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Sample records for aharonov-bohm ab oscillations

  1. Polarization and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in quantum-ring magnetoexcitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dias da Silva, Luis G.G.V.; Ulloa, Sergio E.; Shahbazyan, Tigran V.

    2005-09-15

    We study interaction and radial polarization effects on the absorption spectrum of neutral bound magnetoexcitons confined in quantum-ring structures. We show that the size and orientation of the exciton's dipole moment, as well as the interaction screening, play important roles in the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations. In particular, the excitonic absorption peaks display AB oscillations both in position and amplitude for weak electron-hole interaction and large radial polarization. The presence of impurity scattering induces anticrossings in the exciton spectrum, leading to a modulation in the absorption strength. These properties could be used in experimental investigations of the effect in semiconductor quantum-ring structures.

  2. Recovery of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in asymmetrical quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskoboynikov, O.

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate suppression and recovery of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the diamagnetic response of electrons (holes) confined in self-assembled IncGa1-cAs/GaAs semiconductor reflection asymmetrical quantum rings. Based on the mapping method and gauge-origin-independent definition for the magnetic vector potential we simulate the energies and wave functions of the electron (hole) under external magnetic and electric fields. We examine the transformation of the ground state wave function of the electron (hole) in reflection asymmetrical rings from localized in one of the potential valleys (dotlike shape of the wave function) to distributed over all volume of the ring (ringlike shape) under an appropriate lateral electric field. This transformation greatly recovers the electron (hole) diamagnetic coefficient and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the diamagnetic response of the ring. However, the recovering electric field for the first Aharonov-Bohm diamagnetic oscillation of the electron is a suppressing one for the hole (and vice versa). This can block the recovery of the optical Aharonow-Bohm effect in IncGa1-cAs/GaAs asymmetrically wobbled rings. However, the recovery of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations for the independent electron (hole) by the external electric field remains interesting and feasible objective for the asymmetric rings.

  3. Beating of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in a closed-loop interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Sanghyun; Chang, Dong-In; Lee, Hu-Jong; Khym, Gyong Luck; Kang, Kicheon; Chung, Yunchul; Mahalu, Diana; Umansky, Vladimir

    2007-07-15

    One of the points at issue with closed-loop-type interferometers is beating in the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations. Recent observations suggest the possibility that the beating results from the Berry-phase pickup by the conducting electrons in materials with the strong spin-orbit interaction (SOI). In this study, we also observed beats in the AB oscillations in a gate-defined closed-loop interferometer fabricated on a GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As two-dimensional electron-gas heterostructure. Since this heterostructure has very small SOI, the picture of the Berry-phase pickup is ruled out. The observation of beats in this study, with the controllability of forming a single transverse subband mode in both arms of our gate-defined interferometer, also rules out the often-claimed multiple transverse subband effect. It is observed that nodes of the beats with an h/2e period exhibit a parabolic distribution for varying the side gate. These results are shown to be well interpreted, without resorting to the SOI effect, by the existence of two-dimensional multiple longitudinal modes in a single transverse subband. The Fourier spectrum of measured conductance, despite showing multiple h/e peaks with the magnetic-field dependence that are very similar to that from strong-SOI materials, can also be interpreted as the two-dimensional multiple-longitudinal-modes effect.

  4. Aharonov-Bohm radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones-Smith, Katherine; Mathur, Harsh; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2010-02-15

    A solenoid oscillating in vacuum will pair produce charged particles due to the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interaction. We calculate the radiation pattern and power emitted for charged scalar particles. We extend the solenoid analysis to cosmic strings and find enhanced radiation from cusps and kinks on loops. We argue by analogy with the electromagnetic AB interaction that cosmic strings should emit photons due to the gravitational AB interaction of fields in the conical spacetime of a cosmic string. We calculate the emission from a kink and find that it is of similar order as emission from a cusp, but kinks are vastly more numerous than cusps and may provide a more interesting observational signature.

  5. Distinguishability of stacks in ZnTe/ZnSe quantum dots via spectral analysis of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Bidisha; Ji, Haojie; Dhomkar, Siddharth; Cadieu, Fred J.; Peng, Le; Moug, Richard; Tamargo, Maria C.; Kuskovsky, Igor L.

    2013-02-01

    A spectral analysis of the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations in photoluminescence intensity was performed for stacked type-II ZnTe/ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) fabricated within multilayered Zn-Se-Te system with sub-monolayer insertions of Te. Robust AB oscillations allowed for fine probing of distinguishable QDs stacks within the ensemble of QDs. The AB transition magnetic field, B AB , changed from the lower energy side to the higher energy side of the PL spectra revealing the presence of different sets of QDs stacks. The change occurs within the spectral range, where the contributing green and blue bands of the spectra overlapped. "Bundling" in lifetime measurements is seen at transition spectral regions confirming the results.

  6. Impurity-modulated Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and intraband optical absorption in quantum dot-ring nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barseghyan, M. G.; Manaselyan, A. Kh.; Laroze, D.; Kirakosyan, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we study the electronic states in quantum dot-ring complex nanostructures with an on-center hydrogenic impurity. The influence of the impurity on Aharonov-Bohm energy spectra oscillations and intraband optical absorption is investigated. It is shown that in the presence of a hydrogenic donor impurity the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in quantum dot-ring structures become highly tunable. Furthermore, the presence of the impurity drastically changes the intraband absorption spectra due to the strong controllability of the electron localization type.

  7. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in a quasi-ballistic three-dimensional topological insulator nanowire.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sungjae; Dellabetta, Brian; Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John; Liu, Tiansheng; Gu, Genda; Gilbert, Matthew J; Mason, Nadya

    2015-07-09

    Aharonov-Bohm oscillations effectively demonstrate coherent, ballistic transport in mesoscopic rings and tubes. In three-dimensional topological insulator nanowires, they can be used to not only characterize surface states but also to test predictions of unique topological behaviour. Here we report measurements of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in (Bi1.33Sb0.67)Se3 that demonstrate salient features of topological nanowires. By fabricating quasi-ballistic three-dimensional topological insulator nanowire devices that are gate-tunable through the Dirac point, we are able to observe alternations of conductance maxima and minima with gate voltage. Near the Dirac point, we observe conductance minima for zero magnetic flux through the nanowire and corresponding maxima (having magnitudes of almost a conductance quantum) at magnetic flux equal to half a flux quantum; this is consistent with the presence of a low-energy topological mode. The observation of this mode is a necessary step towards utilizing topological properties at the nanoscale in post-CMOS applications.

  8. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Xian; Li, Cai-Zhen; Yu, Da-Peng; Liao, Zhi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional Dirac semimetals, three-dimensional analogues of graphene, are unusual quantum materials with massless Dirac fermions, which can be further converted to Weyl fermions by breaking time reversal or inversion symmetry. Topological surface states with Fermi arcs are predicted on the surface and have been observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments. Although the exotic transport properties of the bulk Dirac cones have been demonstrated, it is still a challenge to reveal the surface states via transport measurements due to the highly conductive bulk states. Here, we show Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in individual single-crystal Cd3As2 nanowires with low carrier concentration and large surface-to-volume ratio, providing transport evidence of the surface state in three-dimensional Dirac semimetals. Moreover, the quantum transport can be modulated by tuning the Fermi level using a gate voltage, enabling a deeper understanding of the rich physics residing in Dirac semimetals. PMID:26902716

  9. Magneto-optical properties in inhomogeneous quantum dot: The Aharonov-Bohm oscillations effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasri, Djillali; Bettahar, N.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we investigated theoretically the effect of a magnetic field B on the linear, nonlinear, and total absorption coefficients (ACs) and the refractive index changes (RICs) associated with intersubband transitions in the HgS quantum shell. In the calculations, a diagonalization method was employed within the effective-mass approximation. We find that a three kinds of optical transitions (S-P, P-D and D-F) between the ground state and the first excited state appear, resulting from the oscillation of the ground state with B (Aharonov-Bohm effect). In the other hand, the magnetic field enhances and diminishes their related RICs and ACs intensities respectively for the three kinds of optical transitions, and shifts their peaks towards low energy (blue shift).

  10. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Xian; Li, Cai-Zhen; Yu, Da-Peng; Liao, Zhi-Min

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional Dirac semimetals, three-dimensional analogues of graphene, are unusual quantum materials with massless Dirac fermions, which can be further converted to Weyl fermions by breaking time reversal or inversion symmetry. Topological surface states with Fermi arcs are predicted on the surface and have been observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments. Although the exotic transport properties of the bulk Dirac cones have been demonstrated, it is still a challenge to reveal the surface states via transport measurements due to the highly conductive bulk states. Here, we show Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in individual single-crystal Cd3As2 nanowires with low carrier concentration and large surface-to-volume ratio, providing transport evidence of the surface state in three-dimensional Dirac semimetals. Moreover, the quantum transport can be modulated by tuning the Fermi level using a gate voltage, enabling a deeper understanding of the rich physics residing in Dirac semimetals.

  11. Berry's phase manifestation in Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in single Bi nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitsu, D. V.; Huber, T. E.; Konopko, L. A.; Nikolaeva, A. A.

    2009-02-01

    Here we report on Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of magnetoresistance (MR) of the single Bi nanowires with diameter d<80 nm. The samples were prepared by Ulitovsky technique and represented cylindrical single crystals with the 1011 orientation along the wire axis. Due to semimetal-to-semiconductor transformation and big density of surface states with strong spin-orbit interactions Bi nanowire should effectively become a conducting tube. The equidistant oscillations of the MR have been observed in a wide range of magnetic fields up to 14 T at various temperatures (1.5 K< T< 4.2 K) and angles θ (0< θ < 90°) of the sample orientation relative to the magnetic field. We have obtained longitudinal MR oscillations with periods ΔB1=Φ0/S and ΔB2=Φ0/2S, where Φ0=h/e is the flux quantum and S is the wire cross section. From B approx 8 T down to B=0 the extremums of Φ0/2S oscillations are shifted up to 3π at B=0 which is the manifestation of Berry phase shift due to carriers moving in inhomogeneous magnetic field. An interpretation of the MR oscillations in terms of a subband structure in the surface state band caused by quantum interference is presented.

  12. Aharonov-bohm paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trammel, G. T.

    1964-01-01

    Aharonov-bohm paradox involving charge particle interaction with stationary current distribution showing that vector potential term in canonical momenta expression represents electromagnetic field momentum

  13. Inelastic transport through Aharonov-Bohm interferometer in Kondo regime

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshii, Ryosuke; Eto, Mikio; Sakano, Rui; Affleck, Ian

    2013-12-04

    We formulate elastic and inelastic parts of linear conductance through an Aharonov-Bohm (AB) ring with an embedded quantum dot in the Kondo regime. The inelastic part G{sub inel} is proportional to T{sup 2} when the temperature T is much smaller than the Kondo temperature T{sub K}, whereas it is negligibly small compared with elastic part G{sub el} when T ≫ T{sub K}. G{sub inel} weakly depends on the magnetic flux penetrating the AB ring, which disturbs the precise detection of G{sub el}/(G{sub el}+G{sub inel}) by the visibility of AB oscillation.

  14. Aharonov-Bohm and Aharonov-Casher tunneling effects and edge states in double-barrier structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bogachek, E.N.; Landman, U. )

    1994-07-15

    The simultaneous occurrence of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) effects due to edge states in double-barrier two-dimensional wires formed by an electrostatic confinement potential, in the quantum Hall effect regime, is discussed. The AC effect is manifested via a shift of the AB conductance oscillations, and a method for measurement of the effect is proposed.

  15. On the Aharonov-Bohm effect with neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Peshkin, M.

    1994-11-01

    The neutron interferometry phenomenon called scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect (SAB) follows from an ordinary local interaction, contrary to the usual Aharonov-Bohm effect with electrons (AB). I argue that SAB is not a topological effect by any useful definition. SAB in fact measures an apparently novel spin autocorrelation whose operator equations of motion contain the local torque in the magnetic field. The Aharonov-Casher effect shares these properties with SAB.

  16. Magnetic edge states in Aharonov-Bohm graphene quantum rings

    SciTech Connect

    Farghadan, R. Heidari Semiromi, E.; Saffarzadeh, A.

    2013-12-07

    The effect of electron-electron interaction on the electronic structure of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) graphene quantum rings (GQRs) is explored theoretically using the single-band tight-binding Hamiltonian and the mean-field Hubbard model. The electronic states and magnetic properties of hexagonal, triangular, and circular GQRs with different sizes and zigzag edge terminations are studied. The results show that, although the AB oscillations in the all types of nanoring are affected by the interaction, the spin splitting in the AB oscillations strongly depends on the geometry and the size of graphene nanorings. We found that the total spin of hexagonal and circular rings is zero and therefore, no spin splitting can be observed in the AB oscillations. However, the non-zero magnetization of the triangular rings breaks the degeneracy between spin-up and spin-down electrons, which produces spin-polarized AB oscillations.

  17. Aharonov-Bohm radiation of fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Yizen; Mathur, Harsh; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2010-09-15

    We analyze Aharonov-Bohm radiation of charged fermions from oscillating solenoids and cosmic strings. We find that the angular pattern of the radiation has features that differ significantly from that for bosons. For example, fermionic radiation in the lowest harmonic is approximately isotropically distributed around an oscillating solenoid, whereas for bosons the radiation is dipolar. We also investigate the spin polarization of the emitted fermion-antifermion pair. Fermionic radiation from kinks and cusps on cosmic strings is shown to depend linearly on the ultraviolet cutoff, suggesting strong emission at an energy scale comparable to the string energy scale.

  18. Group-theoretical derivation of Aharonov-Bohm phase shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, C. R.

    2013-02-15

    The phase shifts of the Aharonov-Bohm effect are generally determined by means of the partial wave decomposition of the underlying Schroedinger equation. It is shown here that they readily emerge from an o(2,1) calculation of the energy levels employing an added harmonic oscillator potential which discretizes the spectrum.

  19. Flux effect in superconducting hybrid Aharonov-Bohm rings

    SciTech Connect

    Stoof, T.H.; Nazarov, Y.V.

    1996-07-01

    We have extended the circuit theory of Andreev conductance [Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 73}, 1420 (1994)] to diffusive superconducting hybrid structures that contain an Aharonov-Bohm ring. The electrostatic potential distribution in the system is predicted to be flux dependent with a period of the superconducting flux quantum {Phi}{sub 0}={ital h}/2{ital e}. When at least one tunnel barrier is present, the conductance of the system oscillates with the same period. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Macroscopic Test of the Aharonov-Bohm Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Caprez, Adam; Barwick, Brett; Batelaan, Herman

    2007-11-23

    The Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect is a purely quantum mechanical effect. The original (classified as type-I) AB-phase shift exists in experimental conditions where the electromagnetic fields and forces are zero. It is the absence of forces that makes the AB effect entirely quantum mechanical. Although the AB-phase shift has been demonstrated unambiguously, the absence of forces in type-I AB effects has never been shown. Here, we report the observation of the absence of time delays associated with forces of the magnitude needed to explain the AB-phase shift for a macroscopic system.

  1. The interplay between the Aharonov-Bohm interference and parity selective tunneling in graphene nanoribbon rings.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V Hung; Niquet, Y-M; Dollfus, P

    2014-05-21

    We report on a numerical study of the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect and parity selective tunneling in pn junctions based on rectangular graphene rings where the contacts and ring arms are all made of zigzag nanoribbons. We find that when applying a magnetic field to the ring, the AB interference can reverse the parity symmetry of incoming waves and hence can strongly modulate the parity selective transmission through the system. Therefore, the transmission between two states of different parity exhibits the AB oscillations with a π-phase shift, compared to the case of states of the same parity. On this basis, it is shown that interesting effects, such as giant (both positive and negative) magnetoresistance and strong negative differential conductance, can be achieved in this structure. Our study thus presents a new property of the AB interference in graphene nanorings, which could be helpful for further understanding the transport properties of graphene mesoscopic systems. PMID:24785639

  2. Aharonov-Bohm effect without closing a loop

    SciTech Connect

    Retzker, A.; Nussinov, S.; Reznik, B.; Aharonov, Y.; Botero, A.

    2006-03-15

    We discuss the consequences of the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in setups involving several charged particles, wherein none of the charged particles encloses a closed loop around the magnetic flux. We show that in such setups, the AB phase is encoded either in the relative phase of a bipartite or multipartite entangled photons states, or alternatively, gives rise to an overall AB phase that can be measured relative to another reference system. These setups involve processes of annihilation or creation of electron-hole pairs. We discuss the relevance of such effects in 'vacuum birefringence' in QED, and comment on their connection to other known effects.

  3. Aharonov-Bohm Effect in a Rotating Acoustic Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, E. S.; Crispino, L. C. B.; Dolan, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    A classical analogue to the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect occurs in a (idealized) draining bathtub (DBT) vortex system. The DBT vortex presents a sonic horizon, at which the flow rate exceeds the speed of sound. The sonic horizon is the analogue of a black hole event horizon. The DBT vortex also presents an ergoregion, similar to a rotating black hole. Because of the sonic event horizon, the AB effect is modified and has two tuning coefficients proportional to the flow draining and circulation couplings with the perturbation frequency.

  4. Thermoelectric effect in Aharonov-Bohm structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Morrel, William G.; Ni, Xiaoxi; Wu, Chang-Qin; Li, Baowen

    2015-01-01

    The thermoelectric effects of a single Aharonov-Bohm (SAB) ring and coupled double Aharonov-Bohm (DAB) rings have been investigated on a theoretical basis, taking into account the contributions of both electrons and phonons to the transport process by using the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. The thermoelectric figure of merit of the coupled DAB rings cannot be predicted directly by combining the values of two SAB ring systems due to the contribution of electron-phonon interaction to coupling between the two sites connecting the rings. We find that thermoelectric efficiency can be optimized by modulating the phases of the magnetic flux threading the two rings.

  5. Noncommutative analogue Aharonov-Bohm effect and superresonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, M. A.; Brito, F. A.; Passos, E.

    2013-06-01

    We consider the idea of modeling a rotating acoustic black hole by an idealized draining bathtub vortex which is a planar circulating flow phenomenon with a sink at the origin. We find the acoustic metric for this phenomenon from a noncommutative Abelian Higgs model. As such the acoustic metric not only describes a rotating acoustic black hole but also inherits the noncommutative characteristic of the spacetime. We address the issues of superresonance and analogue Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in this background. We mainly show that the scattering of planar waves by a draining bathtub vortex leads to a modified AB effect and due to spacetime noncommutativity, the phase shift persists even in the limit where the parameters associated with the circulation and draining vanish. Finally, we also find that the analogue AB effect and superresonance are competing phenomena at a noncommutative spacetime.

  6. The electric Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Weder, Ricardo

    2011-05-15

    The seminal paper of Aharonov and Bohm [Phys. Rev. 115, 485 (1959)] is at the origin of a very extensive literature in some of the more fundamental issues in physics. They claimed that electromagnetic fields can act at a distance on charged particles even if they are identically zero in the region of space where the particles propagate, that the fundamental electromagnetic quantities in quantum physics are not only the electromagnetic fields but also the circulations of the electromagnetic potentials; what gives them a real physical significance. They proposed two experiments to verify their theoretical conclusions. The magnetic Aharonov-Bohm effect, where an electron is influenced by a magnetic field that is zero in the region of space accessible to the electron, and the electric Aharonov-Bohm effect where an electron is affected by a time-dependent electric potential that is constant in the region where the electron is propagating, i.e., such that the electric field vanishes along its trajectory. The Aharonov-Bohm effects imply such a strong departure from the physical intuition coming from classical physics that it is no wonder that they remain a highly controversial issue after more than fifty years, in spite of the fact that they are discussed in most of the text books in quantum mechanics. The magnetic case has been studied extensively. The experimental issues were settled by the remarkable experiments of Tonomura et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 1443 (1982); Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 792 (1986)] with toroidal magnets, that gave a strong evidence of the existence of the effect, and by the recent experiment of Caprez et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 210401 (2007)] that shows that the results of the Tonomura et al. experiments cannot be explained by the action of a force. The theoretical issues were settled by Ballesteros and Weder [Commun. Math. Phys. 285, 345 (2009); J. Math. Phys. 50, 122108 (2009); Commun. Math. Phys. 303, 175 (2011)] who rigorously proved that quantum

  7. A charged particle in a homogeneous magnetic field accelerated by a time-periodic Aharonov-Bohm flux

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvoda, T.; Stovicek, P.

    2011-10-15

    We consider a nonrelativistic quantum charged particle moving on a plane under the influence of a uniform magnetic field and driven by a periodically time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm flux. We observe an acceleration effect in the case when the Aharonov-Bohm flux depends on time as a sinusoidal function whose frequency is in resonance with the cyclotron frequency. In particular, the energy of the particle increases linearly for large times. An explicit formula for the acceleration rate is derived with the aid of the quantum averaging method, and then it is checked against a numerical solution and a very good agreement is found. - Highlights: > A nonrelativistic quantum charged particle on a plane. > A homogeneous magnetic field and a periodically time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm flux. > The quantum averaging method applied to a time-dependent system. > A resonance of the AB flux with the cyclotron frequency. > An acceleration with linearly increasing energy; a formula for the acceleration rate.

  8. Time-dependent Pauli equation in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bouguerra, Y.; Bounames, A.; Maamache, M.; Saadi, Y.

    2008-04-15

    We use the Lewis-Riesenfeld theory to determine the exact form of the wavefunctions of a two-dimensional Pauli equation of a charged spin 1/2 particle with time-dependent mass and frequency in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect and a two-dimensional time-dependent harmonic oscillator. We find that the irregular solution at the origin as well as the regular one contributes to the phase of the wavefunction.

  9. Calculation of the Aharonov-Bohm wave function

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, M.

    1996-08-01

    A calculation of the Aharonov-Bohm wave function is presented. The result is an asymptotic series of confluent hypergeometric functions which is finite at the forward direction. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effect with the time-dependent gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Mansoori, Seyed Ali; Mirza, Behrouz

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect for time-dependent gauge fields. We prove that the non-Abelian AB phase shift related to time-dependent gauge fields, in which the electric and magnetic fields are written in the adjoint representation of SU (N) generators, vanishes up to the first order expansion of the phase factor. Therefore, the flux quantization in a superconductor ring does not appear in the time-dependent Abelian or non-Abelian AB effect.

  11. Global analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Navin, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    This thesis deals with a global analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect previously pointed out by other authors. The effect was not well understood because the pure Aharonov-Bohm cross section was thought to be merely an approximate low energy limit. This thesis provides a detailed analysis and reveals that in the particular model considered, there is an exact Aharonov-Bohm cross section over the energy range that a mass splitting occurs. At energies slightly above the mass splitting, the effect has completely disappeared and there is effectively no scattering at large distances. This is a curious observation as it was previously thought that a global theory would not act exactly like a local one over an extended range of energies. It begs the heretical speculation that experimentally observed forces modelled with Lagrangians possessing local symmetries may have an underlying global theory.

  12. Absence of the Electric Aharonov-Bohm Effect due to Induced Charges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Feng

    2015-01-01

    This paper states that the induced charge should not be neglected in the electric Aharonov-Bohm (A-B) effect. If the induced charge is taken into account, the interference pattern of the moving charge will not change with the potential difference between the two metal tubes. It means that the scalar potential itself can not affect the phase of the moving charge, and the true factor affecting the phase of the moving charge is the energy of the system including the moving charge and the induced charge. PMID:26392302

  13. Experimental test for approximately dispersionless forces in the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Maria; Batelaan, Herman

    2016-07-01

    A new class of forces, approximately dispersionless forces, were recently predicted as part of a semiclassical description of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Electron time-of-flight measurements have been performed that test for such forces. Magnetized iron cores used in the previous time-of-flight experiment may affect potential back-action forces and have, therefore, been eliminated. We report that no forces were detected. This finding supports the local and nonlocal, quantum descriptions of the AB effect and rules out local, semiclassical descriptions.

  14. Aharonov-Bohm interactions of a vector unparticle

    SciTech Connect

    Kobakhidze, Archil

    2007-11-01

    Recently Georgi argued that a hypothetical conformally invariant hidden sector weakly interacting with ordinary particles will have unusual manifestations at low energies in terms of effective degrees of freedom called unparticles. In this paper we consider Aharonov-Bohm type of interactions due to the vector unparticle coupled to elementary fermions. We have found that the quantum mechanical phase shift is path dependent.

  15. Non-traditional Aharonov-Bohm effects in condensed matter

    SciTech Connect

    Krive, I.V. ); Rozhavsky, A.S. )

    1992-05-10

    In 1959, Aharonov and Bohm proposed an elegant experiment demonstrating observability of electromagnetic potentials (or, which is the same, the non-locality of the wave function of charged particles) in quantum mechanics. This paper discusses the Aharonov-Bohm effect, based on the fundamental principles of quantum theory, as the superposition principles, the quantum character of motion of particles and locality of the interaction of a charge with an electromagnetic potential L{sub int} = j{sub {mu}}A{sup {mu}}. It is thus no wonder that the Aharonov-Bohm's paper aroused much dispute which is still ongoing. Originally, the Aharonov-Bohm effect (ABE) means the dependence of the interference pattern on the magnetic fluid flux {phi} in a Gendaken experiment on a coherent electron beam in the field of an infinitely thin solenoid. Later, however, it became common to refer to the Aharonov-Bohm phenomenon wherever the characteristics of systems under study appear to depend on the flux {phi} in the absence of electric and magnetic fields. In this sense, it was highly interesting to analyze the ABE in condensed media (the many-particle Aharonov-Bohm effect), in particular to study the dependence of the thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics, e.g., of metal on the flux. Such a problem was first discussed by Byers and Yang who formulated the general theorems related to the ABE in conducting condensed media. The next important step was the work of Kulik who formulated a concrete model and calculated the flux-dependent contribution to the metal free energy and provided a first clear formulation of the requirements to reveal.

  16. Excitonic Aharonov-Bohm effect in a two-dimensional quantum ring

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Santander, C.; Dominguez-Adame, F.; Roemer, R. A.

    2011-12-15

    We study theoretically the optical properties of an exciton in a two-dimensional ring threaded by a magnetic flux. We model the quantum ring by a confining potential that can be continuously tuned from strictly one-dimensional to truly two-dimensional with finite radius-to-width ratio. We present an analytic solution of the problem when the electron-hole interaction is short ranged. The oscillatory dependence of the oscillator strength as a function of the magnetic flux is attributed to the Aharonov-Bohm effect. The amplitude of the oscillations changes upon increasing the width of the quantum ring. We find that the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the ground state of the exciton decrease with increasing the width, but, remarkably, the amplitude remains finite down to radius-to-width ratios less than unity. We attribute this resilience of the excitonic oscillations to the nonsimple connectedness of our chosen confinement potential with its centrifugal core at the origin.

  17. Electron Interferometry in the Quantum Hall Regime: Aharonov-Bohm Effect of Interacting Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.V.; Camino, F.; Goldman, V.J.

    2009-09-01

    An apparent h/fe Aharonov-Bohm flux period, where f is an integer, has been reported in coherent quantum Hall devices. Such subperiod is not expected for noninteracting electrons and thus is thought to result from interelectron Coulomb interaction. Here we report experiments in a Fabry-Perot interferometer comprised of two wide constrictions enclosing an electron island. By carefully tuning the constriction front gates, we find a regime where interference oscillations with period h/2e persist throughout the transition between the integer quantum Hall plateaus 2 and 3, including half-filling. In a large quantum Hall sample, a transition between integer plateaus occurs near half-filling, where the bulk of the sample becomes delocalized and thus dissipative bulk current flows between the counterpropagating edges ('backscattering'). In a quantum Hall constriction, where conductance is due to electron tunneling, a transition between forward and backscattering is expected near the half-filling. In our experiment, neither period nor amplitude of the oscillations show a discontinuity at half-filling, indicating that only one interference path exists throughout the transition. We also present experiments and an analysis of the front-gate dependence of the phase of the oscillations. The results point to a single physical mechanism of the observed conductance oscillations: Aharonov-Bohm interference of interacting electrons in quantum Hall regime.

  18. Scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect with longitudinally polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, B. E.; Lee, W.-T.; Motrunich, O. I.; Werner, S. A.

    1999-12-01

    In the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect, a charged particle (electron) interacts with the scalar electrostatic potential U in the field-free (i.e., force-free) region inside an electrostatic cylinder (Faraday cage). Using a perfect single-crystal neutron interferometer we have performed a ''dual'' scalar Aharonov-Bohm experiment by subjecting polarized thermal neutrons to a pulsed magnetic field. The pulsed magnetic field was spatially uniform, precluding any force on the neutrons. Aligning the direction of the pulsed magnetic field to the neutron magnetic moment also rules out any classical torque acting to change the neutron polarization. The observed phase shift is purely quantum mechanical in origin. A detailed description of the experiment, performed at the University of Missouri Research Reactor, and its interpretation is given in this paper. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  19. Topological Aharonov-Bohm Effect and Pseudo-Particle Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payandeh, Farrin

    2016-10-01

    Exploiting a topological approach, we discuss the outstanding Aharonov-Bohm effect and try to explain it in the context of the principal P(M, U(1)) bundle. We show that this could be done by excluding a specific region from the main manifold which acts as the solenoid around which the effect is observed. Moreover, we discuss the impacts of pseudo-particles in this topological approach.

  20. Quantum anholonomies in time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm rings

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Atushi; Cheon, Taksu

    2010-08-15

    Anholonomies in eigenstates are studied through time-dependent variations of a magnetic flux in an Aharonov-Bohm ring. The anholonomies in the eigenenergy and the expectation values of eigenstates are shown to persist beyond the adiabatic regime. The choice of the gauge of the magnetic flux is shown to be crucial to clarify the relationship of these anholonomies to the eigenspace anholonomy, which is described by a non-Abelian connection in the adiabatic limit.

  1. Levinson theorem for Aharonov-Bohm scattering in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Sheka, Denis D.; Mertens, Franz G.

    2006-11-15

    We apply the recently generalized Levinson theorem for potentials with inverse-square singularities [Sheka et al., Phys. Rev. A 68, 012707 (2003)] to Aharonov-Bohm systems in two dimensions (2D). By this theorem, the number of bound states in a given mth partial wave is related to the phase shift and the magnetic flux. The results are applied to 2D soliton-magnon scattering.

  2. Against a proposed alternative explanation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect.

    SciTech Connect

    Peshkin, M.; Physics

    2010-09-03

    The Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect is understood to demonstrate that the Maxwell fields can act nonlocally in some situations. However it has been suggested from time to time that the AB effect is somehow a consequence of a local classical electromagnetic field phenomenon involving energy that is temporarily stored in the overlap between the external field and the field of which the beam particle is the source. That idea was shown in the past not to work for some models of the source of the external field. Here a more general proof is presented for the magnetic AB effect to show that the overlap energy is always compensated by another contribution to the energy of the magnetic field in such a way that the sum of the two is independent of the external flux. Therefore no such mechanism can underlie the AB effect.

  3. Analytic Aharonov-Bohm rings — Currents readout from Zeeman spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Mufei; Reyes-Serrato, Armando

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports the work on the development and analysis of a model for quantum rings in which persistent currents are induced by Aharonov-Bohm (AB) or other similar effects. The model is based on a centric and annual potential profile. The time-independent Schrödinger equation including an external magnetic field and an AB flux is analytically solved. The outputs, namely energy dispersion and wavefunctions, are analyzed in detail. It is shown that the rotation quantum number m is limited to small numbers, especially in weak confinement, and a conceptual proposal is put forward for acquiring the flux and eventually estimating the persistent currents in a Zeeman spectroscopy. The wavefunctions and electron distributions are numerically studied and compared to one-dimensional (1D) quantum well. It is predicated that the model and its solutions, eigen energy structure and analytic wavefunctions, would be a powerful tool for studying various electric and optical properties of quantum rings.

  4. Spin transport in an Aharonov-Bohm ring with exchange interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenko, I. G.; Polozkov, R. G.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate spin-dependent conductance through a quantum Aharonov-Bohm ring containing localized electrons which interact with the propagating flow of electrons via exchange interaction of the ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic type. We analyze the conductance oscillations as a function of both the chemical potential (particle concentration) and external magnetic field. It is demonstrated that the amplitude of the conductance oscillations in the ballistic regime is determined by the value of the noncompensated spin localized in the ring. The results are in agreement with the concept of fractional quantization of the ballistic conductance, proposed by us earlier [Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.71.113311 71, 113311 (2005)].

  5. Relativistic persistent currents in ideal Aharonov-Bohm rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotăescu, Ion I.; Băltăţeanu, Doru-Marcel; Cotăescu, Ion

    2016-11-01

    The exact solutions of the complete Dirac equation for fermions moving in ideal Aharonov-Bohm rings are used for deriving the exact expressions of the relativistic partial currents. It is shown that as in the nonrelativistic case, these currents can be related to the derivative of the fermion energy with respect to the flux parameter. A specific relativistic effect is the saturation of the partial currents for high values of the total angular momentum. Based on this property, the total relativistic persistent current at T = 0 is evaluated giving its analytical expression and showing how this depends on the ring parameters.

  6. Analogue Aharonov-Bohm effect in neo-Newtonian theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, M. A.; Salako, I. G.; Brito, F. A.; Passos, E.

    2015-12-01

    We address the issues of the scattering of massless planar scalar waves by an acoustic black hole in neo-Newtonian hydrodynamics. We then compute the differential cross section through the use of the partial wave approach in the neo-Newtonian theory which is a modification of the usual Newtonian theory that correctly incorporates the effects of pressure. We mainly show that the scattering of planar waves leads to a modified analogue Aharonov-Bohm effect due to a nontrivial response of the parameters defining the equation of state.

  7. Forward-smooth high-order uniform Aharonov-Bohm asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.

    2016-07-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm (AB) function, describing a plane wave scattered by a flux line, is expanded asymptotically in a Fresnel-integral based series whose terms are smooth in the forward direction and uniformly valid in angle and flux. Successive approximations are valid for large distance r from the flux (or short wavelength) but are accurate even within one wavelength of it. Coefficients of all the terms are exhibited explicitly for the forward direction, enabling the high-order asymptotics to be understood in detail. The series is factorally divergent, with optimal truncation error exponentially small in r. Systematic resummation gives further exponential improvement. Terms of the series satisfy a resurgence relation: the high orders are related to the low orders. Discontinuities in the backward direction get smaller order by order, with systematic cancellation by successive terms. The relation to an earlier scheme based on the Cornu spiral is discussed.

  8. An Aharonov-Bohm interferometer for determining Bloch band topology.

    PubMed

    Duca, L; Li, T; Reitter, M; Bloch, I; Schleier-Smith, M; Schneider, U

    2015-01-16

    The geometric structure of a single-particle energy band in a solid is fundamental for a wide range of many-body phenomena and is uniquely characterized by the distribution of Berry curvature over the Brillouin zone. We realize an atomic interferometer to measure Berry flux in momentum space, in analogy to an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer that measures magnetic flux in real space. We demonstrate the interferometer for a graphene-type hexagonal optical lattice loaded with bosonic atoms. By detecting the singular π Berry flux localized at each Dirac point, we establish the high momentum resolution of this interferometric technique. Our work forms the basis for a general framework to fully characterize topological band structures. PMID:25525160

  9. Nonlinear Aharonov-Bohm Scattering by Optical Vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Neshev, Dragomir; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2001-07-23

    We study linear and nonlinear wave scattering by an optical vortex in a self-defocusing nonlinear Kerr medium. In the linear case, we find a splitting of a plane-wave front at the vortex proportional to its circulation, similar to what occurs in the scattered wave of electrons for the Aharonov-Bohm effect. For larger wave amplitudes, we study analytically and numerically the scattering of a dark-soliton stripe (a nonlinear analog of a small-amplitude wave packet) by a vortex and observe a significant asymmetry of the scattered wave. Subsequently, a wave-front splitting of the scattered wave develops into transverse modulational instability, ''unzipping'' the stripe into trains of vortices with opposite charges.

  10. Relativistic Aharonov-Bohm effect in the presence of planar Coulomb potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Khalilov, V.R.

    2005-01-01

    Exact analytic solutions are found to the Dirac equation in 2+1 dimensions for a combination of an Aharonov-Bohm potential and the Lorentz three-vector and scalar Coulomb potentials. By means of the solutions obtained the relativistic quantum Aharonov-Bohm effect is studied for the free (in the presence of a Lorentz three-vector Coulomb potential) and bound fermion states. We obtain the total scattering amplitude in a combination of the Aharonov-Bohm and Lorentz three-vector Coulomb potentials as a sum of two scattering amplitudes. This modifies the expression for the standard Aharonov-Bohm cross section due to the interference of these two amplitudes with each other. We discuss that the observable quantities can be the phases of electron wave functions or the energies of bound states.

  11. What did we learn from the Aharonov-Bohm effect? Is spin 1/2 different?

    SciTech Connect

    Peshkin, M.

    1994-06-01

    I review what has been learned about fundamental issues in quantum mechanics from the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Following that, I consider the Aharonov-Casher effect and the Scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect, in both of which a spin-1/2 particle interacts with a local electromagnetic field through its magnetic moment, and conclude that those effects can be described as observable effects of local torques.

  12. Time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effect on the noncommutative space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kai; Wang, Jian-Hua; Yang, Huan-Xiong

    2016-08-01

    We study the time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effect on the noncommutative space. Because there is no net Aharonov-Bohm phase shift in the time-dependent case on the commutative space, therefore, a tiny deviation from zero indicates new physics. Based on the Seiberg-Witten map we obtain the gauge invariant and Lorentz covariant Aharonov-Bohm phase shift in general case on noncommutative space. We find there are two kinds of contribution: momentum-dependent and momentum-independent corrections. For the momentum-dependent correction, there is a cancellation between the magnetic and electric phase shifts, just like the case on the commutative space. However, there is a non-trivial contribution in the momentum-independent correction. This is true for both the time-independent and time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effects on the noncommutative space. However, for the time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effect, there is no overwhelming background which exists in the time-independent Aharonov-Bohm effect on both commutative and noncommutative space. Therefore, the time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm can be sensitive to the spatial noncommutativity. The net correction is proportional to the product of the magnetic fluxes through the fundamental area represented by the noncommutative parameter θ, and through the surface enclosed by the trajectory of charged particle. More interestingly, there is an anti-collinear relation between the logarithms of the magnetic field B and the averaged flux Φ / N (N is the number of fringes shifted). This nontrivial relation can also provide a way to test the spatial noncommutativity. For BΦ / N ∼ 1, our estimation on the experimental sensitivity shows that it can reach the 10 GeV scale. This sensitivity can be enhanced by using stronger magnetic field strength, larger magnetic flux, as well as higher experimental precision on the phase shift.

  13. The Aharonov-Bohm effect in Möbius rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zehao; Ram-Mohan, L.; CenterComputational NanoScience Team

    2013-03-01

    Electron transmission through finite-width 2D ring structures is calculated for cylindrical, flat (Aharonov-Bohm), and Möbius rings. In the presence of an external magnetic field, curves of constructive transmission display a pattern similar to that for a 1D ring. The periodicity in the magnetic flux, in units of h / e , is weakly broken on 2D rings of finite width, so that a description with a 1D-path is very acceptable. The unusual states with half-integer values of observed on Möbius rings, display a different characteristic in transmission. Such resonant states are in constructive interference for transmission at magnetic fields where the contribution from ordinary states with integer is in destructive interference, and vice versa. This leads to an alternating dominance of the set of half-integer states and the set of integer states in transport with increasing magnetic fields. We anticipate that Möbius rings would be synthesized with graphene ribbons in the near future. Z.L. acknowledges support from a Presidents Undergraduate Fellowship and a Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship at WPI.

  14. Hydrogen atom in a quantum plasma environment under the influence of Aharonov-Bohm flux and electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Falaye, Babatunde James; Sun, Guo-Hua; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the confinement influences of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux and electric and magnetic fields directed along the z axis and encircled by quantum plasmas on the hydrogen atom. The all-inclusive effects result in a strongly attractive system while the localizations of quantum levels change and the eigenvalues decrease. We find that the combined effect of the fields is stronger than a solitary effect and consequently there is a substantial shift in the bound state energy of the system. We also find that to perpetuate a low-energy medium for the hydrogen atom in quantum plasmas, a strong electric field and weak magnetic field are required, whereas the AB flux field can be used as a regulator. The application of the perturbation technique utilized in this paper is not restricted to plasma physics; it can also be applied in molecular physics.

  15. Hydrogen atom in a quantum plasma environment under the influence of Aharonov-Bohm flux and electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Falaye, Babatunde James; Sun, Guo-Hua; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the confinement influences of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux and electric and magnetic fields directed along the z axis and encircled by quantum plasmas on the hydrogen atom. The all-inclusive effects result in a strongly attractive system while the localizations of quantum levels change and the eigenvalues decrease. We find that the combined effect of the fields is stronger than a solitary effect and consequently there is a substantial shift in the bound state energy of the system. We also find that to perpetuate a low-energy medium for the hydrogen atom in quantum plasmas, a strong electric field and weak magnetic field are required, whereas the AB flux field can be used as a regulator. The application of the perturbation technique utilized in this paper is not restricted to plasma physics; it can also be applied in molecular physics. PMID:27300989

  16. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A. W.; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-08-01

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a ``hairline'' solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions.

  17. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms.

    PubMed

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A W; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-08-08

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a "hairline" solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions.

  18. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A. W.; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a “hairline” solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions. PMID:25103877

  19. Valley Zeeman energy in monolayer MoS2 quantum rings: Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D.; Fu, Jiyong; Villegas-Lelovsky, L.; Dias, A. C.; Qu, Fanyao

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the valley Zeeman energy (VZE) in monolayer MoS2 quantum rings, subjected to a magnetic flux Φ only passing through a hole region enclosed by the inner circle of the ring. To gain insight on our numerical outcomes for finite two-dimensional rings, an analytic solution in the one-dimensional limit (zero ring width) is also presented. Although no magnetic field is applied inside the ring region, we observe finite VZEs. Interestingly, in contrast to the usual linear scenario, the VZE of the rings exhibits an oscillatory dependence on Φ with possible vanishing valley Zeeman effect even in a nonzero magnetic flux due to Aharonov-Bohm type effect. On the other hand, within one period of oscillations the VZE increases linearly with Φ . Furthermore, for a given magnetic flux, the valley Zeeman effect is more pronounced in a ring with a stronger quantum confinement. Thus the VZE can be tuned by either magnetic flux or ring confinement or both of them. This opens a new route for controlling the valley Zeeman effect using a nonmagnetic means.

  20. Globalism of commutation relation and mechanism of momentum transfer in the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Fang

    1997-09-01

    After examining the domain of an operator that has classical analog, which is shown to be the whole spatial space, the concept of globalism of a commutation relation is introduced through analyzing the quantization of the kinetic angular momentum in the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Its applications are also given to explain in an elegant and precise way, the mechanism of momentum transfer in the Aharonov-Bohm scattering and to study the probability distribution of the momentum for a particle in a one-dimensional infinitely deep square potential well.

  1. Cloaking of matter waves under the global Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.-H.; Luan, P.-G.

    2009-05-15

    We discuss the Aharonov-Bohm effect of a magnetic flux for its influence on a two-dimensional quantum cloak. It is shown that the matter wave of a charged particle under the global influence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect can still be perfectly cloaked and guided by the quantum cloak. Since the presence of the global influence of a magnetic flux on charged particles is universal, the perfect cloaking and guiding nature not only provides an ideal setup to cloak an object from matter waves but also provides an ideal setup to test the global physics of charged matter waves in the presence of a bare magnetic flux.

  2. Photon mass and quantum effects of the Aharonov-Bohm type

    SciTech Connect

    Spavieri, G.; Rodriguez, M.

    2007-05-15

    The magnetic field due to the photon rest mass m{sub ph} modifies the standard results of the Aharonov-Bohm effect for electrons, and of other recent quantum effects. For the effect involving a coherent superposition of beams of particles with opposite electromagnetic properties, by means of a tabletop experiment, the limit m{sub ph}{approx_equal}10{sup -51} g is achievable, improving by 6 orders of magnitude that derived by Boulware and Deser for the Aharonov-Bohm effect.

  3. Two-dimensional quantum ring in a graphene layer in the presence of a Aharonov-Bohm flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro Neto, José; Bueno, M. J.; Furtado, Claudio

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we study the relativistic quantum dynamics of a massless fermion confined in a quantum ring. We use a model of confining potential and introduce the interaction via Dirac oscillator coupling, which provides ring confinement for massless Dirac fermions. The energy levels and corresponding eigenfunctions for this model in graphene layer in the presence of Aharonov-Bohm flux in the centre of the ring and the expression for persistent current in this model are derived. We also investigate the model for quantum ring in graphene layer in the presence of a disclination and a magnetic flux. The energy spectrum and wave function are obtained exactly for this case. We see that the persistent current depends on parameters characterizing the topological defect.

  4. Line of magnetic monopoles and an extension of the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chee, J.; Lu, W.

    2016-10-01

    In the Landau problem on the two-dimensional plane, physical displacement of a charged particle (i.e., magnetic translation) can be induced by an in-plane electric field. The geometric phase accompanying such magnetic translation around a closed path differs from the topological phase of Aharonov and Bohm in two essential aspects: The particle is in direct contact with the magnetic field and the geometric phase has an opposite sign from the Aharonov-Bohm phase. We show that magnetic translation on the two-dimensional cylinder implemented by the Schrödinger time evolution truly leads to the Aharonov-Bohm effect. The magnetic field normal to the cylinder's surface corresponds to a line of magnetic monopoles of uniform density whose simulation is currently under investigation in cold atom physics. In order to characterize the quantum problem, one needs to specify the value of the magnetic flux (modulo the flux unit) that threads but not in touch with the cylinder. A general closed path on the cylinder may enclose both the Aharonov-Bohm flux and the local magnetic field that is in direct contact with the charged particle. This suggests an extension of the Aharonov-Bohm experiment that naturally takes into account both the geometric phase due to local interaction with the magnetic field and the topological phase of Aharonov and Bohm.

  5. Nucleon statistics in holographic QCD: Aharonov-Bohm effect in a matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Koji; Iizuka, Norihiro

    2010-11-15

    We show that the Aharonov-Bohm effect in the nuclear matrix model [K. Hashimoto, N. Iizuka, and P. Yi, J. High Energy Phys. 10 (2010), 3.] derives the statistical nature of nucleons in holographic QCD. For N{sub c}=odd (even), the nucleon is shown to be a fermion (boson).

  6. Nucleon statistics in holographic QCD: Aharonov-Bohm effect in a matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Iizuka, Norihiro

    2010-11-01

    We show that the Aharonov-Bohm effect in the nuclear matrix model [K. Hashimoto, N. Iizuka, and P. Yi, J. High Energy Phys.JHEPFG1029-8479 10 (2010), 3.10.1007/JHEP10(2010)003] derives the statistical nature of nucleons in holographic QCD. For Nc=odd (even), the nucleon is shown to be a fermion (boson).

