits efficiently tumor growth of human CRPC xenografts. These results indicate that induction ARVs by activated NF-κB signaling in PCa cells is a critical mechanism by which the PCa progresses to CRPC. This has important implications since it can prolong the survival of CRPC patients by restoring the tumors to once again respond to conventional androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). PMID:25220414

  20. A Natural Variant of the T Cell Receptor-Signaling Molecule Vav1 Reduces Both Effector T Cell Functions and Susceptibility to Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Sahar; Bernard, Isabelle; Dejean, Anne S.; Liblau, Roland; Fournié, Gilbert J.; Colacios, Céline

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav1 is essential for transducing T cell antigen receptor signals and therefore plays an important role in T cell development and activation. Our previous genetic studies identified a locus on rat chromosome 9 that controls the susceptibility to neuroinflammation and contains a non-synonymous polymorphism in the major candidate gene Vav1. To formally demonstrate the causal implication of this polymorphism, we generated a knock-in mouse bearing this polymorphism (Vav1R63W). Using this model, we show that Vav1R63W mice display reduced susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by MOG35-55 peptide immunization. This is associated with a lower production of effector cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-17 and GM-CSF) by autoreactive CD4 T cells. Despite increased proportion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in Vav1R63W mice, we show that this lowered cytokine production is intrinsic to effector CD4 T cells and that Treg depletion has no impact on EAE development. Finally, we provide a mechanism for the above phenotype by showing that the Vav1R63W variant has normal enzymatic activity but reduced adaptor functions. Together, these data highlight the importance of Vav1 adaptor functions in the production of inflammatory cytokines by effector T cells and in the susceptibility to neuroinflammation. PMID:27438086

  1. Structure–activity correlations of variant forms of the B pentamer of Escherichia coli type II heat-labile enterotoxin LT-IIb with Toll-like receptor 2 binding

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Vivian; Pace, Jim; Nawar, Hesham F.; King-Lyons, Natalie; Liang, Shuang; Connell, Terry D.; Hajishengallis, George

    2012-12-01

    Structural data for the S74D variant of the pentameric B subunit of type II heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli reveal a smaller pore opening that may explain its reduced Toll-like receptor binding affinity compared to that of the wild type enterotoxin. The explanation for the enhanced Toll-like receptor binding affinity of the S74A variant is more complex than simply being attributed to the pore opening. The pentameric B subunit of the type II heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (LT-IIb-B{sub 5}) is a potent signaling molecule capable of modulating innate immune responses. It has previously been shown that LT-IIb-B{sub 5}, but not the LT-IIb-B{sub 5} Ser74Asp variant [LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(S74D)], activates Toll-like receptor (TLR2) signaling in macrophages. Consistent with this, the LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(S74D) variant failed to bind TLR2, in contrast to LT-IIb-B{sub 5} and the LT-IIb-B{sub 5} Thr13Ile [LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(T13I)] and LT-IIb-B{sub 5} Ser74Ala [LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(S74A)] variants, which displayed the highest binding activity to TLR2. Crystal structures of the Ser74Asp, Ser74Ala and Thr13Ile variants of LT-IIb-B{sub 5} have been determined to 1.90, 1.40 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. The structural data for the Ser74Asp variant reveal that the carboxylate side chain points into the pore, thereby reducing the pore size compared with that of the wild-type or the Ser74Ala variant B pentamer. On the basis of these crystallographic data, the reduced TLR2-binding affinity of the LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(S74D) variant may be the result of the pore of the pentamer being closed. On the other hand, the explanation for the enhanced TLR2-binding activity of the LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(S74A) variant is more complex as its activity is greater than that of the wild-type B pentamer, which also has an open pore as the Ser74 side chain points away from the pore opening. Data for the LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(T13I) variant show that four of the five variant side chains point to the outside

  2. IgA and IgG antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody engagement of Fc receptor genetic variants influences granulomatosis with polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Kelley, James M; Monach, Paul A; Ji, Chuanyi; Zhou, Yebin; Wu, Jianming; Tanaka, Sumiaki; Mahr, Alfred D; Johnson, Sharleen; McAlear, Carol; Cuthbertson, David; Carette, Simon; Davis, John C; Dellaripa, Paul F; Hoffman, Gary S; Khalidi, Nader; Langford, Carol A; Seo, Phillip; St Clair, E William; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H; Spiera, Robert F; Ytterberg, Steven R; Merkel, Peter A; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P

    2011-12-20

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's) is a rare autoimmune neutrophil-mediated vasculitis that can cause renal disease and mucosal manifestations. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are present in many patients, vary in level over time, and induce neutrophil activation through engagement with Fc receptors (FcRs). Given roles for FcRs in ANCA-mediated neutrophil activation and IgA antibodies in mucosal immunity, we hypothesized that FcR genetics and previously unappreciated IgA ANCA affect clinical presentation. We assembled a total of 673 patients and 413 controls from two multicenter cohorts, performed ELISA and immunofluorescence assays to determine IgA and IgG ANCA positivity, and used Illumina, TaqMan, or Pyrosequencing to genotype eight haplotype-tagging SNPs in the IgA FcR (FCAR) and to determine NA1/NA2 genotype of FCGR3B, the most prevalent neutrophil IgG FcR. We evaluated neutrophil activation by measuring degranulation marker CD11b with flow cytometry or neutrophil extracellcular trap formation with confocal microscopy. Functional polymorphisms in FCGR3B and FCAR differed between patient groups stratified by renal involvement. IgA ANCA were found in ∼30% of patients and were less common in patients with severe renal disease. Neutrophil stimulation by IgA or IgG ANCA led to degranulation and neutrophil extracellcular trap formation in a FcR allele-specific manner (IgA:FCAR P = 0.008; IgG:FCGR3B P = 0.003). When stimulated with IgA and IgG ANCA together, IgG ANCA induced neutrophil activation was reduced (P = 0.0001). FcR genotypes, IgA ANCA, and IgG ANCA are potential prognostic and therapeutic targets for understanding the pathogenesis and presentation of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's).

  3. Sporadic melanoma in South-Eastern Italy: the impact of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) polymorphism analysis in low-risk people and report of three novel variants.

    PubMed

    Guida, S; Bartolomeo, N; Zanna, P T; Grieco, C; Maida, I; De Summa, S; Tommasi, S; Guida, M; Azzariti, A; Foti, C; Filotico, R; Guida, G

    2015-08-01

    Environmental and genetic risk factors are involved in the development of melanoma. The role of the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene has been investigated and differences according to geographic areas have been described. To evaluate the role of some clinical and genetic risk factors in melanoma development, we performed a case-control study involving 101 melanoma patients and 103 controls coming from South-Eastern Italy (Puglia), after achieving informed consent. We confirmed the role of known clinical risk factors for melanoma. Furthermore, 42 MC1R polymorphisms were observed. Three of these variants (L26V, H232L, D294Y) were not previously reported in the literature. Their predicted impact on receptor function was evaluated using bioinformatic tools. We report an overall frequency of MC1R variants in our population higher than in Northern or Central Italy. The most common polymorphism found was V60L, that has been recently reported to spread among South Mediterranean population. This variant influenced phenotypic characteristics of our population while it did not impinge on melanoma risk. An increased risk of melanoma was associated with two or more MC1R variants, when at least one was RHC, compared to people carrying the MC1R consensus sequence or a single MC1R polymorphism. Interestingly, we observed an increased risk of melanoma in subjects with darker skin and lower nevus count, usually considered at low risk, when carrying MC1R polymorphisms.

