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Sample records for ah-1 cobra helicopter

  1. Experimental Analysis of Steady-State Maneuvering Effects on Transmission Vibration Patterns Recorded in an AH-1 Cobra Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Edward M.; Dzwonczyk, Mark; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Flight experiment was designed primarily to determine the extent to which steady-state maneuvers influence characteristic vibration patterns measured at the input pinion and output annulus gear locations of the main transmission. If results were to indicate that maneuvers systematically influence vibration patterns, more extensive studies would be planned to explore the response surface. It was also designed to collect baseline data for comparison with experimental data to be recorded at a later date from test stands at Glenn Research Center. Finally, because this was the first vibration flight study on the Cobra aircraft, considerable energy was invested in developing an in-flight recording apparatus, as well as exploring acceleration mounting methods, and generally learning about the overall vibratory characteristics of the aircraft itself.

  2. Simulator Sickness in the AH-1S (Cobra) Flight Simulator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Postural stability ........................................ 38 Correlations .............................................. 38 Pilot variables...in seven helicopter simulators ...................... 34 4. Pre- and post-SSQ means (standard deviations) and paired t-test values...nausea (Kennedy and Frank, 1986). Postural changes occur during and after exposure. Other signs (Colehour and Graybiel, 1966; McClure and Fregly, 1972

  3. Development, documentation and correlation of a NASTRAN vibration model of the AH-1G helicopter airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronkhite, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    NASTRAN was evaluated for vibration analysis of the helicopter airframe. The first effort involved development of a NASTRAN model of the AH-1G helicopter airframe and comprehensive documentation of the model. The next effort was to assess the validity of the NASTRAN model by comparisons with static and vibration tests.

  4. Calculation of flight vibration levels of the AH-1G helicopter and correlation with existing flight vibration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ditaranto, R. A.; Sankewitsch, V.

    1989-01-01

    Boeing Helicopters, together with other U.S. Helicopter manufacturers, participated in a finite element applications program to give the United States a superior capability to utilize finite element analysis models in support of helicopter airframe design. The program was sponsored by the NASA Langley Research Center. Under this program, an activity was sponsored to evaluate existing analysis methods applicable to calculate coupled rotor-airframe vibrations. The helicopter used in this evaluation was the AH-1G helicopter. The results of the Boeing Helicopters efforts are summarized. The planned analytical procedure is reviewed. Changes to the planned procedure are discussed, and results of the correlation study are presented.

  5. Investigation of difficult component effects on FEM vibration prediction for the AH-1G helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, Robert V.

    1988-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations program, a series of ground vibration tests and NASTRAN finite element model correlations were conducted on the Bell AH-1G helicopter gunship to investigate the effects of difficult components on the vibration response of the airframe. Secondary structure and damping were found to have significant effects on the frequency response of the airframe above 15 Hz. The nonlinear effects of thrust stiffening and elastomeric mounts on the low-frequency pylon modes below the main rotor were also significant.

  6. Calculation of flight vibration levels of the AH-1G helicopter and correlation with existing flight vibration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sopher, R.; Twomey, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Langley is sponsoring a rotorcraft structural dynamics program with the objective to establish in the U.S. a superior capability to utilize finite element analysis models for calculations to support industrial design of helicopter airframe structures. In the initial phase of the program, teams from the major U.S. manufacturers of helicopter airframes will apply extant finite element analysis methods to calculate loads and vibrations of helicopter airframes, and perform correlations between analysis and measurements. The aforementioned rotorcraft structural dynamics program was given the acronym DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Method for Vibrations). Sikorsky's RDYNE Rotorcraft Dynamics Analysis used for the correlation study, the specifics of the application of RDYNE to the AH-1G, and comparisons of the predictions of the method with flight data for loads and vibrations on the AH-1G are described. RDYNE was able to predict trends of variations of loads and vibrations with airspeed, but in some instances magnitudes differed from measured results by factors of two or three to one. Sensitivities were studied of predictions to rotor inflow modeling, effects of torsional modes, number of blade bending modes, fuselage structural damping, and hub modal content.

  7. Coupled rotor/fuselage dynamic analysis of the AH-1G helicopter and correlation with flight vibrations data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, J. C.; Cronkhite, J. D.; Dompka, R. V.; Perry, K. S.; Rogers, J. P.; Sadler, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    Under a research program designated Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS (DAMVIBS), existing analytical methods are used for calculating coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations of the AH-1G helicopter for correlation with flight test data from an AH-1G Operational Load Survey (OLS) test program. The analytical representation of the fuselage structure is based on a NASTRAN finite element model (FEM), which has been developed, extensively documented, and correlated with ground vibration test. One procedure that was used for predicting coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations using the advanced Rotorcraft Flight Simulation Program C81 and NASTRAN is summarized. Detailed descriptions of the analytical formulation of rotor dynamics equations, fuselage dynamic equations, coupling between the rotor and fuselage, and solutions to the total system of equations in C81 are included. Analytical predictions of hub shears for main rotor harmonics 2p, 4p, and 6p generated by C81 are used in conjunction with 2p OLS measured control loads and a 2p lateral tail rotor gearbox force, representing downwash impingement on the vertical fin, to excite the NASTRAN model. NASTRAN is then used to correlate with measured OLS flight test vibrations. Blade load comparisons predicted by C81 showed good agreement. In general, the fuselage vibration correlations show good agreement between anslysis and test in vibration response through 15 to 20 Hz.

  8. Predicting Radiation Induced Performance Decrements of AH-1 Helicopter Crews. Volume 1. Predicted Versus Actual Performance of AH-1 Crews Induced with Symptons Simulating Radiation Sickness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    principal method under study was the Performance Decrement Questionnaire, developed as part of DNA’s Intermediate Dose Program. A secondary aspect of...3) Develop MicroSAINT models of AH-1 crew performance based on simulation data and PDQ estimates, and (4) Evaluate the relationship between Walter...48 5.2 Approach ...................................................................................................... 49 5.3 Model Development

  9. Helicopter Antitank Weapons System: AH-1Q or OH-58Q?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-06

    used a laser semiactive fire and forget missile (Hornet), the results tend to corrobarate other studies and provided time factor charts and...Firing a Laser Semiactive Fire and Forget Missile. 3 April 1972. 88 . Tactical Operations Assessment. Attack Helicopter-Daylight D^nse"E^p...to prevent blast damage to the fuselage. Other equipment includes a telescopic gyxb- stabilized sight, guidance and control equipment

  10. A NASTRAN Vibration Model of the AH-1G Helicopter Airframe. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    ACCESSION NO 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE fand Sub(ltl*> A NASTRAN VIBRATION "lODEL OF TUE AU-IG HELICOPTER AIRFRAME VOLUIE I OF TVJO...Half Drive Snaft (AN 30051) = 1.55 lb - Transmitter Dual Tachometer (AN 3<.Ü54) = 0.80 lb Total Engine Weight = 585.35 ib 4-2

  11. AH-1S communication switch integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, Loran; Szoboszlay, Zoltan; Shively, Robert; Bick, Frank J.

    1989-01-01

    The C-6533/ARC communication system as installed on the test AH-1E Cobra helicopter was modified to allow discrete radio selection of all aircraft radios at the cyclic radio/intercommunication system switch. The current Cobra-fleet use of the C-6533 system is cumbersome, particularly during low-altitude operations. Operationally, the current system C-6533 configuration and design requires the pilot to estimate when he can safely remove his hand from an active flight control to select radios during low-altitude flight. The pilot must then physically remove his hand from the flight control, look inside the cockpit to select and verify the radio selection and then effect the selected radio transmission by activating the radio/ICS switch on the cyclic. This condition is potentially hazardous, especially during low-level flight at night in degraded weather. To improve pilot performance, communications effectiveness, and safety, manprint principles were utilized in the selection of a design modification. The modified C-6533 design was kept as basic as possible for potential Cobra-fleet modification. The communications system was modified and the design was subsequently flight-tested by the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate and NASA at the NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California. The design modification enables the Cobra pilot to maintain hands-on flight controls while selecting radios during nap-of-the-Earth (NOE) flight without looking inside the cockpit which resulted in reduced pilot workload ratings, better pilot handling quality ratings and increased flight safety for the NOE flight environment.

  12. Investigation of difficult component effects on finite element model vibration prediction for the Bell AH-1G helicopter. Volume 1: Ground vibration test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, R. V.

    1989-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS (DAMVIBS) program, a series of ground vibration tests and NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) correlations were conducted on the Bell AH-1G helicopter gunship to investigate the effects of difficult components on the vibration response of the airframe. Previous correlations of the AH-1G showed good agreement between NASTRAN and tests through 15 to 20 Hz, but poor agreement in the higher frequency range of 20 to 30 Hz. Thus, this effort emphasized the higher frequency airframe vibration response correlations and identified areas that need further R and T work. To conduct the investigations, selected difficult components (main rotor pylon, secondary structure, nonstructural doors/panels, landing gear, engine, fuel, etc.) were systematically removed to quantify their effects on overall vibratory response of the airframe. The entire effort was planned and documented, and the results reviewed by NASA and industry experts in order to ensure scientific control of the testing, analysis, and correlation exercise. In particular, secondary structure and damping had significant effects on the frequency response of the airframe above 15 Hz. Also, the nonlinear effects of thrust stiffening and elastomer mounts were significant on the low frequency pylon modes below main rotor 1p (5.4 Hz). The results of the ground vibration testing are presented.

  13. Prediction of Rotor Wake Induced Flow Along the Rocket Trajectories of an Army AH-1G Helicopter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-01

    Ar R it At Trajectories -- 30 Kt, Distorted Wake. Figure 50. Va~ritA’.1n of Instantaneous v~ Velocity Cooponent With Rotor Position for the Four...particularly at the low helicopter flight speeds at which rockets are to be fired in accordance vith current Amny tactical concepts. For many years...velocities are described in References 1 through 10. References 1 through 3 represent previous efforts in this field which were supported by the Dept. of

  14. Cobra communications switch integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, Robert J.; Haworth, Loran A.; Szoboszlay, Zoltan; Murray, F. Gerald

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes a design modification to reduce the visual and manual workload associated with the radio selection and communications tasks in the U.S. Army AH-1 Cobra helicopter. The modification involves the integration of the radio selection and microphone actuating tasks into a single operation controlled by the transmit-intercom switch. Ground-based and flight tests were conducted to evaluate the modified configuration during twelve flight tasks. The results show that the proposed configuration performs twice as fast as the original configuration.

  15. Correlation of AH-1G helicopter flight vibration data and tailboom static test data with NASTRAN analytical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronkhite, J. D.; Wilson, H. E.; Berry, V. L.

    1976-01-01

    Level flight airframe vibration at main rotor excitation frequencies was calculated. A NASTRAN tailboom analysis was compared with test data for evaluation of methods used to determine effective skin in a semimonocoque sheet-stringer structure. The flight vibration correlation involved comparison of level flight vibration for two helicopter configurations: clean wing, at light gross weight and wing stores at heavy gross weight. In the tailboom correlation, deflections and internal loads were compared using static test data and a NASTRAN analysis. An iterative procedure was used to determine the amount of effective skin of buckled panels under compression load.

  16. Summary of the modeling and test correlations of a NASTRAN finite element vibrations model for the AH-1G helicopter, task 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronkhite, J. D.; Berry, V. L.; Dompka, R. V.

    1987-01-01

    The AH-1G NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) is described and the correlations with measured data that were conducted to verify the model are summarized. Comparisons of the AH-1G NASTRAN FEM calculations with measured data include the following: (1) fuselage and tailboom static load deflection (stiffness) testing, (2) airframe ground vibration testing (0-30 H<), (3) airframe flight vibration testing (main rotor, 2,4, and 6/rev), and (4) tailboom effective skin static testing. A description of the modeling rationale and techniques used to develop the NASTRAN FEM is presented in conjunction with all previous correlation work. In general, the correlations show good agreement between analysis and test in stiffness and vibration response through 15 to 20 Hz. For higher frequencies (equal to or greater than 4/rev (21.6 Hz)), the vibration responses generally did not agree well. Also, the lateral (2/rev (10.8 Hz)) flight vibration responses were much lower in the FEM than test, indicating that there is a significant excitation source other than at the main rotor hub that is affecting the lateral vibrations, such as downwash impingement on the vertical tail.

  17. Hot gas ingestion effects on fuel control surge recovery and AH-1 rotor drive train torque spikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokarski, Frank; Desai, Mihir; Books, Martin; Zagranski, Raymond

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the work accomplished through computer simulation to understand the impact of the hydromechanical turbine assembly (TA) fuel control on rocket gas ingestion induced engine surges on the AH-1 (Cobra) helicopter. These surges excite the lightly damped torsional modes of the Cobra rotor drive train and can cause overtorqueing of the tail rotor shaft. The simulation studies show that the hydromechanical TA control has a negligible effect on drive train resonances because its response is sufficiently attenuated at the resonant frequencies. However, a digital electronic control working through the TA control's separate, emergency fuel metering system has been identified as a solution to the overtorqueing problem. State-of-the-art software within the electronic control can provide active damping of the rotor drive train to eliminate excessive torque spikes due to any disturbances including engine surges and aggressive helicopter maneuvers. Modifications to the existing TA hydromechanical control are relatively minor, and existing engine sensors can be utilized by the electronic control. Therefore, it is concluded that the combination of full authority digital electronic control (FADEC) with hydromechanical backup using the existing TA control enhances flight safety, improves helicopter performance, reduces pilot workload, and provides a substantial payback for very little investment.

  18. Summary of AH-1G flight vibration data for validation of coupled rotor-fuselage analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, R. V.; Cronkhite, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Under a NASA research program designated DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS), four U. S. helicopter industry participants (Bell Helicopter, Boeing Vertol, McDonnell Douglas Helicopter, and Sikorsky Aircraft) are to apply existing analytical methods for calculating coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations of the AH-1G helicopter for correlation with flight test data from an AH-1G Operational Load Survey (OLS) test program. Bell Helicopter, as the manufacturer of the AH-1G, was asked to provide pertinent rotor data and to collect the OLS flight vibration data needed to perform the correlations. The analytical representation of the fuselage structure is based on a NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) developed by Bell which has been extensively documented and correlated with ground vibration tests.The AH-1G FEM was provided to each of the participants for use in their coupled rotor-fuselage analyses. This report describes the AH-1G OLS flight test program and provides the flight conditions and measured vibration data to be used by each participant in their correlation effort. In addition, the mechanical, structural, inertial and aerodynamic data for the AH-1G two-bladed teetering main rotor system are presented. Furthermore, modifications to the NASTRAN FEM of the fuselage structure that are necessary to make it compatible with the OLS test article are described. The AH-1G OLS flight test data was found to be well documented and provide a sound basis for evaluating currently existing analysis methods used for calculation of coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations.

  19. COBRA Main Engine Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snoddy, Jim; Sides, Steve; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The COBRA (CO-Optimized Booster for Reusable Applications) project include the following: 1. COBRA main engine project team. 2. COBRA and RLX cycles selected. 3. COBRA proto-type engine approach enables mission success. 4. COBRA provides quick, low cost demo of cycle and technologies. 5. COBRA cycle I risk reduction supports. 6. Achieving engine safety. 6. RLX cycle I risk reduction supports. 7. Flight qualification. 9. Life extension engine testing.

  20. Vibration and Temperature Survey Production AH-1G Helicopter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-03-01

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  1. Correlation of AH-1G airframe test data with a NASTRAN mathematical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronkhite, J. D.; Berry, V. L.

    1976-01-01

    Test data was provided for evaluating a mathematical vibration model of the Bell AH-1G helicopter airframe. The math model was developed and analyzed using the NASTRAN structural analysis computer program. Data from static and dynamic tests were used for comparison with the math model. Static tests of the fuselage and tailboom were conducted to verify the stiffness representation of the NASTRAN model. Dynamic test data were obtained from shake tests of the airframe and were used to evaluate the NASTRAN model for representing the low frequency (below 30 Hz) vibration response of the airframe.

  2. Correlation of AH-1G airframe flight vibration data with a coupled rotor-fuselage analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangha, K.; Shamie, J.

    1990-01-01

    The formulation and features of the Rotor-Airframe Comprehensive Analysis Program (RACAP) is described. The analysis employs a frequency domain, transfer matrix approach for the blade structural model, a time domain wake or momentum theory aerodynamic model, and impedance matching for rotor-fuselage coupling. The analysis is applied to the AH-1G helicopter, and a correlation study is conducted on fuselage vibration predictions. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the state-of-the-art in helicopter fuselage vibration prediction technology. The fuselage vibration predicted using RACAP are fairly good in the vertical direction and somewhat deficient in the lateral/longitudinal directions. Some of these deficiencies are traced to the fuselage finite element model.

  3. How COBRA Works Document

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Co-Benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) model is a peer reviewed screening tool that inexpensively and quickly estimates the air quality, human health, and associated economic impacts of various state- and county-level emission reduction scenarios.

  4. COBRA contactless detumbling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas V.; Escorial Olmos, Diego

    2016-09-01

    COBRA is the proposed technique to control the motion of a non-cooperative target by means of the interaction between the thruster exhaust gases from the chaser and the target object. In the original ESA SysNova study, the COBRA concept was investigated as an active debris removal system, using contactless technology to deorbit a space debris object and to control its attitude. It was found that the concept is more effective for controlling the attitude of a debris object. An on-orbit experiment was proposed to have a chaser modify the attitude state of a space object in ESA's COBRA IRIDES project, which has now been canceled due to the lack of propellant in the chaser spacecraft. This study presents the results of an internal follow-up study on how to effectively use the COBRA concept for detumbling a large debris object and controlling its attitude motion prior to capture operations in an active debris removal mission.

  5. Collaborative Beamfocusing Radio (COBRA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Jeremy P.; Hsu, Mark J.; Smith, David; Husain, Anis

    2013-05-01

    A Ziva team has recently demonstrated a novel technique called Collaborative Beamfocusing Radios (COBRA) which enables an ad-hoc collection of distributed commercial off-the-shelf software defined radios to coherently align and beamform to a remote radio. COBRA promises to operate even in high multipath and non-line-of-sight environments as well as mobile applications without resorting to computationally expensive closed loop techniques that are currently unable to operate with significant movement. COBRA exploits two key technologies to achieve coherent beamforming. The first is Time Reversal (TR) which compensates for multipath and automatically discovers the optimal spatio-temporal matched filter to enable peak signal gains (up to 20 dB) and diffraction-limited focusing at the intended receiver in NLOS and severe multipath environments. The second is time-aligned buffering which enables TR to synchronize distributed transmitters into a collaborative array. This time alignment algorithm avoids causality violations through the use of reciprocal buffering. Preserving spatio-temporal reciprocity through the TR capture and retransmission process achieves coherent alignment across multiple radios at ~GHz carriers using only standard quartz-oscillators. COBRA has been demonstrated in the lab, aligning two off-the-shelf software defined radios over-the-air to an accuracy of better than 2 degrees of carrier alignment at 450 MHz. The COBRA algorithms are lightweight, with computation in 5 ms on a smartphone class microprocessor. COBRA also has low start-up latency, achieving high accuracy from a cold-start in 30 ms. The COBRA technique opens up a large number of new capabilities in communications, and electronic warfare including selective spatial jamming, geolocation and anti-geolocation.

  6. King cobra bite.

    PubMed

    Karnchanachetanee, C

    1994-12-01

    King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) bite is rare. The milestones of management should have specific antivenom, adequate assisting respirator and appropriate antibiotics against Proteus vulgaris infection. Tourniquet may play some role in delaying venom absorption and allow a greater chance of venom detoxification by the human body.

  7. The modified Cobra Seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.J.; Drayer, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Cobra Seal was developed in response to the International Atomic Energy Agency's request for an in situ verifiable seal. The Type E metal cap seal, still widely used by the IAEA, must be removed and returned to Agency headquarters for verification. The Cobra Seal allows an inspector to verify seal identity and integrity on site, without removing the seal. The seal consists of a loop of multi-strand fiber optic cable, which can be routed around or through the object to be sealed, and a seal body that secures the ends of the fiber optic cable. A cutting blade in the seal body randomly cuts a portion of the optical fibers in the cable. After the seal assembly is completed, a reference image is recorded of the unique pattern of light spots produced when the seal face is illuminated. Subsequent photographs of the seal pattern are compared to the original to establish the seal identity and integrity. This paper reviews the improvements and the technology of the cobra seal system. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Army Attack Aviation Shift of Training and Doctrine to Win the War of Tomorrow Effectively

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Parameters/96spring/wintoh.htm (accessed December 15, 2008). Zahn, Randy R. Snake Pilot: Flying the Cobra Attack Helicopter in Vietnam. Washinton, DC...that will provide security during all phases of troop air transport. Bell Helicopters gained the contract and developed the AH-1 Cobra for this mission...CCA) The history of the Army conducting close-armed support dates back to the Vietnam War with armed UH-1 Huey and the AH-1 Cobra helicopters

  9. Modifications to Optimize the AH-1Z Human Machine Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-18

    communicate, navigate, process and present data, manage crew station systems, detect and counter threats, acquire and track targets , employ guided and...maintain situational awareness during targeting , aid the non-flying pilot in target or object detection , recognition, and identification, and...Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF) Commander with a capable attack helicopter to utilize in the joint warfighting environment. Increasing its capability

  10. A NASTRAN Vibration Model of the AH-1G Helicopter Airframe. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    8217,giN’vjfvjru’>j’N’vjiM^»M’NM>rtfs’^*^*s*^’* ** ^rf,’n>n>r^ij^tnintn*ntn<niM’*>M^-» >n Ainintn^^f-ot^oooooooo ^^^h.^f^^ ptar ^^^^r-^^ps.^^^^-^K^^^h-r

  11. Status and perspectives of COBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, M.; Zuber, K.

    2013-04-01

    The COBRA experiment is a search for neutrinoless double-beta decay using CdZnTe semiconductor detectors. Currently COBRA is collecting data from 32 coplanar grid (CPG) detectors installed in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. This serves as a prototype for a proposed design of over 100 kg target mass in order to achieve the sensitivity necessary to probe new parameter space for 0νββ. Pixelated detector allowing tracking and thus particle identification are also explored as a unique option in double beta searches.

  12. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  13. e-MERLIN and the COBRaS legacy Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, Luke

    2011-07-01

    As one of the 12 legacy programmes given ~300 hrs observing time on the newly enhanced e-MERLIN; the Cygnus OB2 Radio Survey (COBRaS) (homepage: http://www.homepages.ucl.ac.uk/~ucapdwi/cobras/) is an intensive deep-field mapping of the Cyg OB2 association in the Cygnus region of our Galaxy. This will provide the most detailed census for the most massive OB association in the northern hemisphere. A range of astrophysical problems and themes will be investigated including: mass loss and evolution of massive stars; the formation, dynamics and content of massive OB associations and the frequency of massive binaries and the incidence of non-thermal radiation. As part of of the initial ground work for this project, extensive meta-data catalogues were amalgamated from various catalogues from the Virtual Observatory database. In this talk I will discuss; investigations into JHK photometric techniques which can help identify possible OB candidates and other spectral classes; theoretical mass loss models as described by Vink et al. 2001 along with stellar parameters from Martins et al. 2005, Searle et al. 2008 and Prinja et al 1990 which pave the way to calculate theoretical mass loss rates for smooth winds of O stars and B supergiants, and the predicted 6cm fluxes resulting from the thermal free-free radiation in their winds. This will be essential for the study of clumped winds which is an early goal for this project. Over the months following from when this abstract was written; the first e-MERLIN pointings are expected. In the event of obtaining data, this will also be included in the presentation as part of the 'early science' from e-MERLIN and COBRaS.

  14. Validation of helicopter noise prediction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Succi, G. P.

    1981-01-01

    The current techniques of helicopter rotor noise prediction attempt to describe the details of the noise field precisely and remove the empiricisms and restrictions inherent in previous methods. These techniques require detailed inputs of the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and blade surface pressure distribution. The purpose of this paper is to review those techniques in general and the Farassat/Nystrom analysis in particular. The predictions of the Farassat/Nystrom noise computer program, using both measured and calculated blade surface pressure data, are compared to measured noise level data. This study is based on a contract from NASA to Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc. with measured data from the AH-1G Helicopter Operational Loads Survey flight test program supplied by Bell Helicopter Textron.

  15. Validation of helicopter noise prediction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Succi, G. P.

    1981-04-01

    The current techniques of helicopter rotor noise prediction attempt to describe the details of the noise field precisely and remove the empiricisms and restrictions inherent in previous methods. These techniques require detailed inputs of the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and blade surface pressure distribution. The purpose of this paper is to review those techniques in general and the Farassat/Nystrom analysis in particular. The predictions of the Farassat/Nystrom noise computer program, using both measured and calculated blade surface pressure data, are compared to measured noise level data. This study is based on a contract from NASA to Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc. with measured data from the AH-1G Helicopter Operational Loads Survey flight test program supplied by Bell Helicopter Textron.

  16. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    ScienceCinema

    Love, Lonnie

    2016-11-02

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  17. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in pigs, Réunion Island.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Eric; Pascalis, Hervé; Temmam, Sarah; Hervé, Séverine; Saulnier, Aure; Turpin, Magali; Barbier, Nicolas; Hoarau, Johny; Quéguiner, Stéphane; Gorin, Stéphane; Foray, Coralie; Roger, Matthieu; Porphyre, Vincent; André, Paul; Thomas, Thierry; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Dellagi, Koussay; Simon, Gaëlle

    2012-10-01

    During 2009, pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus affected humans on Réunion Island. Since then, the virus has sustained circulation among local swine herds, raising concerns about the potential for genetic evolution of the virus and possible retransmission back to humans of variants with increased virulence. Continuous surveillance of A(H1N1)pdm09 infection in pigs is recommended.

  18. Helicopter Strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Langley Research Center has done extensive research into the effectiveness of tail boom strakes on conventional tail rotor helicopters. (A strake is a "spoiler" whose purpose is to alter the airflow around an aerodynamic body.) By placing strakes on a tail boom, the air loading can be changed, thrust and power requirements of the tail rotor can be reduced, and helicopter low speed flight handling qualities are improved. This research led to the incorporation of tail boom strakes on three production-type commercial helicopters manufactured by McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Company.

  19. Field testing of the Cobra Seal System

    SciTech Connect

    Yellin, E.; Vodrazka, P. ); Ystesund, K.; Drayer, D. )

    1990-01-01

    The Cobra Seal System consists of a passive fiber optic seal and verification equipment which have been modified to take advantage of current technology. The seal permits on-site verification without requiring replacement of the seal. The modifications to the original Cobra Seal System extended the maximum fiber optic cable length from 1 meter to 10 meters. This improvement allowed the Cobra Seal to be considered for application on dry irradiated fuel storage canisters at two Canadian facilities. These canisters are located in an exterior environment exposed to extreme weather conditions. This paper describe the application of the Cobra Seal to these canisters, a housing for the protection of the Cobra Seal body from the environment, and some preliminary results of the IAEA field tests. 4 refs.

  20. A compilation and analysis of helicopter handling qualities data. Volume 1: Data compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffley, R. K.; Jewell, W. F.; Lehman, J. M.; Vanwinkle, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    A collection of basic descriptive data, stability derivatives and transfer functions for six degrees of freedom, quasi-static model is introduced. The data are arranged in a common, compact format for each of the five helicopters represented. The vehicles studied include the BO-105, AH-1h, and the CH53D.

  1. Influenza A/H1N1 Severe Pneumonia: Novel Morphocytological Findings in Bronchoalveolar Lavage

    PubMed Central

    Faverio, Paola; Messinesi, Grazia; Brenna, Ambrogio; Pesci, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed in three patients with severe influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Light microscopy analysis of BAL cytocentrifugates showed the presence of characteristic large, mononuclear, plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like cells never described before. Via transmission electron microscopy, these cells were classified as atypical type II pneumocytes and some of them showed cytoplasmic vesicles and inclusions. We concluded that plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like type II pneumocytes might represent a morphologic marker of A/H1N1 influenza virus infection as well as reparative cellular activation after diffuse alveolar damage. PMID:25383078

  2. Influenza A/H1N1 Severe Pneumonia: Novel Morphocytological Findings in Bronchoalveolar Lavage.

    PubMed

    Faverio, Paola; Aliberti, Stefano; Ezekiel, Clinton; Messinesi, Grazia; Brenna, Ambrogio; Pesci, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed in three patients with severe influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Light microscopy analysis of BAL cytocentrifugates showed the presence of characteristic large, mononuclear, plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like cells never described before. Via transmission electron microscopy, these cells were classified as atypical type II pneumocytes and some of them showed cytoplasmic vesicles and inclusions. We concluded that plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like type II pneumocytes might represent a morphologic marker of A/H1N1 influenza virus infection as well as reparative cellular activation after diffuse alveolar damage.

  3. Helicopter problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussner, H G

    1937-01-01

    The present report deals with a number of the main problems requiring solution in the development of helicopters and concerning the lift, flying performance, stability, and drive. A complete solution is given for the stability of the helicopter with rigid blades and control surfaces. With a view to making a direct-lift propeller sufficient without the addition of auxiliary propellers, the "flapping drive" is assessed and its efficiency calculated.

  4. Optimization of helicopter airframe structures for vibration reduction considerations, formulations and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, T. Sreekanta

    1988-01-01

    Several key issues involved in the application of formal optimization technique to helicopter airframe structures for vibration reduction are addressed. Considerations which are important in the optimization of real airframe structures are discussed. Considerations necessary to establish relevant set of design variables, constraints and objectives which are appropriate to conceptual, preliminary, detailed design, ground and flight test phases of airframe design are discussed. A methodology is suggested for optimization of airframes in various phases of design. Optimization formulations that are unique to helicopter airframes are described and expressions for vibration related functions are derived. Using a recently developed computer code, the optimization of a Bell AH-1G helicopter airframe is demonstrated.

  5. Whole-Genome Sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila Strain AH-1 (Serotype O11)

    PubMed Central

    Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Tomás, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is an emerging pathogen of aquatic and terrestrial animals, including humans. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of the septicemic A. hydrophila AH-1 strain, belonging to the serotype O11, and the first mesophilic Aeromonas with surface layer (S-layer) to be sequenced. PMID:27587829

  6. Narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination

    PubMed Central

    van der Most, Robbert; Van Mechelen, Marcelle; Destexhe, Eric; Wettendorff, Martine; Hanon, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological data from several European countries suggested an increased risk of the chronic sleep disorder narcolepsy following vaccination with Pandemrix™, an AS03-adjuvanted, pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine. Further research to investigate potential associations between Pandemrix™ vaccination, A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection and narcolepsy is required. Narcolepsy is most commonly caused by a reduction or absence of hypocretin produced by hypocretin-secreting neurons in the hypothalamus, and is tightly associated with HLA-II DQB1*06:02. Consequently, research focusing on CD4+ T-cell responses, building on the hypothesis that for disease development, T cells specific for antigen(s) from hypocretin neurons must be activated or reactivated, is considered essential. Therefore, the following key areas of research can be identified, (1) characterization of hypothetical narcolepsy-specific auto-immune CD4+ T cells, (2) mapping epitopes of such T cells, and (3) evaluating potential mechanisms that would enable such cells to gain access to the hypothalamus. Addressing these questions could further our understanding of the potential links between narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and/or infection. Of particular interest is that any evidence of a mimicry-based mechanism could also explain the association between narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection. PMID:24342916

  7. Potentially-toxic and essential elements profile of AH1N1 patients in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Mireya; Bautista, Edgar G.; Velázquez-González, Antonio; Vázquez-Gutiérrez, Felipe; Tzintzun, Guadalupe; García-Arreola, María Elena; Castillejos, Manuel; Hernández, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    During spring of 2009, a new influenza virus AH1N1 spread in the world causing acute respiratory illness and death, resulting in the first influenza pandemic since 1968. Blood levels of potentially-toxic and essential elements of 40 pneumonia and confirmed AH1N1 were evaluated against two different groups of controls, both not infected with the pandemic strain. Significant concentrations of potentially-toxic elements (lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, arsenic) along with deficiency of selenium or increased Zn/Cu ratios characterized AH1N1 cases under study when evaluated versus controlled cases. Deficiency of selenium is progressively observed from controls I (influenza like illness) through controls II (pneumonia) and finally pneumonia -AH1N1 infected patients. Cases with blood Se levels greater than the recommended for an optimal cut-off to activate glutathione peroxidase (12.5 μg/dL) recovered from illness and survived. Evaluation of this essential element in critical pneumonia patients at the National Institutes is under evaluation as a clinical trial. PMID:23422930

  8. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus Infection in Giant Pandas, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Desheng; Zhu, Ling; Cui, Hengmin; Ling, Shanshan; Fan, Shengtao; Yu, Zhijun; Zhou, Yuancheng; Wang, Tiecheng; Qian, Jun; Xia, Xianzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Wang, Chengdong

    2014-01-01

    We confirmed infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in giant pandas in China during 2009 by using virus isolation and serologic analysis methods. This finding extends the host range of influenza viruses and indicates a need for increased surveillance for and control of influenza viruses among giant pandas. PMID:24565026

  9. Research Updates: Experimental Evaluation of 2009 Pandemic A/H1N1 in Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: In March 2009, a novel pandemic A/H1N1 emerged in the human population in North America (2). The gene constellation of the emerging virus was demonstrated to be a combination of genes from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages that had never before be...

  10. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection in giant pandas, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Desheng; Zhu, Ling; Cui, Hengmin; Ling, Shanshan; Fan, Shengtao; Yu, Zhijun; Zhou, Yuancheng; Wang, Tiecheng; Qian, Jun; Xia, Xianzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Gao, Yuwei; Wang, Chengdong

    2014-03-01

    We confirmed infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in giant pandas in China during 2009 by using virus isolation and serologic analysis methods. This finding extends the host range of influenza viruses and indicates a need for increased surveillance for and control of influenza viruses among giant pandas.

  11. Oseltamivir-resistant seasonal A(H1N1) and A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza viruses from the 2007/2008 to 2012/2013 season in Nara Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Masaki; Okayama, Akiko; Kitahori, Yoshiteru

    2014-01-01

    We examined the incidence of oseltamivir-resistant seasonal A(H1N1) and A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza viruses from the 2007/2008 to 2012/2013 season in Nara Prefecture, Japan. To detect the oseltamivir resistance marker in neuraminidase (NA), 365 influenza viruses (60 seasonal A(H1N1) and 305 A(H1N1)pdm09) were sequenced. The H275Y mutation in the NA gene, which confers resistance to oseltamivir, was identified in 93.8% (30/32) of seasonal A(H1N1) viruses that were circulating during the 2008/2009 season. Moreover, the detection rate of oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses was 4.1% (3/74) and 2.8% (5/180) in the 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 season, respectively. Four cases of oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection occurred in the same hematology ward during the 2010/2011 season. Our data show a low frequency of oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in Nara Prefecture but suggested the possibility of human-to-human transmission of this virus.

  12. Performance and Handling Qualities - AH-1G Helicopter Equipped with Three Hot Metal/Plume Infrared Suppressors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    relative to the aircraft longitudinal axis. The ejector action, created by the engine exhaust as it is accelerated through the replacement nozzle, draws...Lycoming duct is 55 degrees upward relative to the aircraft longitudinal axis. The airflow induced by the ejector is approximately 80 percent of engine...flow. It is estimted that the exhaust gas exits the elbow at approximately 30 degrees relative to the aircraft longitudinal axis. Net increase to the

  13. Job Performance Tests for U/AH-1 Helicopter Mechanics. Volume 2. Administrative Duties and Job Knowledge Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    A. pitting corrosion B. intergranular corrosion C. exfoliation corrosion D. filiform corrosion -51- 77. Using the formula and diagram below, the... teeth engage and then turn clockwise. -89- 156. You are removing the rotor head. You have inserted a 1-inch square drive bar into the square drive of

  14. Evaluation of Standard Gear Metrics in Helicopter Flight Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, M.; Pryor, A. H.; Huff, E. M.

    2002-01-01

    sense that the rpm, torque and forces on the gear have been held steady. For gears used in a dynamic environment such as that occurring in aircraft, the rpm, torque and forces on the gear are constantly changing. The authors have measured significant variation in rpm and torque in the transmissions of helicopters in controlled steady flight conditions flown by highly proficient test pilots. Statistical analyses of the data taken in flight show significant nonstationarity in the vibration measurements. These deviations from stationarity may increase false alarms in gear monitoring during aircraft flight. In the proposed paper, the authors will study vibration measurements made in flight on an AH- 1 Cobra and an OH-58C Kiowa helicopters. The primary focus will be the development of a methodology to assess the impact of nonstationarity on false alarms. Issues to be addressed include how time synchronous averages are constructed from raw data as well as how lack of stationarity effects the behavior of single value metrics. Emphasis will be placed on the occurrence of false alarms with the use of standard metrics. In order to maintain an acceptable level of false alarms in the flight environment, this study will also address the determination of appropriate threshold levels, which may need to be higher than for test rigs.

  15. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and postpandemic influenza in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Ambrozaitis, Arvydas; Radzišauskienė, Daiva; Kuprevičienė, Nerija; Gravenstein, Stefan; Jančorienė, Ligita

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study is to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients hospitalized in Lithuania who are infected with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and to compare pandemic A(H1N1) pdm09 infection with postpandemic. In total, 146 subjects hospitalized with influenza A(H1N1) pdm09 were identified from 2009–2011. There were 53 during the initial pandemic wave in the summer of 2009, 69 during the peak pandemic period, and 24 during the “postpandemic” period that we included in this study. There were 22 subjects who died after laboratory confirmation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. No deaths were documented during the first wave. Subjects presenting during the peak of pandemic influenza had a greater incidence of fever (100% vs 77.4%; p<0.001), dry cough (95.7% vs 82.7%; p=0.01), and vomiting (26.1% vs 1.9%, p<0.001) as compared with patients infected during the first wave. The rate of bacterial pneumonia was 18.8% (13/69) during the peak pandemic period and 12.5% (3/24, p=0.754) during the postpandemic period. None of the postpandemic influenza subjects’ intensive care unit stays were due to pneumonia. The hospitalized early 2009 H1N1 pandemic cases and postpandemic cases were milder compared with those at the peak of pandemic activity. PMID:28352819

  16. Adaptation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in experimental mouse models.

    PubMed

    Prokopyeva, E A; Sobolev, I A; Prokopyev, M V; Shestopalov, A M

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, three mouse-adapted variants of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were obtained by lung-to-lung passages of BALB/c, C57BL/6z and CD1 mice. The significantly increased virulence and pathogenicity of all of the mouse-adapted variants induced 100% mortality in the adapted mice. Genetic analysis indicated that the increased virulence of all of the mouse-adapted variants reflected the incremental acquisition of several mutations in PB2, PB1, HA, NP, NA, and NS2 proteins. Identical amino acid substitutions were also detected in all of the mouse-adapted variants of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, including PB2 (K251R), PB1 (V652A), NP (I353V), NA (I106V, N248D) and NS1 (G159E). Apparently, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus easily adapted to the host after serial passages in the lungs, inducing 100% lethality in the last experimental group. However, cross-challenge revealed that not all adapted variants are pathogenic for different laboratory mice. Such important results should be considered when using the influenza mice model.

  17. 78 FR 13662 - Cobra Pipeline Ltd.; Notice of Petition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cobra Pipeline Ltd.; Notice of Petition Take notice that on February 4, 2013, Cobra Pipeline Ltd. (Cobra) filed in Docket No. PR13-32-000 to correct a Tariff Record filed on...

  18. Cobra sealing system; From field evaluation to practical safeguards application

    SciTech Connect

    Vodrazka, P.; Cermak, L. )

    1991-01-01

    After a successful conclusion of the Cobra seal IAEA field trials, the Cobra Seal System was installed in two Canadian facilities. The seals permit on-site verification without needing to replace them in extreme weather conditions, thus allowing a substantial time reduction for inspectors as well as minimizing intrusiveness of these activities. The paper describes experiences with practical installations of almost sixty Cobra seals including the selection of environmental conduits and housing. Examples of the results of the first several inspections utilizing a new version of the Cobra seal verifier are also included. Possible future outdoor applications of Cobra seals are described and some suggested improvements are outlined.

  19. Helicopter Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Exterior and interior noise problems are addressed both from the physics and engineering as well as the human factors point of view. The role of technology in closing the gap between what the customers and regulating agencies would like to have and what is available is explored. Noise regulation concepts, design, operations and testing for noise control, helicopter noise prediction, and research tools and measurements are among the topics covered.

  20. Hybrid proteins of Cobra Venom Factor and cobra C3: tools to identify functionally important regions in Cobra Venom Factor.

    PubMed

    Hew, Brian E; Wehrhahn, Daniel; Fritzinger, David C; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm

    2012-09-15

    Cobra Venom Factor (CVF) is the complement-activating protein in cobra venom. CVF is structurally and functionally highly homologous to complement component C3. CVF, like C3b, the activated form of C3, forms a bimolecular complex with Factor B in serum, called C3/C5 convertase, an enzyme which activates complement components C3 and C5. Despite the high degree of homology, the two C3/C5 convertases exhibit significant functional differences. The most important difference is that the convertase formed with CVF (CVF,Bb) is physico-chemically far more stable than the convertase formed with C3b (C3b,Bb). In addition, the CVF,Bb convertase and CVF are completely resistant to inactivation by the complement regulatory proteins Factor H and Factor I. Furthermore, the CVF,Bb enzyme shows efficient C5-cleaving activity in fluid phase. In contrast, the C3b,Bb enzyme is essentially devoid of fluid-phase C5-cleaving activity. By taking advantage of the high degree of sequence identity at both the amino acid (85%) and DNA levels (93%) between CVF and cobra C3, we created hybrid proteins of CVF and cobra C3 where sections, or only a few amino acids, of the CVF sequence were replaced with the homologous amino acid sequence of cobra C3. In a first set of experiments, we created five hybrid proteins, termed H1 through H5, where the cobra C3 substitutions collectively spanned the entire length of the CVF protein. We also created three additional hybrid proteins where only four or five amino acid residues in CVF were exchanged with the corresponding amino acid residues from cobra C3. Collectively, these hybrid proteins, representing loss-of-function mutants of CVF, allowed the identification of regions and individual amino acid residues important for the CVF-specific functions. The results include the observation that the CVF β-chain is crucially important for forming a stable convertase, whereas the CVF α-chain appears to harbor no CVF-specific functions. Furthermore, the CVF

  1. An Influenza A/H1N1/2009 Hemagglutinin Vaccine Produced in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Yáñez, José M.; Portillo-Lara, Roberto; Mendoza-Ochoa, Gonzalo I.; García-Echauri, Sergio A.; López-Pacheco, Felipe; Bulnes-Abundis, David; Salgado-Gallegos, Johari; Lara-Mayorga, Itzel M.; Webb-Vargas, Yenny; León-Angel, Felipe O.; Rivero-Aranda, Ramón E.; Oropeza-Almazán, Yuriana; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M.; Zertuche-Guerra, Manuel I.; DuBois, Rebecca M.; White, Stephen W.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Russell, Charles J.; Alvarez, Mario M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The A/H1N1/2009 influenza pandemic made evident the need for faster and higher-yield methods for the production of influenza vaccines. Platforms based on virus culture in mammalian or insect cells are currently under investigation. Alternatively, expression of fragments of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein in prokaryotic systems can potentially be the most efficacious strategy for the manufacture of large quantities of influenza vaccine in a short period of time. Despite experimental evidence on the immunogenic potential of HA protein constructs expressed in bacteria, it is still generally accepted that glycosylation should be a requirement for vaccine efficacy. Methodology/Principal Findings We expressed the globular HA receptor binding domain, referred to here as HA63–286-RBD, of the influenza A/H1N1/2009 virus in Escherichia coli using a simple, robust and scalable process. The recombinant protein was refolded and purified from the insoluble fraction of the cellular lysate as a single species. Recombinant HA63–286-RBD appears to be properly folded, as shown by analytical ultracentrifugation and bio-recognition assays. It binds specifically to serum antibodies from influenza A/H1N1/2009 patients and was found to be immunogenic, to be capable of triggering the production of neutralizing antibodies, and to have protective activity in the ferret model. Conclusions/Significance Projections based on our production/purification data indicate that this strategy could yield up to half a billion doses of vaccine per month in a medium-scale pharmaceutical production facility equipped for bacterial culture. Also, our findings demonstrate that glycosylation is not a mandatory requirement for influenza vaccine efficacy. PMID:20661476

  2. Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Viruses, United States, 2013–14

    PubMed Central

    Okomo-Adhiambo, Margaret; Fry, Alicia M.; Su, Su; Nguyen, Ha T.; Elal, Anwar Abd; Negron, Elizabeth; Hand, Julie; Garten, Rebecca J.; Barnes, John; Xiyan, Xu; Villanueva, Julie M.

    2015-01-01

    We report characteristics of oseltamivir-resistant influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses and patients infected with these viruses in the United States. During 2013–14, fifty-nine (1.2%) of 4,968 analyzed US influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses had the H275Y oseltamivir resistance–conferring neuraminidase substitution. Our results emphasize the need for local surveillance for neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility among circulating influenza viruses. PMID:25532050

  3. Pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, She-Lan; Wang, Jing; Yang, Xu-Hui; Chen, Jin; Huang, Ren-Jie; Ruan, Bing; He, Hong-Xuan; Wang, Cheng-Min; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Sun, Zhou; Xie, Li; Zhuang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Two hundred fourteen abstracts and 87 full texts regarding pregnant women infected with pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus were systematically reviewed by using a PubMed search and assessing pandemic, clinical, laboratory test, vaccine, and control experiences. Both policy and health education were excluded. This review counted the total number of pregnant cases from different countries and analyzed their epidemic features, including trimester distribution, morbidity, hospitalization, intensive care unit admissions, maternal mortality, underlying diseases, complications, high-risk factors for death, pregnancy outcome, and clinical symptoms compared with the previous pandemic seasonal influenza A/H1N1 as compared with the general population. Early identification and treatment were the most important factors in different countries and areas examined. The vaccine and antiviral drugs that have been the most efficient means to control the novel virus appear to be safe but require more extensive study. In the future, the focus should be placed on understanding vertical transmission and the severe mechanisms.

  4. Public sources of information and information needs for pandemic influenza A(H1N1).

    PubMed

    Wong, Li Ping; Sam, I-Ching

    2010-12-01

    Providing health information during disease outbreaks is a fundamental component of outbreak control strategies. This study aimed to explore sources of influenza A(H1N1)-related information, specific information needs and preferences of the lay public during the peak of the outbreak. A cross-sectional, population-based, computer-assisted telephone interview of 1,050 respondents was conducted in Malaysia between July 11 and September 12, 2009. Newspaper, television and family were three main sources of information about A(H1N1). There were substantial ethnic differences; the Malays were significantly more likely to identify television as main source, while newspapers and family were identified as the main sources by the Chinese and Indians, respectively. Overall, the two main information needs identified were prevention and treatment. The Malays expressed lesser need for overall information than other ethnic groups. The three most preferred sources of information were television, newspapers and healthcare providers. There were significant positive correlations between amount of information received with knowledge (r = 0.149), perceived susceptibility to infection (r = 0.177), and other behavioral responses. Health information dissemination should be dedicated to meeting the information needs of diverse sociodemographic and ethnic groups. The findings highlight the importance of providing information that increases awareness and behavioral changes in disease prevention yet reduce fear.

  5. [Epidemic of influenza A(H1N1) 2009 in Reunion Island: epidemiological data].

    PubMed

    Renault, P; Thouillot, F; Do, C; Baroux, N; Cadivel, A; Balleydier, E; Brottet, E; Kermarec, F; D'Ortenzio, E; Filleul, L

    2011-05-01

    In Reunion Island, a French subtropical island located in the southern hemisphere, the monitoring of the epidemiological dynamics of the epidemic linked to the emergence of pandemic virus A(H1N1) 2009 was achieved through the regular influenza surveillance system which has been reinforced on that occasion. It was mainly based on a network of sentinel physicians, combined with virologic monitoring, and on surveillance of severe cases and deaths. The data were analyzed and retroinformation was distributed according to a weekly frequency. The first imported case was confirmed on July 5, 2009 in a traveler arriving from Australia, whereas the first autochthonous cases were reported on July 23. The epidemic peak was reached in five weeks and the duration of the whole epidemic episode was 9 weeks. Pandemic virus has quickly supplanted seasonal viruses that had begun to circulate. The estimated attack rate for symptomatic cases of infection with virus influenza A(H1N1) 2009 was 12.85%. The hospitalization rate was 32 per 10,000 estimated cases, and 24 people had a serious form requiring care in ICU. Among death certificates received at the regional office for health and social affairs, 14 mentioned the influenza, including 7 in whom the pandemic virus has been laboratory confirmed. These deaths occurred in patients significantly younger than usually observed in Reunion Island during the seasonal influenza epidemics. Overall, the epidemic intensity and severity have been similar to those of seasonal influenza in Reunion Island.

  6. Detection of Extensive Cross-Neutralization between Pandemic and Seasonal A/H1N1 Influenza Viruses Using a Pseudotype Neutralization Assay

    PubMed Central

    Labrosse, Béatrice; Tourdjman, Mathieu; Porcher, Raphaël; LeGoff, Jérôme; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Simon, François; Molina, Jean-Michel; Clavel, François

    2010-01-01

    Background Cross-immunity between seasonal and pandemic A/H1N1 influenza viruses remains uncertain. In particular, the extent that previous infection or vaccination by seasonal A/H1N1 viruses can elicit protective immunity against pandemic A/H1N1 is unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Neutralizing titers against seasonal A/H1N1 (A/Brisbane/59/2007) and against pandemic A/H1N1 (A/California/04/2009) were measured using an HIV-1-based pseudovirus neutralization assay. Using this highly sensitive assay, we found that a large fraction of subjects who had never been exposed to pandemic A/H1N1 express high levels of pandemic A/H1N1 neutralizing titers. A significant correlation was seen between neutralization of pandemic A/H1N1 and neutralization of a standard seasonal A/H1N1 strain. Significantly higher pandemic A/H1N1 neutralizing titers were measured in subjects who had received vaccination against seasonal influenza in 2008–2009. Higher pandemic neutralizing titers were also measured in subjects over 60 years of age. Conclusions/Significance Our findings reveal that the extent of protective cross-immunity between seasonal and pandemic A/H1N1 influenza viruses may be more important than previously estimated. This cross-immunity could provide a possible explanation of the relatively mild profile of the recent influenza pandemic. PMID:20543954

  7. Genetic Characterization of Circulating 2015 A(H1N1)pdm09 Influenza Viruses from Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anupam; Nayak, Mukti Kant; Dutta, Shanta; Panda, Samiran; Satpathi, Biswa Ranjan; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, the swine derived A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic strain outbreak became widespread throughout the different states of India. The reported cases and deaths in 2015 surpassed the previous years with more than 39000 laboratory confirmed cases and a death toll of more than 2500 people. There are relatively limited complete genetic sequences available for this virus from Asian countries. In this study, we describe the full genome analysis of influenza 2015 A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated from West Bengal between January through December 2015. The phylogenetic analysis of the haemagglutinin sequence revealed clustering with globally circulating strains of genogroup 6B. This was further confirmed by the constructed concatenated tree using all eight complete gene segments of Kolkata A(H1N1)pdm09 isolates with the other strains from different timeline and lineages. A study from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 2015 reported novel mutations T200A and D225N in haemagglutinin gene of a 2014 Indian strain (A/India/6427/2014). However, in all the pandemic strains of 2014–2015 reported from India, so far including A(H1N1)pdm09 strains from Kolkata, D225N mutation was not observed, though the T200A mutation was found to be conserved. Neuraminidase gene of the analyzed strains did not show any oseltamivir resistant mutation H275Y suggesting continuation of Tamiflu® as drug of choice. The amino acid sequences of the all gene segments from 2015 A(H1N1)pdm09 isolates identified several new mutations compared to the 2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 strains, which may have contributed towards enhanced virulence, compared to 2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 strains. PMID:27997573

  8. Influenza A/H1N1 2009 Pandemic and Respiratory Virus Infections, Beijing, 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    To determine the role of the pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 (A/H1N1 2009pdm) in acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) and its impact on the epidemic of seasonal influenza viruses and other common respiratory viruses, nasal and throat swabs taken from 7,776 patients with suspected viral ARTIs from 2006 through 2010 in Beijing, China were screened by real-time PCR for influenza virus typing and subtyping and by multiplex or single PCR tests for other common respiratory viruses. We observed a distinctive dual peak pattern of influenza epidemic during the A/H1N1 2009pdm in Beijing, China, which was formed by the A/H1N1 2009pdm, and a subsequent influenza B epidemic in year 2009/2010. Our analysis also shows a small peak formed by a seasonal H3N2 epidemic prior to the A/H1N1 2009pdm peak. Parallel detection of multiple respiratory viruses shows that the epidemic of common respiratory viruses, except human rhinovirus, was delayed during the pandemic of the A/H1N1 2009pdm. The H1N1 2009pdm mainly caused upper respiratory tract infections in the sampled patients; patients infected with H1N1 2009pdm had a higher percentage of cough than those infected with seasonal influenza or other respiratory viruses. Our findings indicate that A/H1N1 2009pdm and other respiratory viruses except human rhinovirus could interfere with each other during their transmission between human beings. Understanding the mechanisms and effects of such interference is needed for effective control of future influenza epidemics. PMID:23029253

  9. Cobra Fiber-Optic Positioner Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Charles D.; Braun, David F.; Kaluzny, Joel V.

    2013-01-01

    A prime focus spectrometer (PFS), along with corrective optics, will mount in place of the secondary mirror of the Subaru telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. This will allow simultaneous observations of cosmologic targets. It will enable large-scale galactic archeology and dark energy surveys to help unlock the secrets of the universe. To perform these cosmologic surveys, an array of 2,400 optical fibers needs to be independently positioned within the 498-mm-diameter focal plane of the PFS instrument to collect light from galaxies and stars for spectrographic analyses. To allow for independent re-positioning of the fibers, a very small positioner (7.7 mm in diameter) is required. One hundred percent coverage of the focal plane is also required, so these small actuators need to cover a patrol region of 9.5 mm in diameter. To optimize the amount of light that can be collected, the fibers need to be placed within 5 micrometers of their intended target (either a star or galaxy). The Cobra Fiber Positioner was designed to meet the size and accuracy requirements stated above. Cobra is a two-degrees-of-freedom mechanism that can position an optical fiber in the focal plane of the PFS instrument to a precision of 5 micrometers. It is a theta-phi style positioner containing two rotary piezo tube motors with one offset from the other, which enables the optic fibers to be placed anywhere in a small circular patrol region. The patrol region of the actuator is such that the array of 2,400 positioners allows for full coverage of the instrument focal plane by overlapping the patrol areas. A second-generation Cobra positioner was designed based on lessons learned from the original prototype built in 2009. Improvements were made to the precision of the ceramic motor parts, and hard stops were redesigned to minimize friction and prevent jamming. These changes resulted in reducing the number of move iterations required to position the optical fiber within 5 micrometers of its target. At

  10. Lessons Learned from Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Pandemic Response in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Hanchoworakul, Wanna; Sawanpanyalert, Narumol; Maloney, Susan A.; Brown, Richard Clive; Birmingham, Maureen Elizabeth; Chusuttiwat, Supamit

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Thailand experienced rapid spread of the pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. The national response came under intense public scrutiny as the number of confirmed cases and associated deaths increased. Thus, during July–December 2009, the Ministry of Public Health and the World Health Organization jointly reviewed the response efforts. The review found that the actions taken were largely appropriate and proportionate to need. However, areas needing improvement were surveillance, laboratory capacity, hospital infection control and surge capacity, coordination and monitoring of guidelines for clinical management and nonpharmaceutical interventions, risk communications, and addressing vulnerabilities of non-Thai displaced and migrant populations. The experience in Thailand may be applicable to other countries and settings, and the lessons learned may help strengthen responses to other pandemics or comparable prolonged public health emergencies. PMID:22709628

  11. Modelling influenza A(H1N1) 2009 epidemics using a random network in a distributed computing environment.

    PubMed

    González-Parra, Gilberto; Villanueva, Rafael-J; Ruiz-Baragaño, Javier; Moraño, Jose-A

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we propose the use of a random network model for simulating and understanding the epidemics of influenza A(H1N1). The proposed model is used to simulate the transmission process of influenza A(H1N1) in a community region of Venezuela using distributed computing in order to accomplish many realizations of the underlying random process. These large scale epidemic simulations have recently become an important application of high-performance computing. The network model proposed performs better than the traditional epidemic model based on ordinary differential equations since it adjusts better to the irregularity of the real world data. In addition, the network model allows the consideration of many possibilities regarding the spread of influenza at the population level. The results presented here show how well the SEIR model fits the data for the AH1N1 time series despite the irregularity of the data and returns parameter values that are in good agreement with the medical data regarding AH1N1 influenza virus. This versatile network model approach may be applied to the simulation of the transmission dynamics of several epidemics in human networks. In addition, the simulation can provide useful information for the understanding, prediction and control of the transmission of influenza A(H1N1) epidemics.

  12. An update on swine-origin influenza virus A/H1N1: a review.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Sebastian U; Schnitzler, Paul

    2009-12-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual epidemics and occasional pandemics that have claimed the lives of millions. The emergence of new strains will continue to pose challenges to public health and the scientific communities. The recent flu pandemic caused by a swine-origin influenza virus A/H1N1 (S-OIV) presents an opportunity to examine virulence factors, the spread of the infection and to prepare for major influenza outbreaks in the future. The virus contains a novel constellation of gene segments, the nearest known precursors being viruses found in swine and it probably arose through reassortment of two viruses of swine origin. Specific markers for virulence can be evaluated in the viral genome, PB1-F2 is a molecular marker of pathogenicity but is not present in the new S-OIV. While attention was focused on a threat of an avian influenza H5N1 pandemic emerging from Asia, a novel influenza virus of swine origin emerged in North America, and is now spreading worldwide. However, S-OIV demonstrates that even serotypes already encountered in past human pandemics may constitute new pandemic threats. There are concerns that this virus may mutate or reassort with existing influenza viruses giving rise to more transmissible or more pathogenic viruses. The 1918 Spanish flu pandemic virus was relatively mild in its first wave and acquired more virulence when it returned in the winter. Thus preparedness on a global scale against a potential more virulent strain is highly recommended. Most isolates of the new S-OIVs are susceptible to neuraminidase inhibitors, and currently a vaccine against the pandemic strain is being manufactured and will be available this fall. This review summarizes the current information on the new pandemic swine-origin influenza virus A/H1N1.

  13. [Rapid detection of influenza virus A (AH1, AH3) and B by nested-polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Watanabe, S; Imai, M

    1997-06-01

    We applied the Nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for laboratory diagnosis of influenza virus infection. We used three primer sets for detection of influenza virus A (AH1, AH3) and B. The primer sets for each type (AH1, AH3, B) was able to detect specifically each type of influenza. We measured the sensitivity for detection of vaccine strains. The PCR method was able to detect 0.9 PFU/assey of AH1 type, 1.0 PFU/assey of AH3 type and 1.8 PFU/assey of B type. Out of 46 isolation negative but antibody positive cases, 38 cases were positive for PCR (82.6%). This method is sensitive and useful for rapid diagnosis of influenza virus infection.

  14. Limits on the prediction of helicopter rotor noise using thickness and loading sources: Validation of helicopter noise prediction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Succi, G. P.

    1983-01-01

    The techniques of helicopter rotor noise prediction attempt to describe precisely the details of the noise field and remove the empiricisms and restrictions inherent in previous methods. These techniques require detailed inputs of the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and blade surface pressure distribution. The Farassat noise prediction techniques was studied, and high speed helicopter noise prediction using more detailed representations of the thickness and loading noise sources was investigated. These predictions were based on the measured blade surface pressures on an AH-1G rotor and compared to the measured sound field. Although refinements in the representation of the thickness and loading noise sources improve the calculation, there are still discrepancies between the measured and predicted sound field. Analysis of the blade surface pressure data indicates shocks on the blades, which are probably responsible for these discrepancies.

  15. Timeliness of contact tracing among flight passengers for influenza A/H1N1 2009

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During the initial containment phase of influenza A/H1N1 2009, close contacts of cases were traced to provide antiviral prophylaxis within 48 h after exposure and to alert them on signs of disease for early diagnosis and treatment. Passengers seated on the same row, two rows in front or behind a patient infectious for influenza, during a flight of ≥ 4 h were considered close contacts. This study evaluates the timeliness of flight-contact tracing (CT) as performed following national and international CT requests addressed to the Center of Infectious Disease Control (CIb/RIVM), and implemented by the Municipal Health Services of Schiphol Airport. Methods Elapsed days between date of flight arrival and the date passenger lists became available (contact details identified - CI) was used as proxy for timeliness of CT. In a retrospective study, dates of flight arrival, onset of illness, laboratory diagnosis, CT request and identification of contacts details through passenger lists, following CT requests to the RIVM for flights landed at Schiphol Airport were collected and analyzed. Results 24 requests for CT were identified. Three of these were declined as over 4 days had elapsed since flight arrival. In 17 out of 21 requests, contact details were obtained within 7 days after arrival (81%). The average delay between arrival and CI was 3,9 days (range 2-7), mainly caused by delay in diagnosis of the index patient after arrival (2,6 days). In four flights (19%), contacts were not identified or only after > 7 days. CI involving Dutch airlines was faster than non-Dutch airlines (P < 0,05). Passenger locator cards did not improve timeliness of CI. In only three flights contact details were identified within 2 days after arrival. Conclusion CT for influenza A/H1N1 2009 among flight passengers was not successful for timely provision of prophylaxis. CT had little additional value for alerting passengers for disease symptoms, as this information already was provided during and after the flight. Public health authorities should take into account patient delays in seeking medical advise and laboratory confirmation in relation to maximum time to provide postexposure prophylaxis when deciding to install contact tracing measures. International standardization of CT guidelines is recommended. PMID:22204494

  16. 77 FR 18970 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... (AD) for the Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited (BHTC) Model 407 helicopters. This proposed AD is... Helicopter Textron Canada Limited, 12,800 Rue de l'Avenir, Mirabel, Quebec J7J1R4, telephone (450)...