  7. Stokes' theorem, gauge symmetry and the time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Macdougall, James Singleton, Douglas

    2014-04-15

    Stokes' theorem is investigated in the context of the time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effect—the two-slit quantum interference experiment with a time varying solenoid between the slits. The time varying solenoid produces an electric field which leads to an additional phase shift which is found to exactly cancel the time-dependent part of the usual magnetic Aharonov-Bohm phase shift. This electric field arises from a combination of a non-single valued scalar potential and/or a 3-vector potential. The gauge transformation which leads to the scalar and 3-vector potentials for the electric field is non-single valued. This feature is connected with the non-simply connected topology of the Aharonov-Bohm set-up. The non-single valued nature of the gauge transformation function has interesting consequences for the 4-dimensional Stokes' theorem for the time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effect. An experimental test of these conclusions is proposed.

  8. The Aharonov-Bohm effect and Tonomura et al. experiments: Rigorous results

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros, Miguel; Weder, Ricardo

    2009-12-15

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect is a fundamental issue in physics. It describes the physically important electromagnetic quantities in quantum mechanics. Its experimental verification constitutes a test of the theory of quantum mechanics itself. The remarkable experiments of Tonomura et al. ['Observation of Aharonov-Bohm effect by electron holography', Phys. Rev. Lett 48, 1443 (1982) and 'Evidence for Aharonov-Bohm effect with magnetic field completely shielded from electron wave', Phys. Rev. Lett 56, 792 (1986)] are widely considered as the only experimental evidence of the physical existence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Here we give the first rigorous proof that the classical ansatz of Aharonov and Bohm of 1959 ['Significance of electromagnetic potentials in the quantum theory', Phys. Rev. 115, 485 (1959)], that was tested by Tonomura et al., is a good approximation to the exact solution to the Schroedinger equation. This also proves that the electron, that is, represented by the exact solution, is not accelerated, in agreement with the recent experiment of Caprez et al. in 2007 ['Macroscopic test of the Aharonov-Bohm effect', Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 210401 (2007)], that shows that the results of the Tonomura et al. experiments can not be explained by the action of a force. Under the assumption that the incoming free electron is a Gaussian wave packet, we estimate the exact solution to the Schroedinger equation for all times. We provide a rigorous, quantitative error bound for the difference in norm between the exact solution and the Aharonov-Bohm Ansatz. Our bound is uniform in time. We also prove that on the Gaussian asymptotic state the scattering operator is given by a constant phase shift, up to a quantitative error bound that we provide. Our results show that for intermediate size electron wave packets, smaller than the ones used in the Tonomura et al. experiments, quantum mechanics predicts the results observed by Tonomura et al. with an error bound smaller than 10

  9. Graphene under the influence of Aharonov-Bohm flux and constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, E. A.; Zhukovsky, V. Ch.

    2016-09-01

    Investigation of real two-dimensional systems with Dirac-like electronic behavior under the influence of magnetic field is challenging and leads to many interesting physical results. In this paper we study a 2D graphene model with a particular form of magnetic field as a superposition of a homogeneous field and an Aharonov-Bohm vortex. For this configuration, electronic wave functions and the energy spectrum are obtained and it is shown that the magnetic Aharonov-Bohm vortex plays the role of a charge impurity. As a demonstration of vacuum properties of the system, vacuum current, as well as an electric current, is calculated and their representation for particular limiting cases of a magnetic field is obtained.

  10. Reply to "Comment on `Role of potentials in the Aharonov-Bohm effect' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidman, Lev

    2015-08-01

    The preceding Comment challenged my claim that potentials might be just auxiliary mathematical tools and that they are not necessary for explaining physical phenomena. The Comment did not confront my explanation without the potentials of the Aharonov-Bohm effects that appeared in the original article, but stated that I cannot apply this explanation for seven other examples. In my reply, using my method, I provide explanations of one of the examples, show that two other examples are not relevant, and agree that the remaining examples require further analysis. However, I argue that none of the examples provides robust counterexamples to my claim, similar to the original Aharonov-Bohm setups which were explained in my article, so the Comment does not refute my claim.

  11. Noncommutative correction to Aharonov-Bohm scattering: A field theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Anacleto, M.A.; Gomes, M.; Silva, A.J. da; Spehler, D.

    2004-10-15

    We study a noncommutative nonrelativistic theory in 2+1 dimensions of a scalar field coupled to the Chern-Simons field. In the commutative situation this model has been used to simulate the Aharonov-Bohm effect in the field theory context. We verified that, contrary to the commutative result, the inclusion of a quartic self-interaction of the scalar field is not necessary to secure the ultraviolet renormalizability of the model. However, to obtain a smooth commutative limit the presence of a quartic gauge invariant self-interaction is required. For small noncommutativity we fix the corrections to the Aharonov-Bohm scattering and prove that up to one loop the model is free from dangerous infrared/ultraviolet divergences.

  12. Scattering theory and the Aharonov-Bohm effect in quasiclassical physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sitenko, Yurii A.; Vlasii, Nadiia D.

    2011-06-15

    Research Highlights: > Scattering Aharonov-Bohm effect. > Short-wavelength limit of scattered nonrelativistic particles. > Fraunhofer diffraction in the forward direction. > Fresnel diffraction in the forward region in conical space. > Enclosed magnetic flux is a gate for the propagation of quasiclassical particles. - Abstract: Scattering of a nonrelativistic quantum-mechanical particle by an impenetrable magnetic vortex is considered. The nonvanishing transverse size of the vortex is taken into account, and the limit of short, as compared to this size, wavelengths of the scattered particle is analyzed. We show that the scattering Aharonov-Bohm effect persists in the quasiclassical limit owing to the diffraction persisting in the short-wavelength limit. As a result, the vortex flux serves as a gate for the propagation of short-wavelength, almost classical, particles. This quasiclassical effect is more feasible to experimental detection in the case when space outside the vortex is conical.

  13. Spin accumulation assisted by the Aharonov-Bohm-Fano effect of quantum dot structures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the spin accumulations of Aharonov-Bohm interferometers with embedded quantum dots by considering spin bias in the leads. It is found that regardless of the interferometer configurations, the spin accumulations are closely determined by their quantum interference features. This is mainly manifested in the dependence of spin accumulations on the threaded magnetic flux and the nonresonant transmission process. Namely, the Aharonov-Bohm-Fano effect is a necessary condition to achieve the spin accumulation in the quantum dot of the resonant channel. Further analysis showed that in the double-dot interferometer, the spin accumulation can be detailedly manipulated. The spin accumulation properties of such structures offer a new scheme of spin manipulation. When the intradot Coulomb interactions are taken into account, we find that the electron interactions are advantageous to the spin accumulation in the resonant channel. PMID:22985404

  14. Aharonov-Bohm effect in quantum-to-classical correspondence of the Heisenberg principle

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.-H.; Chang, J.-G.; Hwang, C.-C.

    2003-04-01

    The exact energy spectrum and wave function of a charged particle moving in the Coulomb field and Aharonov-Bohm's magnetic flux are solved by the nonintegrable phase factor. The universal formula for the matrix elements of the radial operator r{sup {alpha}} of arbitrary power {alpha} is given by an analytical solution. The difference between the classical limit of matrix elements of inverse radius in quantum mechanics and the Fourier components of the corresponding quantity for the pure Coulomb system in classical mechanics is examined in reference to the correspondence principle of Heisenberg. Explicit calculation shows that the influence of nonlocal Aharonov-Bohm effect exists even in the classical limit. The semiclassical quantization rule for systems containing the topological effect is presented in the light of Heisenberg's corresponding principle.

  15. Aharonov-Bohm effect and resonances in the circular quantum billiard with two leads

    SciTech Connect

    Ree, S.; Reichl, L.E.

    1999-03-01

    We calculate the conductance through a circular quantum billiard with two leads and a point magnetic flux at the center. The boundary element method is used to solve the Schr{umlt o}dinger equation of the scattering problem, and the Landauer formula is used to calculate the conductance from the transmission coefficients. We use two different shapes of leads, straight and conic, and find that the conductance is affected by lead geometry, the relative positions of the leads and the magnetic flux. The Aharonov-Bohm effect can be seen from shifts and splittings of fluctuations. When the flux is equal to h/2e and the angle between leads is 180{degree}, the conductance tends to be suppressed to zero in the low-energy range due to the Aharonov-Bohm effect. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Atomic multiple-wave interferometer phase-shifted by the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Takatoshi; Yasuhara, Makoto; Morinaga, Atsuo

    2003-05-01

    A time-domain atomic multiple-wave interferometer using laser-cooled and trapped sodium atoms has been developed under pulsed magnetic fields. Each atomic phase was shifted due to the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect by applying spatially homogeneous pulsed magnetic fields between numerous Raman excitation laser pulses. Interference fringes with a finesse of 11 were demonstrated for 11 successive Raman pulses and ten magnetic-field pulses.

  17. Effects of nongauge potentials on the spin-1/2 Aharonov-Bohm problem

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, C.R. )

    1993-12-15

    Some recent work has attempted to show that the singular solutions which are known to occur in the Dirac description of spin-1/2 Aharonov-Bohm scattering can be eliminated by the inclusion of strongly repulsive potentials inside the flux tube. It is shown here that these calculations are generally unreliable since they necessarily require potentials which lead to the occurrence of Klein's paradox. To avoid that difficulty the problem is solved within the framework of the Galilean spin-1/2 wave equation which is free of that particular complication. It is then found that the singular solutions can be eliminated provided that the nongauge potential is made energy dependent. The effect of the inclusion of a Coulomb potential is also considered with the result being that the range of flux parameter for which singular solutions are allowed is only one-half as great as in the pure Aharonov-Bohm limit. Expressions are also obtained for the binding energies which can occur in the combined Aharonov-Bohm-Coulomb system.

  18. Scattering of spin 1/2 particles by the 2+1 dimensional noncommutative Aharonov-Bohm potential

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, A. F.; Gomes, M.; Stechhahn, C. A.

    2007-10-15

    In this work we study modifications in the Aharonov-Bohm effect for relativistic spin 1/2 particles due to the noncommutativity of spacetime in 2+1 dimensions. The noncommutativity gives rise to a correction to the Aharonov-Bohm potential which is highly singular at the origin, producing divergences in a perturbative expansion around the usual solution of the free Dirac equation. This problem is surmounted by using a perturbative expansion around the exact solution of the commutative Aharonov-Bohm problem. We calculate, in this setting, the scattering amplitude and the corrections to the differential and total cross sections for a spin 1/2 particle, in the small-flux limit.

  19. Kondo Resonance in a Mesoscopic Ring Coupled to a Quantum Dot: Exact Results for the Aharonov-Bohm-Casher Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Eckle, H.-P.; Johannesson, H.; Stafford, C. A.

    2001-07-02

    We study the persistent currents induced by both the Aharonov-Bohm and Aharonov-Casher effects in a one-dimensional mesoscopic ring coupled to a sidebranch quantum dot at Kondo resonance. For privileged values of the Aharonov-Bohm-Casher fluxes, the problem can be mapped onto an integrable model, exactly solvable by a Bethe ansatz. In the case of a pure magnetic Aharonov-Bohm flux, we find that the presence of the quantum dot has no effect on the persistent current. In contrast, the Kondo resonance interferes with the spin-dependent Aharonov-Casher effect to induce a current which, in the strong-coupling limit, is independent of the number of electrons in the ring.

  20. Spin filter effects in an Aharonov-Bohm ring with double quantum dots under general Rashba spin-orbit interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Many researchers have reported on spin filters using linear Rashba spin-orbit interactions (SOI). However, spin filters using square and cubic Rashba SOIs have not yet been reported. We consider that this is because the Aharonov-Casher (AC) phases acquired under square and cubic Rashba SOIs are ambiguous. In this study, we try to derive the AC phases acquired under square and cubic Rashba SOIs from the viewpoint of non-Abelian SU(2) gauge theory. These AC phases can be derived successfully from the non-Abelian SU(2) gauge theory without the completing square methods. Using the results, we investigate the spin filtering in a double quantum dot (QD) Aharonov-Bohm (AB) ring under linear, square, and cubic Rashba SOIs. This AB ring consists of elongated QDs and quasi-one-dimensional quantum nanowires under an external magnetic field. The spin transport is investigated from the left nanowire to the right nanowire in the above structure within the tight-binding approximation. In particular, we focus on the difference of spin filtering among linear, square, and cubic Rashba SOIs. The calculation is performed for the spin polarization by changing the penetrating magnetic flux for the AB ring subject to linear, square, and cubic Rashba SOIs. It is found that perfect spin filtering is achieved for all of the Rashba SOIs. This result indicates that this AB ring under general Rashba SOIs can be a promising device for spin current generation. Moreover, the AB rings under general Rashba SOIs behave in totally different ways in response to penetrating magnetic flux, which is attributed to linear, square, and cubic behaviors in the in-plane momentum. This result enables us to make a clear distinction between linear, square, and cubic Rashba SOIs according to the peak position of the perfect spin filtering.

  1. Magnetically tunable Kondo-Aharonov-Bohm effect in a triangular quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, T; Kikoin, K; Avishai, Y

    2006-02-01

    The role of discrete orbital symmetry in mesoscopic physics is manifested in a system consisting of three identical quantum dots forming an equilateral triangle. Under a perpendicular magnetic field, this system demonstrates a unique combination of Kondo and Aharonov-Bohm features due to an interplay between continuous [spin-rotation SU(2)] and discrete (permutation C3v) symmetries, as well as U(1) gauge invariance. The conductance as a function of magnetic flux displays sharp enhancement or complete suppression depending on contact setups.

  2. Anyonic strings and membranes in anti-de Sitter space and dual Aharonov-Bohm effects.

    PubMed

    Hartnoll, Sean A

    2007-03-16

    It is observed that strings in AdS(5) x S(5) and membranes in AdS(7) x S(4) exhibit long range phase interactions. Two well separated membranes dragged around one another in anti-de Sitter space (AdS) acquire phases of 2 pi/N. The same phases are acquired by a well separated F and D string dragged around one another. The phases are shown to correspond to both the standard and a novel type of Aharonov-Bohm effect in the dual field theory.

  3. Scattering of spin-polarized electron in an Aharonov-Bohm potential

    SciTech Connect

    Khalilov, V.R.; Ho, C.-L.

    2008-05-15

    The scattering of spin-polarized electrons in an Aharonov-Bohm vector potential is considered. We solve the Pauli equation in 3 + 1 dimensions taking into account explicitly the interaction between the three-dimensional spin magnetic moment of electron and magnetic field. Expressions for the scattering amplitude and the cross section are obtained for spin-polarized electron scattered off a flux tube of small radius. It is also shown that bound electron states cannot occur in this quantum system. The scattering problem for the model of a flux tube of zero radius in the Born approximation is briefly discussed.

  4. Tunable Pseudogap Kondo Effect and Quantum Phase Transitions in Aharonov-Bohm Interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Dias Da Silva, Luis G; Sandler, Nancy; Simon, Pascal; Ingersent, Kevin; Ulloa, Sergio E

    2009-01-01

    We study two quantum dots embedded in the arms of an Aharonov-Bohm ring threaded by a magnetic flux. This system can be described by an effective one-impurity Anderson model with an energy- and flux- dependent density of states. For specific values of the flux, this density of states vanishes at the Fermi energy, yielding a controlled realization of the pseudogap Kondo effect. The conductance and trans- mission phase shifts reflect a nontrivial interplay between wave interference and interactions, providing clear signatures of quantum phase transitions between Kondo and non-Kondo ground states.

  5. Anyonic Strings and Membranes in Anti-de Sitter Space and Dual Aharonov-Bohm Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnoll, Sean A.

    2007-03-16

    It is observed that strings in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} and membranes in AdS{sub 7}xS{sup 4} exhibit long range phase interactions. Two well separated membranes dragged around one another in anti-de Sitter space (AdS) acquire phases of 2{pi}/N. The same phases are acquired by a well separated F and D string dragged around one another. The phases are shown to correspond to both the standard and a novel type of Aharonov-Bohm effect in the dual field theory.

  6. Enhanced spin figure of merit in an Aharonov-Bohm ring with a double quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xingfei; Qi, Fenghua; Jin, Guojun

    2014-04-21

    We theoretically investigate the thermoelectric effects in an Aharonov-Bohm ring with a serially coupled double quantum dot embedded in one arm. An external magnetic field is perpendicularly applied to the two dots. Using the nonequilibrium Green's function method in the linear-response regime, we calculate the charge and spin figures of merit. When the energy levels of the two quantum dots are equal and the system is connected to two normal leads, a large spin figure of merit (Z{sub s}T ≈ 4.5) accompanying with a small charge figure of merit (Z{sub c}T ≈ 0) can be generated due to the remarkable bipolar effect. Further, when the system is connected to two ferromagnetic leads, the spin figure of merit can reach even a higher value about 9. Afterwards, we find that Z{sub s}T is enhanced while Z{sub c}T is reduced in the coaction of the Aharonov-Bohm flux and Rashba spin-orbit coupling. It is argued that the bipolar effect is positive (negative) to spin (charge) figure of merit in the presence of level detuning of the two quantum dots and intradot Coulomb interactions, respectively. Also, we propose a possible experiment to verify our results.

  7. Inverse problems for the Schroedinger equations with time-dependent electromagnetic potentials and the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Eskin, G.

    2008-02-15

    We consider the inverse boundary value problem for the Schroedinger operator with time-dependent electromagnetic potentials in domains with obstacles. We extend the resuls of the author's works [Inverse Probl. 19, 49 (2003); 19, 985 (2003); 20, 1497 (2004)] to the case of time-dependent potentials. We relate our results to the Aharonov-Bohm effect caused by magnetic and electric fluxes.

  8. Transmission through a quantum dot molecule embedded in an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer.

    PubMed

    Lovey, Daniel A; Gomez, Sergio S; Romero, Rodolfo H

    2011-10-26

    We study theoretically the transmission through a quantum dot molecule embedded in the arms of an Aharonov-Bohm four quantum dot ring threaded by a magnetic flux. The tunable molecular coupling provides a transmission pathway between the interferometer arms in addition to those along the arms. From a decomposition of the transmission in terms of contributions from paths, we show that antiresonances in the transmission arise from the interference of the self-energy along different paths and that application of a magnetic flux can produce the suppression of such antiresonances. The occurrence of a period of twice the quantum of flux arises at the opening of the transmission pathway through the dot molecule. Two different connections of the device to the leads are considered and their spectra of conductance are compared as a function of the tunable parameters of the model.

  9. Aharonov-Bohm scattering of relativistic Dirac particles with an anomalous magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Qionggui

    2005-10-15

    The Aharonov-Bohm scattering of relativistic spin-1/2 particles with an anomalous magnetic moment are studied. The scattering cross sections for unpolarized and polarized particles are obtained by solving the Dirac-Pauli equation. It is somewhat unexpected that the results are in general the same as those for particles without an anomalous magnetic moment. However, when the incident energy takes some special values, the cross section for polarized particles is dramatically changed. In these cases the helicity of scattered particles is not conserved. In particular, the helicity of particles scattered in the backward direction is all reversed. In the nonrelativistic limit, a very simple relation between the polarized directions of the incident and scattered particles is found, for both general and special incident energies. For particles without an anomalous magnetic moment this relation can be drawn from previous results but it appears to be unnoticed.

  10. Elementary Aharonov-Bohm system in three space dimensions: Quantum attraction with no classical force

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, Alfred Scharff; Requist, Ryan

    2003-07-01

    As a consequence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect, there is a quantum-induced attraction between a charged particle and a rigid, impenetrable hoop made from an arbitrarily thin tube containing a superconductor quantum of magnetic flux. This is remarkable because in classical physics there is no force between the two objects, and quantum-mechanical effects (associated with uncertainty-principle energy) generally are repulsive rather than attractive. For an incident spinless charged particle in a P wave (in a configuration with total angular momentum zero) we verify a resonance just above threshold using the Kohn variational principle in its S-matrix form. Even if optimistic choices of parameters describing a model system with these properties were feasible, the temperature required to observe the resonance would be far lower than has yet been attained in the laboratory.

  11. On solutions of Coulomb system and its generalization to the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.-H.

    2009-02-15

    The paper numerically analyzes the Aharonov-Bohm effect of an infinitely thin magnetic flux for its influence on a two- or three-dimensional (3d) solutions of Coulomb system in momentum and coordinate spaces. For any definitive eigenstate, it is shown that the flux shifts the position of the most probable radius (MPR) of a probability distribution inward or outward in momentum or coordinate spaces, respectively. Moreover, the probability density of the shifted MPR is amplified in the momentum space, while reduced in the coordinate space. Since the Coulomb force among charged particles dominate the structure of matter, shifting of the MPR controlling by the flux effect may be beneficial to the construction of nanostructure by manipulating the atomic and molecular bonds.

  12. An Elementary Aharonov-Bohm System in Three Space Dimensions: Quantum Attraction With No Classical Force

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, Alfred S.

    2003-01-09

    As a consequence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect, there is a quantum-induced attraction between a charged particle and a rigid impenetrable hoop made from an arbitrarily thin tube containing a superconductor quantum of magnetic flux. This is remarkable because in classical physics there is no force between the two objects, and quantum-mechanical effects (associated with uncertainty-principle energy) generally are repulsive rather than attractive. For an incident spinless charged particle in a P wave, in a configuration with total angular momentum zero, we verify a resonance just above threshold using the Kohn variational principle in its S-matrix form. Even if optimistic choices of parameters describing a model system with these properties turned out to be feasible, the temperature required to observe the resonance would be far lower than has yet been attained in the laboratory.

  13. Topological phases reviewed: The Aharonov Bohm, Aharonov Casher, and He McKellar Wilkens phases

    SciTech Connect

    McKellar, B. H. J.; He, X-G.; Klein, A. G.

    2014-03-05

    There are three topological phases related to electromagnetic interactions in quantum mechanics: 1. The Aharonov Bohm phase acquired when a charged particle encircles a magnetic field but travels through a field free region. 2. The Aharonov Casher phase acquired when a magnetic dipole encircles electric charges but travels through a charge free region. 3. The He McKellar Wilkens phase acquired when an electric dipole encircles magnetic charges but travels through a charge free region. We review the conditions under which these phases are indeed topological and their experimental realisation. Because the He McKellar Wilkens phase has been recently observed we pay particular attention to how the basic concept of 'an electric dipole encircles magnetic charges' was realised experimentally, and discuss possible future experimental realisations.

  14. Levinson's theorem and higher degree traces for Aharonov-Bohm operators

    SciTech Connect

    Kellendonk, Johannes; Pankrashkin, Konstantin; Richard, Serge

    2011-05-15

    We study Levinson-type theorems for the family of Aharonov-Bohm models from different perspectives. The first one is purely analytical involving the explicit calculation of the wave-operators and allowing to determine precisely the various contributions to the left hand side of Levinson's theorem, namely, those due to the scattering operator, the terms at 0-energy and at energy +{infinity}. The second one is based on non-commutative topology revealing the topological nature of Levinson's theorem. We then include the parameters of the family into the topological description obtaining a new type of Levinson's theorem, a higher degree Levinson's theorem. In this context, the Chern number of a bundle defined by a family of projections on bound states is explicitly computed and related to the result of a 3-trace applied on the scattering part of the model.

  15. Electromagnetism, Local Covariance, the Aharonov-Bohm Effect and Gauss' Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Ko; Dappiaggi, Claudio; Hack, Thomas-Paul

    2014-06-01

    We quantise the massless vector potential A of electromagnetism in the presence of a classical electromagnetic (background) current, j, in a generally covariant way on arbitrary globally hyperbolic spacetimes M. By carefully following general principles and procedures we clarify a number of topological issues. First we combine the interpretation of A as a connection on a principal U(1)-bundle with the perspective of general covariance to deduce a physical gauge equivalence relation, which is intimately related to the Aharonov-Bohm effect. By Peierls' method we subsequently find a Poisson bracket on the space of local, affine observables of the theory. This Poisson bracket is in general degenerate, leading to a quantum theory with non-local behaviour. We show that this non-local behaviour can be fully explained in terms of Gauss' law. Thus our analysis establishes a relationship, via the Poisson bracket, between the Aharonov-Bohm effect and Gauss' law - a relationship which seems to have gone unnoticed so far. Furthermore, we find a formula for the space of electric monopole charges in terms of the topology of the underlying spacetime. Because it costs little extra effort, we emphasise the cohomological perspective and derive our results for general p-form fields A ( p < dim( M)), modulo exact fields, for the Lagrangian density . In conclusion we note that the theory is not locally covariant, in the sense of Brunetti-Fredenhagen-Verch. It is not possible to obtain such a theory by dividing out the centre of the algebras, nor is it physically desirable to do so. Instead we argue that electromagnetism forces us to weaken the axioms of the framework of local covariance, because the failure of locality is physically well-understood and should be accommodated.

  16. Filtering and analyzing mobile qubit information via Rashba-Dresselhaus-Aharonov-Bohm interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharony, Amnon; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Cohen, Guy Z.; Entin-Wohlman, Ora; Katsumoto, Shingo

    2011-07-01

    Spin-1/2 electrons are scattered through one or two diamond-like loops, made of quantum dots connected by one-dimensional wires, and subject to both an Aharonov-Bohm flux and (Rashba and Dresselhaus) spin-orbit interactions. With some symmetry between the two branches of each diamond, and with appropriate tuning of the electric and magnetic fields (or of the diamond shapes), this device completely blocks electrons with one polarization and allows only electrons with the opposite polarization to be transmitted. The directions of these polarizations are tunable by these fields, and do not depend on the energy of the scattered electrons. For each range of fields one can tune the site and bond energies of the device so that the transmission of the fully polarized electrons is close to unity. Thus, these devices perform as ideal spin filters, and these electrons can be viewed as mobile qubits; the device writes definite quantum information on the spinors of the outgoing electrons. The device can also read the information written on incoming polarized electrons: The charge transmission through the device contains full information on this polarization. The double-diamond device can also act as a realization of the Datta-Das spin field-effect transistor.

  17. On the Aharonov-Bohm Operators with Varying Poles: The Boundary Behavior of Eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noris, Benedetta; Nys, Manon; Terracini, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    We consider a magnetic Schrödinger operator with magnetic field concentrated at one point (the pole) of a domain and half integer circulation, and we focus on the behavior of Dirichlet eigenvalues as functions of the pole. Although the magnetic field vanishes almost everywhere, it is well known that it affects the operator at the spectral level (the Aharonov-Bohm effect, Phys Rev (2) 115:485-491, 1959). Moreover, the numerical computations performed in (Bonnaillie-Noël et al., Anal PDE 7(6):1365-1395, 2014; Noris and Terracini, Indiana Univ Math J 59(4):1361-1403, 2010) show a rather complex behavior of the eigenvalues as the pole varies in a planar domain. In this paper, in continuation of the analysis started in (Bonnaillie-Noël et al., Anal PDE 7(6):1365-1395, 2014; Noris and Terracini, Indiana Univ Math J 59(4):1361-1403, 2010), we analyze the relation between the variation of the eigenvalue and the nodal structure of the associated eigenfunctions. We deal with planar domains with Dirichlet boundary conditions and we focus on the case when the singular pole approaches the boundary of the domain: then, the operator loses its singular character and the k-th magnetic eigenvalue converges to that of the standard Laplacian. We can predict both the rate of convergence and whether the convergence happens from above or from below, in relation with the number of nodal lines of the k-th eigenfunction of the Laplacian. The proof relies on the variational characterization of eigenvalues, together with a detailed asymptotic analysis of the eigenfunctions, based on an Almgren-type frequency formula for magnetic eigenfunctions and on the blow-up technique.

  18. Aharonov-Bohm effect on AdS{sub 2} and nonlinear supersymmetry of reflectionless Poeschl-Teller system

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Francisco Jakubsky, Vit Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2009-05-15

    We explain the origin and the nature of a special nonlinear supersymmetry of a reflectionless Poeschl-Teller system by the Aharonov-Bohm effect for a non-relativistic particle on the AdS{sub 2}. A key role in the supersymmetric structure appearing after reduction by a compact generator of the AdS{sub 2} isometry is shown to be played by the discrete symmetries related to the space and time reflections in the ambient Minkowski space. We also observe that a correspondence between the two quantum non-relativistic systems is somewhat of the AdS/CFT holography nature.

  19. Induced vacuum charge of massless fermions in Coulomb and Aharonov-Bohm potentials in 2+1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamsurov, I. V.; Khalilov, V. R.

    2016-08-01

    We study the vacuum polarization of zero-mass charged fermions in Coulomb and Aharonov-Bohm potentials in 2+1 dimensions. For this, we construct the Green's function of the two-dimensional Dirac equation in the considered field configuration and use it to find the density of the induced vacuum charge in so-called subcritical and supercritical regions. The Green's function is represented in regular and singular (in the source) solutions of the Dirac radial equation for a charged fermion in Coulomb and Aharonov-Bohm potentials in 2+1 dimensions and satisfies self-adjoint boundary conditions at the source. In the supercritical region, the Green's function has a discontinuity related to the presence of singularities on the nonphysical sheet of the complex plane of "energy," which are caused by the appearance of an infinite number of quasistationary states with negative energies. Ultimately, this situation represents the neutral vacuum instability. On the boundary of the supercritical region, the induced vacuum charge is independent of the self-adjoint extension. We hope that the obtained results will contribute to a better understanding of important problems in quantum electrodynamics and will also be applicable to the problem of screening the Coulomb impurity due to vacuum polarization in graphene with the effects associated with taking the electron spin into account.

  20. Spin polarized bound states in the continuum in open Aharonov-Bohm rings with the Rashba spin-orbit interaction.

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, Evgeny N; Sadreev, Almas F

    2016-07-01

    We consider the trapping of electrons with a definite spin polarization by bound states in the continuum (BSC) in the open Aharonov-Bohm rings in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI). Neglecting the Zeeman term we show the existence of BSCs in the one-dimensional ring when the eigenstates of the closed ring are doubly degenerate. With account of the Zeeman term BSCs occur only at the points of threefold degeneracy. The BSCs are found in the parametric space of flux and RSOI strength in close pairs with opposite spin polarization. Thereby the spin polarization of electrons transmitted through the ring can be altered by minor variation of magnetic or electric field at the vicinity of these pairs. Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional open ring show similar results for the BSCs. Encircling the BSC points in the parametric space of the flux and the RSOI constant gives rise to a geometric phase. PMID:27165662

  1. Spin polarized bound states in the continuum in open Aharonov-Bohm rings with the Rashba spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgakov, Evgeny N.; Sadreev, Almas F.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the trapping of electrons with a definite spin polarization by bound states in the continuum (BSC) in the open Aharonov-Bohm rings in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI). Neglecting the Zeeman term we show the existence of BSCs in the one-dimensional ring when the eigenstates of the closed ring are doubly degenerate. With account of the Zeeman term BSCs occur only at the points of threefold degeneracy. The BSCs are found in the parametric space of flux and RSOI strength in close pairs with opposite spin polarization. Thereby the spin polarization of electrons transmitted through the ring can be altered by minor variation of magnetic or electric field at the vicinity of these pairs. Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional open ring show similar results for the BSCs. Encircling the BSC points in the parametric space of the flux and the RSOI constant gives rise to a geometric phase.

  2. Quantum geometric phase in Majorana's stellar representation: mapping onto a many-body Aharonov-Bohm phase.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Patrick

    2012-06-15

    The (Berry-Aharonov-Anandan) geometric phase acquired during a cyclic quantum evolution of finite-dimensional quantum systems is studied. It is shown that a pure quantum state in a (2J+1)-dimensional Hilbert space (or, equivalently, of a spin-J system) can be mapped onto the partition function of a gas of independent Dirac strings moving on a sphere and subject to the Coulomb repulsion of 2J fixed test charges (the Majorana stars) characterizing the quantum state. The geometric phase may be viewed as the Aharonov-Bohm phase acquired by the Majorana stars as they move through the gas of Dirac strings. Expressions for the geometric connection and curvature, for the metric tensor, as well as for the multipole moments (dipole, quadrupole, etc.), are given in terms of the Majorana stars. Finally, the geometric formulation of the quantum dynamics is presented and its application to systems with exotic ordering such as spin nematics is outlined. PMID:23004240

  3. Quantum geometric phase in Majorana's stellar representation: mapping onto a many-body Aharonov-Bohm phase.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Patrick

    2012-06-15

    The (Berry-Aharonov-Anandan) geometric phase acquired during a cyclic quantum evolution of finite-dimensional quantum systems is studied. It is shown that a pure quantum state in a (2J+1)-dimensional Hilbert space (or, equivalently, of a spin-J system) can be mapped onto the partition function of a gas of independent Dirac strings moving on a sphere and subject to the Coulomb repulsion of 2J fixed test charges (the Majorana stars) characterizing the quantum state. The geometric phase may be viewed as the Aharonov-Bohm phase acquired by the Majorana stars as they move through the gas of Dirac strings. Expressions for the geometric connection and curvature, for the metric tensor, as well as for the multipole moments (dipole, quadrupole, etc.), are given in terms of the Majorana stars. Finally, the geometric formulation of the quantum dynamics is presented and its application to systems with exotic ordering such as spin nematics is outlined.

  4. Single-slit electron diffraction with Aharonov-Bohm phase: Feynman's thought experiment with quantum point contacts.

    PubMed

    Khatua, Pradip; Bansal, Bhavtosh; Shahar, Dan

    2014-01-10

    In a "thought experiment," now a classic in physics pedagogy, Feynman visualizes Young's double-slit interference experiment with electrons in magnetic field. He shows that the addition of an Aharonov-Bohm phase is equivalent to shifting the zero-field wave interference pattern by an angle expected from the Lorentz force calculation for classical particles. We have performed this experiment with one slit, instead of two, where ballistic electrons within two-dimensional electron gas diffract through a small orifice formed by a quantum point contact (QPC). As the QPC width is comparable to the electron wavelength, the observed intensity profile is further modulated by the transverse waveguide modes present at the injector QPC. Our experiments open the way to realizing diffraction-based ideas in mesoscopic physics. PMID:24483873

  5. Single-slit electron diffraction with Aharonov-Bohm phase: Feynman's thought experiment with quantum point contacts.

    PubMed

    Khatua, Pradip; Bansal, Bhavtosh; Shahar, Dan

    2014-01-10

    In a "thought experiment," now a classic in physics pedagogy, Feynman visualizes Young's double-slit interference experiment with electrons in magnetic field. He shows that the addition of an Aharonov-Bohm phase is equivalent to shifting the zero-field wave interference pattern by an angle expected from the Lorentz force calculation for classical particles. We have performed this experiment with one slit, instead of two, where ballistic electrons within two-dimensional electron gas diffract through a small orifice formed by a quantum point contact (QPC). As the QPC width is comparable to the electron wavelength, the observed intensity profile is further modulated by the transverse waveguide modes present at the injector QPC. Our experiments open the way to realizing diffraction-based ideas in mesoscopic physics.

  6. Single-Slit Electron Diffraction with Aharonov-Bohm Phase: Feynman's Thought Experiment with Quantum Point Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatua, Pradip; Bansal, Bhavtosh; Shahar, Dan

    2014-01-01

    In a "thought experiment," now a classic in physics pedagogy, Feynman visualizes Young's double-slit interference experiment with electrons in magnetic field. He shows that the addition of an Aharonov-Bohm phase is equivalent to shifting the zero-field wave interference pattern by an angle expected from the Lorentz force calculation for classical particles. We have performed this experiment with one slit, instead of two, where ballistic electrons within two-dimensional electron gas diffract through a small orifice formed by a quantum point contact (QPC). As the QPC width is comparable to the electron wavelength, the observed intensity profile is further modulated by the transverse waveguide modes present at the injector QPC. Our experiments open the way to realizing diffraction-based ideas in mesoscopic physics.

  7. Reduction by symmetries in singular quantum-mechanical problems: General scheme and application to Aharonov-Bohm model

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A. G.

    2015-12-15

    We develop a general technique for finding self-adjoint extensions of a symmetric operator that respects a given set of its symmetries. Problems of this type naturally arise when considering two- and three-dimensional Schrödinger operators with singular potentials. The approach is based on constructing a unitary transformation diagonalizing the symmetries and reducing the initial operator to the direct integral of a suitable family of partial operators. We prove that symmetry preserving self-adjoint extensions of the initial operator are in a one-to-one correspondence with measurable families of self-adjoint extensions of partial operators obtained by reduction. The general scheme is applied to the three-dimensional Aharonov-Bohm Hamiltonian describing the electron in the magnetic field of an infinitely thin solenoid. We construct all self-adjoint extensions of this Hamiltonian, invariant under translations along the solenoid and rotations around it, and explicitly find their eigenfunction expansions.

  8. Effective beam separation schemes for the measurement of the electric Aharonov-Bohm effect in an ion interferometer.

    PubMed

    Schütz, G; Rembold, A; Pooch, A; Prochel, H; Stibor, A

    2015-11-01

    We propose an experiment for the first proof of the type I electric Aharonov-Bohm effect in an ion interferometer for hydrogen. The performances of three different beam separation schemes are simulated and compared. The coherent ion beam is generated by a single atom tip (SAT) source and separated by either two biprisms with a quadrupole lens, two biprisms with an einzel-lens or three biprisms. The beam path separation is necessary to introduce two metal tubes that can be pulsed with different electric potentials. The high time resolution of a delay line detector allows to work with a continuous ion beam and circumvents the pulsed beam operation as originally suggested by Aharonov and Bohm. We demonstrate that the higher mass and therefore lower velocity of ions compared to electrons combined with the high expected SAT ion emission puts the direct proof of this quantum effect for the first time into reach of current technical possibilities. Thereby a high detection rate of coherent ions is crucial to avoid long integration times that allow the influence of dephasing noise from the environment. We can determine the period of the expected matter wave interference pattern and the signal on the detector by determining the superposition angle of the coherent partial beams. Our simulations were tested with an electron interferometer setup and agree with the experimental results. We determine the separation scheme with three biprisms to be most efficient and predict a total signal acquisition time of only 80s to measure a phase shift from 0 to 2π due to the electric Aharonov-Bohm effect. PMID:26188995

  9. Half-period Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in disordered rotating optical ring cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huanan; Kottos, Tsampikos; Shapiro, Boris

    2016-09-01

    There exists an analogy between Maxwell equations in a rotating frame and the Schrödinger equation for a charged particle in the presence of a magnetic field. We exploit this analogy to point out that electromagnetic phenomena in the rotating frame, under appropriate conditions, can exhibit periodicity with respect to the angular velocity of rotation. In particular, in disordered ring cavities one finds the optical analog of the Al'tshuler-Aronov-Spivak effect well known in mesoscopic physics of disordered metals.

  10. Measurement of the second-order Zeeman effect on the sodium clock transition in the weak-magnetic-field region using the scalar Aharonov-Bohm phase

    SciTech Connect

    Numazaki, Kazuya; Imai, Hiromitsu; Morinaga, Atsuo

    2010-03-15

    The second-order Zeeman effect of the sodium clock transition in a weak magnetic field of less than 50 {mu}T was measured as the scalar Aharonov-Bohm phase by two-photon stimulated Raman atom interferometry. The ac Stark effect of the Raman pulse was canceled out by adopting an appropriate intensity ratio of two photons in the Raman pulse. The Ramsey fringes for the pulse separation of 7 ms were obtained with a phase uncertainty of {pi}/200 rad. The nondispersive feature of the scalar Aharonov-Bohm phase was clearly demonstrated through 18 fringes with constant amplitude. The Breit-Rabi formula of the sodium clock transition was verified to be {Delta}{nu}=(0.222{+-}0.003)x10{sup 12}xB{sup 1.998{+-}0.004} in a magnetic field of less than 50 {mu}T.

  11. Excitonic Aharonov-Bohm effect in isotopically pure {sup 70}Ge/Si self-assembled type-II quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Satoru; Ishikawa, Toyofumi; Eto, Mikio; Itoh, Kohei M.; Moutanabbir, Oussama; Haller, Eugene E.; Sawano, Kentarou; Shiraki, Yasuhiro

    2010-08-15

    We report on a magnetophotoluminescence study of isotopically pure {sup 70}Ge/Si self-assembled type-II quantum dots. Oscillatory behaviors attributed to the Aharonov-Bohm effect are simultaneously observed for the emission energy and intensity of excitons subject to an increasing magnetic field. When the magnetic flux penetrates through the ringlike trajectory of an electron moving around each quantum dot, the ground state of an exciton experiences a change in its angular momentum. Our results provide the experimental evidence for the phase coherence of localized electron wave functions in group-IV Ge/Si self-assembled quantum structures.

  12. Partial wave analysis of scattering with the nonlocal Aharonov-Bohm effect and the anomalous cross section induced by quantum interference

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.-H.

    2004-05-01

    Partial wave theory of a three dimensional scattering problem for an arbitrary short range potential and a nonlocal Aharonov-Bohm magnetic flux is established. The scattering process of a 'hard sphere'-like potential and the magnetic flux is examined. An anomalous total cross section is revealed at the specific quantized magnetic flux at low energy which helps explain the composite fermion and boson model in the fractional quantum Hall effect. Since the nonlocal quantum interference of magnetic flux on the charged particles is universal, the nonlocal effect is expected to appear in a quite general potential system and will be useful in understanding some other phenomena in mesoscopic physics.

  13. Dynamics of One-Dimensional Bose Liquids: Andreev-Like Reflection at Y Junctions and the Absence of the Aharonov-Bohm Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuno, Akiyuki; Oshikawa, Masaki; Demler, Eugene

    2008-04-11

    We study one-dimensional Bose liquids of interacting ultracold atoms in the Y-shaped potential when each branch is filled with atoms. We find that the excitation packet incident on a single Y junction should experience a negative density reflection analogous to the Andreev reflection at normal-superconductor interfaces, although the present system does not contain fermions. In a ring-interferometer-type configuration, we find that the transport is completely insensitive to the (effective) flux contained in the ring, in contrast with the Aharonov-Bohm effect of a single particle in the same geometry.

  14. Properties of Type-II ZnTe/ZnSe Submonolayer Quantum Dots Studied via Excitonic Aharonov- Bohm Effect and Polarized Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Haojie

    In this thesis I develop understanding of the fundamental physical and material properties of type-II ZnTe/ZnSe submonolayer quantum dots (QDs), grown via combination of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and migration enhanced epitaxy (MEE). I use magneto-photoluminescence, including excitonic Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect and polarized optical spectroscopy as the primary tools in this work. I present previous studies as well as the background of optical and magneto-optical processes in semiconductor nanostructures and introduce the experimental methods in Chapters 1 - 3. In Chapter 4 I focus on the excitonic AB effect in the type-II QDs. I develop a lateral tightly-bound exciton model for ZnTe/ZnSe type-II QDs, using analytical methods and numerical calculations. This explained the magneto-PL observation and allowed for establishing the size and density of the QDs in each sample based on the results of PL and magneto-PL measurements. For samples with larger QDs, I observe behaviors that fall between properties of quantum-dot and quantum-well-like systems due to increased QD densities and their type-II nature. Finally, the decoherence mechanisms of the AB excitons are investigated via the temperature dependent studies of the magneto-PL. It is determined that the AB exciton decoherence is due to transport-like (acoustic phonon) scattering of the electrons moving in the ZnSe barriers, but with substantially smaller magnitude of electron-phonon coupling constant due to relatively strong electron-hole coupling within these type-II QDs. In Chapter 5 I discuss the results of circularly polarized magneto-PL measurements. A model with ultra-long spin-flip time of holes confined to submonolayer QDs is proposed. The g-factor of type-II excitons was extracted from the Zeeman splitting and the g-factor of electrons was obtained by fitting the temperature dependence of the degree of circular polarization (DCP), from which g-factor of holes confined within ZnTe QDs was found. It is shown

  15. Chiral persistent currents and magnetic susceptibilities in the parafermion quantum Hall states in the second Landau level with Aharonov-Bohm flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Lachezar S.

    2004-02-01

    Using the effective conformal field theory for the quantum Hall edge states we propose a compact and convenient scheme for the computation of the periods, amplitudes, and temperature behavior of the chiral persistent currents and the magnetic susceptibilities in the mesoscopic disk version of the Zk parafermion quantum Hall states in the second Landau level. Our numerical calculations show that the persistent currents are periodic in the Aharonov Bohm flux with period exactly one flux quantum and have a diamagnetic nature. In the high-temperature regime their amplitudes decay exponentially with increasing the temperature and the corresponding exponents are universal characteristics of non-Fermi liquids. Our theoretical results for these exponents are in perfect agreement with those extracted from the numerical data and demonstrate that there is in general a nontrivial contribution coming from the neutral sector. We emphasize the crucial role of the nonholomorphic factors, first proposed by Cappelli and Zemba in the context of the conformal field theory partition functions for the quantum Hall states, which ensure the invariance of the annulus partition function under the Laughlin spectral flow.

  16. Exchange interaction and oscillations of the magnetization of the electron gas in a quantum cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Eminov, P. A. Sezonov, Yu. I.; Al'pern, A. V.; Sal'nikov, N. V.

    2006-10-15

    The exchange energy of the electron gas on a cylindrical surface in a constant magnetic field has been calculated. Analytical formulas describing the contribution of the exchange interaction into oscillations of the magnetization of the electron gas in a quantum cylinder have been obtained. It is shown that the magnetic response of the system exhibits Aharonov-Bohm oscillations for both degenerate and Boltzmann electron gases.

  17. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special issue on Quantum Phases: 50 Years of the Aharonov-Bohm Effect and 25 Years of the Berry Phase Special issue on Quantum Phases: 50 Years of the Aharonov-Bohm Effect and 25 Years of the Berry Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidman, Lev; Dennis, Mark; Popescu, Sandu

    2010-01-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to the subject of quantum phases and highlighting the impact of the discovery of the Aharonov--Bohm effect and of the Berry phase across physics. Researchers working in the area are invited to submit papers of original research to this issue. Editorial policy The Editorial Board has invited Lev Vaidman, Mark Dennis and Sandu Popescu to serve as Guest Editors for the special issue. The criteria for acceptance of contributions are as follows: Contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure and high standards of the journal. Papers should be original and should contain substantial new results. All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Papers should report original and significant research that has not already been published. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The DEADLINE for contributed papers will be 1 February 2010. This deadline will allow the special issue to appear in September 2010. Advice on publishing your work in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical www.iop.org/Journals/jphysa. Contributions to the special issue should be submitted electronically, if possible, by web upload at www.iop.org/Journals/jphysa, or by email to jphysa@iop.org, quoting 'JPhysA Special Issue— Quantum Phases'. Submissions should ideally be in standard LaTeX form. Please see the website for further information on electronic submissions. Authors unable to submit electronically may send hard-copy contributions to: Publishing Administrators, Journal of Physics A, IOP Publishing, Dirac House, Temple Back, Bristol BS1 6BE, UK. Please quote 'JPhysA Special Issue— Quantum Phases'. All contributions should be accompanied by a read-me file or covering letter giving the postal and e-mail addresses for correspondence. The Publishing Office should be notified of any

  18. Dirac oscillator interacting with a topological defect

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, J.; Furtado, C.; Moraes, F.