  4. AIP mutations impair AhR signaling in pituitary adenoma patients fibroblasts and in GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Viengchareun, Say; Hage, Mirella; Bouligand, Jérôme; Young, Jacques; Boutron, Audrey; Zizzari, Philippe; Lombès, Marc; Chanson, Philippe; Kamenický, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene predispose humans to pituitary adenomas through unknown molecular mechanisms. The best-known interacting partner of AIP is the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a transcription factor that mediates the effects of xenobiotics implicated in carcinogenesis. As 75% of AIP mutations disrupt the physical and/or functional interaction with AhR, we postulated that the tumorigenic potential of AIP mutations might result from altered AhR signaling. We evaluated the impact of AIP mutations on the AhR signaling pathway, first in fibroblasts from AIP-mutated patients with pituitary adenomas, by comparison with fibroblasts from healthy subjects, then in transfected pituitary GH3 cells. The AIP protein level in mutated fibroblasts was about half of that in cells from healthy subjects, but AhR expression was unaffected. Gene expression analyses showed significant modifications in the expression of the AhR target genes CYP1B1 and AHRR in AIP-mutated fibroblasts, both before and after stimulation with the endogenous AhR ligand kynurenine. Kynurenine increased Cyp1b1 expression to a greater extent in GH3 cells overexpressing wild type compared with cells expressing mutant AIP Knockdown of endogenous Aip in these cells attenuated Cyp1b1 induction by the AhR ligand. Both mutant AIP expression and knockdown of endogenous Aip affected the kynurenine-dependent GH secretion of GH3 cells. This study of human fibroblasts bearing endogenous heterozygous AIP mutations and transfected pituitary GH3 cells shows that AIP mutations affect the AIP protein level and alter AhR transcriptional activity in a gene- and tissue-dependent manner.

  5. A Large Study of Androgen Receptor Germline Variants and Their Relation to Sex Hormone Levels and Prostate Cancer Risk. Results from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Sara; Ma, Jing; Altshuler, David; Giovannucci, Edward; Riboli, Elio; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Chanock, Stephen J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Gaziano, J. Michael; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hunter, David J.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Martínez, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Siddiq, Afshan; Stampfer, Meir; Stattin, Pär; Stram, Daniel O.; Thun, Michael J.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Yeager, Meredith; Kraft, Peter; Freedman, Matthew L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Androgens are key regulators of prostate gland maintenance and prostate cancer growth, and androgen deprivation therapy has been the mainstay of treatment for advanced prostate cancer for many years. A long-standing hypothesis has been that inherited variation in the androgen receptor (AR) gene plays a role in prostate cancer initiation. However, studies to date have been inconclusive and often suffered from small sample sizes. Objective and Methods: We investigated the association of AR sequence variants with circulating sex hormone levels and prostate cancer risk in 6058 prostate cancer cases and 6725 controls of Caucasian origin within the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium. We genotyped a highly polymorphic CAG microsatellite in exon 1 and six haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and tested each genetic variant for association with prostate cancer risk and with sex steroid levels. Results: We observed no association between AR genetic variants and prostate cancer risk. However, there was a strong association between longer CAG repeats and higher levels of testosterone (P = 4.73 × 10−5) and estradiol (P = 0.0002), although the amount of variance explained was small (0.4 and 0.7%, respectively). Conclusions: This study is the largest to date investigating AR sequence variants, sex steroid levels, and prostate cancer risk. Although we observed no association between AR sequence variants and prostate cancer risk, our results support earlier findings of a relation between the number of CAG repeats and circulating levels of testosterone and estradiol. PMID:20534771

  6. Molecular characterization and tissue distribution of aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator isoforms, ARNT1 and ARNT2, and identification of novel splice variants in common cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Seon; Kim, Eun-Young; Iwata, Hisato; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2007-04-01

    High levels of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related planar halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) are accumulated in fish-eating birds including common cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo). Most of the biochemical and toxic effects of TCDD are mediated by a basic helix-loop-helix and a conserved region among Per, ARNT, and Sim (bHLH/PAS) proteins, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT). To study the molecular mechanism of TCDD toxicity in common cormorant as an avian model species, characterization of the AHR/ARNT signaling pathway in this species is necessary. The present study focuses on molecular characterization of ARNT from common cormorant (ccARNT). The cDNA of the ccARNT isoform, ccARNT1 obtained by the screening of hepatic cDNA library contains a 2424-bp open reading frame that encodes 807 amino acids, exhibiting high identities (92%) with chicken ARNT. This isoform contains a unique 22 amino acid residue in 3' end of PAS A domain as is also recognized in chicken ARNT. The ccARNT2 cDNA isolated from brain tissue has a 2151-bp open reading frame. The deduced amino acid sequence of ccARNT2 protein (716 aa) shows a conservation of bHLH and PAS motif in its N-terminal region with high similarities (96% and 78%, respectively) to that of ccARNT1. Using quantitative RT-PCR methods, the tissue distribution profiles of ccARNT1 and ccARNT2 were unveiled. Both ccARNT1 and ccARNT2 mRNAs were ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues including liver. The expression profile of ccARNT1 was comparable with that of rodent ARNT1, but ccARNT2 was not with rodent ARNT2, implying different roles of ARNT2 between the two species. There was a significant positive correlation between ARNT1 and ARNT2 mRNA expression levels in the liver of wild cormorant population, indicating that their expressions may be enforced by similar transcriptional regulation mechanism. Novel variants of ccARNT1 and ccARNT2 isoforms that were supposed to

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor 1B and 1C mRNA transcript alterations in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and their possible regulation by GR gene variants.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Duncan; Fullerton, Janice M; Webster, Maree J; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal patterns of HPA axis activation, under basal conditions and in response to stress, are found in individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA and protein expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in psychiatric illness have also been reported, but the cause of these abnormalities is not known. We quantified expression of GR mRNA transcript variants which employ different 5' promoters, in 35 schizophrenia cases, 31 bipolar disorder cases and 34 controls. We also explored whether sequence variation within the NR3C1 (GR) gene is related to GR mRNA variant expression. Total GR mRNA was decreased in the DLPFC in schizophrenia cases relative to controls (15.1%, p<0.0005) and also relative to bipolar disorder cases (8.9%, p<0.05). GR-1B mRNA was decreased in schizophrenia cases relative to controls (20.2%, p<0.05), while GR-1C mRNA was decreased in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder cases relative to controls (16.1% and 17.2% respectively, both p<0.005). A dose-dependent effect of rs10052957 genotype on GR-1B mRNA expression was observed, where CC homozygotes displayed 18.4% lower expression than TC heterozygotes (p<0.05), and 31.8% lower expression than TT homozygotes (p<0.005). Similarly, a relationship between rs6190 (R23K) genotype and GR-1C expression was seen, with 24.8% lower expression in GG homozygotes than GA heterozygotes (p<0.01). We also observed an effect of rs41423247 (Bcl1) SNP on expression of 67 kDa GRα isoform, the most abundant GRα isoform in the DLPFC. These findings suggest possible roles for the GR-1B and GR-1C promoter regions in mediating GR gene expression changes in psychotic illness, and highlight the potential importance of sequence variation within the NR3C1 gene in modulating GR mRNA expression in the DLPFC.