  17. A/H1N1 Vaccine Intentions in College Students: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwal, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To test the applicability of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) in college students who have not previously received the A/H1N1 vaccine. Participants: Undergraduate communication students at a metropolitan southern university. Methods: In January-March 2010, students from voluntarily participating communication classes completed a…

  18. Contact Tracing for Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus–infected Passenger on International Flight

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Ananda G.; Janmohamed, Kulsum; Smith, Gillian E.; Hogan, Angela H.; De Souza, Valerie; Wallensten, Anders; Oliver, Isabel; Blatchford, Oliver; Cleary, Paul; Ibbotson, Sue

    2014-01-01

    In April 2009, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection was confirmed in a person who had been symptomatic while traveling on a commercial flight from Mexico to the United Kingdom. Retrospective public health investigation and contact tracing led to the identification of 8 additional confirmed cases among passengers and community contacts of passengers. PMID:24377724

  19. Narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination: shaping the research on the observed signal.

    PubMed

    van der Most, Robbert; Van Mechelen, Marcelle; Destexhe, Eric; Wettendorff, Martine; Hanon, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological data from several European countries suggested an increased risk of the chronic sleep disorder narcolepsy following vaccination with Pandemrix(™), an AS03-adjuvanted, pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine. Further research to investigate potential associations between Pandemrix™ vaccination, A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection and narcolepsy is required. Narcolepsy is most commonly caused by a reduction or absence of hypocretin produced by hypocretin-secreting neurons in the hypothalamus, and is tightly associated with HLA-II DQB1*06:02. Consequently, research focusing on CD4(+) T-cell responses, building on the hypothesis that for disease development, T cells specific for antigen(s) from hypocretin neurons must be activated or reactivated, is considered essential. Therefore, the following key areas of research can be identified, (1) characterization of hypothetical narcolepsy-specific auto-immune CD4(+) T cells, (2) mapping epitopes of such T cells, and (3) evaluating potential mechanisms that would enable such cells to gain access to the hypothalamus. Addressing these questions could further our understanding of the potential links between narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and/or infection. Of particular interest is that any evidence of a mimicry-based mechanism could also explain the association between narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection.

  20. Computational model for analyzing the evolutionary patterns of the neuraminidase gene of influenza A/H1N1.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Insung; Son, Hyeon Seok

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we performed computer simulations to evaluate the changes of selection potentials of codons in influenza A/H1N1 from 1999 to 2009. We artificially generated the sequences by using the transition matrices of positively selected codons over time, and their similarities against the database of influenzavirus A genus were determined by BLAST search. This is the first approach to predict the evolutionary direction of influenza A virus (H1N1) by simulating the codon substitutions over time. We observed that the BLAST results showed the high similarities with pandemic influenza A/H1N1 in 2009, suggesting that the classical human-origin influenza A/H1N1 isolated before 2009 might contain some selection potentials of swine-origin viruses. Computer simulations using the time series codon substitution patterns resulted dramatic changes of BLAST results in influenza A/H1N1, providing a possibility of developing a method for predicting the viral evolution in silico.

  1. Efficacy of Inactivated Swine Influenza Virus Vaccines Against the 2009 A/H1N1 Influenza Virus in Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene constellation of the 2009 pandemic A/H1N1 virus is a unique combination from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages, but prior to April 2009 had never before been identified in swine or other species. Although its hemagglutinin gene is related to North Ameri...

  2. Detection of novel influenza A(H1N1) virus by real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Whiley, David M; Bialasiewicz, Seweryn; Bletchly, Cheryl; Faux, Cassandra E; Harrower, Bruce; Gould, Allan R; Lambert, Stephen B; Nimmo, Graeme R; Nissen, Michael D; Sloots, Theo P

    2009-07-01

    Accurate and rapid diagnosis of novel influenza A(H1N1) infection is critical for minimising further spread through timely implementation of antiviral treatment and other public health based measures. In this study we developed two TaqMan-based reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) methods for the detection of novel influenza A(H1N1) virus targeting the haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes. The assays were validated using 152 clinical respiratory samples, including 61 Influenza A positive samples, collected in Queenland, Australia during the years 2008 to 2009 and a further 12 seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 influenza A isolates collected from years 2000 to 2002. A wildtype swine H1N1 isolate was also tested. RNA from an influenza A(H1N1) virus isolate (Auckland, 2009) was used as a positive control. Overall, the results showed that the RT-PCR methods were suitable for sensitive and specific detection of novel influenza A(H1N1) RNA in human samples.

  3. The influenza A(H1N1) epidemic in Mexico. Lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Villalobos, José A; Sarti, Elsa; Arzoz-Padrés, Jacqueline; Manuell-Lee, Gabriel; Méndez, Josefina Romero; Kuri-Morales, Pablo

    2009-09-28

    Several influenza pandemics have taken place throughout history and it was assumed that the pandemic would emerge from a new human virus resulting from the adaptation of an avian virus strain. Mexico, since 2003 had developed a National Preparedness and Response Plan for an Influenza Pandemic focused in risk communication, health promotion, healthcare, epidemiological surveillance, strategic stockpile, research and development. This plan was challenged on April 2009, when a new influenza A(H1N1) strain of swine origen was detected in Mexico. The situation faced, the decisions and actions taken, allowed to control the first epidemic wave in the country. This document describes the critical moments faced and explicitly point out the lessons learned focused on the decided support by the government, the National Pandemic Influenza Plan, the coordination among all the government levels, the presence and solidarity of international organizations with timely and daily information, diagnosis and the positive effect on the population following the preventive hygienic measures recommended by the health authorities. The international community will be able to use the Mexican experience in the interest of global health.

  4. Influenza A/H1N1_09: Australia and New Zealand's winter of discontent.

    PubMed

    Kotsimbos, Tom; Waterer, Grant; Jenkins, Christine; Kelly, Paul M; Cheng, Allen; Hancox, Robert J; Holmes, Mark; Wood-Baker, Richard; Bowler, Simon; Irving, Louis; Thompson, Philip

    2010-02-15

    Influenza A/H1N1_09 emerged in Mexico at the end of the Northern Hemisphere winter. Within weeks, the focus shifted to the Southern Hemisphere as the introduction of the novel virus coincided with the beginning of the influenza season. Intensive public health and health services planning had occurred in Australia and New Zealand as preparation for an influenza pandemic before 2009. However, this first pandemic wave was quite different to what had been expected. Key elements of the pandemic and response are outlined from the perspective of clinicians working at the frontline of patient care. In particular, they examine why past influenza pandemics and recent history are poor predictors of the current pandemic, the discordance between potential for transmission and disease severity, the broad clinical spectrum of H1N1_09 infection, clinical and health service management issues, and the relationship between health care and government policy. Finally, they address the need for the respiratory community to show leadership in times of crisis. Lessons learned in Australia and New Zealand during 2009 have important messages for similarly resourced countries in the Northern Hemisphere in the coming months as they face their own influenza season.

  5. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 during air travel.

    PubMed

    Neatherlin, John; Cramer, Elaine H; Dubray, Christine; Marienau, Karen J; Russell, Michelle; Sun, Hong; Whaley, Melissa; Hancock, Kathy; Duong, Krista K; Kirking, Hannah L; Schembri, Christopher; Katz, Jacqueline M; Cohen, Nicole J; Fishbein, Daniel B

    2013-01-01

    The global spread of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus (pH1N1) associated with travelers from North America during the onset of the 2009 pandemic demonstrates the central role of international air travel in virus migration. To characterize risk factors for pH1N1 transmission during air travel, we investigated travelers and airline employees from four North American flights carrying ill travelers with confirmed pH1N1 infection. Of 392 passengers and crew identified, information was available for 290 (74%) passengers were interviewed. Overall attack rates for acute respiratory infection and influenza-like illness 1-7 days after travel were 5.2% and 2.4% respectively. Of 43 individuals that provided sera, 4 (9.3%) tested positive for pH1N1 antibodies, including 3 with serologic evidence of asymptomatic infection. Investigation of novel influenza aboard aircraft may be instructive. However, beyond the initial outbreak phase, it may compete with community-based mitigation activities, and interpretation of findings will be difficult in the context of established community transmission.

  6. Transmission of pandemic A/H1N1 2009 influenza on passenger aircraft: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Thornley, Craig N; Mills, Clair; Roberts, Sally; Perera, Shanika; Peters, Julia; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian; Wilson, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess the risk of transmission of pandemic A/H1N1 2009 influenza (pandemic A/H1N1) from an infected high school group to other passengers on an airline flight and the effectiveness of screening and follow-up of exposed passengers. Design Retrospective cohort investigation using a questionnaire administered to passengers and laboratory investigation of those with symptoms. Setting Auckland, New Zealand, with national and international follow-up of passengers. Participants Passengers seated in the rear section of a Boeing 747-400 long haul flight that arrived on 25 April 2009, including a group of 24 students and teachers and 97 (out of 102) other passengers in the same section of the plane who agreed to be interviewed. Main outcome measures Laboratory confirmed pandemic A/H1N1 infection in susceptible passengers within 3.2 days of arrival; sensitivity and specificity of influenza symptoms for confirmed infection; and completeness and timeliness of contact tracing. Results Nine members of the school group were laboratory confirmed cases of pandemic A/H1N1 infection and had symptoms during the flight. Two other passengers developed confirmed pandemic A/H1N1 infection, 12 and 48 hours after the flight. They reported no other potential sources of infection. Their seating was within two rows of infected passengers, implying a risk of infection of about 3.5% for the 57 passengers in those rows. All but one of the confirmed pandemic A/H1N1 infected travellers reported cough, but more complex definitions of influenza cases had relatively low sensitivity. Rigorous follow-up by public health workers located 93% of passengers, but only 52% were contacted within 72 hours of arrival. Conclusions A low but measurable risk of transmission of pandemic A/H1N1 exists during modern commercial air travel. This risk is concentrated close to infected passengers with symptoms. Follow-up and screening of exposed passengers is slow and difficult once they have left the airport. PMID:20495017

  7. Seamless Handovers in Cobra Teardrop Satellite Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draim, John E.; Cefola, Paul J.; Ernandes, Kenneth J.

    2007-06-01

    Satellite systems provide the most efficient and possibly the only means of achieving two-way global communications with mobile systems (ships, aircraft, and vehicular traffic). To date, such systems have used only circular orbits, either GEO or LEO. Medium altitude elliptical constellations, on the other hand, can provide an efficient and affordable alternative to these architectures. Users also benefit from their very high average and minimum elevation angles, resulting in minimum signal attenuation. Cobra Teardrop is unique in that it employs time synchronized 8-h left- and right-leaning elliptical orbits giving mid-latitude observers the illusion of viewing a single satellite continuously orbiting almost directly overhead! In reality, observers see six different satellites per day, for 4 h each (while in their active duty cycles). By design, Teardrop satellites are physically in very close proximity at the handover points. This favorable geometry can be utilized to achieve a seamless handover from one satellite to the other (not requiring any electronic buffering). Handover is accomplished at the precise instant that the total path lengths from the transmitting station through both satellites to the receiving station are exactly equal. In these improved Cobra Teardrop arrays, an order of magnitude increase in global communications capacity (equivalent GEO slots) can be realized over earlier Basic Cobra systems. For decades into the future, these new orbital systems could satisfy a widely expanding range of commercial, government, and military high data rate communication requirements. These would include, but not be limited to, satellite cellular, air traffic control, meteorological, and combat net radio systems. With these arrays, a much larger number of system operators could be supported, without mutual electronic interference, than would ever be possible with circular orbits.

  8. Nested X Pinches on the COBRA Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; McBride, R. D.; Knapp, P. F.; Wilhelm, H.; Hammer, D. A.; Sinars, D. B.

    2009-01-21

    Recent results of X pinch studies on the COBRA generator at Cornell University (peak current up to 1.2 MA and rise time of 100 ns) are presented. Using an initial configuration of wires before their twisting, similar to nested cylindrical wire arrays enables the assembly of a symmetric configuration at the X pinch crossing region. It also enables an investigation of multilayered X pinches. X pinches with different configurations, including with different materials in the inner and outer wire layers, were tested.

  9. Rapid research response to the 2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza pandemic (Revised)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background When novel influenza viruses cause human infections, it is critical to characterize the illnesses, viruses, and immune responses to infection in order to develop diagnostics, treatments, and vaccines. The objective of the study was to collect samples from patients with suspected or confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 infections that could be made available to the scientific community. Respiratory secretions, sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected sequentially (when possible) from patients presenting with suspected or previously confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 infections. Clinical manifestations and illness outcomes were assessed. Respiratory secretions were tested for the presence of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus by means of isolation in tissue culture and real time RT-PCR. Sera were tested for the presence and level of HAI and neutralizing antibodies against the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Findings and conclusions Thirty patients with confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 infection were enrolled at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM). Clinical manifestations of illness were consistent with typical influenza. Twenty-eight of 30 had virological confirmation of illness; all recovered fully. Most patients had serum antibody responses or high levels of antibody in convalescent samples. Virus-positive samples were sent to J. Craig Venter Institute for sequencing and sequences were deposited in GenBank. Large volumes of sera collected from 2 convalescent adults were used to standardize antibody assays; aliquots of these sera are available from the repository. Aliquots of serum, PBMCs and stool collected from BCM subjects and subjects enrolled at other study sites are available for use by the scientific community, upon request. PMID:23641940

  10. Molecular character of influenza A/H1N1 2009: Implications for spread and control.

    PubMed

    Aras, Siddhesh; Aiyar, Ashok; Amedee, Angela M; Gallaher, William R

    2009-12-01

    The world is experiencing a pandemic of influenza that emerged in March 2009, due to a novel strain designated influenza A/H1N1 2009. This strain is closest in molecular sequence to swine influenza viruses, but differs from all previously known influenza by a minimum of 6.1%, and from prior "seasonal" H1N1 by 27.2%, giving it great potential for widespread human infection. While spread into India was delayed for two months by an aggressive interdiction program, since 1 August 2009 most cases in India have been indigenous. H1N1 2009 has differentially struck younger patients who are naïve susceptibles to its antigenic subtype, while sparing those >60 who have crossreactive antibody from prior experience with influenza decades ago and the 1977 "swine flu" vaccine distributed in the United States. It also appears to more severely affect pregnant women. It emanated from a single source in central Mexico, but its precise geographical and circumstantial origins, from either Eurasia or the Americas, remain uncertain. While currently a mild pandemic by the standard of past pandemics, the seriousness of H1N1 2009 especially among children should not be underestimated. There is potential for the virus, which continues to adapt to humans, to change over time into a more severe etiologic agent by any of several foreseeable mutations. Mass acceptance of the novel H1N1 2009 vaccine worldwide will be essential to its control. Having spread globally in a few months, affecting millions of people, it is likely to remain circulating in the human population for a decade or more.

  11. The challenges of global case reporting during pandemic A(H1N1) 2009

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Stephanie; Merianos, Angela; Mounts, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Abstract During the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza pandemic, the World Health Organization (WHO) asked all Member States to provide case-based data on at least the first 100 laboratory-confirmed influenza cases to generate an early understanding of the pandemic and provide appropriate guidance to affected countries. In reviewing the pandemic surveillance strategy, we evaluated the utility of case-based data collection and the challenges in interpreting these data at the global level. To do this, we assessed compliance with the surveillance recommendation and data completeness of submitted case records and described the epidemiological characteristics of up to the first 110 reported cases from each country, aggregated into regions. From April 2009 to August 2011, WHO received over 18 000 case records from 84 countries. Data reached WHO at different time intervals, in different formats and without information on collection methods. Just over half of the 18 000 records gave the date of symptom onset, which made it difficult to assess whether the cases were among the earliest to be confirmed. Descriptive epidemiological analyses were limited to summarizing age, sex and hospitalization ratios. Centralized analysis of case-based data had little value in describing key features of the pandemic. Results were difficult to interpret and would have been misleading if viewed in isolation. A better approach would be to identify critical questions, standardize data elements and methods of investigation, and create efficient channels for communication between countries and the international public health community. Regular exchange of routine surveillance data will help to consolidate these essential channels of communication. PMID:24391301

  12. Population modeling of influenza A/H1N1 virus kinetics and symptom dynamics.

    PubMed

    Canini, Laetitia; Carrat, Fabrice

    2011-03-01

    Influenza virus kinetics (VK) is used as a surrogate of infectiousness, while the natural history of influenza is described by symptom dynamics (SD). We used an original virus kinetics/symptom dynamics (VKSD) model to characterize human influenza virus infection and illness, based on a population approach. We combined structural equations and a statistical model to describe intra- and interindividual variability. The structural equations described influenza based on the target epithelial cells, the virus, the innate host response, and systemic symptoms. The model was fitted to individual VK and SD data obtained from 44 volunteers experimentally challenged with influenza A/H1N1 virus. Infection and illness parameters were calculated from best-fitted model estimates. We predicted that the cytokine level and NK cell activity would peak at days 2.2 and 4.2 after inoculation, respectively. Infectiousness, measured as the area under the VK curve above a viral titer threshold, lasted between 7.0 and 1.3 days and was 15 times lower in participants without systemic symptoms than in those with systemic symptoms (P < 0.001). The latent period, defined as the time between inoculation and infectiousness, varied from 0.7 to 1.9 days. The incubation period, defined as the time from inoculation to first symptoms, varied from 1.0 to 2.4 days. Our approach extends previous work by including the innate response and providing realistic estimates of infection and illness parameters, taking into account the strong interindividual variability. This approach could help to optimize studies of influenza VK and SD and to predict the effect of antivirals on infectiousness and symptoms.

  13. The challenges of global case reporting during pandemic A(H1N1) 2009.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephanie; Fitzner, Julia; Merianos, Angela; Mounts, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    During the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza pandemic, the World Health Organization (WHO) asked all Member States to provide case-based data on at least the first 100 laboratory-confirmed influenza cases to generate an early understanding of the pandemic and provide appropriate guidance to affected countries. In reviewing the pandemic surveillance strategy, we evaluated the utility of case-based data collection and the challenges in interpreting these data at the global level. To do this, we assessed compliance with the surveillance recommendation and data completeness of submitted case records and described the epidemiological characteristics of up to the first 110 reported cases from each country, aggregated into regions. From April 2009 to August 2011, WHO received over 18 000 case records from 84 countries. Data reached WHO at different time intervals, in different formats and without information on collection methods. Just over half of the 18 000 records gave the date of symptom onset, which made it difficult to assess whether the cases were among the earliest to be confirmed. Descriptive epidemiological analyses were limited to summarizing age, sex and hospitalization ratios. Centralized analysis of case-based data had little value in describing key features of the pandemic. Results were difficult to interpret and would have been misleading if viewed in isolation. A better approach would be to identify critical questions, standardize data elements and methods of investigation, and create efficient channels for communication between countries and the international public health community. Regular exchange of routine surveillance data will help to consolidate these essential channels of communication.

  14. Comparison of sea snake (Hydrophiidae) neurotoxin to cobra (Naja) neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Komori, Yumiko; Nagamizu, Masaya; Uchiya, Kei-Ichi; Nikai, Toshiaki; Tu, Anthony T

    2009-12-01

    Both sea snakes and cobras have venoms containing postsynaptic neurotoxins. Comparison of the primary structures indicates many similarities, especially the positions of the four disulfide bonds. However, detailed examination reveals differences in several amino acid residues. Amino acid sequences of sea snake neurotoxins were determined, and then compared to cobra neurotoxins by computer modeling. This allowed for easy comparison of the similarities and differences between the two types of postsynaptic neurotoxins. Comparison of computer models for the toxins of sea snakes and cobra will reveal the three dimensional difference of the toxins much clearer than the amino acid sequence alone.

  15. Helicopter Handling Qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Helicopters are used by the military and civilian communities for a variety of tasks and must be capable of operating in poor weather conditions and at night. Accompanying extended helicopter operations is a significant increase in pilot workload and a need for better handling qualities. An overview of the status and problems in the development and specification of helicopter handling-qualities criteria is presented. Topics for future research efforts by government and industry are highlighted.

  16. Small Business Innovations (Helicopters)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The amount of engine power required for a helicopter to hover is an important, but difficult, consideration in helicopter design. The EHPIC program model produces converged, freely distorted wake geometries that generate accurate analysis of wake-induced downwash, allowing good predictions of rotor thrust and power requirements. Continuum Dynamics, Inc., the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) company that developed EHPIC, also produces RotorCRAFT, a program for analysis of aerodynamic loading of helicopter blades in forward flight. Both helicopter codes have been licensed to commercial manufacturers.

  17. Coinfection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and dengue virus in fatal cases

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, Anne Carolinne Bezerra; Ramalho, Izabel Letícia Cavalcante; Guedes, Maria Izabel Florindo; Braga, Deborah Nunes Melo; Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona Góes; de Melo, Maria Elisabeth Lisboa; Araújo, Rafael Montenegro de Carvalho; Lima, Elza Gadelha; da Silva, Luciene Alexandre Bié; Araújo, Lia de Carvalho; Araújo, Fernanda Montenegro de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report on four patients with fatal influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and dengue virus coinfections. Clinical, necropsy and histopathologic findings presented in all cases were characteristic of influenza-dengue coinfections, and all were laboratory-confirmed for both infections. The possibility of influenza and dengue coinfection should be considered in locations where these two viruses’ epidemic periods coincide to avoid fatal outcomes. Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral infection caused by one of the four dengue viruses (DENV-1 to 4). Each of these viruses is capable of causing nonspecific febrile illnesses, classic dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever (Gubler 1998). As a result, dengue is often difficult to diagnose clinically, especially because peak dengue season often coincides with that of other common febrile illnesses in tropical regions (Chacon et al. 2015). In April 2009, a new virus, influenza A/H1N1/pandemic (FluA/H1N1/09pdm), caused a severe outbreak in Mexico. The virus quickly spread throughout the world, and in June 2009, the World Health Organization declared a pandemic (WHO 2010). In Brazil, the first laboratory confirmed case of FluA/H1N1/09pdm was in July 2009 (Pires Neto et al. 2013). The state of Ceará, in Northeast Brazil, is a dengue endemic area. In this state, the virus influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 has circulated since 2009, and through the first half of 2012, 11 deaths caused by the virus were confirmed (Pires Neto et al. 2013). The influenza and dengue seasons in Ceará overlap, which led to diagnostic difficulties. We report four cases of laboratory-confirmed coinfection of deadly influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 with DENV, which occurred during the dengue and influenza season in 2012 and 2013 in Ceará. PMID:27598244

  18. Coinfection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and dengue virus in fatal cases.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Anne Carolinne Bezerra; Ramalho, Izabel Letícia Cavalcante; Guedes, Maria Izabel Florindo; Braga, Deborah Nunes Melo; Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona Góes; Melo, Maria Elisabeth Lisboa de; Araújo, Rafael Montenegro de Carvalho; Lima, Elza Gadelha; Silva, Luciene Alexandre Bié da; Araújo, Lia de Carvalho; Araújo, Fernanda Montenegro de Carvalho

    2016-09-01

    We report on four patients with fatal influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and dengue virus coinfections. Clinical, necropsy and histopathologic findings presented in all cases were characteristic of influenza-dengue coinfections, and all were laboratory-confirmed for both infections. The possibility of influenza and dengue coinfection should be considered in locations where these two viruses' epidemic periods coincide to avoid fatal outcomes. Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral infection caused by one of the four dengue viruses (DENV-1 to 4). Each of these viruses is capable of causing nonspecific febrile illnesses, classic dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever (Gubler 1998). As a result, dengue is often difficult to diagnose clinically, especially because peak dengue season often coincides with that of other common febrile illnesses in tropical regions (Chacon et al. 2015). In April 2009, a new virus, influenza A/H1N1/pandemic (FluA/H1N1/09pdm), caused a severe outbreak in Mexico. The virus quickly spread throughout the world, and in June 2009, the World Health Organization declared a pandemic (WHO 2010). In Brazil, the first laboratory confirmed case of FluA/H1N1/09pdm was in July 2009 (Pires Neto et al. 2013). The state of Ceará, in Northeast Brazil, is a dengue endemic area. In this state, the virus influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 has circulated since 2009, and through the first half of 2012, 11 deaths caused by the virus were confirmed (Pires Neto et al. 2013). The influenza and dengue seasons in Ceará overlap, which led to diagnostic difficulties. We report four cases of laboratory-confirmed coinfection of deadly influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 with DENV, which occurred during the dengue and influenza season in 2012 and 2013 in Ceará.

  19. Genetic makeup of amantadine-resistant and oseltamivir-resistant human influenza A/H1N1 viruses.

    PubMed

    Zaraket, Hassan; Saito, Reiko; Suzuki, Yasushi; Baranovich, Tatiana; Dapat, Clyde; Caperig-Dapat, Isolde; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    The emergence and widespread occurrence of antiviral drug-resistant seasonal human influenza A viruses, especially oseltamivir-resistant A/H1N1 virus, are major concerns. To understand the genetic background of antiviral drug-resistant A/H1N1 viruses, we performed full genome sequencing of prepandemic A/H1N1 strains. Seasonal influenza A/H1N1 viruses, including antiviral-susceptible viruses, amantadine-resistant viruses, and oseltamivir-resistant viruses, obtained from several areas in Japan during the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 influenza seasons were analyzed. Sequencing of the full genomes of these viruses was performed, and the phylogenetic relationships among the sequences of each individual genome segment were inferred. Reference genome sequences from the Influenza Virus Resource database were included to determine the closest ancestor for each segment. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the oseltamivir-resistant strain evolved from a reassortant oseltamivir-susceptible strain (clade 2B) which circulated in the 2007-2008 season by acquiring the H275Y resistance-conferring mutation in the NA gene. The oseltamivir-resistant lineage (corresponding to the Northern European resistant lineage) represented 100% of the H1N1 isolates from the 2008-2009 season and further acquired at least one mutation in each of the polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2), polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1), hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) genes. Therefore, a reassortment event involving two distinct oseltamivir-susceptible lineages, followed by the H275Y substitution in the NA gene and other mutations elsewhere in the genome, contributed to the emergence of the oseltamivir-resistant lineage. In contrast, amantadine-resistant viruses from the 2007-2008 season distinctly clustered in clade 2C and were characterized by extensive amino acid substitutions across their genomes, suggesting that a fitness gap among its genetic components might have driven these mutations to maintain it in the population.

  20. Risk of Guillain–Barré syndrome following pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 vaccination in Germany†

    PubMed Central

    Prestel, Jürgen; Volkers, Peter; Mentzer, Dirk; Lehmann, Helmar C; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Keller-Stanislawski, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A prospective, epidemiologic study was conducted to assess whether the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) vaccination in Germany almost exclusively using an AS03-adjuvanted vaccine (Pandemrix) impacts the risk of Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) and its variant Fisher syndrome (FS). Methods Potential cases of GBS/FS were reported by 351 participating hospitals throughout Germany. The self-controlled case series methodology was applied to all GBS/FS cases fulfilling the Brighton Collaboration (BC) case definition (levels 1–3 of diagnostic certainty) with symptom onset between 1 November 2009 and 30 September 2010 reported until end of December 2010. Results Out of 676 GBS/FS reports, in 30 cases, GBS/FS (BC levels 1–3) occurred within 150 days following influenza A(H1N1) vaccination. The relative incidence of GBS/FS within the primary risk period (days 5–42 post-vaccination) compared with the control period (days 43–150 post-vaccination) was 4.65 (95%CI [2.17, 9.98]). Similar results were found when stratifying for infections within 3 weeks prior to onset of GBS/FS and when excluding cases with additional seasonal influenza vaccination. The overall result of temporally adjusted analyses supported the primary finding of an increased relative incidence of GBS/FS following influenza A(H1N1) vaccination. Conclusions The results indicate an increased risk of GBS/FS in temporal association with pandemic influenza A(H1N1) vaccination in Germany. © 2014 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24817531

  1. Whole-Genome Characterization of a Novel Human Influenza A(H1N2) Virus Variant, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Born, Priscila Silva; Matos, Aline Rocha; Motta, Fernando Couto; Caetano, Braulia Costa; Debur, Maria do Carmo; Riediger, Irina Nastassja; Brown, David; Siqueira, Marilda M.

    2017-01-01

    We report the characterization of a novel reassortant influenza A(H1N2) virus not previously reported in humans. Recovered from a a pig farm worker in southeast Brazil who had influenza-like illness, this virus is a triple reassortant containing gene segments from subtypes H1N2 (hemagglutinin), H3N2 (neuraminidase), and pandemic H1N1 (remaining genes). PMID:27983507

  2. Virulence determinants of pandemic A(H1N1)2009 influenza virus in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Uraki, Ryuta; Kiso, Maki; Shinya, Kyoko; Goto, Hideo; Takano, Ryo; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Takahashi, Kazuo; Daniels, Rod S; Hungnes, Olav; Watanabe, Tokiko; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-02-01

    A novel swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus [A(H1N1)pdm09 virus] caused the 2009 influenza pandemic. Most patients exhibited mild symptoms similar to seasonal influenza, but some experienced severe clinical signs and, in the worst cases, died. Such differences in symptoms are generally associated with preexisting medical conditions, but recent reports indicate the possible involvement of viral factors in clinical severity. To better understand the mechanism of pathogenicity of the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, here, we compared five viruses that are genetically similar but were isolated from patients with either severe or mild symptoms. In a mouse model, A/Norway/3487/2009 (Norway3487) virus exhibited greater pathogenicity than did A/Osaka/164/2009 (Osaka164) virus. By exploiting reassortant viruses between these two viruses, we found that viruses possessing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of Norway3487 in the genetic background of Osaka164 were more pathogenic in mice than other reassortant viruses, indicating a role for HA in the high virulence of Norway3487 virus. Intriguingly, a virus possessing HA, NA, and NS derived from Norway3487 exhibited greater pathogenicity in mice in concert with PB2 and PB1 derived from Osaka164 than did the parental Norway3487 virus. These findings demonstrate that reassortment between A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses can lead to increased pathogenicity and highlight the need for continued surveillance of A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses.

  3. Structural characterization of a protective epitope spanning A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus neuraminidase monomers

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hongquan; Yang, Hua; Shore, David A.; Garten, Rebecca J.; Couzens, Laura; Gao, Jin; Jiang, Lianlian; Carney, Paul J.; Villanueva, Julie; Stevens, James; Eichelberger, Maryna C.

    2015-01-01

    A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza A viruses predominated in the 2013–2014 USA influenza season, and although most of these viruses remain sensitive to Food and Drug Administration-approved neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, alternative therapies are needed. Here we show that monoclonal antibody CD6, selected for binding to the NA of the prototypic A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, A/California/07/2009, protects mice against lethal virus challenge. The crystal structure of NA in complex with CD6 Fab reveals a unique epitope, where the heavy-chain complementarity determining regions (HCDRs) 1 and 2 bind one NA monomer, the light-chain CDR2 binds the neighbouring monomer, whereas HCDR3 interacts with both monomers. This 30-amino-acid epitope spans the lateral face of an NA dimer and is conserved among circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. These results suggest that the large, lateral CD6 epitope may be an effective target of antibodies selected for development as therapeutic agents against circulating H1N1 influenza viruses. PMID:25668439

  4. Status and Perspectives of the COBRA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonsak, Björn

    COBRA is a neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) experiment using an array of Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride semiconductor detectors, the isotope of interest being 116Cd with a Q-value of 2814 keV. To investigate the experimental challenges of operating CdZnTe detectors in low background mode and to identify potential background components, a demonstrator setup is operated at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) in Italy, while additional studies are proceeding in surface laboratories. The experiment consists of monolithic, calorimetric detectors of coplanar grid design (CPG de- tectors). These detectors have a size of 1×1×1 cm3 and are arranged in four layers of 4×4 detectors. An overview of the current status and of future perspectives is given. Results of pulse shape analyses are presented as well as background estimates using the data collected so far.

  5. INGEN: A COBRA-NC input generator user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, C.L.; Dodge, R.E.

    1986-12-01

    The INGEN (INput GENerator) computer program has been developed as a preprocessor to simplify input generation for the COBRA-NC computer program. INGEN uses several empirical correlations and geometric assumptions to simplify the data input requirements for the COBRA-NC computer code. The simplified input scheme is obtained at the expense of much flexibility provided by COBRA-NC. For more complex problems requiring additional flexibility however, INGEN may be used to provide a skeletal input file to which the more detailed input may be added. This report describes the input requirements for INGEN and describes the algorithms and correlations used to generate the COBRA-NC input. 9 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Estimating the fitness advantage conferred by permissive neuraminidase mutations in recent oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jeff; Hooper, Kathryn A; Petrie, Stephen; Lee, Raphael; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Reh, Lucia; Guarnaccia, Teagan; Baas, Chantal; Xue, Lumin; Vitesnik, Sophie; Leang, Sook-Kwan; McVernon, Jodie; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian G; McCaw, James M; Bloom, Jesse D; Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-04-01

    Oseltamivir is relied upon worldwide as the drug of choice for the treatment of human influenza infection. Surveillance for oseltamivir resistance is routinely performed to ensure the ongoing efficacy of oseltamivir against circulating viruses. Since the emergence of the pandemic 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus (A(H1N1)pdm09), the proportion of A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses that are oseltamivir resistant (OR) has generally been low. However, a cluster of OR A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, encoding the neuraminidase (NA) H275Y oseltamivir resistance mutation, was detected in Australia in 2011 amongst community patients that had not been treated with oseltamivir. Here we combine a competitive mixtures ferret model of influenza infection with a mathematical model to assess the fitness, both within and between hosts, of recent OR A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. In conjunction with data from in vitro analyses of NA expression and activity we demonstrate that contemporary A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are now more capable of acquiring H275Y without compromising their fitness, than earlier A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses circulating in 2009. Furthermore, using reverse engineered viruses we demonstrate that a pair of permissive secondary NA mutations, V241I and N369K, confers robust fitness on recent H275Y A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, which correlated with enhanced surface expression and enzymatic activity of the A(H1N1)pdm09 NA protein. These permissive mutations first emerged in 2010 and are now present in almost all circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Our findings suggest that recent A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are now more permissive to the acquisition of H275Y than earlier A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, increasing the risk that OR A(H1N1)pdm09 will emerge and spread worldwide.

  7. Antigenic drift of the pandemic 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus in A ferret model.

    PubMed

    Guarnaccia, Teagan; Carolan, Louise A; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Lee, Raphael T C; Job, Emma; Reading, Patrick C; Petrie, Stephen; McCaw, James M; McVernon, Jodie; Hurt, Aeron C; Kelso, Anne; Mosse, Jennifer; Barr, Ian G; Laurie, Karen L

    2013-01-01

    Surveillance data indicate that most circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza viruses have remained antigenically similar since they emerged in humans in 2009. However, antigenic drift is likely to occur in the future in response to increasing population immunity induced by infection or vaccination. In this study, sequential passaging of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus by contact transmission through two independent series of suboptimally vaccinated ferrets resulted in selection of variant viruses with an amino acid substitution (N156K, H1 numbering without signal peptide; N159K, H3 numbering without signal peptide; N173K, H1 numbering from first methionine) in a known antigenic site of the viral HA. The N156K HA variant replicated and transmitted efficiently between naïve ferrets and outgrew wildtype virus in vivo in ferrets in the presence and absence of immune pressure. In vitro, in a range of cell culture systems, the N156K variant rapidly adapted, acquiring additional mutations in the viral HA that also potentially affected antigenic properties. The N156K escape mutant was antigenically distinct from wildtype virus as shown by binding of HA-specific antibodies. Glycan binding assays demonstrated the N156K escape mutant had altered receptor binding preferences compared to wildtype virus, which was supported by computational modeling predictions. The N156K substitution, and culture adaptations, have been detected in human A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses with N156K preferentially reported in sequences from original clinical samples rather than cultured isolates. This study demonstrates the ability of the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus to undergo rapid antigenic change to evade a low level vaccine response, while remaining fit in a ferret transmission model of immunization and infection. Furthermore, the potential changes in receptor binding properties that accompany antigenic changes highlight the importance of routine characterization of clinical samples in human A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza surveillance.

  8. COBRA-Seq: Sensitive and Quantitative Methylome Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Varinli, Hilal; Statham, Aaron L.; Clark, Susan J.; Molloy, Peter L.; Ross, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    Combined Bisulfite Restriction Analysis (COBRA) quantifies DNA methylation at a specific locus. It does so via digestion of PCR amplicons produced from bisulfite-treated DNA, using a restriction enzyme that contains a cytosine within its recognition sequence, such as TaqI. Here, we introduce COBRA-seq, a genome wide reduced methylome method that requires minimal DNA input (0.1–1.0 μg) and can either use PCR or linear amplification to amplify the sequencing library. Variants of COBRA-seq can be used to explore CpG-depleted as well as CpG-rich regions in vertebrate DNA. The choice of enzyme influences enrichment for specific genomic features, such as CpG-rich promoters and CpG islands, or enrichment for less CpG dense regions such as enhancers. COBRA-seq coupled with linear amplification has the additional advantage of reduced PCR bias by producing full length fragments at high abundance. Unlike other reduced representative methylome methods, COBRA-seq has great flexibility in the choice of enzyme and can be multiplexed and tuned, to reduce sequencing costs and to interrogate different numbers of sites. Moreover, COBRA-seq is applicable to non-model organisms without the reference genome and compatible with the investigation of non-CpG methylation by using restriction enzymes containing CpA, CpT, and CpC in their recognition site. PMID:26512698

  9. COBRA-WC: a version of COBRA for single-phase multiassembly thermal hydraulic transient analysis. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.L.; Basehore, K.L.; Wheeler, C.L.; Prather, W.A.; Masterson, R.E.

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this report is to provide the user of the COBRA-WC (Whole Core) code a basic understanding of the code operation and capabilities. Included in this manual are the equations solved and the assumptions made in their derivations, a general description of the code capabilities, an explanation of the numerical algorithms used to solve the equations, and input instructions for using the code. Also, the auxiliary programs GEOM and SPECSET are described and input instructions for each are given. Input for COBRA-WC sample problems and the corresponding output are given in the appendices. The COBRA-WC code has been developed from the COBRA-IV-I code to analyze liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) assembly transients. It was specifically developed to analyze a core flow coastdown to natural circulation cooling.

  10. Helicopter simulator qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampson, Brian

    1992-01-01

    CAE has extensive experience in building helicopter simulators and has participated in group working sessions for fixed-wing advisory circulars. Against this background, issues that should be addressed in establishing helicopter approval criteria were highlighted. Some of these issues are not immediately obvious and may, indeed, be more important than the criteria a themselves.

  11. The RMAX Helicopter UAV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    7 SYSTEM CONFIGURATION..................................8 OBSERVATION FLIGHT AT ERUPTING VOLCANO , MT. USU...autonomous flight control system. Because our autonomous, unmanned helicopter has succeeded in observation roles at erupting volcanoes , the Japanese...saving devices. In April 2000, we had our GPS-based autonomous helicopter play an observation role at an erupting volcano . This is the first time in

  12. Implementation and verification of a comprehensive helicopter coupled rotor - Fuselage analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, E. R.; Banerjee, D.; Shamie, J.; Straub, F.; Dinyavari, M. A. H.

    1985-01-01

    The analytical basis and the application of a Rotor/Airframe Comprehensive Aeroelastic Program (RACAP) are described in detail. The rationale behind each analytical choice is outlined and the modular procedure is described. The program is verified by application to the AH-1G helicopter. The applicability of various airload prediction models is examined, and both the steady and vibratory responses of the blade are compared with flight test data. Reasonable correlation is found between measured and calculated blade response, with excellent correlation for vibration amplitudes at various locations on the fuselage such as engine, pilot seat, and gunner. Within the analytical model, comparisons are drawn between an isolated blade analysis and a coupled rotor/fuselage model. The deficiency of the former in the context of the AH-1G is highlighted.

  13. Helicopter human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  14. Productive infection of human skeletal muscle cells by pandemic and seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses.

    PubMed

    Desdouits, Marion; Munier, Sandie; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Jeannin, Patricia; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Ozden, Simona; Gessain, Antoine; Van Der Werf, Sylvie; Naffakh, Nadia; Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Besides the classical respiratory and systemic symptoms, unusual complications of influenza A infection in humans involve the skeletal muscles. Numerous cases of acute myopathy and/or rhabdomyolysis have been reported, particularly following the outbreak of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in 2009. The pathogenesis of these influenza-associated myopathies (IAM) remains unkown, although the direct infection of muscle cells is suspected. Here, we studied the susceptibility of cultured human primary muscle cells to a 2009 pandemic and a 2008 seasonal influenza A(H1N1) isolate. Using cells from different donors, we found that differentiated muscle cells (i. e. myotubes) were highly susceptible to infection by both influenza A(H1N1) isolates, whereas undifferentiated cells (i. e. myoblasts) were partially resistant. The receptors for influenza viruses, α2-6 and α2-3 linked sialic acids, were detected on the surface of myotubes and myoblasts. Time line of viral nucleoprotein (NP) expression and nuclear export showed that the first steps of the viral replication cycle could take place in muscle cells. Infected myotubes and myoblasts exhibited budding virions and nuclear inclusions as observed by transmission electron microscopy and correlative light and electron microscopy. Myotubes, but not myoblasts, yielded infectious virus progeny that could further infect naive muscle cells after proteolytic treatment. Infection led to a cytopathic effect with the lysis of muscle cells, as characterized by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. The secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by muscle cells was not affected following infection. Our results are compatible with the hypothesis of a direct muscle infection causing rhabdomyolysis in IAM patients.

  15. A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY OF PANDEMIC INFLUENZA A(H1N1)PDM09 IN BRAZIL, 2009 - 2010.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, Erika Valeska; Luna, Expedito José de Albuquerque

    2016-11-03

    Influenza A viruses undergo frequent antigenic mutations and may thus cause seasonal epidemics and pandemics. The aim of this study was to recover the epidemiological history of the pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Brazil. A descriptive study was conducted in 2009-2010. The Brazilian Information System for reportable diseases (SINAN) was the data source. A total of 105,054 suspected cases of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 were reported to SINAN. Of these, 53,797 (51.2%) were classified as the new influenza virus subtype. Among the confirmed cases, 56.7% were female, the mean age was 26.31 (SD ± 18.1) years. Fever was the most common sign among the confirmed cases (99.7%) and the presence of comorbidities was reported in 32.5% of cases. In 2009 there were confirmed cases in all 26 Brazilian States and the Federal District. The incidence (per 100,000 inhabitants) of severe influenza in the population was 28.0 in 2009 and 0.5 in 2010. The states of Paraná (301.3), Santa Catarina (36.0) and Rio Grande do Sul (27.4) presented the highest incidence; 46.4% of the confirmed cases were hospitalized and 47,643 were cured (93.8%). The case-fatality rate was 3.9% in 2009. The pandemic virus A(H1N1)pdm09 hit Brazil between April/2009 and December/2010 with an important difference in the geographic pattern distribution of the cases from the northeast to the south of the country. Children and young adults were the most affected. The limitations of the study were data quality and inconsistencies in the final classification of cases in SINAN. This study highlights the urgent need for improvements in the surveillance of emerging diseases in Brazil.

  16. Reassortant swine influenza viruses isolated in Japan contain genes from pandemic A(H1N1) 2009.

    PubMed

    Kanehira, Katsushi; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Uchida, Yuko; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko

    2014-06-01

    In 2013, three reassortant swine influenza viruses (SIVs)-two H1N2 and one H3N2-were isolated from symptomatic pigs in Japan; each contained genes from the pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 virus and endemic SIVs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two H1N2 viruses, A/swine/Gunma/1/2013 and A/swine/Ibaraki/1/2013, were reassortants that contain genes from the following three distinct lineages: (i) H1 and nucleoprotein (NP) genes derived from a classical swine H1 HA lineage uniquely circulating among Japanese SIVs; (ii) neuraminidase (NA) genes from human-like H1N2 swine viruses; and (iii) other genes from pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 viruses. The H3N2 virus, A/swine/Miyazaki/2/2013, comprised genes from two sources: (i) hemagglutinin (HA) and NA genes derived from human and human-like H3N2 swine viruses and (ii) other genes from pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 viruses. Phylogenetic analysis also indicated that each of the reassortants may have arisen independently in Japanese pigs. A/swine/Miyazaki/2/2013 were found to have strong antigenic reactivities with antisera generated for some seasonal human-lineage viruses isolated during or before 2003, whereas A/swine/Miyazaki/2/2013 reactivities with antisera against viruses isolated after 2004 were clearly weaker. In addition, antisera against some strains of seasonal human-lineage H1 viruses did not react with either A/swine/Gunma/1/2013 or A/swine/Ibaraki/1/2013. These findings indicate that emergence and spread of these reassortant SIVs is a potential public health risk.

  17. A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY OF PANDEMIC INFLUENZA A(H1N1)PDM09 IN BRAZIL, 2009 - 2010

    PubMed Central

    ROSSETTO, Erika Valeska; LUNA, Expedito José de Albuquerque

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Influenza A viruses undergo frequent antigenic mutations and may thus cause seasonal epidemics and pandemics. The aim of this study was to recover the epidemiological history of the pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Brazil. A descriptive study was conducted in 2009-2010. The Brazilian Information System for reportable diseases (SINAN) was the data source. A total of 105,054 suspected cases of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 were reported to SINAN. Of these, 53,797 (51.2%) were classified as the new influenza virus subtype. Among the confirmed cases, 56.7% were female, the mean age was 26.31 (SD ± 18.1) years. Fever was the most common sign among the confirmed cases (99.7%) and the presence of comorbidities was reported in 32.5% of cases. In 2009 there were confirmed cases in all 26 Brazilian States and the Federal District. The incidence (per 100,000 inhabitants) of severe influenza in the population was 28.0 in 2009 and 0.5 in 2010. The states of Paraná (301.3), Santa Catarina (36.0) and Rio Grande do Sul (27.4) presented the highest incidence; 46.4% of the confirmed cases were hospitalized and 47,643 were cured (93.8%). The case-fatality rate was 3.9% in 2009. The pandemic virus A(H1N1)pdm09 hit Brazil between April/2009 and December/2010 with an important difference in the geographic pattern distribution of the cases from the northeast to the south of the country. Children and young adults were the most affected. The limitations of the study were data quality and inconsistencies in the final classification of cases in SINAN. This study highlights the urgent need for improvements in the surveillance of emerging diseases in Brazil. PMID:27828619

  18. Short communication: antiviral activity of subcritical water extract of Brassica juncea against influenza virus A/H1N1 in nonfat milk.

    PubMed

    Lee, N-K; Lee, J-H; Lim, S-M; Lee, K A; Kim, Y B; Chang, P-S; Paik, H-D

    2014-09-01

    Subcritical water extract (SWE) of Brassica juncea was studied for antiviral effects against influenza virus A/H1N1 and for the possibility of application as a nonfat milk supplement for use as an "antiviral food." At maximum nontoxic concentrations, SWE had higher antiviral activity against influenza virus A/H1N1 than n-hexane, ethanol, or hot water (80°C) extracts. Addition of 0.5mg/mL of B. juncea SWE to culture medium led to 50.35% cell viability (% antiviral activity) for Madin-Darby canine kidney cells infected with influenza virus A/H1N1. Nonfat milk supplemented with 0.28mg/mL of B. juncea SWE showed 39.62% antiviral activity against influenza virus A/H1N1. Thus, the use of B. juncea SWE as a food supplement might aid in protection from influenza viral infection.

  19. Interim estimates of 2015/16 vaccine effectiveness against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, Canada, February 2016.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Catharine; Skowronski, Danuta M; Sabaiduc, Suzana; Winter, Anne Luise; Dickinson, James A; De Serres, Gaston; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Drews, Steven J; Martineau, Christine; Eshaghi, Alireza; Krajden, Mel; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Using a test-negative design, the Canadian Sentinel Practitioner Surveillance Network (SPSN) assessed interim 2015/16 vaccine effectiveness (VE) against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Adjusted VE showed significant protection of 64% (95% confidence interval (CI): 44-77%) overall and 56% (95%CI: 26-73%) for adults between 20 and 64 years-old against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 illness. Among the 67 A(H1N1)pdm09-positive specimens that were successfully sequenced, 62 (> 90%) belonged to the emerging genetic 6B.1 subclade, defined by S162N (potential gain of glycosylation) and I216T mutations in the haemagglutinin protein. Findings from the Canadian SPSN indicate that the 2015/16 northern hemisphere vaccine provided significant protection against A(H1N1)pdm09 illness despite genetic evolution in circulating viruses.

  20. Psychological response of family members of patients hospitalised for influenza A/H1N1 in Oaxaca, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The A/H1N1 pandemic originated in Mexico in April 2009, amid high uncertainty, social and economic disruption, and media reports of panic. The aim of this research project was to evaluate the psychological response of family primary caregivers of patients hospitalised in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with suspected influenza A/H1N1 to establish whether there was empirical evidence of high adverse psychological response, and to identify risk factors for such a response. If such evidence was found, a secondary aim was to develop a specific early intervention of psychological support for these individuals, to reduce distress and possibly lessen the likelihood of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the longer term. Methods Psychological assessment questionnaires were administered to the family primary caregivers of patients hospitalised in the ICU in the General Hospital of Zone 1 of the Mexican Institute for Social Security (IMSS), Oaxaca, Mexico with suspected influenza A/H1N1, during the month of November 2009. The main outcome measures were ratings of reported perceived stress (PSS-10), depression (CES-D), and death anxiety (DAQ). Data were subjected to simple and multiple linear regression analysis to identify risk factors for adverse psychological response. Results Elevated levels of perceived stress and depression, compared to population normative data, and moderate levels of death anxiety were noted. Levels of depression were similar to those found in comparable studies of family members of ICU patients admitted for other conditions. Multiple regression analysis indicated that increasing age and non-spousal family relationship were significantly associated with depression and perceived stress. Female gender, increasing age, and higher levels of education were significantly associated with high death anxiety. Comparisons with data collected in previous studies in the same hospital ICU with groups affected by a range of other medical conditions indicated that the psychological response reported in this study was generally lower. Conclusions Data indicated that, contrary to widely publicised reports of 'panic' surrounding A/H1N1, that some of those most directly affected did not report excessive psychological responses; however, we concluded that there was sufficient evidence to support provision of limited psychological support to family caregivers. PMID:21129214

  1. Prevalence of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus Resistant to Oseltamivir in Shiraz, Iran, During 2012 - 2013

    PubMed Central

    Khodadad, Nastaran; Moattari, Afagh; Shamsi Shahr Abadi, Mahmoud; Kadivar, Mohammad Rahim; Sarvari, Jamal; Tavakoli, Forough; Pirbonyeh, Neda; Emami, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oseltamivir has been used as a drug of choice for the prophylaxis and treatment of human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection across the world. However, the most frequently identified oseltamivir resistant virus, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, exhibit the H275Y substitution in NA gene. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence and phylogenetic relationships of oseltamivir resistance in influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated in Shiraz, Iran. Patients and Methods: Throat swab samples were collected from 200 patients with influenza-like disease from December 2012 until February 2013. A total of 77 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 positive strains were identified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Oseltamivir resistance was detected using quantal assay and nested-PCR method. The NA gene sequencing was conducted to detect oseltamivir-resistant mutants and establish the phylogeny of the prevalent influenza variants. Results: Our results revealed that A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses present in these samples were susceptible to oseltamivir, and contained 5 site specific mutations (V13G, V106I, V241I, N248D, and N369K) in NA gene. These mutations correlated with increasing expression and enzymatic activity of NA protein in the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, which were closely related to a main influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 cluster isolated around the world. Conclusions: A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, identified in this study in Shiraz, Iran, contained 5 site specific mutations and were susceptible to oseltamivir. PMID:26464773

  2. The functional morphology of hooding in cobras.

    PubMed

    Young, Bruce A; Kardong, Kenneth V

    2010-05-01

    Many snakes, particularly cobras, form as part of a defensive display, a hood, an active lateral expansion of their neck skin and underlying musculature and ribs. We identified muscle groups possibly involved in hooding based on their attachments on the specialized ribs of the neck. We then used a combination of morphology, kinematic analysis, morphometrics, electromyography and muscle stimulation to test hypotheses about the functional basis of hooding. We confirmed that hood protraction and erection is an active process that begins cranially and extends caudally, often in stages, through the combined action of several sets of muscles. One set of axial muscles (levator costae and supracostalis lateralis superior) coursing along a line of action to rib displacement are the prime erectors acting to lift the hood. However, a second set of muscles connecting ribs to skin primarily keep the skin taut, rather than to displace the ribs relative to the vertebrae. A third set of muscles coursing between ribs function primarily to transmit forces between adjacent ribs rather than to move ribs. The maintenance of the erect hood requires continued muscle activity. Hood relaxation is due to both active muscle contraction of a fourth set of axial muscles and to passive recoil events in the costovertebral ligaments. The shape of the fully erect hood is reflective of the morphometrics of the underlying ribs, while the duration and kinematics of hood erection and relaxation are related to the behavioral context of the display.

  3. Shed king cobra and cobra skins as model membranes for in-vitro nicotine permeation studies.

    PubMed

    Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Prakongpan, Sompol; Panomsuk, Suwannee; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Priprem, Aroonsri

    2002-10-01

    Shed king cobra skin (SKCS) and shed cobra skin (SCS) were investigated for use as barrier membranes, including some pre-hydration factors, for in-vitro nicotine permeation. Inter-specimen variations in nicotine fluxes using shed snake skin were compared with those using human epidermis. Nicotine in the form of 1% w/v aqueous buffer solution at pH 5 and transdermal patches (dose 14 mg day(-1)) were used. The nicotine fluxes across the shed snake skin were not significantly affected (P > 0.05) by temperature and duration of hydration pre-treatment. Scanning electron micrographs of SKCS and SCS revealed a remarkable difference in surface morphology, but the nicotine fluxes using both shed skins were not significantly different (P > 0.05). When compared with the results obtained using human epidermis, there were similarities in fluxes and permeation profiles of nicotine. Using nicotine solution, the nicotine permeation profiles of all membranes followed zero order kinetics. The amount of nicotine permeated provided good linearity with the square root of time over 24 h (R(2) > 0.98) when using nicotine patches. The nicotine fluxes using SKCS and SCS had less inter-specimen variation than those using human epidermis. The results suggest a potential use for SKCS or SCS as barrier membranes for in-vitro nicotine permeation studies.

  4. Neutralization of cobra venom by cocktail antiserum against venom proteins of cobra (Naja naja naja).

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, C; Sarathi, M; Balasubramanaiyan, G; Vimal, S; Madan, N; Sundar Raj, N; Mohammed Yusuf Bilal, S; Nazeer Basha, A; Farook, M A; Sahul Hameed, A S; Sridevi, G

    2014-01-01

    Naja naja venom was characterized by its immunochemical properties and electrophoretic pattern which revealed eight protein bands (14 kDa, 24 kDa, 29 kDa, 45 kDa, 48 kDa, 65 kDa, 72 kDa and 99 kDa) by SDS-PAGE in reducing condition after staining with Coomassie Brilliant Blue. The results showed that Naja venom presented high lethal activity. Whole venom antiserum or individual venom protein antiserum (14 kDa, 29 kDa, 65 kDa, 72 kDa and 99 kDa) of venom could recognize N. naja venom by Western blotting and ELISA, and N. naja venom presented antibody titer when assayed by ELISA. The neutralization tests showed that the polyvalent antiserum neutralized lethal activities by both in vivo and in vitro studies using mice and Vero cells. The antiserum could neutralize the lethal activities in in-vivo and antivenom administered after injection of cobra venom through intraperitoneal route in mice. The cocktail antiserum also could neutralize the cytotoxic activities in Vero cell line by MTT and Neutral red assays. The results of the present study suggest that cocktail antiserum neutralizes the lethal activities in both in vitro and in vivo models using the antiserum against cobra venom and its individual venom proteins serum produced in rabbits.

  5. Verification and validation of COBRA-SFS transient analysis capability

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D.R.; Michener, T.E.; Cuta, J.M.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides documentation of the verification and validation testing of the transient capability in the COBRA-SFS code, and is organized into three main sections. The primary documentation of the code was published in September 1995, with the release of COBRA-SFS, Cycle 2. The validation and verification supporting the release and licensing of COBRA-SFS was based solely on steady-state applications, even though the appropriate transient terms have been included in the conservation equations from the first cycle. Section 2.0, COBRA-SFS Code Description, presents a capsule description of the code, and a summary of the conservation equations solved to obtain the flow and temperature fields within a cask or assembly model. This section repeats in abbreviated form the code description presented in the primary documentation (Michener et al. 1995), and is meant to serve as a quick reference, rather than independent documentation of all code features and capabilities. Section 3.0, Transient Capability Verification, presents a set of comparisons between code calculations and analytical solutions for selected heat transfer and fluid flow problems. Section 4.0, Transient Capability Validation, presents comparisons between code calculations and experimental data obtained in spent fuel storage cask tests. Based on the comparisons presented in Sections 2.0 and 3.0, conclusions and recommendations for application of COBRA-SFS to transient analysis are presented in Section 5.0.

  6. Helicopter noise research at the Langley V/STOL tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, D. R.; Green, G. C.

    1978-01-01

    The noise generated from a 1/4-scale AH-1G helicopter configuration was investigated in the Langley V/STOL tunnel. Microphones were installed in positions scaled to those for which flight test data were available. Model and tunnel conditions were carefully set to properly scaled flight conditions. Data presented indicate a high degree of similarity between model and flight test results. It was found that the pressure time history waveforms are very much alike in shape and amplitude. Blade slap when it occurred seemed to be generated in about the same location in the rotor disk as on the flight vehicle. If model and tunnel conditions were properly matched, including inflow turbulence characteristics, the intensity of the blade-slap impulse seemed to correlate well with flight.

  7. [Effects of school closure during influenza A/H1N1 pandemic in 2009 in Japan].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Mitsuo; Kaneko, Minoru; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Honda, Takayuki; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2013-01-01

    Schools were closed worldwide during the 2009 influenza A/H1N1 pandemic to prevent the viral spread; however, to date, there has been insufficient evidence to conclude that the closures were beneficial. Therefore, in the present review, we evaluated the effects of school closure during the 2009 influenza A/H1N1 pandemic in Japan. A search of PubMed and Japanese journals identified 24 articles that evaluated the effects of school closure using the following methods: descriptive epidemiology, changes in absenteeism rate, a simulation model, and reproductive number. Almost all of the retrieved studies showed that school closure effectively reduced the number of new infections and thus subsequently suppressed the epidemic. On the other hand, two major sets of confounding variables were identified. First, the effect of school closure was confounded by the methods used to measure, viral infectivity, subject characteristics, increased immunization rates, nonpharmaceutical interventions, antiviral administration, student contact patterns during school closure, and individual household environments. Secondly, school closure implementation was affected by differences between proactive and reactive closures, differences between seasonal and pandemic influenza, decision factors regarding school closure, socioeconomic cost, and ethics of imposing restrictions on individuals. Therefore, a comprehensive, longitudinal study is necessary to clarify the effects of school closure during viral pandemics.

  8. Polar Glycosylated and Lateral Non-Glycosylated Flagella from Aeromonas hydrophila Strain AH-1 (Serotype O11).

    PubMed

    Fulton, Kelly M; Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Twine, Susan M; Tomás, Juan M; Merino, Susana

    2015-11-27

    Polar and but not lateral flagellin proteins from Aeromonas hydrophila strain AH-1 (serotype O11) were found to be glycosylated. Top-down mass spectrometry studies of purified polar flagellins suggested the presence of a 403 Da glycan of mass. Bottom-up mass spectrometry studies showed the polar flagellin peptides to be modified with 403 Da glycans in O-linkage. The MS fragmentation pattern of this putative glycan was similar to that of pseudaminic acid derivative. Mutants lacking the biosynthesis of pseudaminic acid (pseB and pseI homologues) were unable to produce polar flagella but no changes were observed in lateral flagella by post-transcriptional regulation of the flagellin. Complementation was achieved by reintroduction of the wild-type pseB and pseI. We compared two pathogenic features (adhesion to eukaryotic cells and biofilm production) between the wild-type strain and two kinds of mutants: mutants lacking polar flagella glycosylation and lacking the O11-antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but with unaltered polar flagella glycosylation. Results suggest that polar flagella glycosylation is extremely important for A. hydrophila AH-1 adhesion to Hep-2 cells and biofilm formation. In addition, we show the importance of the polar flagella glycosylation for immune stimulation of IL-8 production via toll-"like" receptor 5 (TLR5).

  9. [Cases of children with influenza AH1N1/2009 in the district of Lodz in two epidemic waves].

    PubMed

    Majda-Stanisławska, Ewa; Sobieraj, Iwona

    2011-01-01

    High influenza morbidity due to new antigenic strain AH1N1 was announced in Mexico in spring 2009. Influenza pandemic caused by the virus AH1N1/2009 spread around the world. Two pandemic waves were noted in most European countries: the first one was due to summer months migration, the second wave started in the beginning of common influenza season. We present features of both waves in children from the district of Lodz. We describe mild clinical course in 14 children who came from holiday in Spain with influenza and who were hospitalized and treated with osltamimivir due to unpredictable course of new influenza. We also present 22 influenza cases of the autumn pandemic wave, when children with severe complications of influenza and children from high risk groups were hospitalized and treated with antivirals. Experience that we have gained during 2009 influenza pandemic indicates that International Influenza Control System is very efficient, however more flexibility is required in application of treatment and prophylaxis procedures with new influenza strains. Applied methods of control should mostly depend on the virulence of pandemic strain.

  10. A case of central diabetes insipidus following probable type A/H1N1 influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takaaki; Miwa, Takashi; Odawara, Masato

    2011-01-01

    The major causes of central diabetes insipidus (CDI) are neoplastic or infiltrative lesions of the hypothalamus or pituitary gland, severe head injuries, or pituitary or hypothalamic surgery. Lymphocytic infundibuloneurophysitis (LINH) is associated with autoimmune inflammatory disease of the pituitary gland, but the exact etiology is unknown. CDI caused by viral infections has been rarely reported. Here, we describe the case of a 22-year-old man who was in good health until 2 months prior to admission, presented with acute development of polyuria and polydipsia, and showed increased urinary volume up to 9000 mL/day. The patient showed elevated serum osmolality and low urine osmolality, with a low level of antidiuretic hormone. Endocrinological findings revealed CDI, but his arterial pituitary function appeared normal. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed significant enlargement of the pituitary stalk. We suspected CDI due to LINH based on non-transsphenoidal biopsy findings. He was diagnosed as type A influenza,and given oral therapeutic agents. However, acute onset of polyuria and polydipsia occurred 10 days after the influenza diagnosis. The available epidemiological information regarding the outbreak of influenza around that time strongly suggested that the patient was infected with the A/H1N1 influenza virus, although this virus had not been detected on polymerase chain reaction testing. In the present case, the autoimmune mechanism of LINH may have been associated with novel influenza A/H1N1 virus infection.

