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Sample records for aharonov-bohm ab oscillations

  1. Anomalous aharonov-bohm gap oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sangalli, Davide; Marini, Andrea

    2011-10-12

    The gap oscillations caused by a magnetic flux penetrating a carbon nanotube represent one of the most spectacular observations of the Aharonov-Bohm effect at the nanoscale. Our understanding of this effect is, however, based on the assumption that the electrons are strictly confined on the tube surface, on trajectories that are not modified by curvature effects. Using an ab initio approach based on density functional theory, we show that this assumption fails at the nanoscale inducing important corrections to the physics of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Curvature effects and electronic density that is spilled out of the nanotube surface are shown to break the periodicity of the gap oscillations. We predict the key phenomenological features of this anomalous Aharonov-Bohm effect in semiconductive and metallic tubes and the existence of a large metallic phase in the low flux regime of multiwalled nanotubes, also suggesting possible experiments to validate our results. PMID:21805987

  2. Patterns of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in graphene nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, Igor; Yannouleas, Constantine; Landman, Uzi

    2012-04-01

    Using extensive tight-binding calculations, we investigate (including the spin) the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in monolayer and bilayer trigonal and hexagonal graphene rings with zigzag boundary conditions. Unlike the previous literature, we demonstrate the universality of integer (hc/e) and half-integer (hc/2e) values for the period of the AB oscillations as a function of the magnetic flux, in consonance with the case of mesoscopic metal rings. Odd-even (in the number of Dirac electrons, N) sawtooth-type patterns relating to the halving of the period have also been found; they are more numerous for a monolayer hexagonal ring, compared to the cases of a trigonal and a bilayer hexagonal ring. Additional, more complicated patterns are also present, depending on the shape of the graphene ring. Overall, the AB patterns repeat themselves as a function of N, with periods proportional to the number of the sides of the rings.

  3. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in singly connected disordered conductors.

    PubMed

    Aleiner, I L; Andreev, A V; Vinokur, V

    2015-02-20

    We show that the transport and thermodynamic properties of a singly connected disordered conductor exhibit quantum Aharonov-Bohm oscillations as a function of the total magnetic flux through the sample. The oscillations are associated with the interference contribution from a special class of electron trajectories confined to the surface of the sample. PMID:25763968

  4. Aharonov-Bohm oscillation modes in double-barrier nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jia-Lin; Yu, Xiquan; Dai, Zhensheng; Hu, Xiao

    2003-02-01

    The energy spectrum and Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in a two-dimensional nanoring interrupted by two identical barriers are studied, and a way of labeling a state according to the node numbers of the wave function in the absence of magnetic flux is introduced. It is found that a magnetic flux φ can modify both the phase and amplitude of wave functions due to the presence of the barriers. AB oscillations are strongly affected by the double barriers, and there are two modes of strong AB oscillations, named O and X modes. The energy levels of O and X modes are occasionally degenerate at φ=0 and 0.5, respectively, and the corresponding wave functions of both degenerate states are localized and can be greatly modified by a small change of φ. The O mode of AB oscillations, which does not exist in the parallel double-barrier ring usually used in experiments, presents an interesting picture and suggests other related phenomena.

  5. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in disordered nanorings with quantum dots: Effect of electron-electron interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of electron-electron interactions on Aharonov-Bohm (AB) current oscillations in nanorings formed by a chain of metallic quantum dots. We demonstrate that electron-electron interactions cause electron dephasing thereby suppressing the amplitude of AB oscillations at all temperatures down to T=0. The crossover between thermal and quantum dephasing is found to be controlled by the ring perimeter. Our predictions can be directly tested in future experiments.

  6. Spin-selective Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in a lateral triple quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Delgado, F; Shim, Y-P; Korkusinski, M; Gaudreau, L; Studenikin, S A; Sachrajda, A S; Hawrylak, P

    2008-11-28

    We present a theory of spin-selective Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in a lateral triple quantum dot. We show that to understand the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in an interacting electron system within a triple quantum dot molecule (TQD) where the dots lie in a ring configuration requires one to not only consider electron charge but also spin. Using a Hubbard model supported by microscopic calculations we show that, by localizing a single electron spin in one of the dots, the current through the TQD molecule depends not only on the flux but also on the relative orientation of the spin of the incoming and localized electrons. AB oscillations are predicted only for the spin singlet electron complex resulting in a magnetic field tunable "spin valve." PMID:19113511

  7. Recovery of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in asymmetrical quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskoboynikov, O.

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate suppression and recovery of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the diamagnetic response of electrons (holes) confined in self-assembled IncGa1-cAs/GaAs semiconductor reflection asymmetrical quantum rings. Based on the mapping method and gauge-origin-independent definition for the magnetic vector potential we simulate the energies and wave functions of the electron (hole) under external magnetic and electric fields. We examine the transformation of the ground state wave function of the electron (hole) in reflection asymmetrical rings from localized in one of the potential valleys (dotlike shape of the wave function) to distributed over all volume of the ring (ringlike shape) under an appropriate lateral electric field. This transformation greatly recovers the electron (hole) diamagnetic coefficient and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the diamagnetic response of the ring. However, the recovering electric field for the first Aharonov-Bohm diamagnetic oscillation of the electron is a suppressing one for the hole (and vice versa). This can block the recovery of the optical Aharonow-Bohm effect in IncGa1-cAs/GaAs asymmetrically wobbled rings. However, the recovery of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations for the independent electron (hole) by the external electric field remains interesting and feasible objective for the asymmetric rings.

  8. Quantum interference and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Bardarson, Jens H; Moore, Joel E

    2013-05-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) have an insulating bulk but a metallic surface. In the simplest case, the surface electronic structure of a three-dimensional (3D) TI is described by a single two-dimensional (2D) Dirac cone. A single 2D Dirac fermion cannot be realized in an isolated 2D system with time-reversal symmetry, but rather owes its existence to the topological properties of the 3D bulk wavefunctions. The transport properties of such a surface state are of considerable current interest; they have some similarities with graphene, which also realizes Dirac fermions, but have several unique features in their response to magnetic fields. In this review we give an overview of some of the main quantum transport properties of TI surfaces. We focus on the efforts to use quantum interference phenomena, such as weak anti-localization and the Aharonov-Bohm effect, to verify in a transport experiment the Dirac nature of the surface state and its defining properties. In addition to explaining the basic ideas and predictions of the theory, we provide a survey of recent experimental work. PMID:23552181

  9. Quantum interference and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardarson, Jens H.; Moore, Joel E.

    2013-05-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) have an insulating bulk but a metallic surface. In the simplest case, the surface electronic structure of a three-dimensional (3D) TI is described by a single two-dimensional (2D) Dirac cone. A single 2D Dirac fermion cannot be realized in an isolated 2D system with time-reversal symmetry, but rather owes its existence to the topological properties of the 3D bulk wavefunctions. The transport properties of such a surface state are of considerable current interest; they have some similarities with graphene, which also realizes Dirac fermions, but have several unique features in their response to magnetic fields. In this review we give an overview of some of the main quantum transport properties of TI surfaces. We focus on the efforts to use quantum interference phenomena, such as weak anti-localization and the Aharonov-Bohm effect, to verify in a transport experiment the Dirac nature of the surface state and its defining properties. In addition to explaining the basic ideas and predictions of the theory, we provide a survey of recent experimental work.

  10. Distinguishability of stacks in ZnTe/ZnSe quantum dots via spectral analysis of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Bidisha; Ji, Haojie; Dhomkar, Siddharth; Cadieu, Fred J.; Peng, Le; Moug, Richard; Tamargo, Maria C.; Kuskovsky, Igor L.

    2013-02-01

    A spectral analysis of the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations in photoluminescence intensity was performed for stacked type-II ZnTe/ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) fabricated within multilayered Zn-Se-Te system with sub-monolayer insertions of Te. Robust AB oscillations allowed for fine probing of distinguishable QDs stacks within the ensemble of QDs. The AB transition magnetic field, B AB , changed from the lower energy side to the higher energy side of the PL spectra revealing the presence of different sets of QDs stacks. The change occurs within the spectral range, where the contributing green and blue bands of the spectra overlapped. "Bundling" in lifetime measurements is seen at transition spectral regions confirming the results.

  11. Aharonov-Bohm radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones-Smith, Katherine; Mathur, Harsh; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2010-02-15

    A solenoid oscillating in vacuum will pair produce charged particles due to the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interaction. We calculate the radiation pattern and power emitted for charged scalar particles. We extend the solenoid analysis to cosmic strings and find enhanced radiation from cusps and kinks on loops. We argue by analogy with the electromagnetic AB interaction that cosmic strings should emit photons due to the gravitational AB interaction of fields in the conical spacetime of a cosmic string. We calculate the emission from a kink and find that it is of similar order as emission from a cusp, but kinks are vastly more numerous than cusps and may provide a more interesting observational signature.

  12. Observation of a Biexciton Wigner Molecule by Fractional Optical Aharonov-Bohm Oscillations in a Single Quantum Ring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Dae; Okuyama, Rin; Kyhm, Kwangseuk; Eto, Mikio; Taylor, Robert A; Nicolet, Aurelien L; Potemski, Marek; Nogues, Gilles; Dang, Le Si; Je, Ku-Chul; Kim, Jongsu; Kyhm, Ji-Hoon; Yoen, Kyu Hyoek; Lee, Eun Hye; Kim, Jun Young; Han, Il Ki; Choi, Wonjun; Song, Jindong

    2016-01-13

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect in ring structures in the presence of electronic correlation and disorder is an open issue. We report novel oscillations of a strongly correlated exciton pair, similar to a Wigner molecule, in a single nanoquantum ring, where the emission energy changes abruptly at the transition magnetic field with a fractional oscillation period compared to that of the exciton, a so-called fractional optical Aharonov-Bohm oscillation. We have also observed modulated optical Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of an electron-hole pair and an anticrossing of the photoluminescence spectrum at the transition magnetic field, which are associated with disorder effects such as localization, built-in electric field, and impurities. PMID:26648477

  13. Gate controlled Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations from single neutral excitons in quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, F.; Akopian, N.; Li, B.; Perinetti, U.; Govorov, A.; Peeters, F. M.; Bof Bufon, C. C.; Deneke, C.; Chen, Y. H.; Rastelli, A.; Schmidt, O. G.; Zwiller, V.

    2010-08-01

    We report on a magnetophotoluminescence study of single self-assembled semiconductor nanorings which are fabricated by molecular-beam epitaxy combined with AsBr3 in situ etching. Oscillations in the neutral exciton radiative recombination energy and in the emission intensity are observed under an applied magnetic field. Further, we control the period of the oscillations with a gate potential that modifies the exciton confinement. We infer from the experimental results, combined with calculations, that the exciton Aharonov-Bohm effect may account for the observed effects.

  14. Impurity-modulated Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and intraband optical absorption in quantum dot-ring nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barseghyan, M. G.; Manaselyan, A. Kh.; Laroze, D.; Kirakosyan, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we study the electronic states in quantum dot-ring complex nanostructures with an on-center hydrogenic impurity. The influence of the impurity on Aharonov-Bohm energy spectra oscillations and intraband optical absorption is investigated. It is shown that in the presence of a hydrogenic donor impurity the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in quantum dot-ring structures become highly tunable. Furthermore, the presence of the impurity drastically changes the intraband absorption spectra due to the strong controllability of the electron localization type.

  15. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in a quasi-ballistic three-dimensional topological insulator nanowire.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sungjae; Dellabetta, Brian; Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John; Liu, Tiansheng; Gu, Genda; Gilbert, Matthew J; Mason, Nadya

    2015-01-01

    Aharonov-Bohm oscillations effectively demonstrate coherent, ballistic transport in mesoscopic rings and tubes. In three-dimensional topological insulator nanowires, they can be used to not only characterize surface states but also to test predictions of unique topological behaviour. Here we report measurements of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in (Bi1.33Sb0.67)Se3 that demonstrate salient features of topological nanowires. By fabricating quasi-ballistic three-dimensional topological insulator nanowire devices that are gate-tunable through the Dirac point, we are able to observe alternations of conductance maxima and minima with gate voltage. Near the Dirac point, we observe conductance minima for zero magnetic flux through the nanowire and corresponding maxima (having magnitudes of almost a conductance quantum) at magnetic flux equal to half a flux quantum; this is consistent with the presence of a low-energy topological mode. The observation of this mode is a necessary step towards utilizing topological properties at the nanoscale in post-CMOS applications. PMID:26158768

  16. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Xian; Li, Cai-Zhen; Yu, Da-Peng; Liao, Zhi-Min

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional Dirac semimetals, three-dimensional analogues of graphene, are unusual quantum materials with massless Dirac fermions, which can be further converted to Weyl fermions by breaking time reversal or inversion symmetry. Topological surface states with Fermi arcs are predicted on the surface and have been observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments. Although the exotic transport properties of the bulk Dirac cones have been demonstrated, it is still a challenge to reveal the surface states via transport measurements due to the highly conductive bulk states. Here, we show Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in individual single-crystal Cd3As2 nanowires with low carrier concentration and large surface-to-volume ratio, providing transport evidence of the surface state in three-dimensional Dirac semimetals. Moreover, the quantum transport can be modulated by tuning the Fermi level using a gate voltage, enabling a deeper understanding of the rich physics residing in Dirac semimetals.

  17. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Xian; Li, Cai-Zhen; Yu, Da-Peng; Liao, Zhi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional Dirac semimetals, three-dimensional analogues of graphene, are unusual quantum materials with massless Dirac fermions, which can be further converted to Weyl fermions by breaking time reversal or inversion symmetry. Topological surface states with Fermi arcs are predicted on the surface and have been observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments. Although the exotic transport properties of the bulk Dirac cones have been demonstrated, it is still a challenge to reveal the surface states via transport measurements due to the highly conductive bulk states. Here, we show Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in individual single-crystal Cd3As2 nanowires with low carrier concentration and large surface-to-volume ratio, providing transport evidence of the surface state in three-dimensional Dirac semimetals. Moreover, the quantum transport can be modulated by tuning the Fermi level using a gate voltage, enabling a deeper understanding of the rich physics residing in Dirac semimetals. PMID:26902716

  18. Aharonov-bohm paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trammel, G. T.

    1964-01-01

    Aharonov-bohm paradox involving charge particle interaction with stationary current distribution showing that vector potential term in canonical momenta expression represents electromagnetic field momentum

  19. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, quantum decoherence and amplitude modulation in mesoscopic InGaAs/InAlAs rings.

    PubMed

    Ren, S L; Heremans, J J; Gaspe, C K; Vijeyaragunathan, S; Mishima, T D; Santos, M B

    2013-10-30

    Low-temperature Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in the magnetoresistance of mesoscopic interferometric rings patterned on an InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructure are investigated for their dependence on excitation current and temperature. The rings have an average radius of 650 nm, and a lithographic arm width of 300 nm, yielding pronounced interference oscillations over a wide range of magnetic fields. Apart from a current and temperature dependence, the oscillation amplitude also shows a quasi-periodic modulation with applied magnetic field. The phase coherence length is extracted by analysis of the fundamental and higher Fourier components of the oscillations, and by direct analysis of the amplitude and its dependence on parameters. It is concluded that the Thouless energy forms the measure of excitation energies for quantum decoherence. The amplitude modulation finds an explanation in the effect of the magnetic flux threading the finite width of the interferometer arms. PMID:24096892

  20. Observation of Aharonov-Bohm and Al'tshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations in the background of universal conductance fluctuations in silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mtsuko, Davie; Aslan, Tahir; Ncube, Siphephile; Coleman, Christopher; Wamwangi, Daniel; Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2016-02-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR) oscillations of multiple periodicities are recorded in singly connected silicon nanowires of diameter ≈50 \\text{nm} . At 100 K we observe oscillations of periodicity ≈1.78 \\text{T} and 0.444 T corresponding to h/e and h/4e Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations, whereas at 10 K we record periodicities of 0.98 T, 0.49 T and 0.25 T corresponding to h/e, h/2e (Al'tshuler-Aronov-Spivak (AAS)) and h/4e oscillations. At 2.5 K we find magnetoresistance oscillations with multiple periodicities of 1.3 T, 0.52 T, and 0.325 T corresponding to AB and AAS oscillations. The h/2e and h/4e peaks can be attributed to the interference of time-reversed paths originating from the core orbits that scatter coherently on the surface of the nanowires multiple times. We also observed 20 mT and 60 mT oscillations of small amplitude superimposed on a quasi-periodic background which we attribute to the quantum interference of special surface states associated with skipping orbits that propagate quasi-ballistically. The aperiodic fluctuations in the MR at all temperatures are universal conductance fluctuations (UCF) originating from randomly spaced impurity scattering in the core of the nanowire.

  1. Aharonov-Bohm Constraint for Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahalom, Asher

    It was shown that an Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect exists in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). This effect is best described in terms of the MHD variational variables. If a MHD flow has a non trivial topology some of the functions appearing in the MHD Lagrangian are non-single valued. Some of those functions are analogue to the phases in the AB celebrated effect. While the manifestation of the quantum AB effect is in interference fringe patterns, the manifestation of the MHD Aharonov-Bohm effect is through a new dynamical conservation law. This local conservation law will be shown to constrain the dynamics of MHD flows including fusion scenarios. Bibliography

  2. Magnetic-field-tuned Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and evidence for non-Abelian anyons at ν = 5/2.

    PubMed

    Willett, R L; Nayak, C; Shtengel, K; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W

    2013-11-01

    We show that the resistance of the ν = 5/2 quantum Hall state, confined to an interferometer, oscillates with the magnetic field consistent with an Ising-type non-Abelian state. In three quantum Hall interferometers of different sizes, resistance oscillations at ν = 7/3 and integer filling factors have the magnetic field period expected if the number of quasiparticles contained within the interferometer changes so as to keep the area and the total charge within the interferometer constant. Under these conditions, an Abelian state such as the (3, 3, 1) state would show oscillations with the same period as at an integer quantum Hall state. However, in an Ising-type non-Abelian state there would be a rapid oscillation associated with the "even-odd effect" and a slower one associated with the accumulated Abelian phase due to both the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the Abelian part of the quasiparticle braiding statistics. Our measurements at ν = 5/2 are consistent with the latter. PMID:24237543

  3. Magnetic edge states in Aharonov-Bohm graphene quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farghadan, R.; Saffarzadeh, A.; Heidari Semiromi, E.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of electron-electron interaction on the electronic structure of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) graphene quantum rings (GQRs) is explored theoretically using the single-band tight-binding Hamiltonian and the mean-field Hubbard model. The electronic states and magnetic properties of hexagonal, triangular, and circular GQRs with different sizes and zigzag edge terminations are studied. The results show that, although the AB oscillations in the all types of nanoring are affected by the interaction, the spin splitting in the AB oscillations strongly depends on the geometry and the size of graphene nanorings. We found that the total spin of hexagonal and circular rings is zero and therefore, no spin splitting can be observed in the AB oscillations. However, the non-zero magnetization of the triangular rings breaks the degeneracy between spin-up and spin-down electrons, which produces spin-polarized AB oscillations.

  4. The two-level model of the excitonic Aharonov-Bohm effect in strained self-assembled semiconductor nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadić, M.; Arsoski, V.; Čukarić, N.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-12-01

    The excitonic Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in type-I nanorings are found to be caused by anticrossings between exciton states. These anticrossings are analyzed by a tight-binding-like model of exciton states. The criteria for the existence of the excitonic Aharonov-Bohm oscillations are formulated. For nanorings of realistic width and height, the range of values of the inner radius where the excitonic Aharonov-Bohm oscillations exist is found.

  5. Lorentz violation correction to the Aharonov-Bohm scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, using a (2 +1 )-dimensional field theory approach, we study the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) scattering with Lorentz symmetry breaking. We obtain the modified scattering amplitude to the AB effect due to the small Lorentz violation correction in the breaking parameter and prove that up to one loop the model is free from ultraviolet divergences.

  6. Aharonov-Bohm radiation of fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Yizen; Mathur, Harsh; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2010-09-15

    We analyze Aharonov-Bohm radiation of charged fermions from oscillating solenoids and cosmic strings. We find that the angular pattern of the radiation has features that differ significantly from that for bosons. For example, fermionic radiation in the lowest harmonic is approximately isotropically distributed around an oscillating solenoid, whereas for bosons the radiation is dipolar. We also investigate the spin polarization of the emitted fermion-antifermion pair. Fermionic radiation from kinks and cusps on cosmic strings is shown to depend linearly on the ultraviolet cutoff, suggesting strong emission at an energy scale comparable to the string energy scale.

  7. How quantum impenetrability affects Aharonov-Bohm scattering?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasev, G. N.; Shilov, V. M.

    It is shown that different forms of quantum impenetrability lead to different physical consequences. This should be kept in mind in analyzing experimental data. The relativistic impenetrability conditions are considered and the corresponding relativistic Aharonov-Bohm cross-sections are obtained. The possibility of the AB effect occurrence in simply-connected space regions is discussed.

  8. Excitonic Aharonov-Bohm effect: Unstrained versus strained type-I semiconductor nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadić, M.; Čukarić, N.; Arsoski, V.; Peeters, F. M.

    2011-09-01

    We study how mechanical strain affects the magnetic field dependence of the exciton states in type-I semiconductor nanorings. Strain spatially separates the electron and hole in (In,Ga)As/GaAs nanorings which is beneficial for the occurrence of the excitonic Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect. In narrow strained (In,Ga)As/GaAs nanorings the AB oscillations in the exciton ground-state energy are due to anticrossings with the first excited state. No such AB oscillations are found in unstrained GaAs/(Al,Ga)As nanorings irrespective of the ring width. Our results are obtained within an exact numerical diagonalization scheme and are shown to be accurately described by a two-level model with off-diagonal coupling t. The later transfer integral expresses the Coulomb coupling between states of electron-hole pairs. We also found that the oscillator strength for exciton recombination in (In,Ga)As/GaAs nanorings exhibits AB oscillations, which are superimposed on a linear increase with magnetic field. Our results agree qualitatively with recent experiments on the excitonic Aharonov-Bohm effect in type-I (In,Ga)As/GaAs nanorings.

  9. Realization of adiabatic Aharonov-Bohm scattering with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Erik; Almquist, Martin; Mattsson, Ken; Gürkan, Zeynep Nilhan; Hessmo, Björn

    2015-11-01

    The adiabatic Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect is a manifestation of the Berry phase acquired when some slow variables take a planar spin around a loop. While the effect has been observed in molecular spectroscopy, direct measurement of the topological phase shift in a scattering experiment has been elusive in the past. Here, we demonstrate an adiabatic AB effect by explicit simulation of the dynamics of unpolarized very slow neutrons that scatter on a long straight current-carrying wire.

  10. Spin- and localization-induced fractional Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emperador, A.; Pederiva, F.; Lipparini, E.

    2003-09-01

    We performed a theoretical analysis of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the ground-state energy of quasi-one-dimensional quantum rings in a magnetic field, recently observed in conductance experiments, by means of quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The model rings considered contain N=10 and N=4 electrons, with radii of 20 and 120 nm, respectively. These parameters give a close description of the nanorings analyzed in the experiments. In particular, the two cases well reproduce the high- and low-electron-density regimes. For N=10, we have found fractional Aharonov-Bohm effect with a period Φ0/2 due to the changes in the total spin of the ground state. For N=4, we have found fractional oscillations with a period Φ0/4, which are shown to be a consequence of strong localization.

  11. Aharonov-Bohm effect induced by circularly polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurdsson, H.; Kibis, O. V.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrated theoretically that the strong electron interaction with circularly polarized photons in ring-like nanostructures changes the phase of electron wave. This optically-induced effect is caused by the breaking of time-reversal symmetry and is similar to the Aharonov-Bohm effect. As a consequence of this phenomenon, the conductance of mesoscopic rings irradiated by a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave behaves as an oscillating function of the intensity and frequency of the wave.

  12. Nonlocality of the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonov, Yakir; Cohen, Eliahu; Rohrlich, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Although the Aharonov-Bohm and related effects are familiar in solid-state and high-energy physics, the nonlocality of these effects has been questioned. Here we show that the Aharonov-Bohm effect has two very different aspects. One aspect is instantaneous and nonlocal; the other aspect, which depends on entanglement, unfolds continuously over time. While local, gauge-invariant variables may occasionally suffice for explaining the continuous aspect, we argue that they cannot explain the instantaneous aspect. Thus the Aharonov-Bohm effect is, in general, nonlocal.

  13. The interplay between the Aharonov-Bohm interference and parity selective tunneling in graphene nanoribbon rings.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V Hung; Niquet, Y-M; Dollfus, P

    2014-05-21

    We report on a numerical study of the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect and parity selective tunneling in pn junctions based on rectangular graphene rings where the contacts and ring arms are all made of zigzag nanoribbons. We find that when applying a magnetic field to the ring, the AB interference can reverse the parity symmetry of incoming waves and hence can strongly modulate the parity selective transmission through the system. Therefore, the transmission between two states of different parity exhibits the AB oscillations with a π-phase shift, compared to the case of states of the same parity. On this basis, it is shown that interesting effects, such as giant (both positive and negative) magnetoresistance and strong negative differential conductance, can be achieved in this structure. Our study thus presents a new property of the AB interference in graphene nanorings, which could be helpful for further understanding the transport properties of graphene mesoscopic systems. PMID:24785639

  14. Mode Dependency of Quantum Decoherence Studied via an Aharonov-Bohm Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Tung-Sheng; Lin, Yiping; Wu, Phillip M.; Ling, Dah-Chin; Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the dependence of decoherence on the mode number M in a multiple-mode Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometer. The design of the AB interferometer allows us to precisely determine M by the additivity rule of ballistic conductors; meanwhile, the decoherence rate is simultaneously deduced by the variance of the AB oscillation amplitude. The AB amplitude decreases and fluctuates with depopulating M . Moreover, the normalized amplitude exhibits a maximum at a specific M (˜9 ). Data analysis reveals that the charge-fluctuation-induced dephasing, which depends on the geometry and the charge relaxation resistance of the system, could play an essential role in the decoherence process. Our results suggest that the phase coherence, in principle, can be optimized using a deliberated design and pave one of the ways toward the engineering of quantum coherence.

  15. Mode Dependency of Quantum Decoherence Studied via an Aharonov-Bohm Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Lo, Tung-Sheng; Lin, Yiping; Wu, Phillip M; Ling, Dah-Chin; Chi, C C; Chen, Jeng-Chung

    2016-02-26

    We investigate the dependence of decoherence on the mode number M in a multiple-mode Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometer. The design of the AB interferometer allows us to precisely determine M by the additivity rule of ballistic conductors; meanwhile, the decoherence rate is simultaneously deduced by the variance of the AB oscillation amplitude. The AB amplitude decreases and fluctuates with depopulating M. Moreover, the normalized amplitude exhibits a maximum at a specific M (∼9). Data analysis reveals that the charge-fluctuation-induced dephasing, which depends on the geometry and the charge relaxation resistance of the system, could play an essential role in the decoherence process. Our results suggest that the phase coherence, in principle, can be optimized using a deliberated design and pave one of the ways toward the engineering of quantum coherence. PMID:26967397

  16. Aharonov-Bohm effect of excitons in nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hui; Zhu, Jia-Lin; Li, Dai-Jun; Xiong, Jia-Jiong

    2001-05-01

    The magnetic field effects on excitons in an InAs nanoring are studied theoretically. By numerically diagonalizing the effective-mass Hamiltonian of the problem that can be separated into terms in center-of-mass and relative coordinates, we calculate the low-lying excitonic energy levels and oscillator strengths as a function of the ring width and the strength of an external magnetic field. It is shown that in the presence of Coulomb correlation, the so-called Aharonov-Bohm effect of excitons exists in a finite (but small) width nanoring. However, when the ring width becomes large, the non-simply-connected geometry of nanorings is destroyed, causing the suppression of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. The analytical results are obtained for a narrow-width nanoring in which the radial motion is the fastest one and adiabatically decoupled from the azimuthal motions. The conditional probability distribution calculated for the low-lying excitonic states allows identification of the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. The linear optical susceptibility is also calculated as a function of the magnetic field, to be compared with the future measurements of optical emission experiments on InAs nanorings.

  17. Aharonov-Bohm detection of two-dimensional magnetostatic cloaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valagiannopoulos, Constantinos A.; Askarpour, Amir Nader; Alù, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional magnetostatic cloaks, even when perfectly designed to mitigate the magnetic field disturbance of a scatterer, may be still detectable with Aharonov-Bohm (AB) measurements, and therefore may affect quantum interactions and experiments with elongated objects. We explore a multilayered cylindrical cloak whose permeability profile is tailored to nullify the magnetic-flux perturbation of the system, neutralizing its effect on AB measurements, and simultaneously optimally suppress the overall scattering. In this way, our improved magnetostatic cloak combines substantial mitigation of the magnetostatic scattering response with zero detectability by AB experiments.

  18. Entanglement between static and flying qubits in an Aharonov Bohm double electrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomerus, Henning; Robinson, John P.

    2007-03-01

    We consider the phase-coherent transport of electrons passing through an Aharonov Bohm ring while interacting with a tunnel charge in a double quantum dot (representing a charge qubit) which couples symmetrically to both arms of the ring. For Aharonov Bohm flux ΦAB = h/2e we find that electrons can only be transmitted when they flip the charge qubit's pseudospin parity an odd number of times. The perfect correlations of the dynamics of the pseudospin and individual electronic transmission and reflection events can be used to entangle the charge qubit with an individual passing electron.

  19. Thermoelectric effect in Aharonov-Bohm structures.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Morrel, William G; Ni, Xiaoxi; Wu, Chang-Qin; Li, Baowen

    2015-01-28

    The thermoelectric effects of a single Aharonov-Bohm (SAB) ring and coupled double Aharonov-Bohm (DAB) rings have been investigated on a theoretical basis, taking into account the contributions of both electrons and phonons to the transport process by using the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. The thermoelectric figure of merit of the coupled DAB rings cannot be predicted directly by combining the values of two SAB ring systems due to the contribution of electron-phonon interaction to coupling between the two sites connecting the rings. We find that thermoelectric efficiency can be optimized by modulating the phases of the magnetic flux threading the two rings. PMID:25537848

  20. Thermoelectric effect in Aharonov-Bohm structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Morrel, William G.; Ni, Xiaoxi; Wu, Chang-Qin; Li, Baowen

    2015-01-01

    The thermoelectric effects of a single Aharonov-Bohm (SAB) ring and coupled double Aharonov-Bohm (DAB) rings have been investigated on a theoretical basis, taking into account the contributions of both electrons and phonons to the transport process by using the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. The thermoelectric figure of merit of the coupled DAB rings cannot be predicted directly by combining the values of two SAB ring systems due to the contribution of electron-phonon interaction to coupling between the two sites connecting the rings. We find that thermoelectric efficiency can be optimized by modulating the phases of the magnetic flux threading the two rings.

  1. Dispersionless forces and the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batelaan, H.; Becker, M.

    2015-11-01

    The independence of the Aharonov-Bohm phase shift on particle velocity is one of its defining properties. The classical counterpart to this dispersionless behavior is the absence of forces along the direction of motion of the particle. A reevaluation of the experimental demonstration that forces are absent in the AB physical system is given, including previously unpublished data. It is shown that the debate on the presence or absence of forces is not settled. Experiments that measure the influence of magnetic permeability on forces and search for dispersionless quantum forces are proposed.

  2. Tests of the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprez, Adam Preston

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect was first proposed in 1959, and has stimulated discussion and controversy since the start. Seen by many as a purely quantum mechanical effect, it nevertheless involves such issues as gauge invariance and relativistic dynamics. This multi-faceted nature has led it to be considered a keystone of modern quantum theory. Over the past half-century, interest has remained strong in what many believe is still an open debate as to the purely quantum nature. Additionally, discovery of similar effects for particles other than electrons has further driven curiosity. To better understand the issues such as electromagnetic mass and relativistic effects involved in the Aharonov-Bohm effect, a theoretical study of a simpler two particle system was done. The goal was to understand the manner in which mass of the system behaved strictly classically as compared to a relativistically. As a result of this, a Gedanken experiment is presented which serves as a test for covariance. The two particle system was extended to a spherical shell interacting with a single particle, and a second thought experiment put forth to explore a coupling between electromagnetism and gravitation. In the course of searching for simpler systems which involved the same issues as the Aharonov-Bohm effect, a system presented in the Feynman Lectures of Physics was found to be appropriate. We conduct a complete relativistic analysis of this system as a step towards a full relativistic analysis of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Given the history and significance of the Aharonov-Bohm effect, it is perhaps surprising that relevant experimental tests had not been completed. For the first time, we searched for time delays as an electron passes a macroscopic solenoid. Such time delays are characteristic of classical forces acting on the electron. No such delays were found, seemingly confirming the standard viewpoint. It is still possible a classical explanation may exist for microscopic solenoids

  3. Noncommutative analogue Aharonov-Bohm effect and superresonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, M. A.; Brito, F. A.; Passos, E.

    2013-06-01

    We consider the idea of modeling a rotating acoustic black hole by an idealized draining bathtub vortex which is a planar circulating flow phenomenon with a sink at the origin. We find the acoustic metric for this phenomenon from a noncommutative Abelian Higgs model. As such the acoustic metric not only describes a rotating acoustic black hole but also inherits the noncommutative characteristic of the spacetime. We address the issues of superresonance and analogue Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in this background. We mainly show that the scattering of planar waves by a draining bathtub vortex leads to a modified AB effect and due to spacetime noncommutativity, the phase shift persists even in the limit where the parameters associated with the circulation and draining vanish. Finally, we also find that the analogue AB effect and superresonance are competing phenomena at a noncommutative spacetime.

  4. The electric Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weder, Ricardo

    2011-05-01

    The seminal paper of Aharonov and Bohm [Phys. Rev. 115, 485 (1959)], 10.1103/PhysRev.115.485 is at the origin of a very extensive literature in some of the more fundamental issues in physics. They claimed that electromagnetic fields can act at a distance on charged particles even if they are identically zero in the region of space where the particles propagate, that the fundamental electromagnetic quantities in quantum physics are not only the electromagnetic fields but also the circulations of the electromagnetic potentials; what gives them a real physical significance. They proposed two experiments to verify their theoretical conclusions. The magnetic Aharonov-Bohm effect, where an electron is influenced by a magnetic field that is zero in the region of space accessible to the electron, and the electric Aharonov-Bohm effect where an electron is affected by a time-dependent electric potential that is constant in the region where the electron is propagating, i.e., such that the electric field vanishes along its trajectory. The Aharonov-Bohm effects imply such a strong departure from the physical intuition coming from classical physics that it is no wonder that they remain a highly controversial issue after more than fifty years, in spite of the fact that they are discussed in most of the text books in quantum mechanics. The magnetic case has been studied extensively. The experimental issues were settled by the remarkable experiments of Tonomura et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 1443 (1982); Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 792 (1986)] with toroidal magnets, that gave a strong evidence of the existence of the effect, and by the recent experiment of Caprez et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 210401 (2007)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.210401 that shows that the results of the Tonomura et al. experiments cannot be explained by the action of a force. The theoretical issues were settled by Ballesteros and Weder [Commun. Math. Phys. 285, 345 (2009), 10.1007/s00220-008-0579-1; J. Math. Phys. 50

  5. The electric Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Weder, Ricardo

    2011-05-15

    The seminal paper of Aharonov and Bohm [Phys. Rev. 115, 485 (1959)] is at the origin of a very extensive literature in some of the more fundamental issues in physics. They claimed that electromagnetic fields can act at a distance on charged particles even if they are identically zero in the region of space where the particles propagate, that the fundamental electromagnetic quantities in quantum physics are not only the electromagnetic fields but also the circulations of the electromagnetic potentials; what gives them a real physical significance. They proposed two experiments to verify their theoretical conclusions. The magnetic Aharonov-Bohm effect, where an electron is influenced by a magnetic field that is zero in the region of space accessible to the electron, and the electric Aharonov-Bohm effect where an electron is affected by a time-dependent electric potential that is constant in the region where the electron is propagating, i.e., such that the electric field vanishes along its trajectory. The Aharonov-Bohm effects imply such a strong departure from the physical intuition coming from classical physics that it is no wonder that they remain a highly controversial issue after more than fifty years, in spite of the fact that they are discussed in most of the text books in quantum mechanics. The magnetic case has been studied extensively. The experimental issues were settled by the remarkable experiments of Tonomura et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 1443 (1982); Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 792 (1986)] with toroidal magnets, that gave a strong evidence of the existence of the effect, and by the recent experiment of Caprez et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 210401 (2007)] that shows that the results of the Tonomura et al. experiments cannot be explained by the action of a force. The theoretical issues were settled by Ballesteros and Weder [Commun. Math. Phys. 285, 345 (2009); J. Math. Phys. 50, 122108 (2009); Commun. Math. Phys. 303, 175 (2011)] who rigorously proved that quantum

  6. Optical exciton Aharonov-Bohm effect, persistent current, and magnetization in semiconductor nanorings of type I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grochol, M.; Grosse, F.; Zimmermann, R.

    2006-09-01

    The optical exciton Aharonov-Bohm effect—i.e., an oscillatory component in the energy of optically active (bright) states—is investigated in nanorings. It is shown that a small effective electron mass, strong confinement of the electron, and high barrier for the hole, achieved, e.g., by an InAs nanoring embedded in an AlGaSb quantum well, are favorable for observing the optical exciton Aharonov-Bohm effect. The second derivative of the exciton energy with respect to the magnetic field is utilized to extract Aharonov-Bohm oscillations even for the lowest bright state unambiguously. A connection between the theories for infinitesimal narrow and finite width rings is established. Furthermore, the magnetization is compared to the persistent current, which oscillates periodically with the magnetic field and confirms thus the nontrivial (connected) topology of the wave function in the nanoring.

  7. Phase shifts and phase π jumps in four-terminal waveguide Aharonov-Bohm interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreisbeck, Christoph; Kramer, Tobias; Buchholz, Sven S.; Fischer, Saskia F.; Kunze, Ulrich; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D.

    2010-10-01

    Quantum coherent properties of electrons can be studied in Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometers. We investigate both experimentally and theoretically the transmission phase evolution in a four-terminal quasi-one-dimensional AlGaAs/GaAs-based waveguide AB ring. As main control parameter besides the magnetic field, we tune the Fermi wave number along the pathways using a top-gate. Our experimental results and theoretical calculations demonstrate the strong influence of the measurement configuration upon the AB-resistance-oscillation phase in a four-terminal device. While the nonlocal setup displays continuous phase shifts of the AB oscillations, the phase remains rigid in the local voltage-probe setup. Abrupt phase jumps are found in all measurement configurations. We analyze the phase shifts as functions of the magnetic field and the Fermi energy and provide a detailed theoretical model of the device. Scattering and reflections in the arms of the ring are the source of abrupt phase jumps by π .

  8. Aharonov-Bohm phase for an electromagnetic wave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Max; Singleton, Douglas; Yoshida, Atsushi

    2015-09-01

    The canonical Aharonov-Bohm effect is usually studied with time-independent potentials. In this work, we investigate the Aharonov-Bohm phase acquired by a charged particle moving in time-dependent potentials. In particular, we focus on the case of a charged particle moving in the time-varying field of a plane electromagnetic wave. We work out the Aharonov-Bohm phase using both the potential (i.e. oint A_μ dx ^μ ) and the field (i.e. 1/2int F_{μ ν } dσ ^{μ ν }) forms of the Aharonov-Bohm phase. We give conditions in terms of the parameters of the system (frequency of the electromagnetic wave, the size of the space-time loop, amplitude of the electromagnetic wave) under which the time-varying Aharonov-Bohm effect could be observed.

  9. Photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect in photon-phonon interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Enbang; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Fang, Kejie; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect is one of the most intriguing phenomena in both classical and quantum physics, and associates with a number of important and fundamental issues in quantum mechanics. The Aharonov-Bohm effects of charged particles have been experimentally demonstrated and found applications in various fields. Recently, attention has also focused on the Aharonov-Bohm effect for neutral particles, such as photons. Here we propose to utilize the photon-phonon interactions to demonstrate that photonic Aharonov-Bohm effects do exist for photons. By introducing nonreciprocal phases for photons, we observe experimentally a gauge potential for photons in the visible range based on the photon-phonon interactions in acousto-optic crystals, and demonstrate the photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect. The results presented here point to new possibilities to control and manipulate photons by designing an effective gauge potential. PMID:24476790

  10. Thermoelectric effects in a rectangular Aharonov-Bohm geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, A. J.; Faux, D. A.; Kearney, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    The thermoelectric transport properties of a rectangular Aharonov-Bohm ring at low temperature are investigated using a theoretical approach based on Green's functions. The oscillations in the transmission coefficient as the field is varied can be used to tune the thermoelectric response of the ring. Large magnitude thermopowers are obtainable which, in conjunction with low conductance, can result in a high thermoelectric figure of merit. The effects of single site impurities and more general Anderson disorder are considered explicitly in the context of evaluating their effect on the Fano-type resonances in the transmission coefficient. Importantly, it is shown that even for moderate levels of disorder, the thermoelectric figure of merit can remain significant, increasing the appeal of such structures from the perspective of specialist thermoelectric applications.

  11. Fingerprints of Majorana Bound States in Aharonov-Bohm Geometry.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Krashna Mohan; Das, Sourin; Rao, Sumathi

    2016-04-22

    We study a ring geometry, coupled to two normal metallic leads, which has a Majorana bound state (MBS) embedded in one of its arms and is threaded by Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux ϕ. We show that by varying the AB flux, the two leads go through resonance in an anticorrelated fashion while the resonance conductance is quantized to 2e^{2}/h. We further show that such anticorrelation is completely absent when the MBS is replaced by an Andreev bound state (ABS). Hence this anti-correlation in conductance when studied as a function of ϕ provides a unique signature of the MBS which cannot be faked by an ABS. We contrast the phase sensitivity of the MBS and ABS in terms of tunneling conductances. We argue that the relative phase between the tunneling amplitude of the electrons and holes from either lead to the level (MBS or ABS), which is constrained to 0,π for the MBS and unconstrained for the ABS, is responsible for this interesting contrast in the AB effect between the MBS and ABS. PMID:27152813

  12. Time-dependent Pauli equation in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouguerra, Y.; Bounames, A.; Maamache, M.; Saadi, Y.