  8. Impact of gene variants on sex-specific regulation of human Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-BI) expression in liver and association with lipid levels in a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several studies have noted that genetic variants of SCARB1, a lipoprotein receptor involved in reverse cholesterol transport, are associated with serum lipid levels in a sex-dependent fashion. However, the mechanism underlying this gene by sex interaction has not been explored. Methods We utilized both epidemiological and molecular methods to study how estrogen and gene variants interact to influence SCARB1 expression and lipid levels. Interaction between 35 SCARB1 haplotype-tagged polymorphisms and endogenous estradiol levels was assessed in 498 postmenopausal Caucasian women from the population-based Rancho Bernardo Study. We further examined associated variants with overall and SCARB1 splice variant (SR-BI and SR-BII) expression in 91 human liver tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Results Several variants on a haplotype block spanning intron 11 to intron 12 of SCARB1 showed significant gene by estradiol interaction affecting serum lipid levels, the strongest for rs838895 with HDL-cholesterol (p = 9.2 × 10-4) and triglycerides (p = 1.3 × 10-3) and the triglyceride:HDL cholesterol ratio (p = 2.7 × 10-4). These same variants were associated with expression of the SR-BI isoform in a sex-specific fashion, with the strongest association found among liver tissue from 52 young women <45 years old (p = 0.002). Conclusions Estrogen and SCARB1 genotype may act synergistically to regulate expression of SCARB1 isoforms and impact serum levels of HDL cholesterol and triglycerides. This work highlights the importance of considering sex-dependent effects of gene variants on serum lipid levels. PMID:20085651

  9. Cross-species analysis of Fc engineered anti-Lewis-Y human IgG1 variants in human neonatal receptor transgenic mice reveal importance of S254 and Y436 in binding human neonatal Fc receptor

    PubMed Central

    Burvenich, Ingrid J. G.; Farrugia, William; Lee, Fook T.; Catimel, Bruno; Liu, Zhanqi; Makris, Dahna; Cao, Diana; O'Keefe, Graeme J.; Brechbiel, Martin W.; King, Dylan; Spirkoska, Violeta; Allan, Laura C.; Ramsland, Paul A.; Scott, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT IgG has a long half-life through engagement of its Fc region with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). The FcRn binding site on IgG1 has been shown to contain I253 and H310 in the CH2 domain and H435 in the CH3 domain. Altering the half-life of IgG has been pursued with the aim to prolong or reduce the half-life of therapeutic IgGs. More recent studies have shown that IgGs bind differently to mouse and human FcRn. In this study we characterize a set of hu3S193 IgG1 variants with mutations in the FcRn binding site. A double mutation in the binding site is necessary to abrogate binding to murine FcRn, whereas a single mutation in the FcRn binding site is sufficient to no longer detect binding to human FcRn and create hu3S193 IgG1 variants with a half-life similar to previously studied hu3S193 F(ab')2 (t1/2β, I253A, 12.23 h; H310A, 12.94; H435A, 12.57; F(ab')2, 12.6 h). Alanine substitutions in S254 in the CH2 domain and Y436 in the CH3 domain showed reduced binding in vitro to human FcRn and reduced elimination half-lives in huFcRn transgenic mice (t1/2β, S254A, 37.43 h; Y436A, 39.53 h; wild-type, 83.15 h). These variants had minimal effect on half-life in BALB/c nu/nu mice (t1/2β, S254A, 119.9 h; Y436A, 162.1 h; wild-type, 163.1 h). These results provide insight into the interaction of human Fc by human FcRn, and are important for antibody-based therapeutics with optimal pharmacokinetics for payload strategies used in the clinic. PMID:27030023

  10. In vitro generation of neuraminidase inhibitor resistance in A(H5N1) influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Holien, Jessica K; Barr, Ian G

    2009-10-01

    To identify mutations that can arise in highly pathogenic A(H5N1) viruses under neuraminidase inhibitor selective pressure, two antigenically different strains were serially passaged with increasing levels of either oseltamivir or zanamivir. Under oseltamivir pressure, both A(H5N1) viruses developed a H274Y neuraminidase mutation, although in one strain the mutation occurred in combination with an I222M neuraminidase mutation. The H274Y neuraminidase mutation reduced oseltamivir susceptibility significantly (900- to 2,500-fold compared to the wild type). However the dual H274Y/I222M neuraminidase mutation had an even greater impact on resistance, with oseltamivir susceptibility reduced significantly further (8,000-fold compared to the wild type). A similar affect on oseltamivir susceptibility was observed when the dual H274Y/I222M mutations were introduced, by reverse genetics, into a recombinant seasonal human A(H1N1) virus and also when an alternative I222 substitution (I222V) was generated in combination with H274Y in A(H5N1) and A(H1N1) viruses. These viruses remained fully susceptible to zanamivir but demonstrated reduced susceptibility to peramivir. Following passage of the A(H5N1) viruses in the presence of zanamivir, the strains developed a D198G neuraminidase mutation, which reduced susceptibility to both zanamivir and oseltamivir, and also an E119G neuraminidase mutation, which demonstrated significantly reduced zanamivir susceptibility (1,400-fold compared to the wild type). Mutations in hemagglutinin residues implicated in receptor binding were also detected in many of the resistant strains. This study identified the mutations that can arise in A(H5N1) under either oseltamivir or zanamivir selective pressure and the potential for dual neuraminidase mutations to result in dramatically reduced drug susceptibility.

  11. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by naturally occurring splice variants of TrkC, the receptor for neurotrophin-3.

    PubMed

    Gunn-Moore, F J; Williams, A G; Tavaré, J M

    1997-02-15

    TrkC is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) with high affinity. A number of naturally occurring splice variants of TrkC exist, including one (TrkC kil4) with a 14 amino acid insertion between subdomains VII and VIII of the tyrosine kinase domain. This kinase insert blocks the ability of NT-3 to stimulate neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells and proliferation in fibroblasts. The inserts also block the ability of TrkC to form a high-affinity complex with Shc and phospholipase C gamma (PLC gamma) and the activation of PtdIns 3-kinase, and attenuates the sustained activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In the current study we set out to determine whether the attenuation of the activation of MAPK by the insert was the result of the inability of TrkC to activate the Shc-Ras pathway, PtdIns 3-kinase activation, PLC gamma activation, or a combination thereof. Experiments with the use of cell-permeant inhibitors argue against a major role for PLC gamma and PtdIns 3-kinase in the activation of MAPK by TrkC. The introduction of the 14 amino acid kinase insert appeared to slow the kinetics of NT-3-stimulated Shc phosphorylation and Shc-Grb2 association and reduce their magnitude; an effect which was associated with a delayed, and only transient, activation of MAPK. Taken together, our data suggest that the apparent defect in MAPK activation caused by the kinase insert may result predominantly from an inhibition of high-affinity Shc binding, although a role for PLC gamma and PtdIns 3-kinase cannot be completely excluded.

  12. Human fear acquisition deficits in relation to genetic variants of the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 and the serotonin transporter--revisited.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Groenink, L; van Gool, J M; Domschke, K; Reif, A; Baas, J M P

    2016-02-01

    We recently showed that a genetic polymorphism (rs878886) in the human corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) is associated with reduced fear-conditioned responses to a threat cue. This is a potentially important finding considering that the failure to acquire fear contingencies can leave an individual in a maladaptive state of more generalized anxiety. Consistent with that idea, the CRHR1-dependent fear acquisition deficit translated into heightened contextual anxiety when taking genetic variability within the serotonin transporter long polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) into account. To replicate our previous findings, we conducted a replication study in 224 healthy medication-free human subjects using the exact same cue and context virtual reality fear-conditioning procedure as in study by Heitland et al. (2013). In the replication study, consistent with the original findings, CRHR1 rs878886 G-allele carriers showed reduced acquisition of cue-specific fear-conditioned responses compared with C/C homozygotes. Also, in this larger sample the cue acquisition deficit of G-allele carriers translated into heightened contextual anxiety, even independent of 5-HTT gene variation. In contrast to our earlier findings, there was an additional interaction effect of CRHR1 rs878886 and the triallelic 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 variant on cued fear acquisition. In summary, this study replicated the initially reported association of the CRHR1 rs878886 G-allele with cued fear acquisition deficits, albeit with a different pattern of results regarding the interaction with 5-HTT variation. This further supports the notion that the human corticotropin-releasing hormone plays a role in the acquisition of fears.