    2011-09-15

    In this work we study the interaction problem of a Dirac oscillator with gravitational fields produced by topological defects. The energy levels of the relativistic oscillator in the cosmic string and in the cosmic dislocation space-times are sensible to curvature and torsion associated to these defects and are important evidence of the influence of the topology on this system. In the presence of a localized magnetic field the energy levels acquire a term associated with the Aharonov-Bohm effect. We obtain the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues and see that in the nonrelativistic limit some results known in standard quantum mechanics are reached.

  19. On the effects of a screw dislocation and a linear potential on the harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, M. J.; Furtado, C.; Bakke, K.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum effects on the harmonic oscillator due to the presence of a linear scalar potential and a screw dislocation are investigated. By searching for bound states solutions, it is shown that an Aharonov-Bohm-type effect for bound states and a restriction of the values of the angular frequency of the harmonic oscillator can be obtained, where the allowed values are determined by the topology of the screw dislocation and the quantum numbers associated with the radial modes and the angular momentum. As particular cases, the angular frequency and the energy levels associated with the ground state and the first excited state of the system are obtained.

  20. Magnetoresistance and capacitance oscillations and hysteresis in type-II InAsSbP ellipsoidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambaryan, K. M.; Harutyunyan, V. G.; Aroutiounian, V. M.; Ai, Y.; Ashalley, E.; Wang, Z. M.

    2015-06-01

    The InAsSbP composition type-II quantum dots (QDs) are grown on a InAs(1 0 0) substrate from In-As-Sb-P quaternary liquid phase at a constant temperature in Stranski-Krastanow growth mode. Device structures in the form of photoconductive cells are prepared for investigation. Magnetospectroscopy and high-precision capacitance spectrometry are used to explore the QDs structure’s electric sheet resistance in a magnetic field and the capacitance (charge) law at lateral current flow. Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations with the period of δB = 0.38   ±   0.04 T are found on the magnetoresistance curve at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. The influence of the QDs size distribution on the period of AB oscillations is investigated. The magnetoresistance hysteresis equals to ~50 mΩ and ~400 mΩ is revealed at room and liquid nitrogen temperature, respectively. The capacitance hysteresis (CH) and contra-directional oscillations are also detected. Behavior of the CH versus applied voltage frequency in the range f = 103-106 Hz is investigated. It is shown that the CH decreases with increasing frequency up to 106 Hz. The time constant and corresponding frequency for the QDs R-C parallel circuit (generator) equal to τ = 2.9   ×   10-7 s and f 0 = 5.5   ×   105 Hz, respectively, are calculated.

  1. Klein-Gordon oscillator in Kaluza-Klein theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Josevi; Carvalho, Alexandre M. de M.; Cavalcante, Everton; Furtado, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution we study the Klein-Gordon oscillator on the curved background within the Kaluza-Klein theory. The problem of the interaction between particles coupled harmonically with topological defects in Kaluza-Klein theory is studied. We consider a series of topological defects, then we treat the Klein-Gordon oscillator coupled to this background, and we find the energy levels and corresponding eigenfunctions in these cases. We show that the energy levels depend on the global parameters characterizing these spacetimes. We also investigate a quantum particle described by the Klein-Gordon oscillator interacting with a cosmic dislocation in Som-Raychaudhuri spacetime in the presence of homogeneous magnetic field in a Kaluza-Klein theory. In this case, the energy spectrum is determined, and we observe that these energy levels represent themselves as the sum of the terms related with Aharonov-Bohm flux and of the parameter associated to the rotation of the spacetime.

  2. Quantum oscillations and wave packet revival in conical graphene structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Debabrata; Berche, Bertrand

    2016-03-01

    We present analytical expressions for the eigenstates and eigenvalues of electrons confined in a graphene monolayer in which the crystal symmetry is locally modified by replacing a hexagon by a pentagon, square or heptagon. The calculations are performed in the continuum limit approximation in the vicinity of the Dirac points, solving Dirac equation by freezing out the carrier radial motion. We include the effect of an external magnetic field and show the appearance of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and find out the conditions of gapped and gapless states in the spectrum. We show that the gauge field due to a disclination lifts the orbital degeneracy originating from the existence of two valleys. The broken valley degeneracy has a clear signature on quantum oscillations and wave packet dynamics.

  3. Conductance oscillations of core-shell nanowires in transversal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolescu, Andrei; Nemnes, George Alexandru; Sitek, Anna; Rosdahl, Tomas Orn; Erlingsson, Sigurdur Ingi; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2016-05-01

    We analyze theoretically electronic transport through a core-shell nanowire in the presence of a transversal magnetic field. We calculate the conductance for a variable coupling between the nanowire and the attached leads and show how the snaking states, which are low-energy states localized along the lines of the vanishing radial component of the magnetic field, manifest their existence. In the strong-coupling regime they induce flux periodic, Aharonov-Bohm-like, conductance oscillations, which, by decreasing the coupling to the leads, evolve into well-resolved peaks. The flux periodic oscillations arise due to interference of the snaking states, which is a consequence of backscattering at either the contacts with leads or magnetic or potential barriers in the wire.

  4. Induced current and Aharonov-Bohm effect in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackiw, R.; Milstein, A. I.; Pi, S.-Y.; Terekhov, I. S.

    2009-07-01

    The effect of vacuum polarization in the field of an infinitesimally thin solenoid at distances much larger than the radius of solenoid is investigated. The induced charge density and induced current are calculated. Though the induced charge density turned out to be zero, the induced current is a finite periodical function of the magnetic flux Φ . The expression for this function is found exactly in a value of the flux. The induced current is equal to zero at the integer values of Φ/Φ0 as well as at half-integer values of this ratio, where Φ0=2πℏc/e is the elementary magnetic flux. The latter is a consequence of the Furry theorem and periodicity of the induced current with respect to magnetic flux. As an example we consider the graphene in the field of solenoid perpendicular to the plane of a sample.

  5. Casimir force between two Aharonov-Bohm solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Duru, I.H. )

    1993-05-01

    The vacuum structure for the massive charged scalar field in the region of two parallel, infinitely long and thin solenoids confining the fluxes n[sub 1] and n[sub 2] is studied. By using the Green function method, it is found that the vacuum expectation value of the system's energy has a finite mutual interaction term depending on the distance a between the solenoids, which implies an attractive force per unit length given by F[sub n1n2] = [minus]([h bar]c/[pi][sup 2])(n[sub 1]n[sub 2])[sup 2]/a[sup 3]. 11 refs.

  6. Aharonov-Bohm effect on Aharonov-Casher scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Qionggui

    2010-01-15

    The scattering of relativistic spin-1/2 neutral particles with a magnetic dipole moment by a long straight charged line and a magnetic flux line at the same position is studied. The scattering cross sections for unpolarized and polarized particles are obtained by solving the Dirac-Pauli equation. The results are in general the same as those for pure Aharonov-Casher scattering (by the charged line alone) as expected. However, in special cases when the incident energy, the line charge density, and the magnetic flux satisfy some relations, the cross section for polarized particles is dramatically changed. Relations between the polarization of incident particles and that of scattered ones are presented, both in the full relativistic case and the nonrelativistic limit. The characteristic difference between the general and special cases lies in the backward direction: in the general cases the incident particles are simply bounced while in the special cases their polarization is turned over simultaneously. For pure Aharonov-Casher scattering there exist cases where the helicities of all scattered particles are reversed. This seems to be remarkable but appears unnoticed previously. Two mathematical approaches are employed to deal with the singularity of the electric and magnetic field and it turns out that the physical results are essentially the same.

  7. Self-oscillating AB diblock copolymer developed by post modification strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, Takeshi E-mail: ryo@cross.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Onoda, Michika; Tamate, Ryota; Yoshida, Ryo E-mail: ryo@cross.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2015-06-15

    We prepared AB diblock copolymer composed of hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) segment and self-oscillating polymer segment. In the latter segment, ruthenium tris(2,2′-bipyridine) (Ru(bpy){sub 3}), a catalyst of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, is introduced into the polymer architecture based on N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm). The Ru(bpy){sub 3} was introduced into the polymer segment by two methods; (i) direct random copolymerization (DP) of NIPAAm and Ru(bpy){sub 3} vinyl monomer and (ii) post modification (PM) of Ru(bpy){sub 3} with random copolymer of NIPAAm and N-3-aminopropylmethacrylamide. For both the diblock copolymers, a bistable temperature region (the temperature range; ΔT{sub m}), where the block copolymer self-assembles into micelle at reduced Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} state whereas it breaks-up into individual polymer chain at oxidized Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 3+} state, monotonically extends as the composition of the Ru(bpy){sub 3} increases. The ΔT{sub m} of the block copolymer prepared by PM is larger than that by DP. The difference in ΔT{sub m} is rationalized from the statistical analysis of the arrangement of the Ru(bpy){sub 3} moiety along the self-oscillating segments. By using the PM method, the well-defined AB diblock copolymer having ΔT{sub m} (ca. 25 °C) large enough to cause stable self-oscillation can be prepared. The periodic structural transition of the diblock copolymer in a dilute solution ([Polymer] = 0.1 wt. %) is closely investigated in terms of the time-resolved dynamic light scattering technique at constant temperature in the bistable region. A macroscopic viscosity oscillation of a concentrated polymer solution (15 wt. %) coupled with the periodic microphase separation is also demonstrated.

  8. Superconductivity of the magnetized electron gas of a quantum cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Eminov, P. A. Sezonov, Yu. I.

    2008-10-15

    A microscopic theory of superconductivity is developed for the magnetized electron gas on a cylindrical surface. The Gibbs free energy is calculated for the superconducting system. A gap equation is derived that determines the critical temperature as a function of the quantum-cylinder dimensions and the Aharonov-Bohm parameter. It is shown that the gap not only exhibits Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, but also oscillates with varying curvature of the cylindrical surface.

  9. Quantum interference in an electron-hole graphene ring system

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, D.; Schmidt, H.; Haug, R. J.

    2013-12-04

    Quantum interference is observed in a graphene ring system via the Aharonov Bohm effect. As graphene is a gapless semiconductor, this geometry allows to study the unique situation of quantum interference between electrons and holes in addition to the unipolar quantum interference. The period and amplitude of the observed Aharonov-Bohm oscillations are independent of the sign of the applied gate voltage showing the equivalence between unipolar and dipolar interference.

  10. Conductance phases in the quantum dots of an Aharonov-Bohm ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahalom, A.; Englman, R.

    2006-09-01

    The regimes of growing phases (for electron numbers N≈0 8 ) that pass into regions of self-returning phases (for N>8 ), found recently in quantum dot conductances by Heiblum and co-workers are accounted for by an elementary Green’s function formalism, appropriate to an equi-spaced ladder structure (with at least three rungs) of electronic levels in the quantum dot. The key features of the theory are physically a dissipation rate that increases linearly with the level number (and is tentatively linked to coupling to longitudinal optical phonons) and a set of Fano-like metastable levels, which disturb the unitarity, and mathematically the changeover of the position of the complex transmission amplitude zeros from the upper half in the complex gap-voltage plane to the lower half of that plane. The two regimes are identified with (respectively) the Blaschke term and the Kramers-Kronig integral term in the theory of complex variables.

  11. Decoherence in a double-dot Aharonov-Bohm interferometer: Numerical renormalization group study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubala, Björn; Roosen, David; Sindel, Michael; Hofstetter, Walter; Marquardt, Florian

    2014-07-01

    Coherence in electronic interferometers is typically believed to be restored fully in the limit of small voltages, frequencies, and temperatures. However, it is crucial to check this essentially perturbative argument by nonperturbative methods. Here we use the numerical renormalization group to study ac transport and decoherence in an experimentally realizable model interferometer, a parallel double quantum dot coupled to a phonon mode. The model allows us to clearly distinguish renormalization effects from decoherence. We discuss finite-frequency transport and confirm the restoration of coherence in the dc limit.

  12. The Aharonov-Bohm Effect and Transport Properties in Graphene Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lungu, Mihai; Giugiulan, Raluca; Lungu, Antoanetta; Bunoiu, Madalin; Neculae, Adrian

    2013-12-01

    This paper investigates the possibility to improve the filtering process of flue gas by separation of suspended nanoparticle using dielectrophoresis. The study focuses on the particles having an average radius of about 50-150 nm, that cannot be filtrated by classical techniques but have a harmful effect for environment and human health. The size distribution nanoparticles collected from the flue gas filters of a hazardous waste incinerator plant were evaluated. Based on obtained experimental data and a proposed mathematical model, the concentration distribution of nanoparticle suspended in flue gas inside a microfluidic separation device was analyzed by numerical simulations, using the finite element method. The performances of the device were described in terms of three new specific quantities related to the separation process, namely Recovery, Purity and Separation Efficiency. The simulations could provide the optimal values of control parameters for separation process, and aim to be a useful tool in designing microfluidic devices for separating nanoparticle from combustion gases.

  13. Exciton storage in type-II quantum dots using the optical Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Climente, Juan I.; Planelles, Josep

    2014-05-12

    We investigate the bright-to-dark exciton conversion efficiency in type-II quantum dots subject to a perpendicular magnetic field. To this end, we take the exciton storage protocol recently proposed by Simonin and co-workers [Phys. Rev. B 89, 075304 (2014)] and simulate its coherent dynamics. We confirm the storage is efficient in perfectly circular structures subject to weak external electric fields, where adiabatic evolution is dominant. In practice, however, the efficiency rapidly degrades with symmetry lowering. Besides, the use of excited states is likely unfeasible owing to the fast decay rates. We then propose an adaptation of the protocol which does not suffer from these limitations.

  14. Exciton Storage in a Nanoscale Aharonov-Bohm Ring with Electric Field Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Andrea M.; Roemer, Rudolf A.; Campo, Vivaldo L. Jr.; Portnoi, Mikhail E.

    2009-03-06

    We study analytically the optical properties of a simple model for an electron-hole pair on a ring subjected to perpendicular magnetic flux and in-plane electric field. We show how to tune this excitonic system from optically active to optically dark as a function of these external fields. Our results offer a simple mechanism for exciton storage and readout.

  15. Temperature and magnetic field effects on electron transport through DNA molecules in a two-dimensional four-channel system.

    PubMed

    Joe, Yong S; Lee, Sun H; Hedin, Eric R; Kim, Young D

    2013-06-01

    We utilize a two-dimensional four-channel DNA model, with a tight-binding (TB) Hamiltonian, and investigate the temperature and the magnetic field dependence of the transport behavior of a short DNA molecule. Random variation of the hopping integrals due to the thermal structural disorder, which partially destroy phase coherence of electrons and reduce quantum interference, leads to a reduction of the localization length and causes suppressed overall transmission. We also incorporate a variation of magnetic field flux density into the hopping integrals as a phase factor and observe Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations in the transmission. It is shown that for non-zero magnetic flux, the transmission zero leaves the real-energy axis and moves up into the complex-energy plane. We also point out that the hydrogen bonds between the base pair with flux variations play a role to determine the periodicity of AB oscillations in the transmission.

  16. Dynamic spin-flip shot noise of mesoscopic transport through a toroidal carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. K.; Zhang, J.; Wang, J.

    2015-01-01

    The shot noise in a toroidal carbon nanotube (TCN) interferometer under the perturbation of a rotating magnetic field (RMF) has been investigated. A general shot noise formula has been derived by calculating the current correlation. It was found that photon absorption and emission induce novel features of dynamic shot noise. The oscillatory behavior of shot noise and Fano factor vary with the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) magnetic flux, and they are sensitively dependent on the Zeeman energy, frequency of RMF, and source-drain bias. By adjusting the Zeeman energy, the AB oscillation structures of shot noise and Fano factor show valley-to-peak transformation. The shot noise increases nonlinearly with increasing the Zeeman energy and photon energy. The enhancement and asymmetry of shot noise can be attributed to the spin-flip effect.

  17. Quantum Phenomena Observed Using Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tonomura, Akira

    2011-05-06

    Electron phase microscopy based on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect principle has been used to illuminate fundamental phenomena concerning magnetism and superconductivity by visualizing quantitative magnetic lines of force. This paper deals with confirmation experiments on the AB effect, the magnetization process of tiny magnetic heads for perpendicular recording, and vortex behaviors in high-Tc superconductors.

  18. Magnetoexciton in nanotube under external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Russi, L. F.; Paredes Gutiérrez, H.; Santos, Y. F.; Mikhailov, I. D.

    2016-08-01

    We study the Aharonov-Bohm oscillation of the energy levels of an electron-hole pair confined in a narrow nanotube in the presence of the magnetic field applied along the symmetry axis. We show that the electric field applied at the same direction makes the oscillation more pronounced.

  19. Aharonov-Bohm conductance through a single-channel quantum ring: persistent-current blockade and zero-mode dephasing.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, A P; Gornyi, I V; Kachorovskii, V Yu; Polyakov, D G

    2010-07-16

    We study the effect of electron-electron interaction on transport through a tunnel-coupled single-channel ring. We find that the conductance as a function of magnetic flux shows a series of interaction-induced resonances that survive thermal averaging. The period of the series is given by the interaction strength α. The physics behind this behavior is the blocking of the tunneling current by the circular current. The main mechanism of dephasing is due to circular-current fluctuations. The dephasing rate is proportional to the tunneling rate and does not depend on α.

  20. An "unreasonable effectiveness" of Hilbert transform for the transition phase behavior in an Aharonov-Bohm two-path interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englman, R.

    2016-08-01

    The recent phase shift data of Takada et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 (2014) 126601) for a two level system are reconstructed from their current intensity curves by the method of Hilbert transform, for which the underlying Physics is the principle of causality. An introductory algebraic model illustrates pedagogically the working of the method and leads to newly derived relationships involving phenomenological parameters, in particular for the sign of the phase slope between the resonance peaks. While the parametrization of the experimental current intensity data in terms of a few model parameters shows only a qualitative agreement for the phase shift, due to the strong impact of small, detailed variations in the experimental intensity curve on the phase behavior, the numerical Hilbert transform yields a satisfactory reproduction of the phase.

  1. Two interacting charged particles in an Aharonov-Bohm ring: Bound state transitions, symmetry breaking, persistent currents, and Berry's phase

    SciTech Connect

    Moulopoulos, Konstantinos; Constantinou, Martha

    2004-12-15

    By using a Green's function procedure we determine exactly the energy spectrum and the associated eigenstates of a system of two oppositely charged particles interacting through a contact potential and moving in a one-dimensional ring threaded by a magnetic flux. Critical interactions for the appearance of bound states are analytically determined and are viewed as limiting cases of many-body results from the area of interaction-induced metal-insulator transitions in charged quantal mixtures. Analytical expressions on one-body probability and charge current densities for this overall neutral system are derived and their single-valuedness leads to the possibility of states with broken symmetry, with possible experimental signatures in exciton spectra. Persistent currents are analytically determined and their properties investigated from the point of view of an interacting mesoscopic system. A cyclic adiabatic process on the interaction potential is also identified, with the associated Berry's phase directly linked to the electric (persistent) currents, the probability currents having no contribution for a neutral system.

  2. Energy levels and far-infrared spectra of oval-shaped nanorings

    SciTech Connect

    Gutiérrez, W.; García, L. F.; Mikhailov, I. D.

    2014-05-15

    The evolution of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillation of low-lying states and far infrared spectrum associated to variation of the path curvature for electron motion along nanorings with centerlines in a form of a set of Cassini ovals, whose shape is changed continuously from a single elongated loop to two separated loops is theoretically investigated.

  3. Modeling surface motion effects in N2 dissociation on W(110): Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations and generalized Langevin oscillator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nattino, Francesco; Galparsoro, Oihana; Costanzo, Francesca; Díez Muiño, Ricardo; Alducin, Maite; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    2016-06-01

    Accurately modeling surface temperature and surface motion effects is necessary to study molecule-surface reactions in which the energy dissipation to surface phonons can largely affect the observables of interest. We present here a critical comparison of two methods that allow to model such effects, namely, the ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method and the generalized Langevin oscillator (GLO) model, using the dissociation of N2 on W(110) as a benchmark. AIMD is highly accurate as the surface atoms are explicitly part of the dynamics, but this advantage comes with a large computational cost. The GLO model is much more computationally convenient, but accounts for lattice motion effects in a very approximate way. Results show that, despite its simplicity, the GLO model is able to capture the physics of the system to a large extent, returning dissociation probabilities which are in better agreement with AIMD than static-surface results. Furthermore, the GLO model and the AIMD method predict very similar energy transfer to the lattice degrees of freedom in the non-reactive events, and similar dissociation dynamics.

  4. Modeling surface motion effects in N2 dissociation on W(110): Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations and generalized Langevin oscillator model.

    PubMed

    Nattino, Francesco; Galparsoro, Oihana; Costanzo, Francesca; Díez Muiño, Ricardo; Alducin, Maite; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    2016-06-28

    Accurately modeling surface temperature and surface motion effects is necessary to study molecule-surface reactions in which the energy dissipation to surface phonons can largely affect the observables of interest. We present here a critical comparison of two methods that allow to model such effects, namely, the ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method and the generalized Langevin oscillator (GLO) model, using the dissociation of N2 on W(110) as a benchmark. AIMD is highly accurate as the surface atoms are explicitly part of the dynamics, but this advantage comes with a large computational cost. The GLO model is much more computationally convenient, but accounts for lattice motion effects in a very approximate way. Results show that, despite its simplicity, the GLO model is able to capture the physics of the system to a large extent, returning dissociation probabilities which are in better agreement with AIMD than static-surface results. Furthermore, the GLO model and the AIMD method predict very similar energy transfer to the lattice degrees of freedom in the non-reactive events, and similar dissociation dynamics.

  5. Quantum gates with topological phases

    SciTech Connect

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2003-09-01

    We investigate two models for performing topological quantum gates with the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) effects. Topological one- and two-qubit Abelian phases can be enacted with the AB effect using charge qubits, whereas the AC effect can be used to perform all single-qubit gates (Abelian and non-Abelian) for spin qubits. Possible experimental setups suitable for a solid-state implementation are briefly discussed.

  6. Measurement of the transmission phase of an electron in a quantum two-path interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, S. Watanabe, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Bäuerle, C.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.; Tarucha, S.

    2015-08-10

    A quantum two-path interferometer allows for direct measurement of the transmission phase shift of an electron, providing useful information on coherent scattering problems. In mesoscopic systems, however, the two-path interference is easily smeared by contributions from other paths, and this makes it difficult to observe the true transmission phase shift. To eliminate this problem, multi-terminal Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometers have been used to derive the phase shift by assuming that the relative phase shift of the electrons between the two paths is simply obtained when a smooth shift of the AB oscillations is observed. Nevertheless, the phase shifts using such a criterion have sometimes been inconsistent with theory. On the other hand, we have used an AB ring contacted to tunnel-coupled wires and acquired the phase shift consistent with theory when the two output currents through the coupled wires oscillate with well-defined anti-phase. Here, we investigate thoroughly these two criteria used to ensure a reliable phase measurement, the anti-phase relation of the two output currents, and the smooth phase shift in the AB oscillation. We confirm that the well-defined anti-phase relation ensures a correct phase measurement with a quantum two-path interference. In contrast, we find that even in a situation where the anti-phase relation is less well-defined, the smooth phase shift in the AB oscillation can still occur but does not give the correct transmission phase due to contributions from multiple paths. This indicates that the phase relation of the two output currents in our interferometer gives a good criterion for the measurement of the true transmission phase, while the smooth phase shift in the AB oscillation itself does not.

  7. The active-bridge oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Wessendorf, K.O.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes the Active-Bridge Oscillator (ABO), a new concept in high-stability oscillator design. The ABO is ab ridge-type oscillator design that is easly to design and overcomes many of the operational and design difficulties associated with standard bridge oscillator designs. The ABO will oscillate with a very stable output amplitude over a wide range of operating conditions without the use of an automatic-level-control (ALC). A standard bridge oscillator design requires an ALC to maintain the desired amplitude of oscillation. for this and other reasons, bridge oscilaltors are not used in mainstream designs. Bridge oscillators are generally relegated to relatively low-volume, high-performance applications. The Colpitts and Pierce designs are the most popular oscillators but are typically less stable than a bridge-type oscillator.

  8. Topological insulator Bi2Te3 nanowire field effect devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Luis A.; Zhang, Genqiang; Wu, Yue; Chen, Yong P.

    2012-02-01

    Bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) has been studied extensively as one of the best thermoelectric materials and recently shown to be a prototype topological insulator with nontrivial conducting surface states. We have grown Bi2Te3 nanowires by a two-step solution phase reaction and characterized their material and structural properties by XRD, TEM, XPS and EDS. We fabricate both backgated (on SiO2/Si) and top-gated (with ALD high-k gate dielectric such as Al2O3 or HfO2) field effect devices on such nanowires with diameters ˜50nm. Ambipolar field effect and a resistance modulation of up to 600% at low temperatures have been observed. The 4-terminal resistance shows insulating behavior (increasing with decreasing temperature) from 300 K to 50K, then saturates in a plateau for temperatures below 50K, consistent with the presence of metallic surface state. Aharonov--Bohm (AB) oscillations are observed in the magneto-resistance with a magnetic field parallel to the nanowire, providing further evidence of the presence of surface state conduction Finally, a prominent weak anti-localization (WAL) feature that weakens with increasing magnetic field and/or temperature is observed in the magneto-resistance with a magnetic field perpendicular to the nanowire.

  9. Quantum-ring spin interference device tuned by quantum point contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Diago-Cisneros, Leo; Mireles, Francisco

    2013-11-21

    We introduce a spin-interference device that comprises a quantum ring (QR) with three embedded quantum point contacts (QPCs) and study theoretically its spin transport properties in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Two of the QPCs conform the lead-to-ring junctions while a third one is placed symmetrically in the upper arm of the QR. Using an appropriate scattering model for the QPCs and the S-matrix scattering approach, we analyze the role of the QPCs on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) conductance oscillations of the QR-device. Exact formulas are obtained for the spin-resolved conductances of the QR-device as a function of the confinement of the QPCs and the AB/AC phases. Conditions for the appearance of resonances and anti-resonances in the spin-conductance are derived and discussed. We predict very distinctive variations of the QR-conductance oscillations not seen in previous QR proposals. In particular, we find that the interference pattern in the QR can be manipulated to a large extend by varying electrically the lead-to-ring topological parameters. The latter can be used to modulate the AB and AC phases by applying gate voltage only. We have shown also that the conductance oscillations exhibits a crossover to well-defined resonances as the lateral QPC confinement strength is increased, mapping the eigenenergies of the QR. In addition, unique features of the conductance arise by varying the aperture of the upper-arm QPC and the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Our results may be of relevance for promising spin-orbitronics devices based on quantum interference mechanisms.

  10. An experimental proposal to test the physical effect of the vector potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Feng

    2016-01-01

    There are two interpretations of the Aharonov-Bohm (A-B) effect. One interpretation asserts that the A-B effect demonstrates that the vector potential is a physical reality that can result in the phase shift of a moving charge in quantum mechanics. The other interpretation asserts that the phase shift of the moving charge results from the interaction energy between the electromagnetic field of the moving charge and external electromagnetic fields. This paper briefly reviews these two interpretations and analyzes their differences. In addition, a new experimental scheme is proposed to determine which interpretation is correct.

  11. Aharonov-casher effect in Bi2Se3 square-ring interferometers.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fanming; Yang, Fan; Chen, Jun; Shen, Jie; Ding, Yue; Lu, Jiangbo; Song, Yuanjun; Yang, Huaixin; Liu, Guangtong; Fan, Jie; Li, Yongqing; Ji, Zhongqing; Yang, Changli; Lu, Li

    2011-07-01

    Electrical control of spin dynamics in Bi(2)Se(3) was investigated in ring-type interferometers. Aharonov-Bohm and Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak resistance oscillations against a magnetic field, and Aharonov-Casher resistance oscillations against the gate voltage were observed in the presence of a Berry phase of π. A very large tunability of spin precession angle by the gate voltage has been obtained, indicating that Bi(2)Se(3)-related materials with strong spin-orbit coupling are promising candidates for constructing novel spintronic devices.

  12. Surface state dominated transport in topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdou, Bacel Gooth, Johannes; Dorn, August; Nielsch, Kornelius; Pippel, Eckhard

    2013-11-04

    We report on low temperature magnetoresistance measurements on single-crystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires synthesized via catalytic growth and post-annealing in a Te-rich atmosphere. The observation of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations indicates the presence of topological surface states. Analyses of Subnikov-de Haas oscillations in perpendicular magnetoresistance yield extremely low two-dimensional carrier concentrations and effective electron masses, and very high carrier mobilities. All our findings are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions of massless Dirac fermions at the surfaces of topological insulators.

  13. Quantum Electronic Transport of Topological Surface States in β-Ag2Se Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihwan; Hwang, Ahreum; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Sunghun; Park, Yun Chang; Kim, Si-In; Kim, Hong-Seok; Doh, Yong-Joo; Kim, Jinhee; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-04-26

    Single-crystalline β-Ag2Se nanostructures, a new class of 3D topological insulators (TIs), were synthesized using the chemical vapor transport method. The topological surface states were verified by measuring electronic transport properties including the weak antilocalization effect, Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, and Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. First-principles band calculations revealed that the band inversion in β-Ag2Se is caused by strong spin-orbit coupling and Ag-Se bonding hybridization. These investigations provide evidence of nontrivial surface state about β-Ag2Se TIs that have anisotropic Dirac cones.

  14. Braided oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, A.

    2002-03-01

    A generalized oscillator algebra is proposed and the braided Hopf algebra structure for this generalized oscillator is investigated. Using the solutions for the braided Hopf algebra structure, two types of braided Fibonacci oscillators are introduced. This leads to two types of braided Biedenharn-Macfarlane oscillators as special cases of the Fibonacci oscillators. We also find the braided Hopf algebra solutions for the three dimensional braided space. One of these, as a special case, gives the Hopf algebra given in the literature.

  15. Relativistic Killingbeck energy states under external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshghi, M.; Mehraban, H.; Ikhdair, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    We address the behavior of the Dirac equation with the Killingbeck radial potential including the external magnetic and Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux fields. The spin and pseudo-spin symmetries are considered. The correct bound state spectra and their corresponding wave functions are obtained. We seek such a solution using the biconfluent Heun's differential equation method. Further, we give some of our results at the end of this study. Our final results can be reduced to their non-relativistic forms by simply using some appropriate transformations. The spectra, in the spin and pseudo-spin symmetries, are very similar with a slight difference in energy spacing between different states.

  16. Measurement of Aharonov-Casher effect in a Josephson junction chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Ioan Mihai; Lecocq, Florent; Pannetier, Bernard; Buisson, Olivier; Guichard, Wiebke

    2011-03-01

    We have recently measured the effect of superconducting phase-slips on the ground state of a Josephson junction chain and a rhombi chain. Here we report clear evidence of Aharonov-Casher effect in a chain of Josephson junctions. This phenomenon is the dual of the well known Aharonov-Bohm interference. Using a capacitively coupled gate to the islands of the chain, we induce oscillations of the supercurrent by tuning the polarization charges on the islands. We observe complex interference patterns for different quantum phase slip amplitudes, that we understand quantitatively as Aharonov-Casher vortex interferences. European STREP MIDAS.

  17. Quasiballistic transport of Dirac fermions in a Bi2Se3 nanowire.

    PubMed

    Dufouleur, J; Veyrat, L; Teichgräber, A; Neuhaus, S; Nowka, C; Hampel, S; Cayssol, J; Schumann, J; Eichler, B; Schmidt, O G; Büchner, B; Giraud, R

    2013-05-01

    Quantum coherent transport of surface states in a mesoscopic nanowire of the three-dimensional topological insulator Bi(2}Se(3) is studied in the weak-disorder limit. At very low temperatures, many harmonics are evidenced in the Fourier transform of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, revealing the long phase coherence length of spin-chiral Dirac fermions. Remarkably, from their exponential temperature dependence, we infer an unusual 1/T power law for the phase coherence length L(φ)(T). This decoherence is typical for quasiballistic fermions weakly coupled to their environment.

  18. Memories of AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaks, V. G.

    2013-06-01

    I had the good fortune to be a student of A. B. Migdal - AB, as we called him in person or in his absence - and to work in the sector he headed at the Kurchatov Institute, along with his other students and my friends, including Vitya Galitsky, Spartak Belyayev and Tolya Larkin. I was especially close with AB in the second half of the 1950s, the years most important for my formation, and AB's contribution to this formation was very great. To this day, I've often quoted AB on various occasions, as it's hard to put things better or more precisely than he did; I tell friends stories heard from AB, because these stories enhance life as AB himself enhanced it; my daughter is named Tanya after AB's wife Tatyana Lvovna, and so on. In what follows, I'll recount a few episodes in my life in which AB played an important or decisive role, and then will share some other memories of AB...

  19. Neurodynamic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espinosa, Ismael; Gonzalez, Hortensia; Quiza, Jorge; Gonazalez, J. Jesus; Arroyo, Ruben; Lara, Ritaluz

    1995-01-01

    Oscillation of electrical activity has been found in many nervous systems, from invertebrates to vertebrates including man. There exists experimental evidence of very simple circuits with the capability of oscillation. Neurons with intrinsic oscillation have been found and also neural circuits where oscillation is a property of the network. These two types of oscillations coexist in many instances. It is nowadays hypothesized that behind synchronization and oscillation there is a system of coupled oscillators responsible for activities that range from locomotion and feature binding in vision to control of sleep and circadian rhythms. The huge knowledge that has been acquired on oscillators from the times of Lord Rayleigh has made the simulation of neural oscillators a very active endeavor. This has been enhanced with more recent physiological findings about small neural circuits by means of intracellular and extracellular recordings as well as imaging methods. The future of this interdisciplinary field looks very promising; some researchers are going into quantum mechanics with the idea of trying to provide a quantum description of the brain. In this work we describe some simulations using neuron models by means of which we form simple neural networks that have the capability of oscillation. We analyze the oscillatory activity with root locus method, cross-correlation histograms, and phase planes. In the more complicated neural network models there is the possibility of chaotic oscillatory activity and we study that by means of Lyapunov exponents. The companion paper shows an example of that kind.

  20. Corrigendum: Curl-free vector potential observation on the macro-scale for charged particles in a magnetic field compared with that on the micro-scale: the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Ram K.

    2013-01-01

    The article should include the following section: Acknowledgment This work was supported by the Platinum Jubilee Fellowship of the National Academy of Sciences of India, which is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2001-01-01

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  2. Raindrop oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, K. V.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the change in shape of a raindrop is presented. Raindrops measured by two orthogonal cameras were classified by shape and orientation to determine the nature of the oscillation. A physical model based on potential energy was then developed to study the amplitude variation of oscillating drops. The model results show that oscillations occur about the equilibrium axis ratio, but the time average axis ratio if significantly more spherical for large amplitudes because of asymmetry in the surface potential energy. A generalization of the model to oscillations produced by turbulence yields average axis ratios that are consistent with the camera measurements. The model results for average axis ratios were applied to rainfall studies with a dual polarized radar.

  3. Baryogenesis via particle-antiparticle oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek, Seyda; March-Russell, John

    2016-06-01

    C P violation, which is crucial for producing the baryon asymmetry of the Universe, is enhanced in particle-antiparticle oscillations. We study particle-antiparticle oscillations [of a particle with mass O (100 GeV )] with C P violation in the early Universe in the presence of interactions with O (ab -fb ) cross sections. We show that if baryon-number-violating interactions exist, a baryon asymmetry can be produced via out-of-equilibrium decays of oscillating particles. As a concrete example we study a U (1 )R-symmetric, R -parity-violating supersymmetry model with pseudo-Dirac gauginos, which undergo particle-antiparticle oscillations. Taking bino to be the lightest U (1 )R -symmetric particle, and assuming it decays via baryon-number-violating interactions, we show that bino-antibino oscillations can produce the baryon asymmetry of the Universe.

  4. Baryogenesis via particle-antiparticle oscillations

    DOE PAGES

    Ipek, Seyda; March-Russell, John

    2016-06-29

    CP violation, which is crucial for producing the baryon asymmetry of the Universe, is enhanced in particle-antiparticle oscillations. We study particle-antiparticle oscillations [of a particle with mass O(100GeV)] with CP violation in the early Universe in the presence of interactions with O(ab-fb) cross sections. We show that if baryon-number-violating interactions exist, a baryon asymmetry can be produced via out-of-equilibrium decays of oscillating particles. As a concrete example we study a U(1)R-symmetric, R-parity-violating supersymmetry model with pseudo-Dirac gauginos, which undergo particle-antiparticle oscillations. Hence, taking bino to be the lightest U(1)R-symmetric particle, and assuming it decays via baryon-number-violating interactions, we show thatmore » bino-antibino oscillations can produce the baryon asymmetry of the Universe.« less

  5. Programmable Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Patawaran, Ferze D.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Lee, Clement G.; Nguyen, Huy

    2011-01-01

    A programmable oscillator is a frequency synthesizer with an output phase that tracks an arbitrary function. An offset, phase-locked loop circuit is used in combination with an error control feedback loop to precisely control the output phase of the oscillator. To down-convert the received signal, several stages of mixing may be employed with the compensation for the time-base distortion of the carrier occurring at any one of those stages. In the Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR), the compensation occurs in the mixing from an intermediate frequency (IF), whose value is dependent on the station and band, to a common IF used in the final stage of down-conversion to baseband. The programmable oscillator (PO) is used in the final stage of down-conversion to generate the IF, along with a time-varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the carrier, thus removing it from the final down-converted signal.

  6. Omega-AB

    SciTech Connect

    Siirola, John D.; Slepoy, Alexander; Sprigg, Jr., James A.; Jorgensen, Craig R.; Selzler, Gene; Pryor, Richard J.

    2007-05-01

    A hierarchical, modular modeling environment for hybrid simulations of sequential-modular, systems dynamics, discrete-event, and agent-based paradigms Omega-AB models contain a hierarchically-defined module tree that specifies the execution logic for the simulation, and a multi-network graph that defines the environment within which the simulation occurs. Modules are the fundamental buildinig blocks of an Omega-AB model and can define anything from a basic mathematical operation to a complex behavioral response model. Modules rely on the "plug-in" concept which allows developers to build independent module libraries that are gathered, linked, and instantiated by the Omega-AB engine at run time. Inter-module communication occurs through two complimentary systems: pull-based "ports" for general computation patterns and push-based "plugs" for event processing. The simulation environment is an abstract graph of nodes and links. Agents (module sub-trees headed up by an Agent module) reside at nodes and relate to their neighbors through typed links. To facilitate the construction and visualization of complex, interacting networks with dramatically different structure, Omega-AB provides a system for organizing the nodes into hierarchica trees that describe "slices" of the overall network.

  7. Omega-AB

    2007-05-01

    A hierarchical, modular modeling environment for hybrid simulations of sequential-modular, systems dynamics, discrete-event, and agent-based paradigms Omega-AB models contain a hierarchically-defined module tree that specifies the execution logic for the simulation, and a multi-network graph that defines the environment within which the simulation occurs. Modules are the fundamental buildinig blocks of an Omega-AB model and can define anything from a basic mathematical operation to a complex behavioral response model. Modules rely on the "plug-in" conceptmore » which allows developers to build independent module libraries that are gathered, linked, and instantiated by the Omega-AB engine at run time. Inter-module communication occurs through two complimentary systems: pull-based "ports" for general computation patterns and push-based "plugs" for event processing. The simulation environment is an abstract graph of nodes and links. Agents (module sub-trees headed up by an Agent module) reside at nodes and relate to their neighbors through typed links. To facilitate the construction and visualization of complex, interacting networks with dramatically different structure, Omega-AB provides a system for organizing the nodes into hierarchica trees that describe "slices" of the overall network.« less

  8. Interferometer-Based Studies of Quantum Hall Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Douglas Templeton, III

    The fractional quantum Hall (FQH) effect harbors a wealth of unique phenomena, many of which remain mysterious. Of particular interest is the predicted existence of quasi-particles with unusual topological properties, especially in light of recent proposals to observe these properties using electronic interferometers. An introduction to quantum Hall physics and electronic interferometry is given in Chapter 1 of this thesis. The remaining chapters, summarized below, describe a set of experiments in which FQH systems are studied using electronic Fabry-Perot interferometry and related techniques. Since prior studies of electronic Fabry-Perot interferometers revealed unexpected behavior even in the integer quantum Hall (IQH) regime, we began our measurements there. Our initial experiment, presented in Chapter 2, disentangles signatures of Coulomb interaction effects from those of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interference and provides the first measurement of pure AB interference in these devices. In our next experiment, presented in Chapter 3, we measure AB interference oscillations as a function of an applied dc bias, use their period to study the velocity of the interfering electrons, and study how the oscillations decay as a function of bias and magnetic field. Moving to the FQH regime, applying a similar-sized bias to a quantum point contact leads to long-lasting changes in the strengths and positions of FQH plateaus. The involvement of lattice nuclear spins in this effect, suggested by the long persistence times, is confirmed using NMR-type measurements. Although the exact physical process responsible for the effect remains unclear, its filling-factor dependence provides a striking illustration of composite fermion physics. These measurements are described in Chapter 4. In certain devices, interference oscillations associated with several FQH states are observed. Interpretation of their magnetic-field and gate-voltage periods provides a measurement of quasi-particle charge

  9. Quantum Transport and Nano Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on the Topological Surface States of Single Sb2Te3 Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Arango, Yulieth C; Huang, Liubing; Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, Jose; Asensio, Maria C; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lüth, Hans; Lu, Jia Grace; Schäpers, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on low-temperature transport and electronic band structure of p-type Sb2Te3 nanowires, grown by chemical vapor deposition. Magnetoresistance measurements unravel quantum interference phenomena, which depend on the cross-sectional dimensions of the nanowires. The observation of periodic Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations is attributed to transport in topologically protected surface states in the Sb2Te3 nanowires. The study of universal conductance fluctuations demonstrates coherent transport along the Aharonov-Bohm paths encircling the rectangular cross-section of the nanowires. We use nanoscale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on single nanowires (nano-ARPES) to provide direct experimental evidence on the nontrivial topological character of those surface states. The compiled study of the bandstructure and the magnetotransport response unambiguosly points out the presence of topologically protected surface states in the nanowires and their substantial contribution to the quantum transport effects, as well as the hole doping and Fermi velocity among other key issues. The results are consistent with the theoretical description of quantum transport in intrinsically doped quasi-one-dimensional topological insulator nanowires. PMID:27581169

  10. Quantum Transport and Nano Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on the Topological Surface States of Single Sb2Te3 Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Arango, Yulieth C.; Huang, Liubing; Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, Jose; Asensio, Maria C.; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lüth, Hans; Lu, Jia Grace; Schäpers, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on low-temperature transport and electronic band structure of p-type Sb2Te3 nanowires, grown by chemical vapor deposition. Magnetoresistance measurements unravel quantum interference phenomena, which depend on the cross-sectional dimensions of the nanowires. The observation of periodic Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations is attributed to transport in topologically protected surface states in the Sb2Te3 nanowires. The study of universal conductance fluctuations demonstrates coherent transport along the Aharonov-Bohm paths encircling the rectangular cross-section of the nanowires. We use nanoscale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on single nanowires (nano-ARPES) to provide direct experimental evidence on the nontrivial topological character of those surface states. The compiled study of the bandstructure and the magnetotransport response unambiguosly points out the presence of topologically protected surface states in the nanowires and their substantial contribution to the quantum transport effects, as well as the hole doping and Fermi velocity among other key issues. The results are consistent with the theoretical description of quantum transport in intrinsically doped quasi-one-dimensional topological insulator nanowires. PMID:27581169

  11. Quantum Transport and Nano Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on the Topological Surface States of Single Sb2Te3 Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arango, Yulieth C.; Huang, Liubing; Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, Jose; Asensio, Maria C.; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lüth, Hans; Lu, Jia Grace; Schäpers, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We report on low-temperature transport and electronic band structure of p-type Sb2Te3 nanowires, grown by chemical vapor deposition. Magnetoresistance measurements unravel quantum interference phenomena, which depend on the cross-sectional dimensions of the nanowires. The observation of periodic Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations is attributed to transport in topologically protected surface states in the Sb2Te3 nanowires. The study of universal conductance fluctuations demonstrates coherent transport along the Aharonov-Bohm paths encircling the rectangular cross-section of the nanowires. We use nanoscale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on single nanowires (nano-ARPES) to provide direct experimental evidence on the nontrivial topological character of those surface states. The compiled study of the bandstructure and the magnetotransport response unambiguosly points out the presence of topologically protected surface states in the nanowires and their substantial contribution to the quantum transport effects, as well as the hole doping and Fermi velocity among other key issues. The results are consistent with the theoretical description of quantum transport in intrinsically doped quasi-one-dimensional topological insulator nanowires.

  12. Quantum Transport and Nano Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on the Topological Surface States of Single Sb2Te3 Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Arango, Yulieth C; Huang, Liubing; Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, Jose; Asensio, Maria C; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lüth, Hans; Lu, Jia Grace; Schäpers, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We report on low-temperature transport and electronic band structure of p-type Sb2Te3 nanowires, grown by chemical vapor deposition. Magnetoresistance measurements unravel quantum interference phenomena, which depend on the cross-sectional dimensions of the nanowires. The observation of periodic Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations is attributed to transport in topologically protected surface states in the Sb2Te3 nanowires. The study of universal conductance fluctuations demonstrates coherent transport along the Aharonov-Bohm paths encircling the rectangular cross-section of the nanowires. We use nanoscale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on single nanowires (nano-ARPES) to provide direct experimental evidence on the nontrivial topological character of those surface states. The compiled study of the bandstructure and the magnetotransport response unambiguosly points out the presence of topologically protected surface states in the nanowires and their substantial contribution to the quantum transport effects, as well as the hole doping and Fermi velocity among other key issues. The results are consistent with the theoretical description of quantum transport in intrinsically doped quasi-one-dimensional topological insulator nanowires.

  13. Screening of the Coulomb field in a magnetized electron gas of a quantum cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Eminov, P. A.

    2009-05-15

    The quantum theory is constructed for screening of the Coulomb field of a point charge in a magnetized electron gas of a quantum cylinder. The asymptotics of the screened potential are calculated for both degenerate and Boltzmann electron gases. It is demonstrated that, in the degenerate case, apart from the known quasi-classical monotonic part, the result contains the quantum oscillating part, which corresponds to Friedel oscillations. The Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the screened Coulomb interaction of electrons on a cylindrical surface are described analytically. It is shown that the Friedel oscillations can be represented as a superposition of oscillations with different frequencies which are determined by the macroscopic properties of the nanotube.

  14. STABILIZED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, P.L.; Price, H.J.

    1958-03-18

    This patent relates to sine-wave generators and in particular describes a generator with a novel feedback circuit resulting in improved frequency stability. The generator comprises two triodes having a common cathode circuit connected to oscillate at a frequency and amplitude at which the loop galn of the circutt ls unity, and another pair of triodes having a common cathode circuit arranged as a conventional amplifier. A signal is conducted from the osciliator through a frequency selective network to the amplifier and fed back to the osciliator. The unique feature of the feedback circuit is the amplifier operates in the nonlinear portion of its tube characteristics thereby providing a relatively constant feedback voltage to the oscillator irrespective of the amplitude of its input signal.