    2008-04-01

    We use the Lewis-Riesenfeld theory to determine the exact form of the wavefunctions of a two-dimensional Pauli equation of a charged spin 1/2 particle with time-dependent mass and frequency in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect and a two-dimensional time-dependent harmonic oscillator. We find that the irregular solution at the origin as well as the regular one contributes to the phase of the wavefunction.

  13. Time-dependent Pauli equation in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bouguerra, Y.; Bounames, A.; Maamache, M.; Saadi, Y.

    2008-04-15

    We use the Lewis-Riesenfeld theory to determine the exact form of the wavefunctions of a two-dimensional Pauli equation of a charged spin 1/2 particle with time-dependent mass and frequency in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect and a two-dimensional time-dependent harmonic oscillator. We find that the irregular solution at the origin as well as the regular one contributes to the phase of the wavefunction.

  14. Fingerprints of Majorana Bound States in Aharonov-Bohm Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Krashna Mohan; Das, Sourin; Rao, Sumathi

    2016-04-01

    We study a ring geometry, coupled to two normal metallic leads, which has a Majorana bound state (MBS) embedded in one of its arms and is threaded by Aharonov-Bohm (A B ) flux ϕ . We show that by varying the A B flux, the two leads go through resonance in an anticorrelated fashion while the resonance conductance is quantized to 2 e2/h . We further show that such anticorrelation is completely absent when the MBS is replaced by an Andreev bound state (ABS). Hence this anti-correlation in conductance when studied as a function of ϕ provides a unique signature of the MBS which cannot be faked by an ABS. We contrast the phase sensitivity of the MBS and ABS in terms of tunneling conductances. We argue that the relative phase between the tunneling amplitude of the electrons and holes from either lead to the level (MBS or ABS), which is constrained to 0 ,π for the MBS and unconstrained for the ABS, is responsible for this interesting contrast in the A B effect between the MBS and ABS.

  15. Observation of Optical Signature of the Aharonov-Bohm Phase in Type-II Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuskovsky, Igor; MacDonald, W.; Tamargo, M. C.; Govorov, A. O.; Wei, X.; Tadic, M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2006-03-01

    Recent theoretical studies^1,2 on the optical response of type-II excitons in the magnetic field have shown that the excitons will acquire the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) phase as the electrical dipole, formed due to carrier separation, interacts with the field, resulting in the field dependent exciton energy and the emission intensity. Experimentally, the former has been reported^3; however, the behavior of the intensity is still not fully understood. We present results of magneto-photoluminescence studies on type-II ZnTe/ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) formed in Zn-Se-Te multilayer systems^4; this ensures that electron move within the x-y plane. The observed strong oscillations in the intensity is explained in terms of the AB effect^1,2,5 due to the electron motion around a stack of QDs, when the hole is strongly localized in one them. This is in qualitative agreement with the theoretical predictions^2. 1. Kalameitsev, et al., JETP Lett. 68, 669 (1998); Govorov, et al., PRB R66, 081309 (2002); Janssens, et al., PRB 67, 235325 (2003). 2. Janssens, et al., PRB 69, 235320 (2004). 3. Ribeiro, et al., PRL 92, 126402 (2004). 4. Gu, et al.., PRB 71 045340 (2005). 5. Dias da Silva, et al., PRB 70, 155318 (2004).

  16. Aharonov-Bohm effect in a class of noncommutative theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ashok; Falomir, H.; Nieto, M.; Gamboa, J.; Méndez, F.

    2011-08-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect including spin-noncommutative effects is considered. At linear order in θ, the magnetic field is gauge invariant although spatially strongly anisotropic. Despite this anisotropy, the Schrödinger-Pauli equation is separable through successive unitary transformations and the exact solution is found. The scattering amplitude is calculated and compared with the usual case. In the noncommutative Aharonov-Bohm case the differential cross section is independent of θ.

  17. Aharonov-Casher and scalar Aharonov-Bohm topological effects.

    PubMed

    Dulat, Sayipjamal; Ma, Kai

    2012-02-17

    We reexamine the topological and nonlocal natures of the Aharonov-Casher and scalar Aharonov-Bohm phase effects. The underlying U(1) gauge structure is exhibited explicitly. And the conditions for developing topological Aharonov-Casher and scalar Aharonov-Bohm phases are clarified. We analyze the arguments of M. Peshkin and H. J. Lipkin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2847 (1995)] in detail and show that they are based on the wrong Hamiltonian which yields their conclusion incorrect. PMID:22401183

  18. Photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect based on dynamic modulation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kejie; Yu, Zongfu; Fan, Shanhui

    2012-04-13

    We show that when the refractive index of a photonic system is harmonically modulated, the phase of the modulation introduces an effective gauge potential for photons. This effective gauge potential can be used to create a photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect. We show that the photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect provides the optimal mechanism for achieving complete on-chip nonmagnetic optical isolation. PMID:22587255

  19. Non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effect with the time-dependent gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Mansoori, Seyed Ali; Mirza, Behrouz

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect for time-dependent gauge fields. We prove that the non-Abelian AB phase shift related to time-dependent gauge fields, in which the electric and magnetic fields are written in the adjoint representation of SU (N) generators, vanishes up to the first order expansion of the phase factor. Therefore, the flux quantization in a superconductor ring does not appear in the time-dependent Abelian or non-Abelian AB effect.

  20. Dephasing of electrons in the Aharonov-Bohm interferometer with a single-molecular vibrational junction.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wenxi; Xing, Yunhui; Ma, Zhongshui

    2013-05-22

    Phase relaxation of electrons transferring through an electromechanical transistor is studied using the Aharonov-Bohm interferometer. Using the quantum master equation approach, the phase properties of an electron are numerically analyzed based on the interference fringes. The coherence of the electron is partially destroyed by its scattering on excited levels of the local nanomechanical oscillator. The transmission amplitudes with respect to two adjacent mechanical vibrational levels have a phase difference of π. The character of the π phase shift depends on the oscillator frequency only and is robust over a wide range of values of the applied voltage, tunneling length and damping rate of the mechanical oscillator. PMID:23615899

  1. Absence of the Electric Aharonov-Bohm Effect due to Induced Charges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Feng

    2015-01-01

    This paper states that the induced charge should not be neglected in the electric Aharonov-Bohm (A-B) effect. If the induced charge is taken into account, the interference pattern of the moving charge will not change with the potential difference between the two metal tubes. It means that the scalar potential itself can not affect the phase of the moving charge, and the true factor affecting the phase of the moving charge is the energy of the system including the moving charge and the induced charge. PMID:26392302

  2. Absence of the Electric Aharonov-Bohm Effect due to Induced Charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-Feng

    2015-09-01

    This paper states that the induced charge should not be neglected in the electric Aharonov-Bohm (A-B) effect. If the induced charge is taken into account, the interference pattern of the moving charge will not change with the potential difference between the two metal tubes. It means that the scalar potential itself can not affect the phase of the moving charge, and the true factor affecting the phase of the moving charge is the energy of the system including the moving charge and the induced charge.

  3. Absence of the Electric Aharonov-Bohm Effect due to Induced Charges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Feng

    2015-01-01

    This paper states that the induced charge should not be neglected in the electric Aharonov-Bohm (A-B) effect. If the induced charge is taken into account, the interference pattern of the moving charge will not change with the potential difference between the two metal tubes. It means that the scalar potential itself can not affect the phase of the moving charge, and the true factor affecting the phase of the moving charge is the energy of the system including the moving charge and the induced charge. PMID:26392302

  4. Control of the transmission phase in an asymmetric four-terminal Aharonov-Bohm interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, Sven S.; Fischer, Saskia F.; Kunze, Ulrich; Bell, Matthew; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D.

    2010-07-01

    Phase sensitivity and thermal dephasing in coherent electron transport in quasi-one-dimensional (1D) waveguide rings of an asymmetric four-terminal geometry are studied by magnetotransport measurements. We demonstrate the electrostatic control of the phase in Aharonov-Bohm resistance oscillations and investigate the impact of the measurement circuitry on decoherence. Phase rigidity is broken due to the ring geometry: orthogonal waveguide cross junctions and 1D leads minimize reflections and resonances between leads allowing for a continuous electron transmission phase shift. The measurement circuitry influences dephasing: thermal averaging dominates in the nonlocal measurement configuration while additional influence of potential fluctuations becomes relevant in the local configuration.

  5. Feynman's Relativistic Electrodynamics Paradox and the Aharonov-Bohm Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprez, Adam; Batelaan, Herman

    2009-03-01

    An analysis is done of a relativistic paradox posed in the Feynman Lectures of Physics involving two interacting charges. The physical system presented is compared with similar systems that also lead to relativistic paradoxes. The momentum conservation problem for these systems is presented. The relation between the presented analysis and the ongoing debates on momentum conservation in the Aharonov-Bohm problem is discussed.

  6. Quantum coherence of the molecular states and their corresponding currents in nanoscale Aharonov-Bohm interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Heng; Tu, Matisse Wei-Yuan; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2016-07-01

    By considering a nanoscale Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometer consisting of a laterally coupled double dot coupled to the source and drain electrodes, we investigate the AB phase dependence of the bonding and antibonding states and the transport currents via the bonding and antibonding state channels. The relations of the AB phase dependence between the quantum states and the associated transport current components are analyzed, which provides useful information for the reconstruction of quantum states through the measurement of the transport current in such systems. We also obtain the validity of the experimental analysis [given in T. Hatano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 076801 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.076801] that bonding state currents in different energy configurations are almost the same. With the coherent properties in the quantum dot states as well as in the transport currents, we also provide a way to manipulate the bonding and antibonding states through the AB magnetic flux.

  7. Aharonov-Bohm effect in cyclotron and synchrotron radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, V. G.; Gitman, D. M.; Levin, A.; Tlyachev, V. B.

    2001-07-01

    We study the impact of Aharonov-Bohm solenoid on the radiation of a charged particle moving in a constant uniform magnetic field. With this aim in view, exact solutions of Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations are found in the magnetic-solenoid field. Using such solutions, we calculate exactly all the characteristics of one-photon spontaneous radiation both for spinless and spinning particle. Considering non-relativistic and relativistic approximations, we analyze cyclotron and synchrotron radiations in detail. Radiation peculiarities caused by the presence of the solenoid may be considered as a manifestation of Aharonov-Bohm effect in the radiation. In particular, it is shown that new spectral lines appear in the radiation spectrum. Due to angular distribution peculiarities of the radiation intensity, these lines can in principle be isolated from basic cyclotron and synchrotron radiation spectra.

  8. Vacuum polarization of planar charged fermions with Coulomb and Aharonov-Bohm potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalilov, V. R.; Mamsurov, I. V.

    2016-02-01

    Vacuum polarization of charged massless fermions is investigated in the superposition of Coulomb and Aharonov-Bohm (AB) potentials in 2 + 1 dimensions. For this purpose, we construct the Green function of the two-dimensional Dirac equation with Coulomb and AB potentials (via the regular and irregular solutions of the radial Dirac equation) and then calculate the vacuum polarization charge density in the so-called subcritical and supercritical regimes. In the supercritical regime, the Green function has a discontinuity in the complex plane of “energy” due to the singularities on the negative energy axis; these singularities are situated on the unphysical sheet and related to the creation of infinitely many quasistationary fermionic states with negative energies. We expect that our results will be helpful in gaining deeper understanding of the fundamental problem of quantum electrodynamics which can be applied to the problems of charged impurity screening in graphene taking into consideration the electron spin.

  9. Analytic Aharonov-Bohm rings — Currents readout from Zeeman spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Mufei; Reyes-Serrato, Armando

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports the work on the development and analysis of a model for quantum rings in which persistent currents are induced by Aharonov-Bohm (AB) or other similar effects. The model is based on a centric and annual potential profile. The time-independent Schrödinger equation including an external magnetic field and an AB flux is analytically solved. The outputs, namely energy dispersion and wavefunctions, are analyzed in detail. It is shown that the rotation quantum number m is limited to small numbers, especially in weak confinement, and a conceptual proposal is put forward for acquiring the flux and eventually estimating the persistent currents in a Zeeman spectroscopy. The wavefunctions and electron distributions are numerically studied and compared to one-dimensional (1D) quantum well. It is predicated that the model and its solutions, eigen energy structure and analytic wavefunctions, would be a powerful tool for studying various electric and optical properties of quantum rings.

  10. Noncircular semiconductor nanorings of types I and II: Emission kinetics in the excitonic Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grochol, Michal; Zimmermann, Roland

    2007-11-01

    Transition energies and oscillator strengths of excitons in dependence on magnetic field are investigated in types I and II semiconductor nanorings. A slight deviation from circular (concentric) shape of the type II nanoring gives a better observability of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations since the ground state is always optically active. Kinetic equations for the exciton occupation are solved with acoustic phonon scattering as the major relaxation process, and absorption and luminescence spectra are calculated, showing deviations from equilibrium. The presence of a nonradiative exciton decay leads to a quenching of the integrated photoluminescence with magnetic field.

  11. Analogue Aharonov-Bohm effect in neo-Newtonian theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, M. A.; Salako, I. G.; Brito, F. A.; Passos, E.

    2015-12-01

    We address the issues of the scattering of massless planar scalar waves by an acoustic black hole in neo-Newtonian hydrodynamics. We then compute the differential cross section through the use of the partial wave approach in the neo-Newtonian theory which is a modification of the usual Newtonian theory that correctly incorporates the effects of pressure. We mainly show that the scattering of planar waves leads to a modified analogue Aharonov-Bohm effect due to a nontrivial response of the parameters defining the equation of state.

  12. Spectroscopic detectability of the molecular Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englman, R.

    2016-01-01

    It is theoretically shown that the emission spectra from an excited Jahn-Teller state in which the ions undergo a forced periodic trajectory have an M-shaped form, directly due to the sign change by the Berry-phase factor. The presence of a weak spectral sideline is noted and the effects of a nonlinear vibronic coupling are calculated. Experimental verifications of the results, e.g., on R'-centers in LiF, are proposed. The dip in the M-shaped emission line is a novel, and perhaps unique, spectroscopic manifestation of the "molecular Aharonov-Bohm effect."

  13. Spectroscopic detectability of the molecular Aharonov-Bohm effect.

    PubMed

    Englman, R

    2016-01-14

    It is theoretically shown that the emission spectra from an excited Jahn-Teller state in which the ions undergo a forced periodic trajectory have an M-shaped form, directly due to the sign change by the Berry-phase factor. The presence of a weak spectral sideline is noted and the effects of a nonlinear vibronic coupling are calculated. Experimental verifications of the results, e.g., on R'-centers in LiF, are proposed. The dip in the M-shaped emission line is a novel, and perhaps unique, spectroscopic manifestation of the "molecular Aharonov-Bohm effect." PMID:26772550

  14. Hidden photons in Aharonov-Bohm-type experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Paola; Diaz, Christian; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Jaeckel, Joerg; Koch, Benjamin; Redondo, Javier

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the Aharonov-Bohm effect in the presence of hidden photons kinetically mixed with the ordinary electromagnetic photons. The hidden photon field causes a slight phase shift in the observable interference pattern. It is then shown how the limited sensitivity of this experiment can be largely improved. The key observation is that the hidden photon field causes a leakage of the ordinary magnetic field into the supposedly field-free region. The direct measurement of this magnetic field can provide a sensitive experiment with a good discovery potential, particularly below the ˜meV mass range for hidden photons.

  15. Conservation of momentum and the Aharonov-Bohm Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprez, Adam; Batelaan, Herman

    2008-05-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm Effect serves as an example of a purely quantum mechanical phenomenon in which classical forces on the electron are thought to vanish. The presence of forces is still an ongoing debate [1,2]. Surprisingly, a complete special relativistic treatment of the forces in the electron-solenoid system has never been done [3]. We present our ongoing theoretical work on the issue, and explore a connection between Feynman's well-known example [3] of two moving point charges and the Aharonov-Bohm Effect. The relation between this theoretical work and our earlier experimental results [4] is also discussed. [1] T.H. Boyer, J. Phys. A. 39, 3455 (2006). [2] G.C. Hegerfeldt and J.T. Neumann, [quant-ph] arXiv:0801.0799v1 (2008). [3] Y. Aharonov and D. Rohrlich, Quantum Paradoxes: Quantum Theory for the Perplexed (Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2005). [4] The Feynman Lectures on Physics. Vol. II, pp. 26-2-26-5 (1964). [5] A. Caprez, B. Barwick, and H. Batelaan. Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 210401 (2007).

  16. Revisiting the Marton, Simpson, and Suddeth experimental confirmation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdougall, James; Singleton, Douglas; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2015-09-01

    We perform an "archeological" study of one of the original experiments used as evidence for the static, time-independent Aharonov-Bohm effect. Since the experiment in question [1] involved a time varying magnetic field we show that there are problems with the explanation of this experiment as a confirmation of the static Aharonov-Bohm effect - specifically the previous analysis ignored the electric field which arises in conjunction with a time-varying magnetic flux. We further argue that the results of this experiment do in fact conform exactly to the recent prediction [2,3] of a cancellation between the magnetic and electric phase shifts for the time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effect. To resolve this issue a new time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm experiment is called for.

  17. Aharonov-Bohm photonic cages in waveguide and coupled resonator lattices by synthetic magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Stefano

    2014-10-15

    We suggest a method for trapping photons in quasi-one-dimensional waveguide or coupled-resonator lattices, which is based on an optical analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm cages for charged particles. Light trapping results from a destructive interference of Aharonov-Bohm type induced by a synthetic magnetic field, which is realized by periodic modulation of the waveguide/resonator propagation constants/resonances. PMID:25361112

  18. An Aharonov-Bohm interferometer for determining Bloch band topology.

    PubMed

    Duca, L; Li, T; Reitter, M; Bloch, I; Schleier-Smith, M; Schneider, U

    2015-01-16

    The geometric structure of a single-particle energy band in a solid is fundamental for a wide range of many-body phenomena and is uniquely characterized by the distribution of Berry curvature over the Brillouin zone. We realize an atomic interferometer to measure Berry flux in momentum space, in analogy to an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer that measures magnetic flux in real space. We demonstrate the interferometer for a graphene-type hexagonal optical lattice loaded with bosonic atoms. By detecting the singular π Berry flux localized at each Dirac point, we establish the high momentum resolution of this interferometric technique. Our work forms the basis for a general framework to fully characterize topological band structures. PMID:25525160

  19. Aharonov-Bohm Effect in the Photodetachment Microscopy of Hydrogen Negative Ions in an Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dehua

    2014-09-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in the photodetachment microscopy of the H- ions in an electric field has been studied on the basis of the semiclassical theory. After the H- ion is irradiated by a laser light, they provide a coherent electron source. When the detached electron is accelerated by a uniform electric field, two trajectories of a detached electron which run from the source to the same point on the detector, will interfere with each other and lead to an interference pattern in the photodetachment microscopy. After the solenoid is electrified beside the H- ion, even though no Lorentz force acts on the electron outside the solenoid, the photodetachment microscopy interference pattern on the detector is changed with the variation in the magnetic flux enclosed by the solenoid. This is caused by the AB effect. Under certain conditions, the interference pattern reaches the macroscopic dimensions and could be observed in a direct AB effect experiment. Our study can provide some predictions for the future experimental study of the AB effect in the photodetachment microscopy of negative ions.

  20. Aharonov-Bohm interference in gate-defined ring of high-mobility graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minsoo; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-03-01

    Recent progress in preparing a high-quality graphene layer enables one to investigate the intrinsic carrier transport nature in the material. Here, we report the signature of conservation of the Berry's phase with preserved valley symmetry in Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometers fabricated on monolayer graphene with high carrier mobility, where the graphene was sandwiched between two thin hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) layers. In measurements, charge carriers were confined in an AB ring-shaped potential well formed by the dual-gate operation of the bottom and top gates and the four-terminal magneto-conductance (MC) was measured with varying charge carrier density and temperature. Graphene in the device was in the ballistic regime as confirmed by the conductance quantization in steps of ΔG = 4e2/ h in a constricted conducting channel of separate measurements. We observed h/e periodic modulation of MC and the zero-field conductance minimum with a negative MC background. The phase information of AB interference strongly suggests that carriers in the graphene in our devices preserve the intrinsic Dirac transport nature, which would be conveniently utilized for valleytronics in graphene.

  1. Time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effect on the noncommutative space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kai; Wang, Jian-Hua; Yang, Huan-Xiong

    2016-08-01

    We study the time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effect on the noncommutative space. Because there is no net Aharonov-Bohm phase shift in the time-dependent case on the commutative space, therefore, a tiny deviation from zero indicates new physics. Based on the Seiberg-Witten map we obtain the gauge invariant and Lorentz covariant Aharonov-Bohm phase shift in general case on noncommutative space. We find there are two kinds of contribution: momentum-dependent and momentum-independent corrections. For the momentum-dependent correction, there is a cancellation between the magnetic and electric phase shifts, just like the case on the commutative space. However, there is a non-trivial contribution in the momentum-independent correction. This is true for both the time-independent and time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effects on the noncommutative space. However, for the time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effect, there is no overwhelming background which exists in the time-independent Aharonov-Bohm effect on both commutative and noncommutative space. Therefore, the time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm can be sensitive to the spatial noncommutativity. The net correction is proportional to the product of the magnetic fluxes through the fundamental area represented by the noncommutative parameter θ, and through the surface enclosed by the trajectory of charged particle. More interestingly, there is an anti-collinear relation between the logarithms of the magnetic field B and the averaged flux Φ / N (N is the number of fringes shifted). This nontrivial relation can also provide a way to test the spatial noncommutativity. For BΦ / N ∼ 1, our estimation on the experimental sensitivity shows that it can reach the 10 GeV scale. This sensitivity can be enhanced by using stronger magnetic field strength, larger magnetic flux, as well as higher experimental precision on the phase shift.

  2. The semi-classical limit of the Aharonov-Bohm effect: The actualized approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmetskii, A. L.; Yarman, T.

    2013-03-01

    We suggest an approach, which formally allows us to describe the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in the semi-classical language. In the framework of this approach, we keep the classical concepts of electromagnetic field and force. At the same time, instead of point-like classical charges, we introduce a finite-size elementary charge distribution, modelling the wave-like packet, associated with the motion of a given electron. In this case we derive the force on the wave-like packet on behalf of the solenoid via the minimization of action defined through the Lagrangian density (instead of the Lagrangian used in common classical electrodynamics of point-like charges). We show that this force due to the solenoid, being dependent on the vector potential, yields the common expression for the magnetic AB phase, when the original wave packet is splitted into a superposition of two packets encirling the solenoid. We also analyze in the classical language the implementation of total momentum conservation law for the isolated system "moving electrons plus elongated solenoid" and determine the properties of finite-size charge distribution, when this law is fulfilled. The results obtained are discussed.

  3. Hydrogen atom in a quantum plasma environment under the influence of Aharonov-Bohm flux and electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Falaye, Babatunde James; Sun, Guo-Hua; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the confinement influences of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux and electric and magnetic fields directed along the z axis and encircled by quantum plasmas on the hydrogen atom. The all-inclusive effects result in a strongly attractive system while the localizations of quantum levels change and the eigenvalues decrease. We find that the combined effect of the fields is stronger than a solitary effect and consequently there is a substantial shift in the bound state energy of the system. We also find that to perpetuate a low-energy medium for the hydrogen atom in quantum plasmas, a strong electric field and weak magnetic field are required, whereas the AB flux field can be used as a regulator. The application of the perturbation technique utilized in this paper is not restricted to plasma physics; it can also be applied in molecular physics. PMID:27300989

  4. Hydrogen atom in a quantum plasma environment under the influence of Aharonov-Bohm flux and electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falaye, Babatunde James; Sun, Guo-Hua; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the confinement influences of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux and electric and magnetic fields directed along the z axis and encircled by quantum plasmas on the hydrogen atom. The all-inclusive effects result in a strongly attractive system while the localizations of quantum levels change and the eigenvalues decrease. We find that the combined effect of the fields is stronger than a solitary effect and consequently there is a substantial shift in the bound state energy of the system. We also find that to perpetuate a low-energy medium for the hydrogen atom in quantum plasmas, a strong electric field and weak magnetic field are required, whereas the AB flux field can be used as a regulator. The application of the perturbation technique utilized in this paper is not restricted to plasma physics; it can also be applied in molecular physics.

  5. Pauli isotonic oscillatorwith an anomalous magnetic moment in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect: Laplace transform approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshanzamir-Nikou, M.; Goudarzi, H.

    2016-02-01

    A strong magnetic field significantly affects the intrinsic magnetic moment of fermions. In quantum electrodynamics, it was shown that the anomalous magnetic moment of an electron arises kinematically, while it results from a dynamical interaction with an external magnetic field for hadrons (proton). Taking the anomalous magnetic moment of a fermion into account, we find an exact expression for the boundstate energy and the corresponding eigenfunctions of a two-dimensional nonrelativistic spin-1/2 harmonic oscillator with a centripetal barrier (known as the isotonic oscillator) including an Aharonov-Bohm term in the presence of a strong magnetic field. We use the Laplace transform method in the calculations. We find that the singular solution contributes to the phase of the wave function at the origin and the phase depends on the spin and magnetic flux.

  6. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A. W.; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-08-01

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a ``hairline'' solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions.

  7. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A. W.; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a “hairline” solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions. PMID:25103877

  8. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms.

    PubMed

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A W; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a "hairline" solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions. PMID:25103877

  9. Aharonov-Bohm phases in a quantum LC circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, ChunJun; Yao, Yuan; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2016-03-01

    We study novel types of contributions to the partition function of the Maxwell system defined on a small compact manifold. These contributions, often not addressed in the perturbative treatment with physical photons, emerge as a result of tunneling transitions between topologically distinct but physically identical vacuum winding states. These new terms give an extra contribution to the Casimir pressure, yet to be measured. We argue that this effect is highly sensitive to a small external electric field, which should be contrasted with the conventional Casimir effect, where the vacuum photons are essentially unaffected by any external field. Furthermore, photons will be emitted from the vacuum in response to a time-dependent electric field, similar to the dynamical Casimir effect in which real particles are radiated from the vacuum due to the time-dependent boundary conditions. We also propose an experimental setup using a quantum LC circuit to detect this novel effect. We expect physical electric charges to appear on the capacitor plates when the system dimension is such that coherent Aharonov-Bohm phases can be maintained over macroscopically large distances.

  10. The Aharonov-Bohm effect in Möbius rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zehao; Ram-Mohan, L.; CenterComputational NanoScience Team

    2013-03-01

    Electron transmission through finite-width 2D ring structures is calculated for cylindrical, flat (Aharonov-Bohm), and Möbius rings. In the presence of an external magnetic field, curves of constructive transmission display a pattern similar to that for a 1D ring. The periodicity in the magnetic flux, in units of h / e , is weakly broken on 2D rings of finite width, so that a description with a 1D-path is very acceptable. The unusual states with half-integer values of observed on Möbius rings, display a different characteristic in transmission. Such resonant states are in constructive interference for transmission at magnetic fields where the contribution from ordinary states with integer is in destructive interference, and vice versa. This leads to an alternating dominance of the set of half-integer states and the set of integer states in transport with increasing magnetic fields. We anticipate that Möbius rings would be synthesized with graphene ribbons in the near future. Z.L. acknowledges support from a Presidents Undergraduate Fellowship and a Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship at WPI.

  11. Valley Zeeman energy in monolayer MoS2 quantum rings: Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D.; Fu, Jiyong; Villegas-Lelovsky, L.; Dias, A. C.; Qu, Fanyao

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the valley Zeeman energy (VZE) in monolayer MoS2 quantum rings, subjected to a magnetic flux Φ only passing through a hole region enclosed by the inner circle of the ring. To gain insight on our numerical outcomes for finite two-dimensional rings, an analytic solution in the one-dimensional limit (zero ring width) is also presented. Although no magnetic field is applied inside the ring region, we observe finite VZEs. Interestingly, in contrast to the usual linear scenario, the VZE of the rings exhibits an oscillatory dependence on Φ with possible vanishing valley Zeeman effect even in a nonzero magnetic flux due to Aharonov-Bohm type effect. On the other hand, within one period of oscillations the VZE increases linearly with Φ . Furthermore, for a given magnetic flux, the valley Zeeman effect is more pronounced in a ring with a stronger quantum confinement. Thus the VZE can be tuned by either magnetic flux or ring confinement or both of them. This opens a new route for controlling the valley Zeeman effect using a nonmagnetic means.

  12. Photon mass and quantum effects of the Aharonov-Bohm type

    SciTech Connect

    Spavieri, G.; Rodriguez, M.

    2007-05-15

    The magnetic field due to the photon rest mass m{sub ph} modifies the standard results of the Aharonov-Bohm effect for electrons, and of other recent quantum effects. For the effect involving a coherent superposition of beams of particles with opposite electromagnetic properties, by means of a tabletop experiment, the limit m{sub ph}{approx_equal}10{sup -51} g is achievable, improving by 6 orders of magnitude that derived by Boulware and Deser for the Aharonov-Bohm effect.

  13. Internal frame dragging and a global analog of the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    March-Russell, J. ); Preskill, J. ); Wilczek, F. )

    1992-04-27

    It is shown that the breakdown of a {ital global} symmetry group to a discrete subgroup can lead to analogs of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. At sufficiently low momentum transfer, the cross section for scattering of a particle with nontrivial Z{sub 2} charge off a global vortex is almost equal to (but definitely different from) maximal Aharonov-Bohm scattering; the effect goes away at large momentum transfer. The scattering of a spin-1/2 particle off a magnetic vortex provides an amusing experimentally realizable example.

  14. Exotic Dirac Wavepackets Accumulating Aharonov-Bohm-type Phase in Free Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminer, Ido; Nemirovsky, Jonathan; Rechtsman, Mikael; Bekenstein, Rivka; Segev, Mordechai

    2013-05-01

    Following the seminal 1958 paper by Aharonov-Bohm (AB), it is expected that two parts of the wavefunction of an electron can accumulate phase difference even when they are confined to a region in space with zero EM field. The AB effect was groundbreaking: the EM vector potential is a physical quantity affecting the outcome of experiments directly, not only through the fields extracted from it. But is the EM potential a real necessity for an AB-type effect? Can such effect exist in a potential-free system such as free-space? Here, we find self-accelerating solutions of the potential-free Dirac equation, for massive/massless fermions/bosons. These exotic Dirac particles mimic the dynamics of a free-charge moving under a ``virtual'' EM field. They accelerate even though no field is acting on them (and no charge is defined): the entire dynamics is a direct result of the initial conditions. We show that such particles display an effective AB effect that can be explained by a ``virtual'' potential that ``causes'' the exact same acceleration. We prove that one can create all effects induced by EM fields by only controlling the initial conditions of a wave pattern. Altogether, measurements taken along the trajectory cannot distinguish between a real force and this virtual force: self-induced by the wavepacket itself. The measurable effects of this virtual force are real by all measurable quantities. These phenomena can be observed in various settings: e.g., optical waves in hyperbolic metamaterials, and matter waves in honeycomb interference structures.

  15. Gravitational Aharonov-Bohm effect due to noncommutative BTZ black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, M. A.; Brito, F. A.; Passos, E.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we consider the scattering of massless planar scalar waves by a noncommutative BTZ black hole. We compute the differential cross section via the partial wave approach, and we mainly show that the scattering of planar waves leads to a modified Aharonov-Bohm effect due to spacetime noncommutativity.

  16. Nucleon statistics in holographic QCD: Aharonov-Bohm effect in a matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Koji; Iizuka, Norihiro

    2010-11-15

    We show that the Aharonov-Bohm effect in the nuclear matrix model [K. Hashimoto, N. Iizuka, and P. Yi, J. High Energy Phys. 10 (2010), 3.] derives the statistical nature of nucleons in holographic QCD. For N{sub c}=odd (even), the nucleon is shown to be a fermion (boson).

  17. Nucleon statistics in holographic QCD: Aharonov-Bohm effect in a matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Iizuka, Norihiro

    2010-11-01

    We show that the Aharonov-Bohm effect in the nuclear matrix model [K. Hashimoto, N. Iizuka, and P. Yi, J. High Energy Phys.JHEPFG1029-8479 10 (2010), 3.10.1007/JHEP10(2010)003] derives the statistical nature of nucleons in holographic QCD. For Nc=odd (even), the nucleon is shown to be a fermion (boson).

  18. Stokes' theorem, gauge symmetry and the time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Macdougall, James Singleton, Douglas

    2014-04-15

    Stokes' theorem is investigated in the context of the time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effect—the two-slit quantum interference experiment with a time varying solenoid between the slits. The time varying solenoid produces an electric field which leads to an additional phase shift which is found to exactly cancel the time-dependent part of the usual magnetic Aharonov-Bohm phase shift. This electric field arises from a combination of a non-single valued scalar potential and/or a 3-vector potential. The gauge transformation which leads to the scalar and 3-vector potentials for the electric field is non-single valued. This feature is connected with the non-simply connected topology of the Aharonov-Bohm set-up. The non-single valued nature of the gauge transformation function has interesting consequences for the 4-dimensional Stokes' theorem for the time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm effect. An experimental test of these conclusions is proposed.

  19. Noncommutative correction to Aharonov-Bohm scattering: A field theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Anacleto, M.A.; Gomes, M.; Silva, A.J. da; Spehler, D.

    2004-10-15

    We study a noncommutative nonrelativistic theory in 2+1 dimensions of a scalar field coupled to the Chern-Simons field. In the commutative situation this model has been used to simulate the Aharonov-Bohm effect in the field theory context. We verified that, contrary to the commutative result, the inclusion of a quartic self-interaction of the scalar field is not necessary to secure the ultraviolet renormalizability of the model. However, to obtain a smooth commutative limit the presence of a quartic gauge invariant self-interaction is required. For small noncommutativity we fix the corrections to the Aharonov-Bohm scattering and prove that up to one loop the model is free from dangerous infrared/ultraviolet divergences.

  20. Spin accumulation assisted by the Aharonov-Bohm-Fano effect of quantum dot structures.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wei-Jiang; Han, Yu; Wei, Guo-Zhu; Du, An

    2012-01-01

    : We investigate the spin accumulations of Aharonov-Bohm interferometers with embedded quantum dots by considering spin bias in the leads. It is found that regardless of the interferometer configurations, the spin accumulations are closely determined by their quantum interference features. This is mainly manifested in the dependence of spin accumulations on the threaded magnetic flux and the nonresonant transmission process. Namely, the Aharonov-Bohm-Fano effect is a necessary condition to achieve the spin accumulation in the quantum dot of the resonant channel. Further analysis showed that in the double-dot interferometer, the spin accumulation can be detailedly manipulated. The spin accumulation properties of such structures offer a new scheme of spin manipulation. When the intradot Coulomb interactions are taken into account, we find that the electron interactions are advantageous to the spin accumulation in the resonant channel. PMID:22985404

  1. Reply to "Comment on `Role of potentials in the Aharonov-Bohm effect' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidman, Lev

    2015-08-01

    The preceding Comment challenged my claim that potentials might be just auxiliary mathematical tools and that they are not necessary for explaining physical phenomena. The Comment did not confront my explanation without the potentials of the Aharonov-Bohm effects that appeared in the original article, but stated that I cannot apply this explanation for seven other examples. In my reply, using my method, I provide explanations of one of the examples, show that two other examples are not relevant, and agree that the remaining examples require further analysis. However, I argue that none of the examples provides robust counterexamples to my claim, similar to the original Aharonov-Bohm setups which were explained in my article, so the Comment does not refute my claim.

  2. Spin accumulation assisted by the Aharonov-Bohm-Fano effect of quantum dot structures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the spin accumulations of Aharonov-Bohm interferometers with embedded quantum dots by considering spin bias in the leads. It is found that regardless of the interferometer configurations, the spin accumulations are closely determined by their quantum interference features. This is mainly manifested in the dependence of spin accumulations on the threaded magnetic flux and the nonresonant transmission process. Namely, the Aharonov-Bohm-Fano effect is a necessary condition to achieve the spin accumulation in the quantum dot of the resonant channel. Further analysis showed that in the double-dot interferometer, the spin accumulation can be detailedly manipulated. The spin accumulation properties of such structures offer a new scheme of spin manipulation. When the intradot Coulomb interactions are taken into account, we find that the electron interactions are advantageous to the spin accumulation in the resonant channel. PMID:22985404

  3. How the Test of Aharonov-Bohm Effect Was Initiated at Hitachi Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osakabe, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    I joined the Tonomura's team in 1980. Since then, I have seen his enthusiasm and creativity in science as a member of his team and later as director of the laboratory. I will discuss in this article how the industrially driven technologies met science at Hitachi Central Research Laboratory in the case of verification of the Aharonov-Bohm effect and other scientific achievements by Akira Tonomura.

  4. Spin filter effects in an Aharonov-Bohm ring with double quantum dots under general Rashba spin-orbit interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Many researchers have reported on spin filters using linear Rashba spin-orbit interactions (SOI). However, spin filters using square and cubic Rashba SOIs have not yet been reported. We consider that this is because the Aharonov-Casher (AC) phases acquired under square and cubic Rashba SOIs are ambiguous. In this study, we try to derive the AC phases acquired under square and cubic Rashba SOIs from the viewpoint of non-Abelian SU(2) gauge theory. These AC phases can be derived successfully from the non-Abelian SU(2) gauge theory without the completing square methods. Using the results, we investigate the spin filtering in a double quantum dot (QD) Aharonov-Bohm (AB) ring under linear, square, and cubic Rashba SOIs. This AB ring consists of elongated QDs and quasi-one-dimensional quantum nanowires under an external magnetic field. The spin transport is investigated from the left nanowire to the right nanowire in the above structure within the tight-binding approximation. In particular, we focus on the difference of spin filtering among linear, square, and cubic Rashba SOIs. The calculation is performed for the spin polarization by changing the penetrating magnetic flux for the AB ring subject to linear, square, and cubic Rashba SOIs. It is found that perfect spin filtering is achieved for all of the Rashba SOIs. This result indicates that this AB ring under general Rashba SOIs can be a promising device for spin current generation. Moreover, the AB rings under general Rashba SOIs behave in totally different ways in response to penetrating magnetic flux, which is attributed to linear, square, and cubic behaviors in the in-plane momentum. This result enables us to make a clear distinction between linear, square, and cubic Rashba SOIs according to the peak position of the perfect spin filtering.

  5. Force-free gravitational redshift: proposed gravitational Aharonov-Bohm experiment.

    PubMed

    Hohensee, Michael A; Estey, Brian; Hamilton, Paul; Zeilinger, Anton; Müller, Holger

    2012-06-01

    We propose a feasible laboratory interferometry experiment with matter waves in a gravitational potential caused by a pair of artificial field-generating masses. It will demonstrate that the presence of these masses (and, for moving atoms, time dilation) induces a phase shift, even if it does not cause any classical force. The phase shift is identical to that produced by the gravitational redshift (or time dilation) of clocks ticking at the atom's Compton frequency. In analogy to the Aharonov-Bohm effect in electromagnetism, the quantum mechanical phase is a function of the gravitational potential and not the classical forces. PMID:23003927

  6. Scattering of spin-polarized electron in an Aharonov Bohm potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalilov, V. R.; Ho, Choon-Lin

    2008-05-01

    The scattering of spin-polarized electrons in an Aharonov-Bohm vector potential is considered. We solve the Pauli equation in 3 + 1 dimensions taking into account explicitly the interaction between the three-dimensional spin magnetic moment of electron and magnetic field. Expressions for the scattering amplitude and the cross section are obtained for spin-polarized electron scattered off a flux tube of small radius. It is also shown that bound electron states cannot occur in this quantum system. The scattering problem for the model of a flux tube of zero radius in the Born approximation is briefly discussed.

  7. Achieving nonreciprocal unidirectional single-photon quantum transport using the photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Luqi; Xu, Shanshan; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-11-15

    We show that nonreciprocal unidirectional single-photon quantum transport can be achieved with the photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect. The system consists of a 1D waveguide coupling to two three-level atoms of the V-type. The two atoms, in addition, are each driven by an external coherent field. We show that the phase of the external coherent field provides a gauge potential for the photon states. With a proper choice of the phase difference between the two coherent fields, the transport of a single photon can exhibit unity contrast in its transmissions for the two propagation directions. PMID:26565819

  8. Aharonov-Bohm interferometer based on n -p junctions in graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mreńca-Kolasińska, A.; Heun, S.; Szafran, B.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that the phenomenon of current confinement along graphene n -p junctions at high magnetic fields can be used to form an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer. The interference system exploits a closed n -p junction that can be induced by a floating gate within the sample, and coupling of the junction currents with the edge currents in the quantum Hall regime. Operation of the device requires current splitting at the edge and the n -p junction contacts which is found for armchair ribbons at low Fermi energy.

  9. Anyonic Strings and Membranes in Anti-de Sitter Space and Dual Aharonov-Bohm Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnoll, Sean A.

    2007-03-16

    It is observed that strings in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} and membranes in AdS{sub 7}xS{sup 4} exhibit long range phase interactions. Two well separated membranes dragged around one another in anti-de Sitter space (AdS) acquire phases of 2{pi}/N. The same phases are acquired by a well separated F and D string dragged around one another. The phases are shown to correspond to both the standard and a novel type of Aharonov-Bohm effect in the dual field theory.

  10. Enhanced spin figure of merit in an Aharonov-Bohm ring with a double quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xingfei; Qi, Fenghua; Jin, Guojun

    2014-04-21

    We theoretically investigate the thermoelectric effects in an Aharonov-Bohm ring with a serially coupled double quantum dot embedded in one arm. An external magnetic field is perpendicularly applied to the two dots. Using the nonequilibrium Green's function method in the linear-response regime, we calculate the charge and spin figures of merit. When the energy levels of the two quantum dots are equal and the system is connected to two normal leads, a large spin figure of merit (Z{sub s}T ≈ 4.5) accompanying with a small charge figure of merit (Z{sub c}T ≈ 0) can be generated due to the remarkable bipolar effect. Further, when the system is connected to two ferromagnetic leads, the spin figure of merit can reach even a higher value about 9. Afterwards, we find that Z{sub s}T is enhanced while Z{sub c}T is reduced in the coaction of the Aharonov-Bohm flux and Rashba spin-orbit coupling. It is argued that the bipolar effect is positive (negative) to spin (charge) figure of merit in the presence of level detuning of the two quantum dots and intradot Coulomb interactions, respectively. Also, we propose a possible experiment to verify our results.