  13. A functional variant in the neuropeptide S receptor 1 gene moderates the influence of urban upbringing on stress processing in the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Streit, Fabian; Haddad, Leila; Paul, Torsten; Frank, Josef; Schäfer, Axel; Nikitopoulos, Jörg; Akdeniz, Ceren; Lederbogen, Florian; Treutlein, Jens; Witt, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Rietschel, Marcella; Kirsch, Peter; Wüst, Stefan

    2014-07-01

    We have previously shown that urban upbringing and city living were associated with stress-induced activity in the amygdala and the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC). This finding might link the epidemiological risk factor "urbanicity" to neurobiological mechanisms of psychiatric disorders. However, given the heritability of stress-related phenotypes, it appears likely that genetic factors can modulate the effect of urbanicity on social stress processing. In the present exploratory study, we investigated if a functional sequence variation in the neuropeptide S receptor gene (NPSR1 rs324981) is associated with brain activation patterns under acute psychosocial stress and if it modulates the link between urbanicity and central stress processing. In animals, neuropeptide S has strong anxiolytic effects and it induces hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation. In humans, rs324981 was found to be associated with anxiety and stress-related phenotypes. Forty-two subjects were exposed to a psychosocial stress task for scanner environments (ScanSTRESS). While no main effect of rs324981 on amygdala and pACC activity was detected, we found a distinct interaction between rs324981 and urban upbringing modulating right amygdala responses. Moreover, right amygdala responses were significantly higher in subjects who also showed a salivary cortisol response to the stress exposure. The present finding of a gene × environment interaction further supports the view that the brain NPS system is involved in central stress regulation. This study provides first evidence for the assumption that a NPSR1 variant modulates brain activation under stress, interacting with the environmental risk factor urban upbringing.

  14. The Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Variant rs2149356 and Risk of Gout in European and Polynesian Sample Sets

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Humaira; McKinney, Cushla; Stamp, Lisa K.; Dalbeth, Nicola; Topless, Ruth K.; Day, Richard; Kannangara, Diluk; Williams, Kenneth; Smith, Malcolm; Janssen, Matthijs; Jansen, Tim L.; Joosten, Leo A.; Radstake, Timothy R.; Riches, Philip L.; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Lioté, Frederic; Lu, Leo; Stahl, Eli A.; Choi, Hyon K.; So, Alexander; Merriman, Tony R.

    2016-01-01

    Deposition of crystallized monosodium urate (MSU) in joints as a result of hyperuricemia is a central risk factor for gout. However other factors must exist that control the progression from hyperuricaemia to gout. A previous genetic association study has implicated the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) which activates the NLRP3 inflammasome via the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway upon stimulation by MSU crystals. The T-allele of single nucleotide polymorphism rs2149356 in TLR4 is a risk factor associated with gout in a Chinese study. Our aim was to replicate this observation in participants of European and New Zealand Polynesian (Māori and Pacific) ancestry. A total of 2250 clinically-ascertained prevalent gout cases and 13925 controls were used. Non-clinically-ascertained incident gout cases and controls from the Health Professional Follow-up (HPFS) and Nurses Health Studies (NHS) were also used. Genotypes were derived from genome-wide genotype data or directly obtained using Taqman. Logistic regression analysis was done including age, sex, diuretic exposure and ancestry as covariates as appropriate. The T-allele increased the risk of gout in the clinically-ascertained European samples (OR = 1.12, P = 0.012) and decreased the risk of gout in Polynesians (OR = 0.80, P = 0.011). There was no evidence for association in the HPFS or NHS sample sets. In conclusion TLR4 SNP rs2143956 associates with gout risk in prevalent clinically-ascertained gout in Europeans, in a direction consistent with previously published results in Han Chinese. However, with an opposite direction of association in Polynesians and no evidence for association in a non-clinically-ascertained incident gout cohort this variant should be analysed in other international gout genetic data sets to determine if there is genuine evidence for association. PMID:26808548

  15. Loss of function of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) genetic variant is associated with lower risk of active childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Cantero-Recasens, Gerard; Gonzalez, Juan R; Fandos, César; Duran-Tauleria, Enric; Smit, Lidwien A M; Kauffmann, Francine; Antó, Josep M; Valverde, Miguel A

    2010-09-03

    Transient receptor potential cation channels of the vanilloid subfamily (TRPV) participate in the generation of Ca(2+) signals at different locations of the respiratory system, thereby controlling its correct functioning. TRPV1 expression and activity appear to be altered under pathophysiological conditions such as chronic cough and airway hypersensitivity, whereas TRPV4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, to date, there is no information about the genetic impact of either TRPV1 or TRPV4 on asthma pathophysiology. We now report on the association of two functional SNPs, TRPV1-I585V and TRPV4-P19S, with childhood asthma. Both SNPs were genotyped in a population of 470 controls without respiratory symptoms and 301 asthmatics. Although none of the SNPs modified the risk of suffering from asthma, carriers of the TRPV1-I585V genetic variant showed a lower risk of current wheezing (odds ratio = 0.51; p = 0.01), a characteristic of active asthma, or cough (odds ratio = 0.57; p = 0.02). Functional analysis of TRPV1-I585V, using the Ca(2+)-sensitive dye fura-2 to measure intracellular [Ca(2+)] concentrations, revealed a decreased channel activity in response to two typical TRPV1 stimuli, heat and capsaicin. On the other hand, TRPV4-P19S, despite its loss-of-channel function, showed no significant association with asthma or the presence of wheezing. Our data suggest that genetically determined level of TRPV1 activity is relevant for asthma pathophysiology.

  16. The variant N363S of glucocorticoid receptor in steroid-induced ocular hypertension in Hungarian patients treated with photorefractive keratectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borgulya, Gábor; Filkorn, Tamás; Majnik, Judit; Bányász, Ilona; Nagy, Zoltán Zsolt

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Variation in sensitivity to glucocorticoids observed in healthy population is influenced by genetic polymorphisms of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1). N363S, ER22/23EK, and Bcl I have been previously described as glucocorticoid-sensitivity modulating polymorphisms. We investigated whether these variants may contribute to steroid-induced ocular hypertension and if they play a role as protective or risk factors during exogenous glucocorticoid administration. Methods We examined 102 patients who underwent photorefractive keratectomy and received topical steroids (either fluorometholone 0.1% or prednisolone acetate 0.5% alone or combined) as part of postoperative therapy. The choice of steroid depended on course of wound healing and regression. Variations in intraocular pressure (IOP) levels in response to steroid therapy were observed. To genotype DNA, allele-specific PCR amplification was applied for the N363S polymorphism, and PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was performed to examine the Bcl I and the ER22/23EK polymorphisms. We separately analyzed data from three groups of patients: those who received fluorometholone only; those who were initially given fluorometholone then later switched to prednisolone acetate; and those who received prednisolone acetate only. Covariance analysis with forward stepwise variable selection was carried out. Results In cases where prednisolone acetate was administered, we found a significant correlation between N363S heterozygosity and steroid-induced ocular hypertension. ER22/23EK and Bcl I polymorphisms do not have a major influence on the risk of developing steroid-induced ocular hypertension. Conclusions Genotyping of high risk steroid responders may allow an individual therapy to avoid steroid-induced ocular hypertension. The N363S polymorphism may have a clinical significance in the future. PMID:17563720