  11. Agglutination of human O erythrocytes by influenza A(H1N1) viruses freshly isolated from patients.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Haruki, K; Seto, Y; Kimura, T; Minoshiro, S; Shibe, K

    1991-04-01

    The hemagglutinin titers of 10 influenza A (H1N1) viruses were examined using the erythrocytes of several species. Human O erythrocytes showed the highest agglutination titer to the viruses, whereas chicken erythrocytes showed a low titer. These findings were noted for at least 10 passages by serial dilutions of the viruses in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. All influenza A(H1N1) viruses, plaque-cloned directly from throat-washing specimens of patients, also agglutinated human O but not chicken erythrocytes. The results of a hemadsorption test indicated that chicken erythrocytes possess less affinity to MDCK cells infected with the A/Osaka City/2/88(H1N1) stain than to those infected with the A/Yamagata/120/86(H1N1) strain which is used as an inactivated influenza vaccine in Japan. However, there were no significant differences between the A/Osaka City/2/88 and the A/Yamagata/120/86 strains in the hemagglutination inhibition test. Since human O erythrocytes have high agglutination activity to influenza A(H1N1) and also to A(H3N2) and B viruses in MDCK cells, these erythrocytes may be useful for the serological diagnosis of influenza.

  12. Multimission helicopter cockpit displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, William S.; Terry, Jody K.; Lovelace, Nancy D.

    1996-05-01

    A new operator display subsystem is being incorporated as part of the next generation United States Navy (USN) helicopter avionics system to be integrated into the multi-mission helicopter (MMH) that replaces both the SH-60B and the SH-60F in 2001. This subsystem exploits state-of-the-art technology for the display hardware, the display driver hardware, information presentation methodologies, and software architecture. Both of the existing SH-60 helicopter display systems are based on monochrome CRT technology; a key feature of the MMH cockpit is the integration of color AMLCD multifunction displays. The MMH program is one of the first military programs to use modified commercial AMLCD elements in a tactical aircraft. This paper presents the general configuration of the MMH cockpit and multifunction display subsystem and discusses the approach taken for presenting helicopter flight information to the pilots as well as presentation of mission sensor data for use by the copilot.

  13. Initial high-dose prednisolone combination therapy using COBRA and COBRA-light in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Linda A; van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Lems, Willem F; Boers, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with initial high-dose prednisolone and a combination of methotrexate (MTX) and sulfasalazine (SSZ) according to the COBRA regimen (Dutch acronym for combinatietherapie bij reumatoide artritis, 'combination therapy for rheumatoid arthritis'), has repeatedly been demonstrated to be very effective in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). COBRA combination therapy is superior to initial monotherapy of SSZ and MTX, is also associated with a good long-term outcome, is as safe as other treatment regimes, and performs as well as the combination of high-dose MTX and the tumor necrosis factor antagonist infliximab. A pilot study with an intensified version of the COBRA combination therapy showed that strict monitoring and aggressive treatment intensification based on the Disease Activity Score can result in a remission rate of 90% in patients with active early RA. Also, the first results indicate that an attenuated variation on COBRA combination therapy, called 'COBRA-light', is effective in decreasing disease activity and is generally well tolerated. Based on these results, we conclude that initial high-dose prednisolone in combination with MTX and SSZ could or should be the first choice in early active RA since it is effective and safe, and the cost price of the drugs is low.

  14. The COBRA/CARMA Correlator Data Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. L.; Hobbs, R.; Beard, A.; Daniel, P.; Mehringer, D.; Plante, R.; Kraybill, J. C.; Wright, M.; Leitch, E.; Amarnath, N. S.; Pound, M. W.; Rauch, K. P.; Teuben, P. J.

    The Caltech Owens Valley Broadband Reprogrammable Array (COBRA) digital correlator is an FPGA based spectrometer with 16 MHz resolution and 4 GHz total bandwidth that will be commissioned on the Caltech Millimeter-wave Array in November, 2002. The Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy (CARMA) will join the Caltech array with the BIMA array on a new high elevation site in 2005. The COBRA hardware and computing architecture described here will be the basis for the two CARMA correlators. The COBRA architecture uses nine computers to provide the hardware interface and initial processing. Data is transported using CORBA to a tenth machine that implements the data processing pipeline as multiple processes passing data through shared memory.

  15. Cobra venom cytotoxins; apoptotic or necrotic agents?

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Karim; Shirazi, Farshad H; Mirakabadi, Abbas Zare; Vatanpour, Hossein

    2015-12-15

    Organs homeostasis is controlled by a dynamic balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Failure to induction of apoptosis has been implicated in tumor development. Cytotoxin-I (CTX-I) and cytotoxin-II (CTX-II) are two physiologically active polypeptides found in Caspian cobra venom. Anticancer activity and mechanism of cell death induced by these toxins have been studied. The toxins were purified by different chromatographic steps and their cytotoxicity and pattern of cell death were determined by MTT, LDH release, acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EtBr) double staining, flow cytometric analysis, caspase-3 activity and neutral red assays. The IC50 of CTX-II in MCF-7, HepG2, DU-145 and HL-60 was 4.1 ± 1.3, 21.2 ± 4.4, 9.4 ± 1.8 μg/mL and 16.3 ± 1.9 respectively while the IC50 of this toxin in normal MDCK cell line was 54.5 ± 3.9 μg/mL. LDH release suddenly increase after a specific toxins concentrations in all cell lines. AO/EtBr double staining, flow cytometric analysis and caspase-3 activity assay confirm dose and time-dependent induction of apoptosis by both toxins. CTX-I and CTX-II treated cells lost their lysosomal membrane integrity and couldn't uptake neutral red day. CTX-I and CTX-II showed significant anticancer activity with minimum effects on normal cells and better IC50 compared to current anticancer drug; cisplatin. They induce their apoptotic effect via lysosomal pathways and release of cathepsins to cytosol. These effects were seen in limited rage of toxins concentrations and pattern of cell death rapidly changes to necrosis by increase in toxin's concentration. In conclusion, significant apoptogenic effects of these toxins candidate them as a possible anticancer agent.

  16. Model helicopter rotor high-speed impulsive noise: Measured acoustics and blade pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    A 1/17-scale research model of the AH-1 series helicopter main rotor was tested. Model-rotor acoustic and simultaneous blade pressure data were recorded at high speeds where full-scale helicopter high-speed impulsive noise levels are known to be dominant. Model-rotor measurements of the peak acoustic pressure levels, waveform shapes, and directively patterns are directly compared with full-scale investigations, using an equivalent in-flight technique. Model acoustic data are shown to scale remarkably well in shape and in amplitude with full-scale results. Model rotor-blade pressures are presented for rotor operating conditions both with and without shock-like discontinuities in the radiated acoustic waveform. Acoustically, both model and full-scale measurements support current evidence that above certain high subsonic advancing-tip Mach numbers, local shock waves that exist on the rotor blades ""delocalize'' and radiate to the acoustic far-field.

  17. HIV-1 and Its gp120 Inhibits the Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Life Cycle in an IFITM3-Dependent Fashion

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Milene; Fintelman-Rodrigues, Natalia; Sacramento, Carolina Q.; Abrantes, Juliana L.; Costa, Eduardo; Temerozo, Jairo R.; Siqueira, Marilda M.; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Souza, Thiago Moreno L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1-infected patients co-infected with A(H1N1)pdm09 surprisingly presented benign clinical outcome. The knowledge that HIV-1 changes the host homeostatic equilibrium, which may favor the patient resistance to some co-pathogens, prompted us to investigate whether HIV-1 infection could influence A(H1N1)pdm09 life cycle in vitro. We show here that exposure of A(H1N1)pdm09-infected epithelial cells to HIV-1 viral particles or its gp120 enhanced by 25% the IFITM3 content, resulting in a decrease in influenza replication. This event was dependent on toll-like receptor 2 and 4. Moreover, knockdown of IFITM3 prevented HIV-1 ability to inhibit A(H1N1)pdm09 replication. HIV-1 infection also increased IFITM3 levels in human primary macrophages by almost 100%. Consequently, the arrival of influenza ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to nucleus of macrophages was inhibited, as evaluated by different approaches. Reduction of influenza RNPs entry into the nucleus tolled A(H1N1)pdm09 life cycle in macrophages earlier than usual, limiting influenza's ability to induce TNF-α. As judged by analysis of the influenza hemagglutin (HA) gene from in vitro experiments and from samples of HIV-1/A(H1N1)pdm09 co-infected individuals, the HIV-1-induced reduction of influenza replication resulted in delayed viral evolution. Our results may provide insights on the mechanisms that may have attenuated the clinical course of Influenza in HIV-1/A(H1N1)pdm09 co-infected patients during the recent influenza form 2009/2010. PMID:24978204

  18. A non-inferiority trial of an attenuated combination strategy (‘COBRA-light’) compared to the original COBRA strategy: clinical results after 26 weeks

    PubMed Central

    den Uyl, Debby; ter Wee, Marieke; Boers, Maarten; Kerstens, Pit; Voskuyl, Alexandre; Nurmohamed, Mike; Raterman, Hennie; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; van Dillen, Nancy; Dijkmans, Ben; Lems, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Background Early, intensive treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with the combination of (initially high dose) prednisolone, methotrexate and sulfasalazine (COBRA therapy) considerably lowers disease activity and suppresses radiological progression, but is infrequently prescribed in daily practice. Attenuating the COBRA regimen might lessen concerns about side effects, but the efficacy of such strategies is unknown. Objective To compare the ‘COBRA-light’ strategy with only two drugs, comprising a lower dose of prednisolone (starting at 30 mg/day, tapered to 7.5 mg/day in 9 weeks) and methotrexate (escalated to 25 mg/week in 9 weeks) to COBRA therapy (prednisolone 60 mg/day, tapered to 7.5 mg/day in 6 weeks, methotrexate 7.5 mg/week and sulfasalazine 2 g/day). Method An open, randomised controlled, non-inferiority trial in 164 patients with early active RA, all treated according to a treat to target strategy. Results At baseline patients had moderately active disease: mean (SD) 44-joint disease activity score (DAS44) 4.13 (0.81) for COBRA and 3.95 (0.9) for COBRA-light. After 6 months, DAS44 significantly decreased in both groups (–2.50 (1.21) for COBRA and –2.18 (1.10) for COBRA-light). The adjusted difference in DAS44 improvement between the groups, 0.21 (95% CI –0.11 to 0.53), was smaller than the predefined clinically relevant difference of 0.5. Minimal disease activity (DAS44 <1.6) was reached in almost half of patients in both groups (49% and 41% in COBRA and COBRA-light, respectively). Conclusions At 6 months COBRA-light therapy is most likely non-inferior to COBRA therapy. Clinical Trial Registration Number 55552928. PMID:23606682

  19. Household Transmission of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in the Pandemic and Post-Pandemic Seasons

    PubMed Central

    Casado, Itziar; Martínez-Baz, Iván; Burgui, Rosana; Irisarri, Fátima; Arriazu, Maite; Elía, Fernando; Navascués, Ana; Ezpeleta, Carmen; Aldaz, Pablo; Castilla, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Background The transmission of influenza viruses occurs person to person and is facilitated by contacts within enclosed environments such as households. The aim of this study was to evaluate secondary attack rates and factors associated with household transmission of laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in the pandemic and post-pandemic seasons. Methods During the 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 influenza seasons, 76 sentinel physicians in Navarra, Spain, took nasopharyngeal and pharyngeal swabs from patients diagnosed with influenza-like illness. A trained nurse telephoned households of those patients who were laboratory-confirmed for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 to ask about the symptoms, risk factors and vaccination status of each household member. Results In the 405 households with a patient laboratory-confirmed for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, 977 susceptible contacts were identified; 16% of them (95% CI 14–19%) presented influenza-like illness and were considered as secondary cases. The secondary attack rate was 14% in 2009–2010 and 19% in the 2010–2011 season (p = 0.049), an increase that mainly affected persons with major chronic conditions. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, the risk of being a secondary case was higher in the 2010–2011 season than in the 2009–2010 season (adjusted odds ratio: 1.72; 95% CI 1.17–2.54), and in children under 5 years, with a decreasing risk in older contacts. Influenza vaccination was associated with lesser incidence of influenza-like illness near to statistical significance (adjusted odds ratio: 0.29; 95% CI 0.08–1.03). Conclusion The secondary attack rate in households was higher in the second season than in the first pandemic season. Children had a greater risk of infection. Preventive measures should be maintained in the second pandemic season, especially in high-risk persons. PMID:25254376

  20. Socioeconomic Factors Influencing Hospitalized Patients with Pneumonia Due to Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Toshie; Higuera Iglesias, Anjarath Lorena; Vazquez Manriquez, Maria Eugenia; Martinez Valadez, Eduarda Leticia; Ramos, Leticia Alfaro; Izumi, Shinyu; Takasaki, Jin; Kudo, Koichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background In addition to clinical aspects and pathogen characteristics, people's health-related behavior and socioeconomic conditions can affect the occurrence and severity of diseases including influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. Methodology and Principal Findings A face-to-face interview survey was conducted in a hospital in Mexico City at the time of follow-up consultation for hospitalized patients with pneumonia due to influenza virus infection. In all, 302 subjects were enrolled and divided into two groups based on the period of hospitalization. Among them, 211 tested positive for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus by real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction during the pandemic period (Group-pdm) and 91 tested positive for influenza A virus in the post-pandemic period (Group-post). All subjects were treated with oseltamivir. Data on the demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, living environment, and information relating to A(H1N1)pdm09, and related clinical data were compared between subjects in Group-pdm and those in Group-post. The ability of household income to pay for utilities, food, and health care services as well as housing quality in terms of construction materials and number of rooms revealed a significant difference: Group-post had lower socioeconomic status than Group-pdm. Group-post had lower availability of information regarding H1N1 influenza than Group-pdm. These results indicate that subjects in Group-post had difficulty receiving necessary information relating to influenza and were more likely to be impoverished than those in Group-pdm. Possible factors influencing time to seeking health care were number of household rooms, having received information on the necessity of quick access to health care, and house construction materials. Conclusions Health-care-seeking behavior, poverty level, and the distribution of information affect the occurrence and severity of pneumonia due to H1N1 virus from a socioeconomic point of view. These socioeconomic factors may explain the different patterns of morbidity and mortality for H1N1 influenza observed among different countries and regions. PMID:22808184

  1. Occupational Survey Report. Helicopter Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    helicopters I-D53 Oversee helicopter inspectim or maintance activities during cross-country missions on H- I B15 0014 H-1Maian (Continued) H383 Remove or...Plan maintmeance or inspections of helicopters E95 Comdinate estimated times in commission (ETICs) of maintance jobs with job control A19 Plan work

  2. Reduced replication capacity of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus during the 2010-2011 winter season in Tottori, Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Akeno; Itagaki, Asao; Tsuchie, Hideaki; Tokuhara, Misato; Okada, Takayoshi; Narai, Sakae; Kasagi, Masaaki; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Kageyama, Seiji

    2013-11-01

    A novel swine-origin influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus has been circulating in humans since March-April, 2009. The 2009-2010 epidemic involved predominantly a single subtype of A(H1N1)pdm09 (at 96%, 46/48) in the sentinel sites of this study. However, A(H1N1)pdm09 started to circulate together with other type/subtype (49%, 33/68) at the first peak in the next epidemic season in 2010-2011: A(H1N1)pdm09/A(H3N2) (9%, 6/68), A(H1N1)pdm09/B (35%, 24/68), and A(H1N1)pdm09/A(H3N2)/B (4%, 3/68). Single infection of A(H1N1)pdm09 became a rare event (8%, 5/65) at the second peak of the same season in 2010-2011 compared with that at the first peak (50%, 34/68). Concurrently with this decline, single infections of others, A(H3N2) or B, became evident (6%, 4/65; 14%, 9/65, respectively). Triple infections were more common (29%, 19/65) at the second peak than at the first peak (4%). The A(H1N1)pdm09 detected in 2010-2011 produced less virus upon 72 hr of incubation in vitro after the inoculations at 10(4) and 3,300 copies/ml (2.3 × 10(9) and 2.3 × 10(9) copies/ml on average) than that in 2009-2010 (3.7 × 10(9) and 1.3 × 10(10) copies/ml on average; P<0.05 by ANOVA test), respectively. As described above, the replication capacity of A(H1N1)pdm09 seems to have deteriorated in the 2010-2011 season presumably due to substantial herd immunity and allowed the existence of other type/subtype. These results suggest that assessment of replication capacity is indispensable for analysis of influenza epidemics.

  3. Inflammatory profiles in severe pneumonia associated with the pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus isolated in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga, Joaquín; Torres, Martha; Romo, Javier; Torres, Diana; Jiménez, Luis; Ramírez, Gustavo; Cruz, Alfredo; Espinosa, Enrique; Herrera, Teresa; Buendía, Ivette; Ramírez-Venegas, Alejandra; González, Yolanda; Bobadilla, Karen; Hernández, Fernando; García, Jorge; Quiñones-Falconi, Francisco; Sada, Eduardo; Manjarrez, María E; Cabello, Carlos; Kawa, Simón; Zlotnik, Albert; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moisés

    2011-11-01

    The immune mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of severe pneumonia associated with the A/H1N1 virus are not well known. The objective of this study was to determine whether severe A/H1N1-associated pneumonia can be explained by the emergence of particular T-cell subsets and the cytokines/chemokines they produced, as well as distinct responses to infection. T-cell subset distribution and cytokine/chemokine levels in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were determined in patients with severe A/H1N1 infection, asymptomatic household contacts, and healthy controls. Cytokine and chemokine production was also evaluated after in vitro infection with seasonal H1N1 and pandemic A/H1N1 strains. We found an increase in the frequency of peripheral Th2 and Tc2 cells in A/H1N1 patients. A trend toward increased Tc1 cells was observed in household contacts. Elevated serum levels of IL-6, CXCL8, and CCL2 were found in patients and a similar cytokine/chemokine profile was observed in BAL, in which CCL5 was also increased. Infection assays revealed that both strains induce the production of several cytokines/chemokines at 24 and 72 h, however, IL-6, CCL3, and CXCL8 were strongly up-regulated in 72-h cultures in presence of the A/H1N1 virus. Several inflammatory mediators are up-regulated in peripheral and lung samples from A/H1N1-infected patients who developed severe pneumonia. In addition, the A/H1N1 strain induces higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines than the seasonal H1N1 strain. These findings suggest that it is possible to identify biomarkers of severe pneumonia and also suggest the therapeutic use of immunomodulatory drugs in patients with severe pneumonia associated with A/H1N1 infection.

  4. PD-L1 Expression Induced by the 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1) Virus Impairs the Human T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ferat-Osorio, Eduardo; Mora-Velandia, Luz María; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Sánchez-Torres, Luvia Enid; Isibasi, Armando; Bonifaz, Laura; López-Macías, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    PD-L1 expression plays a critical role in the impairment of T cell responses during chronic infections; however, the expression of PD-L1 on T cells during acute viral infections, particularly during the pandemic influenza virus (A(H1N1)pdm09), and its effects on the T cell response have not been widely explored. We found that A(H1N1)pdm09 virus induced PD-L1 expression on human dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells, as well as PD-1 expression on T cells. PD-L1 expression impaired the T cell response against A(H1N1)pdm09 by promoting CD8+ T cell death and reducing cytokine production. Furthermore, we found increased PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells from influenza-infected patients from the first and second 2009 pandemic waves in Mexico City. PD-L1 expression on CD8+ T cells correlated inversely with T cell proportions in patients infected with A(H1N1)pdm09. Therefore, PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells could be associated with an impaired T cell response during acute infection with A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. PMID:24187568

  5. PD-L1 expression induced by the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus impairs the human T cell response.

    PubMed

    Valero-Pacheco, Nuriban; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ferat-Osorio, Eduardo; Mora-Velandia, Luz María; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Sánchez-Torres, Luvia Enid; Isibasi, Armando; Bonifaz, Laura; López-Macías, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    PD-L1 expression plays a critical role in the impairment of T cell responses during chronic infections; however, the expression of PD-L1 on T cells during acute viral infections, particularly during the pandemic influenza virus (A(H1N1)pdm09), and its effects on the T cell response have not been widely explored. We found that A(H1N1)pdm09 virus induced PD-L1 expression on human dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells, as well as PD-1 expression on T cells. PD-L1 expression impaired the T cell response against A(H1N1)pdm09 by promoting CD8⁺ T cell death and reducing cytokine production. Furthermore, we found increased PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells from influenza-infected patients from the first and second 2009 pandemic waves in Mexico City. PD-L1 expression on CD8⁺ T cells correlated inversely with T cell proportions in patients infected with A(H1N1)pdm09. Therefore, PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells could be associated with an impaired T cell response during acute infection with A(H1N1)pdm09 virus.

  6. Effectiveness of the monovalent influenza A(H1N1)2009 vaccine in Navarre, Spain, 2009-2010: cohort and case-control study.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Jesús; Morán, Julio; Martínez-Artola, Víctor; Fernández-Alonso, Mirian; Guevara, Marcela; Cenoz, Manuel García; Reina, Gabriel; Alvarez, Nerea; Arriazu, Maite; Elía, Fernando; Salcedo, Esther; Barricarte, Aurelio

    2011-08-11

    We defined a population-based cohort (596,755 subjects) in Navarre, Spain, using electronic records from physicians, to evaluate the effectiveness of the monovalent A(H1N1)2009 vaccine in preventing influenza in the 2009-2010 pandemic season. During the 9-week period of vaccine availability and circulation of the A(H1N1)2009 virus, 4608 cases of medically attended influenza-like illness (MA-ILI) were registered (46 per 1000 person-years). After adjustment for sociodemographic covariables, outpatient visits and major chronic conditions, vaccination was associated with a 32% (95% CI: 8-50%) reduction in the overall incidence of MA-ILI. In a test negative case-control analysis nested in the cohort, swabs from 633 patients were included, and 123 were confirmed for A(H1N1)2009 influenza. No confirmed case had received A(H1N1)2009 vaccine versus 9.6% of controls (p<0.001). The vaccine effectiveness in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza was 89% (95% CI: 36-100%) after adjusting for age, health care setting, major chronic conditions and period. Pandemic vaccine was effective in preventing MA-ILI and confirmed cases of influenza A(H1N1)2009 in the 2009-2010 season.

  7. Partial protection of seasonal trivalent inactivated vaccine against novel pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009: case-control study in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Lourdes; Valdespino-Gómez, Jose Luis; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Jimenez-Corona, Aida; Higuera-Iglesias, Anjarath; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Cano-Arellano, Bulmaro; Garcia-Anaya, Antonio; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Baez-Saldaña, Renata; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Ponce-de-León-Rosales, Samuel; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Rodriguez-López, Mario Henry; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Hernandez-Avila, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of 2008-9 seasonal trivalent inactivated vaccine with cases of influenza A/H1N1 during the epidemic in Mexico. Design Frequency matched case-control study. Setting Specialty hospital in Mexico City, March to May 2009. Participants 60 patients with laboratory confirmed influenza A/H1N1 and 180 controls with other diseases (not influenza-like illness or pneumonia) living in Mexico City or the State of Mexico and matched for age and socioeconomic status. Main outcome measures Odds ratio and effectiveness of trivalent inactivated vaccine against influenza A/H1N1. Results Cases were more likely than controls to be admitted to hospital, undergo invasive mechanical ventilation, and die. Controls were more likely than cases to have chronic conditions that conferred a higher risk of influenza related complications. In the multivariate model, influenza A/H1N1 was independently associated with trivalent inactivated vaccine (odds ratio 0.27, 95% confidence interval 0.11 to 0.66) and underlying conditions (0.15, 0.08 to 0.30). Vaccine effectiveness was 73% (95% confidence interval 34% to 89%). None of the eight vaccinated cases died. Conclusions Preliminary evidence suggests some protection from the 2008-9 trivalent inactivated vaccine against pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009, particularly severe forms of the disease, diagnosed in a specialty hospital during the influenza epidemic in Mexico City. PMID:19808768

  8. Determinants of Refusal of A/H1N1 Pandemic Vaccination in a High Risk Population: A Qualitative Approach

    PubMed Central

    d'Alessandro, Eugenie; Hubert, Dominique; Launay, Odile; Bassinet, Laurence; Lortholary, Olivier; Jaffre, Yannick; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Background Our study analyses the main determinants of refusal or acceptance of the 2009 A/H1N1 vaccine in patients with cystic fibrosis, a high-risk population for severe flu infection, usually very compliant for seasonal flu vaccine. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews in 3 cystic fibrosis referral centres in Paris, France. The study included 42 patients with cystic fibrosis: 24 who refused the vaccine and 18 who were vaccinated. The two groups differed quite substantially in their perceptions of vaccine- and disease-related risks. Those who refused the vaccine were motivated mainly by the fears it aroused and did not explicitly consider the 2009 A/H1N1 flu a potentially severe disease. People who were vaccinated explained their choice, first and foremost, as intended to prevent the flu's potential consequences on respiratory cystic fibrosis disease. Moreover, they considered vaccination to be an indirect collective prevention tool. Patients who refused the vaccine mentioned multiple, contradictory information sources and did not appear to consider the recommendation of their local health care provider as predominant. On the contrary, those who were vaccinated stated that they had based their decision solely on the clear and unequivocal advice of their health care provider. Conclusions/Significance These results of our survey led us to formulate three main recommendations for improving adhesion to new pandemic vaccines. (1) it appears necessary to reinforce patient education about the disease and its specific risks, but also general population information about community immunity. (2) it is essential to disseminate a clear and effective message about the safety of novel vaccines. (3) this message should be conveyed by local health care providers, who should be involved in implementing immunization. PMID:22506011

  9. Overview of the winter wave of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1)v in Vojvodina, Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Petrović, Vladimir; Šeguljev, Zorica; Ćosić, Gorana; Ristić, Mioljub; Nedeljković, Jasminka; Dragnić, Nataša; Ukropina, Snežana

    2011-01-01

    Aim To analyze the epidemiological data for pandemic influenza A(H1N1)v in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina, Serbia, during the season of 2009/2010 and to assess whether including severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) hospitalization data to the surveillance system gives a more complete picture of the impact of influenza during the pandemic. Methods From September 2009 to September 2010, the Institute of Public Health of Vojvodina conducted sentinel surveillance of influenza-like illnesses and acute respiratory infections in all hospitalized patients with SARI and virological surveillance of population of Vojvodina according to the European Centers for Disease Control technical document. Results The pandemic influenza outbreak in the province started in October 2009 (week 44) in students who had returned from a school-organized trip to Prague, Bratislava, and Vienna. The highest incidence rate was 1090 per 100 000 inhabitants, found in the week 50. The most affected age group were children 5-14 years old. A total of 1591 patients with severe illness were admitted to regional hospitals, with a case fatality rate of 2%, representing a hospitalization rate of 78.3 per 100 000 inhabitants and a mortality rate of 1.6 per 100 000. Most frequently hospitalized were 15-19 years old patients, male patients, and patients with pneumonia (P < 0.001). The highest case fatality rate was found among patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (P < 0.001). Nasal/throat swabs were obtained for polymerase chain reaction test from 315 hospitalized patients and 20 non-hospitalized patients, and 145 (46%) and 15 (75%) specimens, respectively, tested positive on A(H1N1)v. Conclusion Sentinel influenza-like illness and SARI surveillance, both followed with virological surveillance, seem to be the optimal method to monitor the full scope of the influenza pandemic (from mild to severe influenza) in Vojvodina. PMID:21495196

  10. New Influenza A/H1N1 (“Swine Flu”): information needs of airport passengers and staff

    PubMed Central

    Dickmann, P.; Rubin, G. J.; Gaber, W.; Wessely, S.; Wicker, S.; Serve, H.; Gottschalk, R.

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Dickmann et al. (2010) New Influenza A/H1N1 (“Swine Flu”): information needs of airport passengers and staff. . Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(1), 39–46. Background  Airports are the entrances of infectious diseases. Particularly at the beginning of an outbreak, information and communication play an important role to enable the early detection of signs or symptoms and to encourage passengers to adopt appropriate preventive behaviour to limit the spread of the disease. Objectives  To determine the adequacy of the information provided to airport passengers and staff in meeting their information needs in relation to their concerns. Methods  At the start of the influenza A/H1N1 epidemic (29–30 April 2009), qualitative semi‐structured interviews (N = 101) were conducted at Frankfurt International Airport with passengers who were either returning from or going to Mexico and with airport staff who had close contact with these passengers. Interviews focused on knowledge about swine flu, information needs and fear or concern about the outbreak. Results  The results showed that a desire for more information was associated with higher concern – the least concerned participants did not want any additional information, while the most concerned participants reported a range of information needs. Airport staff in contact with passengers travelling from the epicentre of the outbreak showed the highest levels of fear or concern, coupled with a desire to be adequately briefed by their employer. Conclusions  Our results suggest that information strategies should address not only the exposed or potentially exposed but also groups that feel at risk. Identifying what information these different passenger and staff groups wish to receive will be an important task in any future infectious disease outbreak. PMID:21138539

  11. Target tracking during venom ‘spitting’ by cobras

    PubMed Central

    Westhoff, Guido; Boetig, Melissa; Bleckmann, Horst; Young, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Spitting cobras, which defend themselves by streaming venom towards the face and/or eyes of a predator, must be highly accurate because the venom they spit is only an effective deterrent if it lands on the predator's cornea. Several factors make this level of accuracy difficult to achieve; the target is moving, is frequently >1 m away from the snake and the venom stream is released in approximately 50 ms. In the present study we show that spitting cobras can accurately track the movements of a potentially threatening vertebrate, and by anticipating its subsequent (short-term) movements direct their venom to maximize the likelihood of striking the target's eye. Unlike other animals that project material, in spitting cobras the discharge orifice (the fang) is relatively fixed so directing the venom stream requires rapid movements of the entire head. The cobra's ability to track and anticipate the target's movement, and to perform rapid cephalic oscillations that coordinate with the target's movements suggest a level of neural processing that has not been attributed to snakes, or other reptiles, previously. PMID:20472765

  12. [Spitting cobras: description of 2 cases in Djibouti].

    PubMed

    Rouvin, B; Kone, M; N'diaye, M; Seck, M; Diatta, B

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe two cases involving ophthalmic exposure to venom from spitting cobras. Based on these cases, readers are reminded that eye injury can be prevented by low-cost treatment consisting of prompt, prolonged saline irrigation. This treatment also reduces pain.

  13. 26 CFR 54.4980B-5 - COBRA continuation coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... has coverage at the time of the birth or placement for adoption. Such a child would be entitled to... is a child born to or placed for adoption with a covered employee during a period of COBRA continuation coverage, the child is generally entitled to elect immediately to have the same coverage...

  14. 26 CFR 54.4980B-1 - COBRA in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for topics not addressed in §§ 54.4980B-1 through 54.4980B-10? A-2: For purposes of section 4980B, for topics relating to the COBRA continuation coverage requirements of section 4980B that are not...

  15. A flight investigation of performance and loads for a helicopter with 10-64C main rotor blade sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. E. K.; Tomaine, R. L.; Stevens, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    A flight investigation produced data on performance and rotor loads for a teetering rotor, AH-1G helicopter flown with a main rotor that had the NLR-1T airfoil as the blade section contour. The test envelope included hover, forward flight speeds from 34 to 83 m/sec (65 to 162 knots), and collective fixed maneuvers at about 0.25 tip speed ratio. The data set for each test point describes vehicle flight state, control positions, rotor loads, power requirements, and blade motions. Rotor loads are reviewed primarily in terms of peak to peak and harmonic content. Lower frequency components predominated for most loads and generally increased with increased airspeed, but not necessarily with increased maneuver load factor. Detailed data for an advanced airfoil on an AH-1G are presented.

  16. Maximizing the Efficiency of MAGTF Airlift Capacity in WestPac

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-27

    requirements, are variations similar to the Cessna Citation and Beechcraft King Air respectively. In addition, the upgraded UC-12W model possesses an...the aviation combat element (ACE) maintains command and control of aircraft in support of the MAGTF exercise objectives. During Exercise Cobra Gold...historical achievements and collaborative success in the dual T/M/S of Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron (HMLA), to include AH-1W Cobras and UH-1

  17. [Clinical course of influenza A(H1N1)v in children treated in Warsaw in season 2009/2010].

    PubMed

    Talarek, Ewa; Dembiński, Łukasz; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Smalisz-Skrzypczyk, Katarzyna; Jackowska, Teresa; Marczyńska, Magdalena

    2010-01-01

    In the autumn 2009 in Poland there was an outbreak of influenza A(H1N1)v, approximately 1/3 of confirmed cases in children younger than 14 years. The aim of the study was an epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of pediatric patients with influenza A(H1N1)v and evaluation of antiviral treatment safety. The medical records of 100 children with confirmed influenza A(H1N1)v were reviewed. 48% of children had risk factors for severe clinical course, including 23 younger than 2 years. The most common symptoms were fever (89%) and cough (68%). In 20% children pneumonia was diagnosed, other complications were uncommon. 4 patients required mechanical ventilation and 3 died, all with severe underlying conditions. In 62% of patients oseltamivir was used and it was well tolerated.

  18. Influenza A/H1N1 2009 pneumonia in kidney transplant recipients: characteristics and outcomes following high-dose oseltamivir exposure.

    PubMed

    Watcharananan, S P; Suwatanapongched, T; Wacharawanichkul, P; Chantratitaya, W; Mavichak, V; Mossad, S B

    2010-04-01

    We report 2 cases of severe pneumonia due to the novel pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 in kidney transplant recipients. Our patients initially experienced influenza-like illness that rapidly progressed to severe pneumonia within 48 h. The patients became hypoxic and required non-invasive ventilation. The novel influenza A/H1N1 2009 was identified from their nasal swabs. These cases were treated successfully with a relatively high dose of oseltamivir, adjusted for their renal function. Clinical improvement was documented only after a week of antiviral therapy. Despite early antiviral treatment, we showed that morbidity following novel pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 infection is high among kidney transplant recipients.

  19. Prevalence of Seropositivity to Pandemic Influenza A/H1N1 Virus in the United States following the 2009 Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Carrie; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Hancock, Kathy; Balish, Amanda; Fry, Alicia M.

    2012-01-01

    Background 2009 pandemic influenza A/H1N1 (A(H1N1)pdm09) was first detected in the United States in April 2009 and resulted in a global pandemic. We conducted a serologic survey to estimate the cumulative incidence of A(H1N1)pdm09 through the end of 2009 when pandemic activity had waned in the United States. Methods We conducted a pair of cross sectional serologic surveys before and after the spring/fall waves of the pandemic for evidence of seropositivity (titer ≥40) using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. We tested a baseline sample of 1,142 serum specimens from the 2007–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), and 2,759 serum specimens submitted for routine screening to clinical diagnostic laboratories from ten representative sites. Results The age-adjusted prevalence of seropositivity to A(H1N1)pdm09 by year-end 2009 was 36.9% (95%CI: 31.7–42.2%). After adjusting for baseline cross-reactive antibody, pandemic vaccination coverage and the sensitivity/specificity of the HI assay, we estimate that 20.2% (95%CI: 10.1–28.3%) of the population was infected with A(H1N1)pdm09 by December 2009, including 53.3% (95%CI: 39.0–67.1%) of children aged 5–17 years. Conclusions By December 2009, approximately one-fifth of the US population, or 61.9 million persons, may have been infected with A(H1N1)pdm09, including around half of school-aged children. PMID:23118949

  20. Relation of activation-induced deaminase (AID) expression with antibody response to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination in HIV-1 infected patients.

    PubMed

    Cagigi, Alberto; Pensieroso, Simone; Ruffin, Nicolas; Sammicheli, Stefano; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Hejdeman, Bo; Nilsson, Anna; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-04-26

    The relevance of CD4+T-cells, viral load and age in the immunological response to influenza infection and vaccination in HIV-1 infected individuals has previously been pointed out. Our study aimed at assessing, in the setting of 2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccination, whether quantification of activation-induced deaminase (AID) expression in blood B-cells may provide additional indications for predicting antibody response to vaccination in HIV-1 infected patients with similar CD4+T-cell counts and age. Forty-seven healthy controls, 37 ART-treated and 17 treatment-naïve HIV-1 infected patients were enrolled in the study. Blood was collected prior to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and at 1, 3 and 6 months after vaccination. Antibody titers to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine were measured by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay while the mRNA expression levels of AID were measured by quantitative real time PCR. Upon B-cell activation in vitro, AID increase correlated to antibody response to the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 1 month after vaccination in all individuals. In addition, the maximum expression levels of AID were significantly higher in those individuals who still carried protective levels of A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies after 6 months from vaccination. No correlation was found between CD4+T-cell counts or age at vaccination or HIV-1 viral load and levels of A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies. Assessing AID expression before vaccination may be an additional useful tool for defining a vaccination strategy in immune-compromised individuals at risk of immunization failure.

  1. Effectiveness and safety of the A-H1N1 vaccine in children: a hospital-based case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To verify whether vaccination against the A-H1N1 virus in the paediatric population was effective in preventing the occurrence of influenza-like illness (ILI) or was associated with adverse events of special interest. Design, setting and patients A case–control analysis was performed as part of surveillance of children hospitalised through the emergency departments of eight paediatric hospitals/wards for ILI, neurological disorders, non-infectious muco-cutaneous diseases and vasculitis, thrombocytopaenia and gastroduodenal lesions. Results Among 736 children enrolled from November 2009 to August 2010, only 25 had been vaccinated with the pandemic vaccine. Out of 268 children admitted for a diagnosis compatible with the adverse events of special interest, six had received the A-H1N1 vaccine, although none of the adverse events occurred within the predefined risk windows. Only 35 children out of 244 admitted with a diagnosis of ILI underwent laboratory testing: 11 were positive and 24 negative for the A-H1N1 virus. None of the A-H1N1 positive children had received the pandemic vaccine. The OR of ILI associated with any influenza vaccination was 0.9 (95% CI 0.1 to 5.5). Conclusions The study provides additional information on the benefit–risk profile of the pandemic vaccine. No sign of risk associated with the influenza A-H1N1 vaccine used in Italy was found, although several limitations were observed: in Italy, pandemic vaccination coverage was low, the epidemic was almost over by mid December 2009 and the A-H1N1 laboratory test was performed only during the epidemic phase (in <10% of children). This study supports the importance of the existing network of hospitals for the evaluation of signals relevant to new vaccines and drugs. PMID:22021877

  2. Social class based on occupation is associated with hospitalization for A(H1N1)pdm09 infection. Comparison between hospitalized and ambulatory cases.

    PubMed

    Pujol, J; Godoy, P; Soldevila, N; Castilla, J; González-Candelas, F; Mayoral, J M; Astray, J; Garcia, S; Martin, V; Tamames, S; Delgado, M; Domínguez, A

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to analyse the existence of an association between social class (categorized by type of occupation) and the occurrence of A(H1N1)pmd09 infection and hospitalization for two seasons (2009-2010 and 2010-2011). This multicentre study compared ambulatory A(H1N1)pmd09 confirmed cases with ambulatory controls to measure risk of infection, and with hospitalized A(H1N1)pmd09 confirmed cases to asses hospitalization risk. Study variables were: age, marital status, tobacco and alcohol use, pregnancy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic respiratory failure, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic liver disease, body mass index >40, systemic corticosteroid treatment and influenza vaccination status. Occupation was registered literally and coded into manual and non-manual worker occupational social class groups. A conditional logistic regression analysis was performed. There were 720 hospitalized cases, 996 ambulatory cases and 1062 ambulatory controls included in the study. No relationship between occupational social class and A(H1N1)pmd09 infection was found [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0·97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·74-1·27], but an association (aOR 1·53, 95% CI 1·01-2·31) between occupational class and hospitalization for A(H1N1)pmd09 was observed. Influenza vaccination was a protective factor for A(H1N1)pmd09 infection (aOR 0·41, 95% CI 0·23-0·73) but not for hospitalization. We conclude that manual workers have the highest risk of hospitalization when infected by influenza than other occupations but they do not have a different probability of being infected by influenza.

  3. Helicopter simulator standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boothe, Edward M.

    1992-01-01

    The initial advisory circular was produced in 1984 (AC 120-XX). It was not finalized, however, because the FAR's for pilot certification did not recognize helicopter simulators and, therefore, permitted no credit for their use. That is being rectified, and, when the new rules are published, standards must be available for qualifying simulators. Because of the lack of a data base to support specification of these standards, the FAA must rely on the knowledge of experts in the simulator/training industry. A major aim of this workshop is to form a working group of these experts to produce a set of standards for helicopter training simulators.

  4. Influenza vaccination in the Americas: Progress and challenges after the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Ropero-Álvarez, Alba María; El Omeiri, Nathalie; Kurtis, Hannah Jane; Danovaro-Holliday, M. Carolina; Ruiz-Matus, Cuauhtémoc

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: There has been considerable uptake of seasonal influenza vaccines in the Americas compared to other regions. We describe the current influenza vaccination target groups, recent progress in vaccine uptake and in generating evidence on influenza seasonality and vaccine effectiveness for immunization programs. We also discuss persistent challenges, 5 years after the A(H1N1) 2009 influenza pandemic. Methods: We compiled and summarized data annually reported by countries to the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) through the WHO/UNICEF joint report form on immunization, information obtained through PAHO's Revolving Fund for Vaccine Procurement and communications with managers of national Expanded Programs on Immunization (EPI). Results: Since 2008, 25 countries/territories in the Americas have introduced new target groups for vaccination or expanded the age ranges of existing target groups. As of 2014, 40 (89%) out of 45 countries/territories have policies established for seasonal influenza vaccination. Currently, 29 (64%) countries/territories target pregnant women for vaccination, the highest priority group according to WHO´s Stategic Advisory Group of Experts and PAHO/WHO's Technical Advisory Group on Vaccine-preventable Diseases, compared to only 7 (16%) in 2008. Among 23 countries reporting coverage data, on average, 75% of adults ≥60 years, 45% of children aged 6–23 months, 32% of children aged 5–2 years, 59% of pregnant women, 78% of healthcare workers, and 90% of individuals with chronic conditions were vaccinated during the 2013–14 Northern Hemisphere or 2014 Southern Hemisphere influenza vaccination activities. Difficulties however persist in the estimation of vaccination coverage, especially for pregnant women and persons with chronic conditions. Since 2007, 6 tropical countries have changed their vaccine formulation from the Northern to the Southern Hemisphere formulation and the timing of their campaigns to April-May following the review of national evidence. LAC countries have also established an official network dedicated to evaluating influenza vaccines effectiveness and impact. Conclusion: Following the A(H1N1)2009 influenza pandemic, countries of the Americas have continued their efforts to sustain or increase seasonal influenza vaccine uptake among high risk groups, especially among pregnant women. Countries also continued strengthening influenza surveillance, immunization platforms and information systems, indirectly improving preparedness for future pandemics. Influenza vaccination is particularly challenging compared to other vaccines included in EPI schedules, due to the need for annual, optimally timed vaccination, the wide spectrum of target groups, and the limitations of the available vaccines. Countries should continue to monitor influenza vaccination coverage, generate evidence for vaccination programs and implement social communication strategies addressing existing gaps. PMID:27196006

  5. Outcomes of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus Infection: Results from Two International Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lynfield, Ruth; Davey, Richard; Dwyer, Dominic E.; Losso, Marcelo H.; Wentworth, Deborah; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Herman-Lamin, Kathy; Cholewinska, Grazyna; David, Daniel; Kuetter, Stefan; Ternesgen, Zelalem; Uyeki, Timothy M.; Lane, H. Clifford; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Data from prospectively planned cohort studies on risk of major clinical outcomes and prognostic factors for patients with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus are limited. In 2009, in order to assess outcomes and evaluate risk factors for progression of illness, two cohort studies were initiated: FLU 002 in outpatients and FLU 003 in hospitalized patients. Methods and Findings Between October 2009 and December 2012, adults with influenza-like illness (ILI) were enrolled; outpatients were followed for 14 days and inpatients for 60 days. Disease progression was defined as hospitalization and/or death for outpatients, and hospitalization for >28 days, transfer to intensive care unit (ICU) if enrolled from general ward, and/or death for inpatients. Infection was confirmed by RT-PCR. 590 FLU 002 and 392 FLU 003 patients with influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 were enrolled from 81 sites in 17 countries at 2 days (IQR 1–3) and 6 days (IQR 4–10) following ILI onset, respectively. Disease progression was experienced by 29 (1 death) outpatients (5.1%; 95% CI: 3.4–7.2%) and 80 inpatients [death (32), hospitalization >28 days (43) or ICU transfer (20)] (21.6%; 95% CI: 17.5–26.2%). Disease progression (death) for hospitalized patients was 53.1% (26.6%) and 12.8% (3.8%), respectively, for those enrolled in the ICU and general ward. In pooled analyses for both studies, predictors of disease progression were age, longer duration of symptoms at enrollment and immunosuppression. Patients hospitalized during the pandemic period had a poorer prognosis than in subsequent seasons. Conclusions Patients with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, particularly when requiring hospital admission, are at high risk for disease progression, especially if they are older, immunodeficient, or admitted late in infection. These data reinforce the need for international trials of novel treatment strategies for influenza infection and serve as a reminder of the need to monitor the severity of seasonal and pandemic influenza epidemics globally. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifiers: FLU 002- NCT01056354, FLU 003- NCT01056185. PMID:25004134

  6. Combat Rescue Helicopter (CRH)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-479 Combat Rescue Helicopter (CRH) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense Acquisition...Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined TY - Then Year UCR

  7. The Focke Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Focke, H; Kruger, K B

    1938-01-01

    This report presents some of the problems concerning tests of helicopters, such as forced landings, controllability and stability, general safety, piloting maneuvers, performance, servicing, and the production of lift of a propeller. Test flights are described including a 67.67 mph flight by Hanna Reitsch.

  8. Utility of Helicopter Rotor Reflections at HF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-12-29

    Vesuvius AE 15 Ammunition Helicopter platform Mount Katmai AE 16 Ammunition Helicopter platform Great Sitkin AE 17 Ammunition Helicopter platform Diamond...carried Mount Whitney LCC 20 Amphibious command Utility helicopter carried Eldorado LCC 11 Amphibious command Utility helicopter carried Iwo Jima LPH...Barbara AE 28 Special minesweeper Mount Hood AE 29 Special minesweeper Suribachi AE 21 Ammunition Helicopter platform Mauna Kea AE 22 Ammunition

  9. Cluster of new influenza A(H1N1) cases in travellers returning from Scotland to Greece - community transmission within the European Union?

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulos, T; Bonovas, S; Danis, K; Iliopoulos, D; Dedoukou, X; Pavli, A; Smeti, P; Mentis, A; Kossivakis, A; Melidou, A; Diza, E; Chatzidimitriou, D; Koratzanis, E; Michailides, S; Passalidou, E; Kollaras, P; Nikolaides, P; Tsiodras, S

    2009-05-28

    On 26 and 27 May, the Hellenic Centre for Disease Control and Prevention in Greece reported two confirmed cases of new influenza A(H1N1) virus infection in travellers returning from Scotland. The two cases had no apparent traceable links to an infectious source. Herein we report details of the two cases and potential public health implications.

  10. Cytokine and chemokine responses in pediatric patients with severe pneumonia associated with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yuji; Kawamura, Yoshiki; Nakai, Hidetaka; Sugata, Ken; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Ihira, Masaru; Ohashi, Masahiro; Kato, Tomochika; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2012-09-01

    Severe pneumonia and leukocytosis are characteristic, frequently observed, clinical findings in pediatric patients with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus infection. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of cytokines and chemokines in complicating pneumonia and leukocytosis in patients with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus infection. Forty-seven patients with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus infection were enrolled in this study. Expression of interleukin (IL)-10 (P = 0.027) and IL-5 (P = 0.014) was significantly greater in patients with pneumonia than in those without pneumonia. Additionally, serum concentrations of interferon-γ (P = 0.009), tumor necrosis factor-α (P = 0.01), IL-4 (P = 0.024), and IL-2 (P = 0.012) were significantly lower in pneumonia patients with neutrophilic leukocytosis than in those without neutrophilic leukocytosis. Of the five serum chemokine concentrations assessed, only IL-8 was significantly lower in pneumonia patients with neutrophilic leukocytosis than in those without leukocytosis (P = 0.001). These cytokines and chemokines may play important roles in the pathogenesis of childhood pneumonia associated with A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus infection.

  11. Performance of the Directigen EZ Flu A+B rapid influenza diagnostic test to detect pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009.

    PubMed

    Boyanton, Bobby L; Almradi, Amro; Mehta, Tejal; Robinson-Dunn, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    The Directigen EZ Flu A+B rapid influenza diagnostic test, as compared to real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, demonstrated suboptimal performance to detect pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009. Age- and viral load-stratified test sensitivity ranged from 33.3 to 84.6% and 0 to 100%, respectively.

  12. Recombinant equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) vaccine protects pigs against challenge with influenza A(H1N1)pmd09.

    PubMed

    Said, Abdelrahman; Lange, Elke; Beer, Martin; Damiani, Armando; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2013-05-01

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) is not only an important respiratory pathogen in pigs but also a threat to human health. The pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus likely originated in swine through reassortment between a North American triple reassortant and Eurasian avian-like SIV. The North American triple reassortant virus harbors genes from avian, human and swine influenza viruses. An effective vaccine may protect the pork industry from economic losses and curb the development of new virus variants that may threaten public health. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of a recombinant equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) vaccine (rH_H1) expressing the hemagglutinin H1 of A(H1N1)pdm09 in the natural host. Our data shows that the engineered rH_H1 vaccine induces influenza virus-specific antibody responses in pigs and is able to protect at least partially against challenge infection: no clinical signs of disease were detected and virus replication was reduced as evidenced by decreased nasal virus shedding and faster virus clearance. Taken together, our results indicate that recombinant EHV-1 encoding H1 of A(H1N1)pdm09 may be a promising alternative for protection of pigs against infection with A(H1N1)pdm09 or other influenza viruses.

  13. Non-neutralizing antibodies induced by seasonal influenza vaccine prevent, not exacerbate A(H1N1)pdm09 disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyang; Reber, Adrian J.; Kumar, Amrita; Ramos, Patricia; Sica, Gabriel; Music, Nedzad; Guo, Zhu; Mishina, Margarita; Stevens, James; York, Ian A.; Jacob, Joshy; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2016-01-01

    The association of seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) with increased infection by 2009 pandemic H1N1 (A(H1N1)pdm09) virus, initially observed in Canada, has elicited numerous investigations on the possibility of vaccine-associated enhanced disease, but the potential mechanisms remain largely unresolved. Here, we investigated if prior immunization with TIV enhanced disease upon A(H1N1)pdm09 infection in mice. We found that A(H1N1)pdm09 infection in TIV-immunized mice did not enhance the disease, as measured by morbidity and mortality. Instead, TIV-immunized mice cleared A(H1N1)pdm09 virus and recovered at an accelerated rate compared to control mice. Prior TIV immunization was associated with potent inflammatory mediators and virus-specific CD8 T cell activation, but efficient immune regulation, partially mediated by IL-10R-signaling, prevented enhanced disease. Furthermore, in contrast to suggested pathological roles, pre-existing non-neutralizing antibodies (NNAbs) were not associated with enhanced virus replication, but rather with promoted antigen presentation through FcR-bearing cells that led to potent activation of virus-specific CD8 T cells. These findings provide new insights into interactions between pre-existing immunity and pandemic viruses. PMID:27849030

  14. High Vaccination Coverage among Children during Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 as a Potential Factor of Herd Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Toshihiko; Sato, Tomoki; Akita, Tomoyuki; Yanagida, Jiturou; Ohge, Hiroki; Kuwabara, Masao; Tanaka, Junko

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors related to the expansion of infection and prevention of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. A retrospective non-randomized cohort study (from June 2009 to May 2010) on influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was conducted in a sample of residents from Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. The cumulative incidence of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and the pandemic vaccine effectiveness (VE) were estimated. The response rate was 53.5% (178,669/333,892). Overall, the odds ratio of non-vaccinated group to vaccinated group for cumulative incidence of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was 2.18 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.13–2.23) and the VE was 43.9% (CI: 42.8–44.9). The expansion of infection, indicating the power of transmission from infected person to susceptible person, was high in the 7–15 years age groups in each area. In conclusion, results from this survey suggested that schoolchildren-based vaccination rate participates in determining the level of herd immunity to influenza and children might be the drivers of influenza transmission. For future pandemic preparedness, vaccination of schoolchildren may help to prevent disease transmission during influenza outbreak. PMID:27763532

  15. High Vaccination Coverage among Children during Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 as a Potential Factor of Herd Immunity.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Toshihiko; Sato, Tomoki; Akita, Tomoyuki; Yanagida, Jiturou; Ohge, Hiroki; Kuwabara, Masao; Tanaka, Junko

    2016-10-17

    The objective of this study was to identify factors related to the expansion of infection and prevention of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. A retrospective non-randomized cohort study (from June 2009 to May 2010) on influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was conducted in a sample of residents from Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. The cumulative incidence of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and the pandemic vaccine effectiveness (VE) were estimated. The response rate was 53.5% (178,669/333,892). Overall, the odds ratio of non-vaccinated group to vaccinated group for cumulative incidence of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was 2.18 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.13-2.23) and the VE was 43.9% (CI: 42.8-44.9). The expansion of infection, indicating the power of transmission from infected person to susceptible person, was high in the 7-15 years age groups in each area. In conclusion, results from this survey suggested that schoolchildren-based vaccination rate participates in determining the level of herd immunity to influenza and children might be the drivers of influenza transmission. For future pandemic preparedness, vaccination of schoolchildren may help to prevent disease transmission during influenza outbreak.

  16. Serologic response after vaccination against influenza (A/H1N1)pdm09 in children with renal disease receiving oral immunosuppressive drugs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Seiji; Saikusa, Tomoko; Katafuchi, Yuno; Ushijima, Kosuke; Ohtsu, Yasushi; Tsumura, Naoki; Ito, Yuhei

    2015-09-11

    A limited number of reports are available regarding the effect of the influenza vaccine in pediatric patients receiving steroid and immunosuppressant therapy. The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine was administered to 15 children with renal disease who were receiving steroid and immunosuppressant therapy (treatment group) and 23 children with who were not receiving these drugs (non-treatment group). Titer transition of the hemagglutination inhibition antibody was compared between the 2 groups immediately before vaccination and 4 weeks and 6 months after vaccination. Multivariate analysis showed a significant correlation between geometric mean titer, SCR, and SPR with age, while no correlation was observed between treatment with immunosuppressant therapy and efficacy. No serious adverse reactions occurred after vaccination. This strain is not present in existing influenza vaccines, and A(H1N1)pdm09HA vaccination was administered alone in 2009. The children in this study had not previously been exposed to this strain. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of the A(H1N1)pdm09HA vaccine without the effects of vaccination or past infection with A(H1N1)pdm09HA or A(H3N2) vaccination in the previous year.

  17. Reassortant Eurasian Avian-Like Influenza A(H1N1) Virus from a Severely Ill Child, Hunan Province, China, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenfei; Zhang, Hong; Xiang, Xingyu; Zhong, Lili; Yang, Lei; Guo, Junfeng; Xie, Yiran; Li, Fangcai; Deng, Zhihong; Feng, Hong; Huang, Yiwei; Hu, Shixiong; Xu, Xin; Zou, Xiaohui; Li, Xiaodan; Bai, Tian; Chen, Yongkun; Li, Zi

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, a novel influenza A(H1N1) virus was isolated from a boy in China who had severe pneumonia. The virus was a genetic reassortant of Eurasian avian-like influenza A(H1N1) (EA-H1N1) virus. The hemagglutinin, neuraminidase, and matrix genes of the reassortant virus were highly similar to genes in EA-H1N1 swine influenza viruses, the polybasic 1 and 2, polymerase acidic, and nucleoprotein genes originated from influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, and the nonstructural protein gene derived from classical swine influenza A(H1N1) (CS H1N1) virus. In a mouse model, the reassortant virus, termed influenza A/Hunan/42443/2015(H1N1) virus, showed higher infectivity and virulence than another human EA-H1N1 isolate, influenza A/Jiangsu/1/2011(H1N1) virus. In the respiratory tract of mice, virus replication by influenza A/Hunan/42443/2015(H1N1) virus was substantially higher than that by influenza A/Jiangsu/1/2011(H1N1) virus. Human-to-human transmission of influenza A/Hunan/42443/2015(H1N1) virus has not been detected; however, given the circulation of novel EA-H1N1 viruses in pigs, enhanced surveillance should be instituted among swine and humans. PMID:27767007

  18. Transmission by super-spreading event of pandemic A/H1N1 2009 influenza during road and train travel.

    PubMed

    Pestre, Vincent; Morel, Bruno; Encrenaz, Nathalie; Brunon, Amandine; Lucht, Frédéric; Pozzetto, Bruno; Berthelot, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    The investigation of clustered cases of pandemic A/H1N1 2009 influenza virus infection (21 children, 3 adults) during a summer camp, led to the identification of transportation as the circumstance of transmission. Results suggest that super-spreading of flu can occur in a confined space without sufficient air renewal.

  19. Evaluation of the spread of pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 among Japanese university students.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Mitsuo; Kaneko, Minoru; Tsukahara, Teruomi; Washizuka, Shinsuke; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2014-09-01

    The pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 virus is commonly known to affect younger individuals. Several epidemiological studies have clarified the epidemic features of university students in Japan. In this study, we reviewed these studies in Japan in comparison with reports from other countries. The average cumulative incidence rate among university students was 9.6 %, with the major symptoms being cough, sore throat, and rhinorrhea. These epidemiological features were similar between Japan and other countries. Attitudes and behaviors toward pandemic influenza control measures were different before and improved during and after the epidemic. These features were also similar to those in other countries. On the other hand, the epidemic spread through club activities or social events, and transmission was attenuated after temporary closure of such groups in Japan. This transmission pattern was inconsistent among countries, which may have been due to differences in lifestyle and cultural habits. Based on these results, infection control measures of pandemic influenza for university organizations in Japan should be considered.

  20. Beliefs and knowledge about vaccination against AH1N1pdm09 infection and uptake factors among Chinese parents.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cynthia Sau Ting; Kwong, Enid Wai Yung; Wong, Ho Ting; Lo, Suet Hang; Wong, Anthony Siu Wo

    2014-02-14

    Vaccination against AH1N1pdm09 infection (human swine infection, HSI) is an effective measure of preventing pandemic infection, especially for high-risk groups like children between the ages of 6 months and 6 years. This study used a cross-sectional correlation design and aimed to identify predicting factors of parental acceptance of the HSI vaccine (HSIV) and uptake of the vaccination by their preschool-aged children in Hong Kong. A total of 250 parents were recruited from four randomly selected kindergartens. A self-administered questionnaire based on the health belief framework was used for data collection. The results showed that a number of factors significantly affected the tendency toward new vaccination uptake; these factors included parental age, HSI vaccination history of the children in their family, preferable price of the vaccine, perceived severity, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, and motivating factors for taking new vaccines. Using these factors, a logistic regression model with a high Nagelkerke R2 of 0.63 was generated to explain vaccination acceptance. A strong correlation between parental acceptance of new vaccinations and the motivating factors of vaccination uptake was found, which indicates the importance of involving parents in policy implementation for any new vaccination schemes. Overall, in order to fight against pandemics and enhance vaccination acceptance, it is essential for the government to understand the above factors determining parental acceptance of new vaccinations for their preschool-aged children.

  1. The hemagglutinin of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 is mutating towards stability

    PubMed Central

    Castelán-Vega, Juan A; Magaña-Hernández, Anastasia; Jiménez-Alberto, Alicia; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa María

    2014-01-01

    The last influenza A pandemic provided an excellent opportunity to study the adaptation of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus to the human host. Particularly, due to the availability of sequences taken from isolates since the beginning of the pandemic until date, we could monitor amino acid changes that occurred in the hemagglutinin (HA) as the virus spread worldwide and became the dominant H1N1 strain. HA is crucial to viral infection because it binds to sialidated cell-receptors and mediates fusion of cell and viral membranes; because antibodies that bind to HA may block virus entry to the cell, this protein is subjected to high selective pressure. Multiple alignment analysis of sequences of the HA from isolates taken since 2009 to date allowed us to find amino acid changes that were positively selected as the pandemic progressed. We found nine changes that became prevalent: HA1 subunits D104N, K166Q, S188T, S206T, A259T, and K285E; and HA2 subunits E47K, S124N, and E172K. Most of these changes were located in areas involved in inter- and intrachain interactions, while only two (K166Q and S188T) were located in known antigenic sites. We conclude that selective pressure on HA was aimed to improve its functionality and hence virus fitness, rather than at avoidance of immune recognition. PMID:25328411

  2. Seroepidemiologic effects of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Australia, New Zealand, and Singapore.

    PubMed

    Trauer, James M; Bandaranayake, Don; Booy, Robert; Chen, Mark I; Cretikos, Michelle; Dowse, Gary K; Dwyer, Dominic E; Greenberg, Michael E; Huang, Q Sue; Khandaker, Gulam; Kok, Jen; Laurie, Karen L; Lee, Vernon J; McVernon, Jodie; Walter, Scott; Markey, Peter G

    2013-01-01

    To estimate population attack rates of influenza A(H1N1)pdm2009 in the Southern Hemisphere during June-August 2009, we conducted several serologic studies. We pooled individual-level data from studies using hemagglutination inhibition assays performed in Australia, New Zealand, and Singapore. We determined seropositive proportions (titer ≥40) for each study region by age-group and sex in pre- and postpandemic phases, as defined by jurisdictional notification data. After exclusions, the pooled database consisted of, 4,414 prepandemic assays and 7,715 postpandemic assays. In the prepandemic phase, older age groups showed greater seropositive proportions, with age-standardized, community-based proportions ranging from 3.5% in Singapore to 11.9% in New Zealand. In the postpandemic phase, seropositive proportions ranged from 17.5% in Singapore to 30.8% in New Zealand, with highest proportions seen in school-aged children. Pregnancy and residential care were associated with lower postpandemic seropositivity, whereas Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and Pacific Peoples of New Zealand had greater postpandemic seropositivity.