  11. Thermoelectric effect in an Aharonov-Bohm ring with an embedded quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Chi, Feng; Lu, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Kai-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Thermoelectric effect is studied in an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer with an embedded quantum dot (QD) in the Coulomb blockade regime. The electrical conductance, electron thermal conductance, thermopower, and thermoelectric figure-of-merit are calculated by using the Keldysh Green's function method. It is found that the figure-of-merit ZT of the QD ring may be quite high due to the Fano effect originated from the quantum interference effect. Moreover, the thermoelectric efficiency is sensitive to the magnitude of the dot-lead and inter-lead coupling strengthes. The effect of intradot Coulomb repulsion on ZT is significant in the weak-coupling regime, and then large ZT values can be obtained at rather high temperature. PMID:22369454

  12. Wave-packet rectification in nonlinear electronic systems: a tunable Aharonov-Bohm diode.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunyun; Zhou, Jun; Marchesoni, Fabio; Li, Baowen

    2014-01-01

    Rectification of electron wave-packets propagating along a quasi-one dimensional chain is commonly achieved via the simultaneous action of nonlinearity and longitudinal asymmetry, both confined to a limited portion of the chain termed wave diode. However, it is conceivable that, in the presence of an external magnetic field, spatial asymmetry perpendicular to the direction of propagation suffices to ensure rectification. This is the case of a nonlinear ring-shaped lattice with different upper and lower halves (diode), which is attached to two elastic chains (leads). The resulting device is mirror symmetric with respect to the ring vertical axis, but mirror asymmetric with respect to the chain direction. Wave propagation along the two diode paths can be modeled for simplicity by a discrete Schrödinger equation with cubic nonlinearities. Numerical simulations demonstrate that, thanks to the Aharonov-Bohm effect, such a diode can be operated by tuning the magnetic flux across the ring. PMID:24691462

  13. Characterisation of ferromagnetic rings for Zernike phase plates using the Aharonov-Bohm effect.

    PubMed

    Edgcombe, C J; Ionescu, A; Loudon, J C; Blackburn, A M; Kurebayashi, H; Barnes, C H W

    2012-09-01

    Holographic measurements on magnetised thin-film cobalt rings have demonstrated both onion and vortex states of magnetisation. For a ring in the vortex state, the difference between phases of electron paths that pass through the ring and those that travel outside it was found to agree very well with Aharonov-Bohm theory within measurement error. Thus the magnetic flux in thin-film rings of ferromagnetic material can provide the phase shift required for phase plates in transmission electron microscopy. When a ring of this type is used as a phase plate, scattered electrons will be intercepted over a radial range similar to the ring width. A cobalt ring of thickness 20 nm can produce a phase difference of π/2 from a width of just under 30 nm, suggesting that the range of radial interception for this type of phase plate can be correspondingly small. PMID:22842114

  14. Polarized excitons in nanorings and the optical Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorov, A. O.; Ulloa, S. E.; Karrai, K.; Warburton, R. J.

    2002-08-01

    The quantum nature of matter lies in the wave function phases that accumulate while particles move along their trajectories. A prominent example is the Aharonov-Bohm phase, which has been studied in connection with the conductance of nanostructures. However, optical response in solids is determined by neutral excitations, for which no sensitivity to magnetic flux would be expected. We propose a mechanism for the topological phase of a neutral particle, a polarized exciton confined to a semiconductor quantum ring. We predict that this magnetic-field induced phase may strongly affect excitons in a system with cylindrical symmetry, resulting in switching between ``bright'' exciton ground states and novel ``dark'' states with nearly infinite lifetimes. Since excitons determine the optical response of semiconductors, the predicted phase can be used to tailor photon emission from quantum nanostructures.

  15. Wave-packet rectification in nonlinear electronic systems: A tunable Aharonov-Bohm diode

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunyun; Zhou, Jun; Marchesoni, Fabio; Li, Baowen

    2014-01-01

    Rectification of electron wave-packets propagating along a quasi-one dimensional chain is commonly achieved via the simultaneous action of nonlinearity and longitudinal asymmetry, both confined to a limited portion of the chain termed wave diode. However, it is conceivable that, in the presence of an external magnetic field, spatial asymmetry perpendicular to the direction of propagation suffices to ensure rectification. This is the case of a nonlinear ring-shaped lattice with different upper and lower halves (diode), which is attached to two elastic chains (leads). The resulting device is mirror symmetric with respect to the ring vertical axis, but mirror asymmetric with respect to the chain direction. Wave propagation along the two diode paths can be modeled for simplicity by a discrete Schrödinger equation with cubic nonlinearities. Numerical simulations demonstrate that, thanks to the Aharonov-Bohm effect, such a diode can be operated by tuning the magnetic flux across the ring. PMID:24691462

  16. Transmission through a quantum dot molecule embedded in an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer.

    PubMed

    Lovey, Daniel A; Gomez, Sergio S; Romero, Rodolfo H

    2011-10-26

    We study theoretically the transmission through a quantum dot molecule embedded in the arms of an Aharonov-Bohm four quantum dot ring threaded by a magnetic flux. The tunable molecular coupling provides a transmission pathway between the interferometer arms in addition to those along the arms. From a decomposition of the transmission in terms of contributions from paths, we show that antiresonances in the transmission arise from the interference of the self-energy along different paths and that application of a magnetic flux can produce the suppression of such antiresonances. The occurrence of a period of twice the quantum of flux arises at the opening of the transmission pathway through the dot molecule. Two different connections of the device to the leads are considered and their spectra of conductance are compared as a function of the tunable parameters of the model. PMID:21970845

  17. Topological phases reviewed: The Aharonov Bohm, Aharonov Casher, and He McKellar Wilkens phases

    SciTech Connect

    McKellar, B. H. J.; He, X-G.; Klein, A. G.

    2014-03-05

    There are three topological phases related to electromagnetic interactions in quantum mechanics: 1. The Aharonov Bohm phase acquired when a charged particle encircles a magnetic field but travels through a field free region. 2. The Aharonov Casher phase acquired when a magnetic dipole encircles electric charges but travels through a charge free region. 3. The He McKellar Wilkens phase acquired when an electric dipole encircles magnetic charges but travels through a charge free region. We review the conditions under which these phases are indeed topological and their experimental realisation. Because the He McKellar Wilkens phase has been recently observed we pay particular attention to how the basic concept of 'an electric dipole encircles magnetic charges' was realised experimentally, and discuss possible future experimental realisations.

  18. Aharonov-Bohm effect in the tunnelling of a quantum rotor in a linear Paul trap.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Atsushi; Shikano, Yutaka; Toyoda, Kenji; Urabe, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a common fundamental quantum mechanical phenomenon that originates from the wave-like characteristics of quantum particles. Although the quantum tunnelling effect was first observed 85 years ago, some questions regarding the dynamics of quantum tunnelling remain unresolved. Here we realize a quantum tunnelling system using two-dimensional ionic structures in a linear Paul trap. We demonstrate that the charged particles in this quantum tunnelling system are coupled to the vector potential of a magnetic field throughout the entire process, even during quantum tunnelling, as indicated by the manifestation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in this system. The tunnelling rate of the structures periodically depends on the strength of the magnetic field, whose period is the same as the magnetic flux quantum φ0 through the rotor [(0.99 ± 0.07) × φ0]. PMID:24820051

  19. Enhancement of the Aharonov-Bohm effect of neutral excitons in semiconductor nanorings with an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, A. V.; Citrin, D. S.

    2003-03-01

    This work demonstrates that the Aharonov-Bohm effect for excitons, practically indistinguishable from the numerical noise without an applied electric field, becomes clearly evident in the optical absorption once the electric field is applied in the plane containing the nanoring. The enhancement arises as a result of the field-induced delocalization of the relative electron-hole motion around the entire ring. The excitonic effects are essential to describe even qualitatively the absorption spectra.

  20. GENERAL: Influence of Auxiliary Equation on Wave Functions for Time-Dependent Pauli Equation in Presence of Aharonov-Bohm Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maamache, M.; Lahoulou, C.; Saadi, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Invariant operator method for discrete or continuous spectrum eigenvalue and unitary transformation approach are employed to study the two-dimensional time-dependent Pauli equation in presence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect (AB) and external scalar potential. For the spin particles the problem with the magnetic field is that it introduces a singularity into wave equation at the origin. A physical motivation is to replace the zero radius flux tube by one of radius R, with the additional condition that the magnetic field be confined to the surface of the tube, and then taking the limit R → 0 at the end of the computations. We point that the invariant operator must contain the step function θ(r - R). Consequently, the problem becomes more complicated. In order to avoid this difficulty, we replace the radius R by ρ(t)R, where ρ(t) is a positive time-dependent function. Then at the end of calculations we take the limit R → 0. The qualitative properties for the invariant operator spectrum are described separately for the different values of the parameter C appearing in the nonlinear auxiliary equation satisfied by ρ(t), i.e., C > 0, C = 0, and C < 0. Following the C's values the spectrum of quantum states is discrete (C > 0) or continuous (C <= 0).

  1. Analytical expression of Kondo temperature in quantum dot embedded in Aharonov-Bohm ring.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Ryosuke; Eto, Mikio

    2011-01-01

    We theoretically study the Kondo effect in a quantum dot embedded in an Aharonov-Bohm ring, using the "poor man's" scaling method. Analytical expressions of the Kondo temperature TK are given as a function of magnetic flux Φ penetrating the ring. In this Kondo problem, there are two characteristic lengths, Lc=ℏvF∕|ε̃0| and LK = ħvF = TK, where vF is the Fermi velocity and ε̃0 is the renormalized energy level in the quantum dot. The former is the screening length of the charge fluctuation and the latter is that of the spin fluctuation, i.e., size of Kondo screening cloud. We obtain diferent expressions of TK(Φ) for (i) Lc ≪ LK ≪ L, (ii) Lc ≪ L ≪ LK, and (iii) L ≪ Lc ≪ LK, where L is the size of the ring. TK is remarkably modulated by Φ in cases (ii) and (iii), whereas it hardly depends on Φ in case (i).PACS numbers: PMID:22112300

  2. On the Aharonov-Bohm Operators with Varying Poles: The Boundary Behavior of Eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noris, Benedetta; Nys, Manon; Terracini, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    We consider a magnetic Schrödinger operator with magnetic field concentrated at one point (the pole) of a domain and half integer circulation, and we focus on the behavior of Dirichlet eigenvalues as functions of the pole. Although the magnetic field vanishes almost everywhere, it is well known that it affects the operator at the spectral level (the Aharonov-Bohm effect, Phys Rev (2) 115:485-491, 1959). Moreover, the numerical computations performed in (Bonnaillie-Noël et al., Anal PDE 7(6):1365-1395, 2014; Noris and Terracini, Indiana Univ Math J 59(4):1361-1403, 2010) show a rather complex behavior of the eigenvalues as the pole varies in a planar domain. In this paper, in continuation of the analysis started in (Bonnaillie-Noël et al., Anal PDE 7(6):1365-1395, 2014; Noris and Terracini, Indiana Univ Math J 59(4):1361-1403, 2010), we analyze the relation between the variation of the eigenvalue and the nodal structure of the associated eigenfunctions. We deal with planar domains with Dirichlet boundary conditions and we focus on the case when the singular pole approaches the boundary of the domain: then, the operator loses its singular character and the k-th magnetic eigenvalue converges to that of the standard Laplacian. We can predict both the rate of convergence and whether the convergence happens from above or from below, in relation with the number of nodal lines of the k-th eigenfunction of the Laplacian. The proof relies on the variational characterization of eigenvalues, together with a detailed asymptotic analysis of the eigenfunctions, based on an Almgren-type frequency formula for magnetic eigenfunctions and on the blow-up technique.

  3. Quantum geometric phase in Majorana's stellar representation: mapping onto a many-body Aharonov-Bohm phase.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Patrick

    2012-06-15

    The (Berry-Aharonov-Anandan) geometric phase acquired during a cyclic quantum evolution of finite-dimensional quantum systems is studied. It is shown that a pure quantum state in a (2J+1)-dimensional Hilbert space (or, equivalently, of a spin-J system) can be mapped onto the partition function of a gas of independent Dirac strings moving on a sphere and subject to the Coulomb repulsion of 2J fixed test charges (the Majorana stars) characterizing the quantum state. The geometric phase may be viewed as the Aharonov-Bohm phase acquired by the Majorana stars as they move through the gas of Dirac strings. Expressions for the geometric connection and curvature, for the metric tensor, as well as for the multipole moments (dipole, quadrupole, etc.), are given in terms of the Majorana stars. Finally, the geometric formulation of the quantum dynamics is presented and its application to systems with exotic ordering such as spin nematics is outlined. PMID:23004240

  4. Single-Slit Electron Diffraction with Aharonov-Bohm Phase: Feynman's Thought Experiment with Quantum Point Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatua, Pradip; Bansal, Bhavtosh; Shahar, Dan

    2014-01-01

    In a "thought experiment," now a classic in physics pedagogy, Feynman visualizes Young's double-slit interference experiment with electrons in magnetic field. He shows that the addition of an Aharonov-Bohm phase is equivalent to shifting the zero-field wave interference pattern by an angle expected from the Lorentz force calculation for classical particles. We have performed this experiment with one slit, instead of two, where ballistic electrons within two-dimensional electron gas diffract through a small orifice formed by a quantum point contact (QPC). As the QPC width is comparable to the electron wavelength, the observed intensity profile is further modulated by the transverse waveguide modes present at the injector QPC. Our experiments open the way to realizing diffraction-based ideas in mesoscopic physics.

  5. Reduction by symmetries in singular quantum-mechanical problems: General scheme and application to Aharonov-Bohm model

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A. G.

    2015-12-15

    We develop a general technique for finding self-adjoint extensions of a symmetric operator that respects a given set of its symmetries. Problems of this type naturally arise when considering two- and three-dimensional Schrödinger operators with singular potentials. The approach is based on constructing a unitary transformation diagonalizing the symmetries and reducing the initial operator to the direct integral of a suitable family of partial operators. We prove that symmetry preserving self-adjoint extensions of the initial operator are in a one-to-one correspondence with measurable families of self-adjoint extensions of partial operators obtained by reduction. The general scheme is applied to the three-dimensional Aharonov-Bohm Hamiltonian describing the electron in the magnetic field of an infinitely thin solenoid. We construct all self-adjoint extensions of this Hamiltonian, invariant under translations along the solenoid and rotations around it, and explicitly find their eigenfunction expansions.

  6. Quantum motion of a point particle in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm potential in curved space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Edilberto O.; Ulhoa, Sérgio C.; Andrade, Fabiano M.; Filgueiras, Cleverson; Amorim, R. G. G.

    2015-11-01

    The nonrelativistic quantum dynamics of a spinless charged particle in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm potential in curved space is considered. We chose the surface as being a cone defined by a line element in polar coordinates. The geometry of this line element establishes that the motion of the particle can occur on the surface of a cone or an anti-cone. As a consequence of the nontrivial topology of the cone and also because of two-dimensional confinement, the geometric potential should be taken into account. At first, we establish the conditions for the particle describing a circular path in such a context. Because of the presence of the geometric potential, which contains a singular term, we use the self-adjoint extension method in order to describe the dynamics in all space including the singularity. Expressions are obtained for the bound state energies and wave functions.

  7. Improving the efficiency of hierarchical equations of motion approach and application to coherent dynamics in Aharonov-Bohm interferometers.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dong; Wang, Shikuan; Wang, Rulin; Ye, LvZhou; Xu, RuiXue; Zheng, Xiao; Yan, YiJing

    2015-03-14

    Several recent advancements for the hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) approach are reported. First, we propose an a priori estimate for the optimal number of basis functions for the reservoir memory decomposition. Second, we make use of the sparsity of auxiliary density operators (ADOs) and propose two ansatzs to screen out all the intrinsic zero ADO elements. Third, we propose a new truncation scheme by utilizing the time derivatives of higher-tier ADOs. These novel techniques greatly reduce the memory cost of the HEOM approach, and thus enhance its efficiency and applicability. The improved HEOM approach is applied to simulate the coherent dynamics of Aharonov-Bohm double quantum dot interferometers. Quantitatively accurate dynamics is obtained for both noninteracting and interacting quantum dots. The crucial role of the quantum phase for the magnitude of quantum coherence and quantum entanglement is revealed. PMID:25770531

  8. Reduction by symmetries in singular quantum-mechanical problems: General scheme and application to Aharonov-Bohm model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    We develop a general technique for finding self-adjoint extensions of a symmetric operator that respects a given set of its symmetries. Problems of this type naturally arise when considering two- and three-dimensional Schrödinger operators with singular potentials. The approach is based on constructing a unitary transformation diagonalizing the symmetries and reducing the initial operator to the direct integral of a suitable family of partial operators. We prove that symmetry preserving self-adjoint extensions of the initial operator are in a one-to-one correspondence with measurable families of self-adjoint extensions of partial operators obtained by reduction. The general scheme is applied to the three-dimensional Aharonov-Bohm Hamiltonian describing the electron in the magnetic field of an infinitely thin solenoid. We construct all self-adjoint extensions of this Hamiltonian, invariant under translations along the solenoid and rotations around it, and explicitly find their eigenfunction expansions.

  9. Spin-dependent quantum interference in Aharonov-Bohm ring embedded with two double-quantum-dot molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofei; Liu, Xiaojie; Zhao, Xueyang; Yin, Haitao; Wan, Weilong; Feng, Li

    2014-03-01

    The spin polarized transport properties through an Aharonov-Bohm ring embedded with a double quantum dot-molecule in each arm with Rashba spin-orbit (RSO) interaction is theoretically studied in the framework of the equation of motion of Green's function. Based on molecular state representation, the anti-resonance phenomenon in the conductance spectrum is readily explained. We found that the position of antiresonant peaks in conductance spectrum is determined by the interdot coupling strengths. Moreover, the magnitude of conductance of each spin component can be manipulated by the Rashba spin orbit interaction strength. Especially only one spin component electron can be allowed to transport through this structure by modulating the strength of RSO interaction properly. PMID:24745284

  10. Single-slit electron diffraction with Aharonov-Bohm phase: Feynman's thought experiment with quantum point contacts.

    PubMed

    Khatua, Pradip; Bansal, Bhavtosh; Shahar, Dan

    2014-01-10

    In a "thought experiment," now a classic in physics pedagogy, Feynman visualizes Young's double-slit interference experiment with electrons in magnetic field. He shows that the addition of an Aharonov-Bohm phase is equivalent to shifting the zero-field wave interference pattern by an angle expected from the Lorentz force calculation for classical particles. We have performed this experiment with one slit, instead of two, where ballistic electrons within two-dimensional electron gas diffract through a small orifice formed by a quantum point contact (QPC). As the QPC width is comparable to the electron wavelength, the observed intensity profile is further modulated by the transverse waveguide modes present at the injector QPC. Our experiments open the way to realizing diffraction-based ideas in mesoscopic physics. PMID:24483873

  11. Spin-dependent Seebeck effect in Aharonov-Bohm rings with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Li, Yunyun; Zhou, Jun; Nakayama, Tsuneyoshi; Li, Baowen

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically investigate the spin-dependent Seebeck effect in an Aharonov-Bohm mesoscopic ring in the presence of both Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions under magnetic flux perpendicular to the ring. We apply the Green's function method to calculate the spin Seebeck coefficient employing the tight-binding Hamiltonian. It is found that the spin Seebeck coefficient is proportional to the slope of the energy-dependent transmission coefficients. We study the strong dependence of spin Seebeck coefficient on the Fermi energy, magnetic flux, strength of spin-orbit coupling, and temperature. Maximum spin Seebeck coefficients can be obtained when the strengths of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings are slightly different. The spin Seebeck coefficient can be reduced by increasing temperature and disorder.

  12. Fano effect in the Andreev reflection of the Aharonov-Bohm-Fano ring with Majorana bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Cui; Zheng, Yi-Song

    2015-06-01

    The Andreev reflection in an Aharonov-Bohm-Fano ring induced by Majorana bound states (MBSs) is theoretically investigated. We find that compared with the Fano effect in the normal electron tunneling process, the Fano effect here is more determined by the structural parameters, i.e., the quantum dot level, the dot-MBS coupling, and the dot-MBS and MBS-lead couplings. By transforming the ring into its Nambu representation, we present a comprehensive analysis about the quantum interference in the Andreev reflection, and then explain the reason for the occurrence of the Fano effect. These results will be helpful for understanding the quantum interference in the MBS-assisted Andreev reflection.

  13. Spin polarized bound states in the continuum in open Aharonov-Bohm rings with the Rashba spin-orbit interaction.

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, Evgeny N; Sadreev, Almas F

    2016-07-01

    We consider the trapping of electrons with a definite spin polarization by bound states in the continuum (BSC) in the open Aharonov-Bohm rings in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI). Neglecting the Zeeman term we show the existence of BSCs in the one-dimensional ring when the eigenstates of the closed ring are doubly degenerate. With account of the Zeeman term BSCs occur only at the points of threefold degeneracy. The BSCs are found in the parametric space of flux and RSOI strength in close pairs with opposite spin polarization. Thereby the spin polarization of electrons transmitted through the ring can be altered by minor variation of magnetic or electric field at the vicinity of these pairs. Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional open ring show similar results for the BSCs. Encircling the BSC points in the parametric space of the flux and the RSOI constant gives rise to a geometric phase. PMID:27165662

  14. Effective beam separation schemes for the measurement of the electric Aharonov-Bohm effect in an ion interferometer.

    PubMed

    Schütz, G; Rembold, A; Pooch, A; Prochel, H; Stibor, A

    2015-11-01

    We propose an experiment for the first proof of the type I electric Aharonov-Bohm effect in an ion interferometer for hydrogen. The performances of three different beam separation schemes are simulated and compared. The coherent ion beam is generated by a single atom tip (SAT) source and separated by either two biprisms with a quadrupole lens, two biprisms with an einzel-lens or three biprisms. The beam path separation is necessary to introduce two metal tubes that can be pulsed with different electric potentials. The high time resolution of a delay line detector allows to work with a continuous ion beam and circumvents the pulsed beam operation as originally suggested by Aharonov and Bohm. We demonstrate that the higher mass and therefore lower velocity of ions compared to electrons combined with the high expected SAT ion emission puts the direct proof of this quantum effect for the first time into reach of current technical possibilities. Thereby a high detection rate of coherent ions is crucial to avoid long integration times that allow the influence of dephasing noise from the environment. We can determine the period of the expected matter wave interference pattern and the signal on the detector by determining the superposition angle of the coherent partial beams. Our simulations were tested with an electron interferometer setup and agree with the experimental results. We determine the separation scheme with three biprisms to be most efficient and predict a total signal acquisition time of only 80s to measure a phase shift from 0 to 2π due to the electric Aharonov-Bohm effect. PMID:26188995

  15. Measurement of the second-order Zeeman effect on the sodium clock transition in the weak-magnetic-field region using the scalar Aharonov-Bohm phase

    SciTech Connect

    Numazaki, Kazuya; Imai, Hiromitsu; Morinaga, Atsuo

    2010-03-15

    The second-order Zeeman effect of the sodium clock transition in a weak magnetic field of less than 50 {mu}T was measured as the scalar Aharonov-Bohm phase by two-photon stimulated Raman atom interferometry. The ac Stark effect of the Raman pulse was canceled out by adopting an appropriate intensity ratio of two photons in the Raman pulse. The Ramsey fringes for the pulse separation of 7 ms were obtained with a phase uncertainty of {pi}/200 rad. The nondispersive feature of the scalar Aharonov-Bohm phase was clearly demonstrated through 18 fringes with constant amplitude. The Breit-Rabi formula of the sodium clock transition was verified to be {Delta}{nu}=(0.222{+-}0.003)x10{sup 12}xB{sup 1.998{+-}0.004} in a magnetic field of less than 50 {mu}T.

  16. Persistent current in a correlated quantum ring with electron-phonon interaction in the presence of Rashba interaction and Aharonov-Bohm flux.

    PubMed

    Monisha, P J; Sankar, I V; Sil, Shreekantha; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Persistent current in a correlated quantum ring threaded by an Aharonov-Bohm flux is studied in the presence of electron-phonon interactions and Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The quantum ring is modeled by the Holstein-Hubbard-Rashba Hamiltonian and the energy is calculated by performing the conventional Lang-Firsov transformation followed by the diagonalization of the effective Hamiltonian within a mean-field approximation. The effects of Aharonov-Bohm flux, temperature, spin-orbit and electron-phonon interactions on the persistent current are investigated. It is shown that the electron-phonon interactions reduce the persistent current, while the Rashba coupling enhances it. It is also shown that temperature smoothens the persistent current curve. The effect of chemical potential on the persistent current is also studied. PMID:26831831

  17. Persistent current in a correlated quantum ring with electron-phonon interaction in the presence of Rashba interaction and Aharonov-Bohm flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monisha, P. J.; Sankar, I. V.; Sil, Shreekantha; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-02-01

    Persistent current in a correlated quantum ring threaded by an Aharonov-Bohm flux is studied in the presence of electron-phonon interactions and Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The quantum ring is modeled by the Holstein-Hubbard-Rashba Hamiltonian and the energy is calculated by performing the conventional Lang-Firsov transformation followed by the diagonalization of the effective Hamiltonian within a mean-field approximation. The effects of Aharonov-Bohm flux, temperature, spin-orbit and electron-phonon interactions on the persistent current are investigated. It is shown that the electron-phonon interactions reduce the persistent current, while the Rashba coupling enhances it. It is also shown that temperature smoothens the persistent current curve. The effect of chemical potential on the persistent current is also studied.

  18. Persistent current in a correlated quantum ring with electron-phonon interaction in the presence of Rashba interaction and Aharonov-Bohm flux

    PubMed Central

    Monisha, P. J.; Sankar, I. V.; Sil, Shreekantha; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Persistent current in a correlated quantum ring threaded by an Aharonov-Bohm flux is studied in the presence of electron-phonon interactions and Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The quantum ring is modeled by the Holstein-Hubbard-Rashba Hamiltonian and the energy is calculated by performing the conventional Lang-Firsov transformation followed by the diagonalization of the effective Hamiltonian within a mean-field approximation. The effects of Aharonov-Bohm flux, temperature, spin-orbit and electron-phonon interactions on the persistent current are investigated. It is shown that the electron-phonon interactions reduce the persistent current, while the Rashba coupling enhances it. It is also shown that temperature smoothens the persistent current curve. The effect of chemical potential on the persistent current is also studied. PMID:26831831

  19. Enhanced Magnetoabsorption Oscillations in Semiconductor Nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citrin, David; Maslov, Alex

    2003-03-01

    We present calculations of the interband optical absorption of semiconductor nanoscale rings including essential excitonic effects. We show that an in-plane electric field can significantly enhance the depth of magnetoabsorption oscillations due to Aharonov-Bohm like effects in the optical properties.

  20. Supercurrent and multiple singlet-doublet phase transitions of a quantum dot Josephson junction inside an Aharonov-Bohm ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrasch, C.; Meden, V.

    2009-01-01

    We study a quantum dot Josephson junction inside an Aharonov-Bohm environment. The geometry is modeled by an Anderson impurity coupled to two directly linked BCS leads. We illustrate that the well-established picture of the low-energy physics being governed by an interplay of two distinct (singlet and doublet) phases is still valid for this interferometric setup. The phase boundary depends, however, nonmonotonically on the coupling strength between the superconductors, causing the system to exhibit re-entrance behavior and multiple phase transitions. We compute the zero-temperature Josephson current and demonstrate that it can become negative in the singlet phase by virtue of the Coulomb interaction U . As a starting point, the limit of large superconducting energy gaps Δ=∞ is solved analytically. In order to tackle arbitrary Δ<∞ and U>0 , we employ a truncated functional renormalization-group scheme which was previously demonstrated to give quantitatively reliable results for the quantum dot Josephson problem.

  1. Properties of Type-II ZnTe/ZnSe Submonolayer Quantum Dots Studied via Excitonic Aharonov- Bohm Effect and Polarized Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Haojie

    In this thesis I develop understanding of the fundamental physical and material properties of type-II ZnTe/ZnSe submonolayer quantum dots (QDs), grown via combination of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and migration enhanced epitaxy (MEE). I use magneto-photoluminescence, including excitonic Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect and polarized optical spectroscopy as the primary tools in this work. I present previous studies as well as the background of optical and magneto-optical processes in semiconductor nanostructures and introduce the experimental methods in Chapters 1 - 3. In Chapter 4 I focus on the excitonic AB effect in the type-II QDs. I develop a lateral tightly-bound exciton model for ZnTe/ZnSe type-II QDs, using analytical methods and numerical calculations. This explained the magneto-PL observation and allowed for establishing the size and density of the QDs in each sample based on the results of PL and magneto-PL measurements. For samples with larger QDs, I observe behaviors that fall between properties of quantum-dot and quantum-well-like systems due to increased QD densities and their type-II nature. Finally, the decoherence mechanisms of the AB excitons are investigated via the temperature dependent studies of the magneto-PL. It is determined that the AB exciton decoherence is due to transport-like (acoustic phonon) scattering of the electrons moving in the ZnSe barriers, but with substantially smaller magnitude of electron-phonon coupling constant due to relatively strong electron-hole coupling within these type-II QDs. In Chapter 5 I discuss the results of circularly polarized magneto-PL measurements. A model with ultra-long spin-flip time of holes confined to submonolayer QDs is proposed. The g-factor of type-II excitons was extracted from the Zeeman splitting and the g-factor of electrons was obtained by fitting the temperature dependence of the degree of circular polarization (DCP), from which g-factor of holes confined within ZnTe QDs was found. It is shown

  2. Aharonov-Bohm Beats in Excitonic Luminescence from Quantum Rings and Type-II Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias da Silva, Luis; Shahbazyan, Tigran

    2005-03-01

    We study the absorption spectrum of neutral magnetoexcitons confined in ring-like structures. Despite their neutral character, excitons exhibit strong modulation effects on the energy and oscillator strength in the presence of magnetic fields [1] that have been recently observed [2]. We calculate the absorption coefficient α for neutral excitons confined in circular ring geometries with radii Re for electrons and Rh for holes. A particularly interesting situation comes about when Re!=Rh and a net radial charge polarization arises. In this case, we consider an attractive Coulomb interaction proportional to (Re- Rh)-1 and the excitonic absorption peak shows oscillatory behavior as function of the applied magnetic field both in position and amplitude. Such oscillations strongly depend on the dipole moment P=e(Rh-Re) of the exciton and on the dielectric constant of the system. Such intensity changes could in principle be experimentally observed with single dot spectroscopy in quantum rings [3]. Supported by the NSF-IMC and NSF-RUI [1] A.O. Govorov et al. Phys. Rev. B 66 081309 (2002); A.O. Govorov et al. Physica E 13, 297 (2002). [2] E. Ribeiro et al. Phys Rev. Lett. 92 126402 (2004). [3] R.J. Warburton et al. Nature 405 (6789) 926 (2000).

  3. Tunable spin-dependent Andreev reflection in a four-terminal Aharonov-Bohm interferometer with coherent indirect coupling and Rashba spin-orbit interaction.

    PubMed

    Bai, Long; Zhang, Rong; Duan, Chen-Long

    2012-01-01

    : Using the nonequilibrium Green's function method, we theoretically study the Andreev reflection(AR) in a four-terminal Aharonov-Bohm interferometer containing a coupled double quantum dot with the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) and the coherent indirect coupling via two ferromagnetic leads. When two ferromagnetic electrodes are in the parallel configuration, the spin-up conductance is equal to the spin-down conductance due to the absence of the RSOI. However, for the antiparallel alignment, the spin-polarized AR occurs resulting from the crossed AR (CAR) and the RSOI. The effects of the coherent indirect coupling, RSOI, and magnetic flux on the Andreev-reflected tunneling magnetoresistance are analyzed at length. The spin-related current is calculated, and a distinct swap effect emerges. Furthermore, the pure spin current can be generated due to the CAR when two ferromagnets become two half metals. It is found that the strong RSOI and the large indirect coupling are in favor of the CAR and the production of the strong spin current. The properties of the spin-related current are tunable in terms of the external parameters. Our results offer new ways to manipulate the spin-dependent transport. PMID:23228047

  4. Dirac oscillator interacting with a topological defect

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, J.; Furtado, C.; Moraes, F.

    2011-09-15

    In this work we study the interaction problem of a Dirac oscillator with gravitational fields produced by topological defects. The energy levels of the relativistic oscillator in the cosmic string and in the cosmic dislocation space-times are sensible to curvature and torsion associated to these defects and are important evidence of the influence of the topology on this system. In the presence of a localized magnetic field the energy levels acquire a term associated with the Aharonov-Bohm effect. We obtain the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues and see that in the nonrelativistic limit some results known in standard quantum mechanics are reached.

  5. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special issue on Quantum Phases: 50 Years of the Aharonov-Bohm Effect and 25 Years of the Berry Phase Special issue on Quantum Phases: 50 Years of the Aharonov-Bohm Effect and 25 Years of the Berry Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidman, Lev; Dennis, Mark; Popescu, Sandu

    2010-01-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to the subject of quantum phases and highlighting the impact of the discovery of the Aharonov--Bohm effect and of the Berry phase across physics. Researchers working in the area are invited to submit papers of original research to this issue. Editorial policy The Editorial Board has invited Lev Vaidman, Mark Dennis and Sandu Popescu to serve as Guest Editors for the special issue. The criteria for acceptance of contributions are as follows: Contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure and high standards of the journal. Papers should be original and should contain substantial new results. All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Papers should report original and significant research that has not already been published. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The DEADLINE for contributed papers will be 1 February 2010. This deadline will allow the special issue to appear in September 2010. Advice on publishing your work in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical www.iop.org/Journals/jphysa. Contributions to the special issue should be submitted electronically, if possible, by web upload at www.iop.org/Journals/jphysa, or by email to jphysa@iop.org, quoting 'JPhysA Special Issue— Quantum Phases'. Submissions should ideally be in standard LaTeX form. Please see the website for further information on electronic submissions. Authors unable to submit electronically may send hard-copy contributions to: Publishing Administrators, Journal of Physics A, IOP Publishing, Dirac House, Temple Back, Bristol BS1 6BE, UK. Please quote 'JPhysA Special Issue— Quantum Phases'. All contributions should be accompanied by a read-me file or covering letter giving the postal and e-mail addresses for correspondence. The Publishing Office should be notified of any

  6. On the effects of a screw dislocation and a linear potential on the harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, M. J.; Furtado, C.; Bakke, K.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum effects on the harmonic oscillator due to the presence of a linear scalar potential and a screw dislocation are investigated. By searching for bound states solutions, it is shown that an Aharonov-Bohm-type effect for bound states and a restriction of the values of the angular frequency of the harmonic oscillator can be obtained, where the allowed values are determined by the topology of the screw dislocation and the quantum numbers associated with the radial modes and the angular momentum. As particular cases, the angular frequency and the energy levels associated with the ground state and the first excited state of the system are obtained.

  7. Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Perturbation Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Kay M.; Henneberger, Walter C.

    1978-01-01

    The Aharonov-Bohn effect is obtained in first-order perturbation theory. It is shown that the effect occurs only when the initial state is a superposition of eigenstates of Lz corresponding to eigenvalues having opposite sign. (Author/GA)

  8. Klein-Gordon oscillator in Kaluza-Klein theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Josevi; Carvalho, Alexandre M. de M.; Cavalcante, Everton; Furtado, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution we study the Klein-Gordon oscillator on the curved background within the Kaluza-Klein theory. The problem of the interaction between particles coupled harmonically with topological defects in Kaluza-Klein theory is studied. We consider a series of topological defects, then we treat the Klein-Gordon oscillator coupled to this background, and we find the energy levels and corresponding eigenfunctions in these cases. We show that the energy levels depend on the global parameters characterizing these spacetimes. We also investigate a quantum particle described by the Klein-Gordon oscillator interacting with a cosmic dislocation in Som-Raychaudhuri spacetime in the presence of homogeneous magnetic field in a Kaluza-Klein theory. In this case, the energy spectrum is determined, and we observe that these energy levels represent themselves as the sum of the terms related with Aharonov-Bohm flux and of the parameter associated to the rotation of the spacetime.

  9. Quantum oscillations and wave packet revival in conical graphene structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Debabrata; Berche, Bertrand

    2016-03-01

    We present analytical expressions for the eigenstates and eigenvalues of electrons confined in a graphene monolayer in which the crystal symmetry is locally modified by replacing a hexagon by a pentagon, square or heptagon. The calculations are performed in the continuum limit approximation in the vicinity of the Dirac points, solving Dirac equation by freezing out the carrier radial motion. We include the effect of an external magnetic field and show the appearance of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and find out the conditions of gapped and gapless states in the spectrum. We show that the gauge field due to a disclination lifts the orbital degeneracy originating from the existence of two valleys. The broken valley degeneracy has a clear signature on quantum oscillations and wave packet dynamics.

  10. Conductance oscillations of core-shell nanowires in transversal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolescu, Andrei; Nemnes, George Alexandru; Sitek, Anna; Rosdahl, Tomas Orn; Erlingsson, Sigurdur Ingi; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2016-05-01

    We analyze theoretically electronic transport through a core-shell nanowire in the presence of a transversal magnetic field. We calculate the conductance for a variable coupling between the nanowire and the attached leads and show how the snaking states, which are low-energy states localized along the lines of the vanishing radial component of the magnetic field, manifest their existence. In the strong-coupling regime they induce flux periodic, Aharonov-Bohm-like, conductance oscillations, which, by decreasing the coupling to the leads, evolve into well-resolved peaks. The flux periodic oscillations arise due to interference of the snaking states, which is a consequence of backscattering at either the contacts with leads or magnetic or potential barriers in the wire.

  11. Self-oscillating AB diblock copolymer developed by post modification strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, Takeshi; Onoda, Michika; Tamate, Ryota; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Ryo

    2015-06-01

    We prepared AB diblock copolymer composed of hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) segment and self-oscillating polymer segment. In the latter segment, ruthenium tris(2,2'-bipyridine) (Ru(bpy)3), a catalyst of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, is introduced into the polymer architecture based on N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm). The Ru(bpy)3 was introduced into the polymer segment by two methods; (i) direct random copolymerization (DP) of NIPAAm and Ru(bpy)3 vinyl monomer and (ii) post modification (PM) of Ru(bpy)3 with random copolymer of NIPAAm and N-3-aminopropylmethacrylamide. For both the diblock copolymers, a bistable temperature region (the temperature range; ΔTm), where the block copolymer self-assembles into micelle at reduced Ru(bpy)32+ state whereas it breaks-up into individual polymer chain at oxidized Ru(bpy)33+ state, monotonically extends as the composition of the Ru(bpy)3 increases. The ΔTm of the block copolymer prepared by PM is larger than that by DP. The difference in ΔTm is rationalized from the statistical analysis of the arrangement of the Ru(bpy)3 moiety along the self-oscillating segments. By using the PM method, the well-defined AB diblock copolymer having ΔTm (ca. 25 °C) large enough to cause stable self-oscillation can be prepared. The periodic structural transition of the diblock copolymer in a dilute solution ([Polymer] = 0.1 wt. %) is closely investigated in terms of the time-resolved dynamic light scattering technique at constant temperature in the bistable region. A macroscopic viscosity oscillation of a concentrated polymer solution (15 wt. %) coupled with the periodic microphase separation is also demonstrated.

  12. Self-oscillating AB diblock copolymer developed by post modification strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, Takeshi E-mail: ryo@cross.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Onoda, Michika; Tamate, Ryota; Yoshida, Ryo E-mail: ryo@cross.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2015-06-15

    We prepared AB diblock copolymer composed of hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) segment and self-oscillating polymer segment. In the latter segment, ruthenium tris(2,2′-bipyridine) (Ru(bpy){sub 3}), a catalyst of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, is introduced into the polymer architecture based on N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm). The Ru(bpy){sub 3} was introduced into the polymer segment by two methods; (i) direct random copolymerization (DP) of NIPAAm and Ru(bpy){sub 3} vinyl monomer and (ii) post modification (PM) of Ru(bpy){sub 3} with random copolymer of NIPAAm and N-3-aminopropylmethacrylamide. For both the diblock copolymers, a bistable temperature region (the temperature range; ΔT{sub m}), where the block copolymer self-assembles into micelle at reduced Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} state whereas it breaks-up into individual polymer chain at oxidized Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 3+} state, monotonically extends as the composition of the Ru(bpy){sub 3} increases. The ΔT{sub m} of the block copolymer prepared by PM is larger than that by DP. The difference in ΔT{sub m} is rationalized from the statistical analysis of the arrangement of the Ru(bpy){sub 3} moiety along the self-oscillating segments. By using the PM method, the well-defined AB diblock copolymer having ΔT{sub m} (ca. 25 °C) large enough to cause stable self-oscillation can be prepared. The periodic structural transition of the diblock copolymer in a dilute solution ([Polymer] = 0.1 wt. %) is closely investigated in terms of the time-resolved dynamic light scattering technique at constant temperature in the bistable region. A macroscopic viscosity oscillation of a concentrated polymer solution (15 wt. %) coupled with the periodic microphase separation is also demonstrated.

  13. Aharonov-Bohm effect on Aharonov-Casher scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiong-Gui

    2010-01-01

    The scattering of relativistic spin-1/2 neutral particles with a magnetic dipole moment by a long straight charged line and a magnetic flux line at the same position is studied. The scattering cross sections for unpolarized and polarized particles are obtained by solving the Dirac-Pauli equation. The results are in general the same as those for pure Aharonov-Casher scattering (by the charged line alone) as expected. However, in special cases when the incident energy, the line charge density, and the magnetic flux satisfy some relations, the cross section for polarized particles is dramatically changed. Relations between the polarization of incident particles and that of scattered ones are presented, both in the full relativistic case and the nonrelativistic limit. The characteristic difference between the general and special cases lies in the backward direction: in the general cases the incident particles are simply bounced while in the special cases their polarization is turned over simultaneously. For pure Aharonov-Casher scattering there exist cases where the helicities of all scattered particles are reversed. This seems to be remarkable but appears unnoticed previously. Two mathematical approaches are employed to deal with the singularity of the electric and magnetic field and it turns out that the physical results are essentially the same.