  17. The variant hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 activates the P1 promoter of the human alpha-folate receptor gene in ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tomassetti, Antonella; Mangiarotti, Fabio; Mazzi, Mimma; Sforzini, Sabrina; Miotti, Silvia; Galmozzi, Enrico; Elwood, Patrick C; Canevari, Silvana

    2003-02-01

    The alpha folate receptor (alpha FR) is a membrane glycoprotein that binds folates, and mediates their uptake and that of antifolate drugs. alpha FR is absent on ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) but is detectable during early transforming events in this epithelium, with increasing expression levels in association with tumor progression. Analysis of transcriptional regulation of the alpha FR gene have revealed two promoter regions, P1 and P4, flanking exons 1 and 4, respectively, and a requirement for three SP1 sites and an INR element for optimal P4 activity. Here, we focused on the P1 transcription regulation in ovarian carcinoma cells. RNase protection assay indicated that the 5'-untranslated region is heterogeneous because of different start sites and alternative splicing of exon 3. A core region of the P1 promoter was sufficient for maximal promoter activity in ovarian carcinoma cell lines but not in OSE cells or in alpha FR-nonexpressing cell lines. Deletion and mutation analysis of this core promoter identified a cis-regulatory element at position +27 to +33 of the untranslated exon 1, which is responsible for maximum P1 activity. This element formed an abundant DNA-protein complex with nuclear proteins from ovarian cancer cells but not from other cell lines or OSE cells. Competition experiments and supershift assays demonstrated binding of the P1 cis-regulatory element by a transcription factor involved in embryonic development, the variant hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 (vHNF1). Analysis of RNA from various cell lines and surgical specimens confirmed that vHNF1 is expressed in ovarian carcinomas. Thus, vHNF1 regulates tissue-specific transcription in ovarian carcinoma.

  18. Growth suppression of human hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts by a monoclonal antibody CH12 directed to epidermal growth factor receptor variant III.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Huamao; Tan, Zhonghua; Hu, Suwen; Wang, Hai; Shi, Bizhi; Yang, Lin; Li, Peiyong; Gu, Jianren; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Zonghai

    2011-02-18

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered difficult to cure because it is resistant to radio- and chemotherapy and has a high recurrence rate after curative liver resection. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been reported to express in HCC tissues and cell lines. This article describes the efficacy of an anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (mAb CH12) in the treatment of HCC xenografts with EGFRvIII expression and the underlying mechanism of EGFRvIII as an oncogene in HCC. The results demonstrated that CH12 bound preferentially to EGFRvIII with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 1.346 nm/liter. In addition, CH12 induces strong antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity in Huh7-EGFRvIII (with exogenous expression of EGFRvIII) and SMMC-7721 (with endogenous expression of EGFRvIII) cells. Notably, CH12 significantly inhibited the growth of Huh7-EGFRvIII and SMMC-7721 xenografts in vivo with a growth inhibition ratio much higher than C225, a U. S. Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-EGFR antibody. Treatment of the two HCC xenografts with CH12 significantly suppressed tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. Mechanistically, in vivo treatment with CH12 reduced the phosphorylation of constitutively active EGFRvIII, Akt, and ERK. Down-regulation of the apoptotic protectors Bcl-x(L), Bcl-2, and the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, as well as up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27, were also observed after in vivo CH12 treatment. Collectively, these results indicate that the monoclonal antibody CH12 is a promising therapeutic agent for HCC with EGFRvIII expression.

  19. Growth Suppression of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Xenografts by a Monoclonal Antibody CH12 Directed to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Variant III*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Huamao; Tan, Zhonghua; Hu, Suwen; Wang, Hai; Shi, Bizhi; Yang, Lin; Li, Peiyong; Gu, Jianren; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Zonghai

    2011-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered difficult to cure because it is resistant to radio- and chemotherapy and has a high recurrence rate after curative liver resection. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been reported to express in HCC tissues and cell lines. This article describes the efficacy of an anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (mAb CH12) in the treatment of HCC xenografts with EGFRvIII expression and the underlying mechanism of EGFRvIII as an oncogene in HCC. The results demonstrated that CH12 bound preferentially to EGFRvIII with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.346 nm/liter. In addition, CH12 induces strong antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity in Huh7-EGFRvIII (with exogenous expression of EGFRvIII) and SMMC-7721 (with endogenous expression of EGFRvIII) cells. Notably, CH12 significantly inhibited the growth of Huh7-EGFRvIII and SMMC-7721 xenografts in vivo with a growth inhibition ratio much higher than C225, a U. S. Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-EGFR antibody. Treatment of the two HCC xenografts with CH12 significantly suppressed tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. Mechanistically, in vivo treatment with CH12 reduced the phosphorylation of constitutively active EGFRvIII, Akt, and ERK. Down-regulation of the apoptotic protectors Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, as well as up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27, were also observed after in vivo CH12 treatment. Collectively, these results indicate that the monoclonal antibody CH12 is a promising therapeutic agent for HCC with EGFRvIII expression. PMID:21163950

  20. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor expression in relation to visceral adipose depots, endocannabinoid levels, microvascular damage, and the presence of the Cnr1 A3813G variant in humans.

    PubMed

    Bordicchia, Marica; Battistoni, Ilaria; Mancinelli, Lucia; Giannini, Elena; Refi, Giada; Minardi, Daniele; Muzzonigro, Giovanni; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Montironi, Rodolfo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Petrosino, Stefania; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Rappelli, Alessandro; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Sarzani, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    Dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system in the visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is associated with metabolic and cardiovascular complications of obesity. We studied perirenal VAT CB1 receptor expression in relation to anthropometry, VAT area and endocannabinoid levels, kidney microvascular damage (MVDa), and the presence of the CB1 gene A3813G variant, the frequency of which was also evaluated in a large population of obese-hypertensive (OH) patients with or without the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Perirenal VAT and kidney samples were obtained from 30 patients undergoing renal surgery. Total and perirenal VAT areas were determined by computed tomography. CB1 messenger RNA expression and endocannabinoid levels in perirenal VAT were determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. The MVDa was evaluated in healthy portions of kidney cortex. The A3813G alleles were identified by genotyping in these patients and in 280 nondiabetic OH patients (age

  1. The Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Variant rs2149356 and Risk of Gout in European and Polynesian Sample Sets.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Humaira; McKinney, Cushla; Stamp, Lisa K; Dalbeth, Nicola; Topless, Ruth K; Day, Richard; Kannangara, Diluk; Williams, Kenneth; Smith, Malcolm; Janssen, Matthijs; Jansen, Tim L; Joosten, Leo A; Radstake, Timothy R; Riches, Philip L; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Lioté, Frederic; Lu, Leo; Stahl, Eli A; Choi, Hyon K; So, Alexander; Merriman, Tony R