  15. Antiperiodic oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Freire, Joana G.; Cabeza, Cecilia; Marti, Arturo; Pöschel, Thorsten; Gallas, Jason A. C.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation of regular and irregular patterns in nonlinear oscillators is an outstanding problem in physics and in all natural sciences. In general, regularity is understood as tantamount to periodicity. However, there is now a flurry of works proving the existence of “antiperiodicity”, an unfamiliar type of regularity. Here we report the experimental observation and numerical corroboration of antiperiodic oscillations. In contrast to the isolated solutions presently known, we report infinite hierarchies of antiperiodic waveforms that can be tuned continuously and that form wide spiral-shaped stability phases in the control parameter plane. The waveform complexity increases towards the focal point common to all spirals, a key hub interconnecting them all. PMID:23739041

  16. FEL Oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2003-05-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. More than 30 FEL oscillators are presently operating around the world spanning a wavelength range from the mm region to the ultraviolet using DC and rf linear accelerators and storage rings as electron sources. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high micropulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. Substantial user programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few.

  17. Neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Mark

    2002-05-15

    The wave theory of light, and in particular the principle of interference, was formulated by Thomas Young in 1801. In the 20th century, the principle of interference was extended to the quantum mechanical wave functions describing matter. The phenomenon of quantum mechanical interference of different neutrino states, neutrino oscillations, has provided one of the most exciting developments in high energy particle physics of the last decade. Observations of the flavour oscillations of neutrinos produced by distant sources, such as from the core of the Sun, provide compelling evidence that neutrinos have mass. This article describes the main features and the most significant experimental observations of this unusual application of the principle of interference.

  18. Spike oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzle, J. Mark; Uggla, Claes; Lim, Woei Chet

    2012-11-01

    According to Belinskiǐ, Khalatnikov and Lifshitz (BKL), a generic spacelike singularity is characterized by asymptotic locality: Asymptotically, toward the singularity, each spatial point evolves independently from its neighbors, in an oscillatory manner that is represented by a sequence of Bianchi type I and II vacuum models. Recent investigations support this conjecture but with a modification: Apart from local BKL behavior there also exists formation of spatial structures (“spikes”) at, and in the neighborhood of, certain spatial surfaces that break asymptotic locality; the complete description of a generic spacelike singularity involves spike oscillations, which are described by sequences of Bianchi type I and certain inhomogeneous vacuum models. In this paper we describe how BKL and spike oscillations arise from concatenations of exact solutions in a Hubble-normalized state space setting, suggesting the existence of hidden symmetries and showing that the results of BKL are part of a greater picture.

  19. Ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Laasonen, Kari

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, an introduction to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) has been given. Many of the basic concepts, like the Hellman-Feynman forces, the difference between the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and AIMD, have been explained. Also a very versatile AIMD code, the CP2K, has been introduced. On the application, the emphasis was on the aqueous systems and chemical reactions. The biochemical applications have not been discussed in depth.

  20. Solar Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Oscillations were first detected in the solar photosphere in 1962 by Leighton and students. In 1970 it was calculated that these oscillations, with a period near five minutes, were the manifestations of acoustic waves trapped in the interior. The subsequent measurements of the frequencies of global oscillation modes from the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the waves made possible the refinement of solar interior models. Over the years, increased understanding of the nuclear reaction rates, the opacity, the equation of state, convection, and gravitational settling have resulted. Mass flows shift the frequencies of modes leading to very accurate measurements of the interior rotation as a function of radius and latitude. In recent years, analogues of terrestrial seismology have led to a tomography of the interior, including measurements of global north-south flows and flow and wave speed measurements below features such as sunspots. The future of helioseismology seems bright with the approval of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, to be launched in 2008.

  1. Oscillator detector

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, B.M.

    1980-05-13

    An alien liquid detector employs a monitoring element and an oscillatory electronic circuit for maintaining the temperature of the monitoring element substantially above ambient temperature. The output wave form, eg., frequency of oscillation or wave shape, of the oscillatory circuit depends upon the temperaturedependent electrical characteristic of the monitoring element. A predetermined change in the output waveform allows water to be discriminated from another liquid, eg., oil. Features of the invention employing two thermistors in two oscillatory circuits include positioning one thermistor for contact with water and the other thermistor above the oil-water interface to detect a layer of oil if present. Unique oscillatory circuit arrangements are shown that achieve effective thermistor action with an economy of parts and energizing power. These include an operational amplifier employed in an astable multivibrator circuit, a discrete transistor-powered tank circuit, and use of an integrated circuit chip.

  2. One-dimensional edge transport on the surface of cylindrical Bi{sub x}Te{sub 3−y}Se{sub y} nanowires in transverse magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bäßler, Svenja Hamdou, Bacel; Sergelius, Philip; Michel, Ann-Kathrin; Zierold, Robert; Gooth, Johannes; Reith, Heiko; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2015-11-02

    The geometry of topological insulators (TIs) has a major impact on the magnetoelectric band structure of their surface states. Here, we investigate the surface states of cylindrical TI bismuth telluride selenide nanowires with three different diameters, by parallel and transverse magnetoresistance (MR) measurements. In parallel configuration, we observe Aharonov-Bohm oscillations as well as weak antilocalization, indicating two-dimensional TI surface states. In transverse magnetic fields, we observed MR oscillations that are non-linear against the reciprocal of the magnetic field and thus cannot be explained by two- or three-dimensional states. Instead, our transport data analysis reveals that these MR oscillations are the consequence of one-dimensional edge channels at the nanowire surface that form due to the projection of the external magnetic field on the cylindrically curved surface plane in high magnetic fields. Our observation provides an exotic class of surface states that might be used for electronic and spintronic devices.

  3. Optical analog of the Iordanskii force in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, U.; Oehberg, P.

    2003-05-01

    A vortex in a Bose-Einstein condensate generates the optical analog of the Aharonov-Bohm effect when illuminated with slow light. In contrast to the original Aharonov-Bohm effect the vortex will exchange forces with the light that leads to a measurable motion of the vortex.

  4. Global oscillation mechanism in the stochastic Lotka model.

    PubMed

    Kashcheyevs, V; Kuzovkov, V N

    2001-06-01

    The microscopic one-parameter kinetic model of the oscillatory A+B-->2 B reaction (Lotka model) is studied using direct Monte Carlo simulations and analytical methods. Percolation is proposed as the mechanism of global oscillations that are not limited to any finite size of a system. An analytical estimate of the oscillation frequency is derived and compared to computer simulations. We also observe the transition from synchronized oscillations to specific f(-2) noise in two dimensions which was previously reported for self-organized critical models.

  5. Edge-channel interferometer at the graphene quantum Hall pn junction

    SciTech Connect

    Morikawa, Sei; Moriya, Rai; Masubuchi, Satoru Machida, Tomoki; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2015-05-04

    We demonstrate a quantum Hall edge-channel interferometer in a high-quality graphene pn junction under a high magnetic field. The co-propagating p and n quantum Hall edge channels traveling along the pn interface functions as a built-in Aharonov-Bohm-type interferometer, the interferences in which are sensitive to both the external magnetic field and the carrier concentration. The trajectories of peak and dip in the observed resistance oscillation are well reproduced by our numerical calculation that assumes magnetic flux quantization in the area enclosed by the co-propagating edge channels. Coherent nature of the co-propagating edge channels is confirmed by the checkerboard-like pattern in the dc-bias and magnetic-field dependences of the resistance oscillations.

  6. Point-contact spectroscopy of hopping transport : efffects of a magnetic field.

    SciTech Connect

    Kozub, V. I.; Zyuzin, A. A.; Entin-Wohlman, O.; Aharony, A.; Galperin, Y. M.; Vinokur, V.; Materials Science Division; Russian Acad. Sci.; Ben Gurion Univ.; Univ. Oslo

    2007-01-01

    The conductance of a point contact between two hopping insulators is expected to be dominated by the individual localized states in its vicinity. Here, we study the additional effects due to an external magnetic field. Combined with the measured conductance, the measured magnetoresistance provides detailed information on these states (e.g., their localization length, the energy difference, and the hopping distance between them). We also calculate the statistics of this magnetoresistance, which can be collected by changing the gate voltage in a single device. Since the conductance is dominated by the quantum interference of particular mesoscopic structures near the point contact, it is predicted to exhibit Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, which yield information on the geometry of these structures. These oscillations also depend on local spin accumulation and correlations, which can be modified by the external field. Finally, we also estimate the mesoscopic Hall voltage due to these structures.

  7. Ab interno trabeculectomy.

    PubMed

    Pantcheva, Mina B; Kahook, Malik Y

    2010-10-01

    Anterior chamber drainage angle surgery, namely trabeculotomy and goniotomy, has been commonly utilized in children for many years. Its' reported success has ranged between 68% and 100% in infants and young children with congenital glaucoma. However, the long-term success of these procedures has been limited in adults presumably due to the formation of anterior synechiae (AS) in the postoperative phase. Recently, ab interno trabeculectomy with the Trabectome™ has emerged as a novel surgical approach to effectively and selectively remove and ablate the trabecular meshwork and the inner wall of the Schlemm's canal in an attempt to avoid AS formation or other forms of wound healing with resultant closure of the cleft. This procedure seems to have an appealing safety profile with respect to early hypotony or infection if compared to trabeculectomy or glaucoma drainage device implantation. This might be advantageous in some of the impoverish regions of the Middle East and Africa where patients experience difficulties keeping up with their postoperative visits. It is important to note that no randomized trial comparing the Trabectome to other glaucoma procedures appears to have been published to date. Trabectome surgery is not a panacea, however, and it is associated with early postoperative intraocular pressure spikes that may require additional glaucoma surgery as well as a high incidence of hyphema. Reported results show that postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) remains, at best, in the mid-teen range making it undesirable in patients with low-target IOP goals. A major advantage of Trabectome surgery is that it does not preclude further glaucoma surgery involving the conjunctiva, such as a trabeculectomy or drainage device implantation. As prospective randomized long-term clinical data become available, we will be better positioned to elucidate the exact role of this technique in the glaucoma surgical armamentarium. PMID:21180426

  8. Autonomous Biological System (ABS) experiments.

    PubMed

    MacCallum, T K; Anderson, G A; Poynter, J E; Stodieck, L S; Klaus, D M

    1998-12-01

    Three space flight experiments have been conducted to test and demonstrate the use of a passively controlled, materially closed, bioregenerative life support system in space. The Autonomous Biological System (ABS) provides an experimental environment for long term growth and breeding of aquatic plants and animals. The ABS is completely materially closed, isolated from human life support systems and cabin atmosphere contaminants, and requires little need for astronaut intervention. Testing of the ABS marked several firsts: the first aquatic angiosperms to be grown in space; the first higher organisms (aquatic invertebrate animals) to complete their life cycles in space; the first completely bioregenerative life support system in space; and, among the first gravitational ecology experiments. As an introduction this paper describes the ABS, its flight performance, advantages and disadvantages.

  9. Ab Initio Computation of the Energies of Circular Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Lohne, M. Pedersen; Hagen, Gaute; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Kvaal, S.; Pederiva, F.

    2011-01-01

    We perform coupled-cluster and diffusion Monte Carlo calculations of the energies of circular quantum dots up to 20 electrons. The coupled-cluster calculations include triples corrections and a renormalized Coulomb interaction defined for a given number of low-lying oscillator shells. Using such a renormalized Coulomb interaction brings the coupled-cluster calculations with triples correlations in excellent agreement with the diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. This opens up perspectives for doing ab initio calculations for much larger systems of electrons.

  10. Voltage-controlled oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, J. L.

    1971-01-01

    Oscillator generates symmetrical triangular waveform when inverting and noninverting inputs are equal. Oscillator portion of circuit has integrated circuit, high-performance operational amplifier wired as differential integrator, and two silicon controlled rectifiers.

  11. Saturation in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Ahmed; Hanna, James

    2015-03-01

    We consider a weakly nonlinear system consisting of a resonantly forced oscillator coupled to an unforced oscillator. It has long been known that, for quadratic nonlinearities and a 2:1 resonance between the oscillators, a perturbative solution of the dynamics exhibits a phenomenon known as saturation. At low forcing, the forced oscillator responds, while the unforced oscillator is quiescent. Above a critical value of the forcing, the forced oscillator's steady-state amplitude reaches a plateau, while that of the unforced oscillator increases without bound. We show that, contrary to established folklore, saturation is not unique to quadratically nonlinear systems. We present conditions on the form of the nonlinear couplings and resonance that lead to saturation. Our results elucidate a mechanism for localization or diversion of energy in systems of coupled oscillators, and suggest new approaches for the control or suppression of vibrations in engineered systems.

  12. Cylindric quantum wires in a threading magnetic field: A proposal of characterization based on zero bias electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onorato, P.

    2012-12-01

    We study the quantum transport properties of cylindrical shaped wires, with submicrometric diameters and large aspect ratio. The zero bias conductance as a function of temperature, magnetic field and disorder is calculated for different kinds of nano cylinders, from semiconductor quantum wires to carbon nanotubes. A comparison between our findings and the experimental results allows the understanding of the charge carriers' localization, in the external surface or in the core of the wires, by highlighting the basic mechanism of charge transport. We discuss how we can infer that in InAs quantum wires the carriers move in the core. We examine the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and the quenching that should be observed in the measured magneto conductivity of InAs nano cylinders and carbon nanotubes emphasizing the role of the angle between field and tube.

  13. Magneto Transport of Graphene Monolayer with Antidot Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yin, Ming; Datta, Timir; Mbamalu, Godwin; Alameri, Dheyaa

    Graphene has a significant potential for electronics application as well as in high precision resistive metrological standard. Here we report magneto transport studies of monolayer graphene with antidot in hexagonal arrays on SiO2/Si substrate. The choice of antidot array was motivated by the potential to enhance quantum interference effect amongst charge carriers. The graphene-antidot arrays were fabricated by electron beam lithography followed by reactive ion etching. In our samples the dc magnetic field (B) was applied continuously up to 18 Tesla while the measurement temperature (T) was held steady at desired set points, ranging from 200 mK to 20 K. The effect of nanoarrays on the temperature and field dependence of the electrical properties (MR) and quantum hall effect with particular attention to Aharonov-Bohm oscillations will be reported.

  14. Decoherence of high-energy electrons in weakly disordered quantum Hall edge states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigg, Simon E.; Lunde, Anders Mathias

    2016-07-01

    We investigate theoretically the phase coherence of electron transport in edge states of the integer quantum Hall effect at filling factor ν =2 , in the presence of disorder and inter edge state Coulomb interaction. Within a Fokker-Planck approach, we calculate analytically the visibility of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the current through an electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In agreement with recent experiments, we find that the visibility is independent of the energy of the current-carrying electrons injected high above the Fermi sea. Instead, it is the amount of disorder at the edge that sets the phase space available for inter edge state energy exchange and thereby controls the visibility suppression.

  15. Controlling the magnetic susceptibility in an artificial elliptical quantum ring by magnetic flux and external Rashba effect

    SciTech Connect

    Omidi, Mahboubeh Faizabadi, Edris

    2015-03-21

    Magnetic susceptibility is investigated in a man-made elliptical quantum ring in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interactions and the magnetic flux. It is shown that magnetic susceptibility as a function of magnetic flux changes between negative and positive signs periodically. The periodicity of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations depends on the geometry of the region where magnetic field is applied, the eccentricity, and number of sites in each chain ring (the elliptical ring is composed of chain rings). The magnetic susceptibility sign can be reversed by tuning the Rashba spin-orbit strength as well. Both the magnetic susceptibility strength and sign can be controlled via external spin-orbit interactions, which can be exploited in spintronics and nanoelectronics.

  16. Adiabatic Edge Channel Transport in a Nanowire Quantum Point Contact Register.

    PubMed

    Heedt, S; Manolescu, A; Nemnes, G A; Prost, W; Schubert, J; Grützmacher, D; Schäpers, Th

    2016-07-13

    We report on a prototype device geometry where a number of quantum point contacts are connected in series in a single quasi-ballistic InAs nanowire. At finite magnetic field the backscattering length is increased up to the micron-scale and the quantum point contacts are connected adiabatically. Hence, several input gates can control the outcome of a ballistic logic operation. The absence of backscattering is explained in terms of selective population of spatially separated edge channels. Evidence is provided by regular Aharonov-Bohm-type conductance oscillations in transverse magnetic fields, in agreement with magnetoconductance calculations. The observation of the Shubnikov-de Haas effect at large magnetic fields corroborates the existence of spatially separated edge channels and provides a new means for nanowire characterization. PMID:27347816

  17. Covariant harmonic oscillators and coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Daesoo; Kim, Young S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators shares the basic symmetry properties with the covariant harmonic oscillator formalism which provides a concise description of the basic features of relativistic hadronic features observed in high-energy laboratories. It is shown also that the coupled oscillator system has the SL(4,r) symmetry in classical mechanics, while the present formulation of quantum mechanics can accommodate only the Sp(4,r) portion of the SL(4,r) symmetry. The possible role of the SL(4,r) symmetry in quantum mechanics is discussed.

  18. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  19. Discrete monotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Haynes, W.B.

    1996-08-01

    The authors theoretically and numerically investigate the operation and behavior of the discrete monotron oscillator, a novel high-power microwave source. The discrete monotron differs from conventional monotrons and transit time oscillators by shielding the electron beam from the monotron cavity`s RF fields except at two distinct locations. This makes the discrete monotron act more like a klystron than a distributed traveling wave device. As a result, the oscillator has higher efficiency and can operate with higher beam powers than other single cavity oscillators and has more stable operation without requiring a seed input signal than mildly relativistic, intense-beam klystron oscillators.

  20. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  1. AB 1725: A Comprehensive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Board of Governors.

    A summary and analysis is provided of California Assembly Bill (AB) 1725, a reform bill that provides new direction and support for the state's community colleges. The analysis addresses each of the eight sections of the bill: (1) mission, highlighting reforms related to mission statements, transfer core curriculum, remedial limits, articulation…

  2. Paradoxes of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedov, E. Kh.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2009-08-15

    Despite the theory of neutrino oscillations being rather old, some of its basic issues are still being debated in the literature. We discuss a number of such issues, including the relevance of the 'same energy' and 'same momentum' assumptions, the role of quantum-mechanical uncertainty relations in neutrino oscillations, the dependence of the coherence and localization conditions that ensure the observability of neutrino oscillations on neutrino energy and momentum uncertainties, the question of (in)dependence of the oscillation probabilities on the neutrino production and detection processes, and the applicability limits of the stationary-source approximation. We also develop a novel approach to calculation of the oscillation probability in the wave-packet approach, based on the summation/integration conventions different from the standard one, which allows a new insight into the 'same energy' vs. 'same momentum' problem. We also discuss a number of apparently paradoxical features of the theory of neutrino oscillations.

  3. Oscillations in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, A.; Ringuelet, A. E.; Fontenla, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric excitation and propagation of oscillations are analyzed for typical pulsating stars. The linear, plane-parallel approach for the pulsating atmosphere gives a local description of the phenomenon. From the local analysis of oscillations, the minimum frequencies are obtained for radially propagating waves. The comparison of the minimum frequencies obtained for a variety of stellar types is in good agreement with the observed periods of the oscillations. The role of the atmosphere in the globar stellar pulsations is thus emphasized.

  4. Self-oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Alejandro

    2013-04-01

    Physicists are very familiar with forced and parametric resonance, but usually not with self-oscillation, a property of certain dynamical systems that gives rise to a great variety of vibrations, both useful and destructive. In a self-oscillator, the driving force is controlled by the oscillation itself so that it acts in phase with the velocity, causing a negative damping that feeds energy into the vibration: no external rate needs to be adjusted to the resonant frequency. The famous collapse of the Tacoma Narrows bridge in 1940, often attributed by introductory physics texts to forced resonance, was actually a self-oscillation, as was the swaying of the London Millennium Footbridge in 2000. Clocks are self-oscillators, as are bowed and wind musical instruments. The heart is a “relaxation oscillator”, i.e., a non-sinusoidal self-oscillator whose period is determined by sudden, nonlinear switching at thresholds. We review the general criterion that determines whether a linear system can self-oscillate. We then describe the limiting cycles of the simplest nonlinear self-oscillators, as well as the ability of two or more coupled self-oscillators to become spontaneously synchronized (“entrained”). We characterize the operation of motors as self-oscillation and prove a theorem about their limit efficiency, of which Carnot’s theorem for heat engines appears as a special case. We briefly discuss how self-oscillation applies to servomechanisms, Cepheid variable stars, lasers, and the macroeconomic business cycle, among other applications. Our emphasis throughout is on the energetics of self-oscillation, often neglected by the literature on nonlinear dynamical systems.

  5. Workshop on Harmonic Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D. (Editor); Kim, Y. S. (Editor); Zachary, W. W. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Proceedings of a workshop on Harmonic Oscillators held at the College Park Campus of the University of Maryland on March 25 - 28, 1992 are presented. The harmonic oscillator formalism is playing an important role in many branches of physics. This is the simplest mathematical device which can connect the basic principle of physics with what is observed in the real world. The harmonic oscillator is the bridge between pure and applied physics.

  6. Dirac bound states of anharmonic oscillator in external fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hamzavi, Majid; Ikhdair, Sameer M.; Falaye, Babatunde J.

    2014-02-15

    We explore the effect of the external magnetic and Aharonov–Bohm (AB) flux fields on the energy levels of Dirac particle subjects to mixed scalar and vector anharmonic oscillator field in the two-dimensional (2D) space. We calculate the exact energy eigenvalues and the corresponding un-normalized two-spinor-components wave functions in terms of the chemical potential parameter, magnetic field strength, AB flux field and magnetic quantum number by using the Nikiforov–Uvarov (NU) method. -- Highlights: • Effect of the external fields on the energy levels of Dirac particle with the anharmonic oscillator is investigated. • The solutions are discussed in view of spin and pseudospin symmetries limits. • The energy levels and wave function are presented by the Nikiforov–Uvarov method.

  7. Active-bridge oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2001-01-01

    An active bridge oscillator is formed from a differential amplifier where positive feedback is a function of the impedance of one of the gain elements and a relatively low value common emitter resistance. This use of the nonlinear transistor parameter h stabilizes the output and eliminates the need for ALC circuits common to other bridge oscillators.

  8. Investigating Magnetic Oscillations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brueningsen, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    Studies magnetic oscillation using an air track. Ceramic magnets are attached to the cart and also are used as dampeners in place of the springs. The resulting oscillations are fairly sinusoidal and is a good example of simple harmonic motion. (MVL)

  9. Oscillating Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, M. D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes several oscillating chemical reactions which can be used in undergraduate chemistry laboratories. In one such reaction, ferroin oscillates from red (reducing solution) to blue (oxidizing solution) for about an hour at a frequency which can readily be shown to depend on such factors as the temperature, type of solvent, and concentration…

  10. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  11. Ultrastable Cryogenic Microwave Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Anthony G.

    Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are secondary frequency standards in the microwave domain. The best of these oscillators have demonstrated a short term frequency stability in the range 10-14 to a few times 10-16. The main application for these oscillators is as flywheel oscillators for the next generation of passive atomic frequency standards, and as local oscillators in space telemetry ground stations to clean up the transmitter close in phase noise. Fractional frequency stabilities of passive atomic frequency standards are now approaching 3 x10^-14 /τ where τ is the measurement time, limited only by the number of atoms that are being interrogated. This requires an interrogation oscillator whose short-term stability is of the order of 10-14 or better, which cannot be provided by present-day quartz technology. Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are based on resonators which have very high electrical Q-factors. The resolution of the resonator's linewidth is typically limited by electronics noise to about 1ppm and hence Q-factors in excess of 108 are required. As these are only attained in superconducting cavities or sapphire resonators at low temperatures, use of liquid helium cooling is mandatory, which has so far restricted these oscillators to the research or metrology laboratory. Recently, there has been an effort to dispense with the need for liquid helium and make compact flywheel oscillators for the new generation of primary frequency standards. Work is under way to achieve this goal in space-borne and mobile liquid-nitrogen-cooled systems. The best cryogenic oscillators developed to date are the ``whispering gallery'' (WG) mode sapphire resonator-oscillators of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the University of Western Australia (UWA), as well as Stanford University's superconducting cavity stabilized oscillator (SCSO). All of these oscillators have demonstrated frequency

  12. AB INITIO AND CALPHAD THERMODYNAMICS OF MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P A

    2004-04-14

    Ab initio electronic structure methods can supplement CALPHAD in two major ways for subsequent applications to stability in complex alloys. The first one is rather immediate and concerns the direct input of ab initio energetics in CALPHAD databases. The other way, more involved, is the assessment of ab initio thermodynamics {acute a} la CALPHAD. It will be shown how these results can be used within CALPHAD to predict the equilibrium properties of multi-component alloys.

  13. Oscillations of Quasars.

    PubMed

    McVittie, G C

    1964-10-01

    Rotation in addition to free gravitational motion can produce oscillations in a large spherical mass of gas. The theory may provide an explanation of the variations of brightness in such objects as 3C273.

  14. A novel photonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a novel oscillator for photonic RF systems. This oscillator is capable of generating high-frequency signals up to 70 GHz in both electrical and optical domains and is a special voltage-controlled oscillator with an optical output port. It can be used to make a phase-locked loop (PLL) and perform all functions that a PLL is capable of for photonic systems. It can be synchronized to a reference source by means of optical injection locking, electrical injection locking, and PLL. It can also be self-phase locked and self-injection locked to generate a high-stability photonic RF reference. Its applications include high-frequency reference regeneration and distribution, high-gain frequency multiplication, comb-frequecy and square-wave generation, carrier recovery, and clock recovery. We anticipate that such photonic voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) will be as important to photonic RF systems as electrical VCOs are to electrical RF systems.

  15. Entraining synthetic genetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemakers, Alexandre; Buldú, Javier M.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.; de Luis, Oscar; Izquierdo, Adriana; Coloma, Antonio

    2009-09-01

    We propose a new approach for synchronizing a population of synthetic genetic oscillators, which consists in the entrainment of a colony of repressilators by external modulation. We present a model where the repressilator dynamics is affected by periodic changes in temperature. We introduce an additional plasmid in the bacteria in order to correlate the temperature variations with the enhancement of the transcription rate of a certain gene. This can be done by introducing a promoter that is related to the heat shock response. This way, the expression of that gene results in a protein that enhances the overall oscillations. Numerical results show coherent oscillations of the population for a certain range of the external frequency, which is in turn related to the natural oscillation frequency of the modified repressilator. Finally we study the transient times related with the loss of synchronization and we discuss possible applications in biotechnology of large-scale production coupled to synchronization events induced by heat shock.

  16. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  17. A nonlinear oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlin, R.

    1990-01-27

    A nonlinear oscillator design was imported from Cornell modified, and built for the purpose of simulating the chaotic states of a forced pendulum. Similar circuits have been investigated in the recent nonlinear explosion.

  18. Oscillating fluid power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  19. Ultrastable Multigigahertz Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Novel photonic oscillator developed to serve as ultrastable source of microwave and millimeter-wave signals. In system, oscillations generated photonically, then converted to electronic form. Includes self-mode-locked semiconductor laser producing stream of pulses, detected and fed back to laser as input. System also includes fiber-optic-delay-line discriminator, which detects fluctuations of self-mode-locking frequency and generates error signal used in negative-feedback loop to stabilize pulse-repetition frequency.

  20. Current oscillations in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, Brittany

    We develop a simple phenomenological model to describe current oscillations in single, conically shaped nanopores. The model utilizes aspects of reaction rate theory, electrochemical oscillators, and nonlinear dynamical systems. Time series of experimental data were analyzed and compared to time series simulated using the model equations. There is good qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation, though the model needs to be improved in order to obtain better quantitative agreement.

  1. Oscillating edge-flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckmaster, J.; Zhang, Yi

    1999-09-01

    It has been known for some years that when a near-limit flame spreads over a liquid pool of fuel, the edge of the flame can oscillate. It is also known that when a near-asphyxiated candle-flame burns in zero gravity, the edge of the (hemispherical) flame can oscillate violently prior to extinction. We propose that these oscillations are nothing more than a manifestation of the large Lewis number instability well known in chemical reactor studies and in combustion studies, one that is exacerbated by heat losses. As evidence of this we examine an edge-flame confined within a fuel-supply boundary and an oxygen-supply boundary, anchored by a discontinuity in data at the fuel-supply boundary. We show that when the Lewis number of the fuel is 2, and the Lewis number of the oxidizer is 1, oscillations of the edge occur when the Damköhler number is reduced below a critical value. During a single oscillation period there is a short premixed propagation stage and a long diffusion stage, behaviour that has been observed in flame spread experiments. Oscillations do not occur when both Lewis numbers are equal to 1.

  2. Periodically oscillating plasma sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Nebel, R.A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar

    2005-05-15

    The periodically oscillating plasma sphere, or POPS, is a novel fusion concept first proposed by D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel [Fusion Technol. 38, 28 (1998)]. POPS utilizes the self-similar collapse of an oscillating ion cloud in a spherical harmonic oscillator potential well formed by electron injection. Once the ions have been phase-locked, their coherent motion simultaneously produces very high densities and temperatures during the collapse phase of the oscillation. A requirement for POPS is that the electron injection produces a stable harmonic oscillator potential. This has been demonstrated in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device and verified by particle simulation. Also, the POPS oscillation has been confirmed experimentally through observation that the ions in the potential well exhibit resonance behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the observed POPS frequencies and the theoretical predictions has been observed for a wide range of potential well depths and three different ion species. Practical applications of POPS require large plasma compressions. These large compressions have been observed in particle simulations, although space charge neutralization remains a major issue.

  3. Oscillating asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Tulin, Sean; Yu, Hai-Bo; Zurek, Kathryn M. E-mail: haiboyu@umich.edu

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of dark matter (DM) particle-antiparticle oscillations within the context of asymmetric DM. Oscillations arise due to small DM number-violating Majorana-type mass terms, and can lead to recoupling of annihilation after freeze-out and washout of the DM density. Asymmetric DM oscillations 'interpolate' between symmetric and asymmetric DM freeze-out scenarios, and allow for a larger DM model-building parameter space. We derive the density matrix equations for DM oscillations and freeze-out from first principles using nonequilibrium field theory, and our results are qualitatively different than in previous studies. DM dynamics exhibits particle-vs-antiparticle 'flavor' effects, depending on the interaction type, analogous to neutrino oscillations in a medium. 'Flavor-sensitive' DM interactions include scattering or annihilation through a new vector boson, while 'flavor-blind' interactions include scattering or s-channel annihilation through a new scalar boson. In particular, we find that flavor-sensitive annihilation does not recouple when coherent oscillations begin, and that flavor-blind scattering does not lead to decoherence.

  4. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy Comparison of Ab Interno and Ab Externo Intraocular Lens Scleral Fixation.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Lie; Garcia, Patricia Novita; Malavazzi, Gustavo Ricci; Allemann, Norma; Gomes, Rachel L R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare ab interno and ab externo scleral fixation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PCIOL) using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Methods. Randomized patients underwent ab externo or ab interno scleral fixation of a PCIOL. Ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively, to determine PCIOL centration, IOL distance to the iris at 12, 3, 6, and 9 hours, and haptics placement in relation to the ciliary sulcus. Results. Fifteen patients were enrolled in the study. The ab externo technique was used in 7 eyes (46.6%) and the ab interno in 8 eyes (53.3%). In the ab externo technique, 14 haptics were located: 4 (28.57%) in the ciliary sulcus; 2 (14.28%) anterior to the sulcus; and 8 (57.14%) posterior to the sulcus, 6 in the ciliary body and 2 posterior to the ciliary body. In the ab interno group, 4 haptics (25.0%) were in the ciliary sulcus, 2 (12.50%) anterior to the sulcus, and 10 (75.0%) posterior to the sulcus, 4 in the ciliary body and 6 posterior to the ciliary body. Conclusions. Ab externo and ab interno scleral fixation techniques presented similar results in haptic placement. Ab externo technique presented higher vertical tilt when compared to the ab interno.

  5. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy Comparison of Ab Interno and Ab Externo Intraocular Lens Scleral Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Lie; Garcia, Patricia Novita; Malavazzi, Gustavo Ricci; Allemann, Norma

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare ab interno and ab externo scleral fixation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PCIOL) using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Methods. Randomized patients underwent ab externo or ab interno scleral fixation of a PCIOL. Ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively, to determine PCIOL centration, IOL distance to the iris at 12, 3, 6, and 9 hours, and haptics placement in relation to the ciliary sulcus. Results. Fifteen patients were enrolled in the study. The ab externo technique was used in 7 eyes (46.6%) and the ab interno in 8 eyes (53.3%). In the ab externo technique, 14 haptics were located: 4 (28.57%) in the ciliary sulcus; 2 (14.28%) anterior to the sulcus; and 8 (57.14%) posterior to the sulcus, 6 in the ciliary body and 2 posterior to the ciliary body. In the ab interno group, 4 haptics (25.0%) were in the ciliary sulcus, 2 (12.50%) anterior to the sulcus, and 10 (75.0%) posterior to the sulcus, 4 in the ciliary body and 6 posterior to the ciliary body. Conclusions. Ab externo and ab interno scleral fixation techniques presented similar results in haptic placement. Ab externo technique presented higher vertical tilt when compared to the ab interno. PMID:27293878

  6. Three-cluster dynamics within an ab initio framework

    DOE PAGES

    Quaglioni, Sofia; Romero-Redondo, Carolina; Navratil, Petr

    2013-09-26

    In this study, we introduce a fully antisymmetrized treatment of three-cluster dynamics within the ab initio framework of the no-core shell model/resonating-group method. Energy-independent nonlocal interactions among the three nuclear fragments are obtained from realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions and consistent ab initio many-body wave functions of the clusters. The three-cluster Schrödinger equation is solved with bound-state boundary conditions by means of the hyperspherical-harmonic method on a Lagrange mesh. We discuss the formalism in detail and give algebraic expressions for systems of two single nucleons plus a nucleus. Using a soft similarity-renormalization-group evolved chiral nucleon-nucleon potential, we apply the method to amore » 4He+n+n description of 6He and compare the results to experiment and to a six-body diagonalization of the Hamiltonian performed within the harmonic-oscillator expansions of the no-core shell model. Differences between the two calculations provide a measure of core (4He) polarization effects.« less

  7. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Boris

    2012-06-01

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures. Neutrinos and photons are by far the most abundant elementary particles in the universe. Thus, if we would like to comprehend the universe, we must understand the neutrinos. Of course, studying the neutrinos is challenging, since the only known forces through which these electrically-neutral leptons interact are the weak force and gravity. Consequently, interactions of neutrinos in a detector are very rare events, so that very large detectors and intense neutrino sources are needed to make experiments feasible. Nevertheless, we have confirmed that the weak interactions of neutrinos are correctly described by the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particle physics. Moreover, in the last 14 years, we have discovered that neutrinos have nonzero masses, and that leptons mix. These discoveries have been based on the observation that neutrinos can change from one 'flavor' to another - the phenomenon known as neutrino oscillation. We shall explain the physics of neutrino oscillation, deriving the probability of oscillation in a new way. We shall also provide a very brief guide to references that can be used to study some major neutrino-physics topics other than neutrino oscillation.

  8. Finite q-oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakishiyev, Natig M.; Klimyk, Anatoliy U.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2004-05-01

    The finite q-oscillator is a model that obeys the dynamics of the harmonic oscillator, with the operators of position, momentum and Hamiltonian being functions of elements of the q-algebra suq(2). The spectrum of position in this discrete system, in a fixed representation j, consists of 2j + 1 'sensor'-points x_s={\\case12}[2s]_q, s\\in\\{-j,-j+1,\\ldots,j\\} , and similarly for the momentum observable. The spectrum of energies is finite and equally spaced, so the system supports coherent states. The wavefunctions involve dual q-Kravchuk polynomials, which are solutions to a finite-difference Schrödinger equation. Time evolution (times a phase) defines the fractional Fourier-q-Kravchuk transform. In the classical limit as q rarr 1 we recover the finite oscillator Lie algebra, the N = 2j rarr infin limit returns the Macfarlane-Biedenharn q-oscillator and both limits contract the generators to the standard quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator.

  9. Oscillations of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornek, U.; Müller, F.; Harth, K.; Hahn, A.; Ganesan, S.; Tobiska, L.; Stannarius, R.

    2010-07-01

    Oscillations of droplets or bubbles of a confined fluid in a fluid environment are found in various situations in everyday life, in technological processing and in natural phenomena on different length scales. Air bubbles in liquids or liquid droplets in air are well-known examples. Soap bubbles represent a particularly simple, beautiful and attractive system to study the dynamics of a closed gas volume embedded in the same or a different gas. Their dynamics is governed by the densities and viscosities of the gases and by the film tension. Dynamic equations describing their oscillations under simplifying assumptions have been well known since the beginning of the 20th century. Both analytical description and numerical modeling have made considerable progress since then, but quantitative experiments have been lacking so far. On the other hand, a soap bubble represents an easily manageable paradigm for the study of oscillations of fluid spheres. We use a technique to create axisymmetric initial non-equilibrium states, and we observe damped oscillations into equilibrium by means of a fast video camera. Symmetries of the oscillations, frequencies and damping rates of the eigenmodes as well as the coupling of modes are analyzed. They are compared to analytical models from the literature and to numerical calculations from the literature and this work.

  10. Operator evolution for ab initio theory of light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Micah; Quaglioni, Sofia; Johnson, Calvin; Jurgenson, Eric; Navrátil, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The past two decades have seen a revolution in ab initio calculations of nuclear properties. One key element has been the development of a rigorous effective interaction theory, applying unitary transformations to soften the nuclear Hamiltonian and hence accelerate the convergence as a function of the model space size. For consistency, however, one ought to apply the same transformation to other operators when calculating transitions and mean values from the eigenstates of the renormalized Hamiltonian. Working in a translationally invariant harmonic oscillator basis for the two- and three-nucleon systems, we evolve the Hamiltonian, square radius, and total dipole strength operators by the similarity renormalization group (SRG). The inclusion of up to three-body matrix elements in the 4He nucleus all but completely restores the invariance of the expectation values under the transformation. We also consider a Gaussian operator with adjustable range; short ranges have the largest absolute renormalization when including two- and three-body induced terms, while at long ranges the induced three-body contribution takes on increased relative importance. The past two decades have seen a revolution in ab initio calculations of nuclear properties. One key element has been the development of a rigorous effective interaction theory, applying unitary transformations to soften the nuclear Hamiltonian and hence accelerate the convergence as a function of the model space size. For consistency, however, one ought to apply the same transformation to other operators when calculating transitions and mean values from the eigenstates of the renormalized Hamiltonian. Working in a translationally invariant harmonic oscillator basis for the two- and three-nucleon systems, we evolve the Hamiltonian, square radius, and total dipole strength operators by the similarity renormalization group (SRG). The inclusion of up to three-body matrix elements in the 4He nucleus all but completely restores

  11. Digital numerically controlled oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cellier, A.; Huey, D. C.; Ma, L. N. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The frequency and phase of an output signal from an oscillator circuit are controlled with accuracy by a digital input word. Positive and negative alterations in output frequency are both provided for by translating all values of input words so that they are positive. The oscillator reference frequency is corrected only in one direction, by adding phase to the output frequency of the oscillator. The input control word is translated to a single algebraic sign and the digital 1 is added thereto. The translated input control word is then accumulated. A reference clock signal having a frequency at an integer multiple of the desired frequency of the output signal is generated. The accumulated control word is then compared with a threshold level. The output signal is adjusted in a single direction by dividing the frequency of the reference clock signal by a first integer or by an integer different from the first integer.

  12. The Fastest Quasiperiodic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) at frequencies near 1000 Hz have been detected from a umber of neutron star x-ray binaries using RXTE. These fast oscillations are likely associated with rbital motion very close to the neutron star and and, thus, give us information about the behavior of the accretion disk in the strong gravitational field near the neutron star. The oscillation frequencies can also be used to place constraints on the properties of the neutron stars with the highest detected frequencies being the most constraining. We propose TOOs observations of selected neutron star x-ray binaries when found to be in states likely to produce kHz QPOs with frequencies exceeding 1200 Hz.

  13. Disproportionation of bromous acid HOBrO by direct O-transfer and via anhydrides O(BrO)2 and BrO-BrO2. An ab initio study of the mechanism of a key step of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky oscillating reaction.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Rainer; Jost, Mary

    2012-08-16

    The results are reported of an ab initio study of the thermochemistry and of the kinetics of the HOBrO disproportionation reaction 2HOBrO (2) ⇄ HOBr (1) + HBrO(3) (3), reaction ( R4' ), in gas phase (MP2(full)/6-311G*) and aqueous solution (SMD(MP2(full)/6-311G*)). The reaction energy of bromous acid disproportionation is discussed in the context of the coupled reaction system R2-R4 of the FKN mechanism of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction and considering the acidities of HBr and HOBrO(2). The structures were determined of ten dimeric aggregates 4 of bromous acid, (HOBrO)(2), of eight mixed aggregates 5 formed between the products of disproportionation, (HOBr)(HOBrO(2)), and of four transition states structures 6 for disproportionation by direct O-transfer. It was found that the condensation of two HOBrO molecules provides facile access to bromous acid anhydride 7, O(BrO)(2). A discussion of the potential energy surface of Br(2)O(3) shows that O(BrO)(2) is prone to isomerization to the mixed anhydride 8, BrO-BrO(2), and to dissociation to 9, BrO, and 10, BrO(2), and their radical pair 11. Hence, three possible paths from O(BrO)(2) to the products of disproportionation, HOBr and HOBrO(2), are discussed: (1) hydrolysis of O(BrO)(2) along a path that differs from its formation, (2) isomerization of O(BrO)(2) to BrO-BrO(2) followed by hydrolysis, and (3) O(BrO)(2) dissociation to BrO and BrO(2) and their reactions with water. The results of the potential energy surface analysis show that the rate-limiting step in the disproportionation of HOBrO consists of the formation of the hydrate 12a of bromous acid anhydride 7 via transition state structure 14a. The computed activation free enthalpy ΔG(act)(SMD) = 13.6 kcal/mol for the process 2·2a → [14a](‡) → 12a corresponds to the reaction rate constant k(4) = 667.5 M(-1) s(-1) and is in very good agreement with experimental measurements. The potential energy surface analysis further shows that anhydride 7 is

  14. Gamma Oscillation in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Brian F.; Youn, Soyoung; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2011-01-01

    Dysfunctional neural circuitry has been found to be involved in abnormalities of perception and cognition in patients with schizophrenia. Gamma oscillations are essential for integrating information within neural circuits and have therefore been associated with many perceptual and cognitive processes in healthy human subjects and animals. This review presents an overview of the neural basis of gamma oscillations and the abnormalities in the GABAergic interneuronal system thought to be responsible for gamma-range deficits in schizophrenia. We also review studies of gamma activity in sensory and cognitive processes, including auditory steady state response, attention, object representation, and working memory, in animals, healthy humans and patients with schizophrenia. PMID:22216037

  15. Advances in optoelectronic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguimdo, Romain M.; Saleh, Khaldoun; Lin, Guoping; Matinenghi, Romain; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2016-02-01

    Optoelectronic oscillators are used for a wide variety of applications in microwave photonics. We here report the latest advances in this technology from our research group, with emphasis on the analysis of phase noise performance. We present a stochastic modelling approach for phase noise performance analysis of optoelectronic oscillators based on whispering gallery mode resonators and/or optical fiber delay lines, and the theory is complemented with experimental measurements. We provide a detailed theoretical analysis which enables us to find the stationary states of the system as well as their stability. Our calculations also permit to find explicit formulas for the phase noise spectra, thereby allowing for their optimization.

  16. Micromechanical Oscillating Mass Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altemir, David A. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A micromechanical oscillating mass balance and method adapted for measuring minute quantities of material deposited at a selected location, such as during a vapor deposition process. The invention comprises a vibratory composite beam which includes a dielectric layer sandwiched between two conductive layers. The beam is positioned in a magnetic field. An alternating current passes through one conductive layers, the beam oscillates, inducing an output current in the second conductive layer, which is analyzed to determine the resonant frequency of the beam. As material is deposited on the beam, the mass of the beam increases and the resonant frequency of the beam shifts, and the mass added is determined.

  17. Ab initio phonon limited transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraete, Matthieu

    We revisit the thermoelectric (TE) transport properties of two champion materials, PbTe and SnSe, using fully first principles methods. In both cases the performance of the material is due to subtle combinations of structural effects, scattering, and phase space reduction. In PbTe anharmonic effects are completely opposite to the predicted quasiharmonic evolution of phonon frequencies and to frequently (and incorrectly) cited extrapolations of experiments. This stabilizes the material at high T, but also tends to enhance its thermal conductivity, in a non linear manner, above 600 Kelvin. This explains why PbTe is in practice limited to room temperature applications. SnSe has recently been shown to be the most efficient TE material in bulk form. This is mainly due to a strongly enhanced carrier concentration and electrical conductivity, after going through a phase transition from 600 to 800 K. We calculate the transport coefficients as well as the defect concentrations ab initio, showing excellent agreement with experiment, and elucidating the origin of the double phase transition as well as the new charge carriers. AH Romero, EKU Gross, MJ Verstraete, and O Hellman PRB 91, 214310 (2015) O. Hellman, IA Abrikosov, and SI Simak, PRB 84 180301 (2011)

  18. Coupled opto-electronic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. Steve (Inventor); Maleki, Lute (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A coupled opto-electronic oscillator that directly couples a laser oscillation with an electronic oscillation to simultaneously achieve a stable RF oscillation at a high frequency and ultra-short optical pulsation by mode locking with a high repetition rate and stability. Single-mode selection can be achieved even with a very long opto-electronic loop. A multimode laser can be used to pump the electronic oscillation, resulting in a high operation efficiency. The optical and the RF oscillations are correlated to each other.

  19. Quantum mechanics : Intellectually delicious;

    SciTech Connect

    Peshkin, M.; Vaidman, L.

    2010-03-01

    It is 50 years since the discovery of the Aharonov-Bohm effect, and 25 years since that of the Berry phase. A celebration of this double anniversary at the University of Bristol made evident that these discoveries still offer much food for thought. The meeting celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Berry phase was held on 14-15 December 2009 in the historic H. H.

  20. Wein bridge oscillator circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipoma, P. C.

    1971-01-01

    Circuit with minimum number of components provides stable outputs of 2 to 8 volts at frequencies of .001 to 100 kHz. Oscillator exhibits low power consumption, portability, simplicity, and drive capability, it has application as loudspeaker tester and audible alarm, as well as in laboratory and test generators.