  14. Aharonov-Bohm phase in high density quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Chandrasekhar; Nitta, Muneto

    2016-03-01

    Stable non-Abelian vortices, which are color magnetic flux tubes as well as superfluid vortices, are present in the color-flavor locked phase of dense quark matter with diquark condensations. We calculate the Aharanov-Bohm phases of charged particles, that is, electrons, muons, and color-flavor locked mesons made of tetraquarks around a non-Abelian vortex.

  15. Topological Charge Screening in Disordered Aharonov-Bohm Wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Alexander; Hannay, John; Taylor, Alexander; Dennis, Mark

    Free electrical charges are typically subject to screening relations. For example, in ionic fluids and Coulomb gases there is screening (both global and local) of the electrical charges, described by the first and second Stillinger-Lovett sum rules. A topological analogy governs the statistical behaviour of the nodal points in Gaussian random superpositions of plane waves. These nodal points are integer topological charges, i.e. vortices and antivortices of the complex wavefunction, whose sign is that of the phase circulation. Such superpositions are known to model high energy eigenfunctions in the presence of wave chaos, and display topological charge screening in the bulk. We investigate how these screening relations are affected by the introduction of a magnetic flux line, which may be fractional in strength. We find that the global screening relation is broken, with the average total topological charge of the vortices given by the flux strength, and that the local screening of the flux itself shows unexpected features.

  16. Uniform asymptotic formula for the Aharonov Bohm wavefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannay, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    A uniform asymptotic formula for the Aharonov–Bohm wavefield (that of a plane quantum wave scattered by a thin straight solenoid) far away from the solenoid is obtained in a direct way. Actually quite good accuracy is achieved even down to one wavelength away. The error is numerically of order radius^(‑3/2) for all values of polar angle, including directly forwards. Several previous formulas, uniform and otherwise, for the far field limit exist in the literature. All contain the essential ingredient: the Fresnel integral (complex error function), but ordinarily the error in these formulas is of order radius^(‑1/2) in the forwards direction where the Fresnel contribution is most important.

  17. Multisubband transport and magnetic deflection of Fermi electron trajectories in three terminal junctions and rings.

    PubMed

    Poniedziałek, M R; Szafran, B

    2012-02-29

    We study the electron transport in three terminal junctions and quantum rings looking for the classical deflection of electron trajectories in the presence of intersubband scattering. We indicate that although the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and the Lorentz force effects co-exist in the low subband transport, for higher Fermi energies a simultaneous observation of both effects is difficult and calls for carefully formed structures. In particular, in quantum rings with channels wider than the input lead the Lorentz force is well resolved but the Aharonov-Bohm periodicity is lost in chaotic scattering events. In quantum rings with equal lengths of the channels and T-shaped junctions the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations are distinctly periodic but the Lorentz force effects are not well pronounced. We find that systems with wedge-shaped junctions allow for observation of both the periodic Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and the magnetic deflection. PMID:22277600

  18. Quantum interference in an electron-hole graphene ring system

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, D.; Schmidt, H.; Haug, R. J.

    2013-12-04

    Quantum interference is observed in a graphene ring system via the Aharonov Bohm effect. As graphene is a gapless semiconductor, this geometry allows to study the unique situation of quantum interference between electrons and holes in addition to the unipolar quantum interference. The period and amplitude of the observed Aharonov-Bohm oscillations are independent of the sign of the applied gate voltage showing the equivalence between unipolar and dipolar interference.

  19. Exciton storage in type-II quantum dots using the optical Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Climente, Juan I.; Planelles, Josep

    2014-05-12

    We investigate the bright-to-dark exciton conversion efficiency in type-II quantum dots subject to a perpendicular magnetic field. To this end, we take the exciton storage protocol recently proposed by Simonin and co-workers [Phys. Rev. B 89, 075304 (2014)] and simulate its coherent dynamics. We confirm the storage is efficient in perfectly circular structures subject to weak external electric fields, where adiabatic evolution is dominant. In practice, however, the efficiency rapidly degrades with symmetry lowering. Besides, the use of excited states is likely unfeasible owing to the fast decay rates. We then propose an adaptation of the protocol which does not suffer from these limitations.

  20. Comment on "Role of potentials in the Aharonov-Bohm effect"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonov, Yakir; Cohen, Eliahu; Rohrlich, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Are the electromagnetic scalar and vector potentials dispensable? Vaidman [Phys. Rev. A 86, 040101(R) (2012)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.040101 has suggested that local interactions of gauge-invariant quantities, e.g., magnetic torques, suffice for the description of all quantum electromagnetic phenomena. We analyze six thought experiments that challenge this suggestion. All of them have explanations in terms of local interactions of gauge-dependent quantities, and, in addition, some have explanations in terms of nonlocal interactions of gauge-invariant quantities. We claim, however, that two of our examples have no gauge-invariant formal description and that, in general, no local description can dispense with electromagnetic potentials.

  1. Single electron bipolar conductance switch driven by the molecular Aharonov-Bohm effect.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joonhee; Tallarida, Nicholas; Rios, Laura; Perdue, Shawn M; Apkarian, Vartkess Ara

    2014-06-24

    We demonstrate a conductance switch controlled by the spin-vibronic density of an odd electron on a single molecule. The junction current is modulated by the spin-flip bistability of the electron. Functional images are provided as wiring diagrams for control of the switch's frequency, amplitude, polarity, and duty-cycle. The principle of operation relies on the quantum mechanical phase associated with the adiabatic circulation of a spin-aligned electron around a conical intersection. The functional images quantify the governing vibronic Hamiltonian. PMID:24824563

  2. Electronic energy levels of nanorings with impurities and Aharonov-Bohm effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, S.

    2011-10-01

    By modeling impurities along a nanoring as general potential forms the Schrödinger equation for ballistic electrons is shown to separate in cylindrical coordinates. We find an analytical eigenvalue equation for N delta-function-barrier impurities in the presence of magnetic flux. Previous calculations of the electronic states of a one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) nanoring for only one or two impurities modeled by equal square barriers is explicitly extended to three and four different or equal impurities modeled as delta-barrier, square-barrier, or delta-well potential forms. This is shown to be generalizable to any number N. Effects on the energy spectra due to magnetic flux and different kinds and numbers of impurities are compared in 1D and 2D nanorings.

  3. The Aharonov-Bohm Effect and Transport Properties in Graphene Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lungu, Mihai; Giugiulan, Raluca; Lungu, Antoanetta; Bunoiu, Madalin; Neculae, Adrian

    2013-12-01

    This paper investigates the possibility to improve the filtering process of flue gas by separation of suspended nanoparticle using dielectrophoresis. The study focuses on the particles having an average radius of about 50-150 nm, that cannot be filtrated by classical techniques but have a harmful effect for environment and human health. The size distribution nanoparticles collected from the flue gas filters of a hazardous waste incinerator plant were evaluated. Based on obtained experimental data and a proposed mathematical model, the concentration distribution of nanoparticle suspended in flue gas inside a microfluidic separation device was analyzed by numerical simulations, using the finite element method. The performances of the device were described in terms of three new specific quantities related to the separation process, namely Recovery, Purity and Separation Efficiency. The simulations could provide the optimal values of control parameters for separation process, and aim to be a useful tool in designing microfluidic devices for separating nanoparticle from combustion gases.

  4. Scaling of Aharonov-Bohm couplings and the dynamical vacuum in gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, A.S. ); Li, H. ); Parwani, R.R. )

    1995-01-15

    Recent results on the vacuum polarization induced by a thin string of magnetic flux lead us to suggest an analogue of the Copenhagen flux spaghetti'' QCD vacuum as a possible mechanism for avoiding the divergence of perturbative QED, thus permitting a consistent completion of the full, nonperturbative theory. The mechanism appears to operate for spinor, but not scalar, QED.

  5. Temperature and magnetic field effects on electron transport through DNA molecules in a two-dimensional four-channel system.

    PubMed

    Joe, Yong S; Lee, Sun H; Hedin, Eric R; Kim, Young D

    2013-06-01

    We utilize a two-dimensional four-channel DNA model, with a tight-binding (TB) Hamiltonian, and investigate the temperature and the magnetic field dependence of the transport behavior of a short DNA molecule. Random variation of the hopping integrals due to the thermal structural disorder, which partially destroy phase coherence of electrons and reduce quantum interference, leads to a reduction of the localization length and causes suppressed overall transmission. We also incorporate a variation of magnetic field flux density into the hopping integrals as a phase factor and observe Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations in the transmission. It is shown that for non-zero magnetic flux, the transmission zero leaves the real-energy axis and moves up into the complex-energy plane. We also point out that the hydrogen bonds between the base pair with flux variations play a role to determine the periodicity of AB oscillations in the transmission. PMID:23862423

  6. Dynamic spin-flip shot noise of mesoscopic transport through a toroidal carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. K.; Zhang, J.; Wang, J.

    2015-01-01

    The shot noise in a toroidal carbon nanotube (TCN) interferometer under the perturbation of a rotating magnetic field (RMF) has been investigated. A general shot noise formula has been derived by calculating the current correlation. It was found that photon absorption and emission induce novel features of dynamic shot noise. The oscillatory behavior of shot noise and Fano factor vary with the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) magnetic flux, and they are sensitively dependent on the Zeeman energy, frequency of RMF, and source-drain bias. By adjusting the Zeeman energy, the AB oscillation structures of shot noise and Fano factor show valley-to-peak transformation. The shot noise increases nonlinearly with increasing the Zeeman energy and photon energy. The enhancement and asymmetry of shot noise can be attributed to the spin-flip effect.

  7. Quantum mechanical effects of topological origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duru, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    Following a brief review of the original Casimir and Aharonov-Bohm effects, some other effects of similar natures are mentioned. A Casimir interaction between AB fluxes is presented. Possible realizations of the Casimir effects for massive charged fields in solid state structures and a new AB effect for photons are suggested.

  8. Modeling surface motion effects in N2 dissociation on W(110): Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations and generalized Langevin oscillator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nattino, Francesco; Galparsoro, Oihana; Costanzo, Francesca; Díez Muiño, Ricardo; Alducin, Maite; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    2016-06-01

    Accurately modeling surface temperature and surface motion effects is necessary to study molecule-surface reactions in which the energy dissipation to surface phonons can largely affect the observables of interest. We present here a critical comparison of two methods that allow to model such effects, namely, the ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method and the generalized Langevin oscillator (GLO) model, using the dissociation of N2 on W(110) as a benchmark. AIMD is highly accurate as the surface atoms are explicitly part of the dynamics, but this advantage comes with a large computational cost. The GLO model is much more computationally convenient, but accounts for lattice motion effects in a very approximate way. Results show that, despite its simplicity, the GLO model is able to capture the physics of the system to a large extent, returning dissociation probabilities which are in better agreement with AIMD than static-surface results. Furthermore, the GLO model and the AIMD method predict very similar energy transfer to the lattice degrees of freedom in the non-reactive events, and similar dissociation dynamics.

  9. Energy levels and far-infrared spectra of oval-shaped nanorings

    SciTech Connect

    Gutiérrez, W.; García, L. F.; Mikhailov, I. D.

    2014-05-15

    The evolution of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillation of low-lying states and far infrared spectrum associated to variation of the path curvature for electron motion along nanorings with centerlines in a form of a set of Cassini ovals, whose shape is changed continuously from a single elongated loop to two separated loops is theoretically investigated.

  10. Energy levels and far-infrared spectra of oval-shaped nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, W.; García, L. F.; Mikhailov, I. D.

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillation of low-lying states and far infrared spectrum associated to variation of the path curvature for electron motion along nanorings with centerlines in a form of a set of Cassini ovals, whose shape is changed continuously from a single elongated loop to two separated loops is theoretically investigated.

  11. An "unreasonable effectiveness" of Hilbert transform for the transition phase behavior in an Aharonov-Bohm two-path interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englman, R.

    2016-08-01

    The recent phase shift data of Takada et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 (2014) 126601) for a two level system are reconstructed from their current intensity curves by the method of Hilbert transform, for which the underlying Physics is the principle of causality. An introductory algebraic model illustrates pedagogically the working of the method and leads to newly derived relationships involving phenomenological parameters, in particular for the sign of the phase slope between the resonance peaks. While the parametrization of the experimental current intensity data in terms of a few model parameters shows only a qualitative agreement for the phase shift, due to the strong impact of small, detailed variations in the experimental intensity curve on the phase behavior, the numerical Hilbert transform yields a satisfactory reproduction of the phase.

  12. The active-bridge oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Wessendorf, K.O.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes the Active-Bridge Oscillator (ABO), a new concept in high-stability oscillator design. The ABO is ab ridge-type oscillator design that is easly to design and overcomes many of the operational and design difficulties associated with standard bridge oscillator designs. The ABO will oscillate with a very stable output amplitude over a wide range of operating conditions without the use of an automatic-level-control (ALC). A standard bridge oscillator design requires an ALC to maintain the desired amplitude of oscillation. for this and other reasons, bridge oscilaltors are not used in mainstream designs. Bridge oscillators are generally relegated to relatively low-volume, high-performance applications. The Colpitts and Pierce designs are the most popular oscillators but are typically less stable than a bridge-type oscillator.

  13. Dual evidence of surface Dirac states in thin cylindrical topological insulator Bi₂Te₃ nanowires.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingliang; Ning, Wei; Qu, Zhe; Du, Haifeng; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Yuheng

    2013-01-01

    How the surface state (SS) develops and how the spin transport in a curved cylindrical topological insulator nanowire have attracted theoretical attention recently. However, experimental confirmation for the SS in such a real modeling system still remains insufficient. Here we carried out a systematic comparative study on the cylindrical single-crystal Bi₂Te₃ nanowires of various diameters, and report unambiguously dual evidence for the Dirac SS. Both the predicted anomalous Aharonov-Bohm (AB) quantum oscillations with a period of h/e in H(//) and the 1/2-shifted Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations (i.e., γ = -1/2) in H(⊥) were indentified below 1.4 K. In addition, Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak (AAS)-like oscillations with a period of h/2e and ordinary SdH oscillations with γ = 0 were also resolved. These data provide clear evidence of coexistence of the nontrivial topological Dirac state and trivial electron state on the surface of topological insulator nanowire. PMID:23390572

  14. Dual evidence of surface Dirac states in thin cylindrical topological insulator Bi2Te3 nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Mingliang; Ning, Wei; Qu, Zhe; Du, Haifeng; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Yuheng

    2013-01-01

    How the surface state (SS) develops and how the spin transport in a curved cylindrical topological insulator nanowire have attracted theoretical attention recently. However, experimental confirmation for the SS in such a real modeling system still remains insufficient. Here we carried out a systematic comparative study on the cylindrical single-crystal Bi2Te3 nanowires of various diameters, and report unambiguously dual evidence for the Dirac SS. Both the predicted anomalous Aharonov-Bohm (AB) quantum oscillations with a period of h/e in H// and the 1/2-shifted Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations (i.e., γ = −1/2) in H⊥ were indentified below 1.4 K. In addition, Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak (AAS)-like oscillations with a period of h/2e and ordinary SdH oscillations with γ = 0 were also resolved. These data provide clear evidence of coexistence of the nontrivial topological Dirac state and trivial electron state on the surface of topological insulator nanowire. PMID:23390572

  15. Remembering AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyayev, S. T.

    2013-06-01

    In 1947 I became a second-year student at Moscow State University's Physics and Engineering Department, where a part of the week's classes were taught at base organizations. Our group's base was the future Kurchatov Institute, at that time known as the mysterious "Laboratory N^circ 2," and later as LIPAN. . Besides group lectures and practical work at the experimental laboratories, we also had access to the general seminars which Igor Vasilyevich Kurchatov tried to hold, with Leonid Vasilyevich Groshev filling in when he was absent. At the seminar, theorists spoke as welcome co-presenters and commentators. In 1949 I felt ready to approach A. B. Migdal to ask if I could transfer to his theoretical sector. In response, he suggested a number of simple qualitative problems, which I then successfully solved. (Incidentally, AB used the very same "introductory problems" for screening many generations of students.) So I wound up among AB's students. From 1952 on (for 10 years) I also served as an employee of the Migdal Sector. My memoirs here are mainly inspired by these years of constant communication with AB. After my departure for Novosibirsk in 1962, although our meetings still took place, they became occasional....

  16. Coulomb-interaction effects on the electronic structure of radially polarized excitons in nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barticevic, Z.; Pacheco, M.; Simonin, J.; Proetto, C. R.

    2006-04-01

    The electronic structure of radially polarized excitons in structured nanorings is analyzed, with emphasis in the ground-state properties and their dependence under applied magnetic fields perpendicular to the ring plane. The electron-hole Coulomb attraction has been treated rigorously, through numerical diagonalization of the full exciton Hamiltonian in the noninteracting electron-hole pairs basis. Depending on the relative weight of the kinetic energy and Coulomb contributions, the ground-state of polarized excitons has “extended” or “localized” features. In the first case, corresponding to small rings dominated by the kinetic energy, the ground-state shows Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations due to the individual orbits of the building particles of the exciton. In the localized regime, corresponding to large rings dominated by the Coulomb interaction, the only remaining AB oscillations are due to the magnetic flux trapped between the electron and hole orbits. This dependence of the exciton, a neutral excitation, on the flux difference confirms this feature as a signature of Coulomb dominated polarized excitons. Analytical approximations are provided in both regimes, which accurately reproduce the numerical results.

  17. Measurement of the transmission phase of an electron in a quantum two-path interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, S. Watanabe, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Bäuerle, C.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.; Tarucha, S.

    2015-08-10

    A quantum two-path interferometer allows for direct measurement of the transmission phase shift of an electron, providing useful information on coherent scattering problems. In mesoscopic systems, however, the two-path interference is easily smeared by contributions from other paths, and this makes it difficult to observe the true transmission phase shift. To eliminate this problem, multi-terminal Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometers have been used to derive the phase shift by assuming that the relative phase shift of the electrons between the two paths is simply obtained when a smooth shift of the AB oscillations is observed. Nevertheless, the phase shifts using such a criterion have sometimes been inconsistent with theory. On the other hand, we have used an AB ring contacted to tunnel-coupled wires and acquired the phase shift consistent with theory when the two output currents through the coupled wires oscillate with well-defined anti-phase. Here, we investigate thoroughly these two criteria used to ensure a reliable phase measurement, the anti-phase relation of the two output currents, and the smooth phase shift in the AB oscillation. We confirm that the well-defined anti-phase relation ensures a correct phase measurement with a quantum two-path interference. In contrast, we find that even in a situation where the anti-phase relation is less well-defined, the smooth phase shift in the AB oscillation can still occur but does not give the correct transmission phase due to contributions from multiple paths. This indicates that the phase relation of the two output currents in our interferometer gives a good criterion for the measurement of the true transmission phase, while the smooth phase shift in the AB oscillation itself does not.

  18. Quantum tunneling through graphene nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Z. Z.; Chang, Kai; Peeters, F. M.

    2010-05-01

    We investigate theoretically quantum transport through graphene nanorings in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. Our theoretical results demonstrate that the graphene nanorings behave like a resonant tunneling device, contrary to the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations found in conventional semiconductor rings. The resonant tunneling can be tuned by the Fermi energy, the size of the central part of the graphene nanorings and the external magnetic field.

  19. Quantum tunneling through graphene nanorings.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Z Z; Chang, Kai; Peeters, F M

    2010-05-01

    We investigate theoretically quantum transport through graphene nanorings in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. Our theoretical results demonstrate that the graphene nanorings behave like a resonant tunneling device, contrary to the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations found in conventional semiconductor rings. The resonant tunneling can be tuned by the Fermi energy, the size of the central part of the graphene nanorings and the external magnetic field. PMID:20388970

  20. Transport measurements of the topological surface states in Bi2Te3 nanoribbon field effect devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Luis A.; Pettes, Michael T.; Shi, Li; Rokhinson, Leonid P.; Chen, Yong P.

    2013-03-01

    We have grown nanoribbons (NRs) of Bi2Te3, a prototype topological insulator, by CVD and characterized them by TEM, Raman Spectroscopy and EDS. We fabricate backgated field effect devices where the chemical potential can be tuned and ambipolar field effect has been observed. The as-grown NRs are n-type and the 4-terminal resistance (R4p) versus temperature (T) shows a metallic behavior. Applying a sufficiently negative Vg, the R4p vs T displays an insulating behavior that saturates in a plateau at T < 100K, suggesting a metallic surface conduction dominant at low temperatures. Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations of surface conducting carriers are observed in the magneto-resistance (MR) with a magnetic (B) field parallel to the NR axis. We have also measured the Shubnikov de Haas (SdH) oscillations with the B-field perpendicular to the NR axis at different carrier densities (n). The extrapolated Landau level crossing at 1/B = 0 is 0.5 and the extracted cyclotron mass from the T-dependence of the SdH oscillations is proportional to √{ n}, providing direct evidence of the Dirac fermion nature of the topological surface state. Gate-tunable weak anti-localization is observed and the extracted number of decoupled coherent conduction channels is 2 at the charge neutrality point.

  1. Magnetoluminescence from trion and biexciton in type-II quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Rin; Eto, Mikio; Hyuga, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    We theoretically investigate optical Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effects on trion and biexciton in the type-II semiconductor quantum dots, in which holes are localized near the center of the dot, and electrons are confined in a ring structure formed around the dot. Many-particle states are calculated numerically by the exact diagonalization method. Two electrons in trion and biexciton are strongly correlated to each other, forming a Wigner molecule. Since the relative motion of electrons are frozen, the Wigner molecule behaves as a composite particle whose mass and charges are twice those of an electron. As a result, the period of AB oscillation for trion and biexciton becomes h/2e as a function of magnetic flux penetrating the ring. We find that the magnetoluminescence spectra from trion and biexciton change discontinuously as the magnetic flux increases by h/2e.PACS: 71.35.Ji, 73.21.-b, 73.21.La, 78.67.Hc. PMID:21711894

  2. An exciton on coupled concentric double nanorings in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Weiwei; Jin, Guojun; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2008-09-01

    We study the influence of coupling between two concentric nanorings, embedded in two different layers separated by an insulating barrier, on the exciton's energy levels by the attractive Fermionic Hubbard model. The hopping coefficients between different rings are derived and the carriers' cyclotron movement caused by the magnetic field are taken into account. We find the amplitude of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillation is suppressed by the emergence of the Coulomb interaction. The coupling leads to a decrease of the energy of the excited states and this decrease varies significantly for different types of configuration for the electron and the hole. The study of the energy dependence on the radii of the two rings shows that the lowest energy level is determined by the small ring and the deviations of the exciton's energy from that of the single ring decreases with increasing magnetic field. The results also show that the energy of the AB oscillation can be modulated by changing the thickness of the spacer.

  3. Quantum transport in topological insulator nanoribbon field effect and Josephson devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayyalha, Morteza; Jauregui, Luis; Kazakov, Aleksander; Pettes, Michael; Miotkowski, Ireneusz; Shi, Li; Rokhinson, Leonid; Chen, Yong

    The spin-helical topological surface states (TSS) of topological insulators have attracted great attention in the past few years as an excellent platform to study topological transport and other exotic physics such as Majorana fermions. Here we present experiments studying quantum transport of TSS in topological insulator nanoribbon (TINR) field effect devices with normal as well as superconducting contacts. In Bi2Te3 NRs with normal contacts, we observe that the conductance vs. axial magnetic field exhibits Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations with an alternating phase of zero and π, depending periodically on the Fermi momentum kF tuned by an applied back-gate voltage, consistent with the 1D sub-band structure formed by circumferentially quantized TSS. We also investigated the Josephson effects in BiSbTeSe2 TINRs with superconducting Nb contacts. We measured the gate voltage and temperature dependence of the supercurrent and multiple Andreev reflections (MAR), to probe phase coherent transport via TSS

  4. Topological insulator Bi2Te3 nanowire field effect devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Luis A.; Zhang, Genqiang; Wu, Yue; Chen, Yong P.

    2012-02-01

    Bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) has been studied extensively as one of the best thermoelectric materials and recently shown to be a prototype topological insulator with nontrivial conducting surface states. We have grown Bi2Te3 nanowires by a two-step solution phase reaction and characterized their material and structural properties by XRD, TEM, XPS and EDS. We fabricate both backgated (on SiO2/Si) and top-gated (with ALD high-k gate dielectric such as Al2O3 or HfO2) field effect devices on such nanowires with diameters ˜50nm. Ambipolar field effect and a resistance modulation of up to 600% at low temperatures have been observed. The 4-terminal resistance shows insulating behavior (increasing with decreasing temperature) from 300 K to 50K, then saturates in a plateau for temperatures below 50K, consistent with the presence of metallic surface state. Aharonov--Bohm (AB) oscillations are observed in the magneto-resistance with a magnetic field parallel to the nanowire, providing further evidence of the presence of surface state conduction Finally, a prominent weak anti-localization (WAL) feature that weakens with increasing magnetic field and/or temperature is observed in the magneto-resistance with a magnetic field perpendicular to the nanowire.

  5. Fractional oscillator.

    PubMed

    Stanislavsky, A A

    2004-11-01

    We consider a fractional oscillator which is a generalization of the conventional linear oscillator in the framework of fractional calculus. It is interpreted as an ensemble average of ordinary harmonic oscillators governed by a stochastic time arrow. The intrinsic absorption of the fractional oscillator results from the full contribution of the harmonic oscillator ensemble: these oscillators differ a little from each other in frequency so that each response is compensated by an antiphase response of another harmonic oscillator. This allows one to draw a parallel in the dispersion analysis for media described by a fractional oscillator and an ensemble of ordinary harmonic oscillators with damping. The features of this analysis are discussed. PMID:15600586

  6. Quantum-ring spin interference device tuned by quantum point contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Diago-Cisneros, Leo; Mireles, Francisco

    2013-11-21

    We introduce a spin-interference device that comprises a quantum ring (QR) with three embedded quantum point contacts (QPCs) and study theoretically its spin transport properties in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Two of the QPCs conform the lead-to-ring junctions while a third one is placed symmetrically in the upper arm of the QR. Using an appropriate scattering model for the QPCs and the S-matrix scattering approach, we analyze the role of the QPCs on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) conductance oscillations of the QR-device. Exact formulas are obtained for the spin-resolved conductances of the QR-device as a function of the confinement of the QPCs and the AB/AC phases. Conditions for the appearance of resonances and anti-resonances in the spin-conductance are derived and discussed. We predict very distinctive variations of the QR-conductance oscillations not seen in previous QR proposals. In particular, we find that the interference pattern in the QR can be manipulated to a large extend by varying electrically the lead-to-ring topological parameters. The latter can be used to modulate the AB and AC phases by applying gate voltage only. We have shown also that the conductance oscillations exhibits a crossover to well-defined resonances as the lateral QPC confinement strength is increased, mapping the eigenenergies of the QR. In addition, unique features of the conductance arise by varying the aperture of the upper-arm QPC and the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Our results may be of relevance for promising spin-orbitronics devices based on quantum interference mechanisms.

  7. Topological dephasing in the ν =2 /3 fractional quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhong; Gefen, Yuval; Sim, H.-S.

    2015-12-01

    We study dephasing in electron transport through a large quantum dot (a Fabry-Perot interferometer) in the fractional quantum Hall regime with filling factor 2 /3 . In the regime of sequential tunneling, dephasing occurs due to electron fractionalization into counterpropagating charge and neutral edge modes on the dot. In particular, when the charge mode moves much faster than the neutral mode, and at temperatures higher than the level spacing of the dot, electron fractionalization combined with the fractional statistics of the charge mode leads to the dephasing selectively suppressing h /e Aharonov-Bohm oscillations but not h /(2 e ) oscillations, resulting in oscillation-period halving.

  8. An experimental proposal to test the physical effect of the vector potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Feng

    2016-01-01

    There are two interpretations of the Aharonov-Bohm (A-B) effect. One interpretation asserts that the A-B effect demonstrates that the vector potential is a physical reality that can result in the phase shift of a moving charge in quantum mechanics. The other interpretation asserts that the phase shift of the moving charge results from the interaction energy between the electromagnetic field of the moving charge and external electromagnetic fields. This paper briefly reviews these two interpretations and analyzes their differences. In addition, a new experimental scheme is proposed to determine which interpretation is correct. PMID:26822526

  9. An experimental proposal to test the physical effect of the vector potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-Feng

    2016-01-01

    There are two interpretations of the Aharonov-Bohm (A-B) effect. One interpretation asserts that the A-B effect demonstrates that the vector potential is a physical reality that can result in the phase shift of a moving charge in quantum mechanics. The other interpretation asserts that the phase shift of the moving charge results from the interaction energy between the electromagnetic field of the moving charge and external electromagnetic fields. This paper briefly reviews these two interpretations and analyzes their differences. In addition, a new experimental scheme is proposed to determine which interpretation is correct.

  10. Neurodynamic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espinosa, Ismael; Gonzalez, Hortensia; Quiza, Jorge; Gonazalez, J. Jesus; Arroyo, Ruben; Lara, Ritaluz

    1995-01-01

    Oscillation of electrical activity has been found in many nervous systems, from invertebrates to vertebrates including man. There exists experimental evidence of very simple circuits with the capability of oscillation. Neurons with intrinsic oscillation have been found and also neural circuits where oscillation is a property of the network. These two types of oscillations coexist in many instances. It is nowadays hypothesized that behind synchronization and oscillation there is a system of coupled oscillators responsible for activities that range from locomotion and feature binding in vision to control of sleep and circadian rhythms. The huge knowledge that has been acquired on oscillators from the times of Lord Rayleigh has made the simulation of neural oscillators a very active endeavor. This has been enhanced with more recent physiological findings about small neural circuits by means of intracellular and extracellular recordings as well as imaging methods. The future of this interdisciplinary field looks very promising; some researchers are going into quantum mechanics with the idea of trying to provide a quantum description of the brain. In this work we describe some simulations using neuron models by means of which we form simple neural networks that have the capability of oscillation. We analyze the oscillatory activity with root locus method, cross-correlation histograms, and phase planes. In the more complicated neural network models there is the possibility of chaotic oscillatory activity and we study that by means of Lyapunov exponents. The companion paper shows an example of that kind.

  11. Galactic oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    Long-lived oscillations that act like normal modes are described. The total kinetic energy is found to vary with time by amounts far in excess of the fluctuations expected from the virial theorem, and the variation shows periodic patterns that suggest oscillations. Experimental results indicate that oscillation amplitudes depend on the nature of the model. It is noted that it is difficult to answer questions about likely amplitudes in real galaxies with any confidence at the present time.

  12. Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlying mechanism of calcium oscillations through the power of mathematical modeling. We also summarize recent findings on the role of calcium entry through store-operated channels in sustaining calcium oscillations and in the mechanism by which calcium oscillations couple to downstream effectors. PMID:21421924

  13. Memories of AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaks, V. G.

    2013-06-01

    I had the good fortune to be a student of A. B. Migdal - AB, as we called him in person or in his absence - and to work in the sector he headed at the Kurchatov Institute, along with his other students and my friends, including Vitya Galitsky, Spartak Belyayev and Tolya Larkin. I was especially close with AB in the second half of the 1950s, the years most important for my formation, and AB's contribution to this formation was very great. To this day, I've often quoted AB on various occasions, as it's hard to put things better or more precisely than he did; I tell friends stories heard from AB, because these stories enhance life as AB himself enhanced it; my daughter is named Tanya after AB's wife Tatyana Lvovna, and so on. In what follows, I'll recount a few episodes in my life in which AB played an important or decisive role, and then will share some other memories of AB...

  14. Quantum Electronic Transport of Topological Surface States in β-Ag2Se Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihwan; Hwang, Ahreum; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Sunghun; Park, Yun Chang; Kim, Si-In; Kim, Hong-Seok; Doh, Yong-Joo; Kim, Jinhee; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-04-26

    Single-crystalline β-Ag2Se nanostructures, a new class of 3D topological insulators (TIs), were synthesized using the chemical vapor transport method. The topological surface states were verified by measuring electronic transport properties including the weak antilocalization effect, Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, and Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. First-principles band calculations revealed that the band inversion in β-Ag2Se is caused by strong spin-orbit coupling and Ag-Se bonding hybridization. These investigations provide evidence of nontrivial surface state about β-Ag2Se TIs that have anisotropic Dirac cones. PMID:27018892

  15. Semiclassical and quantum transport in the two-dimensional electron gas in a hard-wall antidot lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, D. A.; Kvon, Z. D.; Plotnikov, A. E.

    2009-03-01

    Commensurate peaks of magnetoresistance and Shubnikov-de Haas and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a lattice of antidots with hard potential walls have been experimentally studied. The behavior of both classical magnetoresistance peaks and quantum oscillations has been shown to fundamentally depend on the lattice period and the antidot size, as well as on the smoothness of the potential at the 2DEG-antidot interface. This result indicates the necessity of revising the interpretation of all numerous experiments with antidot lattices, since this effect has been explicitly or implicitly neglected in them.

  16. Magnetic Flux Effect on a Kondo-Induced Electric Polarization in a Triangular Triple Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Mikito; Matsumoto, Masashige; Kusunose, Hiroaki

    2014-08-01

    A magnetic flux effect is studied theoretically on an electric polarization induced by the Kondo effect in a triangular triple-quantum-dot system, where one of the three dots is connected to a metallic lead. This electric polarization exhibits an Aharonov-Bohm oscillation as a function of the magnetic flux penetrating through the triangular loop. The numerical renormalization group analysis reveals how the oscillation pattern depends on the Kondo coupling of a local spin with lead electrons, which is sensitive to the point contact with the lead. It provides an experimental implication that the Kondo effect is the origin of the emergent electric polarization.

  17. Kondo-induced electric polarization modulated by magnetic flux through a triangular triple quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, M.; Matsumoto, M.; Kusunose, H.

    2015-03-01

    The Kondo effect plays an important role in emergence of electric polarization in a triangular triple-quantum-dot system, where one of the three dots is point-contacted with a single lead, and a magnetic flux penetrates through the triangular loop. The Kondo-induced electric polarization exhibits an Aharonov-Bohm type oscillation as a function of the magnetic flux. Our theoretical study shows various oscillation patterns associated with the field-dependent mixing of twofold orbitally degenerate ground states and their sensitivity to the point contact.

  18. Raindrop oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, K. V.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the change in shape of a raindrop is presented. Raindrops measured by two orthogonal cameras were classified by shape and orientation to determine the nature of the oscillation. A physical model based on potential energy was then developed to study the amplitude variation of oscillating drops. The model results show that oscillations occur about the equilibrium axis ratio, but the time average axis ratio if significantly more spherical for large amplitudes because of asymmetry in the surface potential energy. A generalization of the model to oscillations produced by turbulence yields average axis ratios that are consistent with the camera measurements. The model results for average axis ratios were applied to rainfall studies with a dual polarized radar.

  19. Microelectronic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L.

    1969-01-01

    Bipolar transistor operated in a grounded base configuration is used as the inductor in a microelectronic oscillator. This configuration is employed using thin-film hybrid technology and is also applicable to monolithic technology.

  20. Power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2001-01-01

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  1. Relativistic Killingbeck energy states under external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshghi, M.; Mehraban, H.; Ikhdair, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    We address the behavior of the Dirac equation with the Killingbeck radial potential including the external magnetic and Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux fields. The spin and pseudo-spin symmetries are considered. The correct bound state spectra and their corresponding wave functions are obtained. We seek such a solution using the biconfluent Heun's differential equation method. Further, we give some of our results at the end of this study. Our final results can be reduced to their non-relativistic forms by simply using some appropriate transformations. The spectra, in the spin and pseudo-spin symmetries, are very similar with a slight difference in energy spacing between different states.

  2. Effect of morphology on spectral properties of magneto-trion X+ in vertically coupled type II quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horta-Piñeres, Sindi; Elizabeth Escorcia-Salas, G.; Mikhailov, I. D.; Sierra-Ortega, J.

    2014-11-01

    The energy spectrum of a positively charged exciton confined in vertically coupled type II quantum dots with different morphologies in the presence of the external magnetic field is studied. The effect of the quantum dot morphology on the curves of the lowest energy levels as functions of the magnetic field is analyzed. It is shown that a strong correlation presented in this system generates the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the lower energy levels similar to those in wide quantum ring. The novel curves of the trion energies dependences on the external magnetic field for the disk-like, lens-like, and cone-like structures are presented.

  3. Quasiballistic transport of Dirac fermions in a Bi2Se3 nanowire.

    PubMed

    Dufouleur, J; Veyrat, L; Teichgräber, A; Neuhaus, S; Nowka, C; Hampel, S; Cayssol, J; Schumann, J; Eichler, B; Schmidt, O G; Büchner, B; Giraud, R

    2013-05-01

    Quantum coherent transport of surface states in a mesoscopic nanowire of the three-dimensional topological insulator Bi(2}Se(3) is studied in the weak-disorder limit. At very low temperatures, many harmonics are evidenced in the Fourier transform of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, revealing the long phase coherence length of spin-chiral Dirac fermions. Remarkably, from their exponential temperature dependence, we infer an unusual 1/T power law for the phase coherence length L(φ)(T). This decoherence is typical for quasiballistic fermions weakly coupled to their environment. PMID:23683235

  4. Double-donor complex in vertically coupled quantum dots in a threading magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Manjarres-García, Ramón; Escorcia-Salas, Gene Elizabeth; Manjarres-Torres, Javier; Mikhailov, Ilia D; Sierra-Ortega, José

    2012-01-01

    We consider a model of hydrogen-like artificial molecule formed by two vertically coupled quantum dots in the shape of axially symmetrical thin layers with on-axis single donor impurity in each of them and with the magnetic field directed along the symmetry axis. We present numerical results for energies of some low-lying levels as functions of the magnetic field applied along the symmetry axis for different quantum dot heights, radii, and separations between them. The evolution of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the energy levels with the increase of the separation between dots is analyzed. PMID:23013550

  5. Transport through quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    António, B. A. Z.; Lopes, A. A.; Dias, R. G.

    2013-07-01

    The transport of fermions through nanocircuits plays a major role in mesoscopic physics. Exploring the analogy with classical wave scattering, basic notions of nanoscale transport can be explained in a simple way, even at the level of undergraduate solid state physics courses, and more so if these explanations are supported by numerical simulations of these nanocircuits. This paper presents a simple tight-binding method for the study of the conductance of quantum nanorings connected to one-dimensional leads. We show how to address the effects of applied magnetic and electric fields and illustrate concepts such as Aharonov-Bohm conductance oscillations, resonant tunneling and destructive interference.

  6. Interband optical spectra of magnetoexcitons in semiconductor nanorings: Electron-hole spatial correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citrin, D. S.; Maslov, A. V.

    2005-08-01

    An analytic model [R. A. Römer and M. E. Raikh, Phys. Rev. B 62, 7045 (2000); K. Moulopoulos and M. Constantinou, Phys. Rev. B 70, 235327 (2004)] for magnetoexcitons in nanoscale semiconductor rings is extended to calculate directly the linear optical properties. The spectroscopic properties exhibit pronounced Φ0=hc/e excitonic Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in the threading magnetic flux Φ when the ring radius R is less than the effective exciton Bohr radius a0 . The electron-hole spatial correlation induced by an optical field as a function of nanoring radius and threading magnetic flux is studied.

  7. Programmable Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Patawaran, Ferze D.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Lee, Clement G.; Nguyen, Huy

    2011-01-01

    A programmable oscillator is a frequency synthesizer with an output phase that tracks an arbitrary function. An offset, phase-locked loop circuit is used in combination with an error control feedback loop to precisely control the output phase of the oscillator. To down-convert the received signal, several stages of mixing may be employed with the compensation for the time-base distortion of the carrier occurring at any one of those stages. In the Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR), the compensation occurs in the mixing from an intermediate frequency (IF), whose value is dependent on the station and band, to a common IF used in the final stage of down-conversion to baseband. The programmable oscillator (PO) is used in the final stage of down-conversion to generate the IF, along with a time-varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the carrier, thus removing it from the final down-converted signal.

  8. Baryogenesis via particle-antiparticle oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek, Seyda; March-Russell, John

    2016-06-01

    C P violation, which is crucial for producing the baryon asymmetry of the Universe, is enhanced in particle-antiparticle oscillations. We study particle-antiparticle oscillations [of a particle with mass O (100 GeV )] with C P violation in the early Universe in the presence of interactions with O (ab -fb ) cross sections. We show that if baryon-number-violating interactions exist, a baryon asymmetry can be produced via out-of-equilibrium decays of oscillating particles. As a concrete example we study a U (1 )R-symmetric, R -parity-violating supersymmetry model with pseudo-Dirac gauginos, which undergo particle-antiparticle oscillations. Taking bino to be the lightest U (1 )R -symmetric particle, and assuming it decays via baryon-number-violating interactions, we show that bino-antibino oscillations can produce the baryon asymmetry of the Universe.