  3. Molecular modeling studies demonstrate key mutations that could affect the ligand recognition by influenza AH1N1 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Salinas, Gema L; García-Machorro, J; Quiliano, Miguel; Zimic, Mirko; Briz, Verónica; Rojas-Hernández, Saul; Correa-Basurto, J

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this study was to identify neuraminidase (NA) residue mutants from human influenza AH1N1 using sequences from 1918 to 2012. Multiple alignment studies of complete NA sequences (5732) were performed. Subsequently, the crystallographic structure of the 1918 influenza (PDB ID: 3BEQ-A) was used as a wild-type structure and three-dimensional (3-D) template for homology modeling of the mutated selected NA sequences. The 3-D mutated NAs were refined using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (50 ns). The refined 3-D models were used to perform docking studies using oseltamivir. Multiple sequence alignment studies showed seven representative mutations (A232V, K262R, V263I, T264V, S367L, S369N, and S369K). MD simulations applied to 3-D NAs showed that each NA had different active-site shapes according to structural surface visualization and docking results. Moreover, Cartesian principal component analyses (cPCA) show structural differences among these NA structures caused by mutations. These theoretical results suggest that the selected mutations that are located outside of the active site of NA could affect oseltamivir recognition and could be associated with resistance to oseltamivir.

  4. [Pandemic influenza A(H1N1): the experience of the Spanish Laboratories of Influenza Network (ReLEG)].

    PubMed

    Cuevas González-Nicolás, María Teresa; Ledesma Moreno, Juan; Pozo Sánchez, Francisco; Casas Flecha, Inmaculada; Pérez-Breña, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    There are three types of influenza viruses: A, B, C. These viruses evolves constantly due to two main characteristics: the first one is the lack of the correction ability of the viral polymerase which causes the accumulation of single nucleotide mutations in the viral genes introduced by an error-prone viral RNA polymerase, (antigenic shift). The second one is the nature of their genome, formed by eight segments, which allows the interchange of genes between two different viral strains (antigenic drift). This viral plasticity, has allowed to the influenza A viruses to infect new host species and to cause infections with a pandemic characteristics. The Spanish influenza surveillance system, SVGE (its Spanish acronym), arises as a response to the possibility of facing a pandemic situation, especially after the transmission of avian influenza viruses to humans. This surveillance system is formed by sixteen physician and paediatrics network, nineteen epidemiological services coordinated by the National Epidemiological Centre (CNE) and eighteen laboratories , the Spanish Laboratories of Influenza network (ReLEG), coordinated by the National Centre of Microbiology. The aim of this article is to show the action of the ReLEG, in the pandemic caused by the influenza virus A(H1N1) during the season 2009-2010. The main objective of this network is the surveillance of the circulating viruses by means of their detection and their subsequent antigenic and genetic characterization, including the detection of resistance mutations against the main drugs, such as Oseltamivir.

  5. No Major Host Genetic Risk Factor Contributed to A(H1N1)2009 Influenza Severity

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Bracho, María Alma; Galán, Juan Carlos; Pumarola, Tomàs; Castilla, Jesús; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl; Rodríguez-Dominguez, Mario; Quintela, Inés; Bonet, Núria; Garcia-Garcerà, Marc; Domínguez, Angela; González-Candelas, Fernando; Calafell, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    While most patients affected by the influenza A(H1N1) pandemic experienced mild symptoms, a small fraction required hospitalization, often without concomitant factors that could explain such a severe course. We hypothesize that host genetic factors could contribute to aggravate the disease. To test this hypothesis, we compared the allele frequencies of 547,296 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between 49 severe and 107 mild confirmed influenza A cases, as well as against a general population sample of 549 individuals. When comparing severe vs. mild influenza A cases, only one SNP was close to the conventional p = 5×10−8. This SNP, rs28454025, sits in an intron of the GSK233 gene, which is involved in a neural development, but seems not to have any connections with immunological or inflammatory functions. Indirectly, a previous association reported with CD55 was replicated. Although sample sizes are low, we show that the statistical power in our design was sufficient to detect highly-penetrant, quasi-Mendelian genetic factors. Hence, and assuming that rs28454025 is likely to be a false positive, no major genetic factor was detected that could explain poor influenza A course. PMID:26379185

  6. Modelling the spatial-temporal progression of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic in Chile.

    PubMed

    Bürger, Raimund; Chowell, Gerardo; Mulet, Pep; Villada, Luis M

    2016-02-01

    A spatial-temporal transmission model of 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic influenza across Chile, a country that spans a large latitudinal range, is developed to characterize the spatial variation in peak timing of that pandemic as a function of local transmission rates, spatial connectivity assumptions for Chilean regions, and the putative location of introduction of the novel virus into the country. Specifically, a metapopulation SEIR (susceptible-exposed-infected-removed) compartmental model that tracks the transmission dynamics of influenza in 15 Chilean regions is calibrated. The model incorporates population mobility among neighboring regions and indirect mobility to and from other regions via the metropolitan central region ('hub region'). The stability of the disease-free equilibrium of this model is analyzed and compared with the corresponding stability in each region, concluding that stability may occur even with some regions having basic reproduction numbers above 1. The transmission model is used along with epidemiological data to explore potential factors that could have driven the spatial-temporal progression of the pandemic. Simulations and sensitivity analyses indicate that this relatively simple model is sufficient to characterize the south-north gradient in peak timing observed during the pandemic, and suggest that south Chile observed the initial spread of the pandemic virus, which is in line with a retrospective epidemiological study. The 'hub region' in our model significantly enhanced population mixing in a short time scale.

  7. A Large Proportion of the Mexican Population Remained Susceptible to A(H1N1)pdm09 Infection One Year after the Emergence of 2009 Influenza Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Veguilla, Vic; López-Gatell, Hugo; López-Martínez, Irma; Aparicio-Antonio, Rodrigo; Barrera-Badillo, Gisela; Rojo-Medina, Julieta; Gross, Felicia Liaini; Jefferson, Stacie N.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic initially affected Mexico from April 2009 to July 2010. By August 2010, a fourth of the population had received the monovalent vaccine against the pandemic virus (A(H1N1)pdm09). To assess the proportion of the Mexican population who remained potentially susceptible to infection throughout the summer of 2010, we estimated the population seroprevalence to A(H1N1)pdm09 in a serosurvey of blood donors. Methods We evaluated baseline cross-reactivity to the pandemic strain and set the threshold for seropositivity using pre-pandemic (2005–2008) stored serum samples and sera from confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 infected individuals. Between June and September 2010, a convenience sample serosurvey of adult blood donors, children, and adolescents was conducted in six states of Mexico. Sera were tested by the microneutralization (MN) and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays, and regarded seropositive if antibody titers were equal or exceeded 1:40 for MN and 1:20 for HI. Age-standardized seroprevalence were calculated using the 2010 National Census population. Results Sera from 1,484 individuals were analyzed; 1,363 (92%) were blood donors, and 121 (8%) children or adolescents aged ≤19 years. Mean age (standard deviation) was 31.4 (11.5) years, and 276 (19%) were women. A total of 516 (35%) participants declared history of influenza vaccination after April 2009. The age-standardized seroprevalence to A(H1N1)pdm09 was 48% by the MN and 41% by the HI assays, respectively. The youngest quintile, aged 1 to 22 years, had the highest the seroprevalence; 61% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 56, 66%) for MN, and 56% (95% CI: 51, 62%) for HI. Conclusions Despite high transmission of A(H1N1)pdm09 observed immediately after its emergence and extensive vaccination, over a half of the Mexican population remained potentially susceptible to A(H1N1)pdm09 infection. Subsequent influenza seasons with high transmission of A(H1N1)pdm09, as 2011–2012 and 2013–2014, are compatible with these findings. PMID:27003409

  8. Evaluation of a new immunochromatographic assay for rapid identification of influenza A, B, and A(H1N1)2009 viruses.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Keiko; Kawakami, Chiharu; Shimizu, Hideaki; Abe, Takashi; Konomi, Yasushi; Yasumi, Yuki; Yamazaki, Masahiko; Ichikawa, Masataka; Sugaya, Norio

    2013-08-01

    We evaluated Clearline Influenza A/B/(H1N1)2009, a new multi-line immunochromatographic assay for rapid detection of antigens of influenza A (Flu A), B (Flu B), and A(H1N1)2009 viruses. Clearline detected Flu A, Flu B, and A(H1N1)2009 viruses with a detection limit of 4.6 × 10(3) to 7.5 × 10(4) pfu/assay. The sensitivity and specificity of detection of influenza virus by Clearline, using RT-PCR as reference standard, were determined for A(H1N1)2009, Flu A, and Flu B, in nasopharyngeal aspirate, nasopharyngeal swab, and self-blown nasal discharge specimens. Sensitivity for nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens was: A(H1N1)2009 = 97.3 %, Flu A = 94.5 %, and Flu B = 96.8 %, and specificity was Flu A = 99.1 % and Flu B = 100 %. Sensitivity for nasopharyngeal swab specimens was: A(H1N1)2009 = 91.9 %, Flu A = 92.8 %, and Flu B = 100 %, and specificity was Flu A = 98.2 % and Flu B = 100 %. Sensitivity for self-blown nasal discharge specimens was: A(H1N1)2009 = 75.7 %, Flu A = 86.5 %, and Flu B = 76.2 %, and specificity was Flu A = 98.4 % and Flu B = 100 %. Sensitivity and specificity of Clearline were sufficient for nasopharyngeal aspirate and swab specimens. For self-blown nasal discharge specimens, sensitivity was lower than for nasopharyngeal aspirates and nasopharyngeal swabs. The sensitivity of Clearline for A(H1N1)2009 was good even 6 h after the onset of symptoms. These findings suggest that Clearline may be useful for early clinical diagnosis of influenza.

  9. Helicopter external noise requirements: FAA perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    Enactment of helicopter noise certification standards for the control of noise impact contributing to community annoyance is considered in terms of the development of helicopters as an environmentally compatible air transportation mode. Increased use of helicopters for commercial applications and public awareness of aircraft noise are cited as factors making development of helicopter noise standards necessary both for the protection of the environmental interest of the community and to ensure the orderly growth of the helicopter industry itself. Noise sources, technology trends in helicopter design, and design concepts to control helicopter noise are discussed along with the regulatory background and specific helicopter regulatory concepts.

  10. The Arabidopsis COBRA protein facilitates cellulose crystallization at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Sorek, Nadav; Sorek, Hagit; Kijac, Aleksandra; Szemenyei, Heidi J; Bauer, Stefan; Hématy, Kian; Wemmer, David E; Somerville, Chris R

    2014-12-12

    Mutations in the Arabidopsis COBRA gene lead to defects in cellulose synthesis but the function of COBRA is unknown. Here we present evidence that COBRA localizes to discrete particles in the plasma membrane and is sensitive to inhibitors of cellulose synthesis, suggesting that COBRA and the cellulose synthase complex reside in close proximity on the plasma membrane. Live-cell imaging of cellulose synthesis indicated that, once initiated, cellulose synthesis appeared to proceed normally in the cobra mutant. Using isothermal calorimetry, COBRA was found to bind individual β1-4-linked glucan chains with a KD of 3.2 μm. Competition assays suggests that COBRA binds individual β1-4-linked glucan chains with higher affinity than crystalline cellulose. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the cell wall of the cobra mutant also indicated that, in addition to decreases in cellulose amount, the properties of the cellulose fibrils and other cell wall polymers differed from wild type by being less crystalline and having an increased number of reducing ends. We interpret the available evidence as suggesting that COBRA facilitates cellulose crystallization from the emerging β1-4-glucan chains by acting as a "polysaccharide chaperone."

  11. Influence of prior pandemic A(H1N1)2009 virus infection on invasion of MDCK cells by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yoko; Yano, Hisakazu; Nojima, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Ryuichi; Okamoto, Ryoichi; Hirakata, Yoichi; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Akahoshi, Tohru; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    Secondary bacterial pneumonia due to community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has become a highly publicized cause of death associated with influenza. In this study, we performed the gentamicin-killing assay using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and MRSA strains to investigate whether prior infection from pandemic A(H1N1)2009 virus (A[H1N1]pdm09) lead to increased invasion of MDCK cells by MRSA. We found that the invasion rate of two MRSA strains (ATCC BAA-1680 [USA 300] and ATCC BAA-1699 [USA 100]) into intact MDCK cell monolayers was 0.29 ± 0.15% and 0.007 ± 0.002%, respectively (p < 0.01, n ≥ 3). In addition, the relative invasion rate of both ATCC BAA-1680 and ATCC BAA-1699 was significantly increased by prior A(H1N1)pdm09 infection of MDCK monolayers from 1 ± 0.28 to 1.38 ± 0.02 and from 1 ± 0.24 to 1.73 ± 0.29, respectively (p < 0.01). These results indicate that ATCC BAA-1680 displays much stronger invasiveness of MDCK cells than ATCC BAA-1699, although invasion of both strains was increased by prior A(H1N1)pdm09 infection. In conclusion, this study provided the first evidence that prior A(H1N1)pdm09 infection facilitates the invasion of MDCK cells by MRSA, presumably due to cellular injury caused by the virus.

  12. Helicopter blade tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyothier, R.

    1983-01-01

    Methods of improving helicopter performance and vibration level by proper shaping of helicopter blade tips are considered. The principle involved consists of reducing the extent of the supersonic zone above the advancing tip and of the turbulent interaction. For stationary and advancing flight, the influence of the rotor and the problems posed by blade tips are reviewed. The theoretical methods of dealing with the two types of flight are briefly stated, and the experimental apparatus is described, including model triple and quadruple rotors. Different blade tip shapes are shown and briefly discussed. The theoretical results include an advancing speed of 309 km/H and a blade tip rotational speed of 215 m/s. The experimental values are advancing speed of 302 km/h and blade tip Mach number 0.86 for both types of rotors.

  13. Purification and Characterization of Thermostable and Detergent-Stable α-Amylase from Anoxybacillus sp. AH1

    PubMed Central

    Bekler, Fatma Matpan; Pirinççioğlu, Hemşe; Güven, Reyhan Gül; Güven, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Summary A thermostable and detergent-stable α-amylase from a newly isolated Anoxybacillus sp. AH1 was purified and characterized. Maximum enzyme production (1874.8 U/mL) was obtained at 24 h of incubation. The amylase was purified by using Sephadex G-75 gel filtration, after which an 18-fold increase in specific activity and a yield of 9% were achieved. The molecular mass of the purified enzyme was estimated at 85 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The optimum pH and temperature values of the enzyme were 7.0 and 60 °C, respectively. The enzyme was highly stable in the presence of 30% glycerol, retaining 85% of its original activity at 60 °C within 120 min. Km and vmax values were 0.102 µmol and 0.929 µmol/min, respectively, using Lineweaver-Burk plot. The enzyme activity was increased by various detergents, but it was significantly inhibited in the presence of urea. Mg2+ and Ca2+ also significantly activated α-amylase, while Zn2+, Cu2+ and metal ion chelators ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) greatly inhibited the enzyme activity. α-Amylase activity was enhanced by β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME) and dithiothreitol (DTT) to a great extent, but inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (PCMB). Iodoacetamide (IAA) and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) had a slight, whereas phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) had a strong inhibitory effect on the amylase activity. PMID:27904395

  14. Atraumatic osteonecrosis of the humeral head after influenza A-(H1N1) v-2009 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kuether, G; Dietrich, B; Smith, T; Peter, C; Gruessner, S

    2011-09-16

    In the recent pandemic influenza A-(H1N1) v-2009 vaccination campaign, adjuvanted vaccines have been used because of their antigen-sparing effect. According to available reports, the rate of severe vaccination reactions has not increased, as compared with previous seasonal influenza vaccinations. Here we describe an adult female patient who was vaccinated with an AS03 adjuvanted split-virus vaccine injected into the left arm. She experienced a prolonged and painful local reaction for 4 weeks. During this time, persistent incapacitating pain shifted into the left shoulder. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the injection site detected atraumatic humeral head osteonecrosis in conjunction with bursitis of the rotator cuff region. Clinical and laboratory examination revealed no other underlying disease. Using analgetic medication and physical therapy, resting pain completely remitted within the following 14 weeks. Pain on exertion declined within the following 6 months. Atraumatic osteonecrosis, a relatively rare disorder which initially presents non-specific clinical symptoms, has never been associated with parenteral influenza vaccination. Although the available data cannot establish a causal relationship, our patient's clinical course - with a continuous transition from increased local post-vaccination reactions to symptoms of a severe shoulder lesion with osteonecrosis - raises the question of a pathogenetic link. Considering the vascular pathogenesis of osteonecrosis, we hypothesize that our patient's enhanced local immunologic reaction may have led to regional vasculitis as the cause of bone destruction. As mild forms of osteonecrosis may have escaped previous clinical attention, it is the purpose of our report to increase awareness of this exceptional event as a possible side effect of parenteral adjuvanted vaccination.

  15. Development of oseltamivir and zanamivir resistance in influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, Denmark, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Trebbien, Ramona; Pedersen, Svend Stenvang; Vorborg, Kristine; Franck, Kristina Træholt; Fischer, Thea Kølsen

    2017-01-01

    Antiviral treatment of immunocompromised patients with prolonged influenza virus infection can lead to multidrug resistance. This study reveals the selection of antiviral resistance mutations in influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in an immunocompromised patient during a 6-month period. The patient was treated with two courses of oseltamivir (5 days and 2 months, respectively), with the first course starting at symptom onset, and subsequently zanamivir (2 months and 10 days, respectively). Respiratory samples were investigated by Sanger and next generation sequencing (NGS) and, for NGS data, low-frequency-variant-detection analysis was performed. Neuraminidase-inhibition tests were conducted for samples isolated in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. In a sample collected 15 days after the end of the first treatment with oseltamivir (Day 20 post-symptom onset), oseltamivir resistance was detected (mutation H275Y with 60.3% frequency by NGS). Day 149 when the patient had almost completed the second zanamivir treatment, mixes of the following resistance mutations were detected; H275Y(65.1%), I223R(9.2%), and E119G(89.6%), accompanied by additional mutations, showing a more complex viral population in the long-term treated patient. Two samples obtained on Day 151 from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and nasopharyngeal swab, respectively, showed different mutation profiles, with a higher frequency of antiviral resistance mutations in BAL. The results emphasise the importance of timely antiviral resistance testing both for treatment of individual patients as well as for preventive measures to control the development and transmission of antiviral resistant viruses. PMID:28128091

  16. Purification and Characterization of Thermostable and Detergent-Stable α-Amylase from Anoxybacillus sp. AH1.

    PubMed

    Acer, Ömer; Bekler, Fatma Matpan; Pirinççioğlu, Hemşe; Güven, Reyhan Gül; Güven, Kemal

    2016-03-01

    A thermostable and detergent-stable α-amylase from a newly isolated Anoxybacillus sp. AH1 was purified and characterized. Maximum enzyme production (1874.8 U/mL) was obtained at 24 h of incubation. The amylase was purified by using Sephadex G-75 gel filtration, after which an 18-fold increase in specific activity and a yield of 9% were achieved. The molecular mass of the purified enzyme was estimated at 85 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The optimum pH and temperature values of the enzyme were 7.0 and 60 °C, respectively. The enzyme was highly stable in the presence of 30% glycerol, retaining 85% of its original activity at 60 °C within 120 min. Km and vmax values were 0.102 µmol and 0.929 µmol/min, respectively, using Lineweaver-Burk plot. The enzyme activity was increased by various detergents, but it was significantly inhibited in the presence of urea. Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) also significantly activated α-amylase, while Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and metal ion chelators ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) greatly inhibited the enzyme activity. α-Amylase activity was enhanced by β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME) and dithiothreitol (DTT) to a great extent, but inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (PCMB). Iodoacetamide (IAA) and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) had a slight, whereas phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) had a strong inhibitory effect on the amylase activity.

  17. Helicopter Visual Aid System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baisley, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an evaluation of police helicopter effectiveness revealed a need for improved visual capability. A JPL program developed a method that would enhance visual observation capability for both day and night usage and demonstrated the feasibility of the adopted approach. This approach made use of remote pointable optics, a display screen, a slaved covert searchlight, and a coupled camera. The approach was proved feasible through field testing and by judgement against evaluation criteria.

  18. Apollo 10 Helicopter Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    A Navy helicopter arrivies to recover the Apollo 10 astronauts, seen entering a life raft, as the Command Module 'Charlie Brown' floats in the South Pacific. U.S. Navy underwater demolition team swimmers assist in the recovery operations. Splashdown occurred at 11:53 a.m., May 26, 1969, about 400 miles east of American Samoa. Note that in this photo the divers have attached a flotation collar to the spacecraft.

  19. Operational Helicopter Aviation Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    acoustic stimuli travelling through the system to the inner ear. HEARING PROTECTOR AND VOICE COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS EFFECTS The humar auditory system just...equipment, communication noise, aircrew hearing loss, and weapons impulse noise. Helicopter Safety and Crashworthiness covered crash injury analysis...protect visual and auditory performance while performing aircrew duties were also pre- sented. A summ. ry of the excellent work presented supported the

  20. 77 FR 36131 - Airworthiness Directives; Enstrom Helicopter Corporation Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ...-28, 480, and 480B helicopters to add another trim relay to the applicability and to revise the modification instructions. This AD is prompted by the discovery that another part- numbered trim relay...-28F, 280C, 280F, 280FX, TH-28, 480, and 480B helicopters with a trim relay, part-number (P/N)...

  1. 77 FR 52264 - Airworthiness Directives; Hughes Helicopters, Inc., and McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... Directives; Hughes Helicopters, Inc., and McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems (Type Certificate Currently... proposed AD, contact MD Helicopters Inc., Attn: Customer Support Division, 4555 E. McDowell Rd., Mail Stop... Airworthiness Directive (AD): Hughes Helicopters Inc., and McDonnel Douglas Helicopter Systems (Type...

  2. Sero-Prevalence and Incidence of A/H1N1 2009 Influenza Infection in Scotland in Winter 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    McLeish, Nigel J.; Simmonds, Peter; Robertson, Chris; Handel, Ian; McGilchrist, Mark; Singh, Brajendra K.; Kerr, Shona; Chase-Topping, Margo E.; Sinka, Katy; Bronsvoort, Mark; Porteous, David J.; Carman, William; McMenamin, James; Leigh-Brown, Andrew; Woolhouse, Mark E. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Sero-prevalence is a valuable indicator of prevalence and incidence of A/H1N1 2009 infection. However, raw sero-prevalence data must be corrected for background levels of cross-reactivity (i.e. imperfect test specificity) and the effects of immunisation programmes. Methods and Findings We obtained serum samples from a representative sample of 1563 adults resident in Scotland between late October 2009 and April 2010. Based on a microneutralisation assay, we estimate that 44% (95% confidence intervals (CIs): 40–47%) of the adult population of Scotland were sero-positive for A/H1N1 2009 influenza by 1 March 2010. Correcting for background cross-reactivity and for recorded vaccination rates by time and age group, we estimated that 34% (27–42%) were naturally infected with A/H1N1 2009 by 1 March 2010. The central estimate increases to >40% if we allow for imperfect test sensitivity. Over half of these infections are estimated to have occurred during the study period and the incidence of infection in late October 2009 was estimated at 4.3 new infections per 1000 people per day (1.2 to 7.2), falling close to zero by April 2010. The central estimate increases to over 5.0 per 1000 if we allow for imperfect test specificity. The rate of infection was higher for younger adults than older adults. Raw sero-prevalences were significantly higher in more deprived areas (likelihood ratio trend statistic = 4.92,1 df, P = 0.03) but there was no evidence of any difference in vaccination rates. Conclusions We estimate that almost half the adult population of Scotland were sero-positive for A/H1N1 2009 influenza by early 2010 and that the majority of these individuals (except in the oldest age classes) sero-converted as a result of natural infection with A/H1N1 2009. Public health planning should consider the possibility of higher rates of infection with A/H1N1 2009 influenza in more deprived areas. PMID:21687661

  3. Randomized Controlled Ferret Study to Assess the Direct Impact of 2008–09 Trivalent Inactivated Influenza Vaccine on A(H1N1)pdm09 Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Skowronski, Danuta M.; Hamelin, Marie-Eve; De Serres, Gaston; Janjua, Naveed Z.; Li, Guiyun; Sabaiduc, Suzana; Bouhy, Xavier; Couture, Christian; Leung, Anders; Kobasa, Darwyn; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; de Bruin, Erwin; Balshaw, Robert; Lavigne, Sophie; Petric, Martin; Koopmans, Marion; Boivin, Guy

    2014-01-01

    During spring-summer 2009, several observational studies from Canada showed increased risk of medically-attended, laboratory-confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 illness among prior recipients of 2008–09 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV). Explanatory hypotheses included direct and indirect vaccine effects. In a randomized placebo-controlled ferret study, we tested whether prior receipt of 2008–09 TIV may have directly influenced A(H1N1)pdm09 illness. Thirty-two ferrets (16/group) received 0.5 mL intra-muscular injections of the Canadian-manufactured, commercially-available, non-adjuvanted, split 2008–09 Fluviral or PBS placebo on days 0 and 28. On day 49 all animals were challenged (Ch0) with A(H1N1)pdm09. Four ferrets per group were randomly selected for sacrifice at day 5 post-challenge (Ch+5) and the rest followed until Ch+14. Sera were tested for antibody to vaccine antigens and A(H1N1)pdm09 by hemagglutination inhibition (HI), microneutralization (MN), nucleoprotein-based ELISA and HA1-based microarray assays. Clinical characteristics and nasal virus titers were recorded pre-challenge then post-challenge until sacrifice when lung virus titers, cytokines and inflammatory scores were determined. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups of influenza-naïve animals. Antibody rise to vaccine antigens was evident by ELISA and HA1-based microarray but not by HI or MN assays; virus challenge raised antibody to A(H1N1)pdm09 by all assays in both groups. Beginning at Ch+2, vaccinated animals experienced greater loss of appetite and weight than placebo animals, reaching the greatest between-group difference in weight loss relative to baseline at Ch+5 (7.4% vs. 5.2%; p = 0.01). At Ch+5 vaccinated animals had higher lung virus titers (log-mean 4.96 vs. 4.23pfu/mL, respectively; p = 0.01), lung inflammatory scores (5.8 vs. 2.1, respectively; p = 0.051) and cytokine levels (p>0.05). At Ch+14, both groups had recovered. Findings in influenza-naïve, systematically-infected ferrets may not replicate the human experience. While they cannot be considered conclusive to explain human observations, these ferret findings are consistent with direct, adverse effect of prior 2008–09 TIV receipt on A(H1N1)pdm09 illness. As such, they warrant further in-depth investigation and search for possible mechanistic explanations. PMID:24475142

  4. Characterization of Drug-Resistant Influenza Virus A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) Variants Selected In Vitro with Laninamivir

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Mélanie; Abed, Yacine; Desrochers, François-Marc; Hamilton, Stephanie; Luttick, Angela; Tucker, Simon P.; Pryor, Melinda J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) play a major role for managing influenza virus infections. The widespread oseltamivir resistance among 2007-2008 seasonal A(H1N1) viruses and community outbreaks of oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 strains highlights the need for additional anti-influenza virus agents. Laninamivir is a novel long-lasting NAI that has demonstrated in vitro activity against influenza A and B viruses, and its prodrug (laninamivir octanoate) is in phase II clinical trials in the United States and other countries. Currently, little information is available on the mechanisms of resistance to laninamivir. In this study, we first performed neuraminidase (NA) inhibition assays to determine the activity of laninamivir against a set of influenza A viruses containing NA mutations conferring resistance to one or many other NAIs. We also generated drug-resistant A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) viruses under in vitro laninamivir pressure. Laninamivir demonstrated a profile of susceptibility that was similar to that of zanamivir. More specifically, it retained activity against oseltamivir-resistant H275Y and N295S A(H1N1) variants and the E119V A(H3N2) variant. In vitro, laninamivir pressure selected the E119A NA substitution in the A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 A(H1N1) background, whereas E119K and G147E NA changes along with a K133E hemagglutinin (HA) substitution were selected in the A/Quebec/144147/2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 strain. In the A/Brisbane/10/2007 A(H3N2) background, a large NA deletion accompanied by S138A/P194L HA substitutions was selected. This H3N2 variant had altered receptor-binding properties and was highly resistant to laninamivir in plaque reduction assays. Overall, we confirmed the similarity between zanamivir and laninamivir susceptibility profiles and demonstrated that both NA and HA changes can contribute to laninamivir resistance in vitro. PMID:24957832

  5. Helicopter simulation: Making it work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The opportunities for improved training and checking by using helicopter simulators are greater than they are for airplane pilot training. Simulators permit the safe creation of training environments that are conducive to the development of pilot decision-making, situational awareness, and cockpit management. This paper defines specific attributes required in a simulator to meet a typical helicopter operator's training and checking objectives.

  6. Recent European Developments in Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1921-01-01

    Descriptions are given of two captured helicopters, one driven by electric power, the other by a gasoline engine. An account is given of flight tests of the gasoline powered vehicle. After 15 successful flight tests, the gasoline powered vehicle crashed due to the insufficient thrust. Also discussed here are the applications of helicopters for military observations, for meteorological work, and for carrying radio antennas.

  7. Helicopter Acoustics, part 2. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Exterior and interior helicopter noise problems are addressed from the physics and engineering as well as the human factors point of view. Noise regulation concepts, human factors and criteria, rotor noise generation and control, design, operations and testing for noise control, helicopter noise prediction, and research tools and measurements are covered.

  8. Helicopter discrimination apparatus for the murine radar

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Jr., John G.; Gray, Roger M.

    1977-01-01

    A helicopter discrimination apparatus for a radar utilizing doppler filtering to discriminate between a missile and ground clutter. The short duration of the doppler filter pulses which are emitted by helicopter rotor blades are processed to prevent false alarms, thus allowing the radar-protected helicopter to operate in formation with other helicopters while maintaining protection against infra-red-seeking missiles.

  9. Functional characterization of a tomato COBRA-like gene functioning in fruit development and ripening

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Extensive studies have demonstrated that the COBRA gene is critical for biosynthesis of cell wall constituents comprising structural tissues of roots, stalks, leaves and other vegetative organs, however, its role in fruit development and ripening remains largely unknown. Results We identified a tomato gene (SlCOBRA-like) homologous to Arabidopsis COBRA, and determined its role in fleshy fruit biology. The SlCOBRA-like gene is highly expressed in vegetative organs and in early fruit development, but its expression in fruit declines dramatically during ripening stages, implying a primary role in early fruit development. Fruit-specific suppression of SlCOBRA-like resulted in impaired cell wall integrity and up-regulation of genes encoding proteins involved in cell wall degradation during early fruit development. In contrast, fruit-specific overexpression of SlCOBRA-like resulted in increased wall thickness of fruit epidermal cells, more collenchymatous cells beneath the epidermis, elevated levels of cellulose and reduced pectin solubilization in the pericarp cells of red ripe fruits. Moreover, transgenic tomato fruits overexpressing SlCOBRA-like exhibited desirable early development phenotypes including enhanced firmness and a prolonged shelf life. Conclusions Our results suggest that SlCOBRA-like plays an important role in fruit cell wall architecture and provides a potential genetic tool for extending the shelf life of tomato and potentially additional fruits. PMID:23140186

  10. Why are Dutch rheumatologists reluctant to use the COBRA treatment strategy in early rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Plass, Anne Marie C; Lems, Willem F; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Dijkmans, Ben A C; Boers, Maarten

    2007-01-01

    Background The Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoide Artritis (COBRA) trial has proved that combination therapy with prednisolone, methotrexate and sulphasalazine is superior to sulphasalazine monotherapy in suppressing disease activity and radiological progression of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, 5 years of follow‐up proved that COBRA therapy results in sustained reduction of the rate of radiological progression. Despite this evidence, Dutch rheumatologists seem reluctant to prescribe COBRA therapy. Objective To explore the reasons for the reluctance in Dutch rheumatologists to prescribe COBRA therapy. Methods A short structured questionnaire based on social–psychological theories of behaviour was sent to all Dutch rheumatologists (n = 230). Results The response rate was 50%. COBRA therapy was perceived as both effective and safe, but complex to administer. Furthermore, rheumatologists expressed their concern about the large number of pills that had to be taken, the side effects of high‐dose prednisolone and the low dose of methotrexate. Although the average attitude towards the COBRA therapy was slightly positive (above the neutral point), the majority of responding rheumatologists had a negative intention (below the neutral point) to prescribe COBRA therapy in the near future. Conclusion The reluctance of Dutch rheumatologists to prescribe effective COBRA therapy may be due to perceptions of complexity of the treatment schedule and negative patient‐related consequences of the therapy. PMID:17392349

  11. 26 CFR 54.4980B-10 - Interaction of FMLA and COBRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interaction of FMLA and COBRA. 54.4980B-10...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES § 54.4980B-10 Interaction of FMLA and COBRA. The... leave) under a group health plan of the employee's employer; (2) The employee does not return...

  12. 26 CFR 54.4980B-6 - Electing COBRA continuation coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... coverage is elected: Q-1: What is the election period and how long must it last? A-1: (a) A group health plan can condition the availability of COBRA continuation coverage upon the timely election of such coverage. An election of COBRA continuation coverage is a timely election if it is made during the...

  13. Developing engineering model Cobra fiber positioners for the Subaru Telescope's prime focus spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Charles; Morantz, Chaz; Braun, David; Seiffert, Michael; Aghazarian, Hrand; Partos, Eamon; King, Matthew; Hovland, Larry E.; Schwochert, Mark; Kaluzny, Joel; Capocasale, Christopher; Houck, Andrew; Gross, Johannes; Reiley, Daniel; Mao, Peter; Riddle, Reed; Bui, Khanh; Henderson, David; Haran, Todd; Culhane, Robert; Piazza, Daniele; Walkama, Eric

    2014-07-01

    The Cobra fiber positioner is being developed by the California Institute of Technology (CIT) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) instrument that will be installed at the Subaru Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. PFS is a fiber fed multi-object spectrometer that uses an array of Cobra fiber positioners to rapidly reconfigure 2394 optical fibers at the prime focus of the Subaru Telescope that are capable of positioning a fiber to within 5μm of a specified target location. A single Cobra fiber positioner measures 7.7mm in diameter and is 115mm tall. The Cobra fiber positioner uses two piezo-electric rotary motors to move a fiber optic anywhere in a 9.5mm diameter patrol area. In preparation for full-scale production of 2550 Cobra positioners an Engineering Model (EM) version was developed, built and tested to validate the design, reduce manufacturing costs, and improve system reliability. The EM leveraged the previously developed prototype versions of the Cobra fiber positioner. The requirements, design, assembly techniques, development testing, design qualification and performance evaluation of EM Cobra fiber positioners are described here. Also discussed is the use of the EM build and test campaign to validate the plans for full-scale production of 2550 Cobra fiber positioners scheduled to begin in late-2014.

  14. A rotor-mounted digital instrumentation system for helicopter blade flight research measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, V. H., Jr.; Haywood, W. S., Jr.; Williams, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    A rotor mounted flight instrumentation system developed for helicopter rotor blade research is described. The system utilizes high speed digital techniques to acquire research data from miniature pressure transducers on advanced rotor airfoils which are flight tested on an AH-1G helicopter. The system employs microelectronic pulse code modulation (PCM) multiplexer digitizer stations located remotely on the blade and in a hub mounted metal canister. As many as 25 sensors can be remotely digitized by a 2.5 mm thick electronics package mounted on the blade near the tip to reduce blade wiring. The electronics contained in the canister digitizes up to 16 sensors, formats these data with serial PCM data from the remote stations, and transmits the data from the canister which is above the plane of the rotor. Data are transmitted over an RF link to the ground for real time monitoring and to the helicopter fuselage for tape recording. The complete system is powered by batteries located in the canister and requires no slip rings on the rotor shaft.

  15. The NASA/industry Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) program : Bell Helicopter Textron accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronkhite, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate vibration prediction for helicopter airframes is needed to 'fly from the drawing board' without costly development testing to solve vibration problems. The principal analytical tool for vibration prediction within the U.S. helicopter industry is the NASTRAN finite element analysis. Under the NASA DAMVIBS research program, Bell conducted NASTRAN modeling, ground vibration testing, and correlations of both metallic (AH-1G) and composite (ACAP) airframes. The objectives of the program were to assess NASTRAN airframe vibration correlations, to investigate contributors to poor agreement, and to improve modeling techniques. In the past, there has been low confidence in higher frequency vibration prediction for helicopters that have multibladed rotors (three or more blades) with predominant excitation frequencies typically above 15 Hz. Bell's findings under the DAMVIBS program, discussed in this paper, included the following: (1) accuracy of finite element models (FEM) for composite and metallic airframes generally were found to be comparable; (2) more detail is needed in the FEM to improve higher frequency prediction; (3) secondary structure not normally included in the FEM can provide significant stiffening; (4) damping can significantly affect phase response at higher frequencies; and (5) future work is needed in the areas of determination of rotor-induced vibratory loads and optimization.

  16. Algebraic analysis of social networks for bio-surveillance: the cases of SARS-Beijing-2003 and AH1N1 influenza-México-2009.

    PubMed

    Hincapié, Doracelly; Ospina, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Algebraic analysis of social networks exhibited by SARS-Beijing-2003 and AH1N1 flu-México-2009 was realized. The main tools were the Tutte polynomials and Maple package Graph-Theory. The topological structures like graphs and networks were represented by invariant polynomials. The evolution of a given social network was represented like an evolution of the algebraic complexity of the corresponding Tutte polynomial. The reduction of a given social network was described like an involution of the algebraic complexity of the associated Tutte polynomial. The outbreaks of SARS and AH1N1 Flu were considered like represented by a reduction of previously existing contact networks via the control measures executed by health authorities. From Tutte polynomials were derived numerical indicators about efficiency of control measures.

  17. Biological characteristics of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus circulating in West Siberia during pandemic and post-pandemic periods.

    PubMed

    Prokop'eva, E A; Kurskaya, O G; Saifutdinova, S G; Glushchenko, A V; Shestopalova, L V; Shestopalov, A M; Shkurupii, V A

    2014-03-01

    We studied biological characteristics of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus circulating in Siberia during the 2009 pandemic and the post-pandemic period of 2011. BALB/c mice were chosen as the experimental model. Virus titers in the lungs were evaluated on days 1, 3, 6 and blood serum titers on day 15 after infection with different strains. Blood sera of convalescents after influenza of 2010-2011 epidemic season were analyzed. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus strains isolated during the post-pandemic period of 2011 were characterized by low epidemic activity and virulence in comparison with the strains isolated during 2009 pandemic period, which indicates completion of the pandemic cycle.

  18. Antihemorrhagin in the blood serum of king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah): purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Chanhome, Lawan; Khow, Orawan; Omori-Satoh, Tamotsu; Sitprija, Visith

    2003-06-01

    King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) serum was found to possess antihemorrhagic activity against king cobra hemorrhagin. The activity was stronger than that in commercial king cobra antivenom. An antihemorrhagin has been purified by ion exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography and gel filtration with a 22-fold purification and an overall yield of 12% of the total antihemorrhagic activity contained in crude serum. The purified antihemorrhagin was homogeneous in disc-PAGE and SDS-PAGE. Its apparent molecular weight determined by SDS-PAGE was 120 kDa. The antihemorrhagin was also active against other hemorrhagic snake venoms obtained in Thailand and Japan such as Calloselasma rhodostoma, Trimeresurus albolabris, Trimeresurus macrops and Trimeresurus flavoviridis (Japanese Habu). It inhibited the proteolytic activity of king cobra venom. It is an acid- and thermolabile protein and does not form precipitin lines against king cobra venom.

  19. Whole genome characterization of human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated from Kenya during the 2009 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Gachara, George; Symekher, Samuel; Otieno, Michael; Magana, Japheth; Opot, Benjamin; Bulimo, Wallace

    2016-06-01

    An influenza pandemic caused by a novel influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09 spread worldwide in 2009 and is estimated to have caused between 151,700 and 575,400 deaths globally. While whole genome data on new virus enables a deeper insight in the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and drug sensitivities of the circulating viruses, there are relatively limited complete genetic sequences available for this virus from African countries. We describe herein the full genome analysis of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated in Kenya between June 2009 and August 2010. A total of 40 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated during the pandemic were selected. The segments from each isolate were amplified and directly sequenced. The resulting sequences of individual gene segments were concatenated and used for subsequent analysis. These were used to infer phylogenetic relationships and also to reconstruct the time of most recent ancestor, time of introduction into the country, rates of substitution and to estimate a time-resolved phylogeny. The Kenyan complete genome sequences clustered with globally distributed clade 2 and clade 7 sequences but local clade 2 viruses did not circulate beyond the introductory foci while clade 7 viruses disseminated country wide. The time of the most recent common ancestor was estimated between April and June 2009, and distinct clusters circulated during the pandemic. The complete genome had an estimated rate of nucleotide substitution of 4.9×10(-3) substitutions/site/year and greater diversity in surface expressed proteins was observed. We show that two clades of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were introduced into Kenya from the UK and the pandemic was sustained as a result of importations. Several closely related but distinct clusters co-circulated locally during the peak pandemic phase but only one cluster dominated in the late phase of the pandemic suggesting that it possessed greater adaptability.

  20. Assessing Antigenic Drift of Seasonal Influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tewawong, Nipaporn; Prachayangprecha, Slinporn; Vichiwattana, Preeyaporn; Korkong, Sumeth; Klinfueng, Sirapa; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Thongmee, Thanunrat; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Under selective pressure from the host immune system, antigenic epitopes of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) have continually evolved to escape antibody recognition, termed antigenic drift. We analyzed the genomes of influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 virus strains circulating in Thailand between 2010 and 2014 and assessed how well the yearly vaccine strains recommended for the southern hemisphere matched them. We amplified and sequenced the HA gene of 120 A(H3N2) and 81 A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus samples obtained from respiratory specimens and calculated the perfect-match vaccine efficacy using the pepitope model, which quantitated the antigenic drift in the dominant epitope of HA. Phylogenetic analysis of the A(H3N2) HA1 genes classified most strains into genetic clades 1, 3A, 3B, and 3C. The A(H3N2) strains from the 2013 and 2014 seasons showed very low to moderate vaccine efficacy and demonstrated antigenic drift from epitopes C and A to epitope B. Meanwhile, most A(H1N1)pdm09 strains from the 2012–2014 seasons belonged to genetic clades 6A, 6B, and 6C and displayed the dominant epitope mutations at epitopes B and E. Finally, the vaccine efficacy for A(H1N1)pdm09 (79.6–93.4%) was generally higher than that of A(H3N2). These findings further confirmed the accelerating antigenic drift of the circulating influenza A(H3N2) in recent years. PMID:26440103

  1. A review of the dynamics and severity of the pandemic A(H1N1) influenza virus on Réunion island, 2009.

    PubMed

    D'Ortenzio, E; Renault, P; Jaffar-Bandjee, M C; Gaüzère, B A; Lagrange-Xélot, M; Fouillet, A; Poubeau, P; Winer, A; Bourde, A; Staikowsky, F; Morbidelli, P; Rachou, E; Thouillot, F; Michault, A; Filleul, L

    2010-04-01

    On Reunion Island, in response to the threat of emergence of the pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus, we implemented enhanced influenza surveillance from May 2009 onwards in order to detect the introduction of pandemic H1N1 influenza and to monitor its spread and impact on public health. The first 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus was identified in Réunion on July 5, 2009, in a traveller returning from Australia; seasonal influenza B virus activity had already been detected. By the end of July, a sustained community pandemic virus transmission had been established. Pandemic H1N1 influenza activity peaked during week 35 (24-30 August 2009), 4 weeks after the beginning of the epidemic. The epidemic ended on week 38 and had lasted 9 weeks. During these 9 weeks, an estimated 66 915 persons who consulted a physician could have been infected by the influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus, giving a cumulative attack rate for consultants of 8.26%. Taking into account the people who did not consult, the total number of infected persons reached 104 067, giving a cumulative attack rate for symptomatics of 12.85%. The crude fatality rate (CFR) for influenza A(H1N1)2009 and the CFR for acute respiratory infection was 0.7/10 000 cases. Our data show that influenza pandemic did not have a health impact on overall mortality on Réunion Island. These findings demonstrate the value of an integrated epidemiological, virological and hospital surveillance programme to monitor the scope of an epidemic, identify circulating strains and provide some guidance to public health control measures.

  2. COBRA accelerator for Sandia ICF diode research at Cornell University

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Ingwersen, P.; Bennett, L.F.; Boyes, J.D.; Anderson, D.E.; Greenly, J.B.; Sudan, R.N.

    1995-05-01

    The new COBRA accelerator is being built in stages at the Laboratory of Plasma Studies in Cornell University where its applications will include extraction diode and ion beam research in support of the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The 4- to 5-MV, 125- to 250-kA accelerator is based on a four-cavity inductive voltage adder (IVA) design. It is a combination of new ferromagnetically-isolated cavities and self magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) hardware and components from existing Sandia and Cornell facilities: Marx generator capacitors, hardware, and power supply from the DEMON facility; water pulse forming lines (PFL) and gas switch from the Subsystem Test Facility (STF); a HERMES-III intermediate store capacitor (ISC); and a modified ion diode from Cornell`s LION. The present accelerator consists of a single modified cavity similar to those of the Sandia SABRE accelerator and will be used to establish an operating system for the first stage initial lower voltage testing. Four new cavities will be fabricated and delivered in the first half of FY96 to complete the COBRA accelerator. COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 180{degrees} about their vertical axis. The site preparations, tank construction, and diode design and development are taking place at Cornell with growing enthusiasm as this machine becomes a reality. Preliminary results with the single cavity and short positive inner cylinder MITL configuration will soon be available.

  3. COBRA accelerator for Sandia ICF diode research at Cornell University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.; Ingwersen, Pete; Bennett, Lawrence F.; Boyes, John D.; Anderson, David E.; Greenly, John B.; Sudan, Ravi N.

    The new COBRA accelerator is being built in stages at the Laboratory of Plasma Studies in Cornell University where its applications will include extraction diode and ion beam research in support of the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The 4- to 5-MV, 125- to 250-kA accelerator is based on a four-cavity inductive voltage adder (IVA) design. It is a combination of new ferromagnetically-isolated cavities and self magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) hardware and components from existing Sandia and Cornell facilities: Marx generator capacitors, hardware, and power supply from the DEMON facility; water pulse forming lines (PFL) and gas switch from the Subsystem Test Facility (STF); a HERMES-3 intermediate store capacitor (ISC); and a modified ion diode from Cornell's LION. The present accelerator consists of a single modified cavity similar to those of the Sandia SABRE accelerator and will be used to establish an operating system for the first stage initial lower voltage testing. Four new cavities will be fabricated and delivered in the first half of FY96 to complete the COBRA accelerator. COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 180(degrees) about their vertical axis. The site preparations, tank construction, and diode design and development are taking place at Cornell with growing enthusiasm as this machine becomes a reality. Preliminary results with the single cavity and short positive inner cylinder MITL configuration will soon be available.

  4. Detection of Oseltamivir-Resistant Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1)pdm2009 in Brazil: Can Community Transmission Be Ruled Out?

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Thiago Moreno L.; Resende, Paola C.; Fintelman-Rodrigues, Natalia; Gregianini, Tatiana Schaffer; Ikuta, Nilo; Fernandes, Sandra Bianchini; Cury, Ana Luisa Furtado; Rosa, Maria do Carmo Debur; Siqueira, Marilda M.

    2013-01-01

    Although surveillance efforts that monitor the emergence of drug-resistant strains of influenza are critical, systematic analysis is overlooked in most developing countries. We report on the occurrence of strains of pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 with resistance and decreased susceptibility to oseltamivir (OST) in Brazil in 2009, 2011 and 2012. We found 7 mutant viruses, 2 with the mutation S247N and other 5 with the mutation H275Y. Most of these viruses were from samples concentrated in the southern region of Brazil. Some of these resistant viruses were detected prior to the initiation of OST treatment, suggesting that community transmission of mutant viruses may exist. Moreover, we show that one of these OST-resistant (H275Y) strains of A(H1N1)pdm09 was discovered in the tri-border region between Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay, highlighting that this strain could also be found in other Latin American countries. Our findings reinforce the importance of enhanced antiviral resistance surveillance in Brazil and in other Latin American countries to confirm or rule out the community transmission of OST-resistant strains of A(H1N1)pdm09. PMID:24244615

  5. Systematic review of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus shedding: duration is affected by severity, but not age.

    PubMed

    Fielding, James E; Kelly, Heath A; Mercer, Geoffry N; Glass, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    Duration of viral shedding following infection is an important determinant of disease transmission, informing both control policies and disease modelling. We undertook a systematic literature review of the duration of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus shedding to examine the effects of age, severity of illness and receipt of antiviral treatment. Studies were identified by searching the PubMed database using the keywords 'H1N1', 'pandemic', 'pandemics', 'shed' and 'shedding'. Any study of humans with an outcome measure of viral shedding was eligible for inclusion in the review. Comparisons by age, degree of severity and antiviral treatment were made with forest plots. The search returned 214 articles of which 22 were eligible for the review. Significant statistical heterogeneity between studies precluded meta-analysis. The mean duration of viral shedding generally increased with severity of clinical presentation, but we found no evidence of longer shedding duration of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 among children compared with adults. Shorter viral shedding duration was observed when oseltamivir treatment was administered within 48 hours of illness onset. Considerable differences in the design and analysis of viral shedding studies limit their comparison and highlight the need for a standardised approach. These insights have implications not only for pandemic planning, but also for informing responses and study of seasonal influenza now that the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus has become established as the seasonal H1N1 influenza virus.

  6. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) associated to hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) and revealed after influenza AH1N1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Remiche, Gauthier; Abramowicz, Marc; Mavroudakis, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Neurological complications of AH1N1 vaccination such as Guillain-Barré syndrome were described in the previous years. Several reports suggest that hereditary neuropathies may be a predisposing factor for immune-mediated neuropathies. We report the case of a 54-year-old female who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) 5 weeks after AH1N1 vaccination. She had no previous neurological history, but neurophysiological features led us to suspect an underlying hereditary neuropathy. PMP22 gene analysis showed a typical deletion, confirming the diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). We observed a significant clinical and neurophysiological improvement of the neuropathy after intravenous immunoglobulin treatment. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of CIDP potentially triggered by AH1N1 vaccination. This and previous observations suggest that genetic-determined neuropathies could predispose to the occurrence of immune-mediated neuropathies. One must recall the possibility of a superimposed hereditary neuropathy like HNPP in patients with a clinical presentation of CIDP, especially when positive family history or unexpected neurophysiological features are present.

  7. Tritium analyses of COBRA-1A2 beryllium pebbles

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.L.

    1998-03-01

    Selected tritium measurements have been completed for the COBRA-1A2 experiment C03 and D03 beryllium pebbles. The completed results, shown in Tables 1, 2, and 3, include the tritium assay results for the 1-mm and 3-mm C03 pebbles, and the 1-mm D03 pebbles, stepped anneal test results for both types of 1-mm pebbles, and the residual analyses for the stepped-anneal specimens. All results have been reported with date-of-count and are not corrected for decay. Stepped-anneal tritium release response is provided in addenda.

  8. COBRA System Engineering Processes to Achieve SLI Strategic Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Richard O.

    2003-01-01

    The COBRA Prototype Main Engine Development Project was an endeavor conducted as a joint venture between Pratt & Whitney and Aerojet to conduct risk reduction in LOX/LH2 main engine technology for the NASA Space Launch Initiative (SLI). During the seventeen months of the project (April 2001 to September 2002), approximately seventy reviews were conducted, beginning with the Engine Systems Requirements Review (SRR) and ending with the Engine Systems Interim Design Review (IDR). This paper discusses some of the system engineering practices used to support the reviews and the overall engine development effort.

  9. Dermatophilus chelonae in a king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah).

    PubMed

    Wellehan, James F X; Turenne, Christine; Heard, Darryl J; Detrisac, Carol J; O'Kelley, Jeffrey J

    2004-12-01

    A mass was removed from the left flank of a 10-yr-old male king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), and histologic examination revealed granulomatous dermatitis with intralesional gram-positive cocci and filamentous bacteria. Fourteen months later, a histologically similar subcutaneous mass was removed from a different site. One year later, a large subcutaneous mass at the first surgical site was removed, and histopathologic examination revealed multiloculated granulomas with intralesional gram-positive cocci. An organism was cultured and identified by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing as Dermatophilus chelonae. After a course of antibiotic therapy, no further lesions were seen for 5 mo.

  10. Helicopter Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Even under optimal conditions, helicopter flight is a most demanding form of human-machine interaction, imposing continuous manual, visual, communications, and mental demands on pilots. It is made even more challenging by small margins for error created by the close proximity of terrain in NOE flight and missions flown at night and in low visibility. Although technology advances have satisfied some current and proposed requirements, hardware solutions alone are not sufficient to ensure acceptable system performance and pilot workload. However, human factors data needed to improve the design and use of helicopters lag behind advances in sensor, display, and control technology. Thus, it is difficult for designers to consider human capabilities and limitations when making design decisions. This results in costly accidents, design mistakes, unrealistic mission requirements, excessive training costs, and challenge human adaptability. NASA, in collaboration with DOD, industry, and academia, has initiated a program of research to develop scientific data bases and design principles to improve the pilot/vehicle interface, optimize training time and cost, and maintain pilot workload and system performance at an acceptable level. Work performed at Ames, and by other research laboratories, will be reviewed to summarize the most critical helicopter human factors problems and the results of research that has been performed to: (1) Quantify/model pilots use of visual cues for vehicle control; (2) Improve pilots' performance with helmet displays of thermal imagery and night vision goggles for situation awareness and vehicle control; (3) Model the processes by which pilots encode maps and compare them to the visual scene to develop perceptually and cognitively compatible electronic map formats; (4) Evaluate the use of spatially localized auditory displays for geographical orientation, target localization, radio frequency separation; (5) Develop and flight test control

  11. World helicopter market study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleary, B.; Pearson, R. W.; Greenwood, S. W.; Kaplan, L.

    1978-01-01

    The extent of the threat to the US helicopter industry posed by a determined effort by foreign manufacturers, European companies in particular, to supply their own domestic markets and also to penetrate export markets, including the USA is assessed. Available data on US and world markets for civil and military uses are collated and presented in both graphic and tabular form showing the past history of production and markets and, where forecasts are available, anticipated future trends. The data are discussed on an item-by-item basis and inferences are drawn in as much depth as appears justified.

  12. Helicopter high gain control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, T. B.; Nunn, E. C.

    1979-01-01

    High gain control is explored through a design study of the CH-47B helicopter. The plans are designed to obtain the maximum bandwidth possible given the hardware constraints. Controls are designed with modal control theory to specific bandwidths and closed loop mode shapes. Comparisons are made to an earlier complementary filter approach. Bandwidth improvement by removal of limitations is explored in order to establish hardware and mechanization options. Improvements in the pitch axis control system and in the rate gyro sensor noise characteristics in all axes are discussed. The use of rotor state feedback is assessed.

  13. Materials for helicopter gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Some of the power train transmission gears in helicopter drive systems can become critical components as performance requirements are increased; accordingly, increasing attention must be paid to new alloys in order to obtain required performance reliability and survivability. Candidate advanced alloys, with improved high temperature properties, while increasing the resistance to scoring and scuffing, tend to have lower ductility and fracture toughness. An attempt is made to identify design materials, and process problems and requirements. In addition, it is recommended that the characterization of candidate steels be accelerated; preliminary investigation indicates that new alloys may provide improved capability against surface distress.

  14. Highly Predictive Model for a Protective Immune Response to the A(H1N1)pdm2009 Influenza Strain after Seasonal Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Jürchott, Karsten; Schulz, Axel Ronald; Bozzetti, Cecilia; Pohlmann, Dominika; Stervbo, Ulrik; Warth, Sarah; Mälzer, Julia Nora; Waldner, Julian; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Olek, Sven; Grützkau, Andreas; Babel, Nina; Thiel, Andreas; Neumann, Avidan Uriel

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the immune response after vaccination against new influenza strains is highly important in case of an imminent influenza pandemic and for optimization of seasonal vaccination strategies in high risk population groups, especially the elderly. Models predicting the best sero-conversion response among the three strains in the seasonal vaccine were recently suggested. However, these models use a large number of variables and/or information post- vaccination. Here in an exploratory pilot study, we analyzed the baseline immune status in young (<31 years, N = 17) versus elderly (≥50 years, N = 20) donors sero-negative to the newly emerged A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus strain and correlated it with the serological response to that specific strain after seasonal influenza vaccination. Extensive multi-chromatic FACS analysis (36 lymphocyte sub-populations measured) was used to quantitatively assess the cellular immune status before vaccination. We identified CD4+ T cells, and amongst them particularly naive CD4+ T cells, as the best correlates for a successful A(H1N1)pdm09 immune response. Moreover, the number of influenza strains a donor was sero-negative to at baseline (NSSN) in addition to age, as expected, were important predictive factors. Age, NSSN and CD4+ T cell count at baseline together predicted sero-protection (HAI≥40) to A(H1N1)pdm09 with a high accuracy of 89% (p-value = 0.00002). An additional validation study (N = 43 vaccinees sero-negative to A(H1N1)pdm09) has confirmed the predictive value of age, NSSN and baseline CD4+ counts (accuracy = 85%, p-value = 0.0000004). Furthermore, the inclusion of donors at ages 31-50 had shown that the age predictive function is not linear with age but rather a sigmoid with a midpoint at about 50 years. Using these results we suggest a clinically relevant prediction model that gives the probability for non-protection to A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza strain after seasonal multi-valent vaccination as a continuous function of age, NSSN and baseline CD4 count.

  15. The response of medical virology laboratories to the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 outbreak in Paris Île-de-France region.

    PubMed

    Seringe, E; Agut, H

    2013-10-01

    The outbreak of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was a challenge for the laboratories of Paris Île-de-France region in charge of virological diagnosis. In order to evaluate the quality of their response to this challenge, a retrospective survey based on a self-administered standardized questionnaire was undertaken among the 18 hospital laboratories involved in A(H1N1)pdm09 virus detection over a period of 10 months from April 2009 to January 2010. All concerned laboratories responded to the survey. Due to imposed initial biosafety constraints and indications, virological diagnosis was performed in only two laboratories at the start of the studied period. Step by step, it was further settled in the other laboratories starting from June to November 2009. From the beginning, A(H1N1)pdm09-specific RT-PCR was considered the reference method while the use of rapid influenza detection tests remained temporary and concerned a minority of these laboratories. Among the overall 21,656 specimens received, a positive diagnosis of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was obtained in 5,390 cases (25%), the positivity range being significantly higher among women as compared to men (P<0.0001) and subjects below 45 years of age as compared to those over 65 years (P<0.0001). Two peaks in positivity frequency were observed at weeks 24 (30%, 8-12 June 2009) and 44 (50%, 26-30 October 2009) respectively, the latter one occurring 2 weeks earlier than the peak of epidemic at the national level. In contrast, a low positivity rate was detected at weeks 38-40 in relationship with other respiratory virus infections which were clinically misinterpreted as a peak of influenza epidemic. These data demonstrate the ability of medical virology laboratories of Paris Île-de-France region to provide in real time a valuable diagnosis of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection and a relevant view of outbreak evolution, suggesting they will be a crucial component in the management of future influenza epidemics.

  16. Immunogenicity and safety of cell-derived MF59®-adjuvanted A/H1N1 influenza vaccine for children

    PubMed Central

    Knuf, Markus; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Rümke, Hans; Rivera, Luis; Pedotti, Paola; Arora, Ashwani Kumar; Lattanzi, Maria; Kieninger, Dorothee; Cioppa, Giovanni Della

    2015-01-01

    Mass immunization of children has the potential to decrease infection rates and prevent the transmission of influenza. We evaluated the immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability of different formulations of cell-derived MF59-adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted A/H1N1 influenza vaccine in children and adolescents. This was a randomized, single-blind, multicenter study with a total of 666 healthy subjects aged 6 months–17 y in one of 3 vaccination groups, each receiving formulations containing different amounts of influenza A/H1N1 antigen with or without MF59. A booster trivalent seasonal MF59 vaccine was administered one year after primary vaccinations. Antibody titers were assessed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization assays obtained on days 1, 22, 43, 366, and 387 (3 weeks post booster). Safety was monitored throughout the study. One vaccination with 3.75 μg of A/H1N1 antigen formulated with 50% MF59 (3.75_halfMF59) or 7.5 μg of A/H1N1 antigen formulated with 100% MF59 (7.5_fullMF59) induced an HI titer ≥1:40 in >70% of children in the 1–<3, 3–8, and 9–17 y cohorts; however, 2 vaccinations with nonadjuvanted 15 μg A/H1N1 antigen were needed to achieve this response in the 1–<3 and 3–8 y cohorts. Among children aged 6–11 months, 1 dose of 7.5_fullMF59 resulted in an HI titer ≥1:40 in >70% while 2 doses of 3.75_halfMF59 were required to achieve this result. All vaccines were well tolerated. Our findings support the immunogenicity and safety of the 3.75_halfMF59 (2 doses for children <12 months) and 7.5_fullMF59 vaccine formulations for use in children and adolescents aged 6 months to 17 y The use of the 3.75_halfMF59 could have the benefit of antigen and adjuvant sparing, increasing the available vaccine doses allowing vaccination of more people. PMID:25621884

  17. A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination: A retrospective evaluation of adverse maternal, fetal and neonatal outcomes in a cohort of pregnant women in Italy.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, Massimo; Bella, Antonino; Rota, Maria C; Clagnan, Elena; Gallo, Tolinda; D'Amato, Maurizio; Pezzotti, Patrizio; Ferrara, Lorenza; Demicheli, Vittorio; Martinelli, Domenico; Prato, Rosa; Rizzo, Caterina

    2015-05-05

    Although concerns about safety of influenza vaccination during pregnancy have been raised in the past, vaccination of pregnant women was recommended in many countries during the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic influenza. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the risk of adverse maternal, fetal and neonatal outcomes among pregnant women vaccinated with a MF59-adjuvanted A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine. The study was carried out in four Italian regions (Piemonte, Friuli-Venezia-Giulia, Lazio, and Puglia) among 102,077 pregnant women potentially exposed during the second or third trimester of gestation to the vaccination campaign implemented in 2009/2010. Based on data retrieved from the regional administrative databases, the statistical analysis was performed using the Cox proportional-hazards model, adjusting for the propensity score to account for the potential confounding effect due to the socio-demographic characteristics and the clinical and reproductive history of women. A total of 100,332 pregnant women were eligible for the analysis. Of these, 2003 (2.0%) received the A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination during the second or third trimester of gestation. We did not observe any statistically significant association between the A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination and different maternal outcomes (hospital admissions for influenza, pneumonia, hypertension, eclampsia, diabetes, thyroid disease, and anaemia), fetal outcomes (fetal death after the 22nd gestational week) and neonatal outcomes (pre-term birth, low birth weight, low 5-min Apgar score, and congenital malformations). Pre-existing health-risk conditions (hospital admissions and drug prescriptions for specific diseases before the onset of pregnancy) were observed more frequently among vaccinated women, thus suggesting that concomitant chronic conditions increased vaccination uptake. The results of this study add some evidence on the safety of A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination during pregnancy but, because of the reduced statistical power, meta-analyses and large multi-centres studies are needed in order to obtain more conclusive results, especially for rare outcomes.