  1. Coupled Oscillators with Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, Satoshi; Aizawa, Yoji

    1998-08-01

    A simple coupled oscillator system with chemotaxis is introducedto study morphogenesis of cellular slime molds. The modelsuccessfuly explains the migration of pseudoplasmodium which hasbeen experimentally predicted to be lead by cells with higherintrinsic frequencies. Results obtained predict that its velocityattains its maximum value in the interface region between totallocking and partial locking and also suggest possible rolesplayed by partial synchrony during multicellular development.

  2. Voltage-Controlled Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Integrated Component Systems, Inc. incorporated information from a NASA Tech Briefs article into a voltage-controlled oscillator it designed for a customer. The company then applied the technology to its series of phase-locked loop synthesizers, which offer superior phase noise performance.

  3. Frequency modulated oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A frequency modulated push-pull oscillator in which the non-linear characteristic of varactors producing frequency modulation is compensated for by an opposite non-linear characteristic of a field effect transistor providing modulating bias to the varactors is described.

  4. A simple violin oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    For acoustic tests the violin is driven laterally at the bridge by a small speaker of the type commonly found in pocket transistor radios. An audio oscillator excites the tone which is picked up by a sound level meter. Gross patterns of vibration modes are obtained by the Chladni method.

  5. Oscillating Reactions: Two Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Stojanovska, Marina I.; Šoptrajanov, Bojan T.

    2007-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are truly spectacular phenomena, and demonstrations are always appreciated by the class. However, explaining such reactions to high school or first-year university students is problematic, because it may seem that no acceptable explanation is possible unless the students have profound knowledge of both physical…

  6. Relativistic harmonic oscillator revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Bars, Itzhak

    2009-02-15

    The familiar Fock space commonly used to describe the relativistic harmonic oscillator, for example, as part of string theory, is insufficient to describe all the states of the relativistic oscillator. We find that there are three different vacua leading to three disconnected Fock sectors, all constructed with the same creation-annihilation operators. These have different spacetime geometric properties as well as different algebraic symmetry properties or different quantum numbers. Two of these Fock spaces include negative norm ghosts (as in string theory), while the third one is completely free of ghosts. We discuss a gauge symmetry in a worldline theory approach that supplies appropriate constraints to remove all the ghosts from all Fock sectors of the single oscillator. The resulting ghost-free quantum spectrum in d+1 dimensions is then classified in unitary representations of the Lorentz group SO(d,1). Moreover, all states of the single oscillator put together make up a single infinite dimensional unitary representation of a hidden global symmetry SU(d,1), whose Casimir eigenvalues are computed. Possible applications of these new results in string theory and other areas of physics and mathematics are briefly mentioned.

  7. Nanoparticle Oscillations and Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Lagzi, Istvan; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; Wang, Dawei; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2010-09-30

    Chemical oscillations can be coupled to the dynamic self-assembly of nanoparticles. Periodic pH changes translate into protonation and deprotonation of the ligands that stabilize the nanoparticles, thus altering repulsive and attractive interparticle forces. In a continuous stirred-tank reactor, rhythmic aggregation and dispersion is observed; in spatially distributed media, propagation of particle aggregation fronts is seen.

  8. [Oscillating physiotherapy for secretolysis].

    PubMed

    Brückner, U

    2008-03-01

    Assisted coughing and mechanical cough aids compensate for the weak cough flow in patients with neuromuscular diseases (NMD). In cases with preserved respiratory muscles also breathing techniques and special devices, e. g., flutter or acapella can be used for secretion mobilisation during infections of the airways. These means are summarised as oscillating physiotherapy. Their mechanisms are believed to depend on separation of the mucus from the bronchial wall by vibration, thus facilitating mucus transport from the peripheral to the central airways. In mucoviscidosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease their application is established, but there is a paucity of data regarding the commitment in patients with neuromuscular diseases. The effective adoption of simple oscillation physiotherapeutic interventions demands usually a sufficient force of the respiratory muscles--exceptions are the application of the percussionaire (intrapulmonary percussive ventilator, IPV) or high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO). In daily practice there is evidence that patients with weak respiratory muscles are overstrained with the use of these physiotherapeutic means, or get exhausted. A general recommendation for the adoption of simple oscillating physiotherapeutic interventions cannot be made in patients with NMDs. Perhaps in the future devices such as IPV or HFCWO will prove to be more effective in NMD patients.

  9. Monolithic Millimeter Wave Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan-Lei

    There is an increasing interest in the millimeter -wave spectrum for use in communications and for military and scientific applications. The concept of monolithic integration aims to produce very-high-frequency circuits in a more reliable, reproducible way than conventional electronics, and also at lower cost, with smaller size and lighter weight. In this thesis, a negative resistance device is integrated monolithically with a resonator to produce an effective oscillator. This work fills the void resulting from the exclusion of the local oscillator from the monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMMIC) receiver design. For convenience a microwave frequency model was used to design the resonator circuit. A 5 GHz hybrid oscillator was first fabricated to test the design; the necessary GaAs process technology was developed for the fabrication. Negative resistance devices and oscillator theory were studied, and a simple but practical model of the Gunn diode was devised to solve the impedance matching problem. Monolithic oscillators at the Ka band (35 GHz) were built and refined. All devices operated in CW mode. By means of an electric-field probe, the output power was coupled into a metallic waveguide for measurement purposes. The best result was 3.63 mW of power output, the highest efficiency was 0.43% and the frequency stability was better than 10-4. In the future, an IMPATT diode could replace the Gunn device to give much higher power and efficiency. A varactor-tuned circuit also suitable for large-scale integration is under study.

  10. Orthogonal polynomials and deformed oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzov, V. V.; Damaskinsky, E. V.

    2015-10-01

    In the example of the Fibonacci oscillator, we discuss the construction of oscillator-like systems associated with orthogonal polynomials. We also consider the question of the dimensions of the corresponding Lie algebras.

  11. Ab Initio Study of Polonium

    SciTech Connect

    Zabidi, Noriza Ahmad; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2008-05-20

    Polonium is the only element with a simple cubic (sc) crystal structure. Atoms in solid polonium sit at the corners of a simple cubic unit cell and no where else. Polonium has a valence electron configuration 6s{sup 2}6p{sup 4} (Z = 84). The low temperature {alpha}-phase transforms into the rhombohedral (trigonal) {beta} structure at {approx}348 K. The sc {alpha}-Po unit cell constant is a = 3.345 A. The beta form of polonium ({beta}-Po) has the lattice parameters, a{sub R} = 3.359 A and a rhombohedral angle 98 deg. 13'. We have performed an ab initio electronic structure calculation by using the density functional theory. We have performed the calculation with and without spin-orbit (SO) coupling by using both the LDA and the GGA for the exchange-correlations. The k-points in a simple cubic BZ are determined by R (0.5, 0.5, 0.5), {gamma} (0, 0, 0), X (0.5, 0, 0), M (0.5, 0.5, 0) and {gamma} (0, 0, 0). Other directions of k-points are {gamma} (0, 0, 0), X (0.5, 0, 0), R (0.5, 0.5, 0.5) and {gamma} (0, 0, 0). The SO splittings of p states at the {gamma} point in the GGA+SO scheme for {alpha}-Po are 0.04 eV and 0.02 eV while for the {beta}-Po these are 0.03 eV and 0.97 eV. We have also calculated the vibrational spectra for the unit cells in both the structures. We find that exchanging of a Po atom by Pb atom produces several more bands and destabilizes the {beta} phase.

  12. Ionization oscillations in Hall accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barral, S.; Peradzyński, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of low-frequency oscillations in Hall accelerators is investigated theoretically. It is shown that relaxation oscillations arise from a competition between avalanche ionization and the advective transport of the working gas. The model derived recovers the slow progression and fast recession of the ionization front. Analytical approximations of the shape of current pulses and of the oscillation frequency are provided for the case of large amplitude oscillations.

  13. Modeling study of the ABS relay valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming; Lin, Min; Guo, Bin; Luo, Zai; Xu, Weidong

    2011-05-01

    The ABS (anti-lock braking system) relay valve is the key component of anti-lock braking system in most commercial vehicles such as trucks, tractor-trailers, etc. In this paper, structure of ABS relay valve and its work theory were analyzed. Then a mathematical model of ABS relay valve, which was investigated by dividing into electronic part, magnetic part, pneumatic part and mechanical part, was set up. The displacement of spools and the response of pressure increasing, holding, releasing of ABS relay valve were simulated and analyzed under conditions of control pressure 500 KPa, braking pressure 600 KPa, atmospheric pressure 100 KPa and air temperature 310 K. Thisarticle provides reliable theory for improving the performance and efficiency of anti-lock braking system of vehicles.

  14. Modeling study of the ABS relay valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming; Lin, Min; Guo, Bin; Luo, Zai; Xu, Weidong

    2010-12-01

    The ABS (anti-lock braking system) relay valve is the key component of anti-lock braking system in most commercial vehicles such as trucks, tractor-trailers, etc. In this paper, structure of ABS relay valve and its work theory were analyzed. Then a mathematical model of ABS relay valve, which was investigated by dividing into electronic part, magnetic part, pneumatic part and mechanical part, was set up. The displacement of spools and the response of pressure increasing, holding, releasing of ABS relay valve were simulated and analyzed under conditions of control pressure 500 KPa, braking pressure 600 KPa, atmospheric pressure 100 KPa and air temperature 310 K. Thisarticle provides reliable theory for improving the performance and efficiency of anti-lock braking system of vehicles.

  15. Neutrino Oscillations with Nil Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, Edward R.

    2016-09-01

    An alternative neutrino oscillation process is presented as a counterexample for which the neutrino may have nil mass consistent with the standard model. The process is developed in a quantum trajectories representation of quantum mechanics, which has a Hamilton-Jacobi foundation. This process has no need for mass differences between mass eigenstates. Flavor oscillations and ν ,bar{ν } oscillations are examined.

  16. An ab initio MO study of butalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Katsuhisa; Shima, Toru

    1994-01-01

    Butalene as a structural isomer of p-benzyne has been studied by using an ab initio GVB wavefunction. The geometry of butalene, which is shown to be almost rectangular, is first optimized as a local minimum on the energy surface at the ab initio level. However, the energy barrier of conversion to p-benzyne is as small as 1.6 kcal/mol, and experimental isolation of butalene is predicted to be difficult from a force-constant analysis.

  17. Oscillation death in diffusively coupled oscillators by local repulsive link.

    PubMed

    Hens, C R; Olusola, Olasunkanmi I; Pal, Pinaki; Dana, Syamal K

    2013-09-01

    A death of oscillation is reported in a network of coupled synchronized oscillators in the presence of additional repulsive coupling. The repulsive link evolves as an averaging effect of mutual interaction between two neighboring oscillators due to a local fault and the number of repulsive links grows in time when the death scenario emerges. Analytical condition for oscillation death is derived for two coupled Landau-Stuart systems. Numerical results also confirm oscillation death in chaotic systems such as a Sprott system and the Rössler oscillator. We explore the effect in large networks of globally coupled oscillators and find that the number of repulsive links is always fewer than the size of the network.

  18. THz Local Oscillator Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran

    2004-01-01

    The last decade has seen a number of technological advancements that have now made it possible to implement fully solid state local oscillator chains up to 2 THz. These chains are composed of cascaded planar multiplier stages that are pumped with W-band high power sources. The high power W-band sources are achieved by power combining MMIC amplifiers and can provide in access of 150 mW with about 10% bandwidth. Planar diode technology has also enabled novel circuit topologies that can take advantage of the high input power and demonstrate significant efficiencies well into the THz range. Cascaded chains to 1.9 THz have now been demonstrated with enough output power to successfully pump hot-electron bolometer mixers in this frequency range. An overview of the current State-of-the-Art of the local oscillator technology will be presented along with highlighting future trends and challenges.

  19. Stable local oscillator module.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-11-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) multi-chip module (MCM). It is a follow-on report to SAND2006-6414, Stable Local Oscillator Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. This report describes the development of an MCM-based version of the complete StaLO, fabricated on an alumina thick film hybrid substrate.

  20. Improvements to a five-phase ABS algorithm for experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Mathieu; Pasillas-Lépine, William; de Vries, Edwin; Verhaegen, Michel

    2012-10-01

    The anti-lock braking system (ABS) is the most important active safety system for passenger cars. Unfortunately, the literature is not really precise about its description, stability and performance. This research improves a five-phase hybrid ABS control algorithm based on wheel deceleration [W. Pasillas-Lépine, Hybrid modeling and limit cycle analysis for a class of five-phase anti-lock brake algorithms, Veh. Syst. Dyn. 44 (2006), pp. 173-188] and validates it on a tyre-in-the-loop laboratory facility. Five relevant effects are modelled so that the simulation matches the reality: oscillations in measurements, wheel acceleration reconstruction, brake pressure dynamics, brake efficiency changes and tyre relaxation. The time delays in measurement and actuation have been identified as the main difficulty for the initial algorithm to work in practice. Three methods are proposed in order to deal with these delays. It is verified that the ABS limit cycles encircle the optimal braking point, without assuming any tyre parameter being a priori known. The ABS algorithm is compared with the commercial algorithm developed by Bosch.

  1. Polychromatic optical Bloch oscillations.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Stefano

    2009-07-15

    Bloch oscillations (BOs) of polychromatic beams in circularly curved optical waveguide arrays are smeared out owing to the dependence of the BO spatial period on the wavelength. Here it is shown that restoring of the self-imaging property of the array and approximate BOs over relatively broad spectral ranges can be achieved by the insertion of suitable lumped phase slips uniformly applied across the array.

  2. Covariant deformed oscillator algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quesne, Christiane

    1995-01-01

    The general form and associativity conditions of deformed oscillator algebras are reviewed. It is shown how the latter can be fulfilled in terms of a solution of the Yang-Baxter equation when this solution has three distinct eigenvalues and satisfies a Birman-Wenzl-Murakami condition. As an example, an SU(sub q)(n) x SU(sub q)(m)-covariant q-bosonic algebra is discussed in some detail.

  3. Decay of oscillating universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mithani, Audrey Todhunter

    It has been suggested by Ellis et al that the universe could be eternal in the past, without beginning. In their model, the "emergent universe'' exists forever in the past, in an "eternal'' phase before inflation begins. We will show that in general, such an "eternal'' phase is not possible, because of an instability due to quantum tunneling. One candidate model, the "simple harmonic universe'' has been shown by Graham et al to be perturbatively stable; we find that it is unstable with respect to quantum tunneling. We also investigate the stability of a distinct oscillating model in loop quantum cosmology with respect to small perturbations and to quantum collapse. We find that the model has perturbatively stable and unstable solutions, with both types of solutions occupying significant regions of the parameter space. All solutions are unstable with respect to collapse by quantum tunneling to zero size. In addition, we investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and the Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. Finally, we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe. Although the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence in canonical quantum cosmology, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. Here, we apply this approach to the simple harmonic universe, by extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field φ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock''.

  4. Entangled mechanical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Jost, J D; Home, J P; Amini, J M; Hanneke, D; Ozeri, R; Langer, C; Bollinger, J J; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2009-06-01

    Hallmarks of quantum mechanics include superposition and entanglement. In the context of large complex systems, these features should lead to situations as envisaged in the 'Schrödinger's cat' thought experiment (where the cat exists in a superposition of alive and dead states entangled with a radioactive nucleus). Such situations are not observed in nature. This may be simply due to our inability to sufficiently isolate the system of interest from the surrounding environment-a technical limitation. Another possibility is some as-yet-undiscovered mechanism that prevents the formation of macroscopic entangled states. Such a limitation might depend on the number of elementary constituents in the system or on the types of degrees of freedom that are entangled. Tests of the latter possibility have been made with photons, atoms and condensed matter devices. One system ubiquitous to nature where entanglement has not been previously demonstrated consists of distinct mechanical oscillators. Here we demonstrate deterministic entanglement of separated mechanical oscillators, consisting of the vibrational states of two pairs of atomic ions held in different locations. We also demonstrate entanglement of the internal states of an atomic ion with a distant mechanical oscillator. These results show quantum entanglement in a degree of freedom that pervades the classical world. Such experiments may lead to the generation of entangled states of larger-scale mechanical oscillators, and offer possibilities for testing non-locality with mesoscopic systems. In addition, the control developed here is an important ingredient for scaling-up quantum information processing with trapped atomic ions.

  5. Prominence formation and oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. F.

    Prominences, or filaments, are a striking phenomenon in the solar atmosphere. Besides their own rich features and dynamics, they are related to many other activities, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In the past several years we have been investigating the prominence formation, oscillations, and eruptions through both data analysis and radiative hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. This paper reviews our progress on these topics, which includes: (1) With updated radiative cooling function, the coronal condensation becomes a little faster than previous work; (2) Once a seed condensation is formed, it can grow via siphon flow spontaneously even if the evaporation stops; (3) A scaling law was obtained to relate the length of the prominence thread to various parameters, indicating that higher prominences tend to have shorter threads, which is consistent with the fact that threads are long in active region prominences and short in quiescent prominences; (4) It was proposed that long-time prominence oscillations out of phase might serve as a precursor for prominence eruptions and CMEs; (5) An ensemble of oscillating prominence threads may explain the counter-streaming motion.

  6. Temperature sensitive oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An oscillator circuit for sensing and indicating temperature by changing oscillator frequency with temperature comprises a programmable operational amplifier which is operated on the roll-off portion of its gain versus frequency curve and has its output directly connected to the inverting input to place the amplifier in a follower configuration. Its output is also connected to the non-inverting input by a capacitor with a crystal or other tuned circuit also being connected to the non-inverting input. A resistor is connected to the program input of the amplifier to produce a given set current at a given temperature, the set current varying with temperature. As the set current changes, the gain-bandwidth of the amplifier changes and, in turn, the reflected capacitance across the crystal changes, thereby providing the desired change in oscillator frequency by pulling the crystal. There is no requirement that a crystal employed with this circuit display either a linear frequency change with temperature or a substantial frequency change with temperature.

  7. Nonlinear Oscillators in Space Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester,Daniel; Thronson, Harley

    2011-01-01

    We discuss dynamical systems that produce an oscillation without an external time dependent source. Numerical results are presented for nonlinear oscillators in the Em1h's atmosphere, foremost the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBOl. These fluid dynamical oscillators, like the solar dynamo, have in common that one of the variables in a governing equation is strongly nonlinear and that the nonlinearity, to first order, has particular form. of 3rd or odd power. It is shown that this form of nonlinearity can produce the fundamental li'equency of the internal oscillation. which has a period that is favored by the dynamical condition of the fluid. The fundamental frequency maintains the oscillation, with no energy input to the system at that particular frequency. Nonlinearities of 2nd or even power could not maintain the oscillation.

  8. Quantum mechanics of Drude oscillators with full Coulomb interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, M.; Manby, Frederick R.

    2016-09-01

    Drude oscillators provide a harmonic description of charge fluctuations and are widely studied as a model system and for ab initio calculations. In the dipole approximation the Hamiltonian describing the interaction of Drudes is quadratic, so it can be diagonalized exactly, but the energy diverges at short range. Here we consider the quantum mechanics of Drude oscillators interacting through the full Coulombic Hamiltonian for which the interaction energy does not have this defect. This protypical model for interactions between matter includes electrostatics, induction, and dispersion. Potential energy curves for rare-gas dimers are very closely matched by Drude correlation energies plus a single exponential function. The exact and accurate results presented here help to delineate between the basic properties of the physical model and the effects that arise from the dipole approximation.

  9. Serum PDGF-AB in pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Filiberti, Rosa; Marroni, Paola; Neri, Monica; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Betta, Pier Giacomo; Cafferata, Mara A; Canessa, Pier Aldo; Puntoni, Riccardo; Ivaldi, Giovanni Paolo; Paganuzzi, Michela

    2005-01-01

    Overexpression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) has been observed in lung and pleural tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic role of serum PDGF in pleural mesothelioma (PM). Four groups of subjects were studied: 93 malignant PM patients, 33 primary non small cell lung cancer patients, 51 subjects exposed to asbestos, defined as high-risk controls, and 24 healthy controls. PDGF-AB mean concentration was higher in PM patients (45.8 ng/ml) than in high-risk controls (33.1 ng/ml) and healthy controls (26.8 ng/ml). Using the cut-off level of 49.8 ng/ml, corresponding to the mean+2SD of PDGF-AB in healthy controls, 43% of PM patients showed positive PDGF-AB levels. Survival was evaluated in 82 PM patients. At the end of the follow-up (median 9.8 months) 80.5% of patients had died. Median survival was 13.1 and 7.9 months for patients with PDGF-AB lower and higher than the cut-off, respectively. Adjusting for age, sex, histology and platelet count, positive PDGF-AB levels were associated with lower survival (OR=1.2, 95%CI: 0.9-1.6), even if not significantly so. In conclusion, serum PDGF may represent a useful additional parameter to prognostic factors already available for PM.

  10. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-17

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2{pi} in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step {delta}t. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/{delta}t is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is ''blue shifted'' relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval {delta}t. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  11. Ab interno trabeculectomy: patient selection and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vinod, Kateki; Gedde, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Ab interno trabeculectomy is one among several recently introduced minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries that avoid a conjunctival incision and full-thickness sclerostomy involved in traditional glaucoma surgery. Ablation of the trabecular meshwork and inner wall of Schlemm's canal is performed in an arcuate fashion via a clear corneal incision, alone or in combination with phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Intraocular pressure reduction following ab interno trabeculectomy is limited by resistance in distal outflow pathways and generally stabilizes in the mid-to-high teens. Relief of medication burden has been demonstrated by some studies. A very low rate of complications, most commonly transient hyphema and intraocular pressure elevations in the immediate postoperative period, have been reported. However, available data are derived from small retrospective and prospective case series. Randomized, controlled trials are needed to better elucidate the potential merits of ab interno trabeculectomy in the combined setting versus phacoemulsification cataract surgery alone and to compare it with other minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries. PMID:27574396

  12. Kravchuk oscillator revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakishiyeva, Mesuma K.; Atakishiyev, Natig M.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2014-05-01

    The study of irreducible representations of Lie algebras and groups has traditionally considered their action on functions of a continuous manifold (e.g. the 'rotation' Lie algebra so(3) on functions on the sphere). Here we argue that functions of a discrete variable -Kravchuk functions- are on equal footing for that study in the case of so(3). They lead to a discrete quantum model of the harmonic oscillator, and offer a corresponding set of special function relations. The technique is applicable to other special function families of a discrete variable, which stem from low-dimensional Lie algebras and are stationary solutions for the corresponding discrete quantum models.

  13. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  14. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Joshua; Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards a dual species nuclear magnetic oscillator using synchronous spin exchange optical pumping. By applying the bias field as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses, we generate alkali polarization transverse to the bias field. The alkali polarization is then modulated at the noble gas resonance so that through spin exchange collisions the noble gas becomes polarized. This novel method of NMR suppresses the alkali field frequency shift by at least a factor of 2500 as compared to longitudinal NMR. We will present details of the apparatus and measurements of dual species co-magnetometry using this method. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  15. Brain Oscillations, Hypnosis, and Hypnotizability.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Adachi, Tomonori; Hakimian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the state-of-science knowledge regarding the associations between hypnosis and brain oscillations. Brain oscillations represent the combined electrical activity of neuronal assemblies, usually measured as specific frequencies representing slower (delta, theta, alpha) and faster (beta, gamma) oscillations. Hypnosis has been most closely linked to power in the theta band and changes in gamma activity. These oscillations are thought to play a critical role in both the recording and recall of declarative memory and emotional limbic circuits. The authors propose that this role may be the mechanistic link between theta (and perhaps gamma) oscillations and hypnosis, specifically, that the increases in theta oscillations and changes in gamma activity observed with hypnosis may underlie some hypnotic responses. If these hypotheses are supported, they have important implications for both understanding the effects of hypnosis and for enhancing response to hypnotic treatments.

  16. Transport equations for oscillating neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfan; Burrows, Adam

    2013-11-01

    We derive a suite of generalized Boltzmann equations, based on the density-matrix formalism, that incorporates the physics of neutrino oscillations for two- and three-flavor oscillations, matter refraction, and self-refraction. The resulting equations are straightforward extensions of the classical transport equations that nevertheless contain the full physics of quantum oscillation phenomena. In this way, our broadened formalism provides a bridge between the familiar neutrino transport algorithms employed by supernova modelers and the more quantum-heavy approaches frequently employed to illuminate the various neutrino oscillation effects. We also provide the corresponding angular-moment versions of this generalized equation set. Our goal is to make it easier for astrophysicists to address oscillation phenomena in a language with which they are familiar. The equations we derive are simple and practical, and are intended to facilitate progress concerning oscillation phenomena in the context of core-collapse supernova theory.

  17. Brain Oscillations, Hypnosis, and Hypnotizability

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Adachi, Tomonori; Hakimian, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we summarize the state-of-science knowledge regarding the associations between hypnosis and brain oscillations. Brain oscillations represent the combined electrical activity of neuronal assemblies, and are usually measured as specific frequencies representing slower (delta, theta, alpha) and faster (beta, gamma) oscillations. Hypnosis has been most closely linked to power in the theta band and changes in gamma activity. These oscillations are thought to play a critical role in both the recording and recall of declarative memory and emotional limbic circuits. Here we propose that it is this role that may be the mechanistic link between theta (and perhaps gamma) oscillations and hypnosis; specifically that theta oscillations may facilitate, and that changes in gamma activity observed with hypnosis may underlie, some hypnotic responses. If these hypotheses are supported, they have important implications for both understanding the effects of hypnosis, and for enhancing response to hypnotic treatments. PMID:25792761

  18. Olfactory system oscillations across phyla.

    PubMed

    Kay, Leslie M

    2015-04-01

    Neural oscillations are ubiquitous in olfactory systems of mammals, insects and molluscs. Neurophysiological and computational investigations point to common mechanisms for gamma or odor associated oscillations across phyla (40-100Hz in mammals, 20-30Hz in insects, 0.5-1.5Hz in molluscs), engaging the reciprocal dendrodendritic synapse between excitatory principle neurons and inhibitory interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB), antennal lobe (AL), or procerebrum (PrC). Recent studies suggest important mechanisms that may modulate gamma oscillations, including neuromodulators and centrifugal input to the OB and AL. Beta (20Hz) and theta (2-12Hz) oscillations coordinate activity within and across brain regions. Olfactory beta oscillations are associated with odor learning and depend on centrifugal OB input, while theta oscillations are strongly associated with respiration.

  19. Olfactory system oscillations across phyla

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    Neural oscillations are ubiquitous in olfactory systems of mammals, insects and molluscs. Neurophysiological and computational investigations point to common mechanisms for gamma or odor associated oscillations across phyla (40–100 Hz in mammals, 20–30 Hz in insects, 0.5–1.5 Hz in molluscs), engaging the reciprocal dendrodendritic synapse between excitatory principle neurons and inhibitory interneurons in the olfactory bulb, antennal lobe, or procerebrum. Recent studies suggest important mechanisms that may modulate gamma oscillations, including neuromodulators and centrifugal input to the olfactory bulb and antennal lobe. Beta (20 Hz) and theta (2–12 Hz) oscillations coordinate activity within and across brain regions. Olfactory beta oscillations are associated with odor learning and depend on centrifugal olfactory bulb input, while theta oscillations are strongly associated with respiration. PMID:25460070

  20. Phase-response curves of coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Ko, Tae-Wook; Ermentrout, G Bard

    2009-01-01

    Many real oscillators are coupled to other oscillators, and the coupling can affect the response of the oscillators to stimuli. We investigate phase-response curves (PRCs) of coupled oscillators. The PRCs for two weakly coupled phase-locked oscillators are analytically obtained in terms of the PRC for uncoupled oscillators and the coupling function of the system. Through simulation and analytic methods, the PRCs for globally coupled oscillators are also discussed.

  1. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  2. Mathematics of oscillations and waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonyuk, P. N.

    2016-07-01

    Analytical definition of the sine function and the number π which is related to sine function allows to understand, how harmonic oscillations and waves appear. The functional equation for the sine is received. The new fast algorithm of calculation of the π number is formulated. In the elementary case oscillations and waves are harmonious or sinusoidal. The sine function appears not accidentally. This function can be defined as the solution of the functional equation characterizing periodic properties of oscillations and waves.

  3. C P -violating baryon oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeen, David; Nelson, Ann E.

    2016-10-01

    We enumerate the conditions necessary for C P violation to be manifest in n -n ¯ oscillations and build a simple model that can give rise to such effects. We discuss a possible connection between neutron oscillations and dark matter, provided the mass of the latter lies between mp-me and mp+me. We apply our results to a possible baryogenesis scenario involving C P violation in the oscillations of the Ξ0.

  4. MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: Aerosol experiments ABCOVE AB5, AB6, AB7, and LACE LA2

    SciTech Connect

    Souto, F.J.; Haskin, F.E.; Kmetyk, L.N.

    1994-10-01

    The MELCOR computer code has been used to model four of the large-scale aerosol behavior experiments conducted in the Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) vessel. Tests AB5, AB6 and AB7 of the ABCOVE program simulate the dry aerosol conditions during a hypothetical severe accident in an LMFBR. Test LA2 of the LACE program simulates aerosol behavior in a condensing steam environment during a postulated severe accident in an LWR with failure to isolate the containment. The comparison of code results to experimental data show that MELCOR is able to correctly predict most of the thermal-hydraulic results in the four tests. MELCOR predicts reasonably well the dry aerosol behavior of the ABCOVE tests, but significant disagreements are found in the aerosol behavior modelling for the LA2 experiment. These results tend to support some of the concerns about the MELCOR modelling of steam condensation onto aerosols expressed in previous works. During these analyses, a limitation in the MELCOR input was detected for the specification of the aerosol parameters for more than one component. A Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) sensitivity study of the aerosol dynamic constants is presented for test AB6. The study shows the importance of the aerosol shape factors in the aerosol deposition behavior, and reveals that MELCOR input/output processing is highly labor intensive for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses based on LHS.

  5. Spatial computation with gamma oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Engelhard, Ben; Vaadia, Eilon

    2014-01-01

    Gamma oscillations in cortex have been extensively studied with relation to behavior in both humans and animal models; however, their computational role in the processing of behaviorally relevant signals is still not clear. One oft-overlooked characteristic of gamma oscillations is their spatial distribution over the cortical space and the computational consequences of such an organization. Here, we advance the proposal that the spatial organization of gamma oscillations is of major importance for their function. The interaction of specific spatial distributions of oscillations with the functional topography of cortex enables select amplification of neuronal signals, which supports perceptual and cognitive processing. PMID:25249950

  6. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  7. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators, or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  8. Quartz-crystal-oscillator hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, R.

    1977-01-01

    Measuring device, which eliminates complex and expensive optical components by electronically sensing dewpoint of water vapor in gas, employs piezoelectric crystal oscillator, supportive circuitry, temperature regulators, and readout.

  9. Symmetries of coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Kim, Y. S.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators possesses many interesting symmetries. It is noted that the symmetry of a single oscillator is that of the three-parameter group Sp(2). Thus two uncoupled oscillator exhibits a direct product of two Sp(2) groups, with six parameters. The coupling can be achieved through a rotation in the two-dimensional space of two oscillator coordinates. The closure of the commutation relations for the generators leads to the ten-parameter group Sp(4) which is locally isomorphic to the deSitter group O(3,2).

  10. Theories of white dwarf oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhorn, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of theoretical understanding of the oscillations observed in the ZZ Ceti stars and cataclysmic variables is briefly reviewed. Nonradial g-mode oscillations appear to provide a satisfactory explanation for the low amplitude variables such as R548, with periods in the range of approximately 200 to 300 seconds, but for the longer period (800 to 1000 seconds) oscillators, the situation is still unclear. Rotation may play an important role in this problem, and the effects of both slow and fast rotation upon the mode structure are discussed. In the cataclysmic variables, both accretion and thermonuclear burning may act to excite oscillations of the white dwarf.

  11. Socially synchronized circadian oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Guy; Herzog, Erik D.; Levine, Joel D.; Schwartz, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Daily rhythms of physiology and behaviour are governed by an endogenous timekeeping mechanism (a circadian ‘clock’). The alternation of environmental light and darkness synchronizes (entrains) these rhythms to the natural day–night cycle, and underlying mechanisms have been investigated using singly housed animals in the laboratory. But, most species ordinarily would not live out their lives in such seclusion; in their natural habitats, they interact with other individuals, and some live in colonies with highly developed social structures requiring temporal synchronization. Social cues may thus be critical to the adaptive function of the circadian system, but elucidating their role and the responsible mechanisms has proven elusive. Here, we highlight three model systems that are now being applied to understanding the biology of socially synchronized circadian oscillators: the fruitfly, with its powerful array of molecular genetic tools; the honeybee, with its complex natural society and clear division of labour; and, at a different level of biological organization, the rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus, site of the brain's circadian clock, with its network of mutually coupled single-cell oscillators. Analyses at the ‘group’ level of circadian organization will likely generate a more complex, but ultimately more comprehensive, view of clocks and rhythms and their contribution to fitness in nature. PMID:23825203

  12. Chemotaxis and Actin Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Negrete, Jose; Beta, Carsten; Pumir, Alain; Gholami, Azam; Tarantola, Marco; Westendorf, Christian; Zykov, Vladimir

    Recently, self-oscillations of the cytoskeletal actin have been observed in Dictyostelium, a model system for studying chemotaxis. Here we report experimental results on the self-oscillation mechanism and the role of regulatory proteins and myosin II. We stimulate cells rapidly and periodically by using photo un-caging of the chemoattractant in a micro-fluidic device and measured the cellular responses. We found that the response amplitude grows with stimulation strength only in a very narrow region of stimulation, after which the response amplitude reaches a plateau. Moreover, the frequency-response is not constant but rather varies with the strength of external stimuli. To understand the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the polymerization and de-polymerization time in the single cell level. Despite of the large cell-to-cell variability, we found that the polymerization time is independent of external stimuli and the de-polymerization time is prolonged as the stimulation strength increases. Our conclusions will be summarized and the role of noise in the signaling network will be discussed. German Science Foundation CRC 937.

  13. Policy oscillation is overshooting.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Paul

    2014-04-01

    A majority of approximate dynamic programming approaches to the reinforcement learning problem can be categorized into greedy value function methods and value-based policy gradient methods. The former approach, although fast, is well known to be susceptible to the policy oscillation phenomenon. We take a fresh view to this phenomenon by casting, within the context of non-optimistic policy iteration, a considerable subset of the former approach as a limiting special case of the latter. We explain the phenomenon in terms of this view and illustrate the underlying mechanism with artificial examples. We also use it to derive the constrained natural actor-critic algorithm that can interpolate between the aforementioned approaches. In addition, it has been suggested in the literature that the oscillation phenomenon might be subtly connected to the grossly suboptimal performance in the Tetris benchmark problem of all attempted approximate dynamic programming methods. Based on empirical findings, we offer a hypothesis that might explain the inferior performance levels and the associated policy degradation phenomenon, and which would partially support the suggested connection. Finally, we report scores in the Tetris problem that improve on existing dynamic programming based results by an order of magnitude. PMID:24491826

  14. Extinction of oscillating populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Naftali R.; Meerson, Baruch

    2016-03-01

    Established populations often exhibit oscillations in their sizes that, in the deterministic theory, correspond to a limit cycle in the space of population sizes. If a population is isolated, the intrinsic stochasticity of elemental processes can ultimately bring it to extinction. Here we study extinction of oscillating populations in a stochastic version of the Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey model. To this end we develop a WKB (Wentzel, Kramers and Brillouin) approximation to the master equation, employing the characteristic population size as the large parameter. Similar WKB theories have been developed previously in the context of population extinction from an attracting multipopulation fixed point. We evaluate the extinction rates and find the most probable paths to extinction from the limit cycle by applying Floquet theory to the dynamics of an effective four-dimensional WKB Hamiltonian. We show that the entropic barriers to extinction change in a nonanalytic way as the system passes through the Hopf bifurcation. We also study the subleading pre-exponential factors of the WKB approximation.

  15. MULTIPLE OSCILLATION STABILIZING CONTROL.

    SciTech Connect

    YUE,M.; SCHLUETER,R.; AZARM,M.; BARI,R.

    2004-07-23

    This paper presents a strategy that may be used to guide stabilizing control design for multiple oscillations, which are difficult to control using conventional control design procedures. A multiple oscillation phenomena is observed in an example power system. A local bifurcation and an interarea bifurcation develop in an example power system due to multiple bifurcation parameter variations. The dynamic behaviors of the bifurcating system are complex due to the overlapping of the two different bifurcation subsystems and are shown to be difficult to control. The double bifurcations are studied in this paper and in order to stabilize them, three kind of {mu}-synthesis robust controls are designed, (a) {mu}-synthesis power system stabilizer (MPSS); (b) {mu}-synthesis SVC control (MSVC); and (c) a mixed MPSS/MSVC control. Based on the bifurcation subsystem analysis, the measurement signals and locations of the controls are selected. The control performances of three kind of controls are evaluated and compared. The conclusions are given according to the analysis and time simulation results.

  16. Scanning for oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cheveigné, Alain; Arzounian, Dorothée

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Oscillations are an important aspect of brain activity, but they often have a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) due to source-to-electrode mixing with competing brain activity and noise. Filtering can improve the SNR of narrowband signals, but it introduces ringing effects that may masquerade as genuine oscillations, leading to uncertainty as to the true oscillatory nature of the phenomena. Likewise, time-frequency analysis kernels have a temporal extent that blurs the time course of narrowband activity, introducing uncertainty as to timing and causal relations between events and/or frequency bands. Approach. Here, we propose a methodology that reveals narrowband activity within multichannel data such as electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, electrocorticography or local field potential. The method exploits the between-channel correlation structure of the data to suppress competing sources by joint diagonalization of the covariance matrices of narrowband filtered and unfiltered data. Main results. Applied to synthetic and real data, the method effectively extracts narrowband components at unfavorable SNR. Significance. Oscillatory components of brain activity, including weak sources that are hard or impossible to observe using standard methods, can be detected and their time course plotted accurately. The method avoids the temporal artifacts of standard filtering and time-frequency analysis methods with which it remains complementary.

  17. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  18. Extinction of oscillating populations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Naftali R; Meerson, Baruch

    2016-03-01

    Established populations often exhibit oscillations in their sizes that, in the deterministic theory, correspond to a limit cycle in the space of population sizes. If a population is isolated, the intrinsic stochasticity of elemental processes can ultimately bring it to extinction. Here we study extinction of oscillating populations in a stochastic version of the Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey model. To this end we develop a WKB (Wentzel, Kramers and Brillouin) approximation to the master equation, employing the characteristic population size as the large parameter. Similar WKB theories have been developed previously in the context of population extinction from an attracting multipopulation fixed point. We evaluate the extinction rates and find the most probable paths to extinction from the limit cycle by applying Floquet theory to the dynamics of an effective four-dimensional WKB Hamiltonian. We show that the entropic barriers to extinction change in a nonanalytic way as the system passes through the Hopf bifurcation. We also study the subleading pre-exponential factors of the WKB approximation. PMID:27078294

  19. Level Energies, Oscillator Strengths and Lifetimes for Transitions in Pb IV

    SciTech Connect

    Colon, C.; Alonso-Medina, A.; Zanon, A.; Albeniz, J.

    2008-10-22

    Oscillator strengths for several lines of astrophysical interest arising from some configurations and some levels radiative lifetimes of Pb IV have been calculated. These values were obtained in intermediate coupling (IC) and using ab initio relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations. We use for the IC calculations the standard method of least square fitting of experimental energy levels by means of computer codes from Cowan. Transition Probabilities and oscillator strengths obtained, although in general agreement with the rare experimental data, do present some noticeable discrepancies that are studied in the text.

  20. The Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths of the Alkalis and Alkaline Earth Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmekki, Mohammed Ali

    Lifetimes, transition probabilities and oscillator strengths were calculated ab initio for Strontium and Magnesium using a combination of the R-matrix Method and the Multichannel Quantum Defect Theory (MQDT). The values of lifetimes and transition probabilities were then compared with other calculations and with experimental measurements and the agreement with both is very good. We have also modified the calculation to study transitions from relatively high initial states and we also correlate our results for Sr and Mg. We have also used the Coulomb Approximation Method with Model Potential (CAMP) to calculate the lifetimes and oscillator strengths in the Li sequence and the results were compared with the literature. We also report on our efforts to calculate the mixing coefficients in Be by the ab initio MQDT and the semiempirical MQDT. Finally, we present our conclusions about our data and about the method of calculation and the possible future work that will complement this effort.

  1. Engineering oscillating microtubule bundles.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Timothy; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2013-01-01

    From motility of simple protists to determining the handedness of complex vertebrates, highly conserved eukaryotic cilia and flagella are essential for the reproduction and survival of many biological organisms. Despite extensive studies, the exact mechanism by which individual components coordinate their activity to produce ciliary beating patterns remains unknown. We describe a novel approach toward studying ciliary beating. Instead of deconstructing a fully functional organelle from the top-down, we describe a process by which synthetic cilia-like structures are assembled from the bottom-up and we present methods for engineering such structures. We demonstrate how simple mixtures of microtubules, kinesin clusters, and a bundling agent assemble into structures that produce spontaneous oscillations, suggesting that self-organized beating may be a generic feature of internally driven bundles. Synthetic cilia-like structures can be assembled at high density, leading to synchronization and metachronal traveling waves, reminiscent of the waves seen in biological ciliary fields.

  2. Stable local oscillator microcircuit.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-10-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. The StaLO uses a comb generator followed by surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters. The comb generator creates a set of harmonic components of the 100MHz input signal. The SAW filters are narrow bandpass filters that are used to select the desired component and reject all others. The resulting circuit has very low sideband power levels and low phase noise (both less than -40dBc) that is limited primarily by the phase noise level of the input signal.

  3. Longitudinal oscillation of launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    During powered flight a vehicle may develop longitudinal self-excited oscillations, so-called oscillations, of its structure. The energy supplying the vibration is tapped from the thrust by the activity of the system itself; that is, oscillation of the structure causes oscillation of the propellant system, especially of the pumps. In this way an oscillating thrust can be created that, by a feedback loop, may sustain the structural oscillation under certain circumstances. Two special features of the system proved to be essential for creation of instability. One is the effect of the inherent time interval that the thrust oscillation is lagging behind the structural oscillation. The other is the decreased of system mass caused by the exhausting of gas. The latter feature may cause an initially stable system to become unstable. To examine the stability of the system, a single mass-spring model, which is the result of a one-term Galerkin approach to the equation of motion, has been considered. The Nyquist stability criterion leads to a stability graph that shows the stability conditions in terms of the system parameter and also demonstrates the significance of time lag, feedback magnitude, and loss of mass. An important conclusion can be drawn from the analysis: large relative displacements of the pump-engine masses favor instability. This is also confirmed by flight measurements.

  4. Mechanical Parametric Oscillations and Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William; Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S.

    2013-01-01

    Usually parametric oscillations are not the topic of general physics courses. Probably it is because the mathematical theory of this phenomenon is relatively complicated, and until quite recently laboratory experiments for students were difficult to implement. However parametric oscillations are good illustrations of the laws of physics and can be…

  5. Fano Interference in Classical Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satpathy, S.; Roy, A.; Mohapatra, A.

    2012-01-01

    We seek to illustrate Fano interference in a classical coupled oscillator by using classical analogues of the atom-laser interaction. We present an analogy between the dressed state picture of coherent atom-laser interaction and a classical coupled oscillator. The Autler-Townes splitting due to the atom-laser interaction is analogous to the…

  6. Oscillations in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Stark, Jaroslav; Chan, Cliburn; George, Andrew J T

    2007-04-01

    Oscillations are surprisingly common in the immune system, both in its healthy state and in disease. The most famous example is that of periodic fevers caused by the malaria parasite. A number of hereditary disorders, which also cause periodic fevers, have also been known for a long time. Various reports of oscillations in cytokine concentrations following antigen challenge have been published over at least the past three decades. Oscillations can also occur at the intracellular level. Calcium oscillations following T-cell activation are familiar to all immunologists, and metabolic and reactive oxygen species oscillations in neutrophils have been well documented. More recently, oscillations in nuclear factor kappaB activity following stimulation by tumor necrosis factor alpha have received considerable publicity. However, despite all of these examples, oscillations in the immune system still tend to be considered mainly as pathological aberrations, and their causes and significance remained largely unknown. This is partly because of a lack of awareness within the immunological community of the appropriate theoretical frameworks for describing and analyzing such behavior. We provide an introduction to these frameworks and give a survey of the currently known oscillations that occur within the immune system. PMID:17367345

  7. On the Strain Rate Sensitivity of Abs and Abs Plus Fused Deposition Modeling Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vairis, A.; Petousis, M.; Vidakis, N.; Savvakis, K.

    2016-06-01

    In this work the effect of strain rate on the tensile strength of fused deposition modeling parts built with Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and ABS plus material is presented. ASTM D638-02a specimens were built with ABS and ABS plus and they were tested on a Schenck Trebel Co. tensile test machine at three different test speeds, equal, lower, and higher to the test speed required by the ASTM D638-02a standard. The experimental tensile strength results were compared and evaluated. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscope, to determine failure mode of the filament strands. It was found that, as the test speed increases, specimens develop higher tensile strength and have higher elastic modulus. Specimens tested in the highest speed of the experiment had on average about 10% higher elastic modulus and developed on average about 11% higher tensile strength.

  8. On the Strain Rate Sensitivity of Abs and Abs Plus Fused Deposition Modeling Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vairis, A.; Petousis, M.; Vidakis, N.; Savvakis, K.

    2016-09-01

    In this work the effect of strain rate on the tensile strength of fused deposition modeling parts built with Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and ABS plus material is presented. ASTM D638-02a specimens were built with ABS and ABS plus and they were tested on a Schenck Trebel Co. tensile test machine at three different test speeds, equal, lower, and higher to the test speed required by the ASTM D638-02a standard. The experimental tensile strength results were compared and evaluated. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscope, to determine failure mode of the filament strands. It was found that, as the test speed increases, specimens develop higher tensile strength and have higher elastic modulus. Specimens tested in the highest speed of the experiment had on average about 10% higher elastic modulus and developed on average about 11% higher tensile strength.

  9. Hydrodynamic synchronization of colloidal oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Kotar, Jurij; Leoni, Marco; Bassetti, Bruno; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino; Cicuta, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Two colloidal spheres are maintained in oscillation by switching the position of an optical trap when a sphere reaches a limit position, leading to oscillations that are bounded in amplitude but free in phase and period. The interaction between the oscillators is only through the hydrodynamic flow induced by their motion. We prove that in the absence of stochastic noise the antiphase dynamical state is stable, and we show how the period depends on coupling strength. Both features are observed experimentally. As the natural frequencies of the oscillators are made progressively different, the coordination is quickly lost. These results help one to understand the origin of hydrodynamic synchronization and how the dynamics can be tuned. Cilia and flagella are biological systems coupled hydrodynamically, exhibiting dramatic collective motions. We propose that weakly correlated phase fluctuations, with one of the oscillators typically precessing the other, are characteristic of hydrodynamically coupled systems in the presence of thermal noise. PMID:20385848

  10. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.; Lee, D. L.; Leja, I.