  9. Baryogenesis via particle-antiparticle oscillations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ipek, Seyda; March-Russell, John

    2016-06-29

    CP violation, which is crucial for producing the baryon asymmetry of the Universe, is enhanced in particle-antiparticle oscillations. We study particle-antiparticle oscillations [of a particle with mass O(100GeV)] with CP violation in the early Universe in the presence of interactions with O(ab-fb) cross sections. We show that if baryon-number-violating interactions exist, a baryon asymmetry can be produced via out-of-equilibrium decays of oscillating particles. As a concrete example we study a U(1)R-symmetric, R-parity-violating supersymmetry model with pseudo-Dirac gauginos, which undergo particle-antiparticle oscillations. Hence, taking bino to be the lightest U(1)R-symmetric particle, and assuming it decays via baryon-number-violating interactions, we show thatmore » bino-antibino oscillations can produce the baryon asymmetry of the Universe.« less

  10. Omega-AB

    2007-05-01

    A hierarchical, modular modeling environment for hybrid simulations of sequential-modular, systems dynamics, discrete-event, and agent-based paradigms Omega-AB models contain a hierarchically-defined module tree that specifies the execution logic for the simulation, and a multi-network graph that defines the environment within which the simulation occurs. Modules are the fundamental buildinig blocks of an Omega-AB model and can define anything from a basic mathematical operation to a complex behavioral response model. Modules rely on the "plug-in" conceptmore » which allows developers to build independent module libraries that are gathered, linked, and instantiated by the Omega-AB engine at run time. Inter-module communication occurs through two complimentary systems: pull-based "ports" for general computation patterns and push-based "plugs" for event processing. The simulation environment is an abstract graph of nodes and links. Agents (module sub-trees headed up by an Agent module) reside at nodes and relate to their neighbors through typed links. To facilitate the construction and visualization of complex, interacting networks with dramatically different structure, Omega-AB provides a system for organizing the nodes into hierarchica trees that describe "slices" of the overall network.« less

  11. STABILIZED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, P.L.; Price, H.J.

    1958-03-18

    This patent relates to sine-wave generators and in particular describes a generator with a novel feedback circuit resulting in improved frequency stability. The generator comprises two triodes having a common cathode circuit connected to oscillate at a frequency and amplitude at which the loop galn of the circutt ls unity, and another pair of triodes having a common cathode circuit arranged as a conventional amplifier. A signal is conducted from the osciliator through a frequency selective network to the amplifier and fed back to the osciliator. The unique feature of the feedback circuit is the amplifier operates in the nonlinear portion of its tube characteristics thereby providing a relatively constant feedback voltage to the oscillator irrespective of the amplitude of its input signal.

  12. Solar Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Oscillations were first detected in the solar photosphere in 1962 by Leighton and students. In 1970 it was calculated that these oscillations, with a period near five minutes, were the manifestations of acoustic waves trapped in the interior. The subsequent measurements of the frequencies of global oscillation modes from the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the waves made possible the refinement of solar interior models. Over the years, increased understanding of the nuclear reaction rates, the opacity, the equation of state, convection, and gravitational settling have resulted. Mass flows shift the frequencies of modes leading to very accurate measurements of the interior rotation as a function of radius and latitude. In recent years, analogues of terrestrial seismology have led to a tomography of the interior, including measurements of global north-south flows and flow and wave speed measurements below features such as sunspots. The future of helioseismology seems bright with the approval of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, to be launched in 2008.

  13. Ab initio nuclear structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, Gianina Alina

    Ab initio no core methods have become major tools for understanding the properties of light nuclei based on realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon (NNN) interactions. A brief description is provided for the inter-nucleon interactions that fit two-body scattering and bound state data, as well as NNN interactions. Major new progress, including the goal of applying these interactions to solve for properties of nuclei, is limited by convergence issues. That is, with the goal of obtaining high precision solutions of the nuclear many-body Hamiltonian with no core methods (all nucleons treated on the same footing), one needs to proceed to very large basis spaces to achieve a convergence pattern suitable for extrapolation to the exact result. This thesis investigates (1) the similarity renormalization group (SRG) approach to soften the interaction, while preserving its phase shift properties, and (2) adoption of a realistic basis space using Woods-Saxon (WS) single-particle wavefunctions. Both have their advantages and limitations, discussed here. For (1), SRG was demonstrated by applying it to a realistic NN interaction, JISP16, in a harmonic oscillator (HO) representation. The degree of interaction softening achieved through a regulator parameter is examined. For (2), new results are obtained with the realistic JISP16 NN interaction in ab initio calculations of light nuclei 4He, 6He and 12C, using a WS basis optimized to minimize the ground-state energy within the truncated no core shell model. These are numerically-intensive many-body calculations. Finally, to gain insight into the potential for no core investigations of heavier nuclei, an initial investigation was obtained for the odd mass A = 47 - 49 region nuclei straddling 48Ca. The motivation for selecting these nuclei stems from the aim of preparing for nuclear double beta-decay studies of 48Ca. In these heavier systems, phenomenological additions to the realistic NN interaction determined by previous

  14. Oscillator detector

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, B.M.

    1980-05-13

    An alien liquid detector employs a monitoring element and an oscillatory electronic circuit for maintaining the temperature of the monitoring element substantially above ambient temperature. The output wave form, eg., frequency of oscillation or wave shape, of the oscillatory circuit depends upon the temperaturedependent electrical characteristic of the monitoring element. A predetermined change in the output waveform allows water to be discriminated from another liquid, eg., oil. Features of the invention employing two thermistors in two oscillatory circuits include positioning one thermistor for contact with water and the other thermistor above the oil-water interface to detect a layer of oil if present. Unique oscillatory circuit arrangements are shown that achieve effective thermistor action with an economy of parts and energizing power. These include an operational amplifier employed in an astable multivibrator circuit, a discrete transistor-powered tank circuit, and use of an integrated circuit chip.

  15. Grid oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zorana B.; Kim, Moonil; Rutledge, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Loading a two-dimensional grid with active devices offers a means of combining the power of solid-state oscillators in the microwave and millimeter-wave range. The grid structure allows a large number of negative resistance devices to be combined. This approach is attractive because the active devices do not require an external locking signal, and the combining is done in free space. In addition, the loaded grid is a planar structure amenable to monolithic integration. Measurements on a 25-MESFET grid at 9.7 GHz show power-combining and frequency-locking without an external locking signal, with an ERP of 37 W. Experimental far-field patterns agree with theoretical results obtained using reciprocity.

  16. ABS plastic RPCs

    SciTech Connect

    Ables, E.; Bionta, R.; Olson, H.; Ott, L.; Parker, E.; Wright, D.; Wuest, C

    1996-02-01

    After investigating a number of materials, we discovered that an ABS plastic doped with a conducting polymer performs well as the resistive electrode in a narrow gap RPC (resistive plate chamber). Operating in the streamer mode, we find efficiencies of 90-96% with low noise and low strip multiplicities. We have also studied a variety of operating gases and found that a mixture containing SF{sub 6}, a non-ozone depleting gas, argon and isobutane gives good streamer mode performance, even with isobutane concentrations of 20% or less.

  17. Oscillating Permanent Magnets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelis, M. M.; Haines, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes several ways to partially levitate permanent magnets. Computes field line geometries and oscillation frequencies. Provides several diagrams illustrating the mechanism of the oscillation. (YP)

  18. Interferometer-Based Studies of Quantum Hall Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Douglas Templeton, III

    The fractional quantum Hall (FQH) effect harbors a wealth of unique phenomena, many of which remain mysterious. Of particular interest is the predicted existence of quasi-particles with unusual topological properties, especially in light of recent proposals to observe these properties using electronic interferometers. An introduction to quantum Hall physics and electronic interferometry is given in Chapter 1 of this thesis. The remaining chapters, summarized below, describe a set of experiments in which FQH systems are studied using electronic Fabry-Perot interferometry and related techniques. Since prior studies of electronic Fabry-Perot interferometers revealed unexpected behavior even in the integer quantum Hall (IQH) regime, we began our measurements there. Our initial experiment, presented in Chapter 2, disentangles signatures of Coulomb interaction effects from those of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interference and provides the first measurement of pure AB interference in these devices. In our next experiment, presented in Chapter 3, we measure AB interference oscillations as a function of an applied dc bias, use their period to study the velocity of the interfering electrons, and study how the oscillations decay as a function of bias and magnetic field. Moving to the FQH regime, applying a similar-sized bias to a quantum point contact leads to long-lasting changes in the strengths and positions of FQH plateaus. The involvement of lattice nuclear spins in this effect, suggested by the long persistence times, is confirmed using NMR-type measurements. Although the exact physical process responsible for the effect remains unclear, its filling-factor dependence provides a striking illustration of composite fermion physics. These measurements are described in Chapter 4. In certain devices, interference oscillations associated with several FQH states are observed. Interpretation of their magnetic-field and gate-voltage periods provides a measurement of quasi-particle charge

  19. Oscillation quenching mechanisms: Amplitude vs. oscillation death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseska, Aneta; Volkov, Evgeny; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-10-01

    Oscillation quenching constitutes a fundamental emergent phenomenon in systems of coupled nonlinear oscillators. Its importance for various natural and man-made systems, ranging from climate, lasers, chemistry and a wide range of biological oscillators can be projected from two main aspects: (i) suppression of oscillations as a regulator of certain pathological cases and (ii) a general control mechanism for technical systems. We distinguish two structurally distinct oscillation quenching types: oscillation (OD) and amplitude death (AD) phenomena. In this review we aim to set clear boundaries between these two very different oscillation quenching manifestations and demonstrate the importance for their correct identification from the aspect of theory as well as of applications. Moreover, we pay special attention to the physiological interpretation of OD and AD in a large class of biological systems, further underlying their different properties. Several open issues and challenges that await further resolving are also highlighted.

  20. Quantum Transport and Nano Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on the Topological Surface States of Single Sb2Te3 Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Arango, Yulieth C; Huang, Liubing; Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, Jose; Asensio, Maria C; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lüth, Hans; Lu, Jia Grace; Schäpers, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on low-temperature transport and electronic band structure of p-type Sb2Te3 nanowires, grown by chemical vapor deposition. Magnetoresistance measurements unravel quantum interference phenomena, which depend on the cross-sectional dimensions of the nanowires. The observation of periodic Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations is attributed to transport in topologically protected surface states in the Sb2Te3 nanowires. The study of universal conductance fluctuations demonstrates coherent transport along the Aharonov-Bohm paths encircling the rectangular cross-section of the nanowires. We use nanoscale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on single nanowires (nano-ARPES) to provide direct experimental evidence on the nontrivial topological character of those surface states. The compiled study of the bandstructure and the magnetotransport response unambiguosly points out the presence of topologically protected surface states in the nanowires and their substantial contribution to the quantum transport effects, as well as the hole doping and Fermi velocity among other key issues. The results are consistent with the theoretical description of quantum transport in intrinsically doped quasi-one-dimensional topological insulator nanowires. PMID:27581169

  1. Quantum Transport and Nano Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on the Topological Surface States of Single Sb2Te3 Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Arango, Yulieth C.; Huang, Liubing; Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, Jose; Asensio, Maria C.; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lüth, Hans; Lu, Jia Grace; Schäpers, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on low-temperature transport and electronic band structure of p-type Sb2Te3 nanowires, grown by chemical vapor deposition. Magnetoresistance measurements unravel quantum interference phenomena, which depend on the cross-sectional dimensions of the nanowires. The observation of periodic Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations is attributed to transport in topologically protected surface states in the Sb2Te3 nanowires. The study of universal conductance fluctuations demonstrates coherent transport along the Aharonov-Bohm paths encircling the rectangular cross-section of the nanowires. We use nanoscale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on single nanowires (nano-ARPES) to provide direct experimental evidence on the nontrivial topological character of those surface states. The compiled study of the bandstructure and the magnetotransport response unambiguosly points out the presence of topologically protected surface states in the nanowires and their substantial contribution to the quantum transport effects, as well as the hole doping and Fermi velocity among other key issues. The results are consistent with the theoretical description of quantum transport in intrinsically doped quasi-one-dimensional topological insulator nanowires. PMID:27581169

  2. Synchronization of genetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianshou; Zhang, Jiajun; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Chen, Luonan

    2008-09-01

    Synchronization of genetic or cellular oscillators is a central topic in understanding the rhythmicity of living organisms at both molecular and cellular levels. Here, we show how a collective rhythm across a population of genetic oscillators through synchronization-induced intercellular communication is achieved, and how an ensemble of independent genetic oscillators is synchronized by a common noisy signaling molecule. Our main purpose is to elucidate various synchronization mechanisms from the viewpoint of dynamics, by investigating the effects of various biologically plausible couplings, several kinds of noise, and external stimuli. To have a comprehensive understanding on the synchronization of genetic oscillators, we consider three classes of genetic oscillators: smooth oscillators (exhibiting sine-like oscillations), relaxation oscillators (displaying jump dynamics), and stochastic oscillators (noise-induced oscillation). For every class, we further study two cases: with intercellular communication (including phase-attractive and repulsive coupling) and without communication between cells. We find that an ensemble of smooth oscillators has different synchronization phenomena from those in the case of relaxation oscillators, where noise plays a different but key role in synchronization. To show differences in synchronization between them, we make comparisons in many aspects. We also show that a population of genetic stochastic oscillators have their own synchronization mechanisms. In addition, we present interesting phenomena, e.g., for relaxation-type stochastic oscillators coupled to a quorum-sensing mechanism, different noise intensities can induce different periodic motions (i.e., inhomogeneous limit cycles).

  3. Synchronizing redundant power oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenson, K. J.

    1969-01-01

    Outputs of oscillators are synchronized by summing the power transformer phase voltages, the summed voltages are applied to the frequency determining inductors of the individual voltage-controlled power oscillators. The beat frequency is eliminated when synchronization is achieved.

  4. Saturation in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Ahmed; Hanna, James

    2015-03-01

    We consider a weakly nonlinear system consisting of a resonantly forced oscillator coupled to an unforced oscillator. It has long been known that, for quadratic nonlinearities and a 2:1 resonance between the oscillators, a perturbative solution of the dynamics exhibits a phenomenon known as saturation. At low forcing, the forced oscillator responds, while the unforced oscillator is quiescent. Above a critical value of the forcing, the forced oscillator's steady-state amplitude reaches a plateau, while that of the unforced oscillator increases without bound. We show that, contrary to established folklore, saturation is not unique to quadratically nonlinear systems. We present conditions on the form of the nonlinear couplings and resonance that lead to saturation. Our results elucidate a mechanism for localization or diversion of energy in systems of coupled oscillators, and suggest new approaches for the control or suppression of vibrations in engineered systems.

  5. Microelectronic oscillator, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L.

    1969-01-01

    Microelectronic oscillator uses a bipolar transistor to circumvent the problem of developing suitable inductors for lower frequencies. The oscillator is fabricated by hybrid thin film techniques or by monolithic construction. Discrete microminiature components may also be employed.

  6. Covariant harmonic oscillators and coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Daesoo; Kim, Young S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators shares the basic symmetry properties with the covariant harmonic oscillator formalism which provides a concise description of the basic features of relativistic hadronic features observed in high-energy laboratories. It is shown also that the coupled oscillator system has the SL(4,r) symmetry in classical mechanics, while the present formulation of quantum mechanics can accommodate only the Sp(4,r) portion of the SL(4,r) symmetry. The possible role of the SL(4,r) symmetry in quantum mechanics is discussed.

  7. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  8. Discrete monotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Haynes, W.B.

    1996-08-01

    The authors theoretically and numerically investigate the operation and behavior of the discrete monotron oscillator, a novel high-power microwave source. The discrete monotron differs from conventional monotrons and transit time oscillators by shielding the electron beam from the monotron cavity`s RF fields except at two distinct locations. This makes the discrete monotron act more like a klystron than a distributed traveling wave device. As a result, the oscillator has higher efficiency and can operate with higher beam powers than other single cavity oscillators and has more stable operation without requiring a seed input signal than mildly relativistic, intense-beam klystron oscillators.

  9. Ab Initio Computation of the Energies of Circular Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Lohne, M. Pedersen; Hagen, Gaute; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Kvaal, S.; Pederiva, F.

    2011-01-01

    We perform coupled-cluster and diffusion Monte Carlo calculations of the energies of circular quantum dots up to 20 electrons. The coupled-cluster calculations include triples corrections and a renormalized Coulomb interaction defined for a given number of low-lying oscillator shells. Using such a renormalized Coulomb interaction brings the coupled-cluster calculations with triples correlations in excellent agreement with the diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. This opens up perspectives for doing ab initio calculations for much larger systems of electrons.

  10. Ab initio study of neutron drops with chiral Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, H. D.; Fischer, S.; Maris, P.; Vary, J. P.; Binder, S.; Calci, A.; Langhammer, J.; Roth, R.

    2014-12-01

    We report ab initio calculations for neutron drops in a 10 MeV external harmonic-oscillator trap using chiral nucleon-nucleon plus three-nucleon interactions. We present total binding energies, internal energies, radii and odd-even energy differences for neutron numbers N = 2- 18 using the no-core shell model with and without importance truncation. Furthermore, we present total binding energies for N = 8 , 16 , 20 , 28 , 40 , 50 obtained in a coupled-cluster approach. Comparisons with quantum Monte Carlo results, where available, using Argonne v8‧ with three-nucleon interactions reveal important dependences on the chosen Hamiltonian.

  11. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  12. Non-linear oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, P.

    The mathematical pendulum is used to provide a survey of free and forced oscillations in damped and undamped systems. This simple model is employed to present illustrations for and comparisons between the various approximation schemes. A summary of the Liapunov stability theory is provided. The first and the second method of Liapunov are explained for autonomous as well as for nonautonomous systems. Here, a basic familiarity with the theory of linear oscillations is assumed. La Salle's theorem about the stability of invariant domains is explained in terms of illustrative examples. Self-excited oscillations are examined, taking into account such oscillations in mechanical and electrical systems, analytical approximation methods for the computation of self-excited oscillations, analytical criteria for the existence of limit cycles, forced oscillations in self-excited systems, and self-excited oscillations in systems with several degrees of freedom. Attention is given to Hamiltonian systems and an introduction to the theory of optimal control is provided.

  13. One-dimensional edge transport on the surface of cylindrical BixTe3-ySey nanowires in transverse magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäßler, Svenja; Hamdou, Bacel; Sergelius, Philip; Michel, Ann-Kathrin; Zierold, Robert; Reith, Heiko; Gooth, Johannes; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2015-11-01

    The geometry of topological insulators (TIs) has a major impact on the magnetoelectric band structure of their surface states. Here, we investigate the surface states of cylindrical TI bismuth telluride selenide nanowires with three different diameters, by parallel and transverse magnetoresistance (MR) measurements. In parallel configuration, we observe Aharonov-Bohm oscillations as well as weak antilocalization, indicating two-dimensional TI surface states. In transverse magnetic fields, we observed MR oscillations that are non-linear against the reciprocal of the magnetic field and thus cannot be explained by two- or three-dimensional states. Instead, our transport data analysis reveals that these MR oscillations are the consequence of one-dimensional edge channels at the nanowire surface that form due to the projection of the external magnetic field on the cylindrically curved surface plane in high magnetic fields. Our observation provides an exotic class of surface states that might be used for electronic and spintronic devices.

  14. One-dimensional edge transport on the surface of cylindrical Bi{sub x}Te{sub 3−y}Se{sub y} nanowires in transverse magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bäßler, Svenja Hamdou, Bacel; Sergelius, Philip; Michel, Ann-Kathrin; Zierold, Robert; Gooth, Johannes; Reith, Heiko; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2015-11-02

    The geometry of topological insulators (TIs) has a major impact on the magnetoelectric band structure of their surface states. Here, we investigate the surface states of cylindrical TI bismuth telluride selenide nanowires with three different diameters, by parallel and transverse magnetoresistance (MR) measurements. In parallel configuration, we observe Aharonov-Bohm oscillations as well as weak antilocalization, indicating two-dimensional TI surface states. In transverse magnetic fields, we observed MR oscillations that are non-linear against the reciprocal of the magnetic field and thus cannot be explained by two- or three-dimensional states. Instead, our transport data analysis reveals that these MR oscillations are the consequence of one-dimensional edge channels at the nanowire surface that form due to the projection of the external magnetic field on the cylindrically curved surface plane in high magnetic fields. Our observation provides an exotic class of surface states that might be used for electronic and spintronic devices.

  15. Theory of quadruple plasmon in doped carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Ken-Ichi; Murakami, Shuichi

    A single-wall carbon nanotube possesses two different types of plasmons specified by wavenumbers in the azimuthal and axial directions. In this presentation we show that the azimuthal plasmons consist of underdamped oscillations forming electric dipoles inside a nanotube and overdamped oscillations forming magnetic dipoles. These, originating from the surface plasmons of graphene, are of prime importance in the optical properties of doped ''metallic'' tubes, such as depolarization effect and relaxation of photo-excited carriers. The axial plasmons also consist of underdamped and overdamped oscillations which are inherent in the cylindrical waveguide-structures of nanotubes and relevant to optics and transport. We discuss the exact configurations of the electromagnetic fields in connection with Aharonov-Bohm effect and point out a possibility of the generation of transient energy band gaps in metallic nanotubes.

  16. Paradoxes of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedov, E. Kh.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2009-08-15

    Despite the theory of neutrino oscillations being rather old, some of its basic issues are still being debated in the literature. We discuss a number of such issues, including the relevance of the 'same energy' and 'same momentum' assumptions, the role of quantum-mechanical uncertainty relations in neutrino oscillations, the dependence of the coherence and localization conditions that ensure the observability of neutrino oscillations on neutrino energy and momentum uncertainties, the question of (in)dependence of the oscillation probabilities on the neutrino production and detection processes, and the applicability limits of the stationary-source approximation. We also develop a novel approach to calculation of the oscillation probability in the wave-packet approach, based on the summation/integration conventions different from the standard one, which allows a new insight into the 'same energy' vs. 'same momentum' problem. We also discuss a number of apparently paradoxical features of the theory of neutrino oscillations.

  17. AB 1725: A Comprehensive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Board of Governors.

    A summary and analysis is provided of California Assembly Bill (AB) 1725, a reform bill that provides new direction and support for the state's community colleges. The analysis addresses each of the eight sections of the bill: (1) mission, highlighting reforms related to mission statements, transfer core curriculum, remedial limits, articulation…

  18. Workshop on Harmonic Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D. (Editor); Kim, Y. S. (Editor); Zachary, W. W. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Proceedings of a workshop on Harmonic Oscillators held at the College Park Campus of the University of Maryland on March 25 - 28, 1992 are presented. The harmonic oscillator formalism is playing an important role in many branches of physics. This is the simplest mathematical device which can connect the basic principle of physics with what is observed in the real world. The harmonic oscillator is the bridge between pure and applied physics.

  19. Boxing with Neutrino Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Dj; Weiler, Thomas J.

    1998-03-01

    We have developed a model-independent ``box'' parameterization of neutrino oscillations. Oscillation probabilities are linear in these new parameters, so measurements can straighforwardly determine the box parameters which can then be manipulated to yield magnitudes of mixing matrix elements. We will present these new parameters and examine the effects of unitarity which reduce the number of independent parameters to the minimum set. The framework presented here will facilitate general analyses of neutrino oscillations among n >= 3 flavors.

  20. Self-oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Alejandro

    2013-04-01

    Physicists are very familiar with forced and parametric resonance, but usually not with self-oscillation, a property of certain dynamical systems that gives rise to a great variety of vibrations, both useful and destructive. In a self-oscillator, the driving force is controlled by the oscillation itself so that it acts in phase with the velocity, causing a negative damping that feeds energy into the vibration: no external rate needs to be adjusted to the resonant frequency. The famous collapse of the Tacoma Narrows bridge in 1940, often attributed by introductory physics texts to forced resonance, was actually a self-oscillation, as was the swaying of the London Millennium Footbridge in 2000. Clocks are self-oscillators, as are bowed and wind musical instruments. The heart is a “relaxation oscillator”, i.e., a non-sinusoidal self-oscillator whose period is determined by sudden, nonlinear switching at thresholds. We review the general criterion that determines whether a linear system can self-oscillate. We then describe the limiting cycles of the simplest nonlinear self-oscillators, as well as the ability of two or more coupled self-oscillators to become spontaneously synchronized (“entrained”). We characterize the operation of motors as self-oscillation and prove a theorem about their limit efficiency, of which Carnot’s theorem for heat engines appears as a special case. We briefly discuss how self-oscillation applies to servomechanisms, Cepheid variable stars, lasers, and the macroeconomic business cycle, among other applications. Our emphasis throughout is on the energetics of self-oscillation, often neglected by the literature on nonlinear dynamical systems.

  1. Frequencies of solar oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libbrecht, K. G.; Woodard, M. F.; Kaufman, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Solar oscillations have been observed at three different spatial scales at Big Bear Solar Observatory during 1986-1987 and, using three data sets, a new and more accurate table of solar oscillation frequencies has been compiled. The oscillations, which are presented as functions of radial order n and spherical harmonic degree l, are averages over azimuthal order and therefore approximate the normal mode frequencies of a nonrotating, spherically symmetric sun, near solar minimum. The table contains frequencies for most of the solar p and f modes with l between 0 and 1860, n between 0 and 26, and oscillation mode frequencies between 1.0 and 5.3.

  2. Conductance maps of quantum rings due to a local potential perturbation.

    PubMed

    Petrović, M D; Peeters, F M; Chaves, A; Farias, G A

    2013-12-11

    We performed a numerical simulation of the dynamics of a Gaussian shaped wavepacket inside a small sized quantum ring, smoothly connected to two leads and exposed to a perturbing potential of a biased atomic force microscope tip. Using the Landauer formalism, we calculated conductance maps of this system in the case of single and two subband transport. We explain the main features in the conductance maps as due to the AFM tip influence on the wavepacket phase and amplitude. In the presence of an external magnetic field, the tip modifies the ϕ0 periodic Aharonov-Bohm oscillation pattern into a ϕ0/2 periodic Al'tshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillation pattern. Our results in the case of multiband transport suggest tip selectivity to higher subbands, making them more observable in the total conductance map. PMID:24184634

  3. Edge-channel interferometer at the graphene quantum Hall pn junction

    SciTech Connect

    Morikawa, Sei; Moriya, Rai; Masubuchi, Satoru Machida, Tomoki; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2015-05-04

    We demonstrate a quantum Hall edge-channel interferometer in a high-quality graphene pn junction under a high magnetic field. The co-propagating p and n quantum Hall edge channels traveling along the pn interface functions as a built-in Aharonov-Bohm-type interferometer, the interferences in which are sensitive to both the external magnetic field and the carrier concentration. The trajectories of peak and dip in the observed resistance oscillation are well reproduced by our numerical calculation that assumes magnetic flux quantization in the area enclosed by the co-propagating edge channels. Coherent nature of the co-propagating edge channels is confirmed by the checkerboard-like pattern in the dc-bias and magnetic-field dependences of the resistance oscillations.

  4. Angle-dependent magnetotransport in GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires.

    PubMed

    Haas, Fabian; Wenz, Tobias; Zellekens, Patrick; Demarina, Nataliya; Rieger, Torsten; Lepsa, Mihail; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lüth, Hans; Schäpers, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We study the impact of the direction of magnetic flux on the electron motion in GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires. At small tilt angles, when the magnetic field is aligned nearly parallel to the nanowire axis, we observe Aharonov-Bohm type h/e flux periodic magnetoconductance oscillations. These are attributed to transport via angular momentum states, formed by electron waves within the InAs shell. With increasing tilt of the nanowire in the magnetic field, the flux periodic magnetoconductance oscillations disappear. Universal conductance fluctuations are observed for all tilt angles, however with increasing amplitudes for large tilt angles. We record this evolution of the electron propagation from a circling motion around the core to a diffusive transport through scattering loops and give explanations for the observed different transport regimes separated by the magnetic field orientation. PMID:27091000

  5. Dirac bound states of anharmonic oscillator in external fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hamzavi, Majid; Ikhdair, Sameer M.; Falaye, Babatunde J.

    2014-02-15

    We explore the effect of the external magnetic and Aharonov–Bohm (AB) flux fields on the energy levels of Dirac particle subjects to mixed scalar and vector anharmonic oscillator field in the two-dimensional (2D) space. We calculate the exact energy eigenvalues and the corresponding un-normalized two-spinor-components wave functions in terms of the chemical potential parameter, magnetic field strength, AB flux field and magnetic quantum number by using the Nikiforov–Uvarov (NU) method. -- Highlights: • Effect of the external fields on the energy levels of Dirac particle with the anharmonic oscillator is investigated. • The solutions are discussed in view of spin and pseudospin symmetries limits. • The energy levels and wave function are presented by the Nikiforov–Uvarov method.

  6. Active-bridge oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2001-01-01

    An active bridge oscillator is formed from a differential amplifier where positive feedback is a function of the impedance of one of the gain elements and a relatively low value common emitter resistance. This use of the nonlinear transistor parameter h stabilizes the output and eliminates the need for ALC circuits common to other bridge oscillators.

  7. Investigating Magnetic Oscillations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brueningsen, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    Studies magnetic oscillation using an air track. Ceramic magnets are attached to the cart and also are used as dampeners in place of the springs. The resulting oscillations are fairly sinusoidal and is a good example of simple harmonic motion. (MVL)

  8. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  9. Ultrastable Cryogenic Microwave Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Anthony G.

    Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are secondary frequency standards in the microwave domain. The best of these oscillators have demonstrated a short term frequency stability in the range 10-14 to a few times 10-16. The main application for these oscillators is as flywheel oscillators for the next generation of passive atomic frequency standards, and as local oscillators in space telemetry ground stations to clean up the transmitter close in phase noise. Fractional frequency stabilities of passive atomic frequency standards are now approaching 3 x10^-14 /τ where τ is the measurement time, limited only by the number of atoms that are being interrogated. This requires an interrogation oscillator whose short-term stability is of the order of 10-14 or better, which cannot be provided by present-day quartz technology. Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are based on resonators which have very high electrical Q-factors. The resolution of the resonator's linewidth is typically limited by electronics noise to about 1ppm and hence Q-factors in excess of 108 are required. As these are only attained in superconducting cavities or sapphire resonators at low temperatures, use of liquid helium cooling is mandatory, which has so far restricted these oscillators to the research or metrology laboratory. Recently, there has been an effort to dispense with the need for liquid helium and make compact flywheel oscillators for the new generation of primary frequency standards. Work is under way to achieve this goal in space-borne and mobile liquid-nitrogen-cooled systems. The best cryogenic oscillators developed to date are the ``whispering gallery'' (WG) mode sapphire resonator-oscillators of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the University of Western Australia (UWA), as well as Stanford University's superconducting cavity stabilized oscillator (SCSO). All of these oscillators have demonstrated frequency

  10. Boxing with neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D. J.; Weiler, Thomas J.

    1999-06-01

    We develop a characterization of neutrino oscillations based on the coefficients of the oscillating terms. These coefficients are individually observable; although they are quartic in the elements of the unitary mixing matrix, they are independent of the conventions chosen for the angle and phase parametrization of the mixing matrix. We call these reparametrization-invariant observables ``boxes'' because of their geometric relation to the mixing matrix, and because of their association with the Feynman box diagram that describes oscillations in field theory. The real parts of the boxes are the coefficients for the CP- or T-even oscillation modes, while the imaginary parts are the coefficients for the CP- or T-odd oscillation modes. Oscillation probabilities are linear in the boxes, so measurements can straightforwardly determine values for the boxes (which can then be manipulated to yield magnitudes of mixing matrix elements). We examine the effects of unitarity on the boxes and discuss the reduction of the number of boxes to a minimum basis set. For the three-generation case, we explicitly construct the basis. Using the box algebra, we show that CP violation may be inferred from measurements of neutrino flavor mixing even when the oscillatory factors have averaged. The framework presented here will facilitate general analyses of neutrino oscillations among n>=3 flavors.

  11. Boxing with neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.J.; Weiler, T.J.

    1999-06-01

    We develop a characterization of neutrino oscillations based on the coefficients of the oscillating terms. These coefficients are individually observable; although they are quartic in the elements of the unitary mixing matrix, they are independent of the conventions chosen for the angle and phase parametrization of the mixing matrix. We call these reparametrization-invariant observables {open_quotes}boxes{close_quotes} because of their geometric relation to the mixing matrix, and because of their association with the Feynman box diagram that describes oscillations in field theory. The real parts of the boxes are the coefficients for the {ital CP}- or {ital T}-even oscillation modes, while the imaginary parts are the coefficients for the {ital CP}- or {ital T}-odd oscillation modes. Oscillation probabilities are linear in the boxes, so measurements can straightforwardly determine values for the boxes (which can then be manipulated to yield magnitudes of mixing matrix elements). We examine the effects of unitarity on the boxes and discuss the reduction of the number of boxes to a minimum basis set. For the three-generation case, we explicitly construct the basis. Using the box algebra, we show that {ital CP} violation may be inferred from measurements of neutrino flavor mixing even when the oscillatory factors have averaged. The framework presented here will facilitate general analyses of neutrino oscillations among n{ge}3 flavors. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Oscillating fluid power generator

    DOEpatents

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  13. A novel photonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a novel oscillator for photonic RF systems. This oscillator is capable of generating high-frequency signals up to 70 GHz in both electrical and optical domains and is a special voltage-controlled oscillator with an optical output port. It can be used to make a phase-locked loop (PLL) and perform all functions that a PLL is capable of for photonic systems. It can be synchronized to a reference source by means of optical injection locking, electrical injection locking, and PLL. It can also be self-phase locked and self-injection locked to generate a high-stability photonic RF reference. Its applications include high-frequency reference regeneration and distribution, high-gain frequency multiplication, comb-frequecy and square-wave generation, carrier recovery, and clock recovery. We anticipate that such photonic voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) will be as important to photonic RF systems as electrical VCOs are to electrical RF systems.

  14. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  15. Quasioptical Josephson Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wengler, Michael J.

    1994-09-01

    The Quasioptical Josephson Oscillator (QJO) is a 2-D array of between 100 and 1,000,000 Josephson junctions, each at the center of a small dipole antenna. HYPRES, Inc. of Elmsford, NY has fabricated test chips which have demonstrated 0.35 microwatts radiation at 190 CHz in one case, and 0.7 microwatts radiation at 345 GHz in another case. A significant understanding of the 2-D oscillators was developed through theoretical and numerical calculations.

  16. Ultrastable Multigigahertz Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Novel photonic oscillator developed to serve as ultrastable source of microwave and millimeter-wave signals. In system, oscillations generated photonically, then converted to electronic form. Includes self-mode-locked semiconductor laser producing stream of pulses, detected and fed back to laser as input. System also includes fiber-optic-delay-line discriminator, which detects fluctuations of self-mode-locking frequency and generates error signal used in negative-feedback loop to stabilize pulse-repetition frequency.

  17. Current oscillations in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, Brittany

    We develop a simple phenomenological model to describe current oscillations in single, conically shaped nanopores. The model utilizes aspects of reaction rate theory, electrochemical oscillators, and nonlinear dynamical systems. Time series of experimental data were analyzed and compared to time series simulated using the model equations. There is good qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation, though the model needs to be improved in order to obtain better quantitative agreement.

  18. Oscillating asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Tulin, Sean; Yu, Hai-Bo; Zurek, Kathryn M. E-mail: haiboyu@umich.edu

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of dark matter (DM) particle-antiparticle oscillations within the context of asymmetric DM. Oscillations arise due to small DM number-violating Majorana-type mass terms, and can lead to recoupling of annihilation after freeze-out and washout of the DM density. Asymmetric DM oscillations 'interpolate' between symmetric and asymmetric DM freeze-out scenarios, and allow for a larger DM model-building parameter space. We derive the density matrix equations for DM oscillations and freeze-out from first principles using nonequilibrium field theory, and our results are qualitatively different than in previous studies. DM dynamics exhibits particle-vs-antiparticle 'flavor' effects, depending on the interaction type, analogous to neutrino oscillations in a medium. 'Flavor-sensitive' DM interactions include scattering or annihilation through a new vector boson, while 'flavor-blind' interactions include scattering or s-channel annihilation through a new scalar boson. In particular, we find that flavor-sensitive annihilation does not recouple when coherent oscillations begin, and that flavor-blind scattering does not lead to decoherence.

  19. Periodically oscillating plasma sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Nebel, R.A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar

    2005-05-15

    The periodically oscillating plasma sphere, or POPS, is a novel fusion concept first proposed by D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel [Fusion Technol. 38, 28 (1998)]. POPS utilizes the self-similar collapse of an oscillating ion cloud in a spherical harmonic oscillator potential well formed by electron injection. Once the ions have been phase-locked, their coherent motion simultaneously produces very high densities and temperatures during the collapse phase of the oscillation. A requirement for POPS is that the electron injection produces a stable harmonic oscillator potential. This has been demonstrated in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device and verified by particle simulation. Also, the POPS oscillation has been confirmed experimentally through observation that the ions in the potential well exhibit resonance behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the observed POPS frequencies and the theoretical predictions has been observed for a wide range of potential well depths and three different ion species. Practical applications of POPS require large plasma compressions. These large compressions have been observed in particle simulations, although space charge neutralization remains a major issue.

  20. Oscillating edge-flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckmaster, J.; Zhang, Yi

    1999-09-01

    It has been known for some years that when a near-limit flame spreads over a liquid pool of fuel, the edge of the flame can oscillate. It is also known that when a near-asphyxiated candle-flame burns in zero gravity, the edge of the (hemispherical) flame can oscillate violently prior to extinction. We propose that these oscillations are nothing more than a manifestation of the large Lewis number instability well known in chemical reactor studies and in combustion studies, one that is exacerbated by heat losses. As evidence of this we examine an edge-flame confined within a fuel-supply boundary and an oxygen-supply boundary, anchored by a discontinuity in data at the fuel-supply boundary. We show that when the Lewis number of the fuel is 2, and the Lewis number of the oxidizer is 1, oscillations of the edge occur when the Damköhler number is reduced below a critical value. During a single oscillation period there is a short premixed propagation stage and a long diffusion stage, behaviour that has been observed in flame spread experiments. Oscillations do not occur when both Lewis numbers are equal to 1.

  1. Rocket Engine Oscillation Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tom; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Rocket engine oscillating data can reveal many physical phenomena ranging from unsteady flow and acoustics to rotordynamics and structural dynamics. Because of this, engine diagnostics based on oscillation data should employ both signal analysis and physical modeling. This paper describes an approach to rocket engine oscillation diagnostics, types of problems encountered, and example problems solved. Determination of design guidelines and environments (or loads) from oscillating phenomena is required during initial stages of rocket engine design, while the additional tasks of health monitoring, incipient failure detection, and anomaly diagnostics occur during engine development and operation. Oscillations in rocket engines are typically related to flow driven acoustics, flow excited structures, or rotational forces. Additional sources of oscillatory energy are combustion and cavitation. Included in the example problems is a sampling of signal analysis tools employed in diagnostics. The rocket engine hardware includes combustion devices, valves, turbopumps, and ducts. Simple models of an oscillating fluid system or structure can be constructed to estimate pertinent dynamic parameters governing the unsteady behavior of engine systems or components. In the example problems it is shown that simple physical modeling when combined with signal analysis can be successfully employed to diagnose complex rocket engine oscillatory phenomena.

  2. Quantum Phase Coherence in Mesoscopic Transport Devices with Two-Particle Interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhimei; Guo, Xiaofang; Xue, Haibin; Xue, Naitao; Liang, J-Q

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a new type of quantum phase coherence (QPC), which is generated by the two-body interaction. This conclusion is based on quantum master equation analysis for the full counting statistics of electron transport through two parallel quantum-dots with antiparallel magnetic fluxes in order to eliminate the Aharonov-Bohm interference of either single-particle or non-interacting two-particle wave functions. The interacting two-particle QPC is realized by the flux-dependent oscillation of the zero-frequency cumulants including the shot noise and skewness with a characteristic period. The accurately quantized peaks of cumulant spectrum may have technical applications to probe the two-body Coulomb interaction. PMID:26255858

  3. Quantum Phase Coherence in Mesoscopic Transport Devices with Two-Particle Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhimei; Guo, Xiaofang; Xue, Haibin; Xue, Naitao; Liang, J.-Q.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a new type of quantum phase coherence (QPC), which is generated by the two-body interaction. This conclusion is based on quantum master equation analysis for the full counting statistics of electron transport through two parallel quantum-dots with antiparallel magnetic fluxes in order to eliminate the Aharonov-Bohm interference of either single-particle or non-interacting two-particle wave functions. The interacting two-particle QPC is realized by the flux-dependent oscillation of the zero-frequency cumulants including the shot noise and skewness with a characteristic period. The accurately quantized peaks of cumulant spectrum may have technical applications to probe the two-body Coulomb interaction.

  4. How to distinguish between specular and retroconfigurations for Andreev reflection in graphene rings.

    PubMed

    Schelter, Jörg; Trauzettel, Björn; Recher, Patrik

    2012-03-01

    We numerically investigate Andreev reflection in a graphene ring with one normal conducting and one superconducting lead by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. By tuning chemical potential and bias voltage, it is possible to switch between regimes where electron and hole originate from the same band (retroconfiguration) or from different bands (specular configuration) of the graphene dispersion, respectively. We find that the dominant contributions to the Aharonov-Bohm conductance oscillations in the subgap transport are of period h/2e in retroconfiguration and of period h/e in specular configuration, confirming the predictions obtained from a qualitative analysis of interfering scattering paths. Because of the robustness against disorder and moderate changes to the system, this provides a clear signature to distinguish both types of Andreev reflection processes in graphene. PMID:22463436

  5. Electronic and optical properties of core-shell nanowires in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ravi Kishore, V V; Partoens, B; Peeters, F M

    2014-03-01

    The electronic and optical properties of zincblende nanowires are investigated in the presence of a uniform magnetic field directed along the [001] growth direction within the k · p method. We focus our numerical study on core-shell nanowires consisting of the III-V materials GaAs, Al(x)Ga(1-x)As and (Al(y)Ga(1-y))₀.₅₁In₀.₄₉P. Nanowires with electrons confined in the core exhibit a Fock-Darwin-like spectrum, whereas nanowires with electrons confined in the shell show Aharonov-Bohm oscillations. Thus, by properly choosing the core and the shell materials of the nanowire, the optical properties in a magnetic field can be tuned in very different ways. PMID:24521608

  6. Correlated quantum transport of density wave electrons.

    PubMed

    Miller, J H; Wijesinghe, A I; Tang, Z; Guloy, A M

    2012-01-20

    Recently observed Aharonov-Bohm quantum interference of the period h/2e in charge density wave rings strongly suggests that correlated density wave electron transport is a cooperative quantum phenomenon. The picture discussed here posits that quantum solitons nucleate and transport current above a Coulomb blockade threshold field. We propose a field-dependent tunneling matrix element and use the Schrödinger equation, viewed as an emergent classical equation as in Feynman's treatment of Josephson tunneling, to compute the evolving macrostate amplitudes, finding excellent quantitative agreement with voltage oscillations and current-voltage characteristics in NbSe(3). A proposed phase diagram shows the conditions favoring soliton nucleation versus classical depinning. PMID:22400766

  7. Electron-phonon interaction effect on persistent current in a one-dimensional quantum ring by using a simple model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, Mahboubeh; Faizabadi, Edris

    2015-09-01

    We use a simple model to study the electron-phonon interaction influences on persistent current in a one-dimensional quantum ring enclosed by a magnetic flux. With increasing the temperature, persistent current amplitude is reduced, especially in a quantum ring with two ions per primitive cell (diatomic ring) because of the participation of optical phonons. Furthermore, the periodicity of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations changes to Φ0 / 2 (Φ0 is magnetic flux quantum). In a diatomic ring, by increasing the difference between left and right nearest-neighbor hopping integrals at zero temperature, persistent current variations show a transition from metallic to insulator against distinctive behavior at nonzero temperature.