    2016-01-01

    Deposition of crystallized monosodium urate (MSU) in joints as a result of hyperuricemia is a central risk factor for gout. However other factors must exist that control the progression from hyperuricaemia to gout. A previous genetic association study has implicated the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) which activates the NLRP3 inflammasome via the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway upon stimulation by MSU crystals. The T-allele of single nucleotide polymorphism rs2149356 in TLR4 is a risk factor associated with gout in a Chinese study. Our aim was to replicate this observation in participants of European and New Zealand Polynesian (Māori and Pacific) ancestry. A total of 2250 clinically-ascertained prevalent gout cases and 13925 controls were used. Non-clinically-ascertained incident gout cases and controls from the Health Professional Follow-up (HPFS) and Nurses Health Studies (NHS) were also used. Genotypes were derived from genome-wide genotype data or directly obtained using Taqman. Logistic regression analysis was done including age, sex, diuretic exposure and ancestry as covariates as appropriate. The T-allele increased the risk of gout in the clinically-ascertained European samples (OR = 1.12, P = 0.012) and decreased the risk of gout in Polynesians (OR = 0.80, P = 0.011). There was no evidence for association in the HPFS or NHS sample sets. In conclusion TLR4 SNP rs2143956 associates with gout risk in prevalent clinically-ascertained gout in Europeans, in a direction consistent with previously published results in Han Chinese. However, with an opposite direction of association in Polynesians and no evidence for association in a non-clinically-ascertained incident gout cohort this variant should be analysed in other international gout genetic data sets to determine if there is genuine evidence for association.

  2. Coactivator Recruitment of AhR/ARNT1

    PubMed Central

    Endler, Alexander; Chen, Li; Shibasaki, Futoshi

    2014-01-01

    A common feature of nuclear receptors (NRs) is the transformation of external cell signals into specific transcriptions of the signal molecule. Signal molecules function as ligands for NRs and, after their uptake, activated NRs form homo- or heterodimers at promoter recognition sequences of the specific genes in the nucleus. Another common feature of NRs is their dependence on coactivators, which bridge the basic transcriptional machinery and other cofactors to the target genes, in order to initiate transcription and to unwind histone-bound DNA for exposing additional promoter recognition sites via their histone acetyltransferase (HAT) function. In this review, we focus on our recent findings related to the recruitment of steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC1/NCoA1) by the estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and by the arylhydrocarbon receptor/arylhydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator 1 (AhR/ARNT1) complex. We also describe the extension of our previously published findings regarding the binding between ARNT1.1 exon16 and SRC1e exon 21, via in silico analyses of androgen receptor (AR) NH2-carboxyl-terminal interactions, the results of which were verified by in vitro experiments. Based on these data, we suggest a newly derived tentative binding site of nuclear coactivator 2/glucocorticoid receptor interacting protein-1/transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (NCOA-2/ GRIP-1/TIF-2) for ARNT1.1 exon 16. Furthermore, results obtained by immunoprecipitation have revealed a second leucine-rich binding site for hARNT1.1 exon 16 in SRC1e exon 21 (LSSTDLL). Finally, we discuss the role of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) as an endocrine disruptor for estrogen related transcription. PMID:24950180

  3. Missense splice variant (g.20746A>G, p.Ile183Val) of interferon gamma receptor 1 (IFNGR1) coincidental with mycobacterial osteomyelitis - a screen of osteoarticular lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bińczak-Kuleta, Agnieszka; Szwed, Aleksander; Walter, Mark R.; Kołban, Maciej; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Clark, Jeremy S. C.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, dominant partial interferon-gamma receptor 1 (IFN-γ-R1) susceptibility to environmental mycobacteria was found with IFNGR1 deletions or premature stop. Our aim was to search for IFNGR1 variants in patients with mycobacterial osteoarticular lesions. Biopsies from the patients were examined for acid-fast bacilli, inflammatory cell infiltration, and mycobacterial niacin. Mycobacterial rRNA was analyzed using a target-amplified rRNA probe test. Peripheral-blood-leukocyte genomic DNA was isolated from 19 patients using the QIAamp DNA Mini Kit, and all IFNGR1 exons were sequenced using an ABIPRISM 3130 device. After the discovery of an exon 5 variant, a Polish newborn population sample (n = 100) was assayed for the discovered variant. Splice sites and putative amino acid interactions were analyzed. All patients tested were positive for mycobacteria; one was heterozygous for the IFNGR1 exon 5 single-nucleotide-missense substitution (g.20746A>G, p.Ile183Val). No other variant was found. The splice analysis indicated the creation of an exonic splicing silencer, and alternatively, molecular graphics indicated that the p.Ile183Val might alter beta-strand packing (loss of van der Waals contacts; Val183/Pro205), possibly altering the IFN-γ-R1/IFN-γ-R2 interaction. The probability of non-deleterious variant was estimated as <10%. Heterozygous IFNGR1:p.Ile183Val (frequency 0.003%) was found to be coincidental with mycobacterial osteomyelitis. The small amount of variation detected in the patients with osteoarticular lesions indicates that screens should not yet be restricted: Intronic variants should be analyzed as well as the other genes affecting Type 1 T-helper-cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27356097

  4. AH Draconis - a tale of two periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, D.

    2010-04-01

    Using BAA data from the past 37 years, the SRb variable star AH Dra is found to have two slightly variable periods of around 105 and 189 days and a range of magnitude 7.0 to 8.9. This is in contrast to the GCVS period of 158 days and range of 8.5-9.3.

  5. A Study on Genetic Variants of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 (FGFR2) and the Risk of Breast Cancer from North India

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Sarah; Chattopadhyay, Shilpi; Akhtar, Md. Salman; Najm, Mohammad Zeeshan; Deo, S. V. S.; Shukla, N. K.; Husain, Syed Akhtar

    2014-01-01

    Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have identified Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) as a candidate gene for breast cancer with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in intron 2 region as the susceptibility loci strongly associated with the risk. However, replicate studies have often failed to extrapolate the association to diverse ethnic regions. This hints towards the existing heterogeneity among different populations, arising due to differential linkage disequilibrium (LD) structures and frequencies of SNPs within the associated regions of the genome. It is therefore important to revisit the previously linked candidates in varied population groups to unravel the extent of heterogeneity. In an attempt to investigate the role of FGFR2 polymorphisms in susceptibility to the risk of breast cancer among North Indian women, we genotyped rs2981582, rs1219648, rs2981578 and rs7895676 polymorphisms in 368 breast cancer patients and 484 healthy controls by Polymerase chain reaction-Restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. We observed a statistically significant association with breast cancer risk for all the four genetic variants (P<0.05). In per-allele model for rs2981582, rs1219648, rs7895676 and in dominant model for rs2981578, association remained significant after bonferroni correction (P<0.0125). On performing stratified analysis, significant correlations with various clinicopathological as well as environmental and lifestyle characteristics were observed. It was evident that rs1219648 and rs2981578 interacted with exogenous hormone use and advanced clinical stage III (after Bonferroni correction, P<0.000694), respectively. Furthermore, combined analysis on these four loci revealed that compared to women with 0–1 risk loci, those with 2–4 risk loci had increased risk (OR = 1.645, 95%CI = 1.152–2.347, P = 0.006). In haplotype analysis, for rs2981578, rs2981582 and rs1219648, risk haplotype (GTG) was

  6. DNA methylation and single nucleotide variants in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and oxytocin receptor (OXTR) genes are associated with anxiety/depression in older women