    1979-01-01

    Four areas of surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were investigated and a number of 401.2 MHz oscillators were constructed that showed improved performance. Aging studies on SAW devices packaged in HC36/U cold weld enclosures produced frequency drifts as low as 0.4 ppm in 35 weeks and drift rates well under 0.5 ppm/year. Temperature compensation circuits have substantially improved oscillator temperature stability, with a deviation of + or - 4 ppm observed over the range -45 C to + 40 C. High efficiency amplifiers were constructed for SAW oscillators and a dc to RF efficiency of 44 percent was obtained for an RF output of 25 mW. Shock and vibration tests were made on four oscillators and all survived 500 G shock pulses unchanged. Only when white noise vibration (20 Hz to 2000 Hz) levels of 20 G's rms were applied did some of the devices fail.

  11. Nonlinear oscillations in marine hydroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venslauskas, Mindaugas S.; Asmantas, Sarunas

    2003-06-01

    Irregular oscillations in a colony of marine hydroids Podocoryne carnea were investigated. Quantitative characteristics were obtained as a result of long term (10-12 h) monitoring of oscillations at arbitrary sites. The sliding window spectra as well as the pulse-to-pulse dynamics argue the transient chaotic behavior of hydroid colony. The significant change of amplitudes and frequencies in intact colony oscillations after feeding and long sustained oscillations of stolons separated from colony suggest that the irregular activity could be determined by the network of pacemakers residing in stolon wall cells. These are influenced mechanically by the amount of digesting food and/or by chemical action of nutrients inside the stolon lumen. The possible correlation of these oscillations which can evoke Ca2+ waves in stolon wall cells is discussed.

  12. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    A number of 401.2 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were built and tested. The performance of these oscillators was evaluated for possible use as stable oscillators in communication systems. A short term frequency stability of better than 1 x 10 to the minus 9th power for one second was measured for the SAW oscillators. Long term frequency drift was measured and was found to be dependent on SAW design and packaging. Drift rates ranging from 15 ppm in twenty weeks to 2.5 ppm in twenty weeks were observed. Some further improvement was required. The temperature dependence of the saw oscillators was evaluated and it was concluded that some form of temperature compensation will be necessary to meet the requirements of some communication systems.

  13. The Aharanov-Bohm effect, magnetic monopoles and reversal in spin-ice lattices.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Shawn D; Zhu, Yimei

    2013-06-01

    The proof of the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect has been one of the most important experiments of the last century and used as essential evidence for the theory of gauge fields. In this article, we look at its fundamental relation to the Dirac monopole and string. Despite the Dirac string being invisible to the AB effect, it can be used to study emergent quasiparticles in condensed matter settings that behave similar to the fundamental monopoles and strings between them. We utilize phase-imaging method based on the AB effect to study the ordering in a one-model system - that of frustrated spin ice - to understand the ordering processes that occur during a magnetic field reversal cycle. The reversal is linked to the propagation of monopole defects linked by flux channels, reminiscent of Dirac strings. Monopole interactions govern the defect densities within the lattice. Furthermore, we exploit these interactions to propose a new ordering method in which high degrees of ground-state ordering can be achieved in a frustrated system.

  14. The Aharanov-Bohm effect, magnetic monopoles and reversal in spin-ice lattices.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Shawn D; Zhu, Yimei

    2013-06-01

    The proof of the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect has been one of the most important experiments of the last century and used as essential evidence for the theory of gauge fields. In this article, we look at its fundamental relation to the Dirac monopole and string. Despite the Dirac string being invisible to the AB effect, it can be used to study emergent quasiparticles in condensed matter settings that behave similar to the fundamental monopoles and strings between them. We utilize phase-imaging method based on the AB effect to study the ordering in a one-model system - that of frustrated spin ice - to understand the ordering processes that occur during a magnetic field reversal cycle. The reversal is linked to the propagation of monopole defects linked by flux channels, reminiscent of Dirac strings. Monopole interactions govern the defect densities within the lattice. Furthermore, we exploit these interactions to propose a new ordering method in which high degrees of ground-state ordering can be achieved in a frustrated system. PMID:23549453

  15. Masses and activity of AB Doradus B a/b. The age of the AB Dor quadruple system revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, U.; Czesla, S.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Robrade, J.; Engels, D.; Wieringa, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2014-10-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the close binary AB Dor Ba/b (Rst137B). Our study comprises astrometric orbit measurements, optical spectroscopy, X-ray and radio observations. Using all available adaptive optics images of AB Dor B taken with VLT/NACO from 2004 to 2009, we tightly constrain its orbital period to 360.6 ± 1.5 days. We present the first orbital solution of Rst 137B and estimate the combined mass of AB Dor Ba+b as 0.69+0.02-0.24 M⊙, slightly exceeding previous estimates based on IR photometry. Our determined orbital inclination of Rst 137B is close to the axial inclination of AB Dor A inferred from Doppler imaging. Our VLT/UVES spectra yield high rotational velocities of ≥30 km s-1 for both components Ba and Bb, in accord with previous measurements, which corresponds to rotation periods significantly shorter than one day. Our combined spectral model, using PHOENIX spectra, yields an effective temperature of 3310 ± 50 K for the primary and approximately 60 K less for the secondary. The optical spectra presumably cover a chromospheric flare and show that at least one component of Rst 137B is significantly active. Activity and weak variations are also found in our simultaneous XMM-Newton observations, while our ATCA radio data yield constant fluxes at the level of previous measurements. Using evolutionary models, our newly determined stellar parameters confirm that the age of Rst 137B is between 50 and 100 Myr. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, 383.D-1002(A) and the ESO Science Archive Facility. Using data obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member states and NASA. Using data obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) operated by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO).

  16. Genetic Evidence for a Role for Protein Kinase A in the Maintenance of Sleep and Thalamocortical Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Hellman, Kevin; Hernandez, Pepe; Park, Alice; Abel, Ted

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Genetic manipulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) in Drosophila has implicated an important role for PKA in sleep/wake state regulation. Here, we characterize the role of this signaling pathway in the regulation of sleep using electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic (EMG) recordings in R(AB) transgenic mice that express a dominant negative form of the regulatory subunit of PKA in neurons within cortex and hippocampus. Previous studies have revealed that these mutant mice have reduced PKA activity that results in the impairment of hippocampus-dependent long-term memory and long-lasting forms of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Design: PKA assays, in situ hybridization, immunoblots, and sleep studies were performed in R(AB) transgenic mice and wild-type control mice. Measurements and Results: We have found that R(AB) transgenic mice have reduced PKA activity within cortex and reduced Ser845 phosphorylation of the glutamate receptor subunit GluR1. R(AB) transgenic mice exhibit non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep fragmentation and increased amounts of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep relative to wild-type mice. Further, R(AB) transgenic mice have more delta power but less sigma power during NREM sleep relative to wild-type mice. After sleep deprivation, the amounts of NREM and REM sleep were comparable between wild-type and R(AB) transgenic mice. However, the homeostatic rebound of sigma power in R(AB) transgenic mice was reduced. Conclusions: Alterations in cortical synaptic receptors, impairments in sleep continuity, and alterations in sleep oscillations in R(AB) mice imply that PKA is involved not only in synaptic plasticity and memory storage but also in the regulation of sleep/wake states. Citation: Hellman K; Hernandez P; Park A; Abel T. Genetic evidence for a role for protein kinase a in the maintenance of sleep and thalamocortical oscillations. SLEEP 2010;33(1):19-28. PMID:20120617

  17. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations.

    PubMed

    Duggen, Lars; Lew Yan Voon, L C; Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten

    2016-04-20

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact calculation is given to confirm this phenomenon. Our results allow for a greater freedom of design for experimentally observing Bloch oscillations. For strongly coupled oscillator systems displaying Bloch oscillations, it is further demonstrated that reordering of oscillators leads to destruction of Bloch oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics.

  18. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts.

    PubMed

    Popov, M; Popov, V L; Pohrt, R

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect "relaxation damping". The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  19. Linking oscillations in cerebellar circuits

    PubMed Central

    Courtemanche, Richard; Robinson, Jennifer C.; Aponte, Daniel I.

    2013-01-01

    In many neuroscience fields, the study of local and global rhythmicity has been receiving increasing attention. These network influences could directly impact on how neuronal groups interact together, organizing for different contexts. The cerebellar cortex harbors a variety of such local circuit rhythms, from the rhythms in the cerebellar cortex per se, or those dictated from important afferents. We present here certain cerebellar oscillatory phenomena that have been recorded in rodents and primates. Those take place in a range of frequencies: from the more known oscillations in the 4–25 Hz band, such as the olivocerebellar oscillatory activity and the granule cell layer oscillations, to the more recently reported slow (<1 Hz oscillations), and the fast (>150 Hz) activity in the Purkinje cell layer. Many of these oscillations appear spontaneously in the circuits, and are modulated by behavioral imperatives. We review here how those oscillations are recorded, some of their modulatory mechanisms, and also identify some of the cerebellar nodes where they could interact. A particular emphasis has been placed on how these oscillations could be modulated by movement and certain neuropathological manifestations. Many of those oscillations could have a definite impact on the way information is processed in the cerebellum and how it interacts with other structures in a variety of contexts. PMID:23908606

  20. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    PubMed Central

    Popov, M.; Popov, V.L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  1. Ab initio infrared and Raman spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredkin, D. R.; White, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.; Komornicki, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that with increased computer power and improved computational techniques, such as the gradients developed in recent years, it is becoming practical to compute spectra ab initio, from the fundamental constants of nature, for systems of increasing complexity. The present investigation has the objective to explore several possible ab initio approaches to spectra, giving particular attention to infrared and nonresonance Raman. Two approaches are discussed. The sequential approach, in which first the electronic part and then later the nuclear part of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is solved, is appropriate for small systems. The simultaneous approach, in which the electronic and nuclear parts are solved at the same time, is more appropriate for many-atom systems. A review of the newer quantum gradient techniques is provided, and the infrared and Raman spectral band contours for the water molecule are computed.

  2. VOLTAGE-CONTROLLED TRANSISTOR OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Scheele, P.F.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to transistor oscillators and in particular to those transistor oscillators whose frequencies vary according to controlling voltages. A principal feature of the disclosed transistor oscillator circuit resides in the temperature compensation of the frequency modulating stage by the use of a resistorthermistor network. The resistor-thermistor network components are selected to have the network resistance, which is in series with the modulator transistor emitter circuit, vary with temperature to compensate for variation in the parameters of the transistor due to temperature change.

  3. Theory of Mitotic Spindle Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Kruse, Karsten; Jülicher, Frank

    2005-03-01

    During unequal cell division the mitotic spindle is positioned away from the center of the cell before cell cleavage. In many biological systems this repositioning is accompanied by oscillatory movements of the spindle. We present a theoretical description for mitotic spindle oscillations. We show that the cooperative attachment and detachment of cortical force generators to astral microtubules leads to spontaneous oscillations beyond a critical number of force generators. This mechanism can quantitatively describe the spindle oscillations observed during unequal division of the one cell stage Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

  4. Ab interno trabeculectomy: patient selection and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vinod, Kateki; Gedde, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Ab interno trabeculectomy is one among several recently introduced minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries that avoid a conjunctival incision and full-thickness sclerostomy involved in traditional glaucoma surgery. Ablation of the trabecular meshwork and inner wall of Schlemm’s canal is performed in an arcuate fashion via a clear corneal incision, alone or in combination with phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Intraocular pressure reduction following ab interno trabeculectomy is limited by resistance in distal outflow pathways and generally stabilizes in the mid-to-high teens. Relief of medication burden has been demonstrated by some studies. A very low rate of complications, most commonly transient hyphema and intraocular pressure elevations in the immediate postoperative period, have been reported. However, available data are derived from small retrospective and prospective case series. Randomized, controlled trials are needed to better elucidate the potential merits of ab interno trabeculectomy in the combined setting versus phacoemulsification cataract surgery alone and to compare it with other minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries. PMID:27574396

  5. Sawtooth oscillation in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Monticello, D.A.

    1989-03-01

    A three-dimensional nonlinear toroidal full MHD code, MH3D, has been used to study sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks. The profile evolution during the sawtooth crash phase compares well with experiment, but only if neoclassical resistivity is used in the rise phase. (Classical resistivity has been used in most of the previous theoretical sawtooth studies.) With neoclassical resistivity, the q value at the axis drops from 1 to about 0.8 before the crash phase, and then resets to 1 through a Kadomtsev-type complete reconnection process. This ..delta..q/sub 0/ approx. = 0.2 is much larger than ..delta..q/sub o/ approx. = 0.01, which is obtained if classical resistivity is used. The current profile is strongly peaked at the axis with a flat region around the singular surface, and is similar to the Textor profile. To understand this behavior, approximate formulas for the time behavior of current and q values are derived. A functional dependence of sawtooth period scaling is also derived. A semi-empirical scaling is found which fits the experimental data from various tokamaks. Some evidence is presented which indicates that the fast crash time is due to enhanced effective resistivity inside the singular current sheet, generated by, e.g., microinstability and electron parallel viscosity with stochastic fields at the x-point. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  7. Constraining anisotropic baryon oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin

    2008-06-01

    We present an analysis of anisotropic baryon acoustic oscillations and elucidate how a mis-estimation of the cosmology, which leads to incorrect values of the angular diameter distance, dA, and Hubble parameter, H, manifest themselves in changes to the monopole and quadrupole power spectrum of biased tracers of the density field. Previous work has focused on the monopole power spectrum, and shown that the isotropic dilation combination dA2H-1 is robustly constrained by an overall shift in the scale of the baryon feature. We extend this by demonstrating that the quadrupole power spectrum is sensitive to an anisotropic warping mode dAH, allowing one to break the degeneracy between dA and H. We describe a method for measuring this warping, explicitly marginalizing over the form of redshift-space distortions. We verify this method on N-body simulations and estimate that dAH can be measured with a fractional accuracy of ˜(3/V)% where the survey volume is estimated in h-3Gpc3.

  8. Laser oscillating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Hoag, E.D.

    1988-03-08

    This patent describes a laser oscillating apparatus of type having a hollow cylindrical housing, gas flow generating means for generating a circulatory gas flow within the housing, paired discharge electrode assemblies opposedly disposed in spaced relationship to define a lasing region therebetween traversed by the circulatory gas flow for carrying out a predetermined discharge within the gas flow traversing the lasing region thereby generating a ray of radiation, and optical resonator means disposed within the housing for resonating the ray of radiation generated in the discharge. Each of the paired discharge electrode assemblies comprises: a. an insulated substrate having a molded base portion and an insulated ceramic surface portion disposed adjacent the molded base portion; b. pin-shaped electrodes; c. a ballast capacitor disposed within the molded base portion of the insulated substrate; d. cooling tube means disposed within the molded base portion of the insulated substrate so as to pass between each pair of adjacent rows of the capacitor units forming the ballast capacitor; and e. at least one heat absorbing plate disposed between each pair of adjacent rows of capacitor units forming the ballast capacitor in contact with the cooling tube means passing therebetween.

  9. Analyzing Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.; Latimer, D. C.

    2007-10-26

    We provide a pedagogic derivation of the formula needed to analyze atmospheric data and then derive, for the subset of the data that are fully-contained events, an analysis tool that is quantitative and numerically efficient. Results for the full set of neutrino oscillation data are then presented. We find the following preliminary results: 1.) the sub-dominant approximation provides reasonable values for the best fit parameters for {delta}{sub 32}, {theta}{sub 23}, and {theta}{sub 13} but does not quantitatively provide the errors for these three parameters; 2.) the size of the MSW effect is suppressed in the sub-dominant approximation; 3.) the MSW effect reduces somewhat the extracted error for {delta}{sub 32}, more so for {theta}{sub 23} and {theta}{sub 13}; 4.) atmospheric data alone constrains the allowed values of {theta}{sub 13} only in the sub-dominant approximation, the full three neutrino calculations requires CHOOZ to get a clean constraint; 5.) the linear in {theta}{sub 13} terms are not negligible; and 6.) the minimum value of {theta}{sub 13} is found to be negative, but at a statistically insignificant level.

  10. Glucose Oscillations Can Activate an Endogenous Oscillator in Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Mukhitov, Nikita; Roper, Michael G.; Bertram, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islets manage elevations in blood glucose level by secreting insulin into the bloodstream in a pulsatile manner. Pulsatile insulin secretion is governed by islet oscillations such as bursting electrical activity and periodic Ca2+ entry in β-cells. In this report, we demonstrate that although islet oscillations are lost by fixing a glucose stimulus at a high concentration, they may be recovered by subsequently converting the glucose stimulus to a sinusoidal wave. We predict with mathematical modeling that the sinusoidal glucose signal’s ability to recover islet oscillations depends on its amplitude and period, and we confirm our predictions by conducting experiments with islets using a microfluidics platform. Our results suggest a mechanism whereby oscillatory blood glucose levels recruit non-oscillating islets to enhance pulsatile insulin output from the pancreas. Our results also provide support for the main hypothesis of the Dual Oscillator Model, that a glycolytic oscillator endogenous to islet β-cells drives pulsatile insulin secretion. PMID:27788129

  11. Zeeman effect on surface electron transport in topological insulator Bi2Se3 nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Xian; Yan, Yuan; Zhang, Liang; Liao, Zhi-Min; Wu, Han-Chun; Yu, Da-Peng

    2015-10-01

    Topological insulators have exotic surface states that are massless Dirac fermions, manifesting special magnetotransport properties, such as the Aharonov-Bohm effect, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, and weak antilocalization effects. In the surface Dirac cone, the band structures are typically closely related to the p-orbitals and possess helical orbital texture. Here we report on the tunability of the transport properties via the interaction between the magnetic field and the spin-orbital angular momentum of the surface states in individual Bi2Se3 nanoribbons. Because the surface states have a large Landé factor and helical spin-orbital texture, the in-plane magnetic field induced Zeeman energy will result in the deformation of the Dirac cone, which gives rise to spin polarization of the surface states. The spin-dependent scattering of the conducting electrons on the existing local magnetic moments produces a giant negative magnetoresistance. The negative magnetoresistance is robust with a ratio of -20% at 2 K and -0.5% at 300 K under 14 T. The results are valuable for possible orbital-electronics based on topological insulators.Topological insulators have exotic surface states that are massless Dirac fermions, manifesting special magnetotransport properties, such as the Aharonov-Bohm effect, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, and weak antilocalization effects. In the surface Dirac cone, the band structures are typically closely related to the p-orbitals and possess helical orbital texture. Here we report on the tunability of the transport properties via the interaction between the magnetic field and the spin-orbital angular momentum of the surface states in individual Bi2Se3 nanoribbons. Because the surface states have a large Landé factor and helical spin-orbital texture, the in-plane magnetic field induced Zeeman energy will result in the deformation of the Dirac cone, which gives rise to spin polarization of the surface states. The spin-dependent scattering of

  12. Magnetic field-induced helical mode and topological transitions in a topological insulator nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Luis A.; Pettes, Michael T.; Rokhinson, Leonid P.; Shi, Li; Chen, Yong P.

    2016-04-01

    The spin-helical Dirac fermion topological surface states in a topological insulator nanowire or nanoribbon promise novel topological devices and exotic physics such as Majorana fermions. Here, we report local and non-local transport measurements in Bi2Te3 topological insulator nanoribbons that exhibit quasi-ballistic transport over ˜2 μm. The conductance versus axial magnetic flux Φ exhibits Aharonov-Bohm oscillations with maxima occurring alternately at half-integer or integer flux quanta (Φ0 = h/e, where h is Planck's constant and e is the electron charge) depending periodically on the gate-tuned Fermi wavevector (kF) with period 2π/C (where C is the nanoribbon circumference). The conductance versus gate voltage also exhibits kF-periodic oscillations, anti-correlated between Φ = 0 and Φ0/2. These oscillations enable us to probe the Bi2Te3 band structure, and are consistent with the circumferentially quantized topological surface states forming a series of one-dimensional subbands, which undergo periodic magnetic field-induced topological transitions with the disappearance/appearance of the gapless Dirac point with a one-dimensional spin helical mode.

  13. Magnetic field-induced helical mode and topological transitions in a topological insulator nanoribbon.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Luis A; Pettes, Michael T; Rokhinson, Leonid P; Shi, Li; Chen, Yong P

    2016-04-01

    The spin-helical Dirac fermion topological surface states in a topological insulator nanowire or nanoribbon promise novel topological devices and exotic physics such as Majorana fermions. Here, we report local and non-local transport measurements in Bi2Te3 topological insulator nanoribbons that exhibit quasi-ballistic transport over ∼2 μm. The conductance versus axial magnetic flux Φ exhibits Aharonov-Bohm oscillations with maxima occurring alternately at half-integer or integer flux quanta (Φ0 = h/e, where h is Planck's constant and e is the electron charge) depending periodically on the gate-tuned Fermi wavevector (kF) with period 2π/C (where C is the nanoribbon circumference). The conductance versus gate voltage also exhibits kF-periodic oscillations, anti-correlated between Φ = 0 and Φ0/2. These oscillations enable us to probe the Bi2Te3 band structure, and are consistent with the circumferentially quantized topological surface states forming a series of one-dimensional subbands, which undergo periodic magnetic field-induced topological transitions with the disappearance/appearance of the gapless Dirac point with a one-dimensional spin helical mode.

  14. Matter Effects On Neutrino Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael

    An introduction to neutrino oscillations in vacuum is presented, followed by a survey of various techniques for obtaining either exact or approximate expressions for numu → nue oscillations in matter. The method developed by Arafune, Koike, and Sato uses a perturbative analysis to find an approximation for the evolution operator. The method used by Freund yields an approximate oscillation probability by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian, finding the eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and then using those to find modified mixing angles with the matter effect taken into account. The method devised by Mann, Kafka, Schneps, and Altinok produces an exact expression for the oscillation by determining explicitly the evolution operator. These methods are compared to each other using the T2K, MINOS, NOnuA, and LBNE parameters.

  15. Brain oscillations in neuropsychiatric disease.

    PubMed

    Başar, Erol

    2013-09-01

    The term "brain (or neural) oscillations" refers to the rhythmic and/or repetitive electrical activity generated spontaneously and in response to stimuli by neural tissue in the central nervous system. The importance of brain oscillations in sensory-cognitive processes has become increasingly evident. It has also become clear that event-related oscillations are modified in many types of neuropathology, in particular in cognitive impairment. This review discusses methods such as evoked/event-related oscillations and spectra, coherence analysis, and phase locking. It gives examples of applications of essential methods and concepts in bipolar disorder that provide a basis for fundamental notions regarding neurophysiologic biomarkers in cognitive impairment. The take-home message is that in the development of diagnostic and pharmacotherapeutic strategies, neurophysiologic data should be analyzed in a framework that uses a multiplicity of methods and frequency bands.

  16. Transient voltage oscillations in coils

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    Magnet coils may be excited into internal voltage oscillations by transient voltages. Such oscillations may electrically stress the magnet's dielectric components to many times its normal stress. This may precipitate a dielectric failure, and the attendant prolonged loss of service and costly repair work. Therefore, it is important to know the natural frequencies of oscillations of a magnet during the design stage, and to determine whether the expected switching transient voltages can excite the magnet into high-voltage internal oscillations. The series capacitance of a winding significantly affects its natural frequencies. However, the series capacitance is difficult to calculate, because it may comprise complex capacitance network, consisting of intra- and inter-coil turn-to-turn capacitances of the coil sections. A method of calculating the series capacitance of a winding is proposed. This method is rigorous but simple to execute. The time-varying transient voltages along the winding are also calculated.

  17. Gamma Oscillations and Visual Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Peter A.; Kim, Jong Won

    2006-03-01

    At the root of visual perception is the mechanism the brain uses to analyze features in a scene and bind related ones together. Experiments show this process is linked to oscillations of brain activity in the 30-100 Hz gamma band. Oscillations at different sites have correlation functions (CFs) that often peak at zero lag, implying simultaneous firing, even when conduction delays are large. CFs are strongest between cells stimulated by related features. Gamma oscillations are studied here by modeling mm-scale patchy interconnections in the visual cortex. Resulting predictions for gamma responses to stimuli account for numerous experimental findings, including why oscillations and zero-lag synchrony are associated, observed connections with feature preferences, the shape of the zero-lag peak, and variations of CFs with attention. Gamma waves are found to obey the Schroedinger equation, opening the possibility of cortical analogs of quantum phenomena. Gamma instabilities are tied to observations of gamma activity linked to seizures and hallucinations.

  18. Matrix Theory of Small Oscillations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavda, L. K.

    1978-01-01

    A complete matrix formulation of the theory of small oscillations is presented. Simple analytic solutions involving matrix functions are found which clearly exhibit the transients, the damping factors, the Breit-Wigner form for resonances, etc. (BB)

  19. GeSi Raman spectra vs. local clustering/anticlustering: Percolation scheme and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagès, O.; Hussein, R. Hajj; Torres, V. J. B.

    2013-07-01

    We formalize within the percolation scheme that operates along the linear chain approximation, i.e., at one dimension (1D), an intrinsic ability behind Raman scattering to achieve a quantitative insight into local clustering/anticlustering in an alloy, using GeSi as a case study. For doing so, we derive general expressions of the individual fractions of the six GeSi percolation-type oscillators [1×(Ge-Ge), 3×(Ge-Si), 2×(Si-Si)], which monitor directly the Raman intensities, via a relevant order parameter κ. This is introduced by adapting to the 1D oscillators of the GeSi-diamond version of the 1D-percolation scheme, i.e., along a fully consistent 1D treatment, the approach originally used by Verleur and Barker for the three-dimensional (3D) oscillators of their 1D-cluster scheme applying to zincblende alloys [H. W. Verleur and A. S. Barker, Phys. Rev. 149, 715 (1966)], a somehow problematic one in fact, due to its 3D-1D ambivalence. Predictive κ-dependent intensity-interplays between the Ge0.5Si0.5 Raman lines are confronted with existing experimental data and with ab initio Raman spectra obtained by using (32-atom) disordered supercells matching the required κ values, with special attention to the Ge-Si triplet and to the Si-Si doublet, respectively.

  20. Engineering synchronization of chaotic oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanaban, E.; Dana, Syamal K.

    2011-04-19

    We propose a controller based coupling design for engineering synchronization in chaotic oscillators for unidirectional as well as bi-directional mode. In the synchronization regimes, it is possible to amplify/ attenuate a chaotic attractor with respect to other chaotic attractors. Numerical examples are presented for a Lorenz system, a Roessler oscillator, and a Sprott system. Physical implementation of the scheme is done in electronic circuit to design the controller for verification of the theory.

  1. Results from Neutrino Oscillations Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis

    2010-09-10

    The interpretation of the results of early solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments in terms of neutrino oscillations has been verified by several recent experiments using both, natural and man-made sources. The observations provide compelling evidence in favor of the existence of neutrino masses and mixings. These proceedings give a general description of the results from neutrino oscillation experiments, the current status of the field, and some possible future developments.

  2. Mobius Strip underlying Nonlinear Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopaz, Edaurdo; Satija, Indubala

    2004-03-01

    Geometrical and topolgocial aspects of phase space orbits of driven nonlinear oscillators are shown to share many features with the circuits on the mobius strips. Most important characteristic shared by nonlinear oscillators and the mobius strip is the first order geometrical phase transition characterized in terms of local variable torsion and the global variable the geometrical phase . These geometrical transitions are geometrical resonances and lead to geometrical localization that underlie not only limit cycles but also the strange attractors.

  3. DETECTING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Labatie, A.; Starck, J. L.

    2012-02-20

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) are a feature imprinted in the galaxy distribution by acoustic waves traveling in the plasma of the early universe. Their detection at the expected scale in large-scale structures strongly supports current cosmological models with a nearly linear evolution from redshift z Almost-Equal-To 1000 and the existence of dark energy. In addition, BAOs provide a standard ruler for studying cosmic expansion. In this paper, we focus on methods for BAO detection using the correlation function measurement {xi}-hat. For each method, we want to understand the tested hypothesis (the hypothesis H{sub 0} to be rejected) and the underlying assumptions. We first present wavelet methods which are mildly model-dependent and mostly sensitive to the BAO feature. Then we turn to fully model-dependent methods. We present the method used most often based on the {chi}{sup 2} statistic, but we find that it has limitations. In general the assumptions of the {chi}{sup 2} method are not verified, and it only gives a rough estimate of the significance. The estimate can become very wrong when considering more realistic hypotheses, where the covariance matrix of {xi}-hat depends on cosmological parameters. Instead, we propose to use the {Delta}l method based on two modifications: we modify the procedure for computing the significance and make it rigorous, and we modify the statistic to obtain better results in the case of varying covariance matrix. We verify with simulations that correct significances are different from the ones obtained using the classical {chi}{sup 2} procedure. We also test a simple example of varying covariance matrix. In this case we find that our modified statistic outperforms the classical {chi}{sup 2} statistic when both significances are correctly computed. Finally, we find that taking into account variations of the covariance matrix can change both BAO detection levels and cosmological parameter constraints.

  4. Magnetically Coupled Magnet-Spring Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoso, G.; Ladera, C. L.; Martin, P.

    2010-01-01

    A system of two magnets hung from two vertical springs and oscillating in the hollows of a pair of coils connected in series is a new, interesting and useful example of coupled oscillators. The electromagnetically coupled oscillations of these oscillators are experimentally and theoretically studied. Its coupling is electromagnetic instead of…

  5. Valley-symmetry-preserved transport in ballistic graphene layers with gate-defined carrier guiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minsoo; Choi, Ji-Hae; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Hu-Jong

    Zigzag graphene nanoribbons are predicted to exhibit interesting electronic properties stemming from its Dirac band structure. However, to date, investigation of them is highly limited because of the defects and the roughness at the edges, which mix different valley properties of graphene. Here, we report the signature of conservation of valley symmetry in two types of quasi-1D ballistic graphene transport devices; one is a quantum point contact (QPC) and another is an Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometer. In measurements, charge carriers were confined in a potential well formed by the dual gates operation and the four-terminal magnetoconductance (MC) was measured with varying the carrier density, dc bias, and temperature. It exhibits the conductance quantization in steps of ΔG = 4e2/ h starting from G = (2, 6), 10 ×e2 / h in a constricted conducting channel of QPC-type devices. This behavior is similar to the one observed in zigzag graphene nanoribbons having edge localized channels. Our tight-binding calculation shows that quasi-1D charge flow on a graphene plane acts a zigzag-type nanoribbon, unless it is perfectly aligned along the armchair direction. In the AB interferometry, we observed h/ e periodic modulation of MC and the zero-field conductance minimum with a negative MC background.

  6. Nonlinear oscillations of coalescing magnetic flux ropes.

    PubMed

    Kolotkov, Dmitrii Y; Nakariakov, Valery M; Rowlands, George

    2016-05-01

    An analytical model of highly nonlinear oscillations occurring during a coalescence of two magnetic flux ropes, based upon two-fluid hydrodynamics, is developed. The model accounts for the effect of electric charge separation, and describes perpendicular oscillations of the current sheet formed by the coalescence. The oscillation period is determined by the current sheet thickness, the plasma parameter β, and the oscillation amplitude. The oscillation periods are typically greater or about the ion plasma oscillation period. In the nonlinear regime, the oscillations of the ion and electron concentrations have a shape of a narrow symmetric spikes. PMID:27300993

  7. Undoing Gender Through Legislation and Schooling: the Case of AB 537 and AB 394 IN California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knotts, Greg

    2009-11-01

    This article investigates California laws AB 537: The Student Safety and Violence Prevention Act of 2000, and the recently enacted AB 394: Safe Place to Learn Act. Both demand that gender identity and sexual orientation be added to the lexicon of anti-harassment protection in public education. However, despite these progressive measures, schools have an unconscious acceptance of heteronormativity and gendered norms, which undermines both the spirit and language of these laws. This paper examines how California schools can both change standard practices and realise the transformative social change that laws like AB 537 and AB 394 can instigate. I assert that the systemic implementation of these laws, through the adoption, enforcement and evaluation of existing AB 537 Task Force Recommendations, is necessary for their success. My second assertion is that AB 537 and AB 394 have the potential to change and reconstitute gender-based and heteronormative standards at school sites.

  8. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  9. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  10. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  11. Ab initio melting curve of osmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burakovsky, L.; Burakovsky, N.; Preston, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    The melting curve of osmium up to a pressure P of 500 GPa is obtained from an extensive suite of ab initio quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations using the Z method. The ab initio P =0 melting point of Os is 3370 ±75 K; this range encompasses all of the available data in the literature and corroborates the conclusion of J. W. Arblaster [Platinum Metals Rev. 49, 166 (2005)], 10.1595/147106705X70264 that the melting temperature of pure Os is 3400 ±50 K and that the 3300 K typically quoted in the literature is the melting point of impure Os. The T =0 equation of state (EOS) of Os and the P dependence of the optimized c /a ratio for the hexagonal unit cell, both to pressures ˜900 GPa, are obtained in the ab initio approach as validation of its use. Although excellent agreement with the available experimental data (P ≲80 GPa) is found, it is the third-order Birch-Murnaghan EOS with B0'=5 rather than the more widely accepted B0'=4 that describes the QMD data to higher pressures, in agreement with the more recent experimental EOS by Godwal et al. The theoretical melting curve of Os obtained earlier by Joshi et al. is shown to be inconsistent with our QMD results, and the possible reason for this discrepancy is suggested. Regularities in the melting curves of Os and five other third-row transition metals (Ta, W, Re, Pt, Au) could be used to estimate the currently unknown melting curves of Hf and Ir.

  12. Efficacy of the SU(3) scheme for ab initio large-scale calculations beyond the lightest nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dytrych, T.; Maris, P.; Launey, K. D.; Draayer, J. P.; Vary, J. P.; Langr, D.; Saule, E.; Caprio, M. A.; Catalyurek, U.; Sosonkina, M.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the computational characteristics of ab initio nuclear structure calculations in a symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM) framework. We examine the computational complexity of the current implementation of the SA-NCSM approach, dubbed LSU3shell, by analyzing ab initio results for 6Li and 12C in large harmonic oscillator model spaces and SU3-selected subspaces. We demonstrate LSU3shell's strong-scaling properties achieved with highly-parallel methods for computing the many-body matrix elements. Results compare favorably with complete model space calculations and significant memory savings are achieved in physically important applications. In particular, a well-chosen symmetry-adapted basis affords memory savings in calculations of states with a fixed total angular momentum in large model spaces while exactly preserving translational invariance.

  13. Ab-initio phasing in protein crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Plas, J. L.; Millane, Rick P.

    2000-11-01

    The central problem in the determination of protein structures form x-ray diffraction dada (x-ray crystallography) corresponds to a phase retrieval problem with undersampled amplitude data. Algorithms for this problem that have an increased radius of convergence have the potential for reducing the amount of experimental work, and cost, involved in determining protein structures. We describe such an algorithm. Application of the algorithm to a simulated crystallographic problem shows that it converges to the correct solution, with no initial phase information, where currently used algorithms fail. The results lend support to the possibility of ab initio phasing in protein crystallography.

  14. Testing Distributed ABS System with Fault Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trawczyński, Dawid; Sosnowski, Janusz; Gawkowski, Piotr

    The paper deals with the problem of adapting software implemented fault injection technique (SWIFI) to evaluate dependability of reactive microcontroller systems. We present an original methodology of disturbing controller operation and analyzing fault effects taking into account reactions of the controlled object and the impact of the system environment. Faults can be injected randomly (in space and time) or targeted at the most sensitive elements of the controller to check it at high stresses. This approach allows identifying rarely encountered problems, usually missed in classical approaches. The developed methodology has been used successfully to verify dependability of ABS system. Experimental results are commented in the paper.

  15. New challenges to medicare beneficiary access to mAbs

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Precision binding of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to biological targets, their relative clinical success, and expansion of indications following initial approval, are distinctive clinical features. The relatively high cost of mAbs, together with the absence of a regulatory pathway to generics, stand out as distinctive economic features. Based on both literature review and primary data collection we enumerated mAb original approvals, supplemental indications and off-label uses, assessed payer formulary management of mAbs, and determined new challenges to Medicare beneficiary access to mAbs. We found that the FDA has approved 22 mAbs and 30 supplemental indications pertaining to the originally approved mAbs. In addition, there are 46 off-label use citations in officially recognized pharmaceutical compendia. Across Part B carriers and Part D plans, we found considerable variation in terms of coverage and conditions of reimbursement related to on- and off-label uses of mAbs. Our results point to four major challenges facing mAb developers, health care providers, Medicare beneficiaries, payers and policymakers. These include administrative price controls, coverage variation, projected shift from physician- to self-administered mAbs, and comparative effectiveness. We suggest more systematic use of “coverage with evidence development” as a means of optimally addressing these challenges. PMID:20046575

  16. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2015-11-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a “worship”. Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In contrast, situations where the central flames are suppressed are also found. The phenomena leads to in-phase synchronised states emerging between periods of anti-phase synchronisation for arrays with different columnar sizes of candle and positioning.

  17. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2015-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a "worship". Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In contrast, situations where the central flames are suppressed are also found. The phenomena leads to in-phase synchronised states emerging between periods of anti-phase synchronisation for arrays with different columnar sizes of candle and positioning. PMID:26582365

  18. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2015-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a “worship”. Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In contrast, situations where the central flames are suppressed are also found. The phenomena leads to in-phase synchronised states emerging between periods of anti-phase synchronisation for arrays with different columnar sizes of candle and positioning. PMID:26582365

  19. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2015-11-19

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a "worship". Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In contrast, situations where the central flames are suppressed are also found. The phenomena leads to in-phase synchronised states emerging between periods of anti-phase synchronisation for arrays with different columnar sizes of candle and positioning.

  20. TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS IN CHROMOSPHERIC MOTTLES

    SciTech Connect

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Jess, D. B.; Keenan, F. P.; Morton, R. J.; Erdelyi, R.; Dorrian, G. D.

    2012-05-01

    A number of recent investigations have revealed that transverse waves are ubiquitous in the solar chromosphere. The vast majority of these have been reported in limb spicules and active region fibrils. We investigate long-lived, quiet-Sun, on-disk features such as chromospheric mottles (jet-like features located at the boundaries of supergranular cells) and their transverse motions. The observations were obtained with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope. The data set is comprised of simultaneous imaging in the H{alpha} core, Ca II K, and G band of an on-disk quiet-Sun region. Time-distance techniques are used to study the characteristics of the transverse oscillations. We detect over 40 transverse oscillations in both bright and dark mottles, with periods ranging from 70 to 280 s, with the most frequent occurrence at {approx}165 s. The velocity amplitudes and transverse displacements exhibit characteristics similar to limb spicules. Neighboring mottles oscillating in-phase are also observed. The transverse oscillations of individual mottles are interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves. Their estimated periods and damping times are consistent with phase mixing and resonant mode conversion.

  1. Ab initio Study of HZnF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, S.; Léonard, C.; Chambaud, G.

    2009-11-01

    On the basis of highly correlated ab initio calculations, an accurate determination of the electronic structure and of the rovibrational spectroscopy has been performed for the electronic ground state of the HZnF system. Using effective core pseudopotentials for the Zn and F atoms and associated aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets, we have calculated, at the multireference configuration interaction level including the Davidson correction, the three-dimensional potential energy surface of the X1Σ+ ground state. The rovibrational energy levels have been obtained variationally, and the results have been discussed and compared with existing experimental data on the ground state of the close system HZnCl, which exhibits a complicated vibration-rotation spectrum. Our analysis shows that the nature of the H-ZnF bond is quite similar to that of the H-ZnCl bond, according to their bond lengths, harmonic frequencies of the H-Zn stretching mode, and dissociation energies into H and ZnF/ZnCl. The ab initio study of the electronic ground and excited states of ZnH and ZnH+ are also presented using similar level of calculations. Characteristic constants are given for the first bounded electronic states correlating to the first two dissociation asymptotes of the neutral and ionic diatomics.

  2. Longitudinal wheel slip during ABS braking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartikainen, Lassi; Petry, Frank; Westermann, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    Anti-lock braking system (ABS) braking tests with two subcompact passenger cars were performed on dry and wet asphalt, as well as on snow and ice surfaces. The operating conditions of the tyres in terms of wheel slip were evaluated using histograms of the wheel slip data. The results showed different average slip levels for different road surfaces. It was also found that changes in the tyre tread stiffness affected the slip operating range through a modification of the slip value at which the maximum longitudinal force is achieved. Variation of the tyre footprint length through modifications in the inflation pressure affected the slip operating range as well. Differences in the slip distribution between vehicles with different brake controllers were also observed. The changes in slip operating range in turn modified the relative local sliding speeds between the tyre and the road. The results highlight the importance of the ABS controller's ability to adapt to changing slip-force characteristics of tyres and provide estimates of the magnitude of the effects of different tyre and road operating conditions.

  3. Ab initio non-relativistic spin dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Feizhi; Goings, Joshua J.; Li, Xiaosong; Frisch, Michael J.

    2014-12-07

    Many magnetic materials do not conform to the (anti-)ferromagnetic paradigm where all electronic spins are aligned to a global magnetization axis. Unfortunately, most electronic structure methods cannot describe such materials with noncollinear electron spin on account of formally requiring spin alignment. To overcome this limitation, it is necessary to generalize electronic structure methods and allow each electron spin to rotate freely. Here, we report the development of an ab initio time-dependent non-relativistic two-component spinor (TDN2C), which is a generalization of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equations. Propagating the TDN2C equations in the time domain allows for the first-principles description of spin dynamics. A numerical tool based on the Hirshfeld partitioning scheme is developed to analyze the time-dependent spin magnetization. In this work, we also introduce the coupling between electron spin and a homogenous magnetic field into the TDN2C framework to simulate the response of the electronic spin degrees of freedom to an external magnetic field. This is illustrated for several model systems, including the spin-frustrated Li{sub 3} molecule. Exact agreement is found between numerical and analytic results for Larmor precession of hydrogen and lithium atoms. The TDN2C method paves the way for the ab initio description of molecular spin transport and spintronics in the time domain.

  4. Ab initio non-relativistic spin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feizhi; Goings, Joshua J.; Frisch, Michael J.; Li, Xiaosong

    2014-12-01

    Many magnetic materials do not conform to the (anti-)ferromagnetic paradigm where all electronic spins are aligned to a global magnetization axis. Unfortunately, most electronic structure methods cannot describe such materials with noncollinear electron spin on account of formally requiring spin alignment. To overcome this limitation, it is necessary to generalize electronic structure methods and allow each electron spin to rotate freely. Here, we report the development of an ab initio time-dependent non-relativistic two-component spinor (TDN2C), which is a generalization of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equations. Propagating the TDN2C equations in the time domain allows for the first-principles description of spin dynamics. A numerical tool based on the Hirshfeld partitioning scheme is developed to analyze the time-dependent spin magnetization. In this work, we also introduce the coupling between electron spin and a homogenous magnetic field into the TDN2C framework to simulate the response of the electronic spin degrees of freedom to an external magnetic field. This is illustrated for several model systems, including the spin-frustrated Li3 molecule. Exact agreement is found between numerical and analytic results for Larmor precession of hydrogen and lithium atoms. The TDN2C method paves the way for the ab initio description of molecular spin transport and spintronics in the time domain.

  5. Quantum phases of AB 2 fermionic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murcia-Correa, L. S.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    2016-02-01

    A fermionic chain is a one-dimensional system with fermions that interact locally and can jump between sites in the lattice, in particular an AB n chain type, where A and B are sites that exhibit a difference in energy level of Δ and site B is repeated n-times, such that the unit cell has n +1 sites. A limit case of this model, called the ionic Hubbard model (n = 1), has been widely studied due to its interesting physics and applications. In this paper, we study the ground state of an AB 2 chain, which describes the material R 4[Pt 2(P 2O5H2)4X] · nH 2 O. Specifically, we consider a filling with two electrons per unit cell, and using the density matrix renormalization group method we found that the system exhibits the band insulator and Mott correlated insulator phases, as well as an intermediate phase between them. For couplings of Δ = 2,10 and 20, we estimate the critical points that separate these phases through the structure factor and the energy gap in the sector of charge and spin, finding that the position of the critical point rises as a function of Δ.

  6. Biosorption of Acid Blue 290 (AB 290) and Acid Blue 324 (AB 324) dyes on Spirogyra rhizopus.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ayla; Akkaya, Gönül; Turabik, Meral

    2006-07-31

    In this study, the biosorption of Acid Blue 290 and Acid Blue 324 on Spirogyra rhizopus, a green algae growing on fresh water, was studied with respect to initial pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and biosorbent concentration. The optimum initial pH and temperature values for AB 290 and AB 324 biosorption were found to be 2.0, 30 degrees C and 3.0, 25 degrees C, respectively. It was observed that the adsorbed AB 290 and AB 324 amounts increased with increasing the initial dye concentration up to 1500 and 750 mg/L, respectively. The Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Koble-Corrigan isotherm models were applied to the experimental equilibrium data and the isotherm constants were determined by using Polymath 4.1 software. The monolayer coverage capacities of S. rhizopus for AB 290 and AB 324 dyes were found as 1356.6 mg/g and 367.0 mg/g, respectively. The intraparticle diffusion model and the pseudo-second order kinetic model were applied to the experimental data in order to describe the removal mechanism of these acidic dyes by S. rhizopus. The pseudo-second order kinetic model described very well the biosorption kinetics of AB 290 and AB 324 dyes. Thermodynamic studies showed that the biosorption of AB 290 and AB 324 on S. rhizopus was exothermic in nature.

  7. Position-dependent mass, finite-gap systems, and supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Rafael; Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2016-05-01

    The ordering problem in quantum systems with position-dependent mass (PDM) is treated by inclusion of the classically fictitious similarity transformation into the kinetic term. This provides a generation of supersymmetry with the first-order supercharges from the kinetic term alone, while inclusion of the potential term allows us also to generate nonlinear supersymmetry with higher-order supercharges. A broad class of finite-gap systems with PDM is obtained by different reduction procedures, and general results on supersymmetry generation are applied to them. We show that elliptic finite-gap systems of Lamé and Darboux-Treibich-Verdier types can be obtained by reduction to Seiffert's spherical spiral and Bernoulli lemniscate in the presence of Calogero-like or harmonic oscillator potentials, or by angular momentum reduction of a free motion on some AdS2 -related surfaces in the presence of Aharonov-Bohm flux. The limiting cases include the Higgs and Mathews-Lakshmanan oscillator models as well as a reflectionless model with PDM exploited recently in the discussion of cosmological inflationary scenarios.