  8. Impurity effects on energy levels and far-infrared spectra of nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Pan; Jia-Lin, Zhu

    2003-11-01

    The effects of a positively charged impurity on the energy levels and far-infrared spectra of one and two electrons in semiconductor nanorings under magnetic fields are studied. The effects of the nanoring size and the impurity position are also discussed. It is shown that the electron-electron interaction and electron-impurity one in nanorings are strongly dependent on the nanoring size and the impurity position. Based on the studies of the impurity and field effects, the impurity-induced Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the far-infrared spectra are found. The results predict a possibility of observing phenomena related to electron-impurity interaction in a nanoring in the future.

  9. Magnetic-field effects in graphene nanorings: armchair versus zigzag edge terminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yannouleas, Constantine; Romanovsky, Igor; Landman, Uzi

    2013-03-01

    Dirac quasiparticles in narrow graphene nanorings exhibit characteristic differences in their behavior depending on the shape (e.g., trigonal vs. hexagonal) and the type of edge terminations (armchair vs. zigzag). The differences are manifested in the tight-binding single-particle spectra as a function of the magnetic field B and in the patterns of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations. The symmetry of shape leads to the appearance of three-member (triangles) or six-member (hexagons) braid bands.[2] With the exception of the formation of the braid bands, the characteristic differences maintain in the energy spectra of the continuous Dirac-Weyl equation for a circular ring of finite width. These differences will be further analyzed with the help of a relativistic superlattice model. Supported by the U.S. D.O.E. (FG05-86ER-45234)

  10. Two-electron volcano-shaped quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, L. F.; Gutiérrez, W.; Mikhailov, I. D.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a simple model of non-uniform volcano-shaped quantum dot that reflects the confinement details of the morphology of really fabricated GaAs/InAs nanorings and whose profile geometry, on the one hand, is described by means of simple analytical functions and, on the other hand, allows us to find exact one-particle wave functions. By using them as a basis function we calculate two-electron lower energies as functions of the external magnetic field applied along the growth axis. We show that the ring morphology and electron-electron interaction have great influence on the energy spectrum structure of nanoring and the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations.

  11. Adiabatic Edge Channel Transport in a Nanowire Quantum Point Contact Register.

    PubMed

    Heedt, S; Manolescu, A; Nemnes, G A; Prost, W; Schubert, J; Grützmacher, D; Schäpers, Th

    2016-07-13

    We report on a prototype device geometry where a number of quantum point contacts are connected in series in a single quasi-ballistic InAs nanowire. At finite magnetic field the backscattering length is increased up to the micron-scale and the quantum point contacts are connected adiabatically. Hence, several input gates can control the outcome of a ballistic logic operation. The absence of backscattering is explained in terms of selective population of spatially separated edge channels. Evidence is provided by regular Aharonov-Bohm-type conductance oscillations in transverse magnetic fields, in agreement with magnetoconductance calculations. The observation of the Shubnikov-de Haas effect at large magnetic fields corroborates the existence of spatially separated edge channels and provides a new means for nanowire characterization. PMID:27347816

  12. Controlling the magnetic susceptibility in an artificial elliptical quantum ring by magnetic flux and external Rashba effect

    SciTech Connect

    Omidi, Mahboubeh Faizabadi, Edris

    2015-03-21

    Magnetic susceptibility is investigated in a man-made elliptical quantum ring in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interactions and the magnetic flux. It is shown that magnetic susceptibility as a function of magnetic flux changes between negative and positive signs periodically. The periodicity of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations depends on the geometry of the region where magnetic field is applied, the eccentricity, and number of sites in each chain ring (the elliptical ring is composed of chain rings). The magnetic susceptibility sign can be reversed by tuning the Rashba spin-orbit strength as well. Both the magnetic susceptibility strength and sign can be controlled via external spin-orbit interactions, which can be exploited in spintronics and nanoelectronics.

  13. Imaging coherent transport in a mesoscopic graphene ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabosart, Damien; Faniel, Sébastien; Martins, Frederico; Brun, Boris; Felten, Alexandre; Bayot, Vincent; Hackens, Benoit

    2014-11-01

    Mesoscopic graphene devices often exhibit complex transport properties, stemming both from the peculiar electronic band structure of graphene and from the high sensitivity of transport to local disorder in this two-dimensional crystal. To disentangle contributions of disorder in the different transport phenomena at play in such devices, it is necessary to devise new local-probe methods and to establish links between transport and the microscopic structure of the devices. Here, we present a spatially resolved investigation of coherent transport inside a graphene quantum ring (QR), where Aharonov-Bohm conductance oscillations are observed. Thanks to scanning gate microscopy (SGM), we first identify spatial signatures of the Coulomb blockade, associated with disorder-induced localized states, and of charge-carrier interferences. We then image resonant states which decorate the QR local density of states (LDOS). Simulations of the LDOS in a model disorder graphene QR and temperature dependence of SGM maps confirm the presence of such scarred states.

  14. Quantum Phase Coherence in Mesoscopic Transport Devices with Two-Particle Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhimei; Guo, Xiaofang; Xue, Haibin; Xue, Naitao; Liang, J.-Q.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a new type of quantum phase coherence (QPC), which is generated by the two-body interaction. This conclusion is based on quantum master equation analysis for the full counting statistics of electron transport through two parallel quantum-dots with antiparallel magnetic fluxes in order to eliminate the Aharonov-Bohm interference of either single-particle or non-interacting two-particle wave functions. The interacting two-particle QPC is realized by the flux-dependent oscillation of the zero-frequency cumulants including the shot noise and skewness with a characteristic period. The accurately quantized peaks of cumulant spectrum may have technical applications to probe the two-body Coulomb interaction. PMID:26255858

  15. Shot noise in the hybrid triple-quantum-dot interferometer coupled to superconductor and normal terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong-Kang; Wang, Jian; Wang, Qing

    2014-04-01

    The shot noise of a hybrid triple-quantum-dot (TQD) interferometer has been investigated by employing the nonequilibrium Green's function method, and the general shot noise formula has been derived. The oscillation behaviors of transmission coefficients and shot noise versus the Aharonov-Bohm phase ϕ exhibit asymmetric Fano resonance structure and blockade effect. Sub-Poissonian and super-Poissonian behaviors of shot noise appear in different regimes of terminal bias eVγ contributed by the Andreev reflection, and correlation of Andreev tunneling with the normal electron transport. The inverse resonance and resonance structures emerge in the shot noise and Fano factor with respect to one of the gate voltages in different regimes of eVγ. The asymmetric structure can be enhanced by modifying the energy levels and gate biases of the TQD. The self-correlation and cross-correlation of current components contribute to the enhancement and suppression of shot noise.

  16. Transport of Massless Dirac Fermions in Non-topological Type Edge States

    PubMed Central

    Latyshev, Yu I.; Orlov, A. P.; Volkov, V. A.; Enaldiev, V. V.; Zagorodnev, I. V.; Vyvenko, O. F.; Petrov, Yu V.; Monceau, P.

    2014-01-01

    There are two types of intrinsic surface states in solids. The first type is formed on the surface of topological insulators. Recently, transport of massless Dirac fermions in the band of “topological” states has been demonstrated. States of the second type were predicted by Tamm and Shockley long ago. They do not have a topological background and are therefore strongly dependent on the properties of the surface. We study the problem of the conductivity of Tamm-Shockley edge states through direct transport experiments. Aharonov-Bohm magneto-oscillations of resistance are found on graphene samples that contain a single nanohole. The effect is explained by the conductivity of the massless Dirac fermions in the edge states cycling around the nanohole. The results demonstrate the deep connection between topological and non-topological edge states in 2D systems of massless Dirac fermions. PMID:25524881

  17. Transport of massless Dirac fermions in non-topological type edge states.

    PubMed

    Latyshev, Yu I; Orlov, A P; Volkov, V A; Enaldiev, V V; Zagorodnev, I V; Vyvenko, O F; Petrov, Yu V; Monceau, P

    2014-01-01

    There are two types of intrinsic surface states in solids. The first type is formed on the surface of topological insulators. Recently, transport of massless Dirac fermions in the band of "topological" states has been demonstrated. States of the second type were predicted by Tamm and Shockley long ago. They do not have a topological background and are therefore strongly dependent on the properties of the surface. We study the problem of the conductivity of Tamm-Shockley edge states through direct transport experiments. Aharonov-Bohm magneto-oscillations of resistance are found on graphene samples that contain a single nanohole. The effect is explained by the conductivity of the massless Dirac fermions in the edge states cycling around the nanohole. The results demonstrate the deep connection between topological and non-topological edge states in 2D systems of massless Dirac fermions. PMID:25524881

  18. Magneto Transport of Graphene Monolayer with Antidot Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yin, Ming; Datta, Timir; Mbamalu, Godwin; Alameri, Dheyaa

    Graphene has a significant potential for electronics application as well as in high precision resistive metrological standard. Here we report magneto transport studies of monolayer graphene with antidot in hexagonal arrays on SiO2/Si substrate. The choice of antidot array was motivated by the potential to enhance quantum interference effect amongst charge carriers. The graphene-antidot arrays were fabricated by electron beam lithography followed by reactive ion etching. In our samples the dc magnetic field (B) was applied continuously up to 18 Tesla while the measurement temperature (T) was held steady at desired set points, ranging from 200 mK to 20 K. The effect of nanoarrays on the temperature and field dependence of the electrical properties (MR) and quantum hall effect with particular attention to Aharonov-Bohm oscillations will be reported.

  19. Anomalous magnetotransport through reflection-symmetric artificial molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Anjou, B.; Coish, W. A.

    2013-02-01

    We calculate magnetotransport oscillations in current through a triple-quantum-dot molecule, accounting for higher harmonics (having flux period h/ne, with n an integer). For a reflection-symmetric triple quantum dot, we find that harmonics with n odd can dominate over those with n even. This is opposite to the behavior theoretically predicted due to “dark-state” localization, but has been observed in recent experiments [L. Gaudreau , Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.80.075415 80, 075415 (2009)], albeit in a triple dot that may not exhibit reflection symmetry. This feature arises from a more general result; in the weak-coupling limit, we find that the current is flux-independent for an arbitrary reflection-symmetric Aharonov-Bohm network. We further show that these effects are observable in nanoscale systems even in the presence of typical dephasing sources.

  20. AB INITIO AND CALPHAD THERMODYNAMICS OF MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P A

    2004-04-14

    Ab initio electronic structure methods can supplement CALPHAD in two major ways for subsequent applications to stability in complex alloys. The first one is rather immediate and concerns the direct input of ab initio energetics in CALPHAD databases. The other way, more involved, is the assessment of ab initio thermodynamics {acute a} la CALPHAD. It will be shown how these results can be used within CALPHAD to predict the equilibrium properties of multi-component alloys.

  1. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Boris

    2012-06-01

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures. Neutrinos and photons are by far the most abundant elementary particles in the universe. Thus, if we would like to comprehend the universe, we must understand the neutrinos. Of course, studying the neutrinos is challenging, since the only known forces through which these electrically-neutral leptons interact are the weak force and gravity. Consequently, interactions of neutrinos in a detector are very rare events, so that very large detectors and intense neutrino sources are needed to make experiments feasible. Nevertheless, we have confirmed that the weak interactions of neutrinos are correctly described by the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particle physics. Moreover, in the last 14 years, we have discovered that neutrinos have nonzero masses, and that leptons mix. These discoveries have been based on the observation that neutrinos can change from one 'flavor' to another - the phenomenon known as neutrino oscillation. We shall explain the physics of neutrino oscillation, deriving the probability of oscillation in a new way. We shall also provide a very brief guide to references that can be used to study some major neutrino-physics topics other than neutrino oscillation.

  2. Ab initio H2O in realistic hydrophilic confinement.

    PubMed

    Allolio, Christoph; Klameth, Felix; Vogel, Michael; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2014-12-15

    A protocol for the ab initio construction of a realistic cylindrical pore in amorphous silica, serving as a geometric nanoscale confinement for liquids and solutions, is presented. Upon filling the pore with liquid water at different densities, the structure and dynamics of the liquid inside the confinement can be characterized. At high density, the pore introduces long-range oscillations into the water density profile, which makes the water structure unlike that of the bulk across the entire pore. The tetrahedral structure of water is also affected up to the second solvation shell of the pore wall. Furthermore, the effects of the confinement on hydrogen bonding and diffusion, resulting in a weakening and distortion of the water structure at the pore walls and a slowdown in diffusion, are characterized. PMID:25208765

  3. A New Neutrino Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    Starting in the late 1960s, neutrino detectors began to see signs that neutrinos, now known to come in the flavors electron ({nu}{sub e}), muon ({nu}{sub {mu}}), and tau ({nu}{sub {tau}}), could transform from one flavor to another. The findings implied that neutrinos must have mass, since massless particles travel at the speed of light and their clocks, so to speak, don't tick, thus they cannot change. What has since been discovered is that neutrinos oscillate at two distinct scales, 500 km/GeV and 15,000 km/GeV, which are defined by the baseline (L) of the experiment (the distance the neutrino travels) divided by the neutrino energy (E). Neutrinos of one flavor can oscillate into neutrinos of another flavor at both L/E scales, but the amplitude of these oscillations is different for the two scales and depends on the initial and final flavor of the neutrinos. The neutrino states that propogate unchanged in time, the mass eigenstates {nu}1, {nu}2, {nu}3, are quantum mechanical mixtures of the electron, muon, and tau neutrino flavors, and the fraction of each flavor in a given mass eigenstate is controlled by three mixing angles and a complex phase. Two of these mixing angles are known with reasonable precision. An upper bound exists for the third angle, called {theta}{sub 13}, which controls the size of the muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillation at an L/E of 500 km/GeV. The phase is completely unknown. The existence of this phase has important implications for the asymmetry between matter and antimatter we observe in the universe today. Experiments around the world have steadily assembled this picture of neutrino oscillation, but evidence of muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillation at 500 km/GeV has remained elusive. Now, a paper from the T2K (Tokai to Kamioka) experiment in Japan, reports the first possible observation of muon neutrinos oscillating into electron neutrinos at 500 km/GeV. They see 6 candidate signal events, above an expected background

  4. Forced spaser oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisyansky, Alexander A.; Andrianov, Eugeney S.; Dorofeenko, Alexander V.; Pukhov, Alexander A.; Vinogradov, Alexey P.

    2012-10-01

    We study oscillations of a spaser driven by an external optical wave. When the frequency of the external field is shifted from the frequency of an autonomous spaser, the spaser exhibits stochastic oscillations at low field intensity. The plasmon oscillations lock to the frequency of the external field only when the field amplitude exceeds a threshold value. We find a region of external field amplitude and the frequency detuning (the Arnold tongue) for which the spaser becomes synchronized with the external wave. We obtain the conditions upon the amplitude and frequency of the external field (the curve of compensation) at which the spaser's dipole moment oscillates with a phase shift of π relatively to the external wave. For these values of the amplitude and frequency, the loss in the metal nanoparticles within the spaser is exactly compensated for by the gain. It is expected that if these conditions are not satisfied, then due to loss or gain of energy, the amplitude of the wave travelling along the system of spasers either tends to the curve of compensation or leave the Arnold tongue. We also consider cooperative phenomena showing that in a chain of interacting spasers, depending on the values of the coupling constants, either all spasers oscillate in phase or a nonlinear autowave travels in the system. In the latter scenario, the traveling wave is harmonic, unlike excitations in other nonlinear systems. Due to the nonlinear nature of the system, any initial distribution of spaser states evolves into one of these steady states.

  5. Oscillations of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornek, U.; Müller, F.; Harth, K.; Hahn, A.; Ganesan, S.; Tobiska, L.; Stannarius, R.

    2010-07-01

    Oscillations of droplets or bubbles of a confined fluid in a fluid environment are found in various situations in everyday life, in technological processing and in natural phenomena on different length scales. Air bubbles in liquids or liquid droplets in air are well-known examples. Soap bubbles represent a particularly simple, beautiful and attractive system to study the dynamics of a closed gas volume embedded in the same or a different gas. Their dynamics is governed by the densities and viscosities of the gases and by the film tension. Dynamic equations describing their oscillations under simplifying assumptions have been well known since the beginning of the 20th century. Both analytical description and numerical modeling have made considerable progress since then, but quantitative experiments have been lacking so far. On the other hand, a soap bubble represents an easily manageable paradigm for the study of oscillations of fluid spheres. We use a technique to create axisymmetric initial non-equilibrium states, and we observe damped oscillations into equilibrium by means of a fast video camera. Symmetries of the oscillations, frequencies and damping rates of the eigenmodes as well as the coupling of modes are analyzed. They are compared to analytical models from the literature and to numerical calculations from the literature and this work.

  6. The Kramers Oscillator Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Ludwig; Imkeller, Peter

    In their 1993 paper [14], Schimansky-Geier and Herze1 discovered numerically that the Kramers oscillator (which is identical with the Duffing oscillator forced by additive white noise) has a positive top Lyapunov exponent in the low damping regime. In this paper, we study the Kramers oscillator from the point of view of random dynamical systems. In particular, we confirm the findings in the paper [14] about the Lyapunov exponent by performing more precise simulations, revealing that the Lyapunov exponent is positive up to a critical value of the damping, from which on it remains negative. We then show that the Kramers oscillator has a global random attractor which in the stable regime (large damping) is just a random point and in the unstable regime (small damping) has very complicated geometrical structure. In the lat-ter case the invariant measure supported by the attractor is a Sinai-Ruelle-Bowen measure with positive entropy. The Kramers oscillator hence undergoes a stochastic bifurcation at the critical value of the damping Parameter.

  7. Oscillations following periodic reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Tiago; Machado, Armando

    2009-06-01

    Three experiments examined behavior in extinction following periodic reinforcement. During the first phase of Experiment 1, four groups of pigeons were exposed to fixed interval (FI 16s or FI 48s) or variable interval (VI 16s or VI 48s) reinforcement schedules. Next, during the second phase, each session started with reinforcement trials and ended with an extinction segment. Experiment 2 was similar except that the extinction segment was considerably longer. Experiment 3 replaced the FI schedules with a peak procedure, with FI trials interspersed with non-food peak interval (PI) trials that were four times longer. One group of pigeons was exposed to FI 20s PI 80s trials, and another to FI 40s PI 160s trials. Results showed that, during the extinction segment, most pigeons trained with FI schedules, but not with VI schedules, displayed pause-peck oscillations with a period close to, but slightly greater than the FI parameter. These oscillations did not start immediately after the onset of extinction. Comparing the oscillations from Experiments 1 and 2 suggested that the alternation of reconditioning and re-extinction increases the reliability and earlier onset of the oscillations. In Experiment 3 the pigeons exhibited well-defined pause-peck cycles since the onset of extinction. These cycles had periods close to twice the value of the FI and lasted for long intervals of time. We discuss some hypotheses concerning the processes underlying behavioral oscillations following periodic reinforcement. PMID:18992793

  8. Combustor oscillation pressure stabilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.T.J.; Robey, E.; Cully, S.R.; Addis, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    In accordance with the objective of the present invention, the active control of unsteady combustion induced oscillations in a combustion chamber fired by a suitable fuel and oxidizer mixture, such as a hydrocarbon fuel and air mixture, is provided by restructuring and moving the position of the main flame front and thereby increasing the transport time and displacing the pressure wave further away from the in-phase relationship with the periodic heat release. The restructuring and repositioning of the main flame are achieved by utilizing a pilot flame which is pulsed at a predetermined frequency corresponding to less than about one-half the frequency of the combustion oscillation frequency with the duration of each pulse being sufficient to produce adequate secondary thermal energy to restructure the main flame and thereby decouple the heat release from the acoustic coupling so as to lead to a reduction in the dynamic pressure amplitude. The pulsating pilot flame produces a relatively small and intermittently existing flame front in the combustion zone that is separate from the oscillating main flame front but which provides the thermal energy necessary to effectively reposition the location of the oscillating main flame front out of the region in the combustion zone where the acoustic coupling can occur with the main flame and thereby effectively altering the oscillation-causing phase relationship with the heat of combustion.

  9. Digital numerically controlled oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cellier, A.; Huey, D. C.; Ma, L. N. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The frequency and phase of an output signal from an oscillator circuit are controlled with accuracy by a digital input word. Positive and negative alterations in output frequency are both provided for by translating all values of input words so that they are positive. The oscillator reference frequency is corrected only in one direction, by adding phase to the output frequency of the oscillator. The input control word is translated to a single algebraic sign and the digital 1 is added thereto. The translated input control word is then accumulated. A reference clock signal having a frequency at an integer multiple of the desired frequency of the output signal is generated. The accumulated control word is then compared with a threshold level. The output signal is adjusted in a single direction by dividing the frequency of the reference clock signal by a first integer or by an integer different from the first integer.

  10. The Fastest Quasiperiodic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) at frequencies near 1000 Hz have been detected from a umber of neutron star x-ray binaries using RXTE. These fast oscillations are likely associated with rbital motion very close to the neutron star and and, thus, give us information about the behavior of the accretion disk in the strong gravitational field near the neutron star. The oscillation frequencies can also be used to place constraints on the properties of the neutron stars with the highest detected frequencies being the most constraining. We propose TOOs observations of selected neutron star x-ray binaries when found to be in states likely to produce kHz QPOs with frequencies exceeding 1200 Hz.

  11. Magnetic vortex oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrkac, Gino; Keatley, Paul S.; Bryan, Matthew T.; Butler, Keith

    2015-11-01

    The magnetic vortex has sparked the interest of the academic and industrial communities over the last few decades. From their discovery in the 1970s for bubble memory devices to their modern application as radio frequency oscillators, magnetic vortices have been adopted to modern telecommunication and sensor applications. Basic properties of vortex structures in the static and dynamic regime, from a theoretical and experimental point of view, are presented as well as their application in spin torque driven nano-pillar and magnetic tunnel junction devices. Single vortex excitations and phase locking phenomena of coupled oscillators are discussed with an outlook of vortex oscillators in magnetic hybrid structures with imprinted domain confinement and dynamic encryption devices.

  12. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy Comparison of Ab Interno and Ab Externo Intraocular Lens Scleral Fixation.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Lie; Garcia, Patricia Novita; Malavazzi, Gustavo Ricci; Allemann, Norma; Gomes, Rachel L R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare ab interno and ab externo scleral fixation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PCIOL) using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Methods. Randomized patients underwent ab externo or ab interno scleral fixation of a PCIOL. Ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively, to determine PCIOL centration, IOL distance to the iris at 12, 3, 6, and 9 hours, and haptics placement in relation to the ciliary sulcus. Results. Fifteen patients were enrolled in the study. The ab externo technique was used in 7 eyes (46.6%) and the ab interno in 8 eyes (53.3%). In the ab externo technique, 14 haptics were located: 4 (28.57%) in the ciliary sulcus; 2 (14.28%) anterior to the sulcus; and 8 (57.14%) posterior to the sulcus, 6 in the ciliary body and 2 posterior to the ciliary body. In the ab interno group, 4 haptics (25.0%) were in the ciliary sulcus, 2 (12.50%) anterior to the sulcus, and 10 (75.0%) posterior to the sulcus, 4 in the ciliary body and 6 posterior to the ciliary body. Conclusions. Ab externo and ab interno scleral fixation techniques presented similar results in haptic placement. Ab externo technique presented higher vertical tilt when compared to the ab interno. PMID:27293878

  13. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy Comparison of Ab Interno and Ab Externo Intraocular Lens Scleral Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Lie; Garcia, Patricia Novita; Malavazzi, Gustavo Ricci; Allemann, Norma

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare ab interno and ab externo scleral fixation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PCIOL) using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Methods. Randomized patients underwent ab externo or ab interno scleral fixation of a PCIOL. Ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively, to determine PCIOL centration, IOL distance to the iris at 12, 3, 6, and 9 hours, and haptics placement in relation to the ciliary sulcus. Results. Fifteen patients were enrolled in the study. The ab externo technique was used in 7 eyes (46.6%) and the ab interno in 8 eyes (53.3%). In the ab externo technique, 14 haptics were located: 4 (28.57%) in the ciliary sulcus; 2 (14.28%) anterior to the sulcus; and 8 (57.14%) posterior to the sulcus, 6 in the ciliary body and 2 posterior to the ciliary body. In the ab interno group, 4 haptics (25.0%) were in the ciliary sulcus, 2 (12.50%) anterior to the sulcus, and 10 (75.0%) posterior to the sulcus, 4 in the ciliary body and 6 posterior to the ciliary body. Conclusions. Ab externo and ab interno scleral fixation techniques presented similar results in haptic placement. Ab externo technique presented higher vertical tilt when compared to the ab interno. PMID:27293878

  14. Three-cluster dynamics within an ab initio framework

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Quaglioni, Sofia; Romero-Redondo, Carolina; Navratil, Petr

    2013-09-26

    In this study, we introduce a fully antisymmetrized treatment of three-cluster dynamics within the ab initio framework of the no-core shell model/resonating-group method. Energy-independent nonlocal interactions among the three nuclear fragments are obtained from realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions and consistent ab initio many-body wave functions of the clusters. The three-cluster Schrödinger equation is solved with bound-state boundary conditions by means of the hyperspherical-harmonic method on a Lagrange mesh. We discuss the formalism in detail and give algebraic expressions for systems of two single nucleons plus a nucleus. Using a soft similarity-renormalization-group evolved chiral nucleon-nucleon potential, we apply the method to amore » 4He+n+n description of 6He and compare the results to experiment and to a six-body diagonalization of the Hamiltonian performed within the harmonic-oscillator expansions of the no-core shell model. Differences between the two calculations provide a measure of core (4He) polarization effects.« less

  15. Gamma Oscillation in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Brian F.; Youn, Soyoung; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2011-01-01

    Dysfunctional neural circuitry has been found to be involved in abnormalities of perception and cognition in patients with schizophrenia. Gamma oscillations are essential for integrating information within neural circuits and have therefore been associated with many perceptual and cognitive processes in healthy human subjects and animals. This review presents an overview of the neural basis of gamma oscillations and the abnormalities in the GABAergic interneuronal system thought to be responsible for gamma-range deficits in schizophrenia. We also review studies of gamma activity in sensory and cognitive processes, including auditory steady state response, attention, object representation, and working memory, in animals, healthy humans and patients with schizophrenia. PMID:22216037

  16. Micromechanical Oscillating Mass Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altemir, David A. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A micromechanical oscillating mass balance and method adapted for measuring minute quantities of material deposited at a selected location, such as during a vapor deposition process. The invention comprises a vibratory composite beam which includes a dielectric layer sandwiched between two conductive layers. The beam is positioned in a magnetic field. An alternating current passes through one conductive layers, the beam oscillates, inducing an output current in the second conductive layer, which is analyzed to determine the resonant frequency of the beam. As material is deposited on the beam, the mass of the beam increases and the resonant frequency of the beam shifts, and the mass added is determined.

  17. Coupled opto-electronic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. Steve (Inventor); Maleki, Lute (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A coupled opto-electronic oscillator that directly couples a laser oscillation with an electronic oscillation to simultaneously achieve a stable RF oscillation at a high frequency and ultra-short optical pulsation by mode locking with a high repetition rate and stability. Single-mode selection can be achieved even with a very long opto-electronic loop. A multimode laser can be used to pump the electronic oscillation, resulting in a high operation efficiency. The optical and the RF oscillations are correlated to each other.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Ab initio symplectic no-core shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dytrych, T.; Sviratcheva, K. D.; Draayer, J. P.; Bahri, C.; Vary, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    The no-core shell model (NCSM) is a prominent ab initio method that yields a good description of the low-lying states in few-nucleon systems as well as in more complex p-shell nuclei. Nevertheless, its applicability is limited by the rapid growth of the many-body basis with larger model spaces and increasing number of nucleons. The symplectic no-core shell model (Sp-NCSM) aspires to extend the scope of the NCSM beyond the p-shell region by augmenting the conventional spherical harmonic oscillator basis with the physically relevant symplectic \\SpR{3} symmetry-adapted configurations of the symplectic shell model that describe naturally the monopole-quadrupole vibrational and rotational modes, and also partially incorporate α-cluster correlations. In this review, the models underpinning the Sp-NCSM approach, namely, the NCSM, the Elliott SU(3) model and the symplectic shell model, are discussed. Following this, a prescription for constructing translationally invariant symplectic configurations in the spherical harmonic oscillator basis is given. This prescription is utilized to unveil the extent to which symplectic configurations enter into low-lying states in 12C and 16O nuclei calculated within the framework of the NCSM with the JISP16 realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction. The outcomes of this proof-of-principle study are presented in detail.

  19. Operator evolution for ab initio theory of light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Micah; Quaglioni, Sofia; Johnson, Calvin; Jurgenson, Eric; Navrátil, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The past two decades have seen a revolution in ab initio calculations of nuclear properties. One key element has been the development of a rigorous effective interaction theory, applying unitary transformations to soften the nuclear Hamiltonian and hence accelerate the convergence as a function of the model space size. For consistency, however, one ought to apply the same transformation to other operators when calculating transitions and mean values from the eigenstates of the renormalized Hamiltonian. Working in a translationally invariant harmonic oscillator basis for the two- and three-nucleon systems, we evolve the Hamiltonian, square radius, and total dipole strength operators by the similarity renormalization group (SRG). The inclusion of up to three-body matrix elements in the 4He nucleus all but completely restores the invariance of the expectation values under the transformation. We also consider a Gaussian operator with adjustable range; short ranges have the largest absolute renormalization when including two- and three-body induced terms, while at long ranges the induced three-body contribution takes on increased relative importance. The past two decades have seen a revolution in ab initio calculations of nuclear properties. One key element has been the development of a rigorous effective interaction theory, applying unitary transformations to soften the nuclear Hamiltonian and hence accelerate the convergence as a function of the model space size. For consistency, however, one ought to apply the same transformation to other operators when calculating transitions and mean values from the eigenstates of the renormalized Hamiltonian. Working in a translationally invariant harmonic oscillator basis for the two- and three-nucleon systems, we evolve the Hamiltonian, square radius, and total dipole strength operators by the similarity renormalization group (SRG). The inclusion of up to three-body matrix elements in the 4He nucleus all but completely restores

  20. Nanoparticle Oscillations and Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Lagzi, Istvan; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; Wang, Dawei; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2010-09-30

    Chemical oscillations can be coupled to the dynamic self-assembly of nanoparticles. Periodic pH changes translate into protonation and deprotonation of the ligands that stabilize the nanoparticles, thus altering repulsive and attractive interparticle forces. In a continuous stirred-tank reactor, rhythmic aggregation and dispersion is observed; in spatially distributed media, propagation of particle aggregation fronts is seen.

  1. Voltage-Controlled Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Integrated Component Systems, Inc. incorporated information from a NASA Tech Briefs article into a voltage-controlled oscillator it designed for a customer. The company then applied the technology to its series of phase-locked loop synthesizers, which offer superior phase noise performance.

  2. Coupled Oscillators with Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, Satoshi; Aizawa, Yoji

    1998-08-01

    A simple coupled oscillator system with chemotaxis is introducedto study morphogenesis of cellular slime molds. The modelsuccessfuly explains the migration of pseudoplasmodium which hasbeen experimentally predicted to be lead by cells with higherintrinsic frequencies. Results obtained predict that its velocityattains its maximum value in the interface region between totallocking and partial locking and also suggest possible rolesplayed by partial synchrony during multicellular development.

  3. Oscillating Reactions: Two Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Stojanovska, Marina I.; Šoptrajanov, Bojan T.

    2007-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are truly spectacular phenomena, and demonstrations are always appreciated by the class. However, explaining such reactions to high school or first-year university students is problematic, because it may seem that no acceptable explanation is possible unless the students have profound knowledge of both physical…

  4. Relativistic harmonic oscillator revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Bars, Itzhak

    2009-02-15

    The familiar Fock space commonly used to describe the relativistic harmonic oscillator, for example, as part of string theory, is insufficient to describe all the states of the relativistic oscillator. We find that there are three different vacua leading to three disconnected Fock sectors, all constructed with the same creation-annihilation operators. These have different spacetime geometric properties as well as different algebraic symmetry properties or different quantum numbers. Two of these Fock spaces include negative norm ghosts (as in string theory), while the third one is completely free of ghosts. We discuss a gauge symmetry in a worldline theory approach that supplies appropriate constraints to remove all the ghosts from all Fock sectors of the single oscillator. The resulting ghost-free quantum spectrum in d+1 dimensions is then classified in unitary representations of the Lorentz group SO(d,1). Moreover, all states of the single oscillator put together make up a single infinite dimensional unitary representation of a hidden global symmetry SU(d,1), whose Casimir eigenvalues are computed. Possible applications of these new results in string theory and other areas of physics and mathematics are briefly mentioned.

  5. A simple violin oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    For acoustic tests the violin is driven laterally at the bridge by a small speaker of the type commonly found in pocket transistor radios. An audio oscillator excites the tone which is picked up by a sound level meter. Gross patterns of vibration modes are obtained by the Chladni method.

  6. Wein bridge oscillator circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipoma, P. C.

    1971-01-01

    Circuit with minimum number of components provides stable outputs of 2 to 8 volts at frequencies of .001 to 100 kHz. Oscillator exhibits low power consumption, portability, simplicity, and drive capability, it has application as loudspeaker tester and audible alarm, as well as in laboratory and test generators.

  7. Master oscillator stability requirements considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, H.; Vancraeynest, J.

    1986-06-24

    This note attempts to point out some ideas about the required stability of the 476 MHz master oscillator, assuming that the phase noise of the oscillator is the only source of noise in the accelerator system.

  8. Orthogonal polynomials and deformed oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzov, V. V.; Damaskinsky, E. V.

    2015-10-01

    In the example of the Fibonacci oscillator, we discuss the construction of oscillator-like systems associated with orthogonal polynomials. We also consider the question of the dimensions of the corresponding Lie algebras.

  9. Ionization oscillations in Hall accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barral, S.; Peradzyński, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of low-frequency oscillations in Hall accelerators is investigated theoretically. It is shown that relaxation oscillations arise from a competition between avalanche ionization and the advective transport of the working gas. The model derived recovers the slow progression and fast recession of the ionization front. Analytical approximations of the shape of current pulses and of the oscillation frequency are provided for the case of large amplitude oscillations.

  10. Forced Oscillations for Hybrid Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheshankov, B.

    2009-11-01

    The hybrid system in the paper means a mechanical system which consists from two parts with different structure—a part with distributed parameters and a part with discrete parameters. More concrete the forced longitudinal oscillations of a rod connected with a simple oscillator are considered. The oscillations of the separate parts of the system are very well known. It turned out that the oscillations of this hybrid system propose some difficulties when investigating. The paper proposes an approach to overcome these difficulties.

  11. Ab initio phonon limited transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraete, Matthieu

    We revisit the thermoelectric (TE) transport properties of two champion materials, PbTe and SnSe, using fully first principles methods. In both cases the performance of the material is due to subtle combinations of structural effects, scattering, and phase space reduction. In PbTe anharmonic effects are completely opposite to the predicted quasiharmonic evolution of phonon frequencies and to frequently (and incorrectly) cited extrapolations of experiments. This stabilizes the material at high T, but also tends to enhance its thermal conductivity, in a non linear manner, above 600 Kelvin. This explains why PbTe is in practice limited to room temperature applications. SnSe has recently been shown to be the most efficient TE material in bulk form. This is mainly due to a strongly enhanced carrier concentration and electrical conductivity, after going through a phase transition from 600 to 800 K. We calculate the transport coefficients as well as the defect concentrations ab initio, showing excellent agreement with experiment, and elucidating the origin of the double phase transition as well as the new charge carriers. AH Romero, EKU Gross, MJ Verstraete, and O Hellman PRB 91, 214310 (2015) O. Hellman, IA Abrikosov, and SI Simak, PRB 84 180301 (2011)

  12. A spinor boson AB chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz Reyes, Greis Julieth; Franco, Roberto; Silva Valencia, Jereson; Universidad Santo Tomas Collaboration; Universidad Nacional de Colombia Collaboration

    Recent research is focused on superlattices arising from optical lattices, which allow a tunable environment. Experimentally bosons present transitions from superfluid to Mott insulator by changing the energy offset in the unit cell [Nat. Commun. 5:5735 (2014)]. Many studies displayed that ground state of spinless boson systems on superlattices present superfluid, Mott insulator and an additional CDW phase created by the energy shift between the sites into the unit cell [Phys. Rev. A 83, 053621 (2011)]. The first confinement methods were magnetic traps, which freezes the spin; with optical lattices the grade of freedom of spin plays an important role. We consider bosons with spin S =1 on a superlattice made by two sites with energy offset per unit cell (AB chain). The Hamiltonian that describes the system is the Bose-Hubbard model with the superlattice potential (W) and the exchange interaction (V) parameters. This model supports CDW, Mott insulator and superfluid phases. For W near to U, with V =0, Mott phase disappears, but for V increasing, a new CDW appears due to the spin interaction, while the half-integer CDW decrease. These results are widely different from spinless boson, where the CDW phases are stables.

  13. Ab inito investigation of hydrodesulferization

    SciTech Connect

    Tilson, J.L.; Marshall, C.L.; Brenner, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    We utilize MPP and vector computers to model the interaction of large sulfur-containing species bonded with hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts. This work is made possible by the availability large aggregate memory, parallel computers. The ability of modern non-traditional computers to solve large-scale scientific problems has been demonstrated. This success is accomplished, in part, by access to portable low- and user-level software tools which exhibit good control over NUMA. ab initio SCF methods are used to characterize the energies of adsorption of poly-aromatic, sulfur-containing hydrocarbons onto a series of molecular-based models of MoS2. These hydrocarbon include thiophene (TP), benzothiophene (BT) and dibenzothiophene (DBT) which are representative of heavy crude feedstocks. Our work attempts to ascertain if a consistent model of adsorption onto a MoS2 surface exists and to determine how the electronic and steric configuration of each species affect their energies of interaction with the metal surface.

  14. GINGA Observations of AB Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhu, O.; Tsuru, T.; Collier Cameron, A.

    We report GINGA observations of the pre main sequence star AB Doradus (HD 36705), performed during 8 - 12 January, 1990. Some rotational modulation might be present. four X-ray flares were detected. Three of these events were similar to the EINSTEIN HRI-flare (Vilhu and Linsky, 1987), with decay times around 25 min. The last flare had long rise and decay times (100 min), resembling the EXOSAT flares observed by Collier Cameron et.al. (1988). The mean flare spectrum can be fitted by a thermal bremstrahlung with temperature 5.0 keV, or by a power-law model with photon index 2.2. The 3 upper limit of the Iron line equivalent width in the flare spectrum is 1 keV, weaker than predicted by thermal models. This Iron line anomaly was first discussed in the case of UX Ari by Tsuru et. al. (1989). However, normal equivalent widths can be derived from several EXOSAT spectra of active cool stars (Pallavicini and Tagliaferri, 1990). We discuss the possibility that the continuum from non-thermal electrons (producing also the microwave emission) could occasionally lower the apparent equivalent width. The mechanism works for reasonably low magnetic field strengths and electon power-law indexes. However, a large population of non-thermal electrons is needed (comparable to the thermal one). Stronger magnetic fields could explain the radio emission with less electrons, but then the non-thermal X-ray continuum remains small.

  15. The B AB AR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bazan, A.; Boucham, A.; Boutigny, D.; De Bonis, I.; Favier, J.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Jeremie, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Le Flour, T.; Lees, J. P.; Lieunard, S.; Petitpas, P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zachariadou, K.; Palano, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Stugu, B.; Abbott, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Amerman, L.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Clark, A. R.; Dardin, S.; Day, C.; Dow, S. F.; Fan, Q.; Gaponenko, I.; Gill, M. S.; Goozen, F. R.; Gowdy, S. J.; Gritsan, A.; Groysman, Y.; Hernikl, C.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Jared, R. C.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Karcher, A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kipnis, I.; Kluth, S.; Kral, J. F.; Lafever, R.; LeClerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lewis, S. A.; Lionberger, C.; Liu, T.; Long, M.; Luo, L.; Lynch, G.; Luft, P.; Mandelli, E.; Marino, M.; Marks, K.; Matuk, C.; Meyer, A. B.; Minor, R.; Mokhtarani, A.; Momayezi, M.; Nyman, M.; Oddone, P. J.; Ohnemus, J.; Oshatz, D.; Patton, S.; Pedrali-Noy, M.; Perazzo, A.; Peters, C.; Pope, W.; Pripstein, M.; Quarrie, D. R.; Rasson, J. E.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Stone, R.; Strother, P. D.; Telnov, A. V.; von der Lippe, H.; Weber, T. F.; Wenzel, W. A.; Zizka, G.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Hawkes, C. M.; Kirk, A.; Knowles, D. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Koch, H.; Krug, J.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Andress, J. C.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; De Groot, N.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; Mass, A.; McFall, J. D.; Wallom, D.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Hearty, C.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Camanzi, B.; Harrison, T. J.; McKemey, A. K.; Tinslay, J.; Antohin, E. I.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Bukin, D. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kolachev, G. M.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Mikhailov, S. F.; Onuchin, A. P.; Salnikov, A. A.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Telnov, V. I.; Yushkov, A. N.; Booth, J.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Pier, S.; Stoker, D. P.; Zioulas, G.; Ahsan, A.; Arisaka, K.; Buchanan, C.; Chun, S.; Faccini, R.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Prell, S. A.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Raven, G.; Sharma, V.; Burke, S.; Callahan, D.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Hale, D.; Hart, P. A.; Kuznetsova, N.; Kyre, S.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; May, J.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S.; Beringer, J.; DeWitt, J.; Dorfan, D. E.; Eisner, A. M.; Frey, A.; Grillo, A. A.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Johnson, R. P.; Kroeger, W.; Lockman, W. S.; Pulliam, T.; Rowe, W.; Sadrozinski, H.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E. N.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Wilder, M.; Williams, D. C.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hanson, J. E.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Metzler, S.; Oyang, J.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Weaver, M.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Jayatilleke, S. M.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P.; Broomer, B.; Erdos, E.; Fahey, S.; Ford, W. T.; Gaede, F.; van Hoek, W. C.; Johnson, D. R.; Michael, A. K.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Sen, S.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, D. L.; Blouw, J.; Harton, J. L.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Warner, D. W.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Dahlinger, G.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Eckstein, P.; Futterschneider, H.; Kocian, M. L.; Krause, R.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Behr, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Ferrag, S.; Fouque, G.; Gastaldi, F.; Matricon, P.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Renard, C.; Roussot, E.; T'Jampens, S.; Thiebaux, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Di Lodovico, F.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Falbo, M.; Bozzi, C.; Dittongo, S.; Folegani, M.; Piemontese, L.; Ramusino, A. C.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Xie, Y.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Minutoli, S.; Monge, M. R.; Musenich, R.; Pallavicini, M.; Parodi, R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Priano, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Bartoldus, R.; Dignan, T.; Hamilton, R.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Fischer, P. A.; Lamsa, J.; McKay, R.; Meyer, W. T.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Albert, J. N.; Beigbeder, C.; Benkebil, M.; Breton, D.; Cizeron, R.; Du, S.; Grosdidier, G.; Hast, C.; Höcker, A.; Lacker, H. M.; LePeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.