  18. A/H1N1 antibodies and TRIB2 autoantibodies in narcolepsy patients diagnosed in conjunction with the Pandemrix vaccination campaign in Sweden 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Lind, Alexander; Ramelius, Anita; Olsson, Tomas; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Lamb, Favelle; Khademi, Mohsen; Ambati, Aditya; Maeurer, Markus; Nilsson, Anna-Lena; Bomfim, Izaura Lima; Fink, Katharina; Lernmark, Åke

    2014-05-01

    Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder related to hypocretin deficiency resulting from a specific loss of hypocretin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area. The disease is thought to be autoimmune due to a strong association with HLA-DQB1*06:02. In 2009 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the H1N1 2009 flu pandemic (A/H1N1PDM09). In response to this, the Swedish vaccination campaign began in October of the same year, using the influenza vaccine Pandemrix(®). A few months later an excess of narcolepsy cases was observed. It is still unclear to what extent the vaccination campaign affected humoral autoimmunity associated with narcolepsy. We studied 47 patients with narcolepsy (6-69 years of age) and 80 healthy controls (3-61 years of age) selected after the Pandemrix vaccination campaign. The first aim was to determine antibodies against A/H1N1 and autoantibodies to Tribbles homolog 2 (TRIB2), a narcolepsy autoantigen candidate as well as to GAD65 and IA-2 as disease specificity controls. The second aim was to test if levels and frequencies of these antibodies and autoantibodies were associated with HLA-DQB1*06:02. In vitro transcribed and translated [(35)S]-methionine and -cysteine-labeled influenza A virus (A/California/04/2009/(H1N1)) segment 4 hemagglutinin was used to detect antibodies in a radiobinding assay. Autoantibodies to TRIB2, GAD65 and IA-2 were similarly detected in standard radiobinding assays. The narcolepsy patients had higher median levels of A/H1N1 antibodies than the controls (p = 0.006). A/H1N1 antibody levels were higher among the <13 years old (n = 12) compared to patients who were older than 30 years (n = 12, p = 0.014). Being HLA-DQB1*06:02 positive was associated with higher A/H1N1 antibody levels in both patients and controls (p = 0.026). Serum autoantibody levels to TRIB2 were low overall and high binders did not differ between patients and controls. We observed an association between levels of A/H1N1 antibodies and TRIB2 autoantibody levels particularly among the youngest narcolepsy patients (r = 0.819, p < 0.001). In conclusion, following the 2009 influenza pandemic vaccination, A/H1N1 antibody levels were associated with young age-at-onset narcolepsy patients positive for HLA-DQB1*06:02. The possibility that TRIB2 is an autoantigen in narcolepsy remains to be clarified. We could verify autoantibody responses against TRIB2 which needs to be determined in larger patient cohorts and control populations.

  19. Medical helicopters: carbon monoxide risk?

    PubMed

    Poulton, T J

    1987-02-01

    Carbon monoxide exposure of medical personnel working beneath the turning rotor of a medical helicopter appeared to cause mild clinical illness. We measured the carbon monoxide levels found in various locations beneath the rotor of a jet helicopter under two different conditions. Carbon monoxide levels ranged from 8-76 ppm depending on location of sampling and speed of operation of the engine. This level of carbon monoxide is potentially a problem, as is the inhalation of jet fuel vapor, when working beneath the rotors of an operating helicopter.

  20. Humanized cobra venom factor decreases myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, W Brian; Guikema, Benjamin J; Fritzinger, David C; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Stahl, Gregory L

    2009-12-01

    Cobra venom factor (CVF) is a complement activating protein in cobra venom, which functionally resembles C3b, and has been used for decades for decomplementation of serum to investigate the role of complement in many model systems of disease. The use of CVF for clinical practice is considered impractical because of immunogenicity issues. Humanization of CVF was recently demonstrated to yield a potent CVF-like molecule. In the present study, we demonstrate that mice treated with recombinant humanized CVF (HC3-1496) are protected from myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (MI/R) injuries with resultant preservation of cardiac function. Also, C3 deposition in the myocardium following MI/R was not observed following treatment with HC3-1496. HC3-1496 led to complement activation and depletion of C3, but preserved C5 titers. These data suggest, unlike CVF, HC3-1496 does not form a C5 convertase in the mouse, similar to recent studies in human sera/plasma. These results suggest that humanized CVF (HC3-1496) protects the ischemic myocardium from reperfusion injuries induced by complement activation and represents a novel anti-complement therapy for potential clinical use.

  1. [CO2 Budget and Atmospheric Rectification (COBRA) Over North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the CO2 Budget and Rectification Airborne (COBRA) study was to assess terrestrial sources and sinks of carbon dioxide using an air-borne study. The study was designed to address the measurement gap between plot-scale direct flux measurements and background hemispheric-scale constraints and to refine techniques for measuring terrestrial fluxes at regional to continental scales. The initial funded effort (reported on here) was to involve two air-borne campaigns over North America, one in summer and one in winter. Measurements for COBRA (given the acronym C02BAR in the initial proposal) were conducted from the University of North Dakota Citation 11, a twin-engine jet aircraft capable of profiling from the surface to 12 km and cruising for up to 4 hours and 175m/s. Onboard instrumentation measured concentrations of CO2, CO, and H2O, and meteorological parameters at high rates. In addition, two separate flask sampling systems collected discrete samples for laboratory analysis of CO2,CO, CH4, N2O, SF6, H2, 13CO2, C18O16O,O2/N2, and Ar/N2. The project involved a collaboration between a number of institutions, including (but not limited to) Harvard, NOAA-CMDL, the University of North Dakota, and Scripps.

  2. Generation and characterization of transgenic mice expressing cobra venom factor.

    PubMed

    Andrä, Jörg; Halter, Roman; Kock, Michael A; Niemann, Heiner; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Paul, Dieter

    2002-10-01

    Cobra venom factor (CVF), the anticomplementary protein in cobra venom, activates the alternative complement pathway, eventually leading to complement consumption. Here, we describe the development of a transgenic mouse model for CVF. We generated a DNA construct containing the full-length cDNA for single-chain pre-pro-CVF. Expression of CVF was controlled by the alpha(1)-antitrypsin promoter to achieve liver-specific expression. Linearized DNA was microinjected into murine ovary cells (strain CD(2)F(1) (BALB/cxDBA/2J)) and the newborn mice were analyzed for stable integration of CVF DNA. After establishing the transgene, mice were propagated in a BALB/c background. The CVF mRNA was detected in the liver and, in some animals, in the kidney. CVF protein was detected in small amounts in the serum. Serum complement hemolytic activity in CVF-transgenic mice was virtually absent. The concentration of plasma C3 was significantly reduced. The CVF-transgenic animals show no unusual phenotype. They provide an animal model to study the effect of long-term complement depletion by continued activation, as well as the role of complement in host immune response and pathogenesis of disease.

  3. A fatal cobra-bite in a snake expert.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M Z; Atiqullah, S; Saha, A C; Chowdhury, A J; Jahangir, K M; Faiz, M A

    2010-04-01

    A 35-year-old so called snake-expert from Thakurgaon district was admitted in Medicine department of Rangpur Medical College Hospital (RpMCH), Rangpur, Bangladesh on 2nd November 2007 with history of bites by a cobra snake. He was famous for his outstanding works to establish a snake farm first ever in Bangladesh. He had a collection of more than one hundred snakes of different species. He used to hatch eggs of the snakes, feed the young-snakes, collect venoms and sell those. Everyday many visitors used to visit his farm to watch exciting games with poisonous snakes. Several satellite television (TV) channels and some daily newspapers had covered him on different occasions. He was accidentally bitten by a newly caught hungry cobra snake while recording for a satellite TV channel. Following bites he was brought to the hospital three and a half hours later. By that time, neurotoxicity developed. Repeated doses of Anti Snake Venom (ASV) along with respiratory support and other supportive cares were provided. Despite utmost care feasible at RpMCH, patient expired around 49 hours later.

  4. Study of gas-puff Z-pinches on COBRA

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, N.; Rosenberg, E. W.; Gourdain, P. A.; Grouchy, P. W. L. de; Kusse, B. R.; Hammer, D. A.; Bell, K. S.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Potter, W. M.; Atoyan, L.; Cahill, A. D.; Evans, M.; Greenly, J. B.; Hoyt, C. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Schrafel, P. C.; Kroupp, E.; Fisher, A.; Maron, Y.

    2014-11-15

    Gas-puff Z-pinch experiments were conducted on the 1 MA, 200 ns pulse duration Cornell Beam Research Accelerator (COBRA) pulsed power generator in order to achieve an understanding of the dynamics and instability development in the imploding and stagnating plasma. The triple-nozzle gas-puff valve, pre-ionizer, and load hardware are described. Specific diagnostics for the gas-puff experiments, including a Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence system for measuring the radial neutral density profiles along with a Laser Shearing Interferometer and Laser Wavefront Analyzer for electron density measurements, are also described. The results of a series of experiments using two annular argon (Ar) and/or neon (Ne) gas shells (puff-on-puff) with or without an on- (or near-) axis wire are presented. For all of these experiments, plenum pressures were adjusted to hold the radial mass density profile as similar as possible. Initial implosion stability studies were performed using various combinations of the heavier (Ar) and lighter (Ne) gasses. Implosions with Ne in the outer shell and Ar in the inner were more stable than the opposite arrangement. Current waveforms can be adjusted on COBRA and it was found that the particular shape of the 200 ns current pulse affected on the duration and diameter of the stagnated pinched column and the x-ray yield.

  5. Helicopter human factors research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, David C.; Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    Helicopter flight is among the most demanding of all human-machine integrations. The inherent manual control complexities of rotorcraft are made even more challenging by the small margin for error created in certain operations, such as nap-of-the-Earth (NOE) flight, by the proximity of the terrain. Accident data recount numerous examples of unintended conflict between helicopters and terrain and attest to the perceptual and control difficulties associated with low altitude flight tasks. Ames Research Center, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate, has initiated an ambitious research program aimed at increasing safety margins for both civilian and military rotorcraft operations. The program is broad, fundamental, and focused on the development of scientific understandings and technological countermeasures. Research being conducted in several areas is reviewed: workload assessment, prediction, and measure validation; development of advanced displays and effective pilot/automation interfaces; identification of visual cues necessary for low-level, low-visibility flight and modeling of visual flight-path control; and pilot training.

  6. Helicopter noise regulations: An industry perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    A review of helicopter noise measurement programs and noise reduction/economic studies of FAA is given along with a critique of a study which addresses the economic impact of noise reduction on helicopter noise. Modification of several helicopters to reduce noise and demonstrate the economic impact of the application of the current state-of-the-art technology is discussed. Specific helicopters described include Boeing Vertol 347 Helicopter, Hughes OH-6 Helicopter, and Hughes 269C Helicopter. Other topics covered include: (1) noise trends and possible noise limits; (2) accuracy of helicopter noise prediction techniques; (3) limited change possibilities of derivatives; and (4) rotor impulsive noise. The unique operational capabilities of helicopters and the implications relative to noise regulations and certification are discussed.

  7. Vertebral pain in helicopter pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auffret, R.; Delahaye, R. P.; Metges, P. J.; VICENS

    1980-01-01

    Pathological forms of spinal pain engendered by piloting helicopters were clinically studied. Lumbalgia and pathology of the dorsal and cervical spine are discussed along with their clinical and radiological signs and origins.

  8. Synchronization and an application of a novel fractional order King Cobra chaotic system.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, P; Balasubramaniam, P; Ratnavelu, K

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we design a new three dimensional King Cobra face shaped fractional order chaotic system. The multi-scale synchronization scheme of two fractional order chaotic systems is described. The necessary conditions for the multi-scale synchronization of two identical fractional order King Cobra chaotic systems are derived through feedback control. A new cryptosystem is proposed for an image encryption and decryption by using synchronized fractional order King Cobra chaotic systems with the supports of multiple cryptographic assumptions. The security of the proposed cryptosystem is analyzed by the well known algebraic attacks. Numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed theoretical results.

  9. Synchronization and an application of a novel fractional order King Cobra chaotic system

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumar, P. Balasubramaniam, P.; Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we design a new three dimensional King Cobra face shaped fractional order chaotic system. The multi-scale synchronization scheme of two fractional order chaotic systems is described. The necessary conditions for the multi-scale synchronization of two identical fractional order King Cobra chaotic systems are derived through feedback control. A new cryptosystem is proposed for an image encryption and decryption by using synchronized fractional order King Cobra chaotic systems with the supports of multiple cryptographic assumptions. The security of the proposed cryptosystem is analyzed by the well known algebraic attacks. Numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed theoretical results.

  10. Tests Of Helicopter Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, Kathryn B.; Lebacqz, J. Victor; Hindson, William S.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced control systems being developed for rotorcraft. Report discusses aspects of development of multivariable, explicit-model-following control system for CH-47B fly-by-wire helicopter. Project part of recent trend toward use of highly-augmented, high-gain flight-control systems to assist pilots of military helicopters in performance of demanding tasks and to improve handling qualities of aircraft.

  11. 77 FR 5425 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Helicopter Textron Canada Limited Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... the Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited (BHTC) Model 427 helicopters. This proposed AD is prompted... Canada Limited, 12,800 Rue de l'Avenir, Mirabel, Quebec J7J1R4, telephone (450) 437-2862 or (800)...

  12. The evolution of helicopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Wen, C. Y.; Lorente, S.; Bejan, A.

    2016-07-01

    Here, we show that during their half-century history, helicopters have been evolving into geometrically similar architectures with surprisingly sharp correlations between dimensions, performance, and body size. For example, proportionalities emerge between body size, engine size, and the fuel load. Furthermore, the engine efficiency increases with the engine size, and the propeller radius is roughly the same as the length scale of the whole body. These trends are in accord with the constructal law, which accounts for the engine efficiency trend and the proportionality between "motor" size and body size in animals and vehicles. These body-size effects are qualitatively the same as those uncovered earlier for the evolution of aircraft. The present study adds to this theoretical body of research the evolutionary design of all technologies [A. Bejan, The Physics of Life: The Evolution of Everything (St. Martin's Press, New York, 2016)].

  13. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 resistance and cross-decreased susceptibility to oseltamivir and zanamivir antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Correia, Vanessa; Santos, Luis A; Gíria, Marta; Almeida-Santos, Maria M; Rebelo-de-Andrade, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir and zanamivir are currently the only effective antiviral drugs available worldwide for the management of influenza. The potential development of resistance is continually threatening their use, rationalizing and highlighting the need for a close and sustained evaluation of virus susceptibility. This study aimed to analyze and characterize the phenotypic and genotypic NAIs susceptibility profiles of A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses circulating in Portugal from 2009 to 2010/2011. A total of 144 cases of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection from community and hospitalized patients were studied, including three suspected cases of clinical resistance to oseltamivir. Oseltamivir resistance was confirmed for two of the suspected cases. Neuraminidase (NA) H275Y resistant marker was found in viruses from both cases but for one it was only present in 26.2% of virus population, raising questions about the minimal percentage of resistant virus that should be considered relevant. Cross-decreased susceptibility to oseltamivir and zanamivir (2-4 IC50 fold-change) was detected on viruses from two potentially linked community patients from 2009. Both viruses harbored the NA I223V mutation. NA Y155H mutation was found in 18 statistical non-outlier viruses from 2009, having no impact on virus susceptibility. The mutations at NA N369K and V241I may have contributed to the significantly higher baseline IC50 value obtained to oseltamivir for 2010/2011 viruses, compared to viruses from the pandemic period. These results may contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between phenotype and genotype, which is currently challenging, and to the global assessment of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus susceptibility profile and baseline level to NAIs.

  14. The impact of the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic on attitudes of healthcare workers toward seasonal influenza vaccination 2010/11.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C; Rabenau, H F; Bornmann, S; Gottschalk, R; Wicker, S

    2011-04-28

    The emergence of the influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus provided a major challenge to health services around the world. However, vaccination rates for the public and for healthcare workers (HCWs) have remained low. We performed a study to review the reasons put forward by HCWs to refuse immunisation with the pandemic vaccine in 2009/10 and characterise attitudes in the influenza season 2010/11 due to the emergence of influenza A(H1N1)2009. A survey among HCWs and medical students in the clinical phase of their studies was conducted, using an anonymous questionnaire, at a German university hospital during an influenza vaccination campaign. 1,366 of 3,900 HCWs (35.0%) were vaccinated in the 2010/11 influenza season. Of the vaccinated HCWs, 1,323 (96.9%) completed the questionnaire in addition to 322 vaccinated medical students. Of the 1,645 vaccinees who completed the questionnaire, 712 had not been vaccinated against the influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus in the 2009/10 season. The main reason put forward was the objection to the AS03 adjuvants (239/712, 33.6%). Of the HCWs and students surveyed, 270 of 1,645 (16.4%) stated that the pandemic had influenced their attitude towards vaccination in general. Many German HCWs remained unconvinced of the safety of the pandemic (adjuvanted) influenza vaccine. For this reason, effective risk communication should focus on educating the public and HCWs about influenza vaccine safety and the benefits of vaccination.

  15. Segregation of Virulent Influenza A(H1N1) Variants in the Lower Respiratory Tract of Critically Ill Patients during the 2010–2011 Seasonal Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Piralla, Antonio; Pariani, Elena; Rovida, Francesca; Campanini, Giulia; Muzzi, Alba; Emmi, Vincenzo; Iotti, Giorgio A.; Pesenti, Antonio; Conaldi, Pier Giulio; Zanetti, Alessandro; Baldanti, Fausto

    2011-01-01

    Background Since its appearance in 2009, the pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus circulated worldwide causing several severe infections. Methods Respiratory samples from patients with 2009 influenza A(H1N1) and acute respiratory distress attending 24 intensive care units (ICUs) as well as from patients with lower respiratory tract infections not requiring ICU admission and community upper respiratory tract infections in the Lombardy region (10 million inhabitants) of Italy during the 2010–2011 winter-spring season, were analyzed. Results In patients with severe ILI, the viral load was higher in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) with respect to nasal swab (NS), (p<0.001) suggesting a higher virus replication in the lower respiratory tract. Four distinct virus clusters (referred to as cluster A to D) circulated simultaneously. Most (72.7%, n = 48) of the 66 patients infected with viruses belonging to cluster A had a severe (n = 26) or moderate ILI (n = 22). Amino acid mutations (V26I, I116M, A186T, D187Y, D222G/N, M257I, S263F, I286L/M, and N473D) were observed only in patients with severe ILI. D222G/N variants were detected exclusively in BAL samples. Conclusions Multiple virus clusters co-circulated during the 2010–2011 winter-spring season. Severe or moderate ILI were associated with specific 2009 influenza A(H1N1) variants, which replicated preferentially in the lower respiratory tract. PMID:22194826

  16. Influenza Risk Management: Lessons Learned from an A(H1N1) pdm09 Outbreak Investigation in an Operational Military Setting

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Margaret; Sebeny, Peter; Klena, John D.; DeMattos, Cecilia; Pimentel, Guillermo; Turner, Mark; Joseph, Antony; Espiritu, Jennifer; Zumwalt, John; Dueger, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Background At the onset of an influenza pandemic, when the severity of a novel strain is still undetermined and there is a threat of introduction into a new environment, e.g., via the deployment of military troops, sensitive screening criteria and conservative isolation practices are generally recommended. Objectives In response to elevated rates of influenza-like illness among U.S. military base camps in Kuwait, U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit No. 3 partnered with local U.S. Army medical units to conduct an A(H1N1) pdm09 outbreak investigation. Patients/Methods Initial clinical data and nasal specimens were collected via the existent passive surveillance system and active surveillance was conducted using a modified version of the World Health Organization/U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention influenza-like illness case definition [fever (T > 100.5˚F/38˚C) in addition to cough and/or sore throat in the previous 72 hours] as the screening criteria. Samples were tested via real-time reverse-transcription PCR and sequenced for comparison to global A(H1N1) pdm09 viruses from the same time period. Results The screening criteria used in Kuwait proved insensitive, capturing only 16% of A(H1N1) pdm09-positive individuals. While still not ideal, using cough as the sole screening criteria would have increased sensitivity to 73%. Conclusions The results of and lessons learned from this outbreak investigation suggest that pandemic influenza risk management should be a dynamic process (as information becomes available regarding true attack rates and associated mortality, screening and isolation criteria should be re-evaluated and revised as appropriate), and that military operational environments present unique challenges to influenza surveillance. PMID:23874699

  17. Use of Cumulative Incidence of Novel Influenza A/H1N1 in Foreign Travelers to Estimate Lower Bounds on Cumulative Incidence in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Lipsitch, Marc; Lajous, Martin; O'Hagan, Justin J.; Cohen, Ted; Miller, Joel C.; Goldstein, Edward; Danon, Leon; Wallinga, Jacco; Riley, Steven; Dowell, Scott F.; Reed, Carrie; McCarron, Meg

    2009-01-01

    Background An accurate estimate of the total number of cases and severity of illness of an emerging infectious disease is required both to define the burden of the epidemic and to determine the severity of disease. When a novel pathogen first appears, affected individuals with severe symptoms are more likely to be diagnosed. Accordingly, the total number of cases will be underestimated and disease severity overestimated. This problem is manifest in the current epidemic of novel influenza A/H1N1. Methods and Results We used a simple approach to leverage measures of incident influenza A/H1N1 among a relatively small and well observed group of US, UK, Spanish and Canadian travelers who had visited Mexico to estimate the incidence among a much larger and less well surveyed population of Mexican residents. We estimate that a minimum of 113,000 to 375,000 cases of novel influenza A/H1N1 have occurred in Mexicans during the month of April, 2009. Such an estimate serves as a lower bound because it does not account for underreporting of cases in travelers or for nonrandom mixing between Mexican residents and visitors, which together could increase the estimates by more than an order of magnitude. Conclusions We find that the number of cases in Mexican residents may exceed the number of confirmed cases by two to three orders of magnitude. While the extent of disease spread is greater than previously appreciated, our estimate suggests that severe disease is uncommon since the total number of cases is likely to be much larger than those of confirmed cases. PMID:19742302

  18. [Severe cases of A(H1N1)v2009 infection in Réunion Island in 2009 and 2010].

    PubMed

    Gaüzère, B-A; Bussienne, F; Bouchet, B; Jabot, J; Roussiaux, A; Drouet, D; Djourhi, S; Leauté, B; Belcour, D; Bossard, G; Champion, S; Jaffar-Bandjee, M-C; Belmonte, O; Vilain, P; Brottet, E; Hoang, L; Vandroux, D

    2011-05-01

    In the Southern hemisphere, Réunion Island acts as a sentinel for infections preferentially occurring during the austral winter that are likely to reach the Northern hemisphere a few months later. We relate the main features concerning patients that were admitted during years 2009 and 2010 in our intensive care unit with an A(H1N1)v2009 infection, mainly for acute respiratory distress. Demographic, clinical, and biological data as well as given medications and outcome were prospectively collected among all PCR-confirmed influenza-infected patients. In 2009 and 2010, 25 patients met the criteria. Patients' median age was 40.4 (±17.4) years. Most of them (22/25) had comorbidities such as: chronic diseases, overweight, obesity, pregnancy, and Down syndrome. Maximum bed-occupation rate was 10 days per million inhabitants. Main diagnosis for ICU admission was virus-related pneumonia. Twenty-two out of 25 patients needed mechanical ventilation, some required rescue therapies such as extracorporeal membranous oxygenation (ECMO) or hi-frequency oscillation ventilation (HFOV), both only available in few French hospitals. Within the study period, 12 patients died (48%) mainly of multi-organ failure. Through 2009 and 2010 autumn and winter periods, for several weeks, the A(H1N1)v2009 virus infection resulted in a significant increase of workload in Réunion Island ICUs. In 2010, the failure of the mass immunization campaign, particularly among the at-risk groups, led to severe cases of A(H1N1)v2009 infections, particularly among patients with comorbidities. Our data may contribute toward better management of influenza virus pandemics in the future.

  19. The phylogeny of cobras inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequences: evolution of venom spitting and the phylogeography of the African spitting cobras (Serpentes: Elapidae: Naja nigricollis complex).

    PubMed

    Wüster, Wolfgang; Crookes, Steven; Ineich, Ivan; Mané, Youssouph; Pook, Catharine E; Trape, Jean-François; Broadley, Donald G

    2007-11-01

    We use phylogenetic analysis of 1333 bp of mitochondrial DNA sequence to investigate the phylogeny and historical biogeography of the cobra-like elapid snakes, with special reference to the evolution of spitting and the phylogeography of the African spitting cobras, a radiation widespread in open vegetational formations throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Our results suggest that spitting adaptations appear to have evolved three times in cobras, but alternative scenarios cannot be rejected. The Asiatic Naja are monophyletic and originate from a single colonization of Asia from Africa. The radiation of the African spitting Naja appears to date back to the early Miocene and many speciation events in the group predate the Pliocene expansion of grasslands and the radiation of large grazing mammals in Africa. The cladogenic events in this complex appear to have been triggered by both ecological changes and tectonic events associated with the formation and expansion of the African Rift Valley. Taxonomically, our data confirm the inclusion of Boulengerina and Paranaja within Naja, and reveal a clade of African rainforest cobras including N. melanoleuca, Paranaja multifasciata and Boulengerina that constitutes the sister clade of the African open-formation non-spitting cobras. Naja nigricollis is polyphyletic, and we therefore recognize N. nigricincta as a separate species, more closely related to N. ashei and N. mossambica than to N. nigricollis.

  20. Why were Turks unwilling to accept the A/H1N1 influenza-pandemic vaccination? People's beliefs and perceptions about the swine flu outbreak and vaccine in the later stage of the epidemic.

    PubMed

    Gaygısız, Ümmügülsüm; Gaygısız, Esma; Özkan, Türker; Lajunen, Timo

    2010-12-16

    This study investigated the acceptability of the A/H1N1 influenza vaccination and related factors among 1137 adults in the later stage of the A/H1N1 outbreak in Turkey. Having already been vaccinated or intending to get vaccinated were related to trust in the vaccine effectiveness, perceived risk of the side effects, and benefits of getting vaccinated. Perceived long term consequences of the A/H1N1 infection, perceptions of the A/H1N1 information in media, and barriers for getting vaccinated were related to intention whereas anticipated epidemic situation in Turkey, being chronically ill, and being not married were related to having already been vaccinated.

  1. Estimating the Disease Burden of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1) from Surveillance and Household Surveys in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Sypsa, Vana; Bonovas, Stefanos; Tsiodras, Sotirios; Baka, Agoritsa; Efstathiou, Panos; Malliori, Meni; Panagiotopoulos, Takis; Nikolakopoulos, Ilias; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the disease burden of the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in Greece. Methodology/Principal Findings Data on influenza-like illness (ILI), collected through cross-sectional nationwide telephone surveys of 1,000 households in Greece repeated for 25 consecutive weeks, were combined with data from H1N1 virologic surveillance to estimate the incidence and the clinical attack rate (CAR) of influenza A(H1N1). Alternative definitions of ILI (cough or sore throat and fever>38°C [ILI-38] or fever 37.1–38°C [ILI-37]) were used to estimate the number of symptomatic infections. The infection attack rate (IAR) was approximated using estimates from published studies on the frequency of fever in infected individuals. Data on H1N1 morbidity and mortality were used to estimate ICU admission and case fatality (CFR) rates. The epidemic peaked on week 48/2009 with approximately 750–1,500 new cases/100,000 population per week, depending on ILI-38 or ILI-37 case definition, respectively. By week 6/2010, 7.1%–15.6% of the population in Greece was estimated to be symptomatically infected with H1N1. Children 5–19 years represented the most affected population group (CAR:27%–54%), whereas individuals older than 64 years were the least affected (CAR:0.6%–2.2%). The IAR (95% CI) of influenza A(H1N1) was estimated to be 19.7% (13.3%, 26.1%). Per 1,000 symptomatic cases, based on ILI-38 case definition, 416 attended health services, 108 visited hospital emergency departments and 15 were admitted to hospitals. ICU admission rate and CFR were 37 and 17.5 per 100,000 symptomatic cases or 13.4 and 6.3 per 100,000 infections, respectively. Conclusions/Significance Influenza A(H1N1) infected one fifth and caused symptomatic infection in up to 15% of the Greek population. Although individuals older than 65 years were the least affected age group in terms of attack rate, they had 55 and 185 times higher risk of ICU admission and CFR, respectively. PMID:21694769

  2. Expression of recombinant HA1 protein for specific detection of influenza A/H1N1/2009 antibodies in human serum.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lizhong; Nishi, Krista; Macleod, Erin; Sabara, Marta I; Coleman, Brenda L; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    The hemagglutinin genes (HA1 subunit) from human and animal 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus isolates were expressed with a baculovirus vector. Recombinant HA1 (rHA1) protein-based ELISA was evaluated for detection of specific influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies in serum samples from vaccinated humans. It was found that rHA1 ELISA consistently differentiated between antibodies recognizing the seasonal influenza H1N1 and pdm09 viruses, with a concordance of 94% as compared to the hemagglutination inhibition test. This study suggests the utility of rHA1 ELISA in serosurveillance.

  3. The Impact of Immunosenescence on Humoral Immune Response Variation after Influenza A/H1N1 Vaccination in Older Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Haralambieva, Iana H.; Painter, Scott D.; Kennedy, Richard B.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Lambert, Nathaniel D.; Goergen, Krista M.; Oberg, Ann L.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly, the factors underlying the reduced vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy in this age group are not completely understood. Age and immunosenescence factors, and their impact on humoral immunity after influenza vaccination, are of growing interest for the development of better vaccines for the elderly. Methods We assessed associations between age and immunosenescence markers (T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles – TREC content, peripheral white blood cell telomerase – TERT expression and CD28 expression on T cells) and influenza A/H1N1 vaccine-induced measures of humoral immunity in 106 older subjects at baseline and three timepoints post-vaccination. Results TERT activity (TERT mRNA expression) was significantly positively correlated with the observed increase in the influenza-specific memory B cell ELISPOT response at Day 28 compared to baseline (p-value=0.025). TREC levels were positively correlated with the baseline and early (Day 3) influenza A/H1N1-specific memory B cell ELISPOT response (p-value=0.042 and p-value=0.035, respectively). The expression and/or expression change of CD28 on CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cells at baseline and Day 3 was positively correlated with the influenza A/H1N1-specific memory B cell ELISPOT response at baseline, Day 28 and Day 75 post-vaccination. In a multivariable analysis, the peak antibody response (HAI and/or VNA at Day 28) was negatively associated with age, the percentage of CD8+CD28low T cells, IgD+CD27- naïve B cells, and percentage overall CD20- B cells and plasmablasts, measured at Day 3 post-vaccination. The early change in influenza-specific memory B cell ELISPOT response was positively correlated with the observed increase in influenza A/H1N1-specific HAI antibodies at Day 28 and Day 75 relative to baseline (p-value=0.007 and p-value=0.005, respectively). Conclusion Our data suggest that influenza-specific humoral immunity is significantly influenced by age, and that specific markers of immunosenescence (e.g., the baseline/early expression of CD28 on CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cells and T cell immune abnormalities) are correlated with different humoral immune response outcomes observed after vaccination in older individuals, and thus can be potentially used to predict vaccine immunogenicity. PMID:25816015

  4. A new helicostat from SNIAS helicopter division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morisset, J.

    1977-01-01

    The Helicostat was described as a helicopter in which the vehicle weight is nullified by two balloons arranged in a catamaran fashion. Development of such a vehicle is discussed, and various uses for these helicopters are summarized.

  5. COBRA-SFS modifications and cask model optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D.R.; Michener, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    Spent-fuel storage systems are complex systems and developing a computational model for one can be a difficult task. The COBRA-SFS computer code provides many capabilities for modeling the details of these systems, but these capabilities can also allow users to specify a more complex model than necessary. This report provides important guidance to users that dramatically reduces the size of the model while maintaining the accuracy of the calculation. A series of model optimization studies was performed, based on the TN-24P spent-fuel storage cask, to determine the optimal model geometry. Expanded modeling capabilities of the code are also described. These include adding fluid shear stress terms and a detailed plenum model. The mathematical models for each code modification are described, along with the associated verification results. 22 refs., 107 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Use of Cobra Lily (Darlingtonia californica) & Drosophila for Investigating Predator-Prey Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Carl R.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an experiment that uses the cobra lily (Darlingtonia californica) and fruit flies (Drosophila virilis) to investigate predator-prey relationships in a classroom laboratory. Suggestions for classroom extension of this experimental system are provided. (ZWH)

  7. COBRA/TRAC analysis of the PKL reflood test K9. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, C.A.; Thurgood, M.J.

    1982-08-01

    Experiments at the Primaerkreislaeufe (PKL) test facility in Erlangen, Germany, simulated the refill and reflood procedure after a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in the primary coolant system of a 1300-MW pressurized water reactor (PWR). COBRA/TRAC, a thermal-hydraulics analysis code developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, was used to model experiment K9 of the PKL test series (completed December 1979). The COBRA/TRAC code, which utilizes COBRA-TF as the vessel module and TRAC-P1A for the remaining components, was designed to analyze LOCAs in PWRs. PKL-K9 was characterized by a double-ended guillotine break in the cold leg with emergency core cooling water injected into the cold legs. COBRA/TRAC was able to successfully predict lower-core temperature profiles and quench times, upper-core temperature profiles until the quench, upper plenum and break pressures, and correct trends in collapsed water levels.

  8. Helicopter External Load Acquisition Technology Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    101st Airborne Division, Fort Campbell, Ky. Evergreen Helicopters, McMinnville , Oregon The Army Technical Representative for the program was Mr. Richard...commercial helicopter operator, Evergreen Helicopters, McMinnville , Oregon, to obtain additional data on commercial solutions to external load acquisition

  9. Helicopter Aircrew Training Using Fused Reality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    RTO-MP-HFM-136 27 - 1 Helicopter Aircrew Training Using Fused Reality Dr. Ed Bachelder Systems Technology Inc. 13766 Hawthorne Blvd...applied to training helicopter aircrew personnel using a prototype simulator, the Prototype Aircrew Virtual Environment Training (PAVET) System...cabin) pixels using blue screen imaging techniques. This bitmap is overlaid on a virtual environment, and sent Bachelder, E. (2006) Helicopter Aircrew

  10. 29 CFR 1926.551 - Helicopters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... activating device so designed and installed as to prevent inadvertent operation. In addition, these cargo... allowed to approach within 50 feet of the helicopter when the rotor blades are turning. (p) Approaching helicopter. Whenever approaching or leaving a helicopter with blades rotating, all employees shall remain...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.551 - Helicopters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... activating device so designed and installed as to prevent inadvertent operation. In addition, these cargo... allowed to approach within 50 feet of the helicopter when the rotor blades are turning. (p) Approaching helicopter. Whenever approaching or leaving a helicopter with blades rotating, all employees shall remain...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.551 - Helicopters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activating device so designed and installed as to prevent inadvertent operation. In addition, these cargo... allowed to approach within 50 feet of the helicopter when the rotor blades are turning. (p) Approaching helicopter. Whenever approaching or leaving a helicopter with blades rotating, all employees shall remain...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.551 - Helicopters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... activating device so designed and installed as to prevent inadvertent operation. In addition, these cargo... allowed to approach within 50 feet of the helicopter when the rotor blades are turning. (p) Approaching helicopter. Whenever approaching or leaving a helicopter with blades rotating, all employees shall remain...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.551 - Helicopters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... activating device so designed and installed as to prevent inadvertent operation. In addition, these cargo... allowed to approach within 50 feet of the helicopter when the rotor blades are turning. (p) Approaching helicopter. Whenever approaching or leaving a helicopter with blades rotating, all employees shall remain...

  15. Investigating Flight with a Toy Helicopter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Flight fascinates people of all ages. Recent advances in battery technology have extended the capabilities of model airplanes and toy helicopters. For those who have never outgrown a childhood enthusiasm for the wonders of flight, it is possible to buy inexpensive, remotely controlled planes and helicopters. A toy helicopter offers an opportunity…

  16. Method for Studying Helicopter Longitudinal Maneuver Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Kenneth B

    1954-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of helicopter maneuver stability is made and the results are compared with experimental results for both a single and a tandem rotor helicopter. Techniques are described for measuring in flight the significant stability derivatives for use with the theory to aid in design studies of means for achieving marginal maneuver stability for a prototype helicopter.

  17. COBRA ATD minefield detection results for the Joint Countermine ACTD Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetson, Suzanne P.; Witherspoon, Ned H.; Holloway, John H., Jr.; Suiter, Harold R.; Crosby, Frank J.; Hilton, Russell J.; McCarley, Karen A.

    2000-08-01

    The Coastal Battlefield Reconnaissance and Analysis)COBRA) system described here was a Marine Corps Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD) development consisting of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) airborne multispectral video sensor system and ground station which processes the multispectral video data to automatically detect minefields along the flight path. After successful completion of the ATD, the residual COBRA ATD system participated in the Joint Countermine (JCM) Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD) Demo I held at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina in conjunction with JTFX97 and Demo II held in Stephenville, Newfoundland in conjunction with MARCOT98. These exercises demonstrated the COBRA ATD system in an operational environment, detecting minefields that included several different mine types in widely varying backgrounds. The COBRA system performed superbly during these demonstrations, detecting mines under water, in the surf zone, on the beach, and inland, and has transitioned to an acquisition program. This paper describes the COBRA operation and performance results for these demonstrations, which represent the first demonstrated capability for remote tactical minefield detection from a UAV. The successful COBRA technologies and techniques demonstrated for tactical UAV minefield detection in the Joint Countermine Advanced Concept Technology Demonstrations have formed the technical foundation for future developments in Marine Corps, Navy, and Army tactical remote airborne mine detection systems.

  18. Clinical features and treatment experience: a review of 292 Chinese cobra snakebites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Quan-Fang; Yin, Rui-Xing; Zhu, Ji-Jin; Li, Qi-Bin; Chang, Hai-Hua; Wu, Yan-Bi; Michelson, Edward

    2014-03-01

    Although Chinese cobra snakebite is the most common type of snake venenation in China, it still lacks a comprehensive and systematic description. Hence, we aimed to study Chinese cobra bite cases with particular attention to demography, epidemiology and clinical profile. In this study, a total of 292 cases of Chinese cobra snakebite, presenting between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012, were retrospectively reviewed. To investigate the effect of treatment at different presentation times (time from snakebite to admission), the patients were divided into two groups: group A included 133 cases that presented <12 h after the bite; group B included 159 cases that presented ≥12 h after the bite. To assess the correlation between application of a tourniquet and skin grafting, the cases were re-divided into two groups according to whether or not a tourniquet was used after the snakebite: tourniquet group (n=220) and non-tourniquet group (n=72). The results showed that Chinese cobra snakebites were most commonly seen during the summer, in the upper limbs, and in males, young adults, and snake-hunters. Group A experienced milder intoxication than group B (P<0.001). The rate of skin grafting was significantly higher in the tourniquet group (20.0%, compared with 9.7% in the non-tourniquet group, P<0.05). The results of this study indicate that anti-cobra venom and swift admission (within 12 h of the snakebite) are recommended for Chinese cobra snakebite. Tourniquet use is not recommended.

  19. Protection by face masks against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus on trans-Pacific passenger aircraft, 2009.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijie; Peng, Zhibin; Ou, Jianming; Zeng, Guang; Fontaine, Robert E; Liu, Mingbin; Cui, Fuqiang; Hong, Rongtao; Zhou, Hang; Huai, Yang; Chuang, Shuk-Kwan; Leung, Yiu-Hong; Feng, Yunxia; Luo, Yuan; Shen, Tao; Zhu, Bao-Ping; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Yu, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    In response to several influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infections that developed in passengers after they traveled on the same 2 flights from New York, New York, USA, to Hong Kong, China, to Fuzhou, China, we assessed transmission of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus on these flights. We defined a case of infection as onset of fever and respiratory symptoms and detection of virus by PCR in a passenger or crew member of either flight. Illness developed only in passengers who traveled on the New York to Hong Kong flight. We compared exposures of 9 case-passengers with those of 32 asymptomatic control-passengers. None of the 9 case-passengers, compared with 47% (15/32) of control-passengers, wore a face mask for the entire flight (odds ratio 0, 95% CI 0-0.71). The source case-passenger was not identified. Wearing a face mask was a protective factor against influenza infection. We recommend a more comprehensive intervention study to accurately estimate this effect.

  20. Permissive changes in the neuraminidase play a dominant role in improving the viral fitness of oseltamivir-resistant seasonal influenza A(H1N1) strains.

    PubMed

    Abed, Yacine; Pizzorno, Andrés; Bouhy, Xavier; Boivin, Guy

    2015-02-01

    Permissive neuraminidase (NA) substitutions such as R222Q, V234M and D344N have facilitated the emergence and worldwide spread of oseltamivir-resistant influenza A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1)-H275Y viruses. However, the potential contribution of genetic changes in other viral segments on viral fitness remains poorly investigated. A series of recombinant A(H1N1)pdm09 and A/WSN/33 7:1 reassortants containing the wild-type (WT) A/Brisbane/59/2007 NA gene or its single (H275Y) and double (H275Y/Q222R, H275Y/M234V and H275Y/N344D) variants were generated and their replicative properties were assessed in vitro. The Q222R reversion substitution significantly reduced viral titers when evaluated in both A(H1N1)pdm09 and A/WSN/33 backgrounds. The permissive role of the R222Q was further confirmed using A/WSN/33 7:1 reassortants containing the NA gene of the oseltamivir-susceptible or oseltamivir-resistant influenza A/Mississippi/03/2001 strains. Therefore, NA permissive substitutions play a dominant role for improving viral replication of oseltamivir-resistant A (H1N1)-H275Y viruses in vitro.

  1. Protection by Face Masks against Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus on Trans-Pacific Passenger Aircraft, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijie; Peng, Zhibin; Ou, Jianming; Zeng, Guang; Fontaine, Robert E.; Liu, Mingbin; Cui, Fuqiang; Hong, Rongtao; Zhou, Hang; Huai, Yang; Chuang, Shuk-Kwan; Leung, Yiu-Hong; Feng, Yunxia; Luo, Yuan; Shen, Tao; Zhu, Bao-Ping; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2013-01-01

    In response to several influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infections that developed in passengers after they traveled on the same 2 flights from New York, New York, USA, to Hong Kong, China, to Fuzhou, China, we assessed transmission of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus on these flights. We defined a case of infection as onset of fever and respiratory symptoms and detection of virus by PCR in a passenger or crew member of either flight. Illness developed only in passengers who traveled on the New York to Hong Kong flight. We compared exposures of 9 case-passengers with those of 32 asymptomatic control-passengers. None of the 9 case-passengers, compared with 47% (15/32) of control-passengers, wore a face mask for the entire flight (odds ratio 0, 95% CI 0–0.71). The source case-passenger was not identified. Wearing a face mask was a protective factor against influenza infection. We recommend a more comprehensive intervention study to accurately estimate this effect. PMID:23968983

  2. Event-based biosurveillance of respiratory disease in Mexico, 2007-2009: connection to the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic?

    PubMed

    Nelson, N P; Brownstein, J S; Hartley, D M

    2010-07-29

    The emergence of the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus in North America and its subsequent global spread highlights the public health need for early warning of infectious disease outbreaks. Event-based biosurveillance, based on local- and regional-level Internet media reports, is one approach to early warning as well as to situational awareness. This study analyses media reports in Mexico collected by the Argus biosurveillance system between 1 October 2007 and 31 May 2009. Results from Mexico are compared with the United States and Canadian media reports obtained from the HealthMap system. A significant increase in reporting frequency of respiratory disease in Mexico during the 2008-9 influenza season relative to that of 2007-8 was observed (p<0.0001). The timing of events, based on media reports, suggests that respiratory disease was prevalent in parts of Mexico, and was reported as unusual, much earlier than the microbiological identification of the pandemic virus. Such observations suggest that abnormal respiratory disease frequency and severity was occurring in Mexico throughout the winter of 2008-2009, though its connection to the emergence of the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus remains unclear.

  3. Immune Responses in Pigs Vaccinated with Adjuvanted and Non-Adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm/09 Influenza Vaccines Used in Human Immunization Programmes

    PubMed Central

    Lefevre, Eric A.; Carr, B. Veronica; Inman, Charlotte F.; Prentice, Helen; Brown, Ian H.; Brookes, Sharon M.; Garcon, Fanny; Hill, Michelle L.; Iqbal, Munir; Elderfield, Ruth A.; Barclay, Wendy S.; Gubbins, Simon; Bailey, Mick; Charleston, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Following the emergence and global spread of a novel H1N1 influenza virus in 2009, two A(H1N1)pdm/09 influenza vaccines produced from the A/California/07/09 H1N1 strain were selected and used for the national immunisation programme in the United Kingdom: an adjuvanted split virion vaccine and a non-adjuvanted whole virion vaccine. In this study, we assessed the immune responses generated in inbred large white pigs (Babraham line) following vaccination with these vaccines and after challenge with A(H1N1)pdm/09 virus three months post-vaccination. Both vaccines elicited strong antibody responses, which included high levels of influenza-specific IgG1 and haemagglutination inhibition titres to H1 virus. Immunisation with the adjuvanted split vaccine induced significantly higher interferon gamma production, increased frequency of interferon gamma-producing cells and proliferation of CD4−CD8+ (cytotoxic) and CD4+CD8+ (helper) T cells, after in vitro re-stimulation. Despite significant differences in the magnitude and breadth of immune responses in the two vaccinated and mock treated groups, similar quantities of viral RNA were detected from the nasal cavity in all pigs after live virus challenge. The present study provides support for the use of the pig as a valid experimental model for influenza infections in humans, including the assessment of protective efficacy of therapeutic interventions. PMID:22427834

  4. The immunogenetics of narcolepsy associated with A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination (Pandemrix) supports a potent gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Bomfim, I L; Lamb, F; Fink, K; Szakács, A; Silveira, A; Franzén, L; Azhary, V; Maeurer, M; Feltelius, N; Darin, N; Hallböök, T; Arnheim-Dahlström, L; Kockum, I; Olsson, T

    2017-03-23

    The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination campaign from 2009 to 2010 was associated with a sudden increase in the incidence of narcolepsy in several countries. Narcolepsy with cataplexy is strongly associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II DQB1*06:02 allele, and protective associations with the DQB1*06:03 allele have been reported. Several non-HLA gene loci are also associated, such as common variants of the T-cell receptor-α (TRA), the purinergic receptor P2RY11, cathepsin H (CTSH) and TNFSF4/OX40L/CD252. In this retrospective multicenter study, we investigated if these predisposing gene loci were also involved in vaccination-associated narcolepsy. We compared HLA- along with single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes for non-HLA regions between 42 Pandemrix-vaccinated narcolepsy cases and 1990 population-based controls. The class II gene loci associations supported previous findings. Nominal association (P-value<0.05) with TRA as well as suggestive (P-value<0.1) associations with P2RY11 and CTSH were found. These associations suggest a very strong gene-environment interaction, in which the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strain or Pandemrix vaccine can act as potent environmental triggers.Genes and Immunity advance online publication, 23 March 2017; doi:10.1038/gene.2017.1.

  5. Absenteeism in schools during the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic: a useful tool for early detection of influenza activity in the community?

    PubMed

    Kara, E O; Elliot, A J; Bagnall, H; Foord, D G F; Pnaiser, R; Osman, H; Smith, G E; Olowokure, B

    2012-07-01

    Certain influenza outbreaks, including the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic, can predominantly affect school-age children. Therefore the use of school absenteeism data has been considered as a potential tool for providing early warning of increasing influenza activity in the community. This study retrospectively evaluates the usefulness of these data by comparing them with existing syndromic surveillance systems and laboratory data. Weekly mean percentages of absenteeism in 373 state schools (children aged 4-18 years) in Birmingham, UK, from September 2006 to September 2009, were compared with established syndromic surveillance systems including a telephone health helpline, a general practitioner sentinel network and laboratory data for influenza. Correlation coefficients were used to examine the relationship between each syndromic system. In June 2009, school absenteeism generally peaked concomitantly with the existing influenza surveillance systems in England. Weekly school absenteeism surveillance would not have detected pandemic influenza A(H1N1) earlier but daily absenteeism data and the development of baselines could improve the timeliness of the system.

  6. Experiences of General Practitioners and Practice Assistants during the Influenza A(H1N1) Pandemic in the Netherlands: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Christel E.; Hooiveld, Mariette; Jentink, Anne; Isken, Leslie D.; Timen, Aura; Yzermans, C. Joris

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Since few pandemics have occurred since the Spanish influenza pandemic, we should learn from every (mild) pandemic that occurs. The objective of this study was to report on general practitioners’ and practice assistants’ acceptance of the chosen national policy, and experiences in the Netherlands during the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic. Methods Data on experience and acceptance of the chosen national policy were obtained by structured questionnaires for general practitioners (n = 372) and practice assistants (n = 503) in April 2010. Results The primary policy chosen for general practice was not always accepted and complied with by general practitioners, although the communication (of changes) and collaboration with involved organisations were rated as positive. In particular, the advised personal protective measures were difficult to implement in daily work and thus not executed by 44% of general practitioners. Half of the general practitioners were not satisfied with the patient information provided by the government. The influenza A(H1N1) pandemic highly impacted on general practitioners’ and practice assistants’ workloads, which was not always deemed to be adequately compensated. Discussion Involvement of general practitioners in future infectious disease outbreaks is essential. This study addresses issues in the pandemic policy which might be critical in a more severe pandemic. PMID:26313147

  7. [Detection of conservative and variable epitopes of the pandemic influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09 hemagglutinin using monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Masalova, O V; Chichev, E V; Fediakina, I T; Mukasheva, E A; Klimova, R R; Shchelkanov, M Iu; Burtseva, E I; Ivanova, V T; Kushch, A A; L'vov, D K

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this work was to analyze the antigenic structure of the hemagglutinin (HA) of the pandemic influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09 using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and to develop a sandwich ELISA for identification of pandemic strains. Competitive ELISA demonstrated that 6 MAbs against HA of the pandemic influenza A/ IIV-Moscow/01/2009 (H1N1)pdm09 virus identified six epitopes. Binding of MAbs with 22 strains circulating in Russian Federation during 2009-2012 was analyzed in the hemagglutination-inhibition test (HI). The MAbs differed considerably in their ability to decrease the HI activity of these strains. MAb 5F7 identified all examined strains; MAbs 3A3 and 10G2 reacted with the majority of them. A highly sensitive sandwich ELISA was constructed based on these three MAbs that can differentiate the pandemic influenza strains from the seasonal influenza virus. The constancy of the HA epitope that reacts with MAb 5F7 provides its use for identification of the pandemic influenza strains in HI test. MAbs 3D9, 6A3 and 1E7 are directed against the variable HA epitopes, being sensitive to several amino acid changes in Sa, Sb, and Ca2 antigenic sites and in receptor binding site. These MAbs can be used to detect differences in HA structure and to study the antigenic drift of the pandemic influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09.

  8. Sensitivity of the Quidel Sofia Fluorescent Immunoassay Compared With 2 Nucleic Acid Assays and Viral Culture to Detect Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09.

    PubMed

    Arbefeville, Sophie S; Fickle, Ann R; Ferrieri, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    To confirm a diagnosis of influenza at the point of care, healthcare professionals may rely on rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs). RIDTs have low to moderate sensitivity compared with viral culture or real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR). With the resurgence of the influenza A (Flu A; subtype H1N1) pandemic 2009 (pdm09) strain in the years 2013 and 2014, we evaluated the accuracy of the United State Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved Sofia Influenza A+B Fluorescent Immunoassay to detect epidemic Flu A(H1N1)pdm09 in specimens from the upper-respiratory tract. During a 3-month period, we collected 40 specimens that tested positive via PCR and/or culture for Flu A of the H1N1 pdm09 subtype. Of the 40 specimens, 27 tested positive (67.5%) via Sofia assay for Flu A. Of the 13 specimens with a negative result via Sofia testing, 4 had coinfection, as detected by the GenMark Diagnostics eSensor Respiratory Viral Panel. This sensitivity of the RIDT Sofia assay to detect Flu A(H1N1) pdm09 was comparable to previously reported sensitivities ranging from 10% to 75% for older RIDTs.

  9. Molecular epidemiology and phylogenetic analysis of HA gene of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strain during 2010-2014 in Dalian, North China.

    PubMed

    Han, Yan; Sun, Nan; Lv, Qiu-Yue; Liu, Dan-Hong; Liu, Da-Peng

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the epidemiology of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and its hemagglutinin (HA) molecular and phylogenetic analysis during 2010-2014 in Dalian, North China. A total of 3717 influenza-like illness (ILI) cases were tested by real-time PCR and 493 were found to be positive. Out of these 493 cases, 121 were subtype influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, of which 14 cases were reported in 2010-2011, 29 in 2012-2013, and 78 in 2013-2014. HA coding regions of 45 isolates were compared to that of the vaccine strain A/California/7/09(H1N1), and a number of variations were detected. P83S, S185T, S203T, R223Q, and I321V mutations were observed in all of the Dalian isolates. Furthermore, a high proportion >71 % of the strains possessed the variation D97N and K283E. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the close match of the majority of circulating strains with the vaccine strains. However, it also reveals a trend of strains to accumulate amino acid variations and form new phylogenetic groups.

  10. A spatial-temporal transmission model and early intervention policies of 2009 A/H1N1 influenza in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonggul; Jung, Eunok

    2015-09-07

    We developed a spatial-temporal model of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic in the Seoul metropolitan area (SMA), which is located in the north-west of South Korea and is the second-most complex metropolitan area worldwide. This multi-patch influenza model consists of a SEIAR influenza transmission model and flow model between two districts. This model is based on the daily confirmed cases of A/H1N1 influenza collected by the Korea Center for Disease Control and Prevention from April 27 to September 15, 2009 and the daily commuting data from 33 districts of SMA reported in the 2010 Population and Housing Census (PHC). We analyzed the spread patterns of 2009 influenza in the SMA by the reproductive numbers and geographic information systems. During the early period of novel influenza pandemics, when pharmaceutical interventions are lacking, non-pharmaceutical public health interventions will be the most critical strategies for impeding the spread of influenza and delaying an epidemic. Using the spatial-temporal model developed herein, we also investigated the impact of non-pharmaceutical public health interventions, isolation and/or commuting restrictions, on the incidence reduction in various scenarios. Our model provides scientific evidence for predicting the spread of disease and preparedness for a future pandemic.

  11. Influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates in Croatia in 2010-2011: a season with predominant circulation of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Kurečić Filipović, S; Gjenero-Margan, I; Kissling, E; Kaić, B; Cvitković, A

    2015-09-01

    This is a retrospective study using the test-negative case-control method to estimate seasonal 2010-2011 influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) in Croatia. Of patients consulting a physician for influenza-like illness (ILI) and for whom a swab was taken, we compared RT-PCR influenza-positive and RT-PCR influenza-negative patients. We used a structured questionnaire and physicians' records to obtain information on vaccination status and potential confounders. We conducted a complete case analysis using logistic regression to measure adjusted VE overall, against A(H1N1)pdm09 and in age groups. Out of 785 interviewed patients, 495 eligible patients were included in the study, after applying exclusion criteria [217 cases, of which 92·6% were A(H1N1)pdm09 positive, 278 controls]. Crude VE was 31·9% [95% confidence interval (CI) -40·9 to 67·1] and adjusted VE was 20·7% (95% CI -71·4 to 63·3), with higher VE in youngest and oldest age groups. Results from this first VE study in Croatia suggest a low to moderate VE for the 2010-2011 season. Studies year on year are needed with a greater sample size to provide more precise estimates, and also by age group and risk groups for vaccination.

  12. Civil helicopter flight research. [for CH-53 helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. J.; Schoultz, M. B.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents a description of the NASA CH-53 Civil Helicopter Research Aircraft and discusses preliminary results of the aircraft flight research performed to evaluate factors and requirements for future helicopter transport operations. The CH-53 equipped with a 16-seat airline-type cabin and instrumented for flight research studies in noise, vibration, handling qualities, passenger acceptance, fuel utilization, terminal area maneuvers, and gust response. Predicted fuel usage for typical short-haul missions is compared with actual fuel use. Pilot ratings for an IFR handling quality task for three levels of stability augmentation are presented, and the effects of internal noise, vibration, and motion on passenger acceptance are discussed. Future planned CH-53 flight research within the Civil Helicopter Technology Program is discussed.

  13. [Importance of helicopter rescue].

    PubMed

    Hofer, G; Voelckel, W G

    2014-03-01

    Helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) have become a main part of prehospital emergency medical services over the last 40 years. Recently, an ongoing discussion about financial shortage and personal shortcomings question the role of cost-intensive air rescue. Thus, the value of HEMS must be examined and discussed appropriately. Since the number of physician-staffed ground ambulances may decrease due to the limited availability of qualified physicians, HEMS may fill the gap. In addition patient transfer to specialized hospitals will require an increasing number of air transports in order to minimize prehospital time. The higher risk ratio for HEMS missions when compared with ground rescue requires a rigorous quality management system. When it comes to missions in remote and exposed areas, the scope of medical treatment must be adjusted to the individual situation. Medical competence is key in order to balance guideline compliant or maximal care versus optimal care characterized as a mission-specific, individualized emergency care concept. Although, medical decision making and treatment is typically based on the best scientific evidence, personal skills, competence, and the mission scenario will determine the scope of interventions suitable to improve outcome. Thus, the profile of requirements for the HEMS medical crew is high.

  14. [Back ache in helicopter pilots].

    PubMed

    Colak, S; Jovelić, S; Manojlović, J

    1992-01-01

    Due to low back pain (LBP) and harmful effects of flying, questionnaires were sent to 71 helicopter pilots of the experimental group, 22 mechanics helicopter flyers and to the control group of 28 air-traffic controllers. The prevalence of LBP was the highest in helicopter pilots, then in helicomechanics and air-traffic controllers (53%, 50% and 36%). Effects of exposure to vibration, body posture and working load have not contributed significantly to the occurrence of LBP. LBP has not lead to an important difference in the strength of the back musculature, body mass index and spondylosis, that is, scoliosis. The necessity of further study of LBP and maintaining of specific preventive measures are indicated.

  15. Annoyance of helicopter impulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dambra, F.; Damongeot, A.

    1978-01-01

    Psychoacoustic studies of helicopter impulsive noise were conducted in order to qualify additional annoyance due to this feature and to develop physical impulsiveness descriptors to develop impulsivity correction methods. The currently proposed descriptors and methods of impulsiveness correction are compared using a multilinear regression analysis technique. It is shown that the presently recommended descriptor and correction method provides the best correlation with the subjective evaluations of real helicopter impulsive noises. The equipment necessary for data processing in order to apply the correction method is discussed.

  16. The helicopter - some ergonomic factors.

    PubMed

    Lovesey, E J

    1975-09-01

    Helicopter pilots are some of the hardest working human operators, because of the machine's inherant instability and control problems. This article covers some aspects where ergonomists might help to improve the overall system. After considering basic differences between helicopters and fixed wing aircraft, the author examines controls, where there are prospects of using miniature hand levers; cockpit vision and displays with particular reference to night and instrument flying; seating and vibration where the effects of protective clothing and harnesses are considered; and cabin noise from the engine, transmission and intercom systems. Finally, he assesses pilot activity using cine film techniques for different types of flight.

  17. The Comparative Clinical Course of Pregnant and Non-Pregnant Women Hospitalised with Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Stephen J.; Enstone, Joanne E.; Read, Robert C.; Openshaw, Peter J. M.; Semple, Malcolm G.; Lim, Wei Shen; Taylor, Bruce L.; McMenamin, James; Nicholson, Karl G.; Bannister, Barbara; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The Influenza Clinical Information Network (FLU-CIN) was established to gather detailed clinical and epidemiological information about patients with laboratory confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 infection in UK hospitals. This report focuses on the clinical course and outcomes of infection in pregnancy. Methods A standardised data extraction form was used to obtain detailed clinical information from hospital case notes and electronic records, for patients with PCR-confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 infection admitted to 13 sentinel hospitals in five clinical 'hubs' and a further 62 non-sentinel hospitals, between 11th May 2009 and 31st January 2010.Outcomes were compared for pregnant and non-pregnant women aged 15–44 years, using univariate and multivariable techniques. Results Of the 395 women aged 15–44 years, 82 (21%) were pregnant; 73 (89%) in the second or third trimester. Pregnant women were significantly less likely to exhibit severe respiratory distress at initial assessment (OR = 0.49 (95% CI: 0.30–0.82)), require supplemental oxygen on admission (OR = 0.40 (95% CI: 0.20–0.80)), or have underlying co-morbidities (p-trend <0.001). However, they were equally likely to be admitted to high dependency (Level 2) or intensive care (Level 3) and/or to die, after adjustment for potential confounders (adj. OR = 0.93 (95% CI: 0.46–1.92). Of 11 pregnant women needing Level 2/3 care, 10 required mechanical ventilation and three died. Conclusions Since the expected prevalence of pregnancy in the source population was 6%, our data suggest that pregnancy greatly increased the likelihood of hospital admission with A(H1N1)pdm09. Pregnant women were less likely than non-pregnant women to have respiratory distress on admission, but severe outcomes were equally likely in both groups. PMID:22870239

  18. Antigenic and genomic characterization of human influenza A and B viruses circulating in Argentina after the introduction of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09.