  8. Phase coherent transport in hybrid superconductor-topological insulator devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finck, Aaron

    2015-03-01

    Heterostructures of superconductors and topological insulators are predicted to host unusual zero energy bound states known as Majorana fermions, which can robustly store and process quantum information. Here, I will discuss our studies of such heterostructures through phase-coherent transport, which can act as a unique probe of Majorana fermions. We have extensively explored topological insulator Josephson junctions through SQUID and single-junction diffraction patterns, whose unusual behavior give evidence for low-energy Andreev bound states. In topological insulator devices with closely spaced normal and superconducting leads, we observe prominent Fabry-Perot oscillations, signifying gate-tunable, quasi-ballistic transport that can elegantly interact with Andreev reflection. Superconducting disks deposited on the surface of a topological insulator generate Aharonov-Bohm-like oscillations, giving evidence for unusual states lying near the interface between the superconductor and topological insulator surface. Our results point the way towards sophisticated interferometers that can detect and read out the state of Majorana fermions in topological systems. This work was done in collaboration with Cihan Kurter, Yew San Hor, and Dale Van Harlingen. We acknowledge funding from Microsoft Project Q.

  9. Structure, Biological Functions and Applications of the AB5 Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Beddoe, Travis; Paton, Adrienne W.; Le Nours, Jérôme; Rossjohn, Jamie; Paton, James C.

    2010-01-01

    AB5 toxins are important virulence factors for several major bacterial pathogens, including Bordetella pertussis, Vibrio cholerae, Shigella dysenteriae and at least two distinct pathotypes of Escherichia coli. The AB5 toxins are so termed because they comprise a catalytic A-subunit, which is responsible for disruption of essential host functions, and a pentameric B-subunit that binds to specific glycan receptors on the target cell surface. The molecular mechanisms by which these AB5 toxins cause disease have been largely unraveled, including recent insights into a novel AB5 toxin family, subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB). Furthermore, AB5 toxins have become a valuable tool for studying fundamental cellular functions, and are now being investigated for potential applications in the clinical treatment of human diseases. PMID:20202851

  10. Phase Diffusion in Unequally Noisy Coupled Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Amro, Rami M; Lindner, Benjamin; Neiman, Alexander B

    2015-07-17

    We consider the dynamics of two directionally coupled unequally noisy oscillators, the first oscillator being noisier than the second oscillator. We derive analytically the phase diffusion coefficient of both oscillators in a heterogeneous setup (different frequencies, coupling coefficients, and intrinsic noise intensities) and show that the phase coherence of the second oscillator depends in a nonmonotonic fashion on the noise intensity of the first oscillator: as the first oscillator becomes less coherent, i.e., worse, the second one becomes more coherent, i.e., better. This surprising effect is related to the statistics of the first oscillator which provides a source of noise for the second oscillator, that is non-Gaussian, bounded, and possesses a finite bandwidth. We verify that the effect is robust by numerical simulations of two coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo models.

  11. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jódar, Esther; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Rojas, Fernando

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case.

  12. Nonstationary oscillations in gyrotrons revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Kalis, H.

    2015-05-15

    Development of gyrotrons requires careful understanding of different regimes of gyrotron oscillations. It is known that in the planes of the generalized gyrotron variables: cyclotron resonance mismatch and dimensionless current or cyclotron resonance mismatch and dimensionless interaction length complicated alternating sequences of regions of stationary, periodic, automodulation, and chaotic oscillations exist. In the past, these regions were investigated on the supposition that the transit time of electrons through the interaction space is much shorter than the cavity decay time. This assumption is valid for short and/or high diffraction quality resonators. However, in the case of long and/or low diffraction quality resonators, which are often utilized, this assumption is no longer valid. In such a case, a different mathematical formalism has to be used for studying nonstationary oscillations. One example of such a formalism is described in the present paper.

  13. Large Amplitude Oscillations in Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Large-amplitude Oscillations in prominences are spectacular manifestations of the solar activity. In such events nearby energetic disturbances induce periodic motions on filaments with displacements comparable to the size of the filaments themselves and with velocities larger than 20 km/s. Recent studies have shown that such oscillations open a new window on coronal connectivity, as well as novel diagnostics for hard-to-measure prominence properties such as magnetic field strength and geometry. In addition, this oscillation could be related with activation of filaments prior to eruptions. In this talk I will show past and current research on this subject in order to understand the nature of the solar prominences. Additionally, a large catalogue of such events will be presented.

  14. Oscillations of solar atmosphere neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Mirizzi, A.; Montanino, D.; Serpico, P. D.

    2006-11-01

    The Sun is a source of high-energy neutrinos (E(greater-or-similar sign)10 GeV) produced by cosmic ray interactions in the solar atmosphere. We study the impact of three-flavor oscillations (in vacuum and in matter) on solar atmosphere neutrinos, and calculate their observable fluxes at Earth, as well as their event rates in a kilometer-scale detector in water or ice. We find that peculiar three-flavor oscillation effects in matter, which can occur in the energy range probed by solar atmosphere neutrinos, are significantly suppressed by averaging over the production region and over the neutrino and antineutrino components. In particular, we find that the relation between the neutrino fluxes at the Sun and at the Earth can be approximately expressed in terms of phase-averaged vacuum oscillations, dominated by a single mixing parameter (the angle {theta}{sub 23})

  15. Brain oscillations in neuropsychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Başar, Erol

    2013-01-01

    The term “brain (or neural) oscillations” refers to the rhythmic and/or repetitive electrical activity generated spontaneously and in response to stimuli by neural tissue in the central nervous system. The importance of brain oscillations in sensory-cognitive processes has become increasingly evident. It has also become clear that event-related oscillations are modified in many types of neuropathology, in particular in cognitive impairment. This review discusses methods such as evoked/event-related oscillations and spectra, coherence analysis, and phase locking. It gives examples of applications of essential methods and concepts in bipolar disorder that provide a basis for fundamental notions regarding neurophysiologic biomarkers in cognitive impairment. The take-home message is that in the development of diagnostic and pharmacotherapeutic strategies, neurophysiologic data should be analyzed in a framework that uses a multiplicity of methods and frequency bands. PMID:24174901

  16. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, L.D.; Ballard, W.P.; Clark, M.C.; Marder, B.M.

    1987-05-19

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields are produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap. 11 figs.

  17. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, Larry D.; Ballard, William P.; Clark, M. Collins; Marder, Barry M.

    1988-01-01

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields arfe produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap.

  18. Sound oscillation of dropwise cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavlov, A. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.; Romanyuk, S. N.

    2012-06-01

    There was registered sound oscillation of a dropwise cluster formed over the warmed-up water surface. We have calculated the electrical charge of drops on the basis of experimental data on ion-sound oscillation. It was demonstrated that the charge is proportional to surface area of the drops and does not depend on intensity of their evaporation (condensation) in the range of 60-100 °C. The charge of drops reaches 102-103 units of elementary charge and coincides on magnitude order with the literary value of a charge calculated by another method.

  19. Cherenkov radiation oscillator without reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Wang, Y.; Wei, Y.; Yang, Z.; Hangyo, M.; Miyamoto, S.

    2014-05-12

    This Letter presents a Cherenkov radiation oscillator with an electron beam travelling over a finitely thick plate made of negative-index materials. In such a scheme, the external reflectors required in the traditional Cherenkov oscillators are not necessary, since the electromagnetic energy flows backward in the negative-index materials, leading to inherent feedback. We theoretically analyzed the interaction between the electron beam and the electromagnetic wave, and worked out the growth rate and start current through numerical calculations. With the help of particle-in-cell simulation, the theoretical predictions are well demonstrated.

  20. Oscillation death in asymmetrically delay-coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Tang, Yang; Li, Lixiang; Kurths, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    Symmetrically coupled oscillators represent a limiting case for studying the dynamics of natural systems. Therefore, we here investigate the effect of coupling asymmetry on delay-induced oscillation death (OD) in coupled nonlinear oscillators. It is found that the asymmetrical coupling substantially enlarges the domain of the OD island in the parameter space. Specifically, when the intensity of asymmetry is enhanced by turning down the value of the coupling asymmetry parameter α, the OD island gradually expands along two directions of both the coupling delay and the coupling strength. The expansion behavior of the OD region is well characterized by a power law scaling, R=α(γ) with γ≈-1.19. The minimum value of the intrinsic frequency, for which OD is possible, monotonically decreases with decreasing α and saturates around a constant value in the limit of α→0. The generality of the conducive effect of coupling asymmetry is confirmed in a numerical study of two delay-coupled chaotic Rössler oscillators. Our findings shed an improved light on the understanding of dynamics in asymmetrically delay-coupled systems.

  1. Anharmonicity of internal atomic oscillation and effective antineutrino mass evaluation from gaseous molecular tritium β-decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhov, Alexey V.; Titov, Nikita A.

    2016-07-01

    Data analysis of the next-generation effective antineutrino mass measurement experiment KATRIN requires reliable knowledge of systematic corrections. In particular, the width of the daughter molecular ion excitation spectrum rovibrational band should be known with better than 1% precision. Very precise ab initio quantum calculations exist, and we compare them with the well-known tritium molecule parameters within the framework of a phenomenological model. The rovibrational band width with accuracy of a few percent is interpreted as a result of the zero-point atomic oscillation in the harmonic potential. The Morse interatomic potential is used to investigate the impact of anharmonic atomic oscillations. The calculated corrections cannot account for the difference between the ab initio quantum calculations and the phenomenological model.

  2. Capture into resonance of coupled Duffing oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, Agnessa

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we investigate capture into resonance of a pair of coupled Duffing oscillators, one of which is excited by periodic forcing with a slowly varying frequency. Previous studies have shown that, under certain conditions, a single oscillator can be captured into persistent resonance with a permanently growing amplitude of oscillations (autoresonance). This paper demonstrates that the emergence of autoresonance in the forced oscillator may be insufficient to generate oscillations with increasing amplitude in the attachment. A parametric domain, in which both oscillators can be captured into resonance, is determined. The quasisteady states determining the growth of amplitudes are found. An agreement between the theoretical and numerical results is demonstrated.

  3. Capture into resonance of coupled Duffing oscillators.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Agnessa

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we investigate capture into resonance of a pair of coupled Duffing oscillators, one of which is excited by periodic forcing with a slowly varying frequency. Previous studies have shown that, under certain conditions, a single oscillator can be captured into persistent resonance with a permanently growing amplitude of oscillations (autoresonance). This paper demonstrates that the emergence of autoresonance in the forced oscillator may be insufficient to generate oscillations with increasing amplitude in the attachment. A parametric domain, in which both oscillators can be captured into resonance, is determined. The quasisteady states determining the growth of amplitudes are found. An agreement between the theoretical and numerical results is demonstrated. PMID:26382478

  4. Calculations of combustion response profiles and oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priem, Richard J.; Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-01-01

    The theory and procedures for determining the characteristics of pressure oscillations in rocket engines with prescribed burning rate oscillations are presented. Pressure and velocity oscillations calculated using this procedure are presented for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) to show the influence of baffles and absorbers on the burning rate oscillations required to achieve neutral stability. Results of calculations to determine local combustion responses using detailed physical models for injection, atomization, and vaporization with gas phase oscillations in baffled and unbaffled SSME combustors are presented. The contributions of the various physical phenomena occurring in a combustor to oscillations in combustion response were determined.

  5. Capture into resonance of coupled Duffing oscillators.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Agnessa

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we investigate capture into resonance of a pair of coupled Duffing oscillators, one of which is excited by periodic forcing with a slowly varying frequency. Previous studies have shown that, under certain conditions, a single oscillator can be captured into persistent resonance with a permanently growing amplitude of oscillations (autoresonance). This paper demonstrates that the emergence of autoresonance in the forced oscillator may be insufficient to generate oscillations with increasing amplitude in the attachment. A parametric domain, in which both oscillators can be captured into resonance, is determined. The quasisteady states determining the growth of amplitudes are found. An agreement between the theoretical and numerical results is demonstrated.

  6. BLOCKING OSCILLATOR DOUBLE PULSE GENERATOR CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Haase, J.A.

    1961-01-24

    A double-pulse generator, particuiarly a double-pulse generator comprising a blocking oscillator utilizing a feedback circuit to provide means for producing a second pulse within the recovery time of the blocking oscillator, is described. The invention utilized a passive network which permits adjustment of the spacing between the original pulses derived from the blocking oscillator and further utilizes the original pulses to trigger a circuit from which other pulses are initiated. These other pulses are delayed and then applied to the input of the blocking oscillator, with the result that the output from the oscillator circuit contains twice the number of pulses originally initiated by the blocking oscillator itself.

  7. Anti-GD2 mAbs and next-generation mAb-based agents for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Horta, Zulmarie Perez; Goldberg, Jacob L; Sondel, Paul M

    2016-09-01

    Tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have demonstrated efficacy in the clinic, becoming an important approach for cancer immunotherapy. Due to its limited expression on normal tissue, the GD2 disialogangloside expressed on neuroblastoma cells is an excellent candidate for mAb therapy. In 2015, dinutuximab (an anti-GD2 mAb) was approved by the US FDA and is currently used in a combination immunotherapeutic regimen for the treatment of children with high-risk neuroblastoma. Here, we review the extensive preclinical and clinical development of anti-GD2 mAbs and the different mechanisms by which they mediate tumor cell killing. In addition, we discuss different mAb-based strategies that capitalize on the targeting ability of anti-GD2 mAbs to potentially deliver, as monotherapy, or in combination with other treatments, improved antitumor efficacy.

  8. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis from primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. These results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings. PMID:25411881

  9. Ab Initio Modeling of Molecular Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Schwenke, David

    2014-01-01

    Radiative emission from excited states of atoms and molecules can comprise a significant fraction of the total heat flux experienced by spacecraft during atmospheric entry at hypersonic speeds. For spacecraft with ablating heat shields, some of this radiative flux can be absorbed by molecular constituents in the boundary layer that are formed by the ablation process. Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations are carried out to predict the strengths of these emission and absorption processes. This talk will describe the methods used in these calculations using, as examples, the 4th positive emission bands of CO and the 1g+ 1u+ absorption in C3. The results of these calculations are being used as input to NASA radiation modeling codes like NeqAir, HARA and HyperRad.

  10. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-11-02

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis from primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. Ultimately, these results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings.

  11. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-11-02

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis frommore » primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. Ultimately, these results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings.« less

  12. Dissecting the A-B personality type.

    PubMed

    Ray, J J; Bozek, R

    1980-06-01

    It is suggested that 'freneticism' might be an appropriate name for the type of personality said by Rosenman, Friedman and Jenkins to be at risk from coronary heart disease. In study 1 the measure of this personality type (the JAS) was given a uniform answer format and, as such, was found to give improved reliability. It was administered to a random postal sample of Australians. A short form of 24 items was also produced. In study 2 a similar sample received the 24-item form and scales to measure achievement motivation, dominance and extraversion. 'A' types were found to be very much achievement motivated and dominant. A factor analysis showed these two traits as the main components of the A-B concept with only a third factor of 'freneticism'. This factor was measured in a third study which showed that the factor could be used as a scale in its own right.

  13. Ab Initio Calculation of the Hoyle State

    SciTech Connect

    Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lee, Dean; Meissner, Ulf-G.

    2011-05-13

    The Hoyle state plays a crucial role in the helium burning of stars heavier than our Sun and in the production of carbon and other elements necessary for life. This excited state of the carbon-12 nucleus was postulated by Hoyle as a necessary ingredient for the fusion of three alpha particles to produce carbon at stellar temperatures. Although the Hoyle state was seen experimentally more than a half century ago nuclear theorists have not yet uncovered the nature of this state from first principles. In this Letter we report the first ab initio calculation of the low-lying states of carbon-12 using supercomputer lattice simulations and a theoretical framework known as effective field theory. In addition to the ground state and excited spin-2 state, we find a resonance at -85(3) MeV with all of the properties of the Hoyle state and in agreement with the experimentally observed energy.

  14. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  15. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  16. Observation of anharmonic Bloch oscillations.

    PubMed

    Dreisow, Felix; Wang, Gang; Heinrich, Matthias; Keil, Robert; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander

    2011-10-15

    We report on the experimental observation of Bloch oscillations of an optical wave packet in a lattice with second-order coupling. To this end, we employ zigzag waveguide arrays, in which the second-order coupling can be precisely tuned.

  17. [Forced Oscillations of DNA Bases].

    PubMed

    Yakushevich, L V; Krasnobaeva, L A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the studying of forced angular oscillations of the DNA bases with the help of the mathematical model consisting of two coupled nonlinear differential equations that take into account the effects of dissipation and the influence of an external periodic field. The calculation results are illustrated for sequence of gene encoding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA 17).

  18. Geometry of thermal plasma oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Da; Noble, A.

    2009-01-22

    We develop a method for investigating the relationship between the shape of a 1-particle distribution and non-linear electrostatic oscillations in a collisionless plasma, incorporating transverse thermal motion. A general expression is found for the maximum sustainable electric field, and is evaluated for a particular highly anisotropic distribution.

  19. Temporal oscillations in neuronal nets.

    PubMed

    Ermentrout, G B; Cowan, J D

    1979-04-18

    A model for the interactions of cortical neurons is derived and analyzed. It is shown that small amplitude spatially inhomogeneous standing oscillations can bifurcate from the rest state. In a periodic domain, traveling wave trains exist. Stability of these patterns is discussed in terms of biological parameters. Homoclinic and heteroclinic orbits are demonstrated for the space-clamped system.

  20. Cubication of Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belendez, Augusto; Alvarez, Mariela L.; Fernandez, Elena; Pascual, Immaculada

    2009-01-01

    A cubication procedure of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force, and this allows us to approximate the original nonlinear differential equation by a Duffing equation in which the coefficients for the linear…

  1. Linearization of Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belendez, A.; Alvarez, M. L.; Fernandez, E.; Pascual, I.

    2009-01-01

    A linearization method of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force which allows us to obtain a frequency-amplitude relation which is valid not only for small but also for large amplitudes and, sometimes, for…

  2. [Forced Oscillations of DNA Bases].

    PubMed

    Yakushevich, L V; Krasnobaeva, L A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the studying of forced angular oscillations of the DNA bases with the help of the mathematical model consisting of two coupled nonlinear differential equations that take into account the effects of dissipation and the influence of an external periodic field. The calculation results are illustrated for sequence of gene encoding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA 17). PMID:27192830

  3. Hydrogen rotation-vibration oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1974-01-29

    A laser system is described wherein molecular species of hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes are induced to oscillate on rotational-vibrational levels by subjecting the hydrogen to a transverse beam of electrons of a narrowly defined energy between about 1 and 5 eV, thereby producing high intensity and high energy output. (Official Gazette)

  4. Chimera States in Neural Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Sonya; Glaze, Tera

    2014-03-01

    Chimera states have recently been explored both theoretically and experimentally, in various coupled nonlinear oscillators, ranging from phase-oscillator models to coupled chemical reactions. In a chimera state, both coherent and incoherent (or synchronized and desynchronized) states occur simultaneously in populations of identical oscillators. We investigate chimera behavior in a population of neural oscillators using the Huber-Braun model, a Hodgkin-Huxley-like model originally developed to characterize the temperature-dependent bursting behavior of mammalian cold receptors. One population of neurons is allowed to synchronize, with each neuron receiving input from all the others in its group (global within-group coupling). Subsequently, a second population of identical neurons is placed under an identical global within-group coupling, and the two populations are also coupled to each other (between-group coupling). For certain values of the coupling constants, the neurons in the two populations exhibit radically different synchronization behavior. We will discuss the range of chimera activity in the model, and discuss its implications for actual neural activity, such as unihemispheric sleep.

  5. Optoelectronic Oscillators for Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeira, Bruno; Figueiredo, José

    We introduce and report recent developments on a novel five port optoelectronic voltage controlled oscillator consisting of a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) optical-waveguide integrated with a laser diode. The RTD-based optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) has both optical and electrical input and output ports, with the fifth port allowing voltage control. The RTD-OEO locks to reference radio-frequency (RF) sources by either optical or electrical injection locking techniques allowing remote synchronization, eliminating the need of impedance matching between traditional RF oscillators. RTD-OEO functions include generation, amplification and distribution of RF carriers, clock recovery, carrier recovery, modulation and demodulation and frequency synthesis. Self-injection locking operation modes, where small portions of the output electrical/optical signals are fed back into the electrical/optical input ports, are also proposed. The self-phase locked loop configuration can give rise to low-noise high-stable oscillations, not limited by the RF source performance and with no need of external optoelectronic conversion.

  6. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  7. Covariant harmonic oscillators: 1973 revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noz, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Using the relativistic harmonic oscillator, a physical basis is given to the phenomenological wave function of Yukawa which is covariant and normalizable. It is shown that this wave function can be interpreted in terms of the unitary irreducible representations of the Poincare group. The transformation properties of these covariant wave functions are also demonstrated.

  8. Evolved chiral NN +3N Hamiltonians for ab initio nuclear structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Robert; Calci, Angelo; Langhammer, Joachim; Binder, Sven

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the building blocks for a consistent inclusion of chiral three-nucleon (3N) interactions into ab initio nuclear structure calculations beyond the lower p shell. We highlight important technical developments, such as the similarity renormalization group (SRG) evolution in the 3N sector, a JT-coupled storage scheme for 3N matrix elements with efficient on-the-fly decoupling, and the importance-truncated no-core shell model with 3N interactions. Together, these developments make converged ab initio calculations with explicit 3N interactions possible also beyond the lower p shell. We analyze in detail the impact of various truncations of the SRG-evolved Hamiltonian, in particular the truncation of the harmonic-oscillator model space used for solving the SRG flow equations and the omission of the induced beyond-3N contributions of the evolved Hamiltonian. Both truncations lead to sizable effects in the upper p shell and beyond and we present options to remedy these truncation effects. The analysis of the different truncations is a first step towards a systematic uncertainty quantification of all stages of the calculation.

  9. Three-cluster dynamics within an ab initio framework

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, Sofia; Romero-Redondo, Carolina; Navratil, Petr

    2013-09-26

    In this study, we introduce a fully antisymmetrized treatment of three-cluster dynamics within the ab initio framework of the no-core shell model/resonating-group method. Energy-independent nonlocal interactions among the three nuclear fragments are obtained from realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions and consistent ab initio many-body wave functions of the clusters. The three-cluster Schrödinger equation is solved with bound-state boundary conditions by means of the hyperspherical-harmonic method on a Lagrange mesh. We discuss the formalism in detail and give algebraic expressions for systems of two single nucleons plus a nucleus. Using a soft similarity-renormalization-group evolved chiral nucleon-nucleon potential, we apply the method to a 4He+n+n description of 6He and compare the results to experiment and to a six-body diagonalization of the Hamiltonian performed within the harmonic-oscillator expansions of the no-core shell model. Differences between the two calculations provide a measure of core (4He) polarization effects.

  10. Opto-Electronic Oscillator and its Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental results of a new class of microwave oscillators called opto-electronic oscillators (OEO). We discuss techniques of achieving high stability single mode operation and demonstrate the applications of OEO in photonic communication systems.

  11. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-11-24

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability. 6 figs.

  12. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability.

  13. Fano-Rashba effect in thermoelectricity of a double quantum dot molecular junction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ys; Hong, Xk; Feng, Jf; Yang, Xf

    2011-01-01

    We examine the relation between the phase-coherent processes and spin-dependent thermoelectric effects in an Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometer with a Rashba quantum dot (QD) in each of its arm by using the Green's function formalism and equation of motion (EOM) technique. Due to the interplay between quantum destructive interference and Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) in each QD, an asymmetrical transmission node splits into two spin-dependent asymmetrical transmission nodes in the transmission spectrum and, as a consequence, results in the enhancement of the spin-dependent thermoelectric effects near the spin-dependent asymmetrical transmission nodes. We also examine the evolution of spin-dependent thermoelectric effects from a symmetrical parallel geometry to a configuration in series. It is found that the spin-dependent thermoelectric effects can be enhanced by controlling the dot-electrode coupling strength. The simple analytical expressions are also derived to support our numerical results.PACS numbers: 73.63.Kv; 71.70.Ej; 72.20.Pa. PMID:22151740

  14. Quantum oblivion: A master key for many quantum riddles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitzur, Avshalom C.; Cohen, Eliahu

    2014-02-01

    A simple quantum interaction is analyzed, where the paths of two superposed particles asymmetrically cross, while a detector set to detect an interaction between them remains silent. Despite this negative result, the particles' states leave no doubt that a peculiar interaction has occurred: One particle's momentum is changed while the other's remains unaffected, in apparent violation of momentum conservation. Revisiting the foundations of the standard quantum measurement process offers the resolution. Prior to the macroscopic recording of no interaction, a brief critical interval (CI) prevails, during which the particles and the detector's pointer form a subtle entanglement which immediately dissolves. It is this self-cancellation, henceforth "quantum oblivion (QO)," that lies at the basis of some well-known intriguing quantum effects. Such is interaction-free measurement (IFM)1 and its more paradoxical variants like Hardy's Paradox2 and the quantum liar paradox.3 Even the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect4 and weak measurement (WM)5 turn out to belong to this group. We next study interventions within the CI that produce some other peculiar effects. Finally, we discuss some of the conceptual issues involved. Under a greater time-resolution of the CI, some non-local phenomena turn out to be local. Momentum is conserved due to the quantum uncertainties inflicted by the particle-pointer interaction, which sets the experiment's final boundary condition.

  15. Optical analogue of electronic Bloch oscillations.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, Riccardo; Costantino, Paola; Wiersma, Diederik; Ghulinyan, Mher; Oton, Claudio J; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2003-12-31

    We report on the observation of Bloch oscillations in light transport through periodic dielectric systems. By introducing a linear refractive index gradient along the propagation direction the optical equivalent of a Wannier-Stark ladder was obtained. Bloch oscillations were observed as time-resolved oscillations in transmission, in direct analogy to electronic Bloch oscillations in conducting crystals where the Wannier-Stark ladder is obtained via an external electric field. The observed oscillatory behavior is in excellent agreement with transfer matrix calculations.

  16. Exciton-polariton oscillations in real space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, T. C. H.; Rubo, Y. G.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    We introduce and model spin-Rabi oscillations based on exciton-polaritons in semiconductor microcavities. The phase and polarization of oscillations can be controlled by resonant coherent pulses and the propagation of oscillating domains gives rise to phase-dependent interference patterns in real space. We show that interbranch polariton-polariton scattering controls the propagation of oscillating domains, which can be used to realize logic gates based on an analog variable phase.

  17. AB1402: Design-Build Project Guidelines. 2002 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Div. of School Facilities Planning.

    Assembly Bill (AB) 1402 authorized California's school districts to enter into design-build contracts for projects with design and construction costs exceeding $10 million. These guidelines are intended to accomplish the following purposes: (1) inform school districts of the design-build process under AB 1402; (2) help school districts to…

  18. History of California's AB 1725 and Its Major Provisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Tab

    This paper addresses the history of California's Assembly Bill 1725 (AB 1725) legislation and describes its major provisions. Signed in 1988 by Governor George Deukmejian, AB 1725's focus is to emphasize the new role of California community colleges as postsecondary institutions committed to transferring students, offering remedial courses, and…

  19. Towards Accurate Ab Initio Predictions of the Spectrum of Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have carried out extensive ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of methane, and these results are used to compute vibrational energy levels. We include basis set extrapolations, core-valence correlation, relativistic effects, and Born- Oppenheimer breakdown terms in our calculations. Our ab initio predictions of the lowest lying levels are superb.

  20. Bloch-Zener oscillations in binary superlattices.

    PubMed

    Dreisow, F; Szameit, A; Heinrich, M; Pertsch, T; Nolte, S; Tünnermann, A; Longhi, S

    2009-02-20

    Bloch-Zener oscillations, i.e., the coherent superposition of Bloch oscillations and Zener tunneling between minibands of a binary lattice, are experimentally demonstrated for light waves in curved femtosecond laser-written waveguide arrays. Visualization of double-periodicity breathing and oscillation modes is reported, and synchronous tunneling leading to wave reconstruction is demonstrated.

  1. Scleronomic Holonomic Constraints and Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, R.; Gonzalez-Garcia, G.; Izquierdo-De La Cruz, E.; Fernandez-Anaya, G.

    2011-01-01

    A bead sliding, under the sole influence of its own weight, on a rigid wire shaped in the fashion of a plane curve, will describe (generally anharmonic) oscillations around a local minimum. For given shapes, the bead will behave as a harmonic oscillator in the whole range, such as an unforced, undamped, Duffing oscillator, etc. We also present…

  2. Mechanical and current oscillations in corroding electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Teschke, O.; Galembeck, F.; Tenan, M.A.

    1985-06-01

    Mechanical oscillations of the solution meniscus risen around a corroding wire electrode were observed in synchronism with electrical current oscillations. Scanning electron microscopy coupled to microprobe analysis was used to investigate the topochemistry of the system under study. Solution capillarity effects on iron and on iron compounds are related to the oscillations detected in this system.

  3. Neutrino oscillations: present status and outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Schwetz, Thomas

    2008-02-21

    I summarize the status of three-flavour neutrino oscillations with date of Oct. 2007, and provide an outlook for the developments to be expected in the near future. Furthermore, I discuss the status of sterile neutrino oscillation interpretations of the LSND anomaly in the light of recent MiniBooNE results, and comment on implications for the future neutrino oscillation program.

  4. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    This project focuses on a new technology that reduces NOx emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxygen-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace.

  5. Squeezed states of damped oscillator chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1993-01-01

    The Caldirola-Kanai model of one-dimensional damped oscillator is extended to the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping. The correlated and squeezed states for the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping are constructed. Based on the concept of the integrals of motion, it is demonstrated how squeezing phenomenon arises due to parametric excitation.

  6. Oscillations death revisited; coupling of identical chemical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Bar-Eli, Kedma

    2011-06-28

    The coupling of identical reactors containing chemical oscillators is discussed. The coupling is executed by means of transferring chemical species from one cell (reactor) to the other in a diffusion like manner i.e. in proportion to the concentration difference between the cells. The coupling rate constant, however, is the same for all species. The individual, uncoupled, cells may be oscillating or in a stable steady state (the same for all reactors). In both cases, depending on the initial conditions, the symmetry breaks, and the cells may end up-contrary to intuition-in a stable steady state in which the final concentrations are not equal in the various reactors. The Brusselator and Oregonator mechanisms are examined and they behave in the manner described. On the other hand, the Lotka-Volterra mechanism, being conservative, keeps, when coupled, only the homogeneous solutions. PMID:21594295

  7. Fluidic Oscillator Array for Synchronized Oscillating Jet Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A fluidic oscillator array includes a plurality of fluidic-oscillator main flow channels. Each main flow channel has an inlet and an outlet. Each main flow channel has first and second control ports disposed at opposing sides thereof, and has a first and a second feedback ports disposed at opposing sides thereof. The feedback ports are located downstream of the control ports with respect to a direction of a fluid flow through the main flow channel. The system also includes a first fluid accumulator in fluid communication with each first control port and each first feedback port, and a second fluid accumulator in fluid communication with each second control port and each second feedback port.

  8. Control of Oscillation Patterns in a Symmetric Coupled Biological Oscillator System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko; Tanaka, Reiko; Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2003-08-01

    A chain of three-oscillator system was constructed with living biological oscillators of phasmodial slime mold, Physarum polycehalum and the oscillation patterns were analyzed by the symmetric Hopf bifurcation theory using group theory. Multi-stability of oscillation patterns was observed, even when the coupling strength was fixed. This suggests that the coupling strength is not an effective parameter to obtain a desired oscillation pattern among the multiple patterns. Here we propose a method to control oscillation patterns using resonance to external stimulus and demonstrate pattern switching induced by frequency resonance given to only one of oscillators in the system.

  9. Measuring neutrino oscillation parameters using $\

    SciTech Connect

    Backhouse, Christopher James

    2011-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It consists of two large steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector is situated at Fermilab, close to the production point of the NuMI muon-neutrino beam. The far detector is 735 km away, 716m underground in the Soudan mine, Northern Minnesota. The primary purpose of the MINOS experiment is to make precise measurements of the 'atmospheric' neutrino oscillation parameters (Δmatm2 and sin2atm). The oscillation signal consists of an energy-dependent deficit of vμ interactions in the far detector. The near detector is used to characterize the properties of the beam before oscillations develop. The two-detector design allows many potential sources of systematic error in the far detector to be mitigated by the near detector observations. This thesis describes the details of the vμ-disappearance analysis, and presents a new technique to estimate the hadronic energy of neutrino interactions. This estimator achieves a significant improvement in the energy resolution of the neutrino spectrum, and in the sensitivity of the neutrino oscillation fit. The systematic uncertainty on the hadronic energy scale was re-evaluated and found to be comparable to that of the energy estimator previously in use. The best-fit oscillation parameters of the vμ-disappearance analysis, incorporating this new estimator were: Δm2 = 2.32-0.08+0.12 x 10-3 eV2, sin 2 2θ > 0.90 (90% C.L.). A similar analysis, using data from a period of running where the NuMI beam was operated in a configuration producing a predominantly $\\bar{v}$μ beam, yielded somewhat different best-fit parameters Δ$\\bar{m}${sup 2} = (3.36-0.40+0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3eV2, sin2 2$\\bar{θ}$ = 0.86-0.12_0.11

  10. Restoration of oscillation in network of oscillators in presence of direct and indirect interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majhi, Soumen; Bera, Bidesh K.; Bhowmick, Sourav K.; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2016-10-01

    The suppression of oscillations in coupled systems may lead to several unwanted situations, which requires a suitable treatment to overcome the suppression. In this paper, we show that the environmental coupling in the presence of direct interaction, which can suppress oscillation even in a network of identical oscillators, can be modified by introducing a feedback factor in the coupling scheme in order to restore the oscillation. We inspect how the introduction of the feedback factor helps to resurrect oscillation from various kinds of death states. We numerically verify the resurrection of oscillations for two paradigmatic limit cycle systems, namely Landau-Stuart and Van der Pol oscillators and also in generic chaotic Lorenz oscillator. We also study the effect of parameter mismatch in the process of restoring oscillation for coupled oscillators.

  11. Undoing Gender through Legislation and Schooling: The Case of AB 537 and AB 394 in California, USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knotts, Greg

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates California laws AB 537: The Student Safety and Violence Prevention Act of 2000, and the recently enacted AB 394: Safe Place to Learn Act. Both demand that gender identity and sexual orientation be added to the lexicon of anti-harassment protection in public education. However, despite these progressive measures, schools…

  12. Recent Developments in the Analysis of Couple Oscillator Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation considers linear arrays of coupled oscillators. Our purpose in coupling oscillators together is to achieve high radiated power through the spatial power combining which results when the oscillators are injection locked to each other. York, et. al. have shown that, left to themselves, the ensemble of injection locked oscillators oscillate at the average of the tuning frequencies of all the oscillators. Coupling these arrays achieves high radiated power through coherent spatial power combining. The coupled oscillators are usually designed to produce constant aperture phase. Oscillators are injection locked to each other or to a master oscillator to produce coherent radiation. Oscillators do not necessarily oscillate at their tuning frequency.

  13. Magnetic doping and kondo effect in bi(2)se(3) nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Cha, Judy J; Williams, James R; Kong, Desheng; Meister, Stefan; Peng, Hailin; Bestwick, Andrew J; Gallagher, Patrick; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Cui, Yi

    2010-03-10

    A simple surface band structure and a large bulk band gap have allowed Bi2Se3 to become a reference material for the newly discovered three-dimensional topological insulators, which exhibit topologically protected conducting surface states that reside inside the bulk band gap. Studying topological insulators such as Bi2Se3 in nanostructures is advantageous because of the high surface-to-volume ratio, which enhances effects from the surface states; recently reported Aharonov-Bohm oscillation in topological insulator nanoribbons by some of us is a good example. Theoretically, introducing magnetic impurities in topological insulators is predicted to open a small gap in the surface states by breaking time-reversal symmetry. Here, we present synthesis of magnetically doped Bi2Se3 nanoribbons by vapor-liquid-solid growth using magnetic metal thin films as catalysts. Although the doping concentration is less than approximately 2%, low-temperature transport measurements of the Fe-doped Bi2Se3 nanoribbon devices show a clear Kondo effect at temperatures below 30 K, confirming the presence of magnetic impurities in the Bi2Se3 nanoribbons. The capability to dope topological insulator nanostructures magnetically opens up exciting opportunities for spintronics.

  14. Nanoimprinted substrates for high-yield production of topological insulator nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wi, Sungjin; Elezi, Eljon; Liu, Amy C.; Ray, Vishva; Sun, Kai; Liang, Xiaogan

    2013-06-01

    We present a growth process mediated by nanoimprinted nanostructures specifically for producing bismuth selenide (Bi2Se3) topological insulator nanoribbons with a high yield. In this process, topological insulator nanostructures are grown on nanoimprinted gratings by using a nanoparticle-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. In comparison with the growth processes performed on flat and randomly rough substrates, such a nanograting-mediated growth method produces topological insulator nanoribbons with a higher yield (˜15 000 nanoribbons/mm2), a narrower average ribbon width ( w avg<60 nm), and a higher uniformity in ribbon width ( σ<30 nm); effectively suppresses the formation of other unwanted morphologies; and also results in the axial growth of nanoribbons along specific in-plane directions relative to pre-structured gratings. Such technical merits of nanograting-mediated growth are attributed to the preferential nucleation of Bi2Se3 crystal seeds and the concomitant pinning of catalytic nanoparticles at ordered grating edges. Finally, Aharonov-Bohm interference oscillations in the magnetoresistance were observed and demonstrated the coherent transport of electrons through topological surface states of Bi2Se3 nanoribbons. This growth process in combination with large-area nanoimprint lithography could serve as an important foundation for nanomanufacturing topological insulator nanoribbons with controllable feature size, large-area uniformity, and ordering, suitable for applications in future low-dissipation nanoelectronics.

  15. Zeeman effect on surface electron transport in topological insulator Bi2Se3 nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Xian; Yan, Yuan; Zhang, Liang; Liao, Zhi-Min; Wu, Han-Chun; Yu, Da-Peng

    2015-10-28

    Topological insulators have exotic surface states that are massless Dirac fermions, manifesting special magnetotransport properties, such as the Aharonov-Bohm effect, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, and weak antilocalization effects. In the surface Dirac cone, the band structures are typically closely related to the p-orbitals and possess helical orbital texture. Here we report on the tunability of the transport properties via the interaction between the magnetic field and the spin-orbital angular momentum of the surface states in individual Bi2Se3 nanoribbons. Because the surface states have a large Landé factor and helical spin-orbital texture, the in-plane magnetic field induced Zeeman energy will result in the deformation of the Dirac cone, which gives rise to spin polarization of the surface states. The spin-dependent scattering of the conducting electrons on the existing local magnetic moments produces a giant negative magnetoresistance. The negative magnetoresistance is robust with a ratio of -20% at 2 K and -0.5% at 300 K under 14 T. The results are valuable for possible orbital-electronics based on topological insulators. PMID:26400635

  16. Time-dependent simulation and analytical modelling of electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometry with edge-states wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggi, Andrea; Bordone, Paolo; Buscemi, Fabrizio; Bertoni, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    We compute the exact single-particle time-resolved dynamics of electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometers based on Landau edge-states transport, and assess the effect of the spatial localization of carriers on the interference pattern. The exact carrier dynamics is obtained by solving numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation with a suitable 2D potential profile reproducing the interferometer design. An external magnetic field, driving the system to the quantum Hall regime with filling factor one, is included. The injected carriers are represented by a superposition of edge states, and their interference pattern—controlled via magnetic field and/or area variation—reproduces the one of (Ji et al 2003 Nature 422 415). By tuning the system towards different regimes, we find two additional features in the transmission spectra, both related to carrier localization, namely a damping of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations with increasing difference in the arms length, and an increased mean transmission that we trace to the energy-dependent transmittance of quantum point contacts. Finally, we present an analytical model, also accounting for the finite spatial dispersion of the carriers, able to reproduce the above effects.

  17. Magnetic forces and stationary electron flow in a three-terminal semiconductor quantum ring.

    PubMed

    Poniedziałek, M R; Szafran, B

    2010-06-01

    We study stationary electron flow through a three-terminal quantum ring and describe effects due to deflection of electron trajectories by classical magnetic forces. We demonstrate that generally at high magnetic field (B) the current is guided by magnetic forces to follow a classical path, which for B > 0 leads via the left arm of the ring to the left output terminal. The transport to the left output terminal is blocked for narrow windows of magnetic field for which the interference within the ring leads to formation of wavefunctions that are only weakly coupled to the output channel wavefunctions. These interference conditions are accompanied by injection of the current to the right arm of the ring and by appearance of sharp peaks of the transfer probability to the right output terminal. We find that these peaks at high magnetic field are attenuated by thermal widening of the transport window. We also demonstrate that the interference conditions that lead to their appearance vanish when elastic scattering within the ring is present. The clear effect of magnetic forces on the transfer probabilities disappears along with Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in a chaotic transport regime that is found for rings whose width is larger than the width of the channels.

  18. Dephasing of mesoscopic interferences from Electron Fractionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehur, Karyn

    2006-03-01

    The understanding of dephasing processes (the physical causes of supressed interference effects) constitutes a topics of perpetual interest in mesoscopic systems. Phase-breaking mechanisms in ballistic systems of dimensionality less than two are presently not completely understood and therefore deserve intensive theoretical and experimental endeavors. In this talk, we investigate the dephasing of mesoscopic interferences by electron-electron interactions in a well-defined geometry composed of two tunnel-coupled wires embodied by a Luttinger liquid. We thoroughly demonstrate that interactions can produce a visible attenuation of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations [1]. Moreover, in our geometry, we firmly emphasize that the emerging dephasing time results from the electron factionalization phenomenon that is known to produce an electron life-time in 1/T with T being the temperature [2]. A dephasing time in 1/T has been reported in one-dimensional GaAs rings. [1] Karyn Le Hur, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 076801 (2005). [2] Karyn Le Hur, Phys. Rev. B 65, 233314 (2002).

  19. Controllable multiple-quantum transitions in a T-shaped small quantum dot-ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiongwen; Chen, Baoju; Song, Kehui; Zhou, Guanghui

    2016-05-01

    Based on the tight-binding model and the slave boson mean field approximation, we investigate the electron transport properties in a small quantum dot (QD)-ring system. Namely, a strongly correlated QD not only attaches directly to two normal metallic electrodes, but also forms a magnetic control Aharonov-Bohm quantum ring with a few noninteracting QDs. We show that the parity effect, the Kondo effect, and the multiple Fano effects coexist in our system. Moreover, the parities, defined by the odd- and even-numbered energy levels in this system, can be switched by adjusting magnetic flux phase ϕ located at the center of the quantum ring, which induces multiple controllable Fano-interference energy pathways. Therefore, the constructive and destructive multi-Fano interference transition, the Kondo and Fano resonance transition at the Fermi level, the Fano resonance and ani-resonance transition are realized in the even parity system. They can also be observed in the odd parity system when one adjusts the phase ϕ and the gate voltage Vg applied to the noninteracting QDs. The multi-quantum transitions determine some interesting transport properties such as the current switch and its multi-flatsteps, the differential conductance switch at zero bias voltage and its oscillation or quantization at the low bias voltage. These results may be useful for the observation of multiple quantum effect interplays experimentally and the design of controllable QD-based device.

  20. Zeeman effect on surface electron transport in topological insulator Bi2Se3 nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Xian; Yan, Yuan; Zhang, Liang; Liao, Zhi-Min; Wu, Han-Chun; Yu, Da-Peng

    2015-10-28

    Topological insulators have exotic surface states that are massless Dirac fermions, manifesting special magnetotransport properties, such as the Aharonov-Bohm effect, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, and weak antilocalization effects. In the surface Dirac cone, the band structures are typically closely related to the p-orbitals and possess helical orbital texture. Here we report on the tunability of the transport properties via the interaction between the magnetic field and the spin-orbital angular momentum of the surface states in individual Bi2Se3 nanoribbons. Because the surface states have a large Landé factor and helical spin-orbital texture, the in-plane magnetic field induced Zeeman energy will result in the deformation of the Dirac cone, which gives rise to spin polarization of the surface states. The spin-dependent scattering of the conducting electrons on the existing local magnetic moments produces a giant negative magnetoresistance. The negative magnetoresistance is robust with a ratio of -20% at 2 K and -0.5% at 300 K under 14 T. The results are valuable for possible orbital-electronics based on topological insulators.

  1. Time-dependent simulation and analytical modelling of electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometry with edge-states wave packets.

    PubMed

    Beggi, Andrea; Bordone, Paolo; Buscemi, Fabrizio; Bertoni, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    We compute the exact single-particle time-resolved dynamics of electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometers based on Landau edge-states transport, and assess the effect of the spatial localization of carriers on the interference pattern. The exact carrier dynamics is obtained by solving numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation with a suitable 2D potential profile reproducing the interferometer design. An external magnetic field, driving the system to the quantum Hall regime with filling factor one, is included. The injected carriers are represented by a superposition of edge states, and their interference pattern-controlled via magnetic field and/or area variation-reproduces the one of (Ji et al 2003 Nature 422 415). By tuning the system towards different regimes, we find two additional features in the transmission spectra, both related to carrier localization, namely a damping of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations with increasing difference in the arms length, and an increased mean transmission that we trace to the energy-dependent transmittance of quantum point contacts. Finally, we present an analytical model, also accounting for the finite spatial dispersion of the carriers, able to reproduce the above effects.

  2. A universal conformal field theory approach to the chiral persistent currents in the mesoscopic fractional quantum Hall states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Lachezar S.

    2005-02-01

    We propose a general and compact scheme for the computation of the periods and amplitudes of the chiral persistent currents, magnetizations and magnetic susceptibilities in mesoscopic fractional quantum Hall disk samples threaded by Aharonov-Bohm magnetic field. This universal approach uses the effective conformal field theory for the edge states in the quantum Hall effect to derive explicit formulas for the corresponding partition functions in presence of flux. We point out the crucial role of a special invariance condition for the partition function, following from the Bloch-Byers-Yang theorem, which represents the Laughlin spectral flow. As an example we apply this procedure to the Z parafermion Hall states and show that they have universal non-Fermi liquid behavior without anomalous oscillations. For the analysis of the high-temperature asymptotics of the persistent currents in the parafermion states we derive the modular S-matrices constructed from the S matrices for the u(1) sector and that for the neutral parafermion sector which is realized as a diagonal affine coset.

  3. Geometric phases in astigmatic optical modes of arbitrary order

    SciTech Connect

    Habraken, Steven J. M.; Nienhuis, Gerard

    2010-08-15

    The transverse spatial structure of a paraxial beam of light is fully characterized by a set of parameters that vary only slowly under free propagation. They specify bosonic ladder operators that connect modes of different orders, in analogy to the ladder operators connecting harmonic-oscillator wave functions. The parameter spaces underlying sets of higher-order modes are isomorphic to the parameter space of the ladder operators. We study the geometry of this space and the geometric phase that arises from it. This phase constitutes the ultimate generalization of the Gouy phase in paraxial wave optics. It reduces to the ordinary Gouy phase and the geometric phase of nonastigmatic optical modes with orbital angular momentum in limiting cases. We briefly discuss the well-known analogy between geometric phases and the Aharonov-Bohm effect, which provides some complementary insights into the geometric nature and origin of the generalized Gouy phase shift. Our method also applies to the quantum-mechanical description of wave packets. It allows for obtaining complete sets of normalized solutions of the Schroedinger equation. Cyclic transformations of such wave packets give rise to a phase shift, which has a geometric interpretation in terms of the other degrees of freedom involved.