    PubMed Central

    Chagnon, Yvon C.; Potvin, Olivier; Hudon, Carol; Préville, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Environmental effects and personal experiences could be expressed in individuals through epigenetic non-structural changes such as DNA methylation. This methylation could up- regulate or down-regulate corresponding gene expressions and modify related phenotypes. DNA methylation increases with aging and could be related to the late expression of some forms of mental disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between anxiety disorders and/or depression in older women and DNA methylation for four genes related to anxiety or depression. Methods: Women aged 65 and older with (n = 19) or without (n = 24) anxiety disorders and/or major depressive episode (DSM-IV), were recruited. DNA methylation and single nucleotide variant (SNV) were evaluated from saliva, respectively by pyrosequencing and by PCR, for the following genes: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; rs6265), oxytocin receptor (OXTR; rs53576), serotonin transporter (SLC6A4; rs25531), and apolipoprotein E (APOE; rs429358 and rs7412). Results: A greater BDNF DNA methylation was observed in subjects with anxiety/depression compared to control group subjects (Mean: 2.92 SD ± 0.74 vs. 2.34 ± 0.42; p= 0.0026). This difference was more pronounced in subjects carrying the BDNF rs6265 CT genotype (2.99 ± 0.41 vs. 2.27 ± 0.26; p= 0.0006) than those carrying the CC genotype (p= 0.0332); no subjects with the TT genotype were observed. For OXTR, a greater DNA methylation was observed in subjects with anxiety/depression, but only for those carrying the AA genotype of the OXTR rs53576 SNV, more particularly at one out of the seven CpGs studied (7.01 ± 0.94 vs. 4.44 ± 1.11; p= 0.0063). No significant differences were observed for APOE and SLC6A4. Conclusion: These results suggest that DNA methylation in interaction with SNV variations in BDNF and OXTR, are associated with the occurrence of anxiety/depression in older women. PMID:26175754

  7. NF-κB and Androgen Receptor Variant 7 Induce Expression of SRD5A Isoforms and Confer 5ARI Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Austin, David C.; Strand, Douglas W.; Love, Harold L.; Franco, Omar E.; Grabowska, Magdalena M.; Miller, Nicole L.; Hameed, Omar; Clark, Peter E.; Matusik, Robert J.; Jin, Ren J.; Hayward, Simon W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is treated with 5α-reductase inhibitors (5ARI). These drugs inhibit the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone resulting in apoptosis and prostate shrinkage. Most patients initially respond to 5ARIs; however, failure is common especially in inflamed prostates, and often results in surgery. This communication examines a link between activation of NF-κB and increased expression of SRD5A2 as a potential mechanism by which patients fail 5ARI therapy. METHODS Tissue was collected from “Surgical” patients, treated specifically for lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to advanced BPH; and, cancer free transition zone from “Incidental” patients treated for low grade, localized peripheral zone prostate cancer. Clinical, molecular and histopathological profiles were analyzed. Human prostatic stromal and epithelial cell lines were genetically modified to regulate NF-κB activity, androgen receptor (AR) full length (AR-FL), and AR variant 7 (AR-V7) expression. RESULTS SRD5A2 is upregulated in advanced BPH. SRD5A2 was significantly associated with prostate volume determined by Transrectal Ultrasound (TRUS), and with more severe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) determined by American Urological Association Symptom Score (AUASS). Synthesis of androgens was seen in cells in which NF-κB was activated. AR-FL and AR-V7 expression increased SRD5A2 expression while forced activation of NF-κB increased all three SRD5A isoforms. Knockdown of SRD5A2 in the epithelial cells resulted in significant reduction in proliferation, AR target gene expression, and response to testosterone (T). In tissue recombinants, canonical NF-κB activation in prostatic epithelium elevated all three SRD5A isoforms and resulted in in vivo growth under castrated conditions. CONCLUSION Increased BPH severity in patients correlates with SRD5A2 expression. We demonstrate that NF-κB and AR-V7 upregulate SRD5A expression providing a mechanism

  8. Evidence that the 5p12 Variant rs10941679 Confers Susceptibility to Estrogen-Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer through FGF10 and MRPS30 Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ghoussaini, Maya; French, Juliet D; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Nord, Silje; Beesley, Jonathan; Canisus, Sander; Hillman, Kristine M; Kaufmann, Susanne; Sivakumaran, Haran; Moradi Marjaneh, Mahdi; Lee, Jason S; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dicks, Ed; Milne, Roger L; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Alonso, M Rosario; Pita, Guillermo; Neuhausen, Susan L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Wu, Anna H; Van Den Berg, David; Lambrechts, Diether; Floris, Giuseppe; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J; Hallberg, Emily; Giles, Graham G; Haiman, Christopher A; Le Marchand, Loic; Goldberg, Mark S; Teo, Soo H; Yip, Cheng Har; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Cai, Qiuyin; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Andrulis, Irene L; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Brand, Judith S; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J; Koppert, Linetta B; Li, Jingmei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zheng, Ying; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Shah, Mitul; Rhenius, Valerie; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Kang, Daehee; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Luccarini, Craig; Conroy, Don M; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul D P; Kristensen, Vessela; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M; Edwards, Stacey L

    2016-10-06

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed increased breast cancer risk associated with multiple genetic variants at 5p12. Here, we report the fine mapping of this locus using data from 104,660 subjects from 50 case-control studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). With data for 3,365 genotyped and imputed SNPs across a 1 Mb region (positions 44,394,495-45,364,167; NCBI build 37), we found evidence for at least three independent signals: the strongest signal, consisting of a single SNP rs10941679, was associated with risk of estrogen-receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancer (per-g allele OR ER(+) = 1.15; 95% CI 1.13-1.18; p = 8.35 × 10(-30)). After adjustment for rs10941679, we detected signal 2, consisting of 38 SNPs more strongly associated with ER-negative (ER(-)) breast cancer (lead SNP rs6864776: per-a allele OR ER(-) = 1.10; 95% CI 1.05-1.14; p conditional = 1.44 × 10(-12)), and a single signal 3 SNP (rs200229088: per-t allele OR ER(+) = 1.12; 95% CI 1.09-1.15; p conditional = 1.12 × 10(-05)). Expression quantitative trait locus analysis in normal breast tissues and breast tumors showed that the g (risk) allele of rs10941679 was associated with increased expression of FGF10 and MRPS30. Functional assays demonstrated that SNP rs10941679 maps to an enhancer element that physically interacts with the FGF10 and MRPS30 promoter regions in breast cancer cell lines. FGF10 is an oncogene that binds to FGFR2 and is overexpressed in ∼10% of human breast cancers, whereas MRPS30 plays a key role in apoptosis. These data suggest that the strongest signal of association at 5p12 is mediated through coordinated activation of FGF10 and MRPS30, two candidate genes for breast cancer pathogenesis.