    2002-02-01

    B AB AR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e +e - B Factory operating at the ϒ(4 S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagnetic showers from electrons and photons are detected in an array of CsI crystals located just inside the solenoidal coil of a superconducting magnet. Muons and neutral hadrons are identified by arrays of resistive plate chambers inserted into gaps in the steel flux return of the magnet. Charged hadrons are identified by d E/d x measurements in the tracking detectors and by a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector surrounding the drift chamber. The trigger, data acquisition and data-monitoring systems, VME- and network-based, are controlled by custom-designed online software. Details of the layout and performance of the detector components and their associated electronics and software are presented.

  16. The electrical soliton oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, David Shawn

    Solitons are a special class of pulse-shaped waves that propagate in nonlinear dispersive media while maintaining their spatial confinement. They are found throughout nature where the proper balance between nonlinearity and dispersion is achieved. Examples of the soliton phenomena include shallow water waves, vibrations in a nonlinear spring-mass lattice, acoustic waves in plasma, and optical pulses in fiber optic cable. In electronics, the nonlinear transmission line (NLTL) serves as a nonlinear dispersive medium that propagates voltage solitons. Electrical solitons on the NLTL have been actively investigated over the last 40 years, particularly in the microwave domain, for sharp pulse generation applications and for high-speed RF and microwave sampling applications. In these past studies the NLTL has been predominantly used as a 2-port system where a high-frequency input is required to generate a sharp soliton output through a transient process. One meaningful extension of the past 2-port NLTL works would be to construct a 1-port self-sustained electrical soliton oscillator by properly combining the NLTL with an amplifier (positive active feedback). Such an oscillator would self-start by growing from ambient noise to produce a train of periodic soliton pulses in steady-state, and hence would make a self-contained soliton generator not requiring an external high-frequency input. While such a circuit may offer a new direction in the field of electrical pulse generation, there has not been a robust electrical soliton oscillator reported to date to the best of our knowledge. In this thesis we introduce the first robust electrical soliton oscillator, which is able to self-generate a stable, periodic train of electrical solitons. This new oscillator is made possible by combining the NLTL with a unique nonlinear amplifier that is able to "tame" the unruly dynamics of the NLTL. The principle contribution of this thesis is the identification of the key instability

  17. Collective rotation from ab initio theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprio, M. A.; Maris, P.; Vary, J. P.; Smith, R.

    2015-08-01

    Through ab initio approaches in nuclear theory, we may now seek to quantitatively understand the wealth of nuclear collective phenomena starting from the underlying internucleon interactions. No-core configuration interaction (NCCI) calculations for p-shell nuclei give rise to rotational bands, as evidenced by rotational patterns for excitation energies, electromagnetic moments and electromagnetic transitions. In this review, NCCI calculations of 7-9Be are used to illustrate and explore ab initio rotational structure, and the resulting predictions for rotational band properties are compared with experiment. We highlight the robustness of ab initio rotational predictions across different choices for the internucleon interaction.

  18. Laser-Atomic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2008-05-01

    We report a newly developed technique, laser-atomic oscillator, for simultaneously generating stable optical and electrical modulations with a very few components. It requires only a semiconductor laser, a vapor cell, and a few optical components. No photodetector and electronic feedback are needed. In this new system, the ground-state hyperfine coherence of alkali-metal atoms is spontaneously generated. The modulated laser light with a spectrum of a small optical comb is automatically produced, and the spacing between the comb peaks is photonically locked to the hyperfine frequency. The charge carriers in the semiconductor laser are also modulated at the hyperfine frequency. Laser-atomic oscillator is purely optical. Its simple structure allows the system to be very compact. We believe this new technique will bring some advantages in the applications of atomic chronometry, atomic magnetometry, and generation of multi-coherent light.

  19. Oscillations of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Lai, Choy Heng

    2006-12-01

    A complex network processing information or physical flows is usually characterized by a number of macroscopic quantities such as the diameter and the betweenness centrality. An issue of significant theoretical and practical interest is how such quantities respond to sudden changes caused by attacks or disturbances in recoverable networks, i.e., functions of the affected nodes are only temporarily disabled or partially limited. By introducing a model to address this issue, we find that, for a finite-capacity network, perturbations can cause the network to oscillate persistently in the sense that the characterizing quantities vary periodically or randomly with time. We provide a theoretical estimate of the critical capacity-parameter value for the onset of the network oscillation. The finding is expected to have broad implications as it suggests that complex networks may be structurally highly dynamic.

  20. Stable local oscillator module.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-11-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) multi-chip module (MCM). It is a follow-on report to SAND2006-6414, Stable Local Oscillator Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. This report describes the development of an MCM-based version of the complete StaLO, fabricated on an alumina thick film hybrid substrate.

  1. JFET reflection oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high frequency oscillator circuit is provided using a low cost junction type field effect transistor (T sub 1) with a tuned circuit connected to its gate. The frequency of operation is determined by the tuned circuit and the capacitance reflected from the source to the gate. The transistor is matched to the frequency of operation so that this frequency falls within the roll-off portion of the transistor's transconductance verses frequency curve, preferably somewhat above the 3 db point in frequency. Phase shift necessary to sustain oscillation occurs due to the operation of the transistor in the roll-off portion of the curve and the addition of a phase shifting network (R sub 1, C sub 1) at the source.

  2. Phase chaos in coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Popovych, Oleksandr V; Maistrenko, Yuri L; Tass, Peter A

    2005-06-01

    A complex high-dimensional chaotic behavior, phase chaos, is found in the finite-dimensional Kuramoto model of coupled phase oscillators. This type of chaos is characterized by half of the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents being positive and the Lyapunov dimension equaling almost the total system dimension. Intriguingly, the strongest phase chaos occurs for intermediate-size ensembles. Phase chaos is a common property of networks of oscillators of very different natures, such as phase oscillators, limit-cycle oscillators, and chaotic oscillators, e.g., Rössler systems. PMID:16089804

  3. Phase chaos in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovych, Oleksandr V.; Maistrenko, Yuri L.; Tass, Peter A.

    2005-06-01

    A complex high-dimensional chaotic behavior, phase chaos, is found in the finite-dimensional Kuramoto model of coupled phase oscillators. This type of chaos is characterized by half of the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents being positive and the Lyapunov dimension equaling almost the total system dimension. Intriguingly, the strongest phase chaos occurs for intermediate-size ensembles. Phase chaos is a common property of networks of oscillators of very different natures, such as phase oscillators, limit-cycle oscillators, and chaotic oscillators, e.g., Rössler systems.

  4. Covariant deformed oscillator algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quesne, Christiane

    1995-01-01

    The general form and associativity conditions of deformed oscillator algebras are reviewed. It is shown how the latter can be fulfilled in terms of a solution of the Yang-Baxter equation when this solution has three distinct eigenvalues and satisfies a Birman-Wenzl-Murakami condition. As an example, an SU(sub q)(n) x SU(sub q)(m)-covariant q-bosonic algebra is discussed in some detail.

  5. Ab Initio Study of Polonium

    SciTech Connect

    Zabidi, Noriza Ahmad; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2008-05-20

    Polonium is the only element with a simple cubic (sc) crystal structure. Atoms in solid polonium sit at the corners of a simple cubic unit cell and no where else. Polonium has a valence electron configuration 6s{sup 2}6p{sup 4} (Z = 84). The low temperature {alpha}-phase transforms into the rhombohedral (trigonal) {beta} structure at {approx}348 K. The sc {alpha}-Po unit cell constant is a = 3.345 A. The beta form of polonium ({beta}-Po) has the lattice parameters, a{sub R} = 3.359 A and a rhombohedral angle 98 deg. 13'. We have performed an ab initio electronic structure calculation by using the density functional theory. We have performed the calculation with and without spin-orbit (SO) coupling by using both the LDA and the GGA for the exchange-correlations. The k-points in a simple cubic BZ are determined by R (0.5, 0.5, 0.5), {gamma} (0, 0, 0), X (0.5, 0, 0), M (0.5, 0.5, 0) and {gamma} (0, 0, 0). Other directions of k-points are {gamma} (0, 0, 0), X (0.5, 0, 0), R (0.5, 0.5, 0.5) and {gamma} (0, 0, 0). The SO splittings of p states at the {gamma} point in the GGA+SO scheme for {alpha}-Po are 0.04 eV and 0.02 eV while for the {beta}-Po these are 0.03 eV and 0.97 eV. We have also calculated the vibrational spectra for the unit cells in both the structures. We find that exchanging of a Po atom by Pb atom produces several more bands and destabilizes the {beta} phase.

  6. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.; LSND Collaboration

    1997-11-01

    The LSND experiment at Los Alamos has conducted a search for {anti v}{sub {mu}} {yields} {anti v}{sub e} oscillations using {anti v}{sub {mu}} from {mu}{sup +} decay at rest. The {anti v}{sub e} are detected via the reaction {anti v}{sub e} p {yields} e{sup +}n, correlated with the 2.2 MeV {gamma} from n p {yields} d {gamma}. The use of tight cuts to identify e{sup +} events with correlated {gamma} rays yielded 22 events with e{sup +} energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 {+-} 0.6 background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}. A {chi}{sup 2} fit to the entire e{sup +} sample results in a total excess of 51.8{sub {minus}16.9}{sup +18.7} {+-} 8.0 events with e{sup +} energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to {anti v}{sub {mu}} {yields} {anti v}{sub e} oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of 0.31 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05%.

  7. Laterally oscillating nitinol engine

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, R.

    1987-09-08

    This patent describes a laterally oscillating nitinol engine comprising: a first L-shaped drive member journalled for pivoting horizontal oscillation about the juncture of the legs of the L-shaped member, a second drive member journalled for pivoting about a point proximate the outboard end of the shorter leg of the L-shaped member at a distance from the pivot journal of the L-shaped member, a bearing block secured to the end of longer leg of the L-shaped and having a guide hole. The second member extending through the guide hole and arranged to reciprocate therein, a shape memory alloy power element disposed in flexure secured at its ends to the bearing block and to the second member intermediate the sliding connection with the bearing block and the pivotal connection of the second member, means for disposing different temperature baths below the element whereby as the drive members oscillate about their journals the element alternately dips into one bath and then the other, and means for absorbing a portion of the energy developed by the engine and moving the power element from the cold bath to the hot bath.

  8. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, W.C.; LSND Collaboration

    1996-10-01

    The LSND (Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector) experiment at Los Alamos has conducted a search for muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations using muon neutrinos from antimuon decay at rest. The electron antineutrinos are detected via the reaction electron antineutrino + proton {r_arrow} positron + neutron, correlated with the 2.2-MeV gamma from neutron + proton {r_arrow} deuteron + gamma. The use of tight cuts to identify positron events with correlated gamma rays yields 22 events with positron energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 {+-} 0.6 background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1 {times} 10{sup -8}. A chi-squared fit to the entire positron sample results in a total excess of 51.8 {sup +18.7}{sub -16.9} {+-} 8.0 events with positron energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of (0.31 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05){percent}. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Temperature sensitive oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An oscillator circuit for sensing and indicating temperature by changing oscillator frequency with temperature comprises a programmable operational amplifier which is operated on the roll-off portion of its gain versus frequency curve and has its output directly connected to the inverting input to place the amplifier in a follower configuration. Its output is also connected to the non-inverting input by a capacitor with a crystal or other tuned circuit also being connected to the non-inverting input. A resistor is connected to the program input of the amplifier to produce a given set current at a given temperature, the set current varying with temperature. As the set current changes, the gain-bandwidth of the amplifier changes and, in turn, the reflected capacitance across the crystal changes, thereby providing the desired change in oscillator frequency by pulling the crystal. There is no requirement that a crystal employed with this circuit display either a linear frequency change with temperature or a substantial frequency change with temperature.

  10. Biochemical Oscillations and Cellular Rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbeter, Albert; Berridge, Foreword by M. J.

    1997-04-01

    1. Introduction; Part I. Glycolytic Oscillations: 2. Oscillatory enzymes: simple periodic behaviour in an allosteric model for glycolytic oscillations; Part II. From Simple to Complex Oscillatory Behaviour; 3. Birhythmicity: coexistence between two stable rhythms; 4. From simple periodic behaviour to complex oscillations, including bursting and chaos; Part III. Oscillations Of Cyclic Amo In Dictyostelium Cells: 5. Models for the periodic synthesis and relay of camp signals in Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae; 6. Complex oscillations and chaos in the camp signalling system of Dictyostelium; 7. The onset of camp oscillations in Dictyostelium as a model for the ontogenesis of biological rhythms; Part IV. Pulsatile Signalling In Intercellular Communication: 8. Function of the rhythm of intercellular communication in Dictyostelium. Link with pulsatile hormone secretion; Part V. Calcium Oscillations: 9. Oscillations and waves of intracellular calcium; Part VI. The Mitotic Oscillator: 10. Modelling the mitotic oscillator driving the cell division cycle; Part VII. Circadian Rhythms: 11. Towards a model for circadian oscillations in the Drosophila period protein (PER); 12. Conclusions and perspectives; References.

  11. Nonlinear Oscillators in Space Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester,Daniel; Thronson, Harley

    2011-01-01

    We discuss dynamical systems that produce an oscillation without an external time dependent source. Numerical results are presented for nonlinear oscillators in the Em1h's atmosphere, foremost the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBOl. These fluid dynamical oscillators, like the solar dynamo, have in common that one of the variables in a governing equation is strongly nonlinear and that the nonlinearity, to first order, has particular form. of 3rd or odd power. It is shown that this form of nonlinearity can produce the fundamental li'equency of the internal oscillation. which has a period that is favored by the dynamical condition of the fluid. The fundamental frequency maintains the oscillation, with no energy input to the system at that particular frequency. Nonlinearities of 2nd or even power could not maintain the oscillation.

  12. Improvements to a five-phase ABS algorithm for experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Mathieu; Pasillas-Lépine, William; de Vries, Edwin; Verhaegen, Michel

    2012-10-01

    The anti-lock braking system (ABS) is the most important active safety system for passenger cars. Unfortunately, the literature is not really precise about its description, stability and performance. This research improves a five-phase hybrid ABS control algorithm based on wheel deceleration [W. Pasillas-Lépine, Hybrid modeling and limit cycle analysis for a class of five-phase anti-lock brake algorithms, Veh. Syst. Dyn. 44 (2006), pp. 173-188] and validates it on a tyre-in-the-loop laboratory facility. Five relevant effects are modelled so that the simulation matches the reality: oscillations in measurements, wheel acceleration reconstruction, brake pressure dynamics, brake efficiency changes and tyre relaxation. The time delays in measurement and actuation have been identified as the main difficulty for the initial algorithm to work in practice. Three methods are proposed in order to deal with these delays. It is verified that the ABS limit cycles encircle the optimal braking point, without assuming any tyre parameter being a priori known. The ABS algorithm is compared with the commercial algorithm developed by Bosch.

  13. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-17

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2{pi} in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step {delta}t. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/{delta}t is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is ''blue shifted'' relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval {delta}t. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  14. THz Local Oscillator Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, Imran; Schlecht, Erich; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Siegel, Peter H.

    Most operational Submillimeter-wave radio telescopes, both space borne and ground based, employ local oscillator sources based on Gunn diodes followed by whisker contacted Schottky multipliers. Enough progress, however, has been made on a number of fronts to conclude that next generation of radio telescopes that become operational in the new Millennium will have a different local oscillator (LO) generation architecture. MMIC power amplifiers with impressive gain in the Ka- to-W band have enabled the use of microwave synthesizers which can then be actively multiplied to provide a frequency agile power source beyond 100 GHz. This medium power millimeter source can then be amplified to enable efficient pumping of follow-on balanced multiplier stages. Input power to the multipliers can be further enhanced by power combining to achieve close to half a Watt at W-band. An 800 GHz three-stage multiplier chain, implemented this way has demonstrated a peak output power of 1 mW. A second advance in LO generation lies in the Schottky diode varactor technology. Planar Schottky diode multipliers have now been demonstrated up to 1500 GHz and it can be assumed that most of the future multiplier chains will be based on these robust devices rather than the whisker contacted diode of the past. The ability to produce planar GaAs diode chips deep into the THz range, with submicron dimensions, has opened up a wide range of circuit design space which can be taken advantage of to improve efficiency, bandwidth, and power handling capability of the multipliers. A third breakthrough has been the demonstration of photonic based LO sources utilizing GaAs photomixers. These sources, though not yet implemented in robust space borne missions, offer a number of advantages over their electronic counterparts, including extremely broad tuning, fiber coupled components, and solid-state implementation. Another development, which holds some promise, is the use of micro-machining technology to implement

  15. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  16. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Joshua; Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards a dual species nuclear magnetic oscillator using synchronous spin exchange optical pumping. By applying the bias field as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses, we generate alkali polarization transverse to the bias field. The alkali polarization is then modulated at the noble gas resonance so that through spin exchange collisions the noble gas becomes polarized. This novel method of NMR suppresses the alkali field frequency shift by at least a factor of 2500 as compared to longitudinal NMR. We will present details of the apparatus and measurements of dual species co-magnetometry using this method. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  17. Second harmonic FEL oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, George R.; Benson, S. V.; Biallas, G.; Freund, H. P.; Gubeli, J.; Jordan, K.; Myers, S.; Shinn, M. D.

    2002-05-01

    We have produced and measured for the first time second harmonic oscillation in the infrared region by the high-average-power Jefferson Lab Infrared Free Electron Laser. The finite geometry and beam emittance allows sufficient gain for lasing to occur. We were able to lase at pulse rates up to 74.85 MHz and could produce over 4.5 W average and 40 kW peak of IR power in a 40 nm FWHM bandwidth at 2925 nm. In agreement with predictions, the source preferentially lased in a TEM 01 mode. We present results of initial source performance measurements and comparisons with theory and simulation.

  18. Second Harmonic FEL Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, George R.; Benson, S. V.; Biallas, G.; Gubeli, J.; Jordan, K.; Myers, S.; Shinn, M. D.

    2001-08-01

    We have produced and measured for the first time second harmonic oscillation in the infrared region by a free electron laser. Although such lasing is ideally forbidden, since the gain of a plane wave is zero on axis for an electron beam perfectly aligned with a wiggler, a transverse mode antisymmetry allows sufficient gain in this experiment for lasing to occur. We lased at pulse rates up to 74.85 MHz and could produce over 4.5 W average and 40 kW peak of IR power in a 40 nm FWHM bandwidth at 2925 nm. In agreement with predictions, the source preferentially lased in a TEM01 mode.

  19. Brain Oscillations, Hypnosis, and Hypnotizability

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Adachi, Tomonori; Hakimian, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we summarize the state-of-science knowledge regarding the associations between hypnosis and brain oscillations. Brain oscillations represent the combined electrical activity of neuronal assemblies, and are usually measured as specific frequencies representing slower (delta, theta, alpha) and faster (beta, gamma) oscillations. Hypnosis has been most closely linked to power in the theta band and changes in gamma activity. These oscillations are thought to play a critical role in both the recording and recall of declarative memory and emotional limbic circuits. Here we propose that it is this role that may be the mechanistic link between theta (and perhaps gamma) oscillations and hypnosis; specifically that theta oscillations may facilitate, and that changes in gamma activity observed with hypnosis may underlie, some hypnotic responses. If these hypotheses are supported, they have important implications for both understanding the effects of hypnosis, and for enhancing response to hypnotic treatments. PMID:25792761

  20. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  1. Policy oscillation is overshooting.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Paul

    2014-04-01

    A majority of approximate dynamic programming approaches to the reinforcement learning problem can be categorized into greedy value function methods and value-based policy gradient methods. The former approach, although fast, is well known to be susceptible to the policy oscillation phenomenon. We take a fresh view to this phenomenon by casting, within the context of non-optimistic policy iteration, a considerable subset of the former approach as a limiting special case of the latter. We explain the phenomenon in terms of this view and illustrate the underlying mechanism with artificial examples. We also use it to derive the constrained natural actor-critic algorithm that can interpolate between the aforementioned approaches. In addition, it has been suggested in the literature that the oscillation phenomenon might be subtly connected to the grossly suboptimal performance in the Tetris benchmark problem of all attempted approximate dynamic programming methods. Based on empirical findings, we offer a hypothesis that might explain the inferior performance levels and the associated policy degradation phenomenon, and which would partially support the suggested connection. Finally, we report scores in the Tetris problem that improve on existing dynamic programming based results by an order of magnitude. PMID:24491826

  2. Extinction of oscillating populations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Naftali R; Meerson, Baruch

    2016-03-01

    Established populations often exhibit oscillations in their sizes that, in the deterministic theory, correspond to a limit cycle in the space of population sizes. If a population is isolated, the intrinsic stochasticity of elemental processes can ultimately bring it to extinction. Here we study extinction of oscillating populations in a stochastic version of the Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey model. To this end we develop a WKB (Wentzel, Kramers and Brillouin) approximation to the master equation, employing the characteristic population size as the large parameter. Similar WKB theories have been developed previously in the context of population extinction from an attracting multipopulation fixed point. We evaluate the extinction rates and find the most probable paths to extinction from the limit cycle by applying Floquet theory to the dynamics of an effective four-dimensional WKB Hamiltonian. We show that the entropic barriers to extinction change in a nonanalytic way as the system passes through the Hopf bifurcation. We also study the subleading pre-exponential factors of the WKB approximation. PMID:27078294

  3. Extinction of oscillating populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Naftali R.; Meerson, Baruch

    2016-03-01

    Established populations often exhibit oscillations in their sizes that, in the deterministic theory, correspond to a limit cycle in the space of population sizes. If a population is isolated, the intrinsic stochasticity of elemental processes can ultimately bring it to extinction. Here we study extinction of oscillating populations in a stochastic version of the Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey model. To this end we develop a WKB (Wentzel, Kramers and Brillouin) approximation to the master equation, employing the characteristic population size as the large parameter. Similar WKB theories have been developed previously in the context of population extinction from an attracting multipopulation fixed point. We evaluate the extinction rates and find the most probable paths to extinction from the limit cycle by applying Floquet theory to the dynamics of an effective four-dimensional WKB Hamiltonian. We show that the entropic barriers to extinction change in a nonanalytic way as the system passes through the Hopf bifurcation. We also study the subleading pre-exponential factors of the WKB approximation.

  4. Neutrino Oscillations:. Hierarchy Question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, D. J.; Cogswell, B. K.; Burroughs, H. R.; Escamilla-Roa, J.; Latimer, D. L.

    2014-09-01

    The only experimentally observed phenomenon that lies outside the standard model of the electroweak interaction is neutrino oscillations. A way to try to unify the extensive neutrino oscillation data is to add a phenomenological mass term to the Lagrangian that is not diagonal in the flavor basis. The goal is then to understand the world's data in terms of the parameters of the mixing matrix and the differences between the squares of the masses of the neutrinos. An outstanding question is what is the correct ordering of the masses, the hierarchy question. We point out a broken symmetry relevant to this question, the symmetry of the simultaneous interchange of hierarchy and the sign of θ13. We first present the results of an analysis of data that well determine the phenomenological parameters but are not sensitive to the hierarchy. We find θ13 = 0.152±0.014, θ 23 = 0.25{ - 0.05}{ + 0.03} π and Δ32 = 2.45±0.14×10-3 eV2, results consistent with others. We then include data that are sensitive to the hierarchy and the sign of θ13. We find, unlike others, four isolated minimum in the χ2-space as predicted by the symmetry. Now that Daya Bay and RENO have determined θ13 to be surprisingly large, the Super-K atmospheric data produce meaningful symmetry breaking such that the inverse hierarchy is preferred at the 97.2 % level.

  5. Neutrino oscillations refitted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forero, D. V.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2014-11-01

    Here, we update our previous global fit of neutrino oscillations by including the recent results that have appeared since the Neutrino 2012 conference. These include the measurements of reactor antineutrino disappearance reported by Daya Bay and RENO, together with latest T2K and MINOS data including both disappearance and appearance channels. We also include the revised results from the third solar phase of Super-Kamiokande, SK-III, as well as new solar results from the fourth phase of Super-Kamiokande, SK-IV. We find that the preferred global determination of the atmospheric angle θ23 is consistent with maximal mixing. We also determine the impact of the new data upon all the other neutrino oscillation parameters with an emphasis on the increasing sensitivity to the C P phase, thanks to the interplay between accelerator and reactor data. In the Appendix, we present the updated results obtained after the inclusion of new reactor data presented at the Neutrino 2014 conference. We discuss their impact on the global neutrino analysis.

  6. Chemotaxis and Actin Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Negrete, Jose; Beta, Carsten; Pumir, Alain; Gholami, Azam; Tarantola, Marco; Westendorf, Christian; Zykov, Vladimir

    Recently, self-oscillations of the cytoskeletal actin have been observed in Dictyostelium, a model system for studying chemotaxis. Here we report experimental results on the self-oscillation mechanism and the role of regulatory proteins and myosin II. We stimulate cells rapidly and periodically by using photo un-caging of the chemoattractant in a micro-fluidic device and measured the cellular responses. We found that the response amplitude grows with stimulation strength only in a very narrow region of stimulation, after which the response amplitude reaches a plateau. Moreover, the frequency-response is not constant but rather varies with the strength of external stimuli. To understand the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the polymerization and de-polymerization time in the single cell level. Despite of the large cell-to-cell variability, we found that the polymerization time is independent of external stimuli and the de-polymerization time is prolonged as the stimulation strength increases. Our conclusions will be summarized and the role of noise in the signaling network will be discussed. German Science Foundation CRC 937.

  7. Socially synchronized circadian oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Guy; Herzog, Erik D.; Levine, Joel D.; Schwartz, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Daily rhythms of physiology and behaviour are governed by an endogenous timekeeping mechanism (a circadian ‘clock’). The alternation of environmental light and darkness synchronizes (entrains) these rhythms to the natural day–night cycle, and underlying mechanisms have been investigated using singly housed animals in the laboratory. But, most species ordinarily would not live out their lives in such seclusion; in their natural habitats, they interact with other individuals, and some live in colonies with highly developed social structures requiring temporal synchronization. Social cues may thus be critical to the adaptive function of the circadian system, but elucidating their role and the responsible mechanisms has proven elusive. Here, we highlight three model systems that are now being applied to understanding the biology of socially synchronized circadian oscillators: the fruitfly, with its powerful array of molecular genetic tools; the honeybee, with its complex natural society and clear division of labour; and, at a different level of biological organization, the rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus, site of the brain's circadian clock, with its network of mutually coupled single-cell oscillators. Analyses at the ‘group’ level of circadian organization will likely generate a more complex, but ultimately more comprehensive, view of clocks and rhythms and their contribution to fitness in nature. PMID:23825203

  8. Theories of white dwarf oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhorn, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of theoretical understanding of the oscillations observed in the ZZ Ceti stars and cataclysmic variables is briefly reviewed. Nonradial g-mode oscillations appear to provide a satisfactory explanation for the low amplitude variables such as R548, with periods in the range of approximately 200 to 300 seconds, but for the longer period (800 to 1000 seconds) oscillators, the situation is still unclear. Rotation may play an important role in this problem, and the effects of both slow and fast rotation upon the mode structure are discussed. In the cataclysmic variables, both accretion and thermonuclear burning may act to excite oscillations of the white dwarf.

  9. Modelling Ultradian Oscillations and Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Mogens

    2008-03-01

    We model ultradian oscillations in four different eucaryotic systems: Hes1, p53-mdm2, NF-kB and Wnt-Notch. In each of the systems we identify the feed-back loops for the genetic regulations. Oscillations are possible when time delays are present, either by directly introducing a delay, by many steps in the loops or by saturated degradation. The oscillations are important for apoptosis and control of inflammation. The Wnt-Notch system is essential in embryo segmentation and we introduce a model in which the Wnt oscillates by itself but drives the Notch cycle out of phase with the Wnt cycle, in good agreement with experimental observations.

  10. Quartz-crystal-oscillator hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, R.

    1977-01-01

    Measuring device, which eliminates complex and expensive optical components by electronically sensing dewpoint of water vapor in gas, employs piezoelectric crystal oscillator, supportive circuitry, temperature regulators, and readout.

  11. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators, or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  12. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  13. Symmetries of coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Kim, Y. S.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators possesses many interesting symmetries. It is noted that the symmetry of a single oscillator is that of the three-parameter group Sp(2). Thus two uncoupled oscillator exhibits a direct product of two Sp(2) groups, with six parameters. The coupling can be achieved through a rotation in the two-dimensional space of two oscillator coordinates. The closure of the commutation relations for the generators leads to the ten-parameter group Sp(4) which is locally isomorphic to the deSitter group O(3,2).

  14. Level Energies, Oscillator Strengths and Lifetimes for Transitions in Pb IV

    SciTech Connect

    Colon, C.; Alonso-Medina, A.; Zanon, A.; Albeniz, J.

    2008-10-22

    Oscillator strengths for several lines of astrophysical interest arising from some configurations and some levels radiative lifetimes of Pb IV have been calculated. These values were obtained in intermediate coupling (IC) and using ab initio relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations. We use for the IC calculations the standard method of least square fitting of experimental energy levels by means of computer codes from Cowan. Transition Probabilities and oscillator strengths obtained, although in general agreement with the rare experimental data, do present some noticeable discrepancies that are studied in the text.

  15. Ab interno trabeculectomy: patient selection and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vinod, Kateki; Gedde, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Ab interno trabeculectomy is one among several recently introduced minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries that avoid a conjunctival incision and full-thickness sclerostomy involved in traditional glaucoma surgery. Ablation of the trabecular meshwork and inner wall of Schlemm's canal is performed in an arcuate fashion via a clear corneal incision, alone or in combination with phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Intraocular pressure reduction following ab interno trabeculectomy is limited by resistance in distal outflow pathways and generally stabilizes in the mid-to-high teens. Relief of medication burden has been demonstrated by some studies. A very low rate of complications, most commonly transient hyphema and intraocular pressure elevations in the immediate postoperative period, have been reported. However, available data are derived from small retrospective and prospective case series. Randomized, controlled trials are needed to better elucidate the potential merits of ab interno trabeculectomy in the combined setting versus phacoemulsification cataract surgery alone and to compare it with other minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries. PMID:27574396

  16. Stable local oscillator microcircuit.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-10-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. The StaLO uses a comb generator followed by surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters. The comb generator creates a set of harmonic components of the 100MHz input signal. The SAW filters are narrow bandpass filters that are used to select the desired component and reject all others. The resulting circuit has very low sideband power levels and low phase noise (both less than -40dBc) that is limited primarily by the phase noise level of the input signal.

  17. Multifrequency optoelectronic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yang; Liang, Jianhui; Bai, Guangfu; Hu, Lin; Cai, Shaohong; Li, Hongxia; Shan, Yuanyuan; Ma, Chuang

    2014-11-01

    We propose a simple and cost-effective multifrequency optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) which is able to simultaneously generate two or more independent microwave signals by adding parallel filtering branches in the feedback loop. In the experimental demonstration, two signals with frequencies of 20 and 9 GHz are successfully generated. Compared with a conventional OEO, the generated signals have no additional noise and do not interfere with each other. The side-mode suppression by the optical dual-loop configuration is effective for both channels. The measured side-mode suppression ratios are larger than 65 dB, and the phase noises at a 10-kHz frequency offset are -108 and -113 dBc/Hz for 20 and 9-GHz signals, respectively.

  18. Galilean covariant harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horzela, Andrzej; Kapuscik, Edward

    1993-01-01

    A Galilean covariant approach to classical mechanics of a single particle is described. Within the proposed formalism, all non-covariant force laws defining acting forces which become to be defined covariantly by some differential equations are rejected. Such an approach leads out of the standard classical mechanics and gives an example of non-Newtonian mechanics. It is shown that the exactly solvable linear system of differential equations defining forces contains the Galilean covariant description of harmonic oscillator as its particular case. Additionally, it is demonstrated that in Galilean covariant classical mechanics the validity of the second Newton law of dynamics implies the Hooke law and vice versa. It is shown that the kinetic and total energies transform differently with respect to the Galilean transformations.

  19. MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: Aerosol experiments ABCOVE AB5, AB6, AB7, and LACE LA2

    SciTech Connect

    Souto, F.J.; Haskin, F.E.; Kmetyk, L.N.

    1994-10-01

    The MELCOR computer code has been used to model four of the large-scale aerosol behavior experiments conducted in the Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) vessel. Tests AB5, AB6 and AB7 of the ABCOVE program simulate the dry aerosol conditions during a hypothetical severe accident in an LMFBR. Test LA2 of the LACE program simulates aerosol behavior in a condensing steam environment during a postulated severe accident in an LWR with failure to isolate the containment. The comparison of code results to experimental data show that MELCOR is able to correctly predict most of the thermal-hydraulic results in the four tests. MELCOR predicts reasonably well the dry aerosol behavior of the ABCOVE tests, but significant disagreements are found in the aerosol behavior modelling for the LA2 experiment. These results tend to support some of the concerns about the MELCOR modelling of steam condensation onto aerosols expressed in previous works. During these analyses, a limitation in the MELCOR input was detected for the specification of the aerosol parameters for more than one component. A Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) sensitivity study of the aerosol dynamic constants is presented for test AB6. The study shows the importance of the aerosol shape factors in the aerosol deposition behavior, and reveals that MELCOR input/output processing is highly labor intensive for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses based on LHS.

  20. Longitudinal oscillation of launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    During powered flight a vehicle may develop longitudinal self-excited oscillations, so-called oscillations, of its structure. The energy supplying the vibration is tapped from the thrust by the activity of the system itself; that is, oscillation of the structure causes oscillation of the propellant system, especially of the pumps. In this way an oscillating thrust can be created that, by a feedback loop, may sustain the structural oscillation under certain circumstances. Two special features of the system proved to be essential for creation of instability. One is the effect of the inherent time interval that the thrust oscillation is lagging behind the structural oscillation. The other is the decreased of system mass caused by the exhausting of gas. The latter feature may cause an initially stable system to become unstable. To examine the stability of the system, a single mass-spring model, which is the result of a one-term Galerkin approach to the equation of motion, has been considered. The Nyquist stability criterion leads to a stability graph that shows the stability conditions in terms of the system parameter and also demonstrates the significance of time lag, feedback magnitude, and loss of mass. An important conclusion can be drawn from the analysis: large relative displacements of the pump-engine masses favor instability. This is also confirmed by flight measurements.

  1. Fano Interference in Classical Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satpathy, S.; Roy, A.; Mohapatra, A.

    2012-01-01

    We seek to illustrate Fano interference in a classical coupled oscillator by using classical analogues of the atom-laser interaction. We present an analogy between the dressed state picture of coherent atom-laser interaction and a classical coupled oscillator. The Autler-Townes splitting due to the atom-laser interaction is analogous to the…

  2. Mechanical Parametric Oscillations and Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William; Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S.

    2013-01-01

    Usually parametric oscillations are not the topic of general physics courses. Probably it is because the mathematical theory of this phenomenon is relatively complicated, and until quite recently laboratory experiments for students were difficult to implement. However parametric oscillations are good illustrations of the laws of physics and can be…

  3. Characterization of mAb dimers reveals predominant dimer forms common in therapeutic mAbs.

    PubMed

    Plath, Friederike; Ringler, Philippe; Graff-Meyer, Alexandra; Stahlberg, Henning; Lauer, Matthias E; Rufer, Arne C; Graewert, Melissa A; Svergun, Dmitri; Gellermann, Gerald; Finkler, Christof; Stracke, Jan O; Koulov, Atanas; Schnaible, Volker

    2016-07-01

    The formation of undesired high molecular weight species such as dimers is an important quality attribute for therapeutic monoclonal antibody formulations. Therefore, the thorough understanding of mAb dimerization and the detailed characterization mAb dimers is of great interest for future pharmaceutical development of therapeutic antibodies. In this work, we focused on the analyses of different mAb dimers regarding size, surface properties, chemical identity, overall structure and localization of possible dimerization sites. Dimer fractions of different mAbs were isolated to a satisfactory purity from bulk material and revealed 2 predominant overall structures, namely elongated and compact dimer forms. The elongated dimers displayed one dimerization site involving the tip of the Fab domain. Depending on the stress applied, these elongated dimers are connected either covalently or non-covalently. In contrast, the compact dimers exhibited non-covalent association. Several interaction points were detected for the compact dimers involving the hinge region or the base of the Fab domain. These results indicate that mAb dimer fractions are rather complex and may contain more than one kind of dimer. Nevertheless, the overall appearance of mAb dimers suggests the existence of 2 predominant dimeric structures, elongated and compact, which are commonly present in preparations of therapeutic mAbs. PMID:27031922

  4. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    A number of 401.2 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were built and tested. The performance of these oscillators was evaluated for possible use as stable oscillators in communication systems. A short term frequency stability of better than 1 x 10 to the minus 9th power for one second was measured for the SAW oscillators. Long term frequency drift was measured and was found to be dependent on SAW design and packaging. Drift rates ranging from 15 ppm in twenty weeks to 2.5 ppm in twenty weeks were observed. Some further improvement was required. The temperature dependence of the saw oscillators was evaluated and it was concluded that some form of temperature compensation will be necessary to meet the requirements of some communication systems.

  5. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.; Lee, D. L.; Leja, I.

    1979-01-01

    Four areas of surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were investigated and a number of 401.2 MHz oscillators were constructed that showed improved performance. Aging studies on SAW devices packaged in HC36/U cold weld enclosures produced frequency drifts as low as 0.4 ppm in 35 weeks and drift rates well under 0.5 ppm/year. Temperature compensation circuits have substantially improved oscillator temperature stability, with a deviation of + or - 4 ppm observed over the range -45 C to + 40 C. High efficiency amplifiers were constructed for SAW oscillators and a dc to RF efficiency of 44 percent was obtained for an RF output of 25 mW. Shock and vibration tests were made on four oscillators and all survived 500 G shock pulses unchanged. Only when white noise vibration (20 Hz to 2000 Hz) levels of 20 G's rms were applied did some of the devices fail.

  6. Progress in optical parametric oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Y. X.; Byer, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that tunable coherent sources are very useful for many applications, including spectroscopy, chemistry, combustion diagnostics, and remote sensing. Compared with other tunable sources, optical parametric oscillators (OPO) offer the potential advantage of a wide wavelength operating range, which extends from 0.2 micron to 25 microns. The current status of OPO is examined, taking into account mainly advances made during the last decade. Attention is given to early LiNbO3 parametric oscillators, problems which have prevented wide use of parametric oscillators, the demonstration of OPO's using urea and AgGaS2, progress related to picosecond OPO's, a breakthrough in nanosecond parametric oscillators, the first demonstration of a waveguide and fiber parametric amplification and generation, the importance of chalcopyrite crystals, and theoretical work performed with the aim to understand the factors affecting the parametric oscillator performance.

  7. Ab initio simulation of gap discrete breathers in strained graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobzenko, I. P.; Chechin, G. M.; Bezuglova, G. S.; Baimova, Yu. A.; Korznikova, E. A.; Dmitriev, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    The methods of the density functional theory were used for the first time for the simulation of discrete breathers in graphene. It is demonstrated that breathers can exist with frequencies lying in the gap of the phonon spectrum, induced by uniaxial tension of a monolayer graphene sheet in the "zigzag" direction (axis X), polarized in the "armchair" direction (axis Y). The found gap breathers are highly localized dynamic objects, the core of which is formed by two adjacent carbon atoms located on the Y axis. The atoms surrounding the core vibrate at much lower amplitudes along both the axes ( X and Y). The dependence of the frequency of these breathers on amplitude is found, which shows a soft type of nonlinearity. No breathers of this type were detected in the gap induced by stretching along the Y axis. It is shown that the breather vibrations may be approximated by the Morse oscillators, the parameters of which are determined from ab initio calculations. The results are of fundamental importance, as molecular dynamics calculations based on empirical potentials cannot serve as a reliable proof of the existence of breathers in crystals.

  8. Two Further Experiments on Electron Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteucci, G.; Pozzi, G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the results of two experiments concerning the phenomena of the interference of probabilities and of the so called Aharonov-Bohm effect. An electron biprism and a standard electron microscope have been used for the experiments. (Author/GA)

  9. Maxwell Duality, Lorentz Invariance, and Topological Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, J.; Williams, C.; Franson, J.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the Maxwell electromagnetic duality relations between the Aharonov-Bohm, Aharonov-Casher, and He-McKellar-Wilkens topological phases, which allows a unified description of all three phenomena.