    PubMed

    Russo, Mara L; Pontoriero, Andrea V; Benedetti, Estefania; Czech, Andrea; Avaro, Martin; Periolo, Natalia; Campos, Ana M; Savy, Vilma L; Baumeister, Elsa G

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted as part of the Argentinean Influenza and other Respiratory Viruses Surveillance Network, in the context of the Global Influenza Surveillance carried out by the World Health Organization (WHO). The objective was to study the activity and the antigenic and genomic characteristics of circulating viruses for three consecutive seasons (2010, 2011 and 2012) in order to investigate the emergence of influenza viral variants. During the study period, influenza virus circulation was detected from January to December. Influenza A and B, and all current subtypes of human influenza viruses, were present each year. Throughout the 2010 post-pandemic season, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, unexpectedly, almost disappeared. The haemagglutinin (HA) of the A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses studied were segregated in a different genetic group to those identified during the 2009 pandemic, although they were still antigenically closely related to the vaccine strain A/California/07/2009. Influenza A(H3N2) viruses were the predominant strains circulating during the 2011 season, accounting for nearly 76 % of influenza viruses identified. That year, all HA sequences of the A(H3N2) viruses tested fell into the A/Victoria/208/2009 genetic clade, but remained antigenically related to A/Perth/16/2009 (reference vaccine recommended for this three-year period). A(H3N2) viruses isolated in 2012 were antigenically closely related to A/Victoria/361/2011, recommended by the WHO as the H3 component for the 2013 Southern Hemisphere formulation. B viruses belonging to the B/Victoria lineage circulated in 2010. A mixed circulation of viral variants of both B/Victoria and B/Yamagata lineages was detected in 2012, with the former being predominant. A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses remained antigenically closely related to the vaccine virus A/California/7/2009; A(H3N2) viruses continually evolved into new antigenic clusters and both B lineages, B/Victoria/2/87-like and B/Yamagata/16/88-like viruses, were observed during the study period. The virological surveillance showed that the majority of the circulating strains during the study period were antigenically related to the corresponding Southern Hemisphere vaccine strains except for the 2012 A(H3N2) viruses.

  19. The influence of climatic conditions on the transmission dynamics of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic in Chile

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of demographic factors, climatic conditions, school cycles, and connectivity patterns in shaping the spatio-temporal dynamics of pandemic influenza is not clearly understood. Here we analyzed the spatial, age and temporal evolution of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic in Chile, a southern hemisphere country covering a long and narrow strip comprising latitudes 17°S to 56°S. Methods We analyzed the dissemination patterns of the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic across 15 regions of Chile based on daily hospitalizations for severe acute respiratory disease and laboratory confirmed A/H1N1 influenza infection from 01-May to 31-December, 2009. We explored the association between timing of pandemic onset and peak pandemic activity and several geographical and demographic indicators, school vacations, climatic factors, and international passengers. We also estimated the reproduction number (R) based on the growth rate of the exponential pandemic phase by date of symptoms onset, estimated using maximum likelihood methods. Results While earlier pandemic onset was associated with larger population size, there was no association with connectivity, demographic, school or climatic factors. In contrast, there was a latitudinal gradient in peak pandemic timing, representing a 16-39-day lag in disease activity from the southern regions relative to the northernmost region (P < 0.001). Geographical differences in latitude of Chilean regions, maximum temperature and specific humidity explained 68.5% of the variability in peak timing (P = 0.01). In addition, there was a decreasing gradient in reproduction number from south to north Chile (P < 0.0001). The regional mean R estimates were 1.6-2.0, 1.3-1.5, and 1.2-1.3 for southern, central and northern regions, respectively, which were not affected by the winter vacation period. Conclusions There was a lag in the period of most intense 2009 pandemic influenza activity following a South to North traveling pattern across regions of Chile, significantly associated with geographical differences in minimum temperature and specific humidity. The latitudinal gradient in timing of pandemic activity was accompanied by a gradient in reproduction number (P < 0.0001). Intensified surveillance strategies in colder and drier southern regions could lead to earlier detection of pandemic influenza viruses and improved control outcomes. PMID:23148597

  20. No Evidence for Disease History as a Risk Factor for Narcolepsy after A(H1N1)pdm09 Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Favelle; Ploner, Alexander; Fink, Katharina; Maeurer, Markus; Bergman, Peter; Piehl, Fredrik; Weibel, Daniel; Sparén, Pär; Dahlström, Lisen Arnheim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate disease history before A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination as a risk factor for narcolepsy. Methods Case-control study in Sweden. Cases included persons referred for a Multiple Sleep Latency Test between 2009 and 2010, identified through diagnostic sleep centres and confirmed through independent review of medical charts. Controls, selected from the total population register, were matched to cases on age, gender, MSLT-referral date and county of residence. Disease history (prescriptions and diagnoses) and vaccination history was collected through telephone interviews and population-based healthcare registers. Conditional logistic regression was used to investigate disease history before A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination as a risk-factor for narcolepsy. Results In total, 72 narcolepsy cases and 251 controls were included (range 3–69 years mean19-years). Risk of narcolepsy was increased in individuals with a disease history of nervous system disorders (OR range = 3.6–8.8) and mental and behavioural disorders (OR = 3.8, 95% CI 1.6–8.8) before referral. In a second analysis of vaccinated individuals only, nearly all initial associations were no longer statistically significant and effect sizes were smaller (OR range = 1.3–2.6). A significant effect for antibiotics (OR = 0.4, 95% CI 0.2–0.8) and a marginally significant effect for nervous system disorders was observed. In a third case-only analysis, comparing cases referred before vaccination to those referred after; prescriptions for nervous system disorders (OR = 26.0 95% CI 4.0–170.2) and ADHD (OR = 35.3 95% CI 3.4–369.9) were statistically significant during the vaccination period, suggesting initial associations were due to confounding by indication. Conclusion The findings of this study do not support disease history before A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination as a risk factor for narcolepsy. PMID:27120092

  1. 78 FR 27867 - Airworthiness Directives; MD Helicopters Inc. Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ..., leading to vibration, loss of tail rotor pitch control, and subsequent loss of tail rotor and helicopter... from cracking and separating from the blade, leading to an unbalanced condition, vibration, loss of...) separating from the tail rotor blade, leading to an unbalanced condition, vibration, loss of tail rotor...

  2. 78 FR 65180 - Airworthiness Directives; MD Helicopters, Inc., Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... actions are intended to prevent a pitch horn from cracking, leading to vibration, loss of tail rotor pitch... condition, vibration, loss of tail rotor pitch control, and loss of directional control of the helicopter... (pitch horn) separating from the tail rotor blade, leading to an unbalanced condition, vibration, loss...

  3. 78 FR 65195 - Airworthiness Directives; MD Helicopters, Inc. (MDHI) Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... rotor blade (MRB) retention bolts (bolts) installed. This AD requires a daily check of the position of... other helicopters of the same type designs and that air safety and the public interest require adopting... (ASB SB900-116). ASB SB900-116 specifies a repetitive check of the blade retention bolts, part...

  4. 77 FR 23638 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron, Incorporated Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ..., and the AD ] applicability needs to be expanded to include additional grips similar in design, as well... rotor blade, and subsequent loss of control of the helicopter. DATES: We must receive comments on this... damage to the blade, blade bolt bore, or buffer pad tang surface were found in the two cracked...

  5. 77 FR 5427 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... creating a component history card or equivalent record and begin counting and recording the number of... Internet at http://www.regulations.gov or in person at the Docket Operations Office between 9 a.m. and 5 p... for the specified Bell model helicopters. This proposal would require creating a component...

  6. 77 FR 68055 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ..., and 412CF helicopters. This AD requires a repetitive inspection of the collective lever for a crack, and if there is a crack, before further flight, replacing the collective lever with an airworthy... to detect a crack in the collective lever, which could lead to failure of the collective lever...

  7. 78 FR 18224 - Airworthiness Directives; Robinson Helicopter Company Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA-2012-1088; Directorate Identifier 2012-SW...): 2013-05-15 Robinson Helicopter Company: Amendment 39-17387; Docket No. FAA-2012-1088;...

  8. 78 FR 1730 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... 205A, 205A-1, and 205B helicopters with certain starter/generator power cable assemblies (power cable assemblies). This AD requires replacing the power cable assemblies and their associated parts, and performing continuity readings. This AD was prompted by the determination that the power cable assembly...

  9. 77 FR 729 - Airworthiness Directives; Enstrom Helicopter Corporation Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... certain trim relays to require modifying and testing the lateral and longitudinal cyclic trim actuator..., and 480B helicopters with a trim relay, part-number (P/N) KUP14D55-472, M83536/10-015M, or M83536/10...) and flight tests to determine that the trim relay is working correctly. This AD was prompted...

  10. Perception of the A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and acceptance of influenza vaccination by Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 staff: A descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Amour, Sélilah; Djhehiche, Khaled; Zamora, Adeline; Bergeret, Alain; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the perception and attitudes of university staff, including medical school and other science specialties, toward the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and influenza vaccination program. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among 4,529 university personnel on October 19-20, 2009. Seven hundred (15%) employees participated in the study. Only 18% were willing to be vaccinated, men more than women (29% versus 9%, P < 0.001), and professors/researchers more than administrative/technical staff (30% vs. 6%, P < 0.001). Intention to be vaccinated was insufficient. Additional efforts are needed to improve information dissemination among university staff. Medical university personnel should receive more information to increase vaccine coverage and protect them as well as patients.

  11. Pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 in Morocco: experience of the Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital, Rabat, 12 June to 24 December 2009.

    PubMed

    Lahlou Amine, I; Bajjou, T; El Rhaffouli, H; Laraqui, A; Hilali, F; Menouar, K; Ennibi, K; Boudlal, M; Bouaiti, E A; Sbai, K; Rbai, M; Hachim, M; Zouhair, S

    2011-06-09

    On 12 June 2009, Morocco was the first country in North Africa to report a laboratory-confirmed case of influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus infection. This study describes the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 240 laboratory-confirmed cases among 594 outpatients with influenza-like illness at the Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital, Rabat, from 12 June to 24 December 2009. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR was used to confirm the infection. The epidemic peaked in weeks 47 to 49 (16 November to 6 December 2009). The mean age of cases was 23 years (standard deviation: 14 years). Cough was the most common symptom in 200 cases (83%), followed by fever (≥38 °C) in 195 (81%). Diarrhoea or vomiting was reported in 12 (5%) patients. None of the cases developed any complications and no deaths occurred during the study period.

  12. Perception of the A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and acceptance of influenza vaccination by Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 staff: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Amour, Sélilah; Djhehiche, Khaled; Zamora, Adeline; Bergeret, Alain; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the perception and attitudes of university staff, including medical school and other science specialties, toward the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and influenza vaccination program. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among 4,529 university personnel on October 19–20, 2009. Seven hundred (15%) employees participated in the study. Only 18% were willing to be vaccinated, men more than women (29% versus 9%, P < 0.001), and professors/researchers more than administrative/technical staff (30% vs. 6%, P < 0.001). Intention to be vaccinated was insufficient. Additional efforts are needed to improve information dissemination among university staff. Medical university personnel should receive more information to increase vaccine coverage and protect them as well as patients. PMID:25715115

  13. Seroprotection of HIV-infected subjects after influenza A(H1N1) vaccination is directly associated with baseline frequency of naive T cells.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Lorenzo A; Daniel, Alexander; Frank, Ian; Tebas, Pablo; Boyer, Jean D

    2014-08-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals, despite receipt of antiretroviral therapy (ART), often have impaired vaccine responses. We examined the role that immune activation and cellular phenotypes play in influenza A(H1N1) vaccine responsiveness in HIV-infected subjects receiving ART. Subjects received the H1N1 vaccine (15-µg dose; Novartis), and antibody titers at baseline and after immunization were evaluated. Subjects were classified as responders if, by week 3, seroprotection guidelines were met. Responders had higher percentages of baseline naive T cells and lower percentages of terminally differentiated T cells, compared with nonresponders. Additionally, the naive CD4(+) T-cell percentage and age were negatively correlated. Preservation of naive T-cell populations by starting therapy early could impact vaccine responses against influenza virus and other pathogens, especially as this population ages.

  14. Seroprotection of HIV-Infected Subjects After Influenza A(H1N1) Vaccination Is Directly Associated With Baseline Frequency of Naive T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Lorenzo A.; Daniel, Alexander; Frank, Ian; Tebas, Pablo; Boyer, Jean D.

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)–infected individuals, despite receipt of antiretroviral therapy (ART), often have impaired vaccine responses. We examined the role that immune activation and cellular phenotypes play in influenza A(H1N1) vaccine responsiveness in HIV-infected subjects receiving ART. Subjects received the H1N1 vaccine (15-µg dose; Novartis), and antibody titers at baseline and after immunization were evaluated. Subjects were classified as responders if, by week 3, seroprotection guidelines were met. Responders had higher percentages of baseline naive T cells and lower percentages of terminally differentiated T cells, compared with nonresponders. Additionally, the naive CD4+ T-cell percentage and age were negatively correlated. Preservation of naive T-cell populations by starting therapy early could impact vaccine responses against influenza virus and other pathogens, especially as this population ages. PMID:24610877

  15. In vitro antiviral activity of favipiravir (T-705) against drug-resistant influenza and 2009 A(H1N1) viruses.

    PubMed

    Sleeman, Katrina; Mishin, Vasiliy P; Deyde, Varough M; Furuta, Yousuke; Klimov, Alexander I; Gubareva, Larisa V

    2010-06-01

    Favipiravir (T-705) has previously been shown to have a potent antiviral effect against influenza virus and some other RNA viruses in both cell culture and in animal models. Currently, favipiravir is undergoing clinical evaluation for the treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. In this study, favipiravir was evaluated in vitro for its ability to inhibit the replication of a representative panel of seasonal influenza viruses, the 2009 A(H1N1) strains, and animal viruses with pandemic (pdm) potential (swine triple reassortants, H2N2, H4N2, avian H7N2, and avian H5N1), including viruses which are resistant to the currently licensed anti-influenza drugs. All viruses were tested in a plaque reduction assay with MDCK cells, and a subset was also tested in both yield reduction and focus inhibition (FI) assays. For the majority of viruses tested, favipiravir significantly inhibited plaque formation at 3.2 muM (0.5 microg/ml) (50% effective concentrations [EC(50)s] of 0.19 to 22.48 muM and 0.03 to 3.53 microg/ml), and for all viruses, with the exception of a single dually resistant 2009 A(H1N1) virus, complete inhibition of plaque formation was seen at 3.2 muM (0.5 microg/ml). Due to the 2009 pandemic and increased drug resistance in circulating seasonal influenza viruses, there is an urgent need for new drugs which target influenza. This study demonstrates that favipiravir inhibits in vitro replication of a wide range of influenza viruses, including those resistant to currently available drugs.

  16. Recombinant soluble, multimeric HA and NA exhibit distinctive types of protection against pandemic swine-origin 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus infection in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Berend Jan; Bodewes, Rogier; de Vries, Robert P; Kreijtz, Joost H C M; Bartelink, Willem; van Amerongen, Geert; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; de Haan, Cornelis A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Rottier, Peter J M

    2010-10-01

    The emergence and subsequent swift and global spread of the swine-origin influenza virus A(H1N1) in 2009 once again emphasizes the strong need for effective vaccines that can be developed rapidly and applied safely. With this aim, we produced soluble, multimeric forms of the 2009 A(H1N1) HA (sHA(3)) and NA (sNA(4)) surface glycoproteins using a virus-free mammalian expression system and evaluated their efficacy as vaccines in ferrets. Immunization twice with 3.75-microg doses of these antigens elicited strong antibody responses, which were adjuvant dependent. Interestingly, coadministration of both antigens strongly enhanced the HA-specific but not the NA-specific responses. Distinct patterns of protection were observed upon challenge inoculation with the homologous H1N1 virus. Whereas vaccination with sHA(3) dramatically reduced virus replication (e.g., by lowering pulmonary titers by about 5 log(10) units), immunization with sNA(4) markedly decreased the clinical effects of infection, such as body weight loss and lung pathology. Clearly, optimal protection was achieved by the combination of the two antigens. Our observations demonstrate the great vaccine potential of multimeric HA and NA ectodomains, as these can be easily, rapidly, flexibly, and safely produced in high quantities. In particular, our study underscores the underrated importance of NA in influenza vaccination, which we found to profoundly and specifically contribute to protection by HA. Its inclusion in a vaccine is likely to reduce the HA dose required and to broaden the protective immunity.

  17. Recrudescent Wave of A/H1N1pdm09 Influenza Viruses in Winter 2012-2013 in Kashmir, India

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Parvaiz; Khan, Umar; Bhat, Khursheed; Saha, Siddhartha; Broor, Shobha; Lal, Renu; Chadha, Mandeep

    2013-01-01

    Some parts of world, including India observed a recrudescent wave of influenza A/H1N1pdm09 in 2012. We undertook a study to examine the circulating influenza strains, their clinical association and antigenic characteristics to understand the recrudescent wave of A/H1N1pdm09 from November 26, 2012 to Feb 28, 2013 in Kashmir, India. Of the 751 patients (545 outpatient and 206 hospitalized) presenting with acute respiratory infection at a tertiary care hospital in Srinagar; 184 (24.5%) tested positive for influenza. Further type and subtype analysis revealed that 106 (58%) were influenza A (H1N1pdm09 =105, H3N2=1) and 78 (42%) were influenza B. The influenza positive cases had a higher frequency of chills, nasal discharge, sore throat, body aches and headache, compared to influenza negative cases. Of the 206 patients hospitalized for pneumonia/acute respiratory distress syndrome or an exacerbation of an underlying lung disease, 34 (16.5%) tested positive for influenza (22 for H1N1pdm09, 11 for influenza B). All influenza-positive patients received oseltamivir and while most patients responded well to antiviral therapy and supportive care, 6 patients (4 with H1N1pdm09 and 2 with influenza B) patients died of progressive respiratory failure and multi-organ dysfunction. Following a period of minimal circulation, H1N1pdm09 re-emerged in Kashmir in 2012-2013, causing serious illness and fatalities. As such the healthcare administrators and policy planners need to be wary and monitor the situation closely. PMID:24818063

  18. Likely Correlation between Sources of Information and Acceptability of A/H1N1 Swine-Origin Influenza Virus Vaccine in Marseille, France

    PubMed Central

    Ninove, Laetitia; Sartor, Catherine; Badiaga, Sékéné; Botelho, Elizabeth; Brouqui, Philippe; Zandotti, Christine; De Lamballerie, Xavier; La Scola, Bernard; Drancourt, Michel; Gould, Ernest A.; Charrel, Rémi N.; Raoult, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Background In France, there was a reluctance to accept vaccination against the A/H1N1 pandemic influenza virus despite government recommendation and investment in the vaccine programme. Methods and Findings We examined the willingness of different populations to accept A/H1N1vaccination (i) in a French hospital among 3315 employees immunized either by in-house medical personnel or mobile teams of MDs and (ii) in a shelter housing 250 homeless persons. Google was used to assess the volume of enquiries concerning incidence of influenza. We analyzed the information on vaccination provided by Google, the website of the major French newspapers, and PubMed. Two trust Surveys were used to assess public opinion on the trustworthiness of people in different professions. Paramedics were significantly more reluctant to accept immunisation than qualified medical staff. Acceptance was significantly increased when recommended directly by MDs. Anecdotal cases of directly observed severe infections were followed by enhanced acceptance of paramedical staff. Scientific literature was significantly more in favour of vaccination than Google and French newspaper websites. In the case of the newspaper websites, information correlated with their recognised political reputations, although they would presumably claim independence from political bias. The Trust Surveys showed that politicians were highly distrusted in contrast with doctors and pharmacists who were considered much more trustworthy. Conclusions The low uptake of the vaccine could reflect failure to convey high quality medical information and advice relating to the benefits of being vaccinated. We believe that the media and internet contributed to this problem by raising concerns within the general population and that failure to involve GPs in the control programme may have been a mistake. GPs are highly regarded by the public and can provide face-to-face professional advice and information. The top-down strategy of vaccine programme management and information delivered by the Ministry of Health could have aggravated the problem, because the general population does not always trust politicians. PMID:20593024

  19. Gamma irradiation of Egyptian Cobra (Naja haje) Venom.

    PubMed

    Shaban, E A; Ahmed, A A; Ayobe, M H

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare an effective and safe toxoid for the Egyptian Cobra (Naja haje) Venom by gamma irradiation. The effects of gamma irradiation (0.1-10 M rad) on the toxicity, as well as the antigen antibody complex formation reactivity was described. It appears from the results that the lethality of Naja haje venom irradiated in the dry form was not affected up to a dose of 10 M rad (100 KGy). On the other hand, the venom irradiated in the aqueous solution form showed a decrease in its lethality, and this was proportionately related to the dose of irradiation, while the ability of the venom antigens to react with its corresponding antibodies was retained up to irradiation dose of 5 M rad. The results of double immunodiffusion of non irradiated and the different dose levels of gamma irradiated venom (0.1-5 M rad) against a commercial Egyptian polyvalent antivenin, all showed similar patterns, the four visible lines obtained in the immunodiffusion reactions were identical and joined smoothly at the corners, indicating that there was no change in antigenic reactivity with antibodies determinants.

  20. Helicopter Toy and Lift Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakerin, Said

    2013-01-01

    A $1 plastic helicopter toy (called a Wacky Whirler) can be used to demonstrate lift. Students can make basic measurements of the toy, use reasonable assumptions and, with the lift formula, estimate the lift, and verify that it is sufficient to overcome the toy's weight. (Contains 1 figure.)

  1. 78 FR 47531 - Airworthiness Directives; Various Restricted Category Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... State University); Firefly Aviation Helicopter Services (previously Erickson Air-Crane Co.); California... State University); Firefly Aviation Helicopter Services (previously Erickson Air-Crane Co.); California... Falcon Exporters, Inc. (previously Utah State University); Firefly Aviation Helicopter...

  2. 77 FR 44434 - Airworthiness Directives; Various Restricted Category Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... State University); Firefly Aviation Helicopter Services (previously Erickson Air-Crane Co.); California... apply to Arrow Falcon Exporters, Inc. (previously Utah State University); Firefly Aviation Helicopter... Arrow Falcon Exporters, Inc. (previously Utah State University); Firefly Aviation Helicopter...

  3. 78 FR 54792 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France (Eurocopter) Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... (Eurocopter) Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Model EC225 LP helicopters. This proposed AD would add a new operating limitation that would require increasing the minimum density altitude flight limitation for helicopters without certain...

  4. Effect of cyclosporine, total lymphoid irradiation, and cobra venom factor on hyperacute rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Knechtle, S.J.; Halperin, E.C.; Murphy, C.E.; Saad, T.; Abernethy, K.; Miller, D.; Bollinger, R.R.

    1985-09-01

    Transplantation into sensitized recipients is contraindicated due to the potential for hyperacute rejection. In order to study the mechanism of hyperacute rejection and the role of immunosuppression in the face of presensitization, we evaluated the effect of total lymphoid irradiation, cyclosporine, and cobra venom factor, alone and in combination, on hyperacute rejection of heterotopic rat heart allografts. Lewis rats were sensitized to strongly RT-1-incompatible ACI rats by three successive skin grafts. Heart allografts were then performed, and survived for a mean period of 15.7 +/- 7.4 hours. Neither preoperative treatment of hypersensitized rats with total lymphoid irradiation alone nor with cyclosporine (5 mg/kg/day) resulted in a prolongation of survival (20.4 +/- 16.6 hours and 35.6 +/- 6.2 hours, respectively). However, complement depletion using cobra venom factor significantly prolonged mean graft survival time to 114.4 +/- 31.0 hours (p less than 0.05). Cyclosporine (10 mg/kg/day) also significantly prolonged survival to 149 +/- 29 hours (p less than 0.01), but did not lower the antibody or complement levels. The addition of total lymphoid irradiation or cyclosporine to treatment with cobra venom factor did not result in longer survival than cobra venom factor alone. In conclusion, cobra venom factor and cyclosporine delay but do not prevent hyperacute rejection, while total lymphoid irradiation has no observable effect on hyperacute rejection.

  5. Identification of MEDIATOR16 as the Arabidopsis COBRA suppressor MONGOOSE1.

    PubMed

    Sorek, Nadav; Szemenyei, Heidi; Sorek, Hagit; Landers, Abigail; Knight, Heather; Bauer, Stefan; Wemmer, David E; Somerville, Chris R

    2015-12-29

    We performed a screen for genetic suppressors of cobra, an Arabidopsis mutant with defects in cellulose formation and an increased ratio of unesterified/esterified pectin. We identified a suppressor named mongoose1 (mon1) that suppressed the growth defects of cobra, partially restored cellulose levels, and restored the esterification ratio of pectin to wild-type levels. mon1 was mapped to the MEDIATOR16 (MED16) locus, a tail mediator subunit, also known as SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 (SFR6). When separated from the cobra mutation, mutations in MED16 caused resistance to cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors, consistent with their ability to suppress the cobra cellulose deficiency. Transcriptome analysis revealed that a number of cell wall genes are misregulated in med16 mutants. Two of these genes encode pectin methylesterase inhibitors, which, when ectopically expressed, partially suppressed the cobra phenotype. This suggests that cellulose biosynthesis can be affected by the esterification levels of pectin, possibly through modifying cell wall integrity or the interaction of pectin and cellulose.

  6. A flight investigation of performance and loads for a helicopter with NLR-1T main-rotor blade sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. E. K., Jr.; Tomaine, R. L.; Stevens, D. D.

    1979-01-01

    Data on performance and rotor loads for a teetering-rotor, AH-1G helicopter flown with a main rotor that had the NLR-1T airfoil as the blade-section contour are presented. The test envelope included hover, forward-flight speed sweeps from 35 to 85 m/sec, and collective-fixed maneuvers at about 0.25 tip-speed ratio. The data set for each test point described vehicle flight state, control positions, rotor loads, power requirements, and blade motions. Rotor loads are reviewed primarily in terms of peak-to-peak and harmonic content. Lower frequency components predominated for most loads and generally increased with increased airspeed, but not necessarily with increased maneuver load factor.

  7. A flight investigation of blade section aerodynamics for a helicopter main rotor having NLR-1T airfoil sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. E. K., Jr.; Stevens, D. D.; Tomaine, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A flight investigation was conducted using a teetering-rotor AH-1G helicopter to obtain data on the aerodynamic behavior of main-rotor blades with the NLR-1T blade section. The data system recorded blade-section aerodynamic pressures at 90 percent rotor radius as well as vehicle flight state, performance, and loads. The test envelope included hover, forward flight, and collective-fixed maneuvers. Data were obtained on apparent blade-vortex interactions, negative lift on the advancing blade in high-speed flight and wake interactions in hover. In many cases, good agreement was achieved between chordwise pressure distributions predicted by airfoil theory and flight data with no apparent indications of blade-vortex interactions.

  8. Comparison of the Roche RealTime ready Influenza A/H1N1 Detection Set with CDC A/H1N1pdm09 RT-PCR on samples from three hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Nguyen thi; Hang, Vu thi Ty; Khanh, Trong Huu; Viet, Do Chau; Hien, Tran Tinh; Farrar, Jeremy; van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; van Doorn, H. Rogier

    2012-01-01

    Background Real-time PCR can be considered the gold standard for detection of influenza viruses due to its high sensitivity and specificity. Roche has developed the RealTime ready Influenza A/H1N1 Detection Set, consisting of a generic influenza virus A PCR targeting the M2 gene (M2 PCR) and a specific PCR targeting the HA of A/H1N1-pdm09 (HA PCR, 2009 H1N1), with the intention to make a reliable, rapid, and simple test to detect and quantify 2009 H1N1 in clinical samples. Methods We evaluated this kit against the USCDC/WHO real-time PCR for influenza virus using 419 nose and throat swabs from 210 patients collected in 3 large hospitals in Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam. Results In the per patient analysis, when compared to CDC PCR, the sensitivity and specificity of the M2 PCR were 85.8 and 97.6%, respectively; the sensitivity and specificity of HA PCR were 88.2 and 100%, respectively. In the per sample analysis, the sensitivity and specificity in nose swabs were higher than in throat swabs for both M2 and HA PCRs. The viral loads as determined with the M2 and HA PCRs correlated well with the Ct values of the CDC PCR. Conclusion Compared with the CDC PCR, the kit has a reasonable sensitivity and very good specificity for the detection and quantification of Influenza A virus and A/H1N1-pdm09. However, given the current status of 2009 H1N1, a kit that can detect all circulating seasonal influenza viruses would be preferable. PMID:22785431

  9. Treatment of the first known case of king cobra envenomation in the United Kingdom, complicated by severe anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Veto, T; Price, R; Silsby, J F; Carter, J A

    2007-01-01

    We report the first known case of envenomation following snake bite by a king cobra in the UK. The patient required tracheal intubation and ventilation. Treatment with king cobra antivenom resulted in anaphylaxis (bronchospasm and hypotension), requiring adrenaline infusion. The patient's trachea was extubated 11 h after administration of antivenom.

  10. Oseltamivir-zanamivir combination therapy is not superior to zanamivir monotherapy in mice infected with influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses.

    PubMed

    Pizzorno, Andrés; Abed, Yacine; Rhéaume, Chantal; Boivin, Guy

    2014-05-01

    The efficacy of oseltamivir-zanamivir combination therapy compared to that of monotherapy was evaluated in mice infected with influenza A(H3N2) or A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. For A(H3N2) virus, zanamivir monotherapy and oseltamivir-zanamivir combination showed significant reduction of mean weight loss compared to oseltamivir. Zanamivir monotherapy also conferred decreased mortality, weight loss and lung viral titers (LVT) compared to oseltamivir for A(H1N1)pdm09 wild-type virus. Intermediate benefits were observed for the oseltamivir-zanamivir combination. For the oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 H275Y virus, the efficacy of oseltamivir-zanamivir was comparable to that of zanamivir and significantly higher than that of oseltamivir in terms of survival, weight loss and LVT.

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis of Evolutionary Markers of Human Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) Viruses May Guide Selection of Vaccine Strain Candidates.

    PubMed

    Belanov, Sergei S; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Benner, Christian; Ripatti, Samuli; Ojala, Teija; Kankainen, Matti; Kai Lee, Hong; Wei-Tze Tang, Julian; Kainov, Denis E

    2015-11-27

    Here we analyzed whole-genome sequences of 3,969 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 4,774 A(H3N2) strains that circulated during 2009-2015 in the world. The analysis revealed changes at 481 and 533 amino acid sites in proteins of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively. Many of these changes were introduced as a result of random drift. However, there were 61 and 68 changes that were present in relatively large number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively, that circulated during relatively long time. We named these amino acid substitutions evolutionary markers, as they seemed to contain valuable information regarding the viral evolution. Interestingly, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses acquired non-overlapping sets of evolutionary markers. We next analyzed these characteristic markers in vaccine strains recommended by the World Health Organization for the past five years. Our analysis revealed that vaccine strains carried only few evolutionary markers at antigenic sites of viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The absence of these markers at antigenic sites could affect the recognition of HA and NA by human antibodies generated in response to vaccinations. This could, in part, explain moderate efficacy of influenza vaccines during 2009-2014. Finally, we identified influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, which contain all the evolutionary markers of influenza A strains circulated in 2015, and which could be used as vaccine candidates for the 2015/2016 season. Thus, genome-wide analysis of evolutionary markers of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses may guide selection of vaccine strain candidates.

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis of Evolutionary Markers of Human Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) Viruses May Guide Selection of Vaccine Strain Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Belanov, Sergei S.; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Benner, Christian; Ripatti, Samuli; Ojala, Teija; Kankainen, Matti; Kai Lee, Hong; Wei-Tze Tang, Julian; Kainov, Denis E.

    2015-01-01

    Here we analyzed whole-genome sequences of 3,969 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 4,774 A(H3N2) strains that circulated during 2009–2015 in the world. The analysis revealed changes at 481 and 533 amino acid sites in proteins of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively. Many of these changes were introduced as a result of random drift. However, there were 61 and 68 changes that were present in relatively large number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively, that circulated during relatively long time. We named these amino acid substitutions evolutionary markers, as they seemed to contain valuable information regarding the viral evolution. Interestingly, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses acquired non-overlapping sets of evolutionary markers. We next analyzed these characteristic markers in vaccine strains recommended by the World Health Organization for the past five years. Our analysis revealed that vaccine strains carried only few evolutionary markers at antigenic sites of viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The absence of these markers at antigenic sites could affect the recognition of HA and NA by human antibodies generated in response to vaccinations. This could, in part, explain moderate efficacy of influenza vaccines during 2009–2014. Finally, we identified influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, which contain all the evolutionary markers of influenza A strains circulated in 2015, and which could be used as vaccine candidates for the 2015/2016 season. Thus, genome-wide analysis of evolutionary markers of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses may guide selection of vaccine strain candidates. PMID:26615216

  13. Optimal landing of a helicopter in autorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, A. Y. N.

    1985-01-01

    Gliding descent in autorotation is a maneuver used by helicopter pilots in case of engine failure. The landing of a helicopter in autorotation is formulated as a nonlinear optimal control problem. The OH-58A helicopter was used. Helicopter vertical and horizontal velocities, vertical and horizontal displacement, and the rotor angle speed were modeled. An empirical approximation for the induced veloctiy in the vortex-ring state were provided. The cost function of the optimal control problem is a weighted sum of the squared horizontal and vertical components of the helicopter velocity at touchdown. Optimal trajectories are calculated for entry conditions well within the horizontal-vertical restriction curve, with the helicopter initially in hover or forwared flight. The resultant two-point boundary value problem with path equality constraints was successfully solved using the Sequential Gradient Restoration Technique.

  14. Model predictive formation control of helicopter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffarian, Mehdi

    In this thesis, a robust formation control framework for formation control of a group of helicopters is proposed and designed. The dynamic model of the helicopter has been developed and verified through simulations. The control framework is constructed using two main control schemes for navigation of a helicopter group in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Two schemes are designed to maintain the position of one helicopter with respect to one or two other neighboring members, respectively. The developed parameters can uniquely define the position of the helicopters with respect to each other and can be used for any other aerial and under water vehicles such as airplanes, spacecrafts and submarines. Also, since this approach is modular, it is possible to use it for desired number and form of the group helicopters. Using the defined control parameters, two decentralized controllers are designed based on Nonlinear Model Predictive Control (NMPC) algorithm technique. The framework performance has been tested through simulation of different formation scenarios.

  15. 76 FR 66609 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada (Bell) Model 407 and 427 Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... Textron Canada (Bell) Model 407 and 427 Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION... the service information identified in this AD from Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited, 12,800 Rue... the helicopter. Transport Canada, the airworthiness authority for Canada, notified the FAA that...

  16. 78 FR 23688 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Inc. Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... Textron Canada Inc. Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Inc. (BHT) Model 206A, 206B, and 206L helicopters. This proposed AD... Canada Limited, 12,800 Rue de l'Avenir, Mirabel, Quebec J7J1R4; telephone (450) 437-2862 or (800)...

  17. Cobra venom contains a pool of cysteine-rich secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Alexey V; Levashov, Mikhail Yu; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2005-03-04

    A large family of cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) includes proteins of different origin, the function of the majority of CRISPs being unknown. For CRISPs isolated from snake venom, two types of activities were found: two proteins blocked cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels, several others blocked potassium-stimulated smooth muscle contraction. Thus, snake CRISPs represent potentially valuable tools for studies of ion channels, which makes promising a search for new CRISPs. Here we report on the isolation of several novel CRISPs from the venoms of Asian cobra Naja kaouthia and African cobra Naja haje using a combination of different types of liquid chromatography. Four CRISP variants were identified in N. kaouthia venom and three proteins, one of them acidic, were found in N. haje venom. Acidic CRISP was found in a reptilian venom for the first time. Our data suggest that each cobra venom contains a pool of different CRISPs.

  18. Documenting helicopter operations from an energy standpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. J.; Stepniewski, W. Z.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of a study of the relative and absolute energy consumption of helicopters, including limited comparisons with fixed-wing aircraft, and selected surface transportation vehicles. Additional comparisons were made to determine the level of reduction in energy consumption expected from the application of advanced technologies to the helicopter design and sizing process. It was found that improvements in helicopter consumption characteristics can be accomplished through the utilization of advanced technology to reduce drag, structures weight, and powerplant fuel consumption.

  19. Research On The CH-47B Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, Kathryn B.; Tucker, George E.; Chen, Robert T. N.; Fry, Emmett B.; Hindson, William S.

    1988-01-01

    Report describes equipment added to, and research capabilities of CH-47B helicopter. Programmable symbol generator provides display formats for variety of missions - those of vertical-takeoff-and-landing aircraft and helicopters. Powerful general-purpose flight computer in operation. Computer programmable in high-level languages and supports research more efficiently. Flight-control software developed to improve capability of helicopter to perform simulations in flight.

  20. Portable-Beacon Landing System for Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Clary, George R.; Chisholm, John P.; Macdonald, Stanley L.

    1987-01-01

    Prototype beacon landing system (BLS) allows helicopters to make precise landings in all weather. BLS easily added to existing helicopter avionic equipment and readily deployed at remote sites. Small and light, system employs X-band radar and digital processing. Variety of beams pulsed sequentially by ground station after initial interrogation by weather radar of approaching helicopter. Airborne microprocessor processes pulses to determine glide slope, course deviation, and range.

  1. Assessment of worm gearing for helicopter transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaiko, Lev

    1990-01-01

    A high-efficiency hydrostatic worm gear drive for helicopter transmissions is assessed. The example given is for a large cargo helicopter with three 4000-kW engines and transmission reduction ratio of 110. Also contained are: an efficiency calculation, a description of the test stand for evaluating the feasibility of worm gear hydrostatic mesh, a weight calculation, and a comparison with conventional helicopter transmissions of the same power and transmission reduction ratio.

  2. MUOS: Application in Naval Helicopter Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    frequency HSC Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron HSL Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light HSM Helicopter Strike Maritime Squadron ISAR inverse ...using the AN/APS 147 Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR), which gives the aircraft the ability to identify tracks based solely on radar data. The...footprint of the satellite (see Figure 12). Each beam is like a cell tower that covers approximately 600 square miles of earth (Buck & Russ, 2007). Using a

  3. Portability of health insurance: COBRA expansions and small group market reform.

    PubMed

    Fronstin, P

    1995-10-01

    Proposals are currently being put forth to change the health care system incrementally. One area of proposed legislation addresses portability, which allows an individual to change insurers without being subjected to a new waiting period for preexisting conditions. These proposals, discussed in this Issue Brief, contain provisions to limit preexisting condition exclusions, guarantee access to health insurance, guarantee renewal of health insurance, allow individuals to contribute to medical savings accounts on a pretax basis, and change the current law under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 (COBRA). The proposals would affect insurers, employers, and insured individuals by potentially increasing the cost of providing and purchasing health insurance. Concern about the portability of health insurance primarily arises in situations where an individual is leaving, or would like to leave, a job. If health insurance is not offered by a prospective employer, if the worker must satisfy a waiting period before becoming eligible for coverage, if the benefits package offered through the prospective employer is less generous, or if the employee (or a dependent) has a medical condition that is considered a preexisting condition and would not be covered by the new plan, the employee may opt to remain with his or her current employer--a situation known as job lock. Expansions of COBRA may not have any effect on portability. Employers can charge up to 102 percent of the premium for COBRA coverage, making it unaffordable for many workers. Because cost is a major factor, if there is no reduction in cost (or health care cost inflation) there could be little or no increase in coverage. According to one survey, in 1994 average COBRA costs were $5,301 per COBRA covered worker, compared with $3,420 for active employees. Any expansion of COBRA would almost certainly increase employer cost for health insurance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  4. US Navy Helicopter Mishap Findings & Recommendations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    15 Birthplace, Home and Future of Aerospace Medicine H-60, SeaHawk • SH-60B/F, UH - 60L , VH-60N, HH-60H, others • First flew in 1974 • Fleet size...Medicine Average Annual Inventory Size FY 85 – 05 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 Number in Fleet AH-1 UH -1 H-46 H-53 H-60 7 Birthplace, Home and...Future of Aerospace Medicine Utilization Rates, Hours per Aircraft-Year, FY 85 – 05 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 Hours per Aircraft-Year AH-1 UH -1

  5. Structure-function relationship of king cobra cathelicidin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Guo-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Shen, Ji-Hong; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2010-08-01

    King cobra cathelicidin (OH-CATH) is composed of 34 amino acid residues having strong antibacterial and very weak hemolytic activities as reported by us recently. OH-CATH can be served as a valuable template to develop novel therapeutic drugs. In this study, OH-CATH and six of its analogs were synthesized to explore their structure-function relationships based on their bactericidal and hemolytic activities. Experimental results of OH-CATH(3-34) and OH-CATH(5-34) indicated that the N-terminal 4 amino acid residues of OH-CATH played an important role on its hemolytic activity but had weak effects on its bactericidal activity. Among OH-CATH and its analogs, OH-CATH(5-34) had the lowest hemolytic activity while maintained strong antimicrobial activity. To evaluate its potential usage, the biological activities of OH-CATH(5-34) were compared with those of pexiganan. The bactericidal activity of OH-CATH(5-34) against 5 different species (11 laboratory strains) was 2-4 times stronger than that of pexiganan (4-16 microg/ml vs 8-32 microg/ml). Hemolytic activity of OH-CATH(5-34) against human erythrocytes was 0.69% while that of pexiganan was 16.5% at the dosage of 200 microg/ml. OH-CATH(5-34) showed very weak cytotoxic activities against primary rabbit ventricular endothelial cells and four human cancer cell lines whereas pexiganan showed strong cytotoxic activity against these five cell lines (IC(50)=20-90 microg/ml). The intravenous LD(50) value of OH-CATH(5-34) on mice was 7-fold higher than that of pexiganan (175 mg/kg vs 25mg/kg). Taken together, our results suggested that OH-CATH(5-34) should be considered as an excellent candidate for developing therapeutic drugs.

  6. Advanced Control System Increases Helicopter Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    With support and funding from a Phase II NASA SBIR project from Ames Research Center, Hoh Aeronautics Inc. (HAI), of Lomita, California, produced HeliSAS, a low-cost, lightweight, attitude-command-attitude-hold stability augmentation system (SAS) for civil helicopters and unmanned aerial vehicles. HeliSAS proved itself in over 160 hours of flight testing and demonstrations in a Robinson R44 Raven helicopter, a commercial helicopter popular with news broadcasting and police operations. Chelton Flight Systems, of Boise, Idaho, negotiated with HAI to develop, market, and manufacture HeliSAS, now available as the Chelton HeliSAS Digital Helicopter Autopilot.

  7. Improvements and applications of COBRA-TF for stand-alone and coupled LWR safety analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Avramova, M.; Cuervo, D.

    2006-07-01

    The advanced thermal-hydraulic subchannel code COBRA-TF has been recently improved and applied for stand-alone and coupled LWR core calculations at the Pennsylvania State Univ. in cooperation with AREVA NP GmbH (Germany)) and the Technical Univ. of Madrid. To enable COBRA-TF for academic and industrial applications including safety margins evaluations and LWR core design analyses, the code programming, numerics, and basic models were revised and substantially improved. The code has undergone through an extensive validation, verification, and qualification program. (authors)

  8. COBRA/TRAC analysis of the PKL reflood test K9

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, C.A.

    1982-03-01

    Experiments simulating the refill and reflood procedure after a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a 1300 MW PWR primary coolant system were performed at the KWU test facility in Erlangen, Germany. COBRA/TRAC was used to model experiment K9 of the PKL series (completed December 1979). PKL-K9 was characterized by a double-ended guillotine break in the cold leg with emergency core cooling water injected into the cold legs. COBRA/TRAC was able to successfully predict lower core temperature profiles and quench times, upper core temperature profiles until quench, upper plenum and break pressures and correct trends in collapsed water levels.

  9. COBRA-SFS predictions of single assembly spent fuel heat transfer data

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, N.J.; Michener, T.E.; Wheeler, C.L.; Rector, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    The study reported here is one of several efforts to evaluate and qualify the COBRA-SFS computer code for use in spent fuel storage system thermal analysis. The ability of COBRA-SFS to predict the thermal response of two single assembly spent fuel heat transfer tests was investigated through comparisons of predictions with experimental test data. From these comparisons, conclusions regarding the computational treatment of the physical phenomena occurring within a storage system can be made. This objective was successfully accomplished as reasonable agreement between predictions and data were obtained for the 21 individual test cases of the two experiments.

  10. COBRA-WC model and predictions for a fast-reactor natural-circulation transient. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.L.; Basehore, K.L.; Prather, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    The COBRA-WC (Whole Core) code has been used to predict the core-wide coolant and rod temperature distribution in a liquid metal fast reactor during the early part (first 220 seconds) of a natural circulation transient. Approximately one-sixth of the core was modeled including bypass flows and the pressure losses above and below the core region. Detailed temperature and flow distributions were obtained for the two test fuel assemblies. The COBRA-WC model, the approach, and predictions of core-wide transient coolant and rod temperatures during a natural circulation transient are presented in this paper.

  11. Using High-Throughput Sequencing to Leverage Surveillance of Genetic Diversity and Oseltamivir Resistance: A Pilot Study during the 2009 Influenza A(H1N1) Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Rodríguez, Mario Henry; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa E.; Valdovinos-Torres, Humberto; Hidalgo, Ana Cecilia; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Luna, René Santos; Carrillo-Valenzo, Erik; Ramos, Celso; García-García, Lourdes; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza viruses display a high mutation rate and complex evolutionary patterns. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been widely used for qualitative and semi-quantitative assessment of genetic diversity in complex biological samples. The “deep sequencing” approach, enabled by the enormous throughput of current NGS platforms, allows the identification of rare genetic viral variants in targeted genetic regions, but is usually limited to a small number of samples. Methodology and Principal Findings We designed a proof-of-principle study to test whether redistributing sequencing throughput from a high depth-small sample number towards a low depth-large sample number approach is feasible and contributes to influenza epidemiological surveillance. Using 454-Roche sequencing, we sequenced at a rather low depth, a 307 bp amplicon of the neuraminidase gene of the Influenza A(H1N1) pandemic (A(H1N1)pdm) virus from cDNA amplicons pooled in 48 barcoded libraries obtained from nasal swab samples of infected patients (n  =  299) taken from May to November, 2009 pandemic period in Mexico. This approach revealed that during the transition from the first (May-July) to second wave (September-November) of the pandemic, the initial genetic variants were replaced by the N248D mutation in the NA gene, and enabled the establishment of temporal and geographic associations with genetic diversity and the identification of mutations associated with oseltamivir resistance. Conclusions NGS sequencing of a short amplicon from the NA gene at low sequencing depth allowed genetic screening of a large number of samples, providing insights to viral genetic diversity dynamics and the identification of genetic variants associated with oseltamivir resistance. Further research is needed to explain the observed replacement of the genetic variants seen during the second wave. As sequencing throughput rises and library multiplexing and automation improves, we foresee that the approach presented here can be scaled up for global genetic surveillance of influenza and other infectious diseases. PMID:23843978

  12. Accumulation of Human-Adapting Mutations during Circulation of A(H1N1)pdm09 Influenza Virus in Humans in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Elderfield, Ruth A.; Watson, Simon J.; Godlee, Alexandra; Adamson, Walt E.; Thompson, Catherine I.; Dunning, Jake; Fernandez-Alonso, Mirian; Blumenkrantz, Deena; Hussell, Tracy; Zambon, Maria; Openshaw, Peter; Kellam, Paul

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The influenza pandemic that emerged in 2009 provided an unprecedented opportunity to study adaptation of a virus recently acquired from an animal source during human transmission. In the United Kingdom, the novel virus spread in three temporally distinct waves between 2009 and 2011. Phylogenetic analysis of complete viral genomes showed that mutations accumulated over time. Second- and third-wave viruses replicated more rapidly in human airway epithelial (HAE) cells than did the first-wave virus. In infected mice, weight loss varied between viral isolates from the same wave but showed no distinct pattern with wave and did not correlate with viral load in the mouse lungs or severity of disease in the human donor. However, second- and third-wave viruses induced less alpha interferon in the infected mouse lungs. NS1 protein, an interferon antagonist, had accumulated several mutations in second- and third-wave viruses. Recombinant viruses with the third-wave NS gene induced less interferon in human cells, but this alone did not account for increased virus fitness in HAE cells. Mutations in HA and NA genes in third-wave viruses caused increased binding to α-2,6-sialic acid and enhanced infectivity in human mucus. A recombinant virus with these two segments replicated more efficiently in HAE cells. A mutation in PA (N321K) enhanced polymerase activity of third-wave viruses and also provided a replicative advantage in HAE cells. Therefore, multiple mutations allowed incremental changes in viral fitness, which together may have contributed to the apparent increase in severity of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus during successive waves. IMPORTANCE Although most people infected with the 2009 pandemic influenza virus had mild or unapparent symptoms, some suffered severe and devastating disease. The reasons for this variability were unknown, but the numbers of severe cases increased during successive waves of human infection in the United Kingdom. To determine the causes of this variation, we studied genetic changes in virus isolates from individual hospitalized patients. There were no consistent differences between these viruses and those circulating in the community, but we found multiple evolutionary changes that in combination over time increased the virus's ability to infect human cells. These adaptations may explain the remarkable ability of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus to continue to circulate despite widespread immunity and the apparent increase in severity of influenza over successive waves of infection. PMID:25210166

  13. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus Suppresses RIG-I Initiated Innate Antiviral Responses in the Human Lung

    PubMed Central

    Booth, J. Leland; Metcalf, Jordan P.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is believed to play an important role in the recognition of, and response to, influenza virus and other RNA viruses. Our study focuses on the hypothesis that pandemic H1N1/09 influenza virus alters the influenza-induced proinflammatory response and suppresses host antiviral activity. We first compared the innate response to a clinical isolate of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, OK/09, a clinical isolate of seasonal H3N2 virus, OK/06, and to a laboratory adapted seasonal H1N1 virus, PR8, using a unique human lung organ culture model. Exposure of human lung tissue to either pandemic or seasonal influenza virus resulted in infection and replication in alveolar epithelial cells. Pandemic virus induces a diminished RIG-I mRNA and antiviral cytokine response than seasonal virus in human lung. The suppression of antiviral response and RIG-I mRNA expression was confirmed at the protein level by ELISA and western blot. We performed a time course of RIG-I and interferon-β (IFN-β) mRNA induction by the two viruses. RIG-I and IFN-β induction by OK/09 was of lower amplitude and shorter duration than that caused by PR8. In contrast, the pandemic virus OK/09 caused similar induction of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-8 and IL-6, at both the transcriptional and translational level as PR8 in human lung. Differential antiviral responses did not appear to be due to a difference in cellular infectivity as immunohistochemistry showed that both viruses infected alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. These findings show that influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus suppresses anti-viral immune responses in infected human lung through inhibition of viral-mediated induction of the pattern recognition receptor, RIG-I, though proinflammatory cytokine induction was unaltered. This immunosuppression of the host antiviral response by pandemic virus may have contributed to the more serious lung infections that occurred in the H1N1 pandemic of 2009. PMID:23185463

  14. Risk of Narcolepsy after AS03 Adjuvanted Pandemic A/H1N1 2009 Influenza Vaccine in Adults: A Case-Coverage Study in England

    PubMed Central

    Stowe, Julia; Andrews, Nicholas; Kosky, Christopher; Dennis, Gary; Eriksson, Sofia; Hall, Andrew; Leschziner, Guy; Reading, Paul; Shneerson, John M.; Donegan, Katherine; Miller, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: An increased risk of narcolepsy has been observed in children following ASO3-adjuvanted pandemic A/H1N1 2009 (Pandemrix) vaccine. We investigated whether this risk extends to adults in England. Methods: Six adult sleep centers in England were visited between November 2012 and February 2014 and vaccination/clinical histories obtained from general practitioners. Suspected narcolepsy cases aged older than 17 y were selected. The risk of narcolepsy following Pandemrix was calculated using cases diagnosed by the time of the center visits and those with a diagnosis by November 30, 2011 after which there was increased awareness of the risk in children. The odds of vaccination in cases and in matched population data were compared using a case-coverage design. Results: Of 1,446 possible cases identified, most had onset before 2009 or were clearly not narcolepsy. Of the 60 remaining cases, 20 were excluded after expert review, leaving 40 cases with narcolepsy; 5 had received Pandemrix between 3 and 18 mo before onset. All the vaccinated cases had cataplexy, two received a diagnosis by November 2011 and two were aged 40 y or older. The odds ratio for vaccination in cases compared to the population was 4.24 (95% confidence interval 1.45–12.38) using all cases and 9.06 (1.90–43.17) using cases with a diagnosis by November 2011, giving an attributable risk of 0.59 cases per 100,000 doses. Conclusions: We found a significantly increased risk of narcolepsy in adults following Pandemrix vaccination in England. The risk was lower than that seen in children using a similar study design. Citation: Stowe J, Andrews N, Kosky C, Dennis G, Eriksson S, Hall A, Leschziner G, Reading P, Shneerson JM, Donegan K, Miller E. Risk of narcolepsy after AS03 adjuvanted pandemic A/H1N1 2009 influenza vaccine in adults: a case-coverage study in England. SLEEP 2016;39(5):1051–1057. PMID:26856903

  15. Control of helicopter rotorblade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabunmi, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study of a method for controlling the aerodynamics of helicopter rotorblades using stacks of piezoelectric ceramic plates are presented. A resonant mechanism is proposed for the amplification of the displacements produced by the stack. This motion is then converted into linear displacement for the actuation of the servoflap of the blades. A design which emulates the actuation of the servoflap on the Kaman SH-2F is used to demonstrate the fact that such a system can be designed to produce the necessary forces and velocities needed to control the aerodynamics of the rotorblades of such a helicopter. Estimates of the electrical power requirements are also presented. A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 Program is suggested, whereby a bench-top prototype of the device can be built and tested. A collaborative effort between AEDAR Corporation and Kaman Aerospace Corporation is anticipated for future effort on this project.

  16. Lytic spondylolisthesis in helicopter pilots.

    PubMed

    Froom, P; Froom, J; Van Dyk, D; Caine, Y; Ribak, J; Margaliot, S; Floman, Y

    1984-06-01

    Trauma to the back from the force of chronic stress is thought to be an etiologic factor in isthmic spondylolisthesis (SLL). The relationship of first degree spondylolisthesis to low back pain (LBP) is controversial. We compare the prevalence of SLL in helicopter pilots who are subject to strong vibrational forces, with other airforce personnel. Helicopter pilots had more than a four times higher prevalence of SLL (4.5%) than did cadets (1.0%) and transport pilots (0.9%). Low back pain was more frequent in pilots with SLL than in those without this lesion but in no case was the pain disabling or the defect progressive. We conclude that SLL may be induced by vibrational forces and although SLL is associated with LBP, the pain was little clinical significance.

  17. Helicopter tail rotor noise analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to interactions with the main rotor tip vortices, and with the fuselage separation mean wake. The tail rotor blade-main rotor tip vortex interaction is modelled as an airfoil of infinite span cutting through a moving vortex. The vortex and the geometry information required by the analyses are obtained through a free wake geometry analysis of the main rotor. The acoustic pressure-time histories for the tail rotor blade-vortex interactions are then calculated. These acoustic results are compared to tail rotor loading and thickness noise, and are found to be significant to the overall tail rotor noise generation. Under most helicopter operating conditions, large acoustic pressure fluctuations can be generated due to a series of skewed main rotor tip vortices passing through the tail rotor disk. The noise generation depends strongly upon the helicopter operating conditions and the location of the tail rotor relative to the main rotor.

  18. Kinetics of lung lesion development and pro-inflammatory cytokine response in pigs with vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease induced by challenge with pandemic (2009) A/H1N1 influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this report was to characterize the enhanced clinical disease and lung lesions observed in pigs vaccinated with inactivated H1N2 swine delta-cluster influenza A virus and challenged with pandemic 2009 A/H1N1 human influenza virus. Eighty-four, six-week-old, crossbred pigs were rand...

  19. Model-based reconstruction of an epidemic using multiple datasets: understanding influenza A/H1N1 pandemic dynamics in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Yaari, R.; Katriel, G.; Stone, L.; Mendelson, E.; Mandelboim, M.; Huppert, A.

    2016-01-01

    Intensified surveillance during the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic in Israel resulted in large virological and serological datasets, presenting a unique opportunity for investigating the pandemic dynamics. We employ a conditional likelihood approach for fitting a disease transmission model to virological and serological data, conditional on clinical data. The model is used to reconstruct the temporal pattern of the pandemic in Israel in five age-groups and evaluate the factors that shaped it. We estimate the reproductive number at the beginning of the pandemic to be R = 1.4. We find that the combined effect of varying absolute humidity conditions and school vacations (SVs) is responsible for the infection pattern, characterized by three epidemic waves. Overall attack rate is estimated at 32% (28–35%) with a large variation among the age-groups: the highest attack rates within school children and the lowest within the elderly. This pattern of infection is explained by a combination of the age-group contact structure and increasing immunity with age. We assess that SVs increased the overall attack rates by prolonging the pandemic into the winter. Vaccinating school children would have been the optimal strategy for minimizing infection rates in all age-groups. PMID:27030041

  20. The Lao Experience in Deploying Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Vaccine: Lessons Made Relevant in Preparing for Present Day Pandemic Threats.

    PubMed

    Xeuatvongsa, Anonh; Mirza, Sara; Winter, Christian; Feldon, Keith; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Phonekeo, Darouny; Denny, Justin; Khanthamaly, Viengphone; Kounnavong, Bounheuang; Lylianou, Doualy; Phousavath, Sisouphane; Norasingh, Sisouveth; Boutta, Nao; Olsen, Sonja; Bresee, Joseph; Moen, Ann; Corwin, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Lao PDR, as did most countries of the Mekong Region, embarked on a pandemic vaccine initiative to counter the threat posed by influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. Overall, estimated vaccine coverage of the Lao population was 14%, with uptake in targeted health care workers and pregnant women 99% and 41%, respectively. Adverse Events Following Immunization accounted for only 6% of survey driven, reported vaccination experiences, with no severe consequences or deaths. Public acceptability of the vaccine campaign was high (98%). Challenges to vaccine deployment included: 1) no previous experience in fielding a seasonal influenza vaccine, 2) safety and efficacy concerns, and 3) late arrival of vaccine 10 months into the pandemic. The Lao success in surmounting these hurdles was in large measure attributed to the oversight assigned the National Immunization Program, and national sensitivities in responding to the avian influenza A(H5N1) crisis in the years leading up to the pandemic. The Lao "lessons learned" from pandemic vaccine deployment are made even more relevant four years on, given the many avian influenza strains circulating in the region, all with pandemic potential.

  1. Analysis of Coinfections with A/H1N1 Strain Variants among Pigs in Poland by Multitemperature Single-Strand Conformational Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Lepek, Krzysztof; Pajak, Beata; Rabalski, Lukasz; Urbaniak, Kinga; Kucharczyk, Krzysztof; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Szewczyk, Boguslaw

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring and control of infections are key parts of surveillance systems and epidemiological risk prevention. In the case of influenza A viruses (IAVs), which show high variability, a wide range of hosts, and a potential of reassortment between different strains, it is essential to study not only people, but also animals living in the immediate surroundings. If understated, the animals might become a source of newly formed infectious strains with a pandemic potential. Special attention should be focused on pigs, because of the receptors specific for virus strains originating from different species, localized in their respiratory tract. Pigs are prone to mixed infections and may constitute a reservoir of potentially dangerous IAV strains resulting from genetic reassortment. It has been reported that a quadruple reassortant, A(H1N1)pdm09, can be easily transmitted from humans to pigs and serve as a donor of genetic segments for new strains capable of infecting humans. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a simple, cost-effective, and rapid method for evaluation of IAV genetic variability. We describe a method based on multitemperature single-strand conformational polymorphism (MSSCP), using a fragment of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene, for detection of coinfections and differentiation of genetic variants of the virus, difficult to identify by conventional diagnostic. PMID:25961024

  2. Clinical aspects of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 cases reported during the pandemic in Brazil, 2009-2010

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Érika Valeska; Luna, Expedito José de Albuquerque

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the clinical aspects of cases of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Brazil. Methods: A descriptive study of cases reported in Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação (SINAN), 2009-2010. Results: As the final classification, we obtained 53,797 (56.79%) reported cases confirmed as a new influenza virus subtype, and 40,926 (43.21%) cases discarded. Fever was the most common sign, recorded in 99.74% of the confirmed and 98.92% of the discarded cases. Among the confirmed cases, the presence of comorbidities was reported in 32.53%, and in 38.29% of the discarded cases. The case fatality rate was 4.04%; 3,267 pregnant women were confirmed positive for influenza A new viral subtype and 2,730 of them were cured. The case fatality rate of pregnant women was 6.88%. Conclusion: The findings suggested concern of the health system with pregnant women, and patients with comorbidities and quality of care may have favored a lower mortality. We recommend that, when caring for patients with severe respiratory symptoms, with comorbidities, or pregnant women, health professionals should consider the need for hospital care, as these factors make up a worse prognosis of infection by the pandemic influenza virus. PMID:26154537

  3. Model-based reconstruction of an epidemic using multiple datasets: understanding influenza A/H1N1 pandemic dynamics in Israel.

    PubMed

    Yaari, R; Katriel, G; Stone, L; Mendelson, E; Mandelboim, M; Huppert, A

    2016-03-01

    Intensified surveillance during the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic in Israel resulted in large virological and serological datasets, presenting a unique opportunity for investigating the pandemic dynamics. We employ a conditional likelihood approach for fitting a disease transmission model to virological and serological data, conditional on clinical data. The model is used to reconstruct the temporal pattern of the pandemic in Israel in five age-groups and evaluate the factors that shaped it. We estimate the reproductive number at the beginning of the pandemic to beR= 1.4. We find that the combined effect of varying absolute humidity conditions and school vacations (SVs) is responsible for the infection pattern, characterized by three epidemic waves. Overall attack rate is estimated at 32% (28-35%) with a large variation among the age-groups: the highest attack rates within school children and the lowest within the elderly. This pattern of infection is explained by a combination of the age-group contact structure and increasing immunity with age. We assess that SVs increased the overall attack rates by prolonging the pandemic into the winter. Vaccinating school children would have been the optimal strategy for minimizing infection rates in all age-groups.

  4. [Comparison of the influenza epidemics in Russia caused by the pandemic virus A(H1N1)pdm09 within the period from 2009 to 2013].