  9. Presence of sst5TMD4, a truncated splice variant of the somatostatin receptor subtype 5, is associated to features of increased aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Villa-Osaba, Alicia; Adrados, Magdalena; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Martín-Pérez, Elena; Culler, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are rare and heterogeneous tumors, and their biological behavior is not well known. We studied the presence and potential functional roles of somatostatin receptors (sst1-5), focusing particularly on the truncated variants (sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5) and on their relationships with the angiogenic system (Ang/Tie-2 and VEGF) in human GEP-NETs. Experimental Design We evaluated 42 tumor tissue samples (26 primary/16 metastatic) from 26 patients with GEP-NETs, and 30 non-tumoral tissues (26 from adjacent non-tumor regions and 4 from normal controls) from a single center. Expression of sst1-5, sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5, Ang1-2, Tie-2 and VEGF was analyzed using real-time qPCR, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. Expression levels were associated with tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes. Functional role of sst5TMD4 was analyzed in GEP-NET cell lines. Results sst1 exhibited the highest expression in GEP-NET, whilst sst2 was the most frequently observed sst-subtype (90.2%). Expression levels of sst1, sst2, sst3, sst5TMD4, and sst5TMD5 were significantly higher in tumor tissues compared to their adjacent non-tumoral tissue. Lymph-node metastases expressed higher levels of sst5TMD4 than in its corresponding primary tumor tissue. sst5TMD4 was also significantly higher in intestinal tumor tissues from patients with residual disease of intestinal origin compared to those with non-residual disease. Functional assays demonstrated that the presence of sst5TMD4 was associated to enhanced malignant features in GEP-NET cells. Angiogenic markers correlated positively with sst5TMD4, which was confirmed by immunohistochemical/fluorescence studies. Conclusions sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in GEP-NETs and is associated to enhanced aggressiveness, suggesting its potential value as biomarker and target in GEP-NETs. PMID:26673010

  10. A single amino acid controls the functional switch of human constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) 1 to the xenobiotic-sensitive splicing variant CAR3.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Tompkins, Leslie M; Li, Linhao; Li, Haishan; Kim, Gregory; Zheng, Yuxin; Wang, Hongbing

    2010-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is constitutively activated in immortalized cell lines independent of xenobiotic stimuli. This feature of CAR has limited its use as a sensor for xenobiotic-induced expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Recent reports, however, reveal that a splicing variant of human CAR (hCAR3), which contains an insertion of five amino acids (APYLT), exhibits low basal but xenobiotic-inducible activities in cell-based reporter assays. Nonetheless, the underlying mechanisms of this functional shift are not well understood. We have now generated chimeric constructs containing various residues of the five amino acids of hCAR3 and examined their response to typical hCAR activators. Our results showed that the retention of alanine (hCAR1+A) alone is sufficient to confer the constitutively activated hCAR1 to the xenobiotic-sensitive hCAR3. It is noteworthy that hCAR1+A was significantly activated by a series of known hCAR activators, and displayed activation superior to that of hCAR3. Moreover, intracellular localization assays revealed that hCAR1+A exhibits nuclear accumulation upon 6-(4-chlorophenyl) imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde-O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl) oxime (CITCO) treatment in COS1 cells, which differs from the spontaneous nuclear distribution of hCAR1 and the nontranslocatable hCAR3. Mammalian two-hybrid and glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays further demonstrated that hCAR1+A interacts with the coactivator SRC-1 and GRIP-1 at low level before activation, while at significantly enhanced level in the presence of CITCO. Thus, the alanine residue in the insertion of hCAR3 seems in charge of the xenobiotic response of hCAR3 through direct and indirect mechanisms. Activation of hCAR1+A may represent a sensitive avenue for the identification of hCAR activators.

  11. Variants in the vitamin D pathway, serum levels of vitamin D, and estrogen receptor negative breast cancer among African-American women: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction American women of African ancestry (AA) are more likely than European Americans (EA) to have estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer. 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) is low in AAs, and was associated with ER-negative tumors in EAs. We hypothesized that racial differences in 25OHD levels, as well as in inherited genetic variations, may contribute, in part, to the differences in tumor characteristics. Methods In a case (n = 928)-control (n = 843) study of breast cancer in AA and EA women, we measured serum 25OHD levels in controls and tested associations between risk and tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in VDR, CYP24A1 and CYP27B1, particularly by ER status. Results More AAs had severe vitamin D deficiency (< 10 ng/ml) than EAs (34.3% vs 5.9%), with lowest levels among those with the highest African ancestry. Associations for SNPs differed by race. Among AAs, VDR SNP rs2239186, associated with higher serum levels of 25OHD, decreased risk after correction for multiple testing (OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.31-0.79, p by permutation = 0.03), but had no effect in EAs. The majority of associations were for ER-negative breast cancer, with seven differential associations between AA and EA women for CYP24A1 (p for interaction < 0.10). SNP rs27622941 was associated with a > twofold increased risk of ER-negative breast cancer among AAs (OR = 2.62, 95% CI = 1.38-4.98), but had no effect in EAs. rs2209314 decreased risk among EAs (OR = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.20-0.73), with no associations in AAs. The increased risk of ER-negative breast cancer in AAs compared to EAs was reduced and became non-significant (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 0.80-1.79) after adjusting for these two CYP24A1 SNPs. Conclusions These data suggest that genetic variants in the vitamin D pathway may be related to the higher prevalence of ER-negative breast cancer in AA women. PMID:22480149

  12. NcoA2-Dependent Inhibition of HIF-1α Activation Is Regulated via AhR.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chi-Hao; Li, Ching-Hao; Liao, Po-Lin; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Shih-Hsuan; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2015-12-01

    High endogenous levels of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) contribute to hypoxia signaling pathway inhibition following exposure to the potent AhR ligand benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and could alter cellular homeostasis and disease condition. Increasing evidence indicates that AhR might compete with AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) for complex formation with hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) for transactivation, which could alter several physiological variables. Nuclear receptor coactivator 2 (NcoA2) is a transcription coactivator that regulates transcription factor activation and inhibition of basic helix-loop-helix Per (Period)-ARNT-SIM (single-minded) (bHLH-PAS) family proteins, such as HIF-1α, ARNT, and AhR, through protein-protein interactions. In this study, we demonstrated that both hypoxia and hypoxia-mimic conditions decreased NcoA2 protein expression in HEK293T cells. Hypoxia response element (HRE) and xenobiotic-responsive element (XRE) transactivation also were downregulated with NcoA2 knockdown under hypoxic conditions. In addition, B[a]P significantly decreased NcoA2 protein expression be accompanied with AhR degradation. We next evaluated whether the absence of AhR could affect NcoA2 protein function under hypoxia-mimetic conditions. NcoA2 and HIF-1α nuclear localization decreased in both B[a]P-pretreated and AhR-knockdown HepG2 cells under hypoxia-mimic conditions. Interestingly, NcoA2 overexpression downregulated HRE transactivation by competing with HIF-1α and AhR to form protein complexes with ARNT. Both NcoA2 knockdown and overexpression inhibited endothelial cell tube formation in vitro. We also demonstrated using the in vivo plug assay that NcoA2-regulated vascularization decreased in mice. Taken together, these results revealed a biphasic role of NcoA2 between AhR and hypoxic conditions, thus providing a novel mechanism underlying the cross talk between AhR and hypoxia that affects disease development and progression.

  13. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  14. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  15. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  16. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  17. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  18. In-flight AHS MTF measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallefont-Robinet, Françoise; Fontanilles, Guillaume; de Miguel, Eduardo

    2008-10-01

    The disposal of couples of images of the same landscape acquired with two spatial resolutions gives the opportunity to assess the in-flight Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of the lower resolution sensor in the common spectral bands. For each couple, the higher resolution image stands for the landscape so that the ratio of the spectra obtained by FFT of the two images, gives the lower resolution sensor MTF. This paper begins with a brief recall of the method including the aliasing correction. The next step presents the data to be processed, provided by the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA). The model of the AHS MTF is described. The presentation of the corresponding AHS results naturally follows. Last part of the paper consists in a comparison with other measurements: measurements obtained with the edge method and laboratory measurements.

  19. Regulatory crosstalk and interference between the xenobiotic and hypoxia sensing pathways at the AhR-ARNT-HIF1α signaling node