  4. Superperiods in Interference of eÕ3 Laughlin Quasiparticles Encircling Filling 2/5 FractionalQuantum Hall Island

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.V.; Camino, F.; Goldman, V.J.

    2009-12-01

    We report experiments in a large, 2.5 {mu}m diameter Fabry-Perot quantum Hall interferometer with two tunneling constrictions. Interference fringes are observed as conductance oscillations as a function of applied magnetic field (the Aharonov-Bohm flux through the electron island) or a global backgate voltage (electronic charge in the island). Depletion is such that in the fractional quantum Hall regime, filling 1/3 current-carrying chiral edge channels pass through constrictions when the island filling is 2/5. The interferometer device is calibrated with fermionic electrons in the integer quantum Hall regime. In the fractional regime, we observe magnetic flux and charge periods 5h/e and 2e, respectively, corresponding to creation of ten e/5 Laughlin quasiparticles in the island. These results agree with our prior report of the superperiods in a much smaller interferometer device. The observed experimental periods are interpreted as imposed by anyonic statistical interaction of fractionally charged quasiparticles.

  5. Combustor oscillating pressure stabilization and method

    DOEpatents

    Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.T.J.; Robey, E.H.; Cully, S.R.; Addis, R.E.

    1998-08-11

    High dynamic pressure oscillations in hydrocarbon-fueled combustors typically occur when the transport time of the fuel to the flame front is at some fraction of the acoustic period. These oscillations are reduced to acceptably lower levels by restructuring or repositioning the flame front in the combustor to increase the transport time. A pilot flame front located upstream of the oscillating flame and pulsed at a selected frequency and duration effectively restructures and repositions the oscillating flame in the combustor to alter the oscillation-causing transport time. 7 figs.

  6. Combustor oscillating pressure stabilization and method

    DOEpatents

    Gemmen, Randall S.; Richards, George A.; Yip, Mui-Tong Joseph; Robey, Edward H.; Cully, Scott R.; Addis, Richard E.

    1998-01-01

    High dynamic pressure oscillations in hydrocarbon-fueled combustors typically occur when the transport time of the fuel to the flame front is at some fraction of the acoustic period. These oscillations are reduced to acceptably lower levels by restructuring or repositioning the flame front in the combustor to increase the transport time. A pilot flame front located upstream of the oscillating flame and pulsed at a selected frequency and duration effectively restructures and repositions the oscillating flame in the combustor to alter the oscillation-causing transport time.

  7. A Tunable Carbon Nanotube Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonova, Vera

    2005-03-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. Carbon nanotubes (NT) are perhaps the ultimate material for realizing a NEMS device as they are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus is able to sense its own motion. Here, we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string oscillation modes of doubly-clamped NT oscillators. We observed resonance frequencies in the 5MHz to 150MHz range with quality factors in the 50 to 100 range. We showed that the resonance frequencies can be widely tuned by a gate voltage. We also report on the temperature dependence of the quality factor and present a discussion of possible loss mechanisms.

  8. Oscillators: Old and new perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.; Roy, Jyotirmoy

    2014-02-01

    We consider some of the well known oscillators in literature which are known to exhibit interesting effects of nonlinearity. We review the Lindstedt-Poincare technique for dealing with with the nonlinear effects and then go on to introduce the relevance of the renormalization group for the oscillator following the pioneering work of Chen et al. It is pointed out that the traditional Lindstedt-Poincare and the renormalization group techniques have operational connections. We use this to find an unexpected mode softening in the double pendulum. This mode softening prompted us to look for chaos in the double pendulum at low energies-energies that are just sufficient to allow the outer pendulum to rotate (the double pendulum is known to be chaotic at high energies-energies that are greater than that needed to make both pendulums to rotate). The emergence of the chaos is strongly dependent on initial conditions.

  9. Neutrino oscillation results from MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, Alexandre; /Oxford U.

    2007-08-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) long-baseline experiment has been actively collecting beam data since 2005, having already accumulated 3 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target (POT). MINOS uses the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) neutrino beam measured in two locations: at Fermilab, close to beam production, and 735 km downstream, in Northern Minnesota. By observing the oscillatory structure in the neutrino energy spectrum, MINOS can precisely measure the neutrino oscillation parameters in the atmospheric sector. These parameters were determined to be |{Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}| = 2.74{sub -0.26}{sup +0.44} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}/c{sup 4} and sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) > 0.87 (68% C.L.) from analysis of the first year of data, corresponding to 1.27 x 10{sup 20} POT.

  10. Analysis of rattleback chaotic oscillations.

    PubMed

    Hanias, Michael; Stavrinides, Stavros G; Banerjee, Santo

    2014-01-01

    Rattleback is a canoe-shaped object, already known from ancient times, exhibiting a nontrivial rotational behaviour. Although its shape looks symmetric, its kinematic behaviour seems to be asymmetric. When spun in one direction it normally rotates, but when it is spun in the other direction it stops rotating and oscillates until it finally starts rotating in the other direction. It has already been reported that those oscillations demonstrate chaotic characteristics. In this paper, rattleback's chaotic dynamics are studied by applying Kane's model for different sets of (experimentally decided) parameters, which correspond to three different experimental prototypes made of wax, gypsum, and lead-solder. The emerging chaotic behaviour in all three cases has been studied and evaluated by the related time-series analysis and the calculation of the strange attractors' invariant parameters. PMID:24511290

  11. Analysis of Rattleback Chaotic Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Stavrinides, Stavros G.; Banerjee, Santo

    2014-01-01

    Rattleback is a canoe-shaped object, already known from ancient times, exhibiting a nontrivial rotational behaviour. Although its shape looks symmetric, its kinematic behaviour seems to be asymmetric. When spun in one direction it normally rotates, but when it is spun in the other direction it stops rotating and oscillates until it finally starts rotating in the other direction. It has already been reported that those oscillations demonstrate chaotic characteristics. In this paper, rattleback's chaotic dynamics are studied by applying Kane's model for different sets of (experimentally decided) parameters, which correspond to three different experimental prototypes made of wax, gypsum, and lead-solder. The emerging chaotic behaviour in all three cases has been studied and evaluated by the related time-series analysis and the calculation of the strange attractors' invariant parameters. PMID:24511290

  12. Oscillators: Old and new perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.; Roy, Jyotirmoy

    2014-02-11

    We consider some of the well known oscillators in literature which are known to exhibit interesting effects of nonlinearity. We review the Lindstedt-Poincare technique for dealing with with the nonlinear effects and then go on to introduce the relevance of the renormalization group for the oscillator following the pioneering work of Chen et al. It is pointed out that the traditional Lindstedt-Poincare and the renormalization group techniques have operational connections. We use this to find an unexpected mode softening in the double pendulum. This mode softening prompted us to look for chaos in the double pendulum at low energies-energies that are just sufficient to allow the outer pendulum to rotate (the double pendulum is known to be chaotic at high energies-energies that are greater than that needed to make both pendulums to rotate). The emergence of the chaos is strongly dependent on initial conditions.

  13. Growth oscillation in larger foraminifera

    PubMed Central

    Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann

    2015-01-01

    This work shows the potential for applying three-dimensional biometry to studying cell growth in larger benthic foraminifera. The volume of each test chamber was measured from the three-dimensional model obtained by means of computed tomography. Analyses of cell growth based on the sequence of chamber volumes revealed constant and significant oscillations for all investigated specimens, characterized by periods of approximately 15, 30, 90, and 360 days. Possible explanations for these periods are connected to tides, lunar cycles, and seasonality. The potential to record environmental oscillations or fluctuations during the lifetime of larger foraminifera is pivotal for reconstructing short-term paleoenvironmental variations or for gaining insight into the influence of tides or tidal current on the shallow-water benthic fauna in both recent and fossil environments. PMID:26166912

  14. Magnetic Torsional Oscillations in Magnetars

    SciTech Connect

    Sotani, Hajime; Kokkotas, Kostas D.; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2009-05-01

    We investigate torsional Alfven oscillations of relativistic stars with a global dipole magnetic field, via 2D numerical simulations. We find that a) there exist two families of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) with harmonics at integer multiples of the fundamental frequency, b) the QPOs are long-lived, c) for the chosen form of dipolar magnetic field, the frequency ratio of the lower to upper fundamental QPOs is about 0.6, independent of the equilibrium model or of the strength of the magnetic field, and d) within a representative sample of EOS and of various magnetar masses, the Alfven QPO frequencies are given by accurate empirical relations that depend only on the compactness of the star and on the magnetic field strength. Compared to the observational frequencies, we also obtain an upper limit on the strength of magnetic field of SGR 1806-20 (if is dominated by a dipolar component) between {approx}3 and 7x10{sup 15} Gauss.

  15. Probing the Si(001) surface with a Si tip: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantorovich, Lev; Hobbs, Chris

    2006-06-01

    Topographic noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) images of the p(2×1) and c(4×2) reconstructions of the Si(001) surface are simulated for the cases of weak and strong tip-surface interactions and various temperatures using ab initio density functional theory. In the simulations the surface is imaged by a sharp silicon tip with a single dangling bond at its apex. At a very close approach to the surface, the tip flips a surface dimer when positioned close to its lower atom. The energy barriers for an individual flipped surface dimer to regain its initial configuration are calculated to be ˜0.1eV , implying that the surface should be able to “heal” itself at all but extremely low temperatures during one oscillation cycle of the cantilever. Thus, at small enough temperatures, T⩽70K , and large frequency shifts, the imaging process is dominated by tip induced dimer flip events resulting in a permanent deformation of the surface and an apparent p(2×1) symmetric phase to be observed. No dissipation is expected as the tip oscillations are conservative at these conditions. At intermediate temperatures, 70K⩽T⩽200K , the flipped dimers are able to return to the ground state during each tip oscillation, resulting in continuous healing of the surface and thus large dissipation is expected. At T⩾200K dimers flip back and forth easily resulting in an apparent symmetric p(2×1) phase and noticeable dissipation. At small frequency shifts the dimers do not flip, still the upper dimer atoms are imaged as bright so that surface reconstruction can easily be determined. The possibility of manipulating the orientation of dimers at low temperatures and large frequency shifts by means of preprogrammed scan directions, is also discussed.

  16. Structural and Biophysical Characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis Insecticidal Proteins Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1

    PubMed Central

    Kelker, Matthew S.; Berry, Colin; Evans, Steven L.; Pai, Reetal; McCaskill, David G.; Wang, Nick X.; Russell, Joshua C.; Baker, Matthew D.; Yang, Cheng; Pflugrath, J. W.; Wade, Matthew; Wess, Tim J.; Narva, Kenneth E.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis strains are well known for the production of insecticidal proteins upon sporulation and these proteins are deposited in parasporal crystalline inclusions. The majority of these insect-specific toxins exhibit three domains in the mature toxin sequence. However, other Cry toxins are structurally and evolutionarily unrelated to this three-domain family and little is known of their three dimensional structures, limiting our understanding of their mechanisms of action and our ability to engineer the proteins to enhance their function. Among the non-three domain Cry toxins, the Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins from B. thuringiensis strain PS149B1 are required to act together to produce toxicity to the western corn rootworm (WCR) Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte via a pore forming mechanism of action. Cry34Ab1 is a protein of ∼14 kDa with features of the aegerolysin family (Pfam06355) of proteins that have known membrane disrupting activity, while Cry35Ab1 is a ∼44 kDa member of the toxin_10 family (Pfam05431) that includes other insecticidal proteins such as the binary toxin BinA/BinB. The Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 proteins represent an important seed trait technology having been developed as insect resistance traits in commercialized corn hybrids for control of WCR. The structures of Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 have been elucidated to 2.15 Å and 1.80 Å resolution, respectively. The solution structures of the toxins were further studied by small angle X-ray scattering and native electrospray ion mobility mass spectrometry. We present here the first published structure from the aegerolysin protein domain family and the structural comparisons of Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 with other pore forming toxins. PMID:25390338

  17. Structural and biophysical characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal proteins Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1.

    PubMed

    Kelker, Matthew S; Berry, Colin; Evans, Steven L; Pai, Reetal; McCaskill, David G; Wang, Nick X; Russell, Joshua C; Baker, Matthew D; Yang, Cheng; Pflugrath, J W; Wade, Matthew; Wess, Tim J; Narva, Kenneth E

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis strains are well known for the production of insecticidal proteins upon sporulation and these proteins are deposited in parasporal crystalline inclusions. The majority of these insect-specific toxins exhibit three domains in the mature toxin sequence. However, other Cry toxins are structurally and evolutionarily unrelated to this three-domain family and little is known of their three dimensional structures, limiting our understanding of their mechanisms of action and our ability to engineer the proteins to enhance their function. Among the non-three domain Cry toxins, the Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins from B. thuringiensis strain PS149B1 are required to act together to produce toxicity to the western corn rootworm (WCR) Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte via a pore forming mechanism of action. Cry34Ab1 is a protein of ∼14 kDa with features of the aegerolysin family (Pfam06355) of proteins that have known membrane disrupting activity, while Cry35Ab1 is a ∼44 kDa member of the toxin_10 family (Pfam05431) that includes other insecticidal proteins such as the binary toxin BinA/BinB. The Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 proteins represent an important seed trait technology having been developed as insect resistance traits in commercialized corn hybrids for control of WCR. The structures of Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 have been elucidated to 2.15 Å and 1.80 Å resolution, respectively. The solution structures of the toxins were further studied by small angle X-ray scattering and native electrospray ion mobility mass spectrometry. We present here the first published structure from the aegerolysin protein domain family and the structural comparisons of Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 with other pore forming toxins.

  18. Forced Oscillations of Supported Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Edward D.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    Oscillations of supported liquid drops are the subject of wide scientific interest, with applications in areas as diverse as liquid-liquid extraction, synthesis of ceramic powders, growing of pure crystals in low gravity, and measurement of dynamic surface tension. In this research, axisymmetric forced oscillations of arbitrary amplitude of viscous liquid drops of fixed volume which are pendant from or sessile on a rod with a fixed or moving contact line and surrounded by an inviscid ambient gas are induced by moving the rod in the vertical direction sinusiodally in time. In this paper, a preliminary report is made on the computational analysis of the oscillations of supported drops that have 'clean' interfaces and whose contact lines remain fixed throughout their motions. The relative importance of forcing to damping can be increased by either increasing the amplitude of rod motion A or Reynolds number Re. It is shown that as the ratio of forcing to damping rises, for drops starting from an initial rest state a sharp increase in deformation can occur when they are forced to oscillate in the vicinity of their resonance frequencies, indicating the incipience of hysteresis. However, it is also shown that the existence of a second stable limit cycle and the occurrence of hysteresis can be observed if the drop is subjected to a so-called frequency sweep, where the forcing frequency is first increased and then decreased over a suitable range. Because the change in drop deformation response is abrupt in the vicinity of the forcing frequencies where hysteresis occurs, it should be possible to exploit the phenomenon to accurately measure the viscosity and surface tension of the drop liquid.

  19. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifang; Xing, Zhi-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    This essay is intended to provide a brief description of the peculiar properties of neutrinos within and beyond the standard theory of weak interactions. The focus is on the flavor oscillations of massive neutrinos, from which one has achieved some striking knowledge about their mass spectrum and flavor mixing pattern. The experimental prospects towards probing the absolute neutrino mass scale, possible Majorana nature and CP-violating effects, will also be addressed.

  20. The receptivity of boundary layers on blunt bodies to oscillations in the free stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    It is concluded that in the region of the nose of a symmetric, two dimensional blunt body at zero angle of attack, the steady plus oscillating flow is very similar for a wide class of body shapes. This conclusion was shown to be true for elliptic cylinders with a/b 25, and for the parabolic cylinder. In all cases, the flow field in the nose region of a two dimensional blunt body is generic to that of the flow in the neighborhood of the stagnation point on a plane wall.

  1. Ab initio calculations of nitramine dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh-Fallet, Sharon; Schweigert, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Elevated temperatures and pressures are typically thought to have opposing effects on the reaction channels of nitramine decomposition. These high temperatures promote reactions with loose transition structures (positive activation entropies and volumes), such as N-N bond homolysis. Elevated pressures promote reactions with tight transition structures (negative activation entropies and volumes), such as intramolecular and intermolecular H transfer. However, no quantitative data exists regarding the range of temperatures and pressures at which these effects become pronounced. We are pursuing ab initio calculations of the corresponding unimolecular and bimolecular transition structures with the objective of estimating the relevant thermochemical parameters and quantifying the effects of elevated temperature and pressures on the corresponding rate constants. Here, we present density functional theory and complete active space calculations of gas-phase molecular dimers of nitramines as an intermediate step toward modeling transition structures directly in the condensed phase. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory via the American Society for Engineering and Education and by the Office of Naval Research, both directly and through the Naval Research Laboratory.

  2. Ab initio two-component Ehrenfest dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Feizhi; Goings, Joshua J.; Liu, Hongbin; Lingerfelt, David B.; Li, Xiaosong

    2015-09-21

    We present an ab initio two-component Ehrenfest-based mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics method to describe the effect of nuclear motion on the electron spin dynamics (and vice versa) in molecular systems. The two-component time-dependent non-collinear density functional theory is used for the propagation of spin-polarized electrons while the nuclei are treated classically. We use a three-time-step algorithm for the numerical integration of the coupled equations of motion, namely, the velocity Verlet for nuclear motion, the nuclear-position-dependent midpoint Fock update, and the modified midpoint and unitary transformation method for electronic propagation. As a test case, the method is applied to the dissociation of H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. In contrast to conventional Ehrenfest dynamics, this two-component approach provides a first principles description of the dynamics of non-collinear (e.g., spin-frustrated) magnetic materials, as well as the proper description of spin-state crossover, spin-rotation, and spin-flip dynamics by relaxing the constraint on spin configuration. This method also holds potential for applications to spin transport in molecular or even nanoscale magnetic devices.

  3. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Seibold, Leonard K.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient. PMID:25624670

  4. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  5. ABS_PDv14.0 beta

    2008-07-30

    ABS_PD stands for Adaptive Background Suppression and Peak Detection algorithm. This algorithm uses an iterative process to simultaneously estimate the background and identify peaks in signals where the bakground is slowly varying relative to the peaks to be detected. This is sone on an automated manner. The algorithm can be applied to many physical processes where the desired signal is superimposed on a background. The main advantage of this algorithm is that the background canmore » be variable and doesn't have to be known. All that is required is that a set of basis function,s capa ble of representing the background, needs to be defined. Depending on the signals to be processed, the basis functions can be as simple as low order polynomials. The current algorithm has polynomials built-in and allows for additional basis functions to be defined by the user. An additional advantage is that the algorithm does not use any derivatives in detection of peaks and thus allows for analysis of noisy data. The noise level in the data is automatically taken into account when setting thresholds for peak detection.« less

  6. Ab initio two-component Ehrenfest dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feizhi; Goings, Joshua J.; Liu, Hongbin; Lingerfelt, David B.; Li, Xiaosong

    2015-09-01

    We present an ab initio two-component Ehrenfest-based mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics method to describe the effect of nuclear motion on the electron spin dynamics (and vice versa) in molecular systems. The two-component time-dependent non-collinear density functional theory is used for the propagation of spin-polarized electrons while the nuclei are treated classically. We use a three-time-step algorithm for the numerical integration of the coupled equations of motion, namely, the velocity Verlet for nuclear motion, the nuclear-position-dependent midpoint Fock update, and the modified midpoint and unitary transformation method for electronic propagation. As a test case, the method is applied to the dissociation of H2 and O2. In contrast to conventional Ehrenfest dynamics, this two-component approach provides a first principles description of the dynamics of non-collinear (e.g., spin-frustrated) magnetic materials, as well as the proper description of spin-state crossover, spin-rotation, and spin-flip dynamics by relaxing the constraint on spin configuration. This method also holds potential for applications to spin transport in molecular or even nanoscale magnetic devices.

  7. Ab Initio Studies of Calcium Carbonate Hydration.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Berganza, Josue A; Diao, Yijue; Pamidighantam, Sudhakar; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M

    2015-11-25

    Ab initio simulations of large hydrated calcium carbonate clusters are challenging due to the existence of multiple local energy minima. Extensive conformational searches around hydrated calcium carbonate clusters (CaCO3·nH2O for n = 1-18) were performed to find low-energy hydration structures using an efficient combination of Monte Carlo searches, density-functional tight binding (DFTB+) method, and density-functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP level, or Møller-Plesset perturbation theory at the MP2 level. This multilevel optimization yields several low-energy structures for hydrated calcium carbonate. Structural and energetics analysis of the hydration of these clusters revealed a first hydration shell composed of 12 water molecules. Bond-length and charge densities were also determined for different cluster sizes. The solvation of calcium carbonate in bulk water was investigated by placing the explicitly solvated CaCO3·nH2O clusters in a polarizable continuum model (PCM). The findings of this study provide new insights into the energetics and structure of hydrated calcium carbonate and contribute to the understanding of mechanisms where calcium carbonate formation or dissolution is of relevance.

  8. Phonocatalysis. An ab initio simulation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwangnam; Kaviany, Massoud

    2016-06-01

    Using simulations, we postulate and show that heterocatalysis on large-bandgap semiconductors can be controlled by substrate phonons, i.e., phonocatalysis. With ab initio calculations, including molecular dynamic simulations, the chemisorbed dissociation of XeF6 on h-BN surface leads to formation of XeF4 and two surface F/h-BN bonds. The reaction pathway and energies are evaluated, and the sorption and reaction emitted/absorbed phonons are identified through spectral analysis of the surface atomic motion. Due to large bandgap, the atomic vibration (phonon) energy transfer channels dominate and among them is the match between the F/h-BN covalent bond stretching and the optical phonons. We show that the chemisorbed dissociation (the pathway activation ascent) requires absorption of large-energy optical phonons. Then using progressively heavier isotopes of B and N atoms, we show that limiting these high-energy optical phonons inhibits the chemisorbed dissociation, i.e., controllable phonocatalysis.

  9. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Bivens, H.M.; Wessendorf, K.O.

    1994-08-16

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a telemetered sensor beacon'' that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20--100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available. 21 figs.

  10. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Bivens, Hugh M.; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    1994-01-01

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a "telemetered sensor beacon" that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20-100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available.

  11. Automatic oscillator frequency control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A frequency control system makes an initial correction of the frequency of its own timing circuit after comparison against a frequency of known accuracy and then sequentially checks and corrects the frequencies of several voltage controlled local oscillator circuits. The timing circuit initiates the machine cycles of a central processing unit which applies a frequency index to an input register in a modulo-sum frequency divider stage and enables a multiplexer to clock an accumulator register in the divider stage with a cyclical signal derived from the oscillator circuit being checked. Upon expiration of the interval, the processing unit compares the remainder held as the contents of the accumulator against a stored zero error constant and applies an appropriate correction word to a correction stage to shift the frequency of the oscillator being checked. A signal from the accumulator register may be used to drive a phase plane ROM and, with periodic shifts in the applied frequency index, to provide frequency shift keying of the resultant output signal. Interposition of a phase adder between the accumulator register and phase plane ROM permits phase shift keying of the output signal by periodic variation in the value of a phase index applied to one input of the phase adder.

  12. Superimposed oscillations in brane inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Ávila, Santiago; Martin, Jérôme; Steer, Danièle A. E-mail: jmartin@iap.fr

    2014-08-01

    In canonical scalar field inflation, the Starobinsky model (with a linear potential but discontinuous slope) is remarkable in that though slow-roll is violated, both the power-spectrum and bi-spectrum can be calculated exactly analytically. The two-point function is characterised by different power on large and small scales, and a burst of small amplitude superimposed oscillations in between. We extend this analysis to Dirac Born Infeld (DBI) inflation, for which generalised slow-roll is violated at the discontinuity and a rapid variation in the speed of sound c{sub S} occurs. In an attempt to characterise the effect of non-linear kinetic terms on the oscillatory features of the primordial power-spectrum, we show that the resulting power spectrum has a shape and features which differ significantly from those of the standard Starobinsky model. In particular, when c{sub S} is small, the power-spectrum now takes very similar scale invariant values on large and small scales, while on intermediate scales it is characterised by much larger amplitude and higher frequency superimposed oscillations. We also show that calculating non-Gaussianities in this model is a complicated but interesting task since all terms in the cubic action now contribute. Investigating whether the superimposed oscillations could fit to the Planck Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data (for instance by explaining the large scale Planck anomalies) with, at the same time, small non-Gaussianities remains an intriguing and open possibility.

  13. Complex mode dynamics of coupled wave oscillators.

    PubMed

    Alexander, T J; Yan, D; Kevrekidis, P G

    2013-12-01

    We explore how nonlinear coherent waves localized in a few wells of a periodic potential can act analogously to a chain of coupled oscillators. We identify the small-amplitude oscillation modes of these "coupled wave oscillators" and find that they can be extended into the large amplitude regime, where some "ring" for long times. We also reveal the appearance of complex behavior such as the breakdown of Josephson-like oscillations, the destabilization of fundamental oscillation modes, and the emergence of chaotic oscillations for large amplitude excitations. We show that the dynamics may be accurately described by a discrete model with nearest-neighbor coupling, in which the lattice oscillators bear an effective mass.

  14. Dynamical robustness of coupled heterogeneous oscillators.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Gouhei; Morino, Kai; Daido, Hiroaki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-05-01

    We study tolerance of dynamic behavior in networks of coupled heterogeneous oscillators to deterioration of the individual oscillator components. As the deterioration proceeds with reduction in dynamic behavior of the oscillators, an order parameter evaluating the level of global oscillation decreases and then vanishes at a certain critical point. We present a method to analytically derive a general formula for this critical point and an approximate formula for the order parameter in the vicinity of the critical point in networks of coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators. Using the critical point as a measure for dynamical robustness of oscillator networks, we show that the more heterogeneous the oscillator components are, the more robust the oscillatory behavior of the network is to the component deterioration. This property is confirmed also in networks of Morris-Lecar neuron models coupled through electrical synapses. Our approach could provide a useful framework for theoretically understanding the role of population heterogeneity in robustness of biological networks.

  15. Synchronization of oscillators coupled through an environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katriel, Guy

    2008-11-01

    We study synchronization of oscillators that are indirectly coupled through their interaction with an environment. We give criteria for the stability or instability of a synchronized oscillation. Using these criteria we investigate synchronization of systems of oscillators which are weakly coupled, in the sense that the influence of the oscillators on the environment is weak. We prove that arbitrarily weak coupling will synchronize the oscillators, provided that this coupling is of the ‘right’ sign. We illustrate our general results by applications to a model of coupled GnRH neuron oscillators proposed by Khadra and Li [A. Khadra, Y.X. Li, A model for the pulsatile secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone from synchronized hypothalamic neurons, Biophys. J. 91 (2006) 74-83.], and to indirectly weakly-coupled λ- ω oscillators.

  16. Current techniques for AB0-incompatible living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rummler, Silke; Bauschke, Astrid; Bärthel, Erik; Jütte, Heike; Maier, Katrin; Ziehm, Patrice; Malessa, Christina; Settmacher, Utz

    2016-09-24

    For a long time, it was considered medical malpractice to neglect the blood group system during transplantation. Because there are far more patients waiting for organs than organs available, a variety of attempts have been made to transplant AB0-incompatible (AB0i) grafts. Improvements in AB0i graft survival rates have been achieved with immunosuppression regimens and plasma treatment procedures. Nevertheless, some grafts are rejected early after AB0i living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) due to antibody mediated rejection or later biliary complications that affect the quality of life. Therefore, the AB0i LDLT is an option only for emergency situations, and it requires careful planning. This review compares the treatment possibilities and their effect on the patients' graft outcome from 2010 to the present. We compared 11 transplant center regimens and their outcomes. The best improvement, next to plasma treatment procedures, has been reached with the prophylactic use of rituximab more than one week before AB0i LDLT. Unfortunately, no standardized treatment protocols are available. Each center treats its patients with its own scheme. Nevertheless, the transplant results are homogeneous. Due to refined treatment strategies, AB0i LDLT is a feasible option today and almost free of severe complications. PMID:27683633

  17. Boiling treatment of ABS and PS plastics for flotation separation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Wu, Bao-xin; Liu, Qun

    2014-07-01

    A new physical method, namely boiling treatment, was developed to aid flotation separation of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and polystyrene (PS) plastics. Boiling treatment was shown to be effective in producing a hydrophilic surface on ABS plastic. Fourier Transform Infrared analysis was conducted to investigate the mechanism of boiling treatment of ABS. Surface rearrangement of polymer may be responsible for surface change of boiling treated ABS, and the selective influence of boiling treatment on the floatability of boiling treated plastics may be attributed to the difference in the molecular mobility of polymer chains. The effects of flotation time, frother concentration and particle size on flotation behavior of simple plastic were investigated. Based on flotation behavior of simple plastic, flotation separation of boiling treatment ABS and PS with different particle sizes was achieved efficiently. The purity of ABS and PS was up to 99.78% and 95.80%, respectively; the recovery of ABS and PS was up to 95.81% and 99.82%, respectively. Boiling treatment promotes the industrial application of plastics flotation and facilitates plastic recycling.

  18. Current techniques for AB0-incompatible living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rummler, Silke; Bauschke, Astrid; Bärthel, Erik; Jütte, Heike; Maier, Katrin; Ziehm, Patrice; Malessa, Christina; Settmacher, Utz

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it was considered medical malpractice to neglect the blood group system during transplantation. Because there are far more patients waiting for organs than organs available, a variety of attempts have been made to transplant AB0-incompatible (AB0i) grafts. Improvements in AB0i graft survival rates have been achieved with immunosuppression regimens and plasma treatment procedures. Nevertheless, some grafts are rejected early after AB0i living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) due to antibody mediated rejection or later biliary complications that affect the quality of life. Therefore, the AB0i LDLT is an option only for emergency situations, and it requires careful planning. This review compares the treatment possibilities and their effect on the patients’ graft outcome from 2010 to the present. We compared 11 transplant center regimens and their outcomes. The best improvement, next to plasma treatment procedures, has been reached with the prophylactic use of rituximab more than one week before AB0i LDLT. Unfortunately, no standardized treatment protocols are available. Each center treats its patients with its own scheme. Nevertheless, the transplant results are homogeneous. Due to refined treatment strategies, AB0i LDLT is a feasible option today and almost free of severe complications. PMID:27683633

  19. Current techniques for AB0-incompatible living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rummler, Silke; Bauschke, Astrid; Bärthel, Erik; Jütte, Heike; Maier, Katrin; Ziehm, Patrice; Malessa, Christina; Settmacher, Utz

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it was considered medical malpractice to neglect the blood group system during transplantation. Because there are far more patients waiting for organs than organs available, a variety of attempts have been made to transplant AB0-incompatible (AB0i) grafts. Improvements in AB0i graft survival rates have been achieved with immunosuppression regimens and plasma treatment procedures. Nevertheless, some grafts are rejected early after AB0i living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) due to antibody mediated rejection or later biliary complications that affect the quality of life. Therefore, the AB0i LDLT is an option only for emergency situations, and it requires careful planning. This review compares the treatment possibilities and their effect on the patients’ graft outcome from 2010 to the present. We compared 11 transplant center regimens and their outcomes. The best improvement, next to plasma treatment procedures, has been reached with the prophylactic use of rituximab more than one week before AB0i LDLT. Unfortunately, no standardized treatment protocols are available. Each center treats its patients with its own scheme. Nevertheless, the transplant results are homogeneous. Due to refined treatment strategies, AB0i LDLT is a feasible option today and almost free of severe complications.

  20. Safety assessment of Cry1Ab/Ac fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Cao, Sishuo; He, Xiaoyun; Luo, Yunbo; Guo, Xing; Yuan, Yanfang; Huang, Kunlun

    2009-07-01

    Cry1ab/ac gene was fused by both the cry1ab gene (GenBank Accession No. X54939) and the cry1ac gene (GenBank Accession No. Y09787), which was widely used in genetically modified (GM) rice, cotton, maize and so on. In order to support the safety assessment of GM food or feed products containing Cry1Ab/Ac protein, sufficient quantities of Cry1Ab/Ac protein were produced in Escherichia coli for in vitro evaluation and animal studies. The Cry1Ab/Ac protein does not possess the characteristics associated with food toxins or allergens, i.e., it has no sequence homology with any known allergens or toxins, and no N-glycosylation sites, can be rapidly degraded in gastric and intestinal fluids, and is devoid of adverse effects in mice by gavage at a high dose level of 5g (Cry1Ab/Ac protein)/kg body weight. In conclusion, there is a reasonable certainty of no harm resulting from the inclusion of the Cry1Ab/Ac protein in human food or animal feed.

  1. Structural Basis of Subtilase Cytotoxin SubAB Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Le Nours, Jérôme; Paton, Adrienne W.; Byres, Emma; Troy, Sally; Herdman, Brock P.; Johnson, Matthew D.; Paton, James C.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli produce a number of toxins that belong to the AB5 toxin family, which comprise a catalytic A-subunit that induces cellular dysfunction and a B-pentamer that recognizes host glycans. Although the molecular actions of many of the individual subunits of AB5 toxins are well understood, how they self-associate and the effect of this association on cytotoxicity are poorly understood. Here we have solved the structure of the holo-SubAB toxin that, in contrast to other AB5 toxins whose molecular targets are located in the cytosol, cleaves the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone BiP. SubA interacts with SubB in a similar manner to other AB5 toxins via the A2 helix and a conserved disulfide bond that joins the A1 domain with the A2 helix. The structure revealed that the active site of SubA is not occluded by the B-pentamer, and the B-pentamer does not enhance or inhibit the activity of SubA. Structure-based sequence comparisons with other AB5 toxin family members, combined with extensive mutagenesis studies on SubB, show how the hydrophobic patch on top of the B-pentamer plays a dominant role in binding the A-subunit. The structure of SubAB and the accompanying functional characterization of various mutants of SubAB provide a framework for understanding the important role of the B-pentamer in the assembly and the intracellular trafficking of this AB5 toxin. PMID:23921389

  2. Dysrhythmias of the respiratory oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paydarfar, David; Buerkel, Daniel M.

    1995-03-01

    Breathing is regulated by a central neural oscillator that produces rhythmic output to the respiratory muscles. Pathological disturbances in rhythm (dysrhythmias) are observed in the breathing pattern of children and adults with neurological and cardiopulmonary diseases. The mechanisms responsible for genesis of respiratory dysrhythmias are poorly understood. The present studies take a novel approach to this problem. The basic postulate is that the rhythm of the respiratory oscillator can be altered by a variety of stimuli. When the oscillator recovers its rhythm after such perturbations, its phase may be reset relative to the original rhythm. The amount of phase resetting is dependent upon stimulus parameters and the level of respiratory drive. The long-range hypothesis is that respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli that impinge upon or arise within the respiratory oscillator with certain combinations of strength and timing relative to the respiratory cycle. Animal studies were performed in anesthetized or decerebrate preparations. Neural respiratory rhythmicity is represented by phrenic nerve activity, allowing use of open-loop experimental conditions which avoid negative chemical feedback associated with changes in ventilation. In animal experiments, respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli having specific combinations of strength and timing. Newborn animals readily exhibit spontaneous dysrhythmias which become more prominent at lower respiratory drives. In human subjects, swallowing was studied as a physiological perturbation of respiratory rhythm, causing a pattern of phase resetting that is characterized topologically as type 0. Computational studies of the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol (BvP) equations, whose qualitative behavior is representative of many excitable systems, supports a unified interpretation of these experimental findings. Rhythmicity is observed when the BvP model exhibits recurrent periods of excitation alternating with

  3. Ab initio derivation of model energy density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobaczewski, Jacek

    2016-08-01

    I propose a simple and manageable method that allows for deriving coupling constants of model energy density functionals (EDFs) directly from ab initio calculations performed for finite fermion systems. A proof-of-principle application allows for linking properties of finite nuclei, determined by using the nuclear nonlocal Gogny functional, to the coupling constants of the quasilocal Skyrme functional. The method does not rely on properties of infinite fermion systems but on the ab initio calculations in finite systems. It also allows for quantifying merits of different model EDFs in describing the ab initio results.

  4. On the hierarchical parallelization of ab initio simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Barragan, Sergi; Ishimura, Kazuya; Shiga, Motoyuki

    2016-02-01

    A hierarchical parallelization has been implemented in a new unified code PIMD-SMASH for ab initio simulation where the replicas and the Born-Oppenheimer forces are parallelized. It is demonstrated that ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulations can be carried out very efficiently for systems up to a few tens of water molecules. The code was then used to study a Diels-Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene and butenone by ab initio string method. A reduction in the reaction energy barrier is found in the presence of hydrogen-bonded water, in accordance with experiment.

  5. Skutterudites under pressure: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Swetarekha; Kanchana, V.; Valsakumar, M. C.

    2014-03-07

    Ab initio results on the band structure, density of states, and Fermi surface (FS) properties of LaRu{sub 4}X{sub 12} (X = P, As, Sb) are presented at ambient pressure as well as under compression. The analysis of density of states reveals the major contribution at the Fermi level to be mainly from the Ru-d and X-p states. We have a complicated Fermi surface with both electron and hole characters for all the three compounds which is derived mainly from the Ru-d and X-p states. There is also a simpler FS with hole character derived from the P-p{sub z} orbital for LaRu{sub 4}P{sub 12} and Ru-d{sub z{sup 2}} orbital in the case of As and Sb containing compounds. More interestingly, Fermi surface nesting feature is observed only in the case of the LaRu{sub 4}P{sub 12}. Under compression, we observe the topology of the complicated FS sheet of LaRu{sub 4}As{sub 12} to change around V/V{sub 0} = 0.85, leading to a behaviour similar to that of a multiband superconductor, and in addition, we have two more hole pockets centered around Γ at V/V{sub 0} = 0.8 for the same compound. Apart from this, we find the hole pocket to vanish at V/V{sub 0} = 0.8 in the case of LaRu{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and the opening of the complicated FS sheet gets reduced. The de Haas van Alphen calculation shows the number of extremal orbits in the complicated sheet to change in As and Sb containing compounds under compression, where we also observe the FS topology to change.

  6. Ab Initio Calculations of Water Line Strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Partridge, Harry

    1998-01-01

    We report on the determination of a high quality ab initiu potential energy surface (PES) and dipole moment function for water. This PES is empirically adjusted to improve the agreement between the computed line positions and those from the HITRAN 92 data base with J less than 6 for H2O. The changes in the PES are small, nonetheless including an estimate of core (oxygen 1s) electron correlation greatly improves the agreement with experiment. Using this adjusted PES, we can match 30,092 of the 30,117 transitions in the HITRAN 96 data base for H2O with theoretical lines. The 10,25,50,75, and 90 percentiles of the difference between the calculated and tabulated line positions are -0.11, -0.04, -0.01, 0.02, and 0.07 l/cm. Non-adiabatic effects are not explicitly included. About 3% of the tabulated line positions appear to be incorrect. Similar agreement using this adjusted PES is obtained for the oxygen 17 and oxygen 18 isotopes. For HDO, the agreement is not as good, with root-mean-square error of 0.25 l/cm for lines with J less than 6. This error is reduced to 0.02 l/cm by including a small asymmetric correction to the PES, which is parameterized by simultaneously fitting to HDO md D2O data. Scaling this correction by mass factors yields good results for T2O and HTO. The intensities summed over vibrational bands are usually in good agreement between the calculations and the tabulated results, but individual lines strengths can differ greatly. A high temperature list consisting of 307,721,352 lines is generated for H2O using our PES and dipole moment function.

  7. Oscillations in a sunspot with light bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ding; Su, Jiangtao; Yan, Yihua; Tan, Baolin; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Huang, Zhenghua; Li, Bo

    2014-09-01

    The Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode observed a sunspot (AR 11836) with two light bridges (LBs) on 2013 August 31. We analyzed a two-hour Ca II H emission intensity data set and detected strong five-minute oscillation power on both LBs and in the inner penumbra. The time-distance plot reveals that the five-minute oscillation phase does not vary significantly along the thin bridge, indicating that the oscillations are likely to originate from underneath it. The slit taken along the central axis of the wide LB exhibits a standing wave feature. However, at the center of the wide bridge, the five-minute oscillation power is found to be stronger than at its sides. Moreover, the time-distance plot across the wide bridge exhibits a herringbone pattern that indicates a counter-stream of two running waves, which originated at the bridge's sides. Thus, the five-minute oscillations on the wide bridge also resemble the properties of running penumbral waves. The five-minute oscillations are suppressed in the umbra, while the three-minute oscillations occupy all three cores of the sunspot's umbra, separated by the LBs. The three-minute oscillations were found to be in phase at both sides of the LBs. This may indicate that either LBs do not affect umbral oscillations, or that umbral oscillations at different umbral cores share the same source. It also indicates that LBs are rather shallow objects situated in the upper part of the umbra. We found that umbral flashes (UFs) follow the life cycles of umbral oscillations with much larger amplitudes. They cannot propagate across LBs. UFs dominate the three-minute oscillation power within each core; however, they do not disrupt the phase of umbral oscillation.

  8. Ab Initio: And a New Era of Airline Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gesell, Laurence E.

    1995-01-01

    Expansion of air transportation and decreasing numbers seeking pilot training point to a shortage of qualified pilots. Ab initio training, in which candidates with no flight time are trained to air transport proficiency, could resolve the problem. (SK)

  9. Tensile deformation mechanisms of ABS/PMMA/EMA blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. H.; Gao, J.; Lin, S. X.; Zhang, P.; Huang, J.; Xu, L. L.

    2014-08-01

    The tensile deformation mechanisms of acrylonitrile - butadiene - styrene (ABS) / polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) blends toughened by ethylene methacrylate (EMA) copolymer was investigated by analysing the fracture morphology. ABS/PMMA was blended with EMA copolymer by melt mixing technique using co-rotating twin extruder. Tensile tests show that the elongation at break of ABS/PMMA blends can be efficiently improved with the increase in EMA content. Fracture morphology of ABS/PMMA/EMA blends reveals that the material yield induced by hollowing-out of EMA particles and its propagation into yield zone is the main toughening mechanism. Moreover, the appearance that EMA particles in the central area are given priority to hollowing-out may be related to the skin-core structure of the injection moulded parts caused by the different cooling rate between surface and inside in the process of injection moulding.

  10. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors.

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Wen, L J; Zhang, C

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos. PMID:25913819

  11. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors.

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Wen, L J; Zhang, C

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  12. Magnus approximation in neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, Mario A.; Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis A.; D'Olivo, J. C.

    2011-04-01

    Oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos remain as an open possibility to explain some anomalous experimental observations. In a four-neutrino (three active plus one sterile) mixing scheme, we use the Magnus expansion of the evolution operator to study the evolution of neutrino flavor amplitudes within the Earth. We apply this formalism to calculate the transition probabilities from active to sterile neutrinos with energies of the order of a few GeV, taking into account the matter effect for a varying terrestrial density.

  13. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  14. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  15. Strange nonchaotic self-oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalnine, Alexey Yu.; Kuznetsov, Sergey P.

    2016-08-01

    An example of strange nonchaotic attractor (SNA) is discussed in a dissipative system of mechanical nature driven by a constant torque applied to one of the elements of the construction. So the external force is not oscillatory, and the system is autonomous. Components of the motion with incommensurable frequencies emerge due to the irrational ratio of the sizes of the involved rotating elements. We regard the phenomenon as strange nonchaotic self-oscillations, and its existence sheds new light on the question of feasibility of SNA in autonomous systems.

  16. Pair creation and plasma oscillations.

    SciTech Connect

    Prozorkevich, A. V.; Vinnik, D. V.; Schmidt, S. M.; Hecht, M. B.; Roberts, C. D.

    2000-12-15

    We describe aspects of particle creation in strong fields using a quantum kinetic equation with a relaxation-time approximation to the collision term. The strong electric background field is determined by solving Maxwell's equation in tandem with the Vlasov equation. Plasma oscillations appear as a result of feedback between the background field and the field generated by the particles produced. The plasma frequency depends on the strength of the initial background fields and the collision frequency, and is sensitive to the necessary momentum-dependence of dressed-parton masses.

  17. Chemical oscillators in structured media.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Irving R; Vanag, Vladimir K; Balazs, Anna C; Kuksenok, Olga; Dayal, Pratyush; Bhattacharya, Amitabh

    2012-12-18

    Evolution is a characteristic feature of living systems, and many fundamental processes in life, including the cell cycle, take place in a periodic fashion. From a chemistry perspective, these repeating phenomena suggest the question of whether reactions in which concentrations oscillate could provide a basis and/or useful models for the behavior of organisms, and perhaps even their ability to evolve. In this Account, we examine several aspects of the behavior of the prototype oscillating chemical reaction, the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) system, carried out in microemulsions, arrays of micrometer-sized aqueous droplets suspended in oil, or hydrogels. Each of these environments contains elements of the compartmentalization that likely played a role in the development of the first living cells, and within them we observe behaviors not found in the BZ reaction in simple aqueous solution. Several of these phenomena resemble traits displayed by living organisms. For example, the nanodroplets in a BZ microemulsion "communicate" with each other through a phenomenon analogous to quorum sensing in bacteria to produce a remarkable variety of patterns and waves on length scales 10(5) times the size of a single droplet. A photosensitive version can "remember" an imposed image. Larger, micrometer-sized droplets exhibit similarly rich behavior and allow for the observation and control of individual droplets. These droplets offer promise for building arrays capable of computation by varying the strength and sign of the coupling between drops. Gels that incorporate a BZ catalyst and are immersed in a solution containing the BZ reactants change their shape and volume in oscillations that follow the variation in the redox state of the catalyst. Using this phenomenon, we can construct phototactic gel "worms" or segments of gel that attract one another. Whether such systems will provide more realistic caricatures of life, and whether they can serve as useful materials will largely

  18. Reinjection laser oscillator and method

    DOEpatents

    McLellan, Edward J.

    1984-01-01

    A uv preionized CO.sub.2 oscillator with integral four-pass amplifier capable of providing 1 to 5 GW laser pulses with pulse widths from 0.1 to 0.5 ns full width at half-maximum (FWHM) is described. The apparatus is operated at any pressure from 1 atm to 10 atm without the necessity of complex high voltage electronics. The reinjection technique employed gives rise to a compact, efficient system that is particularly immune to alignment instabilities with a minimal amount of hardware and complexity.

  19. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos. PMID:25913819

  20. The oscillations of vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Yin, Z.; Yang, B.

    2003-04-01

    Bob Apfel had so many interests that it is impossible-however fitting and desirable-to pay homage to his work as a whole. Some of his early studies were devoted to bubble nucleation at high superheats. In the first part of this paper a recent application of this phenomenon is described. Once a vapor bubble is generated, its subsequent oscillations (free and forced) present analogies and differences with those of a gas bubble: the second part of the paper focuses on this topic. [Work supported by NSF and NASA.