    PubMed

    Karpova, L S; Sominina, A A; Burtseva, E I; Pelikh, M Yu; Feodoritova, E L; Popovtseva, N M; Stolyarov, T P; Kiselev, O I

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the three past epidemics with the participation of the pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was conducted according to the results of the epidemiological trials of two WHO National influenza centers for the morbidity, hospitalization, and mortality of the influenza in 59 cities of Russia for the period from 2009 to 2013. The first wave of the pandemic of 2009 was the most severe. Compared with this wave, during the next epidemics of 2011 and 2013, the involvement of urban population in the epidemic was reduced, as well as the morbidity in the people 15-64 years old and schoolchildren 7-14 years old. The duration of the epidemic among the adult population, the mortality rate of the total population, and the mortality rates in all age groups were also decreased. Vice versa, the incidence in the children of preschool age and the elderly people and the duration of the epidemic among children (especially preschool children) were increased. The share of patients 65 years and older, children 0-2 years old, and patients with pathology of the cardiovascular systems among the deceased patients increased to 33.6%.

  5. [Outbreak of influenza pandemic virus A(H1N1) 2009 infections in the Emergency Department, Saint-Pierre, Réunion Island, July-September 2009].

    PubMed

    Staikowsky, F; Vanhecke, C; D'Andréa, C; Souab, A; Rakotoson, R; Michault, A

    2011-05-01

    A new H1N1 virus originating from swine recently emerged as the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century. On July 3, 2009, this new influenza A(H1N1) virus (S-OIV) of swine origins was identified in Réunion Island, a French overseas department located in the southern hemisphere. The present study describes the characteristics of the epidemic from July 3 to September 30, 2009. Among the 479 patients included in our study (236 males, 37.3 ± 19.0 years), 255 (53.2%) were reported to have comorbidities or risk factors (RF) for complications. Complications occurred in 160 patients (33.4%). The most common complications were bronchial hyperreactivity (52.7%), pneumonia (32.1%), and decompensation caused by comorbidity (17.9%). 111 patients (23.2%) required hospitalization. Patients aged 65 and over, accounted for 11.9% of all patients, 32.4% of hospitalized patients and 22.5% of complicated S-OIV infections. Regardless of age, comorbidity and/or RF were reported in 80.0% of complicated S-OIV infections and 91.0% of hospitalized patients. Recommendations for surveillance, prevention and policy for persons with RF, particularly respiratory disease, are justified. However, the absence of risk factors did not prevent the occurrence of complications, present in 14.3% of the cases.

  6. Different transmission patterns in the early stages of the influenza A(H1N1)v pandemic: a comparative analysis of 12 European countries.

    PubMed

    Flasche, Stefan; Hens, Niel; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Mossong, Joël; van Ballegooijen, W Marijn; Nunes, Baltazar; Rizzo, Caterina; Popovici, Florin; Santa-Olalla, Patricia; Hrubá, Frantiska; Parmakova, Kremena; Baguelin, Marc; van Hoek, Albert Jan; Desenclos, Jean-Claude; Bernillon, Pascale; Cámara, Amparro Larrauri; Wallinga, Jacco; Asikainen, Tommi; White, Peter J; Edmunds, W John

    2011-06-01

    Following the emergence of a novel strain of influenza A(H1N1) in Mexico and the United States in April 2009, its epidemiology in Europe during the summer was limited to sporadic and localised outbreaks. Only the United Kingdom experienced widespread transmission declining with school holidays in late July. Using statistical modelling where applicable we explored the following causes that could explain this surprising difference in transmission dynamics: extinction by chance, differences in the susceptibility profile, age distribution of the imported cases, differences in contact patterns, mitigation strategies, school holidays and weather patterns. No single factor was able to explain the differences sufficiently. Hence an additive mixed model was used to model the country-specific weekly estimates of the effective reproductive number using the extinction probability, school holidays and weather patterns as explanatory variables. The average extinction probability, its trend and the trend in absolute humidity were found to be significantly negatively correlated with the effective reproduction number - although they could only explain about 3% of the variability in the model. By comparing the initial epidemiology of influenza A (H1N1) across different European countries, our analysis was able to uncover a possible role for the timing of importations (extinction probability), mixing patterns and the absolute humidity as underlying factors. However, much uncertainty remains. With better information on the role of these epidemiological factors, the control of influenza could be improved.

  7. Persistence and avidity maturation of antibodies to A(H1N1)pdm09 in healthcare workers following repeated annual vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Eidem, Synnøve; Tete, Sarah M; Jul-Larsen, Åsne; Hoschler, Katja; Montomoli, Emanuele; Brokstad, Karl A; Cox, Rebecca J

    2015-08-07

    Healthcare workers are at increased risk of influenza infection through direct patient care, particularly during the early stages of a pandemic. Although influenza vaccination is widely recommended in Healthcare workers, data on long-term immunogenicity of vaccination in healthcare workers are lacking. The present study was designed to assess the persistence of the humoral response after pandemic vaccination as well as the impact of repeated annual vaccination in healthcare workers (n=24). Pandemic influenza vaccination resulted in a significant increase in haemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers with 93-100% of subjects achieving protective titers 21-days post each of the three annual vaccinations. Seroprotective antibodies measured by HI, microneutralization and single radial hemolysis assays were present in 77-94% of healthcare workers 6 months post-vaccination. Repeated vaccination resulted in an increased duration of seroprotective antibodies with seroprotective titers increasing from 35-62% 12 months after 2009 pandemic vaccination to 50-75% 12 months after 2010 vaccination. Furthermore, repeated annual vaccination augmented the avidity of influenza-specific IgG antibodies. In conclusion, we have shown that A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination induces high seroprotective titers that persist for at least 6 months. We demonstrate that repeated vaccination is beneficial to healthcare workers and results in further avidity maturation of vaccine-induced antibodies.

  8. Identification of Low- and High-Impact Hemagglutinin Amino Acid Substitutions That Drive Antigenic Drift of Influenza A(H1N1) Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, William T.; Benton, Donald J.; Gregory, Victoria; Hall, James P. J.; Daniels, Rodney S.; Bedford, Trevor; Haydon, Daniel T.; Hay, Alan J.; McCauley, John W.; Reeve, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Determining phenotype from genetic data is a fundamental challenge. Identification of emerging antigenic variants among circulating influenza viruses is critical to the vaccine virus selection process, with vaccine effectiveness maximized when constituents are antigenically similar to circulating viruses. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay data are commonly used to assess influenza antigenicity. Here, sequence and 3-D structural information of hemagglutinin (HA) glycoproteins were analyzed together with corresponding HI assay data for former seasonal influenza A(H1N1) virus isolates (1997–2009) and reference viruses. The models developed identify and quantify the impact of eighteen amino acid substitutions on the antigenicity of HA, two of which were responsible for major transitions in antigenic phenotype. We used reverse genetics to demonstrate the causal effect on antigenicity for a subset of these substitutions. Information on the impact of substitutions allowed us to predict antigenic phenotypes of emerging viruses directly from HA gene sequence data and accuracy was doubled by including all substitutions causing antigenic changes over a model incorporating only the substitutions with the largest impact. The ability to quantify the phenotypic impact of specific amino acid substitutions should help refine emerging techniques that predict the evolution of virus populations from one year to the next, leading to stronger theoretical foundations for selection of candidate vaccine viruses. These techniques have great potential to be extended to other antigenically variable pathogens. PMID:27057693

  9. Utility of the first few100 approach during the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To guide policy and control measures, decent scientific data are needed for a comprehensive assessment of epidemiological, clinical and virological characteristics of the First Few hundred (FF100) cases. We discuss the feasibility of the FF100 approach during the 2009 pandemic and the added value compared with alternative data sources available. Methods The pandemic preparedness plan enabled us to perform a case–control study, assessing patient characteristics and risk factors for experiencing symptomatic influenza A(H1N1)2009 infection and providing insight into transmission. We assessed to what extent timely and novel data were generated compared to other available data sources. Results In May-December 2009, a total of 68 cases and 48 controls were included in the study. Underlying non-respiratory diseases were significantly more common among cases compared to controls, while a protective effect was found for frequent hand washing. Seroconversion was found for 7/30 controls (23%), and persisting high titers for 4/30 controls (13%). The labour-intensive study design resulted in slow and restricted recruitment. Conclusions The findings of our case–control study gave new insights in transmission risks and possible interventions for improved control. Nevertheless, the FF100 approach lacked timeliness and power due to limited recruitment. For future pandemics we suggest pooling data from several countries, to enable collecting sufficient data in a relatively short period. PMID:22995284

  10. Risk perception and information-seeking behaviour during the 2009/10 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic in Germany.

    PubMed

    Walter, D; Bohmer, Mm; Reiter, S; Krause, G; Wichmann, O

    2012-03-29

    During the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic in 2009/10, a total of 13 consecutive surveys were carried out of the general population in Germany to monitor knowledge, attitude and behaviour concerning the disease and vaccination against pandemic influenza in real time. In total, 13,010 persons aged 14 years or older were interviewed by computer-assisted telephone techniques between November 2009 and April 2010. During the peak of the pandemic, only 18% of participants stated that they perceived the risk of pandemic influenza as high; this proportion fell to 10% in January 2010. There was a significant difference in information-seeking behaviour among population subgroups concerning the disease and vaccine uptake. However, in all subgroups, conventional media sources such as television, radio and newspapers were more frequently used than the Internet. While the majority of participants (78%) felt sufficiently informed to make a decision for or against vaccination, overall vaccination coverage remained low. Among those who decided against vaccination, fear of adverse events and perception that the available vaccines were not sufficiently evaluated were the most frequently stated reasons. Such mistrust in the vaccines and the perceived low risk of the disease were the main barriers that contributed to the low vaccination coverage in Germany during the pandemic.

  11. Screening of Random Peptide Library of Hemagglutinin from Pandemic 2009 A(H1N1) Influenza Virus Reveals Unexpected Antigenically Important Regions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wanghui; Han, Lu; Lin, Zhanglin

    2011-01-01

    The antigenic structure of the membrane protein hemagglutinin (HA) from the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus was dissected with a high-throughput screening method using complex antisera. The approach involves generating yeast cell libraries displaying a pool of random peptides of controllable lengths on the cell surface, followed by one round of fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) against antisera from mouse, goat and human, respectively. The amino acid residue frequency appearing in the antigenic peptides at both the primary sequence and structural level was determined and used to identify “hot spots” or antigenically important regions. Unexpectedly, different antigenic structures were seen for different antisera. Moreover, five antigenic regions were identified, of which all but one are located in the conserved HA stem region that is responsible for membrane fusion. Our findings are corroborated by several recent studies on cross-neutralizing H1 subtype antibodies that recognize the HA stem region. The antigenic peptides identified may provide clues for creating peptide vaccines with better accessibility to memory B cells and better induction of cross-neutralizing antibodies than the whole HA protein. The scheme used in this study enables a direct mapping of the antigenic regions of viral proteins recognized by antisera, and may be useful for dissecting the antigenic structures of other viral proteins. PMID:21437206

  12. Improving the Evidence Base for Decision Making During a Pandemic: The Example of 2009 Influenza A/H1N1

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, Lyn; Heffernan, Richard T.; Leung, Gabriel M.; Redd, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    This article synthesizes and extends discussions held during an international meeting on “Surveillance for Decision Making: The Example of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A/H1N1,” held at the Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics (CCDD), Harvard School of Public Health, on June 14 and 15, 2010. The meeting involved local, national, and global health authorities and academics representing 7 countries on 4 continents. We define the needs for surveillance in terms of the key decisions that must be made in response to a pandemic: how large a response to mount and which control measures to implement, for whom, and when. In doing so, we specify the quantitative evidence required to make informed decisions. We then describe the sources of surveillance and other population-based data that can presently—or in the future—form the basis for such evidence, and the interpretive tools needed to process raw surveillance data. We describe other inputs to decision making besides epidemiologic and surveillance data, and we conclude with key lessons of the 2009 pandemic for designing and planning surveillance in the future. PMID:21612363

  13. Genetic suppression reveals DNA repair-independent antagonism between BRCA1 and COBRA1 in mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sreejith J; Zhang, Xiaowen; Chiang, Huai-Chin; Jahid, Md Jamiul; Wang, Yao; Garza, Paula; April, Craig; Salathia, Neeraj; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Alenazi, Fahad S; Ruan, Jianhua; Fan, Jian-Bing; Parvin, Jeffrey D; Jin, Victor X; Hu, Yanfen; Li, Rong

    2016-03-04

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 is well known for its function in double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair. While BRCA1 is also implicated in transcriptional regulation, the physiological significance remains unclear. COBRA1 (also known as NELF-B) is a BRCA1-binding protein that regulates RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) pausing and transcription elongation. Here we interrogate functional interaction between BRCA1 and COBRA1 during mouse mammary gland development. Tissue-specific deletion of Cobra1 reduces mammary epithelial compartments and blocks ductal morphogenesis, alveologenesis and lactogenesis, demonstrating a pivotal role of COBRA1 in adult tissue development. Remarkably, these developmental deficiencies due to Cobra1 knockout are largely rescued by additional loss of full-length Brca1. Furthermore, Brca1/Cobra1 double knockout restores developmental transcription at puberty, alters luminal epithelial homoeostasis, yet remains deficient in homologous recombination-based DSB repair. Thus our genetic suppression analysis uncovers a previously unappreciated, DNA repair-independent function of BRCA1 in antagonizing COBRA1-dependent transcription programme during mammary gland development.

  14. Narcolepsy, 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic influenza, and pandemic influenza vaccinations: what is known and unknown about the neurological disorder, the role for autoimmunity, and vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S Sohail; Schur, Peter H; MacDonald, Noni E; Steinman, Lawrence

    2014-05-01

    The vaccine safety surveillance system effectively detected a very rare adverse event, narcolepsy, in subjects receiving AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine made using the European inactivation/purification protocol. The reports of increased cases of narcolepsy in non-vaccinated subjects infected with wild A(H1N1) pandemic influenza virus suggest a role for the viral antigen(s) in disease development. However, additional investigations are needed to better understand what factor(s) in wild influenza infection trigger(s) narcolepsy in susceptible hosts. An estimated 31 million doses of European AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine were used in more than 47 countries. The Canadian AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine was used with high coverage in Canada where an estimated 12 million doses were administered. As no similar narcolepsy association has been reported to date with the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine made using the Canadian inactivation/purification protocol, this suggests that the AS03 adjuvant alone may not be responsible for the narcolepsy association. To date, no narcolepsy association has been reported with the MF59®-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine. This review article provides a brief background on narcolepsy, outlines the different types of vaccine preparations including the ones for influenza, reviews the accumulated evidence for the safety of adjuvants, and explores the association between autoimmune diseases and natural infections. It concludes by assimilating the historical observations and recent clinical studies to formulate a feasible hypothesis on why vaccine-associated narcolepsy may not be solely linked to the AS03 adjuvant but more likely be linked to how the specific influenza antigen component of the European AS03-adjuvanted pandemic vaccine was prepared. Careful and long-term epidemiological studies of subjects who developed narcolepsy in association with AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine prepared with the European inactivation/purification protocol are needed.

  15. Pneumatic boot for helicopter rotor deicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaha, B. J.; Evanich, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    Pneumatic deicer boots for helicopter rotor blades were tested. The tests were conducted in the 6 by 9 ft icing research tunnel on a stationary section of a UH-IH helicopter main rotor blade. The boots were effective in removing ice and in reducing aerodynamic drag due to ice.

  16. Study of Helicopter Roll Control Effectiveness Criteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    variety of helicopter configurations and control system types , and a wide range of flight tasks and maneuvers. The basis of the experimental design...represent a wide range of basic helicopter rotor hub and airframe designs and flight control system types . It was intended to generally limit

  17. Neural Network Based Helicopter Low Airspeed Indicator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-24

    This invention relates generally to virtual sensors and, more particularly, to a means and method utilizing a neural network for estimating...helicopter airspeed at speeds below about 50 knots using only fixed system parameters (i.e., parameters measured or determined in a reference frame fixed relative to the helicopter fuselage) as inputs to the neural network .

  18. 46 CFR 109.577 - Helicopter fueling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Helicopter fueling. 109.577 Section 109.577 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.577 Helicopter fueling. (a) The master or person in charge shall designate persons...

  19. 46 CFR 109.577 - Helicopter fueling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Helicopter fueling. 109.577 Section 109.577 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.577 Helicopter fueling. (a) The master or person in charge shall designate persons...

  20. 46 CFR 109.577 - Helicopter fueling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Helicopter fueling. 109.577 Section 109.577 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.577 Helicopter fueling. (a) The master or person in charge shall designate persons...

  1. 46 CFR 109.577 - Helicopter fueling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Helicopter fueling. 109.577 Section 109.577 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.577 Helicopter fueling. (a) The master or person in charge shall designate persons...

  2. 46 CFR 109.577 - Helicopter fueling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Helicopter fueling. 109.577 Section 109.577 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.577 Helicopter fueling. (a) The master or person in charge shall designate persons...

  3. Note on Hovering Turns with Tandem Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, John P; Tapscott, Robert J

    1955-01-01

    The source of an appreciable pitching-moment difference between left and right hovering turns for a tandem helicopter is described. The difference in pitching moment results from the difference in rotational speed of the counter rotating rotors with respect to the air while the helicopter is turning.

  4. NASA helicopter transmission system technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E. V.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the NASA Helicopter Transmission System Technology Program is to improve specific mechanical components and the technology for combining these into advanced drive systems to make helicopters more viable and cost competitive for commerical applications. The history, goals, and elements of the program are discussed.

  5. Helicopter Operations and Personnel Safety (Helirescue Manual). Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalle-Molle, John

    The illustrated manual includes information on various aspects of helicopter rescue missions, including mission management roles for key personnel, safety rules around helicopters, requests for helicopter support, sample military air support forms, selection of landing zones, helicopter evacuations, rescuer delivery, passenger unloading, crash…

  6. Thermal ramp tritium release in COBRA-1A2 C03 beryllium pebbles

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.L.

    1998-03-01

    Tritium release kinetics, using the method of thermal ramp heating at three linear ramp rates, were measured on the COBRA-1A2 C03 1-mm beryllium pebbles. This report includes a brief discussion of the test, and the test data in graph format.

  7. DOSE -RESPONSE RELATIONSHIP OF CRUDE COBRA VENOM (NAJA JANA) IN THE DOG

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The study was conducted to determine the dose - response effects of crude cobra venom (Naja naja) in the anesthetized dog. It was concluded that the LD50 is about 0.105 mg/kg, and the LD99 is 0.148 mg/kg.

  8. From the Kiss of a Cobra: A Sidelong View of Snakebite, Antivenin, and Serum Sickness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Douglas H.

    1992-01-01

    Article tells the story of how a New York City customs man was bit by a King Cobra from Thailand and the medical treatment he received. Describes three types of snake venoms: hemotoxins, cytotoxins, and neurotoxins. Explains how horses are used to produce antitoxins and side effects of the antitoxins on humans. (PR)

  9. Cloning and purification of alpha-neurotoxins from king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah).

    PubMed

    He, Ying-Ying; Lee, Wei-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2004-09-01

    Thirteen complete and three partial cDNA sequences were cloned from the constructed king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom gland cDNA library. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences of king cobra with those from other snake venoms revealed that obtained cDNAs are highly homologous to snake venom alpha-neurotoxins. Alignment of deduced mature peptide sequences of the obtained clones with those of other reported alpha-neurotoxins from the king cobra venom indicates that our obtained 16 clones belong to long-chain neurotoxins (seven), short-chain neurotoxins (seven), weak toxin (one) and variant (one), respectively. Up to now, two out of 16 newly cloned king cobra alpha-neurotoxins have identical amino acid sequences with CM-11 and Oh-6A/6B, which have been characterized from the same venom. Furthermore, five long-chain alpha-neurotoxins and two short-chain alpha-neurotoxins were purified from crude venom and their N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined. The cDNAs encoding the putative precursors of the purified native peptide were also determined based on the N-terminal amino acid sequencing. The purified alpha-neurotoxins showed different lethal activities on mice.

  10. Complete Assignment of (1)H-NMR Resonances of the King Cobra Neurotoxin CM-11.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu-Xi; Liu, Wei-Dong; Liu, Ai-Zhuo; Pei, Feng-Kui

    1997-01-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus Hannah) neurotoxin CM-Il is long-chain peptide with 72 amino acid residues. Its complete assignment of (1)H-NMR resonances was obtained using various 2D-NMR technologies, including DQF-COSY, clean-TOCSY and NOESY.

  11. Spitting cobras: fluid jets in nature as models for technical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmert, Alexander; Hess, David; Brücker, Christoph; Bleckmann, Horst; Westhoff, Guido

    2011-04-01

    Spitting cobras defend themselves by ejecting rapid jets of venom through their fangs towards the face of an offender. To generate these jets, the venom delivery system of spitting cobras has some unique adaptations, such as prominent ridges on the surface of the venom channel. We examined the fluid acceleration mechanisms in three spitting cobra species of the genus Naja. To investigate the liquid-flow through the venom channel we built a three-dimensional 60:1 scale model. First we determined the three-dimensional structure of the channel by using microcomputer tomography. With help of the micro computer tomographical data we then created a negative form out of wax. Finally, silicon was casted around the wax form and the wax removed, resulting in a completely transparent model of the cobrás venom channel. The physical-chemical properties of the cobra venom were measured by micro rheometry and tensiometry. Thereafter, an artificial fluid with similar properties was generated. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was performed to visualize the flow of the artificial liquid in the three-dimensional model. Our experiments show how the surface structure of the venom channel determines the liquid flow through the channel and ultimately the form of the liquid jet. Understanding the biological mechanisms of venom ejection helps to enhance industrial processes such as water jet cutting and cleaning as well as injection methods in technical and medical sectors, e.g. liquid microjet dissection in microsurgery.

  12. 75 FR 16841 - Proposed Extension of Information Collection Request Submitted for Public Comment; COBRA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... for health care continuation coverage. On December 19, 2009, President Obama signed the Department of... revision of the information collection provisions of its final rule at 29 CFR part 2590, Health Care... access to health care. COBRA provides the Secretary of Labor (the Secretary) with authority under...

  13. Influenza A Viruses of Swine (IAV-S) in Vietnam from 2010 to 2015: Multiple Introductions of A(H1N1)pdm09 Viruses into the Pig Population and Diversifying Genetic Constellations of Enzootic IAV-S.

    PubMed

    Takemae, Nobuhiro; Harada, Michiyo; Nguyen, Phuong Thanh; Nguyen, Tung; Nguyen, Tien Ngoc; To, Thanh Long; Nguyen, Tho Dang; Pham, Vu Phong; Le, Vu Tri; Do, Hoa Thi; Vo, Hung Van; Le, Quang Vinh Tin; Tran, Tan Minh; Nguyen, Thanh Duy; Thai, Phuong Duy; Nguyen, Dang Hoang; Le, Anh Quynh Thi; Nguyen, Diep Thi; Uchida, Yuko; Saito, Takehiko

    2017-01-01

    Active surveillance of influenza A viruses of swine (IAV-S) involving 262 farms and 10 slaughterhouses in seven provinces in northern and southern Vietnam from 2010 to 2015 yielded 388 isolates from 32 farms; these viruses were classified into H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 subtypes. Whole-genome sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolates represented 15 genotypes, according to the genetic constellation of the eight segments. All of the H1N1 viruses were entirely A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, whereas all of the H1N2 and H3N2 viruses were reassortants among 5 distinct ancestral viruses: H1 and H3 triple-reassortant (TR) IAV-S that originated from North American pre-2009 human seasonal H1, human seasonal H3N2, and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Notably, 93% of the reassortant IAV-S retained M genes that were derived from A(H1N1)pdm09, suggesting some advantage in terms of their host adaptation. Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis revealed that multiple introductions of A(H1N1)pdm09 and TR IAV-S into the Vietnamese pig population have driven the genetic diversity of currently circulating Vietnamese IAV-S. In addition, our results indicate that a reassortant IAV-S with human-like H3 and N2 genes and an A(H1N1)pdm09 origin M gene likely caused a human case in Ho Chi Minh City in 2010. Our current findings indicate that human-to-pig transmission as well as cocirculation of different IAV-S have contributed to diversifying the gene constellations of IAV-S in Vietnam.

  14. Pandemic vaccination strategies and influenza severe outcomes during the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic and the post-pandemic influenza season: the Nordic experience.

    PubMed

    Gil Cuesta, Julita; Aavitsland, Preben; Englund, Hélène; Gudlaugsson, Ólafur; Hauge, Siri Helene; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Sigmundsdóttir, Guðrún; Tegnell, Anders; Virtanen, Mikko; Krause, Tyra Grove

    2016-04-21

    During the 2009/10 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic, the five Nordic countries adopted different approaches to pandemic vaccination. We compared pandemic vaccination strategies and severe influenza outcomes, in seasons 2009/10 and 2010/11 in these countries with similar influenza surveillance systems. We calculated the cumulative pandemic vaccination coverage in 2009/10 and cumulative incidence rates of laboratory confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 infections, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and deaths in 2009/10 and 2010/11. We estimated incidence risk ratios (IRR) in a Poisson regression model to compare those indicators between Denmark and the other countries. The vaccination coverage was lower in Denmark (6.1%) compared with Finland (48.2%), Iceland (44.1%), Norway (41.3%) and Sweden (60.0%). In 2009/10 Denmark had a similar cumulative incidence of A(H1N1)pdm09 ICU admissions and deaths compared with the other countries. In 2010/11 Denmark had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of A(H1N1)pdm09 ICU admissions (IRR: 2.4; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.9-3.0) and deaths (IRR: 8.3; 95% CI: 5.1-13.5). Compared with Denmark, the other countries had higher pandemic vaccination coverage and experienced less A(H1N1)pdm09-related severe outcomes in 2010/11. Pandemic vaccination may have had an impact on severe influenza outcomes in the post-pandemic season. Surveillance of severe outcomes may be used to compare the impact of influenza between seasons and support different vaccination strategies.

  15. The Helicopter Antenna Radiation Prediction Code (HARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klevenow, F. T.; Lynch, B. G.; Newman, E. H.; Rojas, R. G.; Scheick, J. T.; Shamansky, H. T.; Sze, K. Y.

    1990-01-01

    The first nine months effort in the development of a user oriented computer code, referred to as the HARP code, for analyzing the radiation from helicopter antennas is described. The HARP code uses modern computer graphics to aid in the description and display of the helicopter geometry. At low frequencies the helicopter is modeled by polygonal plates, and the method of moments is used to compute the desired patterns. At high frequencies the helicopter is modeled by a composite ellipsoid and flat plates, and computations are made using the geometrical theory of diffraction. The HARP code will provide a user friendly interface, employing modern computer graphics, to aid the user to describe the helicopter geometry, select the method of computation, construct the desired high or low frequency model, and display the results.

  16. Hematology and serum biochemistry of Indian spectacled cobra (Naja naja) and Indian rat snake (Ptyas mucosa)

    PubMed Central

    Muliya, Sanath Krishna; Bhat, Mudraje Narayana

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the hematology and serum biochemistry parameters of Indian spectacled cobra (Naja naja) and Indian rat snake (Ptyas mucosa) and to evaluate the differences in the same between captive and wild populations. Materials and Methods: Animals were categorized into four groups, viz., wild Indian spectacled cobra (n=10), wild Indian rat snakes (n=10), captive Indian spectacled cobra (n=10), and captive Indian rat snake (n=10). The snakes were restrained with restraint tubes, and 2 ml of blood was collected from either heart or ventral coccygeal vein. Hematological examinations were performed manually and serum biochemistry assays were performed on semi-automated clinical chemistry analyzer. Results: The values of total erythrocyte count, packed cell volume, and hemoglobin were slightly low in captive spectacled cobras and captive rat snakes compared to wild ones, whereas total leukocyte count was found to be slightly high in wild spectacled cobras compared to captive ones. All the recorded values of biochemical and electrolyte analytes were found to be well within expected range for snakes except for total protein and chloride levels in both the species which was slightly above the expected range. Conclusion: The hematology and serum biochemistry intervals of the two most common Indian snakes are presented here. The data will be useful in routine health evaluations and aiding in better medical management of the species studied. Since this study is the first to report complete hematologic and blood biochemical ranges for the study species, observations made here can also be used as referral intervals for future use. PMID:27651683

  17. An evaluation of helicopter noise and vibration ride qualities criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, C. E.; Hollenbaugh, D. D.; Clevenson, S. A.; Leatherwood, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Two methods of quantifying helicopter ride quality; absorbed power for vibration only and the NASA ride comfort model for both noise and vibration are discussed. Noise and vibration measurements were obtained on five operational US Army helicopters. The data were converted to both absorbed power and DISC's (discomfort units used in the NASA model) for specific helicopter flight conditions. Both models indicate considerable variation in ride quality between the five helicopters and between flight conditions within each helicopter.

  18. The impact of urban operations on helicopter noise requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spector, S. R.

    1978-01-01

    The interrelationship of urban helicopter operations, helicopter noise, and the establishment of urban public-use heliports is discussed. Public resistance to urban helicopter operations due to concern for safety and noise is shown to negatively impact the establishment of public-use heliports in urban centers. It is indicated that increased government and industry effort to reduce helicopter noise is needed to ensure continued growth in the helicopter industry.

  19. An Evaluation of Community Assessment Tools (CATs) in Predicting Use of Clinical Interventions and Severe Outcomes during the A(H1N1)pdm09 Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Karl G.; Lim, Wei Shen; Read, Robert C.; Taylor, Bruce L.; Brett, Stephen J.; Openshaw, Peter J. M.; Enstone, Joanne E.; McMenamin, James; Bannister, Barbara; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S.

    2013-01-01

    During severe influenza pandemics healthcare demand can exceed clinical capacity to provide normal standards of care. Community Assessment Tools (CATs) could provide a framework for triage decisions for hospital referral and admission. CATs have been developed based on evidence that supports the recognition of severe influenza and pneumonia in the community (including resource limited settings) for adults, children and infants, and serious feverish illness in children. CATs use six objective criteria and one subjective criterion, any one or more of which should prompt urgent referral and admission to hospital. A retrospective evaluation of the ability of CATs to predict use of hospital-based interventions and patient outcomes in a pandemic was made using the first recorded routine clinical assessment on or shortly after admission from 1520 unselected patients (800 female, 480 children <16 years) admitted with PCR confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 infection (the FLU-CIN cohort). Outcome measures included: any use of supplemental oxygen; mechanical ventilation; intravenous antibiotics; length of stay; intensive or high dependency care; death; and “severe outcome” (combined: use of intensive or high dependency care or death during admission). Unadjusted and multivariable analyses were conducted for children (age <16 years) and adults. Each CATs criterion independently identified both use of clinical interventions that would in normal circumstances only be provided in hospital and patient outcome measures. “Peripheral oxygen saturation ≤92% breathing air, or being on oxygen” performed well in predicting use of resources and outcomes for both adults and children; supporting routine measurement of peripheral oxygen saturation when assessing severity of disease. In multivariable analyses the single subjective criterion in CATs “other cause for clinical concern” independently predicted death in children and in adults predicted length of stay, mechanical ventilation and “severe outcome”; supporting the role of clinical acumen as an important independent predictor of serious illness. PMID:24069409

  20. The environmental deposition of influenza virus from patients infected with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09: Implications for infection prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Killingley, Benjamin; Greatorex, Jane; Digard, Paul; Wise, Helen; Garcia, Fayna; Varsani, Harsha; Cauchemez, Simon; Enstone, Joanne E; Hayward, Andrew; Curran, Martin D; Read, Robert C; Lim, Wei S; Nicholson, Karl G; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S

    2016-01-01

    In a multi-center, prospective, observational study over two influenza seasons, we sought to quantify and correlate the amount of virus recovered from the nares of infected subjects with that recovered from their immediate environment in community and hospital settings. We recorded the symptoms of adults and children with A(H1N1)pdm09 infection, took nasal swabs, and sampled touched surfaces and room air. Forty-two infected subjects were followed up. The mean duration of virus shedding was 6.2 days by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) and 4.2 days by culture. Surface swabs were collected from 39 settings; 16 (41%) subject locations were contaminated with virus. Overall, 33 of the 671 (4.9%) surface swabs were PCR positive for influenza, of which two (0.3%) yielded viable virus. On illness Day 3, subjects yielding positive surface samples had significantly higher nasal viral loads (geometric mean ratio 25.7; 95% CI 1.75, 376.0, p=0.021) and a positive correlation (r=0.47, p=0.006) was observed between subject nasal viral loads and viral loads recovered from the surfaces around them. Room air was sampled in the vicinity of 12 subjects, and PCR positive samples were obtained for five (42%) samples. Influenza virus shed by infected subjects did not detectably contaminate the vast majority of surfaces sampled. We question the relative importance of the indirect contact transmission of influenza via surfaces, though our data support the existence of super-spreaders via this route. The air sampling results add to the accumulating evidence that supports the potential for droplet nuclei (aerosol) transmission of influenza.

  1. Predictors of clinical outcome in a national hospitalised cohort across both waves of the influenza A/H1N1 pandemic 2009–2010 in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Myles, Puja R; Semple, Malcolm G; Lim, Wei Shen; Openshaw, Peter J M; Gadd, Elaine M; Read, Robert C; Taylor, Bruce L; Brett, Stephen J; McMenamin, James; Enstone, Joanne E; Armstrong, Colin; Bannister, Barbara; Nicholson, Karl G

    2012-01-01

    Background Although generally mild, the 2009–2010 influenza A/H1N1 pandemic caused two major surges in hospital admissions in the UK. The characteristics of patients admitted during successive waves are described. Methods Data were systematically obtained on 1520 patients admitted to 75 UK hospitals between May 2009 and January 2010. Multivariable analyses identified factors predictive of severe outcome. Results Patients aged 5–54 years were over-represented compared with winter seasonal admissions for acute respiratory infection, as were non-white ethnic groups (first wave only). In the second wave patients were less likely to be school age than in the first wave, but their condition was more likely to be severe on presentation to hospital and they were more likely to have delayed admission. Overall, 45% had comorbid conditions, 16.5% required high dependency (level 2) or critical (level 3) care and 5.3% died. As in 1918–1919, the likelihood of severe outcome by age followed a W-shaped distribution. Pre-admission antiviral drug use decreased from 13.3% to 10% between the first and second waves (p=0.048), while antibiotic prescribing increased from 13.6% to 21.6% (p<0.001). Independent predictors of severe outcome were age 55–64 years, chronic lung disease (non-asthma, non-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), neurological disease, recorded obesity, delayed admission (≥5 days after illness onset), pneumonia, C-reactive protein ≥100 mg/litre, and the need for supplemental oxygen or intravenous fluid replacement on admission. Conclusions There were demographic, ethnic and clinical differences between patients admitted with pandemic H1N1 infection and those hospitalised during seasonal influenza activity. Despite national policies favouring use of antiviral drugs, few patients received these before admission and many were given antibiotics. PMID:22407890

  2. Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease does not interfere with the adaptive immune response following challenge with pandemic A/H1N1 2009.

    PubMed

    Gauger, Phillip C; Loving, Crystal L; Lager, Kelly M; Janke, Bruce H; Kehrli, Marcus E; Roth, James A; Vincent, Amy L

    2013-10-01

    The implications of sequential prime and challenge with mismatched influenza A viruses is a concern in mammals, including humans. We evaluated the ability of pigs affected with vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) to generate a humoral immune response against the heterologous challenge virus inciting the VAERD. Vaccinated and challenged (V/C) pigs were administered an inactivated swine δ-cluster H1N2 (MN08) vaccine with an HA similar to pre-2009 seasonal human viruses and challenged with heterologous A(H1N1) pandemic 2009 (H1N1pdm09). Vaccination induced MN08-specific hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody but not cross-reacting H1N1pdm09 HI antibody. However, vaccinated pigs demonstrated significantly higher post-challenge anti-H1N1pdm09 serum neutralizing (SN) antibodies at 14 and 21 days post inoculation (dpi) compared to nonvaccinated, challenged pigs (NV/C), indicating a priming effect of the vaccine. Serum and lung whole virus anti-H1N1pdm09 IgG ELISA antibodies in the vaccinated group were significantly higher than the challenge only pigs at all-time points evaluated. Lung IgA ELISA antibodies to both antigens were detected at 2, 5, and 21 dpi in vaccine-primed pigs, contrasted against mucosal ELISA antibody responses detected only at 21 dpi in the naïve-challenged group. Collectively, vaccine-primed pigs demonstrated a robust humoral immune response and elevated local adaptive cytokine levels, indicating VAERD does not adversely affect the induction of an immune response to challenge with heterologous virus despite the severe clinical disease and underlying lung pathology. Thus, original antigenic sin does not appear to be a component of VAERD.

  3. Personal Decision-Making Criteria Related to Seasonal and Pandemic A(H1N1) Influenza-Vaccination Acceptance among French Healthcare Workers

    PubMed Central

    Bouadma, Lila; Barbier, François; Biard, Lucie; Esposito-Farèse, Marina; Le Corre, Bertrand; Macrez, Annick; Salomon, Laurence; Bonnal, Christine; Zanker, Caroline; Najem, Christophe; Mourvillier, Bruno; Lucet, Jean Christophe; Régnier, Bernard; Wolff, Michel; Tubach, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Background Influenza-vaccination rates among healthcare workers (HCW) remain low worldwide, even during the 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic. In France, this vaccination is free but administered on a voluntary basis. We investigated the factors influencing HCW influenza vaccination. Methods In June–July 2010, HCW from wards of five French hospitals completed a cross-sectional survey. A multifaceted campaign aimed at improving vaccination coverage in this hospital group was conducted before and during the 2009 pandemic. Using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire, we assessed the relationships between seasonal (SIV) and pandemic (PIV) influenza vaccinations, and sociodemographic and professional characteristics, previous and current vaccination statuses, and 33 statements investigating 10 sociocognitive domains. The sociocognitive domains describing HCWs' SIV and PIV profiles were analyzed using the classification-and-regression–tree method. Results Of the HCWs responding to our survey, 1480 were paramedical and 401 were medical with 2009 vaccination rates of 30% and 58% for SIV and 21% and 71% for PIV, respectively (p<0.0001 for both SIV and PIV vaccinations). Older age, prior SIV, working in emergency departments or intensive care units, being a medical HCW and the hospital they worked in were associated with both vaccinations; while work shift was associated only with PIV. Sociocognitive domains associated with both vaccinations were self-perception of benefits and health motivation for all HCW. For medical HCW, being a role model was an additional domain associated with SIV and PIV. Conclusions Both vaccination rates remained low. Vaccination mainly depended on self-determined factors and for medical HCW, being a role model. PMID:22848342

  4. Risk Factors for Death from Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, State of São Paulo, Brazil, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Ana Freitas; Pellini, Alessandra Cristina Guedes; Kitagawa, Beatriz Yuko; Marques, Daniel; Madalosso, Geraldine; de Cassia Nogueira Figueira, Gerrita; Fred, João; Albernaz, Ricardo Kerti Mangabeira; Carvalhanas, Telma Regina Marques Pinto; Zanetta, Dirce Maria Trevisan

    2015-01-01

    This case-control study aimed to assess the risk factors for death from influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in patients with laboratory confirmation, who had severe acute respiratory illness-SARI and were hospitalized between June 28th and August 29th 2009, in the metropolitan regions of São Paulo and Campinas, Brazil. Medical charts of all the 193 patients who died (cases) and the 386 randomly selected patients who recovered (controls) were investigated in 177 hospitals. Household interviews were conducted with those who had survived and the closest relative of those who had died. 73.6% of cases and 38.1% of controls were at risk of developing influenza-related complications. The 18-to-59-year age group (OR = 2.31, 95%CI: 1.31–4.10 (reference up to 18 years of age)), presence of risk conditions for severity of influenza (OR = 1.99, 95%CI: 1.11–3.57, if one or OR = 6.05, 95%CI: 2.76–13.28, if more than one), obesity (OR = 2.73, 95%CI: 1.28–5.83), immunosuppression (OR = 3.43, 95%CI: 1.28–9.19), and search for previous care associated with the hospitalization (OR = 3.35, 95%CI: 1.75–6.40) were risk factors for death. Antiviral treatment performed within 72 hours of the onset of symptoms (OR = 0.17, 95%CI: 0.08–0.37, if within 48hours, and OR = 0.30, 95%CI: 0.11–0.81, if between 48 and 72 hours) was protective against death. The identification of high-risk patients and early treatment are important factors for reducing morbi-mortality from influenza. PMID:25774804

  5. Helicopter flight control compensator design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaici, Malika; Hariche, Kamel; Clarke, Tim

    2017-01-01

    In a precedent paper a design process is described to achieve eigenstructure assignment using block poles. Systems described in state space equations are transformed to systems in matrix fractions description (MFD) and its desired eigenstructure is transformed to a desired latent structure, which is used to construct desired block poles. In this paper, the proposed design method is applied for attitude stabilization of a Lynx helicopter in hover. An input-output feedback configuration has been chosen for more generality, and to validate the results the output responses are compared to state and output feedback control responses.

  6. Special opportunities in helicopter aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccroskey, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Aerodynamic research relating to modern helicopters includes the study of three dimensional, unsteady, nonlinear flow fields. A selective review is made of some of the phenomenon that hamper the development of satisfactory engineering prediction techniques, but which provides a rich source of research opportunities: flow separations, compressibility effects, complex vortical wakes, and aerodynamic interference between components. Several examples of work in progress are given, including dynamic stall alleviation, the development of computational methods for transonic flow, rotor-wake predictions, and blade-vortex interactions.

  7. Advanced helicopter cockpit and control configurations for helicopter combat missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, Loran A.; Atencio, Adolph, Jr.; Bivens, Courtland; Shively, Robert; Delgado, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Two piloted simulations were conducted by the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate to evaluate workload and helicopter-handling qualities requirements for single pilot operation in a combat Nap-of-the-Earth environment. The single-pilot advanced cockpit engineering simulation (SPACES) investigations were performed on the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator, using the Advanced Digital Optical Control System control laws and an advanced concepts glass cockpit. The first simulation (SPACES I) compared single pilot to dual crewmember operation for the same flight tasks to determine differences between dual and single ratings, and to discover which control laws enabled adequate single-pilot helicopter operation. The SPACES II simulation concentrated on single-pilot operations and use of control laws thought to be viable candidates for single pilot operations workload. Measures detected significant differences between single-pilot task segments. Control system configurations were task dependent, demonstrating a need for inflight reconfigurable control system to match the optimal control system with the required task.

  8. Wind tunnel investigation of helicopter-rotor wake effects on three helicopter fuselage models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Mineck, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of rotor wake on helicopter fuselage aerodynamic characteristics were investigated in the Langley V/STOL tunnel. Force, moment, and pressure data were obtained on three fuselage models at various combinations of windspeed, sideslip angle, and pitch angle. The data show that the influence of rotor wake on the helicopter fuselage yawing moment imposes a significant additional thrust requirement on the tail rotor of a single-rotor helicopter at high sideslip angles.

  9. Tourniquet Application after Cobra Bite: Delay in the Onset of Neurotoxicity and the Dangers of Sudden Release

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Poisonous snakebite treatment the monocellate Thai cobra (Naja kaouthia). in the United States. JAMA, 240: 654-656. Am A Trop. Med Hui.. 35: 173-181...198 1. First. aid treatment of poisonous snake- 3. Virava, C., Veeravat, U., Warill, M. J., Theak- bie Are currently recommended procedures sam, R...respiratory paralysis caused by cobra Luzon Island, Philippines, between March 1984 venom is the leading cause of snakebite death in and March 1987

  10. What's Cookin' With Helicopter Microwave Landing Systems?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Richard L.

    1980-01-01

    This article describes a joint effort of the FAA, NASA and the Helicopter Industry to establish a data base for (Microwave Landing Systems) MLS approaches, and to aid the FAA in developing the MLS Terminal Instrument Procedures (TERPS) criteria for rotary-wing IFR operations. The latter is of particular importance for it appears to signal sincere official interest in filling in the blanks in Chapter 11 of TERPS -- that portion set aside for helicopter IFR operations and recognition of the unique capabilities of the helicopter in the instrument environment. One of the program objectives is to find out what a sample of pilots can do with the MLS in a minimum machine.

  11. Quantitative prediction of cellular metabolism with constraint-based models: the COBRA Toolbox v2.0

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberger, Jan; Que, Richard; Fleming, Ronan M. T.; Thiele, Ines; Orth, Jeffrey D.; Feist, Adam M.; Zielinski, Daniel C.; Bordbar, Aarash; Lewis, Nathan E.; Rahmanian, Sorena; Kang, Joseph; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, a growing community of researchers has emerged around the use of COnstraint-Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) methods to simulate, analyze and predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes using genome-scale models. The COBRA Toolbox, a MATLAB package for implementing COBRA methods, was presented earlier. Here we present a significant update of this in silico ToolBox. Version 2.0 of the COBRA Toolbox expands the scope of computations by including in silico analysis methods developed since its original release. New functions include: (1) network gap filling, (2) 13C analysis, (3) metabolic engineering, (4) omics-guided analysis, and (5) visualization. As with the first version, the COBRA Toolbox reads and writes Systems Biology Markup Language formatted models. In version 2.0, we improved performance, usability, and the level of documentation. A suite of test scripts can now be used to learn the core functionality of the Toolbox and validate results. This Toolbox lowers the barrier of entry to use powerful COBRA methods. PMID:21886097

  12. Droplet digital PCR to investigate quasi-species at codons 119 and 275 of the A(H1N1)pdm09 neuraminidase during zanamivir and oseltamivir therapies.

    PubMed

    Abed, Yacine; Carbonneau, Julie; L'Huillier, Arnaud G; Kaiser, Laurent; Boivin, Guy

    2017-04-01

    The H275Y and E119D neuraminidase (NA) mutations constitute important molecular markers of resistance to NA inhibitors in A(H1N1) pdm09 viruses. We used reverse transcriptase-droplet digital PCR amplification (RT-ddPCR) to analyze quasi-species at codons 275 and 119 of the NA in A(H1N1) pdm09 viruses recovered from an immuncompromised patient who received oseltamivir and zanamivir therapies. RT-ddPCR assays detected and quantified H275Y and E119D mutations with an efficiency that was comparable to that of high throughput sequencing (HiSeq 2500 Illumina, San Diego, CA) technology. With its sensitivity and reproducibility, RT-ddPCR could be a reliable method for accurate detection and quantification of major NAI-resistance mutations in clinical settings. J. Med. Virol. 89:737-741, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Safety and persistence of the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by 2 doses of an AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza vaccine administered to infants, children and adolescents: Two open, uncontrolled studies.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sicilia, José; Arístegui, Javier; Omeñaca, Félix; Carmona, Alfonso; Tejedor, Juan C; Merino, José M; García-Corbeira, Pilar; Walravens, Karl; Bambure, Vinod; Moris, Philippe; Caplanusi, Adrian; Gillard, Paul; Dieussaert, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    In children, 2 AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine doses given 21 days apart were previously shown to induce a high humoral immune response and to have an acceptable safety profile up to 42 days following the first vaccination. Here, we analyzed the persistence data from 2 open-label studies, which assessed the safety, and humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by 2 doses of this vaccine. The first study was a phase II, randomized trial conducted in 104 children aged 6-35 months vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 1.9 µg haemagglutinin antigen (HA) and AS03B (5.93 mg tocopherol) and the second study, a phase III, non-randomized trial conducted in 210 children and adolescents aged 3-17 years vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 3.75 µg HA and AS03A (11.86 mg tocopherol). Approximately one year after the first dose, all children with available data were seropositive for haemagglutinin inhibition and neutralising antibody titres, but a decline in geometric mean antibody titres was noted. The vaccine induced a cell-mediated immune response in terms of antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cells, which persisted up to one year post-vaccination. The vaccine did not raise any safety concern, though these trials were not designed to detect rare events. In conclusion, 2 doses of the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 2 different dosages had a clinically acceptable safety profile, and induced high and persistent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in children aged 6-35 months and 3-17 years. These studies have been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00971321 and NCT00964158.

  14. Seroprevalence of antibodies to influenza A/H1N1/2009 among transmission risk groups after the second wave in Mexico, by a virus-free ELISA method

    PubMed Central

    Elizondo-Montemayor, Leticia; Alvarez, Mario M.; Hernández-Torre, Martín; Ugalde-Casas, Patricia A.; Lam-Franco, Lorena; Bustamante-Careaga, Humberto; Castilleja-Leal, Fernando; Contreras-Castillo, Julio; Moreno-Sánchez, Héctor; Tamargo-Barrera, Daniela; López-Pacheco, Felipe; Freiden, Pamela J.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective No serological studies have been performed in Mexico to assess the seroprevalence of influenza A/H1N1/2009 in groups of people according to the potential risk of transmission. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of antibodies against influenza A/H1N1/2009 in subjects in Mexico grouped by risk of transmission. Methods Two thousand two hundred and twenty-two subjects were categorized into one of five occupation groups according to the potential risk of transmission: (1) students, (2) teachers, (3) healthcare workers, (4) institutional home residents aged >60 years, and (5) general population. Seroprevalence by potential transmission group and by age grouped into decades was determined by a virus-free ELISA method based on the recombinant receptor-binding domain of the hemagglutinin of influenza A/H1N1/2009 virus as antigen (85% sensitivity; 95% specificity). The Wilson score, Chi-square test, and logistic regression models were used for the statistical analyses. Results Seroprevalence for students was 47.3%, for teachers was 33.9%, for older adults was 36.5%, and for the general population was 33.0%, however it was only 24.6% for healthcare workers (p = 0.011). Of the students, 56.6% of those at middle school, 56.4% of those at high school, 52.7% of those at elementary school, and 31.1% of college students showed positive antibodies (p < 0.001). Seroprevalence was 44.6% for college teachers, 31.6% for middle school teachers, and 29.8% for elementary school teachers, but was only 20.3% for high school teachers (p = 0.002). Conclusions The student group was the group most affected by influenza A/H1N1/2009, while the healthcare worker group showed the lowest prevalence. Students represent a key target for preventive measures. PMID:21855383

  15. Efficacy of the New Perilaryngeal Airway (CobraPLA™) Versus the Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA™) to Improve Oropharyngeal Leak Pressure in Obese and Overweight Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoobi, Siamak; Abootorabi, Seyed Mohamadreza; Kayalha, Hamid; Van Zundert, Tom C

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to evaluate the applicability of Cobra perilaryngeal airway (Cobra PLA™) for obese patients under general anesthesia and also to compare the results with those of classic laryngeal mask airway (LMA™). Materials and Methods: Seventy-three overweight and obese patients were included in this study. The patients were randomly assigned to LMA™ or Cobra PLA™ groups. Time required for intubation, successful intubation attempt, airway sealing pressure and incidence of complications including blood staining, sore throat and dysphagia were assessed and noted. Results: Thirty-six and 37 patients were randomly allocated to LMA™ and Cobra PLA™ groups, respectively. Most patients were males and had Mallampati Class II airway in both groups. The first attempt and overall insertion success for Cobra PLA™ was significantly higher compared to LMA (P<0.05). Airway insertion was more successful (P = 0.027; 94% vs. 77%) with Cobra PLA™. Insertion times were similar with Cobra PLA™ and LMA™ (Cobra PLA™, 29.94±16.35s; LMA™, 27.00±7.88s). The oropharyngeal leak pressure in the Cobra PLA™ group (24.80±0.90 H2O) was significantly higher than that in LMA™ group (19±1 H2O, p<0.001). Sore throat was more frequent in the LMA™ group although it did not reach statistical significance (Fisher’s exact test, P = 0.33). Blood staining on airway tube was seen in both groups with a higher incidence in the Cobra PLA™ group (Fisher’s Exact test, P = 0.02). Incidence of dysphagia was not different between the two groups. Conclusion: CobraPLA™ was found to be safe with low complications. It provided better airway sealing with high rate of the first insertion success for use in obese and overweight patients. This study recommends the use of CobraPLA™ as a rescue device in emergency situations for obese and overweight patients. PMID:26221151

  16. Synergy between the classical and alternative pathways of complement is essential for conferring effective protection against the pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Rattan, Ajitanuj; Pawar, Shailesh D.; Nawadkar, Renuka; Kulkarni, Neeraja

    2017-01-01

    The pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus caused significant morbidity and mortality worldwide thus necessitating the need to understand the host factors that influence its control. Previously, the complement system has been shown to provide protection during the seasonal influenza virus infection, however, the role of individual complement pathways is not yet clear. Here, we have dissected the role of intact complement as well as of its individual activation pathways during the pandemic influenza virus infection using mouse strains deficient in various complement components. We show that the virus infection in C3-/- mice results in increased viral load and 100% mortality, which can be reversed by adoptive transfer of naïve wild-type (WT) splenocytes, purified splenic B cells, or passive transfer of immune sera from WT, but not C3-/- mice. Blocking of C3a and/or C5a receptor signaling in WT mice using receptor antagonists and use of C3aR-/- and C5aR-/- mice showed significant mortality after blocking/ablation of C3aR, with little or no effect after blocking/ablation of C5aR. Intriguingly, deficiency of C4 and FB in mice resulted in only partial mortality (24%-32%) suggesting a necessary cross-talk between the classical/lectin and alternative pathways for providing effective protection. In vitro virus neutralization experiments performed to probe the cross-talk between the various pathways indicated that activation of the classical and alternative pathways in concert, owing to coating of viral surface by antibodies, is needed for its efficient neutralization. Examination of the virus-specific complement-binding antibodies in virus positive subjects showed that their levels vary among individuals. Together these results indicate that cooperation between the classical and alternative pathways not only result in efficient direct neutralization of the pandemic influenza virus, but also lead to the optimum generation of C3a, which when sensed by the immune cells along with the antigen culminates in generation of effective protective immune responses. PMID:28301559

  17. Transonic Aeroelasticity Analysis For Helicopter Rotor Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I-Chung; Gea, Lie-Mine; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1991-01-01

    Numerical-simulation method for aeroelasticity analysis of helicopter rotor blade combines established techniques for analysis of aerodynamics and vibrations of blade. Application of method clearly shows elasticity of blade modifies flow and, consequently, aerodynamic loads on blade.

  18. Small crack test program for helicopter materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annigeri, Bal; Schneider, George

    1994-01-01

    Crack propagation tests were conducted to determine crack growth behavior in five helicopter materials for surface cracks between 0.005 to 0.020 inches in depth. Constant amplitude tests were conducted at stress ratios R equals 0.1 and 0.5, and emphasis was placed on near threshold data (i.e., 10-8 to 10-6 inches/cycle). Spectrum tests were conducted using a helicopter spectrum. The test specimen was an unnotched tension specimen, and cracks were initiated from a small EDM notch. An optical/video system was used to monitor crack growth. The material for the test specimens was obtained from helicopter part forgings. Testing was conducted at stresses below yield to reflect actual stresses in helicopter parts.

  19. 14 CFR 93.103 - Helicopter operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Orient Point, shall utilize the North Shore Helicopter route and altitude, as published. (b) Pilots may deviate from the route and altitude requirements of paragraph (a) of this section when necessary...

  20. 14 CFR 93.103 - Helicopter operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Orient Point, shall utilize the North Shore Helicopter route and altitude, as published. (b) Pilots may deviate from the route and altitude requirements of paragraph (a) of this section when necessary...

  1. Complement depletion with humanised cobra venom factor: efficacy in preclinical models of vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Fritzinger, David C; Gorsuch, W Brian; Stahl, Gregory L

    2015-03-01

    The complement system is an intrinsic part of the immune system and has important functions in both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, inadvertent or misdirected complement activation is also involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, contributing solely or significantly to tissue injury and disease development. Multiple approaches to develop pharmacological agents to inhibit complement are currently being pursued. We have developed a conceptually different approach of not inhibiting but depleting complement, based on the complement-depleting activities of cobra venom factor (CVF), a non-toxic cobra venom component with structural and functional homology to complement component C3. We developed a humanised version of CVF by creating human complement component C3 derivatives with complement-depleting activities of CVF (humanised CVF) as a promising therapeutic agent for diseases with complement pathogenesis. Here we review the beneficial therapeutic effect of humanised CVF in several murine models of vascular diseases such as reperfusion injury.

  2. Successful treatment of neurotoxic king cobra envenomation in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Gold, B S; Pyle, P

    1998-12-01

    The growing trend toward the collection of exotic snakes by private collectors increases the likelihood that emergency physicians will face the challenge of treating an exotic envenomation. We report a case involving a professional reptile handler who sustained an extremity bite from a king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah ). Rapid, progressive neurotoxicity developed as manifested clinically by bulbar and respiratory paralysis requiring endotracheal intubation and mechanical support. After infusion of Thai Red Cross Society monospecific king cobra antivenin, all neurologic sequelae rapidly resolved within 7 hours after the bite. In treating an exotic envenomation, the emergency physician should contact personnel at the regional poison control center or local zoo. Both are prepared to assist the physician by facilitating the timely acquisition of exotic antivenins and by arranging consultation with experts experienced in the management and treatment of exotic envenomations.

  3. Ophthalmia due to spitting cobra venom in an urban setting--a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Ang, Leslie Jonathan; Sanjay, Srinivasan; Sangtam, Tiakumzuk

    2014-01-01

    To describe three presentations of spitting cobra venom induced ophthalmia in urban Singapore. Case notes and photographs of three patients with venom ophthalmia who presented to our clinic between 2007 and 2012 were reviewed. Two patients encountered the spitting cobra while working at a job site while the third patient had caught the snake and caged it. The venom entered the eyes in all 3 cases. Immediate irrigation with tap water was carried out before presenting to the Accident and Emergency department. All patients were treated medically with topical antibiotic prophylaxis and copious lubricants. The use of anti-venom was not required in any case. All eyes recovered with no long-term sequelae. If irrigation is initiated early, eyes can recover with no significant complications or sequelae.

  4. Helicopter model rotor-blade vortex interaction impulsive noise: Scalability and parametric variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic data taken in the anechoic Deutsch-Niederlaendischer Windkanal (DNW) have documented the blade vortex interaction (BVI) impulsive noise radiated from a 1/7-scale model main rotor of the AH-1 series helicopter. Averaged model scale data were compared with averaged full scale, inflight acoustic data under similar nondimensional test conditions. At low advance ratios (mu = 0.164 to 0.194), the data scale remarkable well in level and waveform shape, and also duplicate the directivity pattern of BVI impulsive noise. At moderate advance ratios (mu = 0.224 to 0.270), the scaling deteriorates, suggesting that the model scale rotor is not adequately simulating the full scale BVI noise; presently, no proved explanation of this discrepancy exists. Carefully performed parametric variations over a complete matrix of testing conditions have shown that all of the four governing nondimensional parameters - tip Mach number at hover, advance ratio, local inflow ratio, and thrust coefficient - are highly sensitive to BVI noise radiation.

  5. Pre- and postpandemic estimates of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) seroprotection to inform surveillance-based incidence, by age, during the 2013-2014 epidemic in Canada.

    PubMed

    Skowronski, Danuta M; Chambers, Catharine; Sabaiduc, Suzana; Janjua, Naveed Z; Li, Guiyun; Petric, Martin; Krajden, Mel; Purych, Dale; Li, Yan; De Serres, Gaston

    2015-01-01

    To understand the epidemic resurgence of influenza due to the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) strain (A[H1N1]pdm09) during the 2013-2014 influenza season, we compared age-related cross-sectional estimates of seroprotection before the pandemic (during 2009) and after the pandemic (during 2010 and 2013) to subsequent surveillance-based, laboratory-confirmed incidence of influenza due to A(H1N1)pdm09 in British Columbia, Canada. Prepandemic seroprotection was negligible except for very old adults (defined as adults aged ≥ 80 years), among whom 80% had seroprotection. Conversely, postpandemic seroprotection followed a U-shaped distribution, with detection in approximately 35%-45% of working-aged adults but in ≥ 70% of very old adults and young children, excluding children aged <5 years in 2013, among whom seroprotection again decreased to <20%. The incidence was 5-fold higher during 2013-2014, compared with 2010-2011, and was highest among children aged <5 years and working-aged adults, reflecting a mirror image of the age-based seroprotection data.

  6. Revealing the True Incidence of Pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 Influenza in Finland during the First Two Seasons - An Analysis Based on a Dynamic Transmission Model.

    PubMed

    Shubin, Mikhail; Lebedev, Artem; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Auranen, Kari

    2016-03-01

    The threat of the new pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 imposed a heavy burden on the public health system in Finland in 2009-2010. An extensive vaccination campaign was set up in the middle of the first pandemic season. However, the true number of infected individuals remains uncertain as the surveillance missed a large portion of mild infections. We constructed a transmission model to simulate the spread of influenza in the Finnish population. We used the model to analyse the two first years (2009-2011) of A(H1N1)pdm09 in Finland. Using data from the national surveillance of influenza and data on close person-to-person (social) contacts in the population, we estimated that 6% (90% credible interval 5.1 - 6.7%) of the population was infected with A(H1N1)pdm09 in the first pandemic season (2009/2010) and an additional 3% (2.5 - 3.5%) in the second season (2010/2011). Vaccination had a substantial impact in mitigating the second season. The dynamic approach allowed us to discover how the proportion of detected cases changed over the course of the epidemic. The role of time-varying reproduction number, capturing the effects of weather and changes in behaviour, was important in shaping the epidemic.

  7. Civil helicopter design and operational requirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, K. T.

    1978-01-01

    Design and operational requirements and other factors that have a restraining influence on expansion of the helicopter market are discussed. The needs of operators, users, pilots and the community at large are examined. The impact of future technology developments and other trends such as use, energy shortages, and civil and military helicopter requirements and development is assessed. Areas where research and development are needed to provide opportunities for lowering life cycle costs and removing barriers to further expansion of the industry are analyzed.

  8. Helicopter training simulators: Key market factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, John

    1992-01-01

    Simulators will gain an increasingly important role in training helicopter pilots only if the simulators are of sufficient fidelity to provide positive transfer of skills to the aircraft. This must be done within an economic model of return on investment. Although rotor pilot demand is still only a small percentage of overall pilot requirements, it will grow in significance. This presentation described the salient factors influencing the use of helicopter training simulators.

  9. The effective acoustic environment of helicopter crewmen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, R. T., Jr.; Mozo, B. T.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of measuring the composite acoustic environment of helicopters in order to quantify the effective acoustic environment of the crewmen and to assess the real acoustic hazards of the personnel are examined. It is indicated that the attenuation characteristics of the helmets and hearing protectors and the variables of the physiology of the human ear be accounted for in determining the effective acoustic environment of Army helicopter crewmen as well as the acoustic hazards of voice communications systems noise.

  10. Tail Rotor Airfoils Stabilize Helicopters, Reduce Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Founded by former Ames Research Center engineer Jim Van Horn, Van Horn Aviation of Tempe, Arizona, built upon a Langley Research Center airfoil design to create a high performance aftermarket tail rotor for the popular Bell 206 helicopter. The highly durable rotor has a lifetime twice that of the original equipment manufacturer blade, reduces noise by 40 percent, and displays enhanced performance at high altitudes. These improvements benefit helicopter performance for law enforcement, military training, wildfire and pipeline patrols, and emergency medical services.

  11. The Evolution of the Advanced Attack Helicopter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-06

    engineering laboratory at McCook Field, Dayton, Ohio. The first helicopter which appears to have been evaluated was th. Peter Cooper Hewitt design...through five decades to an evaluation of the Peter Cooper Hewitt design in 1918. The first helicopter contracted for by the military was the 199 200 de...used counter-rotating rotors, control vanes below, 24-hp Antoinette engine, two 20 foot rotors. On 13 Nov lifted inventor and two passen- gers, a

  12. Helicopter Performance Evaluation (HELPE) Computer Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    questions : * For a given helicopter at given flight conditions and specified mission weight, how fast can the helicopter cruise in level flight...possible level speed its maneuverability in a turn, and its hover and climb capabilities in the in-ground and out-of-ground effects modes. The code... levels , and mappings ..... 2 2. Available engine power output as a function of altitude "h".................... 8 3. Schematic drawing of the thrust

  13. Effect of cobra venom factor on experimental infection of mice against Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Y; Kijima, M; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, T; Nakamura, M

    1992-10-01

    The effect of cobra venom factor (CoVF) treatment was examined to clarify the mechanism of resistance of mice to Clostridium chauvoei infection. In CoVF-treated mice inoculated with spores of C. chauvoei, no death occurred and the organisms in the infected muscle progressively decreased, similar to that of non-treated control mice. These results indicated that C3 did not play a significant role in the resistance of mice against C. chauvoei infection.

  14. Production of {sup 4}He and tritium from Be in the COBRA-1A2 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.

    1998-03-01

    The production of {sup 4}He and tritium has been calculated for beryllium irradiated in the COBRA-1A2 experiment in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. Reaction rates were based on adjusted neutron spectra determined from reactor dosimetry measurements at three different elevations in the region of the beryllium capsules. Equations are given so that gas production can be calculated for any specific capsule elevation.

  15. Surveillance for Respiratory Infections, Including Severe Acute Respiratory, Syndrome (SARS), in Cobra Gold 2003

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-10

    to be causal. Respiratory illnesses caused by viruses in the family Coronaviridae have long been recognized.2-13 Two species known to cause human ...tested positive for influenza A, 2 (13%) for coronavirus OC43, 2 (13%) for respiratory syncytial virus , 1 (6%) rhinovirus, 9 and 4 (25%) were...NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SURVEILLANCE FOR RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS , INCLUDING SEVERE ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNDROME (SARS), IN COBRA

  16. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the EBRII COBRA-1A irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1997-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint U.S. and Japanese COBRA-1A1 and 1A2 irradiations in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The maximum total neutron fluences at midplane were 2.0E+22 and 7.5E+22 n/cm{sup 2}, for the 1A1 and 1A2 irradiations, respectively, resulting in about 8.0 and 30.3 dpa in stainless steel.

  17. An analysis of venom ontogeny and prey-specific toxicity in the Monocled Cobra (Naja kaouthia).

    PubMed

    Modahl, Cassandra M; Mukherjee, Ashis K; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2016-09-01

    Venoms of snakes of the family Elapidae (cobras, kraits, mambas, and relatives) are predominantly composed of numerous phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) and three-finger toxins (3FTxs), some of which are lethal while others are not significantly toxic. Currently, the only identified prey-specific toxins are several nonconventional 3FTxs, and given the large diversity of 3FTxs within Monocled Cobra (Naja kaouthia) venom, it was hypothesized that several 3FTxs, previously found to be non-toxic or weakly toxic 3FTxs in murine models, could potentially be toxic towards non-murine prey. Additionally, it was hypothesized that ontogenetic dietary shifts will be correlated with observable changes in specific 3FTx isoform abundance. Adult and juvenile N. kaouthia venom composition was investigated using ion-exchange FPLC, 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE, mass spectrometry, and various enzymatic and LD50 assays. Alpha-cobratoxin (α-elapitoxin) was the only significantly toxic (LD50 < 1 μg/g) 3FTx found in N. kaouthia venom and was equally toxic toward both lizard and mouse models. The abundance and diversity of 3FTxs and most enzyme activities did not vary between adult and juvenile cobra venoms; however, total venom PLA2 activity and specific PLA2 isoforms did vary, with juveniles lacking several of the least acidic PLA2s, and these differences could have both biological (related to predation) and clinical (antivenom efficacy) implications. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous presence of α-cobratoxin in both adult and juvenile cobra venoms, with high toxicity toward both reptiles and mammals, represents a venom compositional strategy wherein a single potent toxin effectively immobilizes a variety of prey types encountered across life history stages.

  18. Development in High-Density Cobra Fiber Positioners for the Subaru Telescope's Prime Focus Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Charles D.; Braun, David F.; Kaluzny, Joel V.; Seiffert, Mic D.; Dekany, Richard G.; Ellis, Richard S.; Smith, Roger S.

    2012-01-01

    The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a fiber fed multi-object spectrometer for the Subaru Telescope that will conduct a variety of targeted surveys for studies of dark energy, galaxy evolution, and galactic archaeology. The key to the instrument is a high density array of fiber positioners placed at the prime focus of the Subaru Telescope. The system, nicknamed "Cobra", will be capable of rapidly reconfiguring the array of 2394 optical fibers to the image positions of astronomical targets in the focal plane with high accuracy. The system uses 2394 individual "SCARA robot" mechanisms that are 7.7mm in diameter and use 2 piezo-electric rotary motors to individually position each of the optical fibers within its patrol region. Testing demonstrates that the Cobra positioner can be moved to within 5 micrometers of an astronomical target in 6 move iterations with a success rate of 95%. The Cobra system is a key aspect of PFS that will enable its unprecedented combination of high-multiplex factor and observing efficiency on the Subaru telescope. The requirements, design, and prototyping efforts for the fiber positioner system for the PFS are described here as are the plans for modular construction, assembly, integration, functional testing, and performance validation.

  19. COBRA: A Computational Brewing Application for Predicting the Molecular Composition of Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Fooshee, David R.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Baldi, Pierre

    2012-05-08

    Atmospheric organic aerosols (OA) represent a significant fraction of airborne particulate matter and can impact climate, visibility, and human health. These mixtures are difficult to characterize experimentally due to the enormous complexity and dynamic nature of their chemical composition. We introduce a novel Computational Brewing Application (COBRA) and apply it to modeling oligomerization chemistry stemming from condensation and addition reactions of monomers pertinent to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by photooxidation of isoprene. COBRA uses two lists as input: a list of chemical structures comprising the molecular starting pool, and a list of rules defining potential reactions between molecules. Reactions are performed iteratively, with products of all previous iterations serving as reactants for the next one. The simulation generated thousands of molecular structures in the mass range of 120-500 Da, and correctly predicted ~70% of the individual SOA constituents observed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). Selected predicted structures were confirmed with tandem mass spectrometry. Esterification and hemiacetal formation reactions were shown to play the most significant role in oligomer formation, whereas aldol condensation was shown to be insignificant. COBRA is not limited to atmospheric aerosol chemistry, but is broadly applicable to the prediction of reaction products in other complex mixtures for which reasonable reaction mechanisms and seed molecules can be supplied by experimental or theoretical methods.

  20. Investigation into the efficiency of different bionic algorithm combinations for a COBRA meta-heuristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedova, Sh; Semenkin, E.

    2017-02-01

    Previously, a meta-heuristic approach, called Co-Operation of Biology-Related Algorithms or COBRA, for solving real-parameter optimization problems was introduced and described. COBRA’s basic idea consists of a cooperative work of five well-known bionic algorithms such as Particle Swarm Optimization, the Wolf Pack Search, the Firefly Algorithm, the Cuckoo Search Algorithm and the Bat Algorithm, which were chosen due to the similarity of their schemes. The performance of this meta-heuristic was evaluated on a set of test functions and its workability was demonstrated. Thus it was established that the idea of the algorithms’ cooperative work is useful. However, it is unclear which bionic algorithms should be included in this cooperation and how many of them. Therefore, the five above-listed algorithms and additionally the Fish School Search algorithm were used for the development of five different modifications of COBRA by varying the number of component-algorithms. These modifications were tested on the same set of functions and the best of them was found. Ways of further improving the COBRA algorithm are then discussed.

  1. 77 FR 23388 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... helicopters with certain main rotor blades installed to reduce the life limit of those blades. This AD is... rotor blade failed because of fatigue cracking. These actions are intended to prevent failure of the main rotor blade and subsequent loss of control of the helicopter. DATES: This AD becomes effective...

  2. 78 FR 56148 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited (Bell) Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... Textron Canada Limited (Bell) Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... service information identified in this AD, contact Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited, 12,800 Rue de l...-2009-32, dated July 24, 2009, issued by Transport Canada Civil Aviation (TCCA), which is the...

  3. 78 FR 54751 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Inc. Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ...-17576; AD 2013-18-03] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Inc... new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Inc. (BHT) Model 206A... Textron Canada Limited, 12,800 Rue de l'Avenir, Mirabel, Quebec J7J1R4; telephone (450) 437-2862 or...

  4. Analysis of helicopter noise data using international helicopter noise certification procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. S.; Rickley, E. J.; Levanduski, D. A.; Woolridge, S. B.

    1986-03-01

    The results of a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) noise measurement flight test program involving seven helicopters are documented. Noise levels were established using the basic testing, reduction and analysis techniques specified by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) for helicopter noise certification, supplemented with some procedural refinements contained in ICAO Working Group II recommendations for incorporation into the standard.

  5. Instrument Approach Aids for Helicopters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    Me 3.9 "HELICOPTER ONLY" CRITERIA 3-27 h3-30 3.9.1 Procedure Limitations 3-30 3.9.2 Point in Space Concept 3-30 3.9.3 Descent Gradients 3-30 3.9.4...601-800 ft 3/4 mile 801 ft and up 1 mile * Point in space procedures HAS Visibility Minimum 250-800 ft 3/4 mile 801 ft and up 1 mile 1.3 ESTABLISHED...procedures. In the analysis of visibility data most procedures were able to achieve 1/2 mile minimums. A few, primarily the RNAV Point in Space

  6. 77 FR 58973 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-25

    ... ] power supply disruptions while a helicopter is on the ground, causing the landing gear to retract and... power supply disruptions, which caused the landing gear to retract and the helicopter to drop,...

  7. Further Study Of Face Gears For Helicopter Transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Wang, J. C.; Bossler, R. B., Jr.; Chen, Y. J. D.; Heath, G.; Lewicki, D. G.

    1995-01-01

    Document describes theoretical, computational, and experimental studies of feasibility of proposed lightweight, split-torque helicopter transmissions based on face gears. Majority of work also described in prior document "Face Gears for Helicopter Transmissions" (LEW-15840).

  8. 77 FR 18969 - Airworthiness Directives; Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... Directives; Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... (AD) for certain Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation (Sikorsky) Model S-76C helicopters. This proposed AD is... Aircraft Corporation, Attn: Manager, Commercial Technical Support, mailstop s581a, 6900 Main...

  9. Lubricant Effects on Efficiency of a Helicopter Transmission.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    Research Cen- ter’s 500 hp torque regenerative helicopter transmission test stand. The test transmission was the 01158 helicopter main transmission...cooling systema. This effect adds to increase the payload capacity of the helicopter. The total power loss in a helicopter transmision is a function...friction between Sear teeth . Martin (rof 3) concentrates on the problem of calcmlatiui the losses in the tooth contact. Anderson and Loeventhel (ref 4

  10. 77 FR 57524 - Stage 3 Helicopter Noise Certification Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... applications for a new helicopter type design and for a supplemental type certificate for those new type designs. A helicopter type certificated under this standard would be designated as a Stage 3 helicopter... standards of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). The proposal of these more...

  11. 14 CFR 135.207 - VFR: Helicopter surface reference requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false VFR: Helicopter surface reference... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.207 VFR: Helicopter surface reference requirements. No person may operate a helicopter under VFR unless that person has visual surface reference...

  12. 78 FR 17593 - Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... helicopters. This AD requires establishing a lower life limit on certain swashplate outer ring assemblies... lead to the loss of main rotor (M/R) blade pitch control and subsequent loss of helicopter control..., which could lead to the loss of M/R blade pitch control and subsequent loss of helicopter...

  13. Degenerative Changes of Spine in Helicopter Pilots

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Joo Hyeon; Kim, Jung Won; Jeong, Ho Joong; Sim, Young Joo; Kim, Dong Kyu; Choi, Jong Kyoung; Im, Hyoung June

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between whole body vibration (WBV) induced helicopter flights and degenerative changes of the cervical and lumbar spine. Methods We examined 186 helicopter pilots who were exposed to WBV and 94 military clerical workers at a military hospital. Questionnaires and interviews were completed for 164 of the 186 pilots (response rate, 88.2%) and 88 of the 94 clerical workers (response rate, 93.6%). Radiographic examinations of the cervical and the lumbar spines were performed after obtaining informed consent in both groups. Degenerative changes of the cervical and lumbar spines were determined using four radiographs per subject, and diagnosed by two independent, blinded radiologists. Results There was no significant difference in general and work-related characteristics except for flight hours and frequency between helicopter pilots and clerical workers. Degenerative changes in the cervical spine were significantly more prevalent in the helicopter pilots compared with control group. In the cervical spine multivariate model, accumulated flight hours (per 100 hours) was associated with degenerative changes. And in the lumbar spine multivariate model, accumulated flight hours (per 100 hours) and age were associated with degenerative changes. Conclusion Accumulated flight hours were associated with degenerative changes of the cervical and lumbar spines in helicopter pilots. PMID:24236259

  14. Evolution of civil aeromedical helicopter aviation.

    PubMed

    Meier, D R; Samper, E R

    1989-07-01

    The rapid increase in the use of helicopters for hospital transport during the 1980s is the culmination of several hundred years of military medical innovation. Mass battefield casualties spurred both technologic and medical changes necessary for today's sophisticated helicopter systems in use worldwide, particularly in the United States. The Napoleonic Era and the American Civil War provided the framework for the evolution of today's state-of-the-art emergency medical techniques. The use of airplanes to evacuate the wounded eventually led to using helicopters for rescue missions in World War II. The combat experiences of the United States in Korea, the British in Malaya, and the French in Indochina proved that rotary-wing aircraft were invaluable in reducing battlefield death rates. Any skepticism about the efficacy of helicopter medical evacuation was erased during the Vietnam conflict. As an integral part of the modern battlefield, these specialized aircraft became a necessity. The observations and experience of American servicemen and medical personnel in Vietnam established the foundation for the acceptance of helicopter transport in modern hospital systems.

  15. All-weather capability for rescue helicopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitmair-Steck, Wolfgang; Haisch, Stefan

    2001-08-01

    In Germany as well as in numerous other countries the air rescue system has been extended significantly since the first operation of the rescue helicopter Christoph 1. The primary target of the air rescue system was to guarantee fast and efficient emergency medical services for victims of accidents. During the years, the scope of the helicopter operations has been extended not only to other types of emergency medical services, but also to secondary medical services like the displacement of patients from hospitals to special service hospitals. While in general the displacement of patients is operated from well known and registered helipads, the primary rescue service currently has to rely on available onboard systems only. Those operations are risky and challenging for the pilots because of time pressure and the danger of obstacles in the environment of the helicopter. In addition, reduced visibility due to fog, rainfall or low light levels can further increase the risks or can make the services unavailable at all. Almost one decade ago, Eurocopter started the investigation of technologies and systems that could help the pilots to perform their tasks with reduced workload and risk, and to allow for a 24 h operation of helicopters irrespective of the weather conditions. After a number of preliminary studies, in 1995 the research program 'All-weather helicopter' has been started as a joint effort of Eurocopter and the supplier industry in Europe. The first phase of the program has been successfully completed in 1999 and the second phase is currently in progress.

  16. COBRA-NC: a thermal hydraulics code for transient analysis of nuclear reactor components. Volume 2. COBRA-NC numerical solution methods

    SciTech Connect

    Thurgood, M.J.; George, T.L.; Wheeler, C.L.

    1986-04-01

    The COBRA-NC computer program has been developed to predict the thermal-hydraulic response of nuclear reactor components to thermal-hydraulic transients. The code solves the multicomponent, compressible three-dimensional, two-fluid, three-field equations for two-phase flow. The three fields are the vapor field, the continuous liquid field, and the liquid drop field. The code has been used to model flow and heat transfer within the reactor core, the reactor vessel, the steam generators, and in the nuclear containment. This volume describes the finite-volume equations and the numerical solution methods used to solve these equations. It is directed toward the user who is interested in gaining a more complete understanding of the numerical methods used to obtain a solution to the hydrodynamic equations.

  17. Newly emerging mutations in the matrix genes of the human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses reduce the detection sensitivity of real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Rong; Kuo, Chuan-Yi; Huang, Hsiang-Yi; Wu, Fu-Ting; Huang, Yi-Lung; Cheng, Chieh-Yu; Su, Yu-Ting; Chang, Feng-Yee; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Liu, Ming-Tsan

    2014-01-01

    New variants of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses were detected in Taiwan between 2012 and 2013. Some of these variants were not detected in clinical specimens using a common real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay that targeted the conserved regions of the viral matrix (M) genes. An analysis of the M gene sequences of the new variants revealed that several newly emerging mutations were located in the regions where the primers or probes of the real-time RT-PCR assay bind; these included three mutations (G225A, T228C, and G238A) in the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, as well as one mutation (C163T) in the A(H3N2) virus. These accumulated mismatch mutations, together with the previously identified C154T mutation of the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus and the C153T and G189T mutations of the A(H3N2) virus, result in a reduced detection sensitivity for the real-time RT-PCR assay. To overcome the loss of assay sensitivity due to mismatch mutations, we established a real-time RT-PCR assay using degenerate nucleotide bases in both the primers and probe and successfully increased the sensitivity of the assay to detect circulating variants of the human influenza A viruses. Our observations highlight the importance of the simultaneous use of different gene-targeting real-time RT-PCR assays for the clinical diagnosis of influenza.

  18. E119D Neuraminidase Mutation Conferring Pan-Resistance to Neuraminidase Inhibitors in an A(H1N1)pdm09 Isolate From a Stem-Cell Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    L'Huillier, Arnaud G.; Abed, Yacine; Petty, Tom J.; Cordey, Samuel; Thomas, Yves; Bouhy, Xavier; Schibler, Manuel; Simon, Audrey; Chalandon, Yves; van Delden, Christian; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Boquete-Suter, Patricia; Boivin, Guy; Kaiser, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Background. An influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection was diagnosed in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient during conditioning regimen. He was treated with oral oseltamivir, later combined with intravenous zanamivir. The H275Y neuraminidase (NA) mutation was first detected, and an E119D NA mutation was identified during zanamivir therapy. Methods. Recombinant wild-type (WT) E119D and E119D/H275Y A(H1N1)pdm09 NA variants were generated by reverse genetics. Susceptibility to NA inhibitors (NAIs) was evaluated with a fluorometric assay using the 2′-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid (MUNANA) substrate. Susceptibility to favipiravir (T-705) was assessed using plaque reduction assays. The NA affinity and velocity values were determined with NA enzymatic studies. Results. We identified an influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 E119D mutant that exhibited a marked increase in the 50% inhibitory concentrations against all tested NAIs (827-, 25-, 286-, and 702-fold for zanamivir, oseltamivir, peramivir, and laninamivir, respectively). The double E119D/H275Y mutation further increased oseltamivir and peramivir 50% inhibitory concentrations by 790- and >5000-fold, respectively, compared with the WT. The mutant viruses remained susceptible to favipiravir. The NA affinity and velocity values of the E119D variant decreased by 8.1-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, compared with the WT. Conclusions. The actual emergence of a single NA mutation conferring pan-NAI resistance in the clinical setting reinforces the pressing need to develop new anti-influenza strategies. PMID:25985905

  19. [Epidemic of influenza A(H1N1) 2009 in the French overseas territories of the Americas: epidemiological surveillance set up and main results, April 2009-January 2010].

    PubMed

    Larrieu, S; Rosine, J; Ledrans, M; Flamand, C; Chappert, J-L; Cassadou, S; Carvalho, L; Blateau, A; Barrau, M; Ardillon, V; Quénel, P

    2011-05-01

    Guadeloupe, French Guiana, Martinique, St. Martin and St. Barthelemy were the French territories most exposed to the new influenza A(H1N1)v, and adequate epidemiological surveillance tools were promptly developed in order to detect its emergence. The first stage, "containment phase", consisted in detection and management of individual cases. Then, when an autochthonous A(H1N1)v circulation was confirmed, its evolution has been monitored within the whole population, mainly through data collected from sentinel doctors' networks and virological surveillance. This allowed to detect very early the occurrence of epidemics, and to follow their evolution until they were over. Like all the other Caribbean countries, the five French overseas territories were hit by an outbreak of influenza A(H1N1)v. Although they had globally similar characteristics, each epidemic had its specificity in terms of scale and severity. They started between August and September 2009 in four of the five territories, while the last one, St. Barthelemy, was not affected until the end of the year. Attack rate estimates varied from 28 to 70 per 1000 inhabitants according to the territory, and hospitalisation rate varied from 4.3 to 10.3 per 1000 cases. Severity rate didn't reach 1 per 1000 cases in any of the territories. Compared to metropolitan France, the surveillance system presented several strengths, including the pre-existence of both an active sentinel network and an expert committee on emerging diseases in each territory. On the other hand, specific difficulties appeared, notably linked with logistical aspects of virological surveillance and the co-circulation of dengue virus in Guadeloupe and St. Barthelemy. Despite these difficulties, the different tools allowed early detection of the epidemics and follow-up of their evolution. All of them lead to very concordant results, suggesting that they are completely appropriate to monitor a potential new epidemic wave.

  20. Cobra-IE Evaluation by Simulation of the NUPEC BWR Full-Size Fine-Mesh Bundle Test (BFBT)

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, C. J. and Aumiler, D. L.

    2006-04-26

    The COBRA-IE computer code is a thermal-hydraulic subchannel analysis program capable of simulating phenomena present in both PWRs and BWRs. As part of ongoing COBRA-IE assessment efforts, the code has been evaluated against experimental data from the NUPEC BWR Full-Size Fine-Mesh Bundle Tests (BFBT). The BFBT experiments utilized an 8 x 8 rod bundle to simulate BWR operating conditions and power profiles, providing an excellent database for investigation of the capabilities of the code. Benchmarks performed included steady-state and transient void distribution, single-phase and two-phase pressure drop, and steady-state and transient critical power measurements. COBRA-IE effectively captured the trends seen in the experimental data with acceptable prediction error. Future sensitivity studies are planned to investigate the effects of enabling and/or modifying optional code models dealing with void drift, turbulent mixing, rewetting, and CHF.

  1. NASA TechPort Entry for Coiled Brine Recovery Assembly (CoBRA) CL IR&D Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pensinger, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The Coiled Brine Recovery Assembly (CoBRA) project will result in a proof-of-concept demonstration for a lightweight, compact, affordable, regenerable and disposable solution to brine water recovery. The heart of CoBRA is an evaporator that produces water vapor from brine. This evaporator leverages a novel design that enables passive transport of brine from place to place within the system. While it will be necessary to build or modify a system for testing the CoBRA concept, the emphasis of this project will be on developing the evaporator itself. This project will utilize a “test early, test often” approach, building at least one trial evaporator to guide the design of the final product.

  2. COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 2, User's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D.R.; Cuta, J.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Michener, T.E.; Wheeler, C.L.

    1986-11-01

    COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code used to predict temperatures and velocities in a wide variety of systems. The code was refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. The finite-volume equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation are written for an incompressible, single-phase fluid. The flow equations model a wide range of conditions including natural circulation. The energy equations include the effects of solid and fluid conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. The COBRA-SFS code is structured to perform both steady-state and transient calculations; however, the transient capability has not yet been validated. This volume contains the input instructions for COBRA-SFS and an auxiliary radiation exchange factor code, RADX-1. It is intended to aid the user in becoming familiar with the capabilities and modeling conventions of the code.

  3. Helicopter stability during aggressive maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Ranjith

    The dissertation investigates helicopter trim and stability during level bank-angle and diving bank-angle turns. The level turn is moderate in that sufficient power is available to maintain level maneuver, and the diving turn is severe where the power deficit is overcome by the kinetic energy of descent. The investigation basically represents design conditions where the peak loading goes well beyond the steady thrust limit and the rotor experiences appreciable stall. The major objectives are: (1) to assess the sensitivity of the trim and stability predictions to the approximations in modeling stall, (2) to correlate the trim predictions with the UH-60A flight test data, and (3) to demonstrate the feasibility of routinely using the exact fast-Floquet periodic eigenvector method for mode identification in the stability analysis. The UH-60A modeling and analysis are performed using the comprehensive code RCAS (Army's Rotorcraft Comprehensive Analysis System). The trim and damping predictions are based on quasisteady stall, ONERA-Edlin (Equations Differentielles Lineaires) and Leishman-Beddoes dynamic stall models. From the correlation with the test data, the strengths and weaknesses of the trim predictions are presented.

  4. Helicopter emergency medical service in mountainous areas.

    PubMed

    Tomazin, Iztok

    2009-01-01

    The outcome of patient care can be dramatically improved by bringing rapid rescue-medical treatment to the scene and by rapid transport to a medical facility. In mountainous areas this is usually possible only with the use of helicopters. ICAR MEDCOM suggests international standards for competent and safe response to medical problems in mountainous and wilderness areas. Rescue helicopters should work within the existing emergency medical system with appropriate mountain rescue and medically-trained personnel and with medical and rescue equipment on board. Safety is most important issue in mountain rescue. Activation and approach time should be as short as possible. All persons responsible for activation and realization of a helicopter rescue operation should be aware of all specific problems in the mountains and wilderness.

  5. Flight service evaluation of composite helicopter components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardoian, G. H.; Ezzo, M. B.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents an assessment of composite helicopter tail rotor spars and horizontal stabilizers, exposed to the effects of the environment, after up to five and a half years of commercial service. This evaluation is supported by test results of helicopter components and panels which have been exposed to outdoor environmental effects since September 1979. Full scale static and fatigue tests have been conducted on graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy composite components obtained from Sikorsky Model S-76 helicopters in commercial operations in the Gulf Coast region of Louisiana. Small scale static and fatigue tests are being conducted on coupons obtained from panels under exposure to outdoor conditions in Stratford, Connecticut and West Palm, Florida. The panel layups are representative of the S-76 components. Additionally, this report discusses the results of moisture absorption evaluations and strength tests on the S-76 components and composite panels with up to five years of outdoor exposure.

  6. Flight service evaluation of composite helicopter components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.; Lowry, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    An assessment of composite helicopter structures, exposed to environmental effects, after four years of commercial service is presented. This assessment is supported by test results of helicopter components and test panels which have been exposed to environmental effects since late 1979. Full scale static and fatigue tests are being conducted on composite components obtained from S-76 helicopters in commercial operations in the Gulf Coast region of Louisiana. Small scale tests are being conducted on coupons obtained from panels being exposed to outdoor conditions in Stratford, Connecticut and West Palm Beach, Florida. The panel layups represent S-76 components. Moisture evaluations and strength tests are being conducted, on the S-76 components and panels, over a period of eight years. Results are discussed for components and panels with up to four years of exposure.

  7. Minimum-complexity helicopter simulation math model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffley, Robert K.; Mnich, Marc A.

    1988-01-01

    An example of a minimal complexity simulation helicopter math model is presented. Motivating factors are the computational delays, cost, and inflexibility of the very sophisticated math models now in common use. A helicopter model form is given which addresses each of these factors and provides better engineering understanding of the specific handling qualities features which are apparent to the simulator pilot. The technical approach begins with specification of features which are to be modeled, followed by a build up of individual vehicle components and definition of equations. Model matching and estimation procedures are given which enable the modeling of specific helicopters from basic data sources such as flight manuals. Checkout procedures are given which provide for total model validation. A number of possible model extensions and refinement are discussed. Math model computer programs are defined and listed.

  8. Neuro-optimal control of helicopter UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nodland, David; Ghosh, Arpita; Zargarzadeh, H.; Jagannathan, S.

    2011-05-01

    Helicopter UAVs can be extensively used for military missions as well as in civil operations, ranging from multirole combat support and search and rescue, to border surveillance and forest fire monitoring. Helicopter UAVs are underactuated nonlinear mechanical systems with correspondingly challenging controller designs. This paper presents an optimal controller design for the regulation and vertical tracking of an underactuated helicopter using an adaptive critic neural network framework. The online approximator-based controller learns the infinite-horizon continuous-time Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation and then calculates the corresponding optimal control input that minimizes the HJB equation forward-in-time. In the proposed technique, optimal regulation and vertical tracking is accomplished by a single neural network (NN) with a second NN necessary for the virtual controller. Both of the NNs are tuned online using novel weight update laws. Simulation results are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control design in hovering applications.

  9. Disorientation phenomena in naval helicopter pilots.

    PubMed

    Tormes, F R; Guedry, F E

    1975-04-01

    The incidence of pilot disorientation in fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft has been previously investigated, but special orientation problems of naval helicopter pilots engaged in operations at sea and landing on moving platforms have not been previously investigated. A questionnaire concerning disorientations was answered anonymously and individually by 104 active naval helicopter pilots. Fifty-six percent indicated one or more espisodes of severe disorientation, and 8.6% indicated having experienced severe disorientation five or more times while piloting helicopters. A number of factors conducive to disorientation were identified. Some precipitating factors appear to be specific to operations over water or over a moving deck, although some of these may well have their counterparts in special operations over land. Other factors are common to fixed-wing as well as rotary-wing aircraft. A number of potential countermeasures for various precipitating factors are discussed.

  10. Workload and operational fatigue in helicopter pilots.

    PubMed

    Rotondo, G

    1978-02-01

    In light of the modern aetiopathogenic views, a brief review was made concerning possible causes of operational fatigue to which flying personnel in general are exposed in the exercise of flying activity. The author then describes and analyzes the meaning and importance of the various stressing factors that constitute the physical and psychic workload to which the helicopter pilot is subjected in performing his professional activities. Also analyzed are the influences exercised, both separately and jointly, on the genesis of flight fatigue in helicopter pilots by stressing and fatiguing effects of vibrations, noise, and psycho-emotional and psycho-sensorial factors related to the variety and danger of utilization of this modern aircraft. Such an analytical investigation enables the author to conclude that one must admit that helicopter piloting involves a psycho-physical workload certainly no less than that required by more powerful and faster aircraft.

  11. Helicopter impulsive noise: Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanism is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanism of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory-experiment are suggested.

  12. A comprehensive plan for helicopter drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Montana, P. S.

    1975-01-01

    Current helicopters have parasite drag levels 6 to 10 times as great as fixed wing aircraft. The commensurate poor cruise efficiency results in a substantial degradation of potential mission capability. The paper traces the origins of helicopter drag and shows that the problem (primarily due to bluff body flow separation) can be solved by the adoption of a comprehensive research and development plan. This plan, known as the Fuselage Design Methodology, comprises both nonaerodynamic and aerodynamic aspects. The aerodynamics are discussed in detail and experimental and analytical programs are described which will lead to a solution of the bluff body problem. Some recent results of work conducted at the Naval Ship Research and Development Center (NSRDC) are presented to illustrate these programs. It is concluded that a 75-per cent reduction of helicopter drag is possible by the full implementation of the Fuselage Design Methodology.

  13. A critical care helicopter system in trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, L. M.; Bennett, B.

    1989-01-01

    Civilian helicopters and emergency medical services in the United States have been in existence for approximately 15 years. The rapid growth of this type of health care delivery coupled with an increasing number of accidents has prompted professional and lay scrutiny of these programs. Although they have a demonstrated history of benefit to patients, the type and severity of injuries to patients who are eligible for helicopter transportation need further definition. The composition of the medical crews and the benefits that particular crew members bring to the patients require ongoing evaluation. Significant questions regarding the number of pilots in a helicopter and in a program remain to be answered. This article reviews the role of emergency medical air transport services in providing care to trauma patients, staff training and evaluation, and safety criteria and offers recommendations to minimize risks to patients and crews. PMID:2695653

  14. ALLFlight: multisensor data fusion for helicopter operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doehler, H.-U.; Lueken, T.

    2010-04-01

    The objective of the project ALLFlight (Assisted Low Level Flight and Landing on Unprepared Landing Sites) is to demonstrate and evaluate the characteristics of different sensors for helicopter operations within degraded visual environments, such as brownout or whiteout. The sensor suite, which is mounted onto DLR's research helicopter EC135 consists of standard color or black and white TV cameras, an un-cooled thermal infrared camera (EVS-1000, Max-Viz, USA), an optical radar scanner (HELLAS-W, EADS, Germany; a millimeter wave radar system (AI-130, ICx Radar Systems, Canada). Data processing is designed and realized by a sophisticated, high performance sensor co-computer (SCC) cluster architecture, which is installed into the helicopter's experimental electronic cargo bay. This paper describes applied methods and the software architecture in terms of real time data acquisition, recording, time stamping and sensor data fusion. First concepts for a pilot HMI are presented as well.

  15. Rare positive laboratory tests for the presence of influenza virus A/H1N1--2009 in May, June, July, 2011, in the districts of Kosice I-IV and surroundings of Kosice in the Slovak Republic.

    PubMed

    Seligová, Jana; Belyová, Anna; Culmanová, Andrea; Oleár, Vladimír; Cisláková, Lýdia

    2011-12-01

    Influenza illnesses and positive laboratory tests for the presence of influenza virus in recent years in the districts of Kosice I-IV and surroundings have only occurred during the winter season. In May to July 2010 only one positive laboratory test for the presence of influenza virus A/H1N1-2009 was reported. In 2011, during the same period, a total of 29 positive laboratory tests recorded the presence of influenza virus A/ H1N1-2009 in individuals with typical clinical symptoms of influenza. Of 29 clinical cases, 27 were diagnosed as influenza and 2 as SARI; 4 cases involved children.

  16. Evolution of the hemagglutinin expressed by human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses circulating between 2008-2009 and 2013-2014 in Germany.

    PubMed

    Wedde, Marianne; Biere, Barbara; Wolff, Thorsten; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the evolution of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses circulating in Germany between 2008-2009 and 2013-2014. The phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) genes of both subtypes revealed similar evolution of the HA variants that were also seen worldwide with minor exceptions. The analysis showed seven distinct HA clades for A(H1N1)pdm09 and six HA clades for A(H3N2) viruses. Herald strains of both subtypes appeared sporadically since 2008-2009. Regarding A(H1N1)pdm09, herald strains of HA clade 3 and 4 were detected late in the 2009-2010 season. With respect to A(H3N2), we found herald strains of HA clade 3, 4 and 7 between 2009 and 2012. Those herald strains were predominantly seen for minor and not for major HA clades. Generally, amino acid substitutions were most frequently found in the globular domain, including substitutions near the antigenic sites or the receptor binding site. Differences between both influenza A subtypes were seen with respect to the position of the indicated substitutions in the HA. For A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, we found more substitutions in the stem region than in the antigenic sites. In contrast, in A(H3N2) viruses most changes were identified in the major antigenic sites and five changes of potential glycosylation sites were identified in the head of the HA monomer. Interestingly, we found in seasons with less influenza activity a relatively high increase of substitutions in the head of the HA in both subtypes. This might be explained by the fact that mutations under negative selection are subsequently compensated by secondary mutations to restore important functions e.g. receptor binding properties. A better knowledge of basic evolution strategies of influenza viruses will contribute to the refinement of predictive mathematical models for identifying novel antigenic drift variants.

  17. Detection of pandemic strain of influenza virus (A/H1N1/pdm09) in pigs, West Africa: implications and considerations for prevention of future influenza pandemics at the source

    PubMed Central

    Adeola, Oluwagbenga A.; Olugasa, Babasola O.; Emikpe, Benjamin O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human and animal influenza are inextricably linked. In particular, the pig is uniquely important as a mixing vessel for genetic reassortment of influenza viruses, leading to emergence of novel strains which may cause human pandemics. Significant reduction in transmission of influenza viruses from humans, and other animals, to swine may therefore be crucial for preventing future influenza pandemics. This study investigated the presence of the 2009 pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus, A(H1N1)pdm09, in Nigerian and Ghanaian pigs, and also determined levels of acceptance of preventive measures which could significantly reduce the transmission of this virus from humans to pigs. Methods Nasal swab specimens from 125 pigs in Ibadan, Nigeria, and Kumasi, Ghana, were tested for the presence of influenza A/California/04/2009 (H1N1) by quantitative antigen-detection ELISA. A semi-structured questionnaire was also administered to pig handlers in the two study areas and responses were analyzed to evaluate their compliance with seven measures for preventing human-to-swine transmission of influenza viruses. Results The virus was detected among pigs in the two cities, with prevalence of 8% in Ibadan and 10% in Kumasi. Levels of compliance of pig handlers with relevant preventive measures were also found to be mostly below 25 and 40% in Ibadan and Kumasi, respectively. Conclusion Detection of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 among pigs tested suggests the possibility of human-to-swine transmission, which may proceed even more rapidly, considering the very poor acceptance of basic preventive measures observed in this study. This is also the first report on detection of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Ghanaian pigs. We recommend improvement on personal hygiene among pig handlers, enforcement of sick leave particularly during the first few days of influenza-like illnesses, and training of pig handlers on recognition of influenza-like signs in humans and pigs. These could be crucial for prevention of future influenza pandemics. PMID:26715380

  18. Triple-reassortant influenza A virus with H3 of human seasonal origin, NA of swine origin, and internal A(H1N1) pandemic 2009 genes is established in Danish pigs.

    PubMed

    Krog, Jesper Schak; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Michael Albin; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2017-02-28

    This report describes a triple-reassortant influenza A virus with a HA that resembles H3 of human seasonal influenza from 2004 to 2005, N2 from influenza A virus already established in swine, and the internal gene cassette from A(H1N1)pdm09 has spread in Danish pig herds. The virus has been detected in several Danish pig herds during the last 2-3 years and may possess a challenge for human as well as animal health.

  19. Safety and persistence of the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by 2 doses of an AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza vaccine administered to infants, children and adolescents: Two open, uncontrolled studies

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Sicilia, José; Arístegui, Javier; Omeñaca, Félix; Carmona, Alfonso; Tejedor, Juan C; Merino, José M; García-Corbeira, Pilar; Walravens, Karl; Bambure, Vinod; Moris, Philippe; Caplanusi, Adrian; Gillard, Paul; Dieussaert, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    In children, 2 AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine doses given 21 days apart were previously shown to induce a high humoral immune response and to have an acceptable safety profile up to 42 days following the first vaccination. Here, we analyzed the persistence data from 2 open-label studies, which assessed the safety, and humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by 2 doses of this vaccine. The first study was a phase II, randomized trial conducted in 104 children aged 6–35 months vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 1.9 µg haemagglutinin antigen (HA) and AS03B (5.93 mg tocopherol) and the second study, a phase III, non-randomized trial conducted in 210 children and adolescents aged 3–17 years vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 3.75 µg HA and AS03A (11.86 mg tocopherol). Approximately one year after the first dose, all children with available data were seropositive for haemagglutinin inhibition and neutralising antibody titres, but a decline in geometric mean antibody titres was noted. The vaccine induced a cell-mediated immune response in terms of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells, which persisted up to one year post-vaccination. The vaccine did not raise any safety concern, though these trials were not designed to detect rare events. In conclusion, 2 doses of the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 2 different dosages had a clinically acceptable safety profile, and induced high and persistent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in children aged 6–35 months and 3–17 years. These studies have been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00971321 and NCT00964158. PMID:26176592

  20. Predominance of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus genetic subclade 6B.1 and influenza B/Victoria lineage viruses at the start of the 2015/16 influenza season in Europe.

    PubMed

    Broberg, Eeva; Melidou, Angeliki; Prosenc, Katarina; Bragstad, Karoline; Hungnes, Olav

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses predominated in the European influenza 2015/16 season. Most analysed viruses clustered in a new genetic subclade 6B.1, antigenically similar to the northern hemisphere vaccine component A/California/7/2009. The predominant influenza B lineage was Victoria compared with Yamagata in the previous season. It remains to be evaluated at the end of the season if these changes affected the effectiveness of the vaccine for the 2015/16 season.

  1. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus exhibiting enhanced cross-resistance to oseltamivir and peramivir due to a dual H275Y/G147R substitution, Japan, March 2016.

    PubMed

    Takashita, Emi; Fujisaki, Seiichiro; Shirakura, Masayuki; Nakamura, Kazuya; Kishida, Noriko; Kuwahara, Tomoko; Shimazu, Yukie; Shimomura, Takeshi; Watanabe, Shinji; Odagiri, Takato

    2016-06-16

    An influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus carrying a G147R substitution in combination with an H275Y substitution in the neuraminidase protein, which confers cross-resistance to oseltamivir and peramivir, was detected from an immunocompromised inpatient in Japan, March 2016. This dual H275Y/G147R mutant virus exhibited enhanced cross-resistance to both drugs compared with the single H275Y mutant virus and reduced susceptibility to zanamivir, although it showed normal inhibition by laninamivir.

  2. Helicopter Mechanic Career Ladder (AFSC 431X0C/D).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    SYSTEMS ON H-i HELICOPTERS 88 G352 LAUNCH H-i HELICOPTERS 88 G415 REMOVE OR INSTALL BATTERIES ON H-i HELICOPTERS 88 G351 JACK H-i HELICOPTERS 88 F165...PREPARE AFTO FORMS 781H (AEROSPACE VEHICLE FLIGHT STATUS AND MAINTENANCE DOCUMENT) 72 G351 JACK H-i HELICOPTERS 72 E122 PREPARE AFTO FORMS 350...H-I HELICOPTERS 97 G308 ATTACH OR DETACH TOW BARS ON H-i HELICOPTERS 96 G351 JACK H-I HELICOPTERS 95 G507 TIE DOWN BLADES ON H-i HELICOPTERS 93 G336

  3. The Development of the Skull of the Egyptian Cobra Naja h. haje (Squamata: Serpentes: Elapidae)

    PubMed Central

    Khannoon, Eraqi R.; Evans, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The study of craniofacial development is important in understanding the ontogenetic processes behind morphological diversity. A complete morphological description of the embryonic skull development of the Egyptian cobra, Naja h. haje, is lacking and there has been little comparative discussion of skull development either among elapid snakes or between them and other snakes. Methodology/Principal Findings We present a description of skull development through a full sequence of developmental stages of the Egyptian cobra, and compare it to other snakes. Associated soft tissues of the head are noted where relevant. The first visible ossification centres are in the supratemporal, prearticular and surangular, with slight ossification visible in parts of the maxilla, prefrontal, and dentary. Epiotic centres of ossification are present in the supraoccipital, and the body of the supraoccipital forms from the tectum posterior not the tectum synoticum. The venom glands are visible as distinct bodies as early at stage 5 and enlarge later to extend from the otic capsule to the maxilla level with the anterior margin of the eye. The gland becomes more prominent shortly before hatching, concomitant with the development of the fangs. The tongue shows incipient forking at stage 5, and becomes fully bifid at stage 6. Conclusions/Significance We present the first detailed staging series of cranial development for the Egyptian cobra, Naja h. haje. This is one of the first studies since the classical works of G. de Beer and W. Parker that provides a detailed description of cranial development in an advanced snake species. It allows us to correct errors and misinterpretations in previous accounts which were based on a small sample of specimens of uncertain age. Our results highlight potentially significant variation in supraoccipital formation among squamates and the need for further research in this area. PMID:25860015

  4. Coiled Brine Recovery Assembly (CoBRA): A New Approach to Recovering Water from Wastewater Brines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pensinger, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Brine water recovery represents a current technology gap in water recycling for human spaceflight. The role of a brine processor is to take the concentrated discharge from a primary wastewater processor, called brine, and recover most of the remaining water from it. The current state-of-the-art primary processor is the ISS Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) that currently achieves 70% water recovery. Recent advancements in chemical pretreatments are expected to increase this to 85% in the near future. This is a welcome improvement, yet is still not high enough for deep space transit. Mission architecture studies indicate that at least 95% is necessary for a Mars mission, as an example. Brine water recovery is the technology that bridges the gap between 85% and 95%, and moves life support systems one step closer to full closure of the water loop. Several brine water recovery systems have been proposed for human spaceflight, most of them focused on solving two major problems: operation in a weightless environment, and management and containment of brine residual. Brine residual is the leftover byproduct of the brine recovery process, and is often a viscous, sticky paste, laden with crystallized solid particles. Due to the chemical pretreatments added to wastewater prior to distillation in a primary processor, these residuals are typically toxic, which further complicates matters. Isolation of crewmembers from these hazardous materials is paramount. The Coiled Brine Recovery Assembly (CoBRA) is a recently developed concept from the Johnson Space Center that offers solutions to these challenges. CoBRA is centered on a softgoods evaporator that enables a passive fill with brine, and regeneration by discharging liquid brine residual to a collection bag. This evaporator is meant to be lightweight, which allows it to be discarded along with the accumulated brine solids contained within it. This paper discusses design and development of a first CoBRA prototype, and reports

  5. Antiproliferative activity of king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Li Lee, Mui; Chung, Ivy; Yee Fung, Shin; Kanthimathi, M S; Hong Tan, Nget

    2014-04-01

    King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), a heat-stable enzyme, is an extremely potent antiproliferative agent against cancer cells when compared with LAAO isolated from other snake venoms. King cobra venom LAAO was shown to exhibit very strong antiproliferative activities against MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma) and A549 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cells, with an IC50 value of 0.04±0.00 and 0.05±0.00 μg/mL, respectively, after 72-hr treatment. In comparison, its cytotoxicity was about 3-4 times lower when tested against human non-tumourigenic breast (184B5) and lung (NL 20) cells, suggesting selective antitumour activity. Furthermore, its potency in MCF-7 and A549 cell lines was greater than the effects of doxorubicin, a clinically established cancer chemotherapeutic agent, which showed an IC50 value of 0.18±0.03 and 0.63±0.21 μg/mL, respectively, against the two cell lines. The selective cytotoxic action of the LAAO was confirmed by phycoerythrin (PE) annexin V/7-amino-actinomycin (AAD) apoptotic assay, in which a significant increase in apoptotic cells was observed in LAAO-treated tumour cells than in their non-tumourigenic counterparts. The ability of LAAO to induce apoptosis in tumour cells was further demonstrated using caspase-3/7 and DNA fragmentation assays. We also determined that this enzyme may target oxidative stress in its killing of tumour cells, as its cytotoxicity was significantly reduced in the presence of catalase (a H2O2 scavenger). In view of its heat stability and selective and potent cytotoxic action on cancer cells, king cobra venom LAAO can be potentially developed for treating solid tumours.

  6. Purification of native and recombinant cobra venom factor using thiophilic adsorption chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kölln, Johanna; Braren, Ingke; Bredehorst, Reinhard; Spillner, Edzard

    2007-01-01

    The complement activating venom component Cobra Venom Factor (CVF) forms a stable CVF-dependent C3 convertase complex, which initiates continuous activation of the complement system, consumes all downstream complement components and obliterates functional complement. Therefore, native CVF is routinely used as decomplementing agent in vivo and in vitro. However, in most countries, CVF and even unfractionated cobra venom are now becoming unavailable due to the CITES agreement. Although CVF is a complex molecule with three disulfide linked polypeptide chains and pronounced glycosylation, recombinant expression of the active molecule in eukaryotic host cells may provide an alternative source. In this study we describe a strategy for the production and efficient isolation of recombinant CVF from supernatant of mammalian cells. Thiophilic adsorption chromatography (TAC), an efficient procedure for purification of the human homologue C3, was evaluated for its suitability regarding purification of both native as well as recombinant CVF. Native CVF could be purified by TAC in a one-step procedure from cobra venom with yields of 92% compared to 35% by conventional approaches. After establishment of stably transfected mammalian cells recombinant CVF could be obtained and enriched from CHO supernatants by TAC to a purity of 73%, and up to 90% if an additional affinity chromatography step was included. Subsequent characterization revealed comparable hemolytic and bystander lysis activity and of rCVF and nCVF. These data demonstrate that the functional expression in mammalian cells in combination with TAC for purification renders rCVF a highly attractive substitute for its native counterpart.

  7. A parallelization approach to the COBRA-TF thermal-hydraulic subchannel code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Enrique; Abarca, Agustín; Roman, Jose E.; Miró, Rafael

    2014-06-01

    In order to reduce the response time when simulating large reactors in detail, we have developed a parallel version of the thermal-hydraulic subchannel code COBRA-TF, with standard message passing technology (MPI). The parallelization is oriented to reactor cells, so it is best suited for models consisting of many cells. The generation of the Jacobian is parallelized, in such a way that each processor is in charge of generating the data associated to a subset of cells. Also, the solution of the linear system of equations is done in parallel, using the PETSc toolkit.

  8. Studies of Hot Spots in Imploding Wire Arrays at 1 MA on COBRA

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, Sergey A.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; McBride, Ryan D.; Hammer, David A.

    2009-01-21

    We present recent results from hot spot investigations in imploding Al wire array z-pinches on the COBRA generator at Cornell University using x-ray diagnostics. Measurements of the temporal and spatial distribution of hot spots in stagnating plasmas by an x-ray streak-camera are included. Experiments show that hot spots have nanosecond lifetime and appear randomly along the array axis after plasma stagnation in secondary pinches in 8 mm diameter and during plasma stagnation in the arrays with 4 mm diameter.

  9. Hannahpep: A novel fibrinolytic peptide from the Indian King Cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom.

    PubMed

    Gomes, A; De, P

    1999-12-20

    A novel fibrinolytic peptide (Hannahpep) was isolated and purified from the venom of the Indian King Cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) by thin-layer chromatography followed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The MW of the peptide was found to be 610 Da and the amino acid sequence of Hannahpep was determined to be Arg, His, Ala, Arg, His, Asp. Hannahpep produced defibrinogenating activity in male albino mice. It exhibited significant fibrinolytic and fibrinogenolytic activity in vitro. Hannahpep showed plasma-anticlotting activity. However, it lacked hemolytic, hemorrhagic, or phospholipase activity. This peptide may have possible therapeutic application in the management of thrombosis or occlusion of a blood vessel.

  10. Helicopter trajectory planning using optimal control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Cheng, V. H. L.; Kim, E.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for optimal trajectory planning, useful in the nap-of-the-earth guidance of helicopters, is presented. This approach uses an adjoint-control transformation along with a one-dimensional search scheme for generating the optimal trajectories. In addition to being useful for helicopter nap-of-the-earth guidance, the trajectory planning solution is of interest in several other contexts, such as robotic vehicle guidance and terrain-following guidance for cruise missiles and aircraft. A distinguishing feature of the present research is that the terrain constraint and the threat envelopes are incorporated in the equations of motion. Second-order necessary conditions are examined.

  11. CMU's autonomous helicopter explores new territory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, J.

    1998-10-01

    In the summer of 1998, several members of Carnegie Mellon University's (CMUs) Autonomous Helicopter Project team joined NASA on a multidisciplinary expedition to the Canadian Arctic's Haughton Crater. NASA was willing to travel to such a remote corner of the globe because of its similarity to an even more remote locale - Mars. Researchers are studying the 23-million-year-old meteorite impact crater in the hope of learning more about Mars's environment. While there, they also tested a number of technologies that will enable future exploration of Mars, including CMU's autonomous helicopter.

  12. Influence of maneuverability on helicopter combat effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falco, M.; Smith, R.

    1982-01-01

    A computational procedure employing a stochastic learning method in conjunction with dynamic simulation of helicopter flight and weapon system operation was used to derive helicopter maneuvering strategies. The derived strategies maximize either survival or kill probability and are in the form of a feedback control based upon threat visual or warning system cues. Maneuverability parameters implicit in the strategy development include maximum longitudinal acceleration and deceleration, maximum sustained and transient load factor turn rate at forward speed, and maximum pedal turn rate and lateral acceleration at hover. Results are presented in terms of probability of skill for all combat initial conditions for two threat categories.

  13. Efficient fault diagnosis of helicopter gearboxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, H.; Danai, K.; Lewicki, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    Application of a diagnostic system to a helicopter gearbox is presented. The diagnostic system is a nonparametric pattern classifier that uses a multi-valued influence matrix (MVIM) as its diagnostic model and benefits from a fast learning algorithm that enables it to estimate its diagnostic model from a small number of measurement-fault data. To test this diagnostic system, vibration measurements were collected from a helicopter gearbox test stand during accelerated fatigue tests and at various fault instances. The diagnostic results indicate that the MVIM system can accurately detect and diagnose various gearbox faults so long as they are included in training.

  14. Contingency power concepts for helicopter turboshaft engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschkron, R.; Davis, R. H.; Goldstein, D. N.; Haynes, J. F.; Gauntner, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Twin helicopter engines are often sized by power requirement of safe mission completion after the failure of one of the two engines. This study was undertaken for NASA Lewis by General Electric Co. to evaluate the merits of special design features to provide a 2-1/2 minute Contingency Power rating, permitting an engine size reduction. The merits of water injection, cooling flow modulation, throttle push and an auxiliary power plant were evaluated using military life cycle cost (LCC) and commercial helicopter direct operating cost (DOC) merit factors in a rubber engine/rubber aircraft scenario.

  15. Helicopter-based live-line work. Volume 1, Helicopter platform work between phases: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gela, G.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents experimental data on tests of a configuration consisting of a helicopter between two energized phases (for AC and switching surge) or poles (for DC). The configuration is that related to live-line work from a hovering helicopter. The McDonnell Douglas 500 Series helicopter was used for the tests. All tests were performed with phase-to-phase, or pole-to-pole energization. For AC tests, proper relationship between the phase-to-ground voltages and the phase-to-phase voltage was maintained by energizing the experimental setup from a balanced 3-{phi} AC source. For DC tests, one pole was energized with positive DC voltage to ground, while the other pole was energized with negative DC voltage to ground. For switching surge tests, a surge of positive polarity and a specific peak voltage magnitude was applied to one phase while a surge of negative polarity and the same peak voltage Magnitude was simultaneously applied to the other phase, resulting in {alpha} = 0.5 ({alpha} is the ratio between negative and total surge). In the research program, four conditions were investigated, namely helicopter operating versus not operating, and helicopter bonded to one phase or pole versus not bonded. Results from this research show effects of the rotating main rotor blade of the helicopter, effect of the position of the electrically floating helicopter in the phase-to-phase or pole-to-pole gap, effects of the mannequin, importance of the polarity of the DC poles and switching surges, and effects of inclement weather such as rain. The overall conclusion of this research is that the phase-to-phase or pole-to-pole spacings that cause sparkover with the helicopter between phases (poles) were always significantly smaller than the typical spacings on actual existing overhead transmission lines of the corresponding voltage rating.

  16. A subregional analysis of epidemiologic and genetic characteristics of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Africa: Senegal, Cape Verde, Mauritania, and Guinea, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Dia, Ndongo; Ndiaye, Mbayame Niang; Monteiro, Maria de Lourdes; Koivogui, Lamine; Bara, Mohamed Ould; Diop, Ousmane M

    2013-05-01

    During the pandemic 2009 episode, we conducted laboratory-based surveillance in four countries from West Africa: Senegal, Mauritania, Cape Verde, and Guinea. Specimens were obtained from 3,155 patients: 2,264 patients from Senegal, 498 patients from Cape Verde, 227 patients from Mauritania, and 166 patients from Guinea; 911 (28.9%) patients were positive for influenza, 826 (90.7%) patients were positive for influenza A, and 85 (9.3%) patients were positive for influenza B. Among the influenza A positives, 503 (60.9%) positives were H1N1pdm09, 314 (38.0%) positives were H3N2, and 9 (1.1%) positives were seasonal H1N1. The highest detection rate for seasonal influenza viruses (17.1%) occurred in the 5-14 years age group. However, for A(H1N1)pdm09, the detection rate was highest in the 15-24 years age group (35.8%). Based on the present study data, the timeline of detection of A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses in these four countries should be Cape Verde, Guinea, Mauritania, and finally, Senegal. Genetic and antigenic analyses were performed in some isolates.

  17. COBRA-SFS: A thermal-hydraulic analysis code for spent fuel storage and transportation casks

    SciTech Connect

    Michener, T.E.; Rector, D.R.; Cuta, J.M.; Dodge, R.E.; Enderlin, C.W.

    1995-09-01

    COBRA-SFS is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code for prediction of material temperatures and fluid conditions in a wide variety of systems. The code has been validated for analysis of spent fuel storage systems, as part of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program of the US Department of Energy. The code solves finite volume equations representing the conservation equations for mass, moment, and energy for an incompressible single-phase heat transfer fluid. The fluid solution is coupled to a finite volume solution of the conduction equation in the solid structure of the system. This document presents a complete description of Cycle 2 of COBRA-SFS, and consists of three main parts. Part 1 describes the conservation equations, constitutive models, and solution methods used in the code. Part 2 presents the User Manual, with guidance on code applications, and complete input instructions. This part also includes a detailed description of the auxiliary code RADGEN, used to generate grey body view factors required as input for radiative heat transfer modeling in the code. Part 3 describes the code structure, platform dependent coding, and program hierarchy. Installation instructions are also given for the various platform versions of the code that are available.

  18. Ohanin, a novel protein from king cobra venom: its cDNA and genomic organization.

    PubMed

    Pung, Yuh Fen; Kumar, Sanjeed Vijaya; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Fry, Bryan G; Kumar, Prakash P; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2006-04-26

    Ohanin, from king cobra venom, is a novel protein which induces hypolocomotion and hyperalgesia in mice [Pung, Y.F., Wong, P.T.H., Kumar, P.P., Hodgson W.C., Kini, R.M., 2005. Ohanin, a novel protein from king cobra venom induces hypolocomotion and hyperalgesia in mice. J. Biol. Chem. 280, 13137-13147.]. It is weakly similar to PRY-SPRY domains (B30.2-like domain). Here we report the complete cDNA and genomic organization of ohanin. Interestingly, cDNA sequence does not show significant sequence similarity to any known sequences, including those of B30.2-like domain-containing proteins. Its full-length cDNA sequence of 1558 bp encodes for prepro-ohanin with a propeptide segment at the C-terminal. Ohanin is the first member of a new subfamily of proteins containing B30.2-like domain with short N-terminal segment. We named this subfamily as vespryns. There are two mRNA subtypes differing in their 5'-untranslated regions. Southern hybridization study shows that ohanin is encoded by a single gene. Its genomic sequence is 7086 bp with five exons and four introns, and the two types of mRNAs are generated by alternative splicing of exon 2. Our results indicate that ohanin and vespryns may have evolved from the same ancestral gene as B30.2 domain.

  19. The king cobra genome reveals dynamic gene evolution and adaptation in the snake venom system.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Freek J; Casewell, Nicholas R; Henkel, Christiaan V; Heimberg, Alysha M; Jansen, Hans J; McCleary, Ryan J R; Kerkkamp, Harald M E; Vos, Rutger A; Guerreiro, Isabel; Calvete, Juan J; Wüster, Wolfgang; Woods, Anthony E; Logan, Jessica M; Harrison, Robert A; Castoe, Todd A; de Koning, A P Jason; Pollock, David D; Yandell, Mark; Calderon, Diego; Renjifo, Camila; Currier, Rachel B; Salgado, David; Pla, Davinia; Sanz, Libia; Hyder, Asad S; Ribeiro, José M C; Arntzen, Jan W; van den Thillart, Guido E E J M; Boetzer, Marten; Pirovano, Walter; Dirks, Ron P; Spaink, Herman P; Duboule, Denis; McGlinn, Edwina; Kini, R Manjunatha; Richardson, Michael K

    2013-12-17

    Snakes are limbless predators, and many species use venom to help overpower relatively large, agile prey. Snake venoms are complex protein mixtures encoded by several multilocus gene families that function synergistically to cause incapacitation. To examine venom evolution, we sequenced and interrogated the genome of a venomous snake, the king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), and compared it, together with our unique transcriptome, microRNA, and proteome datasets from this species, with data from other vertebrates. In contrast to the platypus, the only other venomous vertebrate with a sequenced genome, we find that snake toxin genes evolve through several distinct co-option mechanisms and exhibit surprisingly variable levels of gene duplication and directional selection that correlate with their functional importance in prey capture. The enigmatic accessory venom gland shows a very different pattern of toxin gene expression from the main venom gland and seems to have recruited toxin-like lectin genes repeatedly for new nontoxic functions. In addition, tissue-specific microRNA analyses suggested the co-option of core genetic regulatory components of the venom secretory system from a pancreatic origin. Although the king cobra is limbless, we recovered coding sequences for all Hox genes involved in amniote limb development, with the exception of Hoxd12. Our results provide a unique view of the origin and evolution of snake venom and reveal multiple genome-level adaptive responses to natural selection in this complex biological weapon system. More generally, they provide insight into mechanisms of protein evolution under strong selection.

  20. Developments in high-density Cobra fiber positioners for the Subaru Telescope's Prime Focus Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Charles D.; Braun, David F.; Kaluzny, Joel V.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Dekany, Richard G.; Ellis, Richard S.; Smith, Roger M.

    2012-09-01

    The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a fiber fed multi-object spectrometer for the Subaru Telescope that will conduct a variety of targeted surveys for studies of dark energy, galaxy evolution, and galactic archaeology. The key to the instrument is a high density array of fiber positioners placed at the prime focus of the Subaru Telescope. The system, nicknamed “Cobra”, will be capable of rapidly reconfiguring the array of 2394 optical fibers to the image positions of astronomical targets in the focal plane with high accuracy. The system uses 2394 individual “SCARA robot” mechanisms that are 7.7mm in diameter and use 2 piezo-electric rotary motors to individually position each of the optical fibers within its patrol region. Testing demonstrates that the Cobra positioner can be moved to within 5μm of an astronomical target in 6 move iterations with a success rate of 95%. The Cobra system is a key aspect of PFS that will enable its unprecedented combination of high-multiplex factor and observing efficiency on the Subaru telescope. The requirements, design, and prototyping efforts for the fiber positioner system for the PFS are described here as are the plans for modular construction, assembly, integration, functional testing, and performance validation.