  10. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggen, Lars; Voon, L. C. Lew Yan; Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten

    2016-04-01

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact calculation is given to confirm this phenomenon. Our results allow for a greater freedom of design for experimentally observing Bloch oscillations. For strongly coupled oscillator systems displaying Bloch oscillations, it is further demonstrated that reordering of oscillators leads to destruction of Bloch oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics.

  11. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    PubMed Central

    Popov, M.; Popov, V.L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  12. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, M.; Popov, V. L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-11-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed.

  13. On the Strain Rate Sensitivity of Abs and Abs Plus Fused Deposition Modeling Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vairis, A.; Petousis, M.; Vidakis, N.; Savvakis, K.

    2016-06-01

    In this work the effect of strain rate on the tensile strength of fused deposition modeling parts built with Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and ABS plus material is presented. ASTM D638-02a specimens were built with ABS and ABS plus and they were tested on a Schenck Trebel Co. tensile test machine at three different test speeds, equal, lower, and higher to the test speed required by the ASTM D638-02a standard. The experimental tensile strength results were compared and evaluated. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscope, to determine failure mode of the filament strands. It was found that, as the test speed increases, specimens develop higher tensile strength and have higher elastic modulus. Specimens tested in the highest speed of the experiment had on average about 10% higher elastic modulus and developed on average about 11% higher tensile strength.

  14. Rapid digestion of Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 in simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Herman, Rod A; Schafer, Barry W; Korjagin, Valerie A; Ernest, April D

    2003-11-01

    Two genes were identified in Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) that code for the proteins that comprise a Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 binary insecticidal crystal protein. Maize, Zea mays L., plants have been transformed to express the Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 proteins, and as a result, these plants are resistant to attack by western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, a major pest in the Midwestern corn-growing area of the U.S.A. As part of the safety assessment for the proteins, digestibility studies were conducted. Digestion experiments with both proteins demonstrated rapid degradation in simulated gastric fluid, comparable to other registered plant-incorporated protectants. Quantitative and qualitative approaches for determining digestibility are illustrated. PMID:14582981

  15. Theory of Mitotic Spindle Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Kruse, Karsten; Jülicher, Frank

    2005-03-01

    During unequal cell division the mitotic spindle is positioned away from the center of the cell before cell cleavage. In many biological systems this repositioning is accompanied by oscillatory movements of the spindle. We present a theoretical description for mitotic spindle oscillations. We show that the cooperative attachment and detachment of cortical force generators to astral microtubules leads to spontaneous oscillations beyond a critical number of force generators. This mechanism can quantitatively describe the spindle oscillations observed during unequal division of the one cell stage Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

  16. VOLTAGE-CONTROLLED TRANSISTOR OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Scheele, P.F.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to transistor oscillators and in particular to those transistor oscillators whose frequencies vary according to controlling voltages. A principal feature of the disclosed transistor oscillator circuit resides in the temperature compensation of the frequency modulating stage by the use of a resistorthermistor network. The resistor-thermistor network components are selected to have the network resistance, which is in series with the modulator transistor emitter circuit, vary with temperature to compensate for variation in the parameters of the transistor due to temperature change.

  17. Forced synchronization of quasiperiodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankevich, N. V.; Kurths, J.; Kuznetsov, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    A model of a generator of quasiperiodic oscillations forced by a periodic pulse sequence is studied. We analyze synchronization when the autonomous generator demonstrates periodic, quasiperiodic, respective weakly chaotic oscillations. For the forced quasiperiodic oscillations a picture of synchronization, consisting of small-scale and large-scale structures was uncovered. It even includes the existence of stable the three-frequency tori. For the regime of weak chaos a partial destruction of this features and of the regime of three-frequency tori are found.

  18. Analyzing Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.; Latimer, D. C.

    2007-10-26

    We provide a pedagogic derivation of the formula needed to analyze atmospheric data and then derive, for the subset of the data that are fully-contained events, an analysis tool that is quantitative and numerically efficient. Results for the full set of neutrino oscillation data are then presented. We find the following preliminary results: 1.) the sub-dominant approximation provides reasonable values for the best fit parameters for {delta}{sub 32}, {theta}{sub 23}, and {theta}{sub 13} but does not quantitatively provide the errors for these three parameters; 2.) the size of the MSW effect is suppressed in the sub-dominant approximation; 3.) the MSW effect reduces somewhat the extracted error for {delta}{sub 32}, more so for {theta}{sub 23} and {theta}{sub 13}; 4.) atmospheric data alone constrains the allowed values of {theta}{sub 13} only in the sub-dominant approximation, the full three neutrino calculations requires CHOOZ to get a clean constraint; 5.) the linear in {theta}{sub 13} terms are not negligible; and 6.) the minimum value of {theta}{sub 13} is found to be negative, but at a statistically insignificant level.

  19. Sawtooth oscillation in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Monticello, D.A.

    1989-03-01

    A three-dimensional nonlinear toroidal full MHD code, MH3D, has been used to study sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks. The profile evolution during the sawtooth crash phase compares well with experiment, but only if neoclassical resistivity is used in the rise phase. (Classical resistivity has been used in most of the previous theoretical sawtooth studies.) With neoclassical resistivity, the q value at the axis drops from 1 to about 0.8 before the crash phase, and then resets to 1 through a Kadomtsev-type complete reconnection process. This ..delta..q/sub 0/ approx. = 0.2 is much larger than ..delta..q/sub o/ approx. = 0.01, which is obtained if classical resistivity is used. The current profile is strongly peaked at the axis with a flat region around the singular surface, and is similar to the Textor profile. To understand this behavior, approximate formulas for the time behavior of current and q values are derived. A functional dependence of sawtooth period scaling is also derived. A semi-empirical scaling is found which fits the experimental data from various tokamaks. Some evidence is presented which indicates that the fast crash time is due to enhanced effective resistivity inside the singular current sheet, generated by, e.g., microinstability and electron parallel viscosity with stochastic fields at the x-point. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  1. Oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for the W xlv ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, S.; Hibbert, A.; Ramsbottom, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for W xlv transitions between levels arising from configurations 3d104s2,4p2,4d2, 3d104k4l (k = s,p,d,f and l = p,d,f), 3d94s24l (l = p,d,f) and 3d94s4p2. The model used to calculate these contained all configurations which can be constructed from the available orbitals (up to n = 4), with either a 3d10 or 3d9 core. The calculations were performed with the configuration interaction CIV3 program with the inclusion of relativistic effects achieved through the use of the Breit-Pauli approximation. We compare our ab initio energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition rates with other experimental and theoretical values available in the literature. There is generally good agreement when only levels with 3d10 cores are considered. The literature is sparse for levels in which the 3d-subshell is opened: for the majority of the fine-structure lines considered, there is either no comparison data available or substantial differences are found. This paper also investigates how the inclusion of relativistic effects can result in a significant redistribution of the oscillator strength from the LS calculations.

  2. Determination of time-reversal symmetry breaking lengths in an InGaAs interferometer array.

    PubMed

    Ren, S L; Heremans, J J; Vijeyaragunathan, S; Mishima, T D; Santos, M B

    2015-05-13

    Quantum interference oscillations due to the Aharonov-Bohm phase were measured in a ring interferometer array fabricated on a two-dimensional electron system in an InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructure. Coexisting oscillations with magnetic flux periodicity h/e and h/2e were observed and their amplitudes compared as function of applied magnetic field. The h/2e oscillations originate in time-reversed trajectories with the ring interferometers operating in Sagnac-type mode, while the h/e oscillations result from Mach-Zehnder operation. The h/2e oscillations require time-reversal symmetry and hence can be used to quantify time-reversal symmetry breaking, more particularly the fundamental mesoscopic dephasing length associated with time-reversal symmetry breaking under applied magnetic field, an effective magnetic length. The oscillation amplitudes were investigated over magnetic fields spanning 2.2 T, using Fourier transforms over short segments of 40 mT. As the magnetic field increased, the h/2e oscillation amplitude decreased due to time-reversal symmetry breaking by the local magnetic flux in the interferometer arms. A dephasing model for quantum-coherent arrays was used to experimentally quantify effective magnetic lengths. The data was then compared with analytical expressions for diffusive, ballistic and confined systems. PMID:25880699

  3. Quantum mechanics : Intellectually delicious;

    SciTech Connect

    Peshkin, M.; Vaidman, L.

    2010-03-01

    It is 50 years since the discovery of the Aharonov-Bohm effect, and 25 years since that of the Berry phase. A celebration of this double anniversary at the University of Bristol made evident that these discoveries still offer much food for thought. The meeting celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Berry phase was held on 14-15 December 2009 in the historic H. H.

  4. Ab initio infrared and Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredkin, Donald R.; Komornicki, Andrew; White, Steven R.; Wilson, Kent R.

    1983-06-01

    We discuss several ways in which molecular absorption and scattering spectra can be computed ab initio, from the fundamental constants of nature. These methods can be divided into two general categories. In the first, or sequential, type of approach, one first solves the electronic part of the Schrödinger equation in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, mapping out the potential energy, dipole moment vector (for infrared absorption) and polarizability tensor (for Raman scattering) as functions of nuclear coordinates. Having completed the electronic part of the calculation, one then solves the nuclear part of the problem either classically or quantum mechanically. As an example of the sequential ab initio approach, the infrared and Raman rotational and vibrational-rotational spectral band contours for the water molecule are computed in the simplest rigid rotor, normal mode approximation. Quantum techniques are used to calculate the necessary potential energy, dipole moment, and polarizability information at the equilibrium geometry. A new quick, accurate, and easy to program classical technique involving no reference to Euler angles or special functions is developed to compute the infrared and Raman band contours for any rigid rotor, including asymmetric tops. A second, or simultaneous, type of ab initio approach is suggested for large systems, particularly those for which normal mode analysis is inappropriate, such as liquids, clusters, or floppy molecules. Then the curse of dimensionality prevents mapping out in advance the complete potential, dipole moment, and polarizability functions over the whole space of nuclear positions of all atoms, and a solution in which the electronic and nuclear parts of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation are simultaneously solved is needed. A quantum force classical trajectory (QFCT) molecular dynamic method, based on linear response theory, is described, in which the forces, dipole moment, and polarizability are computed quantum

  5. Dynamics of hierarchical Brownian oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, E. W.

    1988-11-01

    Two hierarchical Brownian oscillator models are introduced by using a discretized Brownian oscillator model. The dynamical behavior of these models is solved exactly. Closed-form expressions for the intermediate scattering function and the energy relaxation function governing the frequency-dependent specific heat are given. A general relationship between the two relaxation functions is established. The case of a rectangular distribution of activation energies for the different hierarchy levels of the oscillator is considered in more detail. There the energy relaxation function decays with a logarithmic slope and the intermediate scattering function exhibits an algebraic long-time decay. The two hierarchical Brownian oscillator models have the same dynamical behavior though they possess a quite different coupling scheme.

  6. Brain oscillations in neuropsychiatric disease.

    PubMed

    Başar, Erol

    2013-09-01

    The term "brain (or neural) oscillations" refers to the rhythmic and/or repetitive electrical activity generated spontaneously and in response to stimuli by neural tissue in the central nervous system. The importance of brain oscillations in sensory-cognitive processes has become increasingly evident. It has also become clear that event-related oscillations are modified in many types of neuropathology, in particular in cognitive impairment. This review discusses methods such as evoked/event-related oscillations and spectra, coherence analysis, and phase locking. It gives examples of applications of essential methods and concepts in bipolar disorder that provide a basis for fundamental notions regarding neurophysiologic biomarkers in cognitive impairment. The take-home message is that in the development of diagnostic and pharmacotherapeutic strategies, neurophysiologic data should be analyzed in a framework that uses a multiplicity of methods and frequency bands. PMID:24174901

  7. Transient voltage oscillations in coils

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    Magnet coils may be excited into internal voltage oscillations by transient voltages. Such oscillations may electrically stress the magnet's dielectric components to many times its normal stress. This may precipitate a dielectric failure, and the attendant prolonged loss of service and costly repair work. Therefore, it is important to know the natural frequencies of oscillations of a magnet during the design stage, and to determine whether the expected switching transient voltages can excite the magnet into high-voltage internal oscillations. The series capacitance of a winding significantly affects its natural frequencies. However, the series capacitance is difficult to calculate, because it may comprise complex capacitance network, consisting of intra- and inter-coil turn-to-turn capacitances of the coil sections. A method of calculating the series capacitance of a winding is proposed. This method is rigorous but simple to execute. The time-varying transient voltages along the winding are also calculated.

  8. Results from Neutrino Oscillations Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis

    2010-09-10

    The interpretation of the results of early solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments in terms of neutrino oscillations has been verified by several recent experiments using both, natural and man-made sources. The observations provide compelling evidence in favor of the existence of neutrino masses and mixings. These proceedings give a general description of the results from neutrino oscillation experiments, the current status of the field, and some possible future developments.

  9. Wavelet Analysis of Umbral Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopoulou, E. B.; Skodras, A.; Georgakilas, A. A.; Koutchmy, S.

    2003-07-01

    We study the temporal behavior of the intensity and velocity chromospheric umbral oscillations, applying wavelet analysis techniques to four sets of observations in the Hα line and one set of simultaneous observations in the Hα and the nonmagnetic Fe I (5576.099 Å) line. The wavelet and Fourier power spectra of the intensity and the velocity at chromospheric levels show both 3 and 5 minute oscillations. Oscillations in the 5 minute band are prominent in the intensity power spectra; they are significantly reduced in the velocity power spectra. We observe multiple peaks of closely spaced cospatial frequencies in the 3 minute band (5-8 mHz). Typically, there are three oscillating modes present: (1) a major one near 5.5 mHz, (2) a secondary near 6.3 mHz, and (3) oscillations with time-varying frequencies around 7.5 mHz that are present for limited time intervals. In the frame of current theories, the oscillating mode near 5.5 mHz should be considered as a fingerprint of the photospheric resonator, while the other two modes can be better explained by the chromospheric resonator. The wavelet spectra show a dynamic temporal behavior of the 3 minute oscillations. We observed (1) frequency drifts, (2) modes that are stable over a long time and then fade away or split up into two oscillation modes, and (3) suppression of frequencies for short time intervals. This behavior can be explained by the coupling between modes closely spaced in frequency or/and by long-term variations of the driving source of the resonators. Based on observations performed on the National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak Observatory Richard B. Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) and on the Big Bear Solar Observatory Harold Zirin Telescope.

  10. DETECTING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Labatie, A.; Starck, J. L.

    2012-02-20

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) are a feature imprinted in the galaxy distribution by acoustic waves traveling in the plasma of the early universe. Their detection at the expected scale in large-scale structures strongly supports current cosmological models with a nearly linear evolution from redshift z Almost-Equal-To 1000 and the existence of dark energy. In addition, BAOs provide a standard ruler for studying cosmic expansion. In this paper, we focus on methods for BAO detection using the correlation function measurement {xi}-hat. For each method, we want to understand the tested hypothesis (the hypothesis H{sub 0} to be rejected) and the underlying assumptions. We first present wavelet methods which are mildly model-dependent and mostly sensitive to the BAO feature. Then we turn to fully model-dependent methods. We present the method used most often based on the {chi}{sup 2} statistic, but we find that it has limitations. In general the assumptions of the {chi}{sup 2} method are not verified, and it only gives a rough estimate of the significance. The estimate can become very wrong when considering more realistic hypotheses, where the covariance matrix of {xi}-hat depends on cosmological parameters. Instead, we propose to use the {Delta}l method based on two modifications: we modify the procedure for computing the significance and make it rigorous, and we modify the statistic to obtain better results in the case of varying covariance matrix. We verify with simulations that correct significances are different from the ones obtained using the classical {chi}{sup 2} procedure. We also test a simple example of varying covariance matrix. In this case we find that our modified statistic outperforms the classical {chi}{sup 2} statistic when both significances are correctly computed. Finally, we find that taking into account variations of the covariance matrix can change both BAO detection levels and cosmological parameter constraints.

  11. Collective rotation from ab initio theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprio, Mark A.; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.

    2015-10-01

    The challenge of ab initio nuclear theory is to quantitatively predict the complex and highly-correlated behavior of the nuclear many-body system, starting from the underlying internucleon interactions. We may now seek to understand the wealth of nuclear collective phenomena through ab initio approaches. No-core configuration interaction (NCCI) calculations for p-shell nuclei give rise to rotational bands, as evidenced by rotational patterns for excitation energies, electromagnetic moments, and electromagnetic transitions. In this talk, the intrinsic structure of these bands is discussed, and the predicted rotational bands are compared to experiment. Supported by the US DOE under Award Nos. DE-FG02-95ER-40934, DESC0008485 (SciDAC/NUCLEI), and DE-FG02-87ER40371 and the US NSF under Award No. 0904782. Computational resources provided by NERSC (US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231).

  12. Ab initio infrared and Raman spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredkin, D. R.; White, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.; Komornicki, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that with increased computer power and improved computational techniques, such as the gradients developed in recent years, it is becoming practical to compute spectra ab initio, from the fundamental constants of nature, for systems of increasing complexity. The present investigation has the objective to explore several possible ab initio approaches to spectra, giving particular attention to infrared and nonresonance Raman. Two approaches are discussed. The sequential approach, in which first the electronic part and then later the nuclear part of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is solved, is appropriate for small systems. The simultaneous approach, in which the electronic and nuclear parts are solved at the same time, is more appropriate for many-atom systems. A review of the newer quantum gradient techniques is provided, and the infrared and Raman spectral band contours for the water molecule are computed.

  13. Interaction of vermiculite with Katamin AB

    SciTech Connect

    Veksler, V.I.; Makashev, Yu.A.; Mikhailova, V.N.; Aleksandrova, E.M.; Vinogradova, I.A.

    1986-12-10

    Vermiculite can interact with quaternary ammonium salts to form organmineral compounds in the ion-exchange adsorption of these salts from waste water. This paper investigates this interaction between vermiculite and Katamin AB, a commercial cationic surfactant consisting of an aqueous solution of alkylbenyldimethylammonium chloride homologs. It is shown that ion exchange and molecular sorption occur simultaneously during the interaction and that vermiculite is a highly effective adsorbent in process water purification.

  14. Ab initio vel ex eventu. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, P. A.; Treder, H.-J.

    Jedes initium wird durch experimenta crucis zum eventus. Jedes theoretisch interpretierbare ex-eventu-Resultat führt auf ein neues Initium. Gerade dies ist die gemeinsame Aussage von Atomistik, Quantenmechanik und Relativitätstheorie.Translated AbstractAb initio vel ex eventu. IIEvery initium becomes an eventus by experimenta crucis. Every theoretically interpretable ex-eventu result leads to a new initium. Right this is the joint assertion of atomism, quantum mechanics, and relativity.

  15. Ab initio Bogoliubov coupled cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signoracci, Angelo; Hagen, Gaute; Duguet, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Coupled cluster (CC) theory has become a standard method in nuclear theory for realistic ab initio calculations of medium mass nuclei, but remains limited by its requirement of a Slater determinant reference state which reasonably approximates the nuclear system of interest. Extensions of the method, such as equation-of-motion CC, permit the calculation of nuclei with one or two nucleons added or removed from a doubly magic core, yet still only a few dozen nuclei are accessible with modern computational restrictions. In order to extend the applicability of ab initio methods to open-shell systems, the superfluid nature of nuclei must be taken into account. By utilizing Bogoliubov algebra and employing spontaneous symmetry breaking with respect to particle number conservation, superfluid systems can be treated by a single reference state. An ab initio theory to include correlations on top of a Bogoliubov reference state has been developed in the guise of standard CC theory. The formalism and first results of this Bogoliubov coupled cluster theory will be presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method.

  16. Ab interno trabeculectomy: patient selection and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vinod, Kateki; Gedde, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Ab interno trabeculectomy is one among several recently introduced minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries that avoid a conjunctival incision and full-thickness sclerostomy involved in traditional glaucoma surgery. Ablation of the trabecular meshwork and inner wall of Schlemm’s canal is performed in an arcuate fashion via a clear corneal incision, alone or in combination with phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Intraocular pressure reduction following ab interno trabeculectomy is limited by resistance in distal outflow pathways and generally stabilizes in the mid-to-high teens. Relief of medication burden has been demonstrated by some studies. A very low rate of complications, most commonly transient hyphema and intraocular pressure elevations in the immediate postoperative period, have been reported. However, available data are derived from small retrospective and prospective case series. Randomized, controlled trials are needed to better elucidate the potential merits of ab interno trabeculectomy in the combined setting versus phacoemulsification cataract surgery alone and to compare it with other minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries. PMID:27574396

  17. Ab-inition melting curve of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Vincent; Bouchet, Johann; Bottin, Francois

    2014-03-01

    Thermodynamical properties of titanium are of great interest for aerospace and aviation industries and many studies are done in order to understand its behaviour under pressure (P) and temperature (T) : phase transitions at low T, melting curve at high T and P. In this work we compute the first ab-initio melting curve of titanium. This one is obtained with the Abinit package using DFT, in the GGA approximation, and in the framework of the projector augmented wave method (PAW). At first, we perform ground state calculations and study the five allotropic phases of titanium. Two PAW atomic data are generated with two different cutoff radius. The larger one gives results near previews ab-initio calculations, whereas the smaller one gives results near all electron calculation. Using the second PAW atomic data and performing ab-initio molecular dynamic simulations, we then compute the melting curve of titanium with three different methods. Results show relevance of our calculations, but also discrepencies with experimental data.

  18. Magnetically Coupled Magnet-Spring Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoso, G.; Ladera, C. L.; Martin, P.

    2010-01-01

    A system of two magnets hung from two vertical springs and oscillating in the hollows of a pair of coils connected in series is a new, interesting and useful example of coupled oscillators. The electromagnetically coupled oscillations of these oscillators are experimentally and theoretically studied. Its coupling is electromagnetic instead of…

  19. Nonlinear oscillations of coalescing magnetic flux ropes.

    PubMed

    Kolotkov, Dmitrii Y; Nakariakov, Valery M; Rowlands, George

    2016-05-01

    An analytical model of highly nonlinear oscillations occurring during a coalescence of two magnetic flux ropes, based upon two-fluid hydrodynamics, is developed. The model accounts for the effect of electric charge separation, and describes perpendicular oscillations of the current sheet formed by the coalescence. The oscillation period is determined by the current sheet thickness, the plasma parameter β, and the oscillation amplitude. The oscillation periods are typically greater or about the ion plasma oscillation period. In the nonlinear regime, the oscillations of the ion and electron concentrations have a shape of a narrow symmetric spikes. PMID:27300993

  20. The source of solar oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, R.

    1999-05-01

    In this study the role of line asymmetry and phase difference between velocity and intensity helioseismic spectra for understanding the excitation of solar oscillations is discussed. The solar intensity and velocity oscillations are usually observed from variations in an absorption line. These variations consist of two parts: solar oscillation modes and granulation noise. Because the oscillation modes are excited by granulation, we argue that the granulation signal (noise) is partially correlated with the oscillations. The data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) have clearly revealed a reversal of asymmetry between velocity and intensity power spectra. We have shown that the cause of reversal in asymmetry between velocity and intensity power spectra is due to the presence of the correlated noise in the intensity data. This noise is also responsible for the high-frequency shift in the two spectra at and above the acoustic cutoff frequency. Our theory also explains the deviation of the observed phase difference between velocity and intensity from that predicted by simple adiabatic theory of solar oscillations. The observed phase, jumps in the vicinity of an eigenfrequency, but theory does not explain such jumps. We studied different types of excitation sources at various depths and found that monopole and quadrupole acoustic sources when placed in the superadiabatic layer (at a depth of 75 km below the photosphere) match the observations. For these source types, the sign of the correlation is negative corresponding to photospheric darkening. Finally, an asymmetric fitting formula is used to determine the eigenfrequencies of solar oscillations by fitting both the velocity and intensity power spectra.

  1. The Source of Solar Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, R.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    1998-12-01

    In this study the role of line asymmetry and phase difference between velocity and intensity helioseismic spectra for understanding the excitation of solar oscillations is discussed. The solar intensity and velocity oscillations are usually observed from variations in an absorption line. These variations consist of two parts: solar oscillation modes and granulation noise. Because the oscillation modes are excited by granulation, we argue that the granulation signal (noise) is partially correlated with the oscillations. The data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) have clearly revealed a reversal of asymmetry between velocity and intensity power spectra. We have shown that the cause of reversal in asymmetry between velocity and intensity power spectra is due to the presence of the correlated noise in the intensity data. This noise is also responsible for the high-frequency shift in the two spectra at and above the acoustic cutoff frequency. Our theory also explains the deviation of the observed phase difference between velocity and intensity from that predicted by simple adiabatic theory of solar oscillations. The observed phase, jumps in the vicinity of an eigenfrequency, but theory does not explain such jumps. We studied different types of excitation sources at various depths and found that monopole and quadrupole acoustic sources when placed in the superadiabatic layer (at a depth of 75 km below the photosphere) match the observations. For these source types, the sign of the correlation is negative corresponding to photospheric darkening. Finally, an asymmetric fitting formula is used to determine the eigenfrequencies of solar oscillations by fitting both the velocity and intensity power spectra.

  2. Fano quadrupole in a nanoscale ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satanin, Arkady; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2005-03-01

    In solid state systems such as Aharonov-Bohm (AB) rings, two-dimensional electronic waveguides, and barriers, interference of a localized wave with propagating states produces Fano resonances in the conductance. The scattering amplitude near a Fano zero-pole pair behaves like the amplitude of a dipole when the pole and the zero play the roles of a particle and an antiparticle, respectively [1]. This separate Fano-dipole has been already observed in the AB ring with an embedded quantum dot (QD) [2]. In the present work, we examine new effects on the collision of Fano dipoles and its manifestation in the transmission. The numerical results for a realistic AB ring with two embedded QD's will be presented. We show that the two Fano-dipoles form a new quasi-particle, which behaves as a coupled object -- the Fano quadrupole. This property gives an additional possibility of manipulating transmission resonances (a collapse of particle and hole) in a nanoscale ring by changing the parameters of the system. We discuss an analogy of Fano collision in an AB ring and a γ-X barrier [3]. [1] Z. Shao et al., PRB 49, 7453 (1994). [2] K. Kobayashi, et al. PRL, 85, 256806 (2002). [3] R. C. Bowen, et al. PRB 52, 2754 (1995).

  3. Ab initio no-core shell model with continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, Petr

    2008-04-01

    The ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) is a many-body approach to nuclear structure of light nuclei. The NCSM adopts an effective interaction theory to transform fundamental inter-nucleon interactions into effective interactions for a specified nucleus in a selected harmonic oscillator basis space [1]. The method is capable of predicting nuclear structure from inter-nucleon forces derived from quantum chromodynamics by means of chiral effective field theory [2]. NCSM extensions to the microscopic description of nuclear reactions are now under development. In my talk, I will first discuss our recent calculations of the ^4He total photo-absorption cross section using two- and three-nucleon interactions from chiral effective field theory [3]. I will then outline our effort to augment the NCSM by the resonating group method (RGM) technique to develop a new method capable of describing simultaneously both bound states and nuclear reactions on light nuclei [4]. This approach, which preserves translational symmetry and the Pauli principle, will allow us to calculate cross sections of reactions important for astrophysics and describe weakly-bound systems from first principles. I will present our first phase shift results for neutron scattering off ^3H, ^4He and ^7Li and proton scattering off ^3He, ^4He and ^7Be using realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials. 3mm [1] P. Navr'atil, J. P. Vary and B. R. Barrett, Phys. Rev. C 62, 054311 (2000). [2] P. Navr'atil and V. G. Gueorguiev and J. P. Vary, W. E. Ormand and A. Nogga, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 042501 (2007). [3] S. Quaglioni and P. Navr'atil, Phys. Lett. B 652, 370 (2007). [4] S. Quaglioni and P. Navr'atil, arXiv:0712.0855.

  4. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2015-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a “worship”. Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In contrast, situations where the central flames are suppressed are also found. The phenomena leads to in-phase synchronised states emerging between periods of anti-phase synchronisation for arrays with different columnar sizes of candle and positioning. PMID:26582365

  5. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2015-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a "worship". Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In contrast, situations where the central flames are suppressed are also found. The phenomena leads to in-phase synchronised states emerging between periods of anti-phase synchronisation for arrays with different columnar sizes of candle and positioning. PMID:26582365

  6. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2015-11-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a “worship”. Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In contrast, situations where the central flames are suppressed are also found. The phenomena leads to in-phase synchronised states emerging between periods of anti-phase synchronisation for arrays with different columnar sizes of candle and positioning.

  7. Synthetic in vitro transcriptional oscillators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongmin; Winfree, Erik

    2011-02-01

    The construction of synthetic biochemical circuits from simple components illuminates how complex behaviors can arise in chemistry and builds a foundation for future biological technologies. A simplified analog of genetic regulatory networks, in vitro transcriptional circuits, provides a modular platform for the systematic construction of arbitrary circuits and requires only two essential enzymes, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and Escherichia coli ribonuclease H, to produce and degrade RNA signals. In this study, we design and experimentally demonstrate three transcriptional oscillators in vitro. First, a negative feedback oscillator comprising two switches, regulated by excitatory and inhibitory RNA signals, showed up to five complete cycles. To demonstrate modularity and to explore the design space further, a positive-feedback loop was added that modulates and extends the oscillatory regime. Finally, a three-switch ring oscillator was constructed and analyzed. Mathematical modeling guided the design process, identified experimental conditions likely to yield oscillations, and explained the system's robust response to interference by short degradation products. Synthetic transcriptional oscillators could prove valuable for systematic exploration of biochemical circuit design principles and for controlling nanoscale devices and orchestrating processes within artificial cells. PMID:21283141

  8. Large amplitude drop shape oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental study of large amplitude drop shape oscillation was conducted in immiscible liquids systems and with levitated free liquid drops in air. In liquid-liquid systems the results indicate the existence of familiar characteristics of nonlinear phenomena. The resonance frequency of the fundamental quadrupole mode of stationary, low viscosity Silicone oil drops acoustically levitated in water falls to noticeably low values as the amplitude of oscillation is increased. A typical, experimentally determined relative frequency decrease of a 0.5 cubic centimeters drop would be about 10% when the maximum deformed shape is characterized by a major to minor axial ratio of 1.9. On the other hand, no change in the fundamental mode frequency could be detected for 1 mm drops levitated in air. The experimental data for the decay constant of the quadrupole mode of drops immersed in a liquid host indicate a slight increase for larger oscillation amplitudes. A qualitative investigation of the internal fluid flows for such drops revealed the existence of steady internal circulation within drops oscillating in the fundamental and higher modes. The flow field configuration in the outer host liquid is also significantly altered when the drop oscillation amplitude becomes large.

  9. Undoing Gender Through Legislation and Schooling: the Case of AB 537 and AB 394 IN California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knotts, Greg

    2009-11-01

    This article investigates California laws AB 537: The Student Safety and Violence Prevention Act of 2000, and the recently enacted AB 394: Safe Place to Learn Act. Both demand that gender identity and sexual orientation be added to the lexicon of anti-harassment protection in public education. However, despite these progressive measures, schools have an unconscious acceptance of heteronormativity and gendered norms, which undermines both the spirit and language of these laws. This paper examines how California schools can both change standard practices and realise the transformative social change that laws like AB 537 and AB 394 can instigate. I assert that the systemic implementation of these laws, through the adoption, enforcement and evaluation of existing AB 537 Task Force Recommendations, is necessary for their success. My second assertion is that AB 537 and AB 394 have the potential to change and reconstitute gender-based and heteronormative standards at school sites.

  10. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  11. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  12. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  13. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  14. [Low-Frequency Flow Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.

    1997-01-01

    The results of the research conducted under this grant are presented in detail in three Master theses, by Heinrich, Balow, and Broeren. Additional analysis of the experimental data can be found in two AIAA Journal articles and two conference papers. Citations for all of the studies' publications can be found in the bibliography which is attached. The objective of Heinrich's study was to document the low-frequency flow oscillation on the LRN-1007 airfoil, which had been previously observed at low Reynolds number, to determine its origin, and explore the phenomenon at higher Reynolds number. Heinrich performed detailed flow visualization on the airfoil using surface fluorescent oil and laser-sheet off-body visualization. A large leading-edge separation bubble and trailing-edge separation was identified on the airfoil just prior to the onset of the unsteady stall flow oscillation. From the laser-sheet data, the unsteady flow appeared as a massive boundary-layer separation followed by flow reattachment. Hot-wire data were taken in the wake to identify the presence of the flow oscillation and the dominant frequency. The oscillation was found in the flow from a Reynolds number of 0.3 to 1.3 x 10 exp 6. The Strouhal number based on airfoil projected height was nominally 0.02 and increased slightly with increasing Reynolds number and significantly with increasing airfoil angle of attack. Balow focused his research on the leading-edge separation bubble which was hypothesized to be the origin of the low-frequency oscillation. Initially, experimental measurements in the bubble at the onset of the low-frequency oscillation were attempted to study the characteristics of the bubble and explain possible relationships to the shear-layer-flapping phenomena. Unfortunately, the bubble proved to be extremely sensitive to the probe interference and it drastically reduced the size of the bubble. These detailed measurements were then abandoned by Balow. However, this led to a series of

  15. An ab initio calculation of the rotational-vibrational energies in the electronic ground state of NH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Per; Buenker, Robert J.; Hirsch, Gerhard; Rai, Sachchida N.

    We have calculated ab initio the three-dimensional potential-energy surface of the NH2 molecule at 145 nuclear geometries spanning energy ranges of about 18 000 cm-1 for the NH stretch and 12 000 cm-1 for the bend. The ab initio configuration-interaction calculations were done using the multireference MRD-CI method. The calculated equilibrium configuration has NH bond length re = 1·0207 Å and bond angle α = 103·1°. The rotational-vibrational energies for 14NH2, 14NHD and 14ND2 were calculated variationally using the Morse-oscillator rigid-bender internal-dynamics Hamiltonian. For 14NH2 we calculate that υ1 = 3267 (3219) cm-1, υ2 = 1462 (1497) cm-1 and υ3 = 3283 (3301) cm-1, where experimental values are given in parentheses.

  16. Oscillations of solar atmosphere neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Mirizzi, A.; Montanino, D.; Serpico, P. D.

    2006-11-01

    The Sun is a source of high-energy neutrinos (E(greater-or-similar sign)10 GeV) produced by cosmic ray interactions in the solar atmosphere. We study the impact of three-flavor oscillations (in vacuum and in matter) on solar atmosphere neutrinos, and calculate their observable fluxes at Earth, as well as their event rates in a kilometer-scale detector in water or ice. We find that peculiar three-flavor oscillation effects in matter, which can occur in the energy range probed by solar atmosphere neutrinos, are significantly suppressed by averaging over the production region and over the neutrino and antineutrino components. In particular, we find that the relation between the neutrino fluxes at the Sun and at the Earth can be approximately expressed in terms of phase-averaged vacuum oscillations, dominated by a single mixing parameter (the angle {theta}{sub 23})

  17. Nonstationary oscillations in gyrotrons revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Kalis, H.

    2015-05-15

    Development of gyrotrons requires careful understanding of different regimes of gyrotron oscillations. It is known that in the planes of the generalized gyrotron variables: cyclotron resonance mismatch and dimensionless current or cyclotron resonance mismatch and dimensionless interaction length complicated alternating sequences of regions of stationary, periodic, automodulation, and chaotic oscillations exist. In the past, these regions were investigated on the supposition that the transit time of electrons through the interaction space is much shorter than the cavity decay time. This assumption is valid for short and/or high diffraction quality resonators. However, in the case of long and/or low diffraction quality resonators, which are often utilized, this assumption is no longer valid. In such a case, a different mathematical formalism has to be used for studying nonstationary oscillations. One example of such a formalism is described in the present paper.

  18. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, L.D.; Ballard, W.P.; Clark, M.C.; Marder, B.M.

    1987-05-19

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields are produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap. 11 figs.

  19. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, Larry D.; Ballard, William P.; Clark, M. Collins; Marder, Barry M.

    1988-01-01

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields arfe produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap.

  20. Ab initio melting curve of osmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burakovsky, L.; Burakovsky, N.; Preston, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    The melting curve of osmium up to a pressure P of 500 GPa is obtained from an extensive suite of ab initio quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations using the Z method. The ab initio P =0 melting point of Os is 3370 ±75 K; this range encompasses all of the available data in the literature and corroborates the conclusion of J. W. Arblaster [Platinum Metals Rev. 49, 166 (2005)], 10.1595/147106705X70264 that the melting temperature of pure Os is 3400 ±50 K and that the 3300 K typically quoted in the literature is the melting point of impure Os. The T =0 equation of state (EOS) of Os and the P dependence of the optimized c /a ratio for the hexagonal unit cell, both to pressures ˜900 GPa, are obtained in the ab initio approach as validation of its use. Although excellent agreement with the available experimental data (P ≲80 GPa) is found, it is the third-order Birch-Murnaghan EOS with B0'=5 rather than the more widely accepted B0'=4 that describes the QMD data to higher pressures, in agreement with the more recent experimental EOS by Godwal et al. The theoretical melting curve of Os obtained earlier by Joshi et al. is shown to be inconsistent with our QMD results, and the possible reason for this discrepancy is suggested. Regularities in the melting curves of Os and five other third-row transition metals (Ta, W, Re, Pt, Au) could be used to estimate the currently unknown melting curves of Hf and Ir.

  1. High power radial klystron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Arman, M.J.

    1995-11-01

    The advantages of the radial klystron amplifier over the conventional klystron amplifier have been reported by Arman et al. Briefly, the radial structure of this design allows for much smaller impedances and thus higher power, the beam-cavity coupling is stronger because the beam travels inside the cavity, and the source is much more compact because there is no need for external magnetic fields. Here the author reports on possible advantages of the radial klystron oscillator over the radial klystron amplifier. The amplifying nature of certain HPM sources is often mandated by the requirement for synchronization and phase-locking of a number of sources in specific applications. In situations where amplification is solely adhered to for the purpose of achieving higher powers, the oscillator will be a better choice if a mechanism can be found to grow the desired mode at the required frequency. By switching to the oscillator mode there will be no need for priming the cavity or maintaining the phase. This simplifies the design and reduces the operational and maintenance cost of the source. Here he reports that an oscillator version of the radial klystron is possible and in fact more suitable for many applications. The mechanism for exciting and growing the mode will be transit-time effects thus providing all the beneficial features of the transit-time oscillators. The complications due to the presence of thin foils in the radial design still persist and will be dealt with in subsequent works. Numerical simulations using the PIC codes MAGIC and SOS indicate the radial klystron oscillator is a viable and efficient means of rf generation.

  2. New challenges to medicare beneficiary access to mAbs

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Precision binding of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to biological targets, their relative clinical success, and expansion of indications following initial approval, are distinctive clinical features. The relatively high cost of mAbs, together with the absence of a regulatory pathway to generics, stand out as distinctive economic features. Based on both literature review and primary data collection we enumerated mAb original approvals, supplemental indications and off-label uses, assessed payer formulary management of mAbs, and determined new challenges to Medicare beneficiary access to mAbs. We found that the FDA has approved 22 mAbs and 30 supplemental indications pertaining to the originally approved mAbs. In addition, there are 46 off-label use citations in officially recognized pharmaceutical compendia. Across Part B carriers and Part D plans, we found considerable variation in terms of coverage and conditions of reimbursement related to on- and off-label uses of mAbs. Our results point to four major challenges facing mAb developers, health care providers, Medicare beneficiaries, payers and policymakers. These include administrative price controls, coverage variation, projected shift from physician- to self-administered mAbs, and comparative effectiveness. We suggest more systematic use of “coverage with evidence development” as a means of optimally addressing these challenges. PMID:20046575

  3. Ab initio quantum chemistry: Methodology and applications

    PubMed Central

    Friesner, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    This Perspective provides an overview of state-of-the-art ab initio quantum chemical methodology and applications. The methods that are discussed include coupled cluster theory, localized second-order Moller–Plesset perturbation theory, multireference perturbation approaches, and density functional theory. The accuracy of each approach for key chemical properties is summarized, and the computational performance is analyzed, emphasizing significant advances in algorithms and implementation over the past decade. Incorporation of a condensed-phase environment by means of mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics or self-consistent reaction field techniques, is presented. A wide range of illustrative applications, focusing on materials science and biology, are discussed briefly. PMID:15870212

  4. Testing Distributed ABS System with Fault Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trawczyński, Dawid; Sosnowski, Janusz; Gawkowski, Piotr

    The paper deals with the problem of adapting software implemented fault injection technique (SWIFI) to evaluate dependability of reactive microcontroller systems. We present an original methodology of disturbing controller operation and analyzing fault effects taking into account reactions of the controlled object and the impact of the system environment. Faults can be injected randomly (in space and time) or targeted at the most sensitive elements of the controller to check it at high stresses. This approach allows identifying rarely encountered problems, usually missed in classical approaches. The developed methodology has been used successfully to verify dependability of ABS system. Experimental results are commented in the paper.

  5. Smart contact oscillations by IPMCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, H.; Asaka, K.; Su, J.; Poubel, L.; Shahinpoor, M.

    2016-02-01

    An ion migration-induced self-oscillation phenomenon observed in ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) is reported. These oscillations are generated from a purely static equilibrium configuration of IPMCs in loose contact with a stationary electrode, and in particular the anode of an imposed DC voltage source. Many interesting possibilities emerge, which are described in this paper. Of particular importance is the emergence of the possibility of creating tailor-made electric signals or pulse-width modulation-type signals from a DC source.

  6. Cherenkov radiation oscillator without reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Wang, Y.; Wei, Y.; Yang, Z.; Hangyo, M.; Miyamoto, S.

    2014-05-12

    This Letter presents a Cherenkov radiation oscillator with an electron beam travelling over a finitely thick plate made of negative-index materials. In such a scheme, the external reflectors required in the traditional Cherenkov oscillators are not necessary, since the electromagnetic energy flows backward in the negative-index materials, leading to inherent feedback. We theoretically analyzed the interaction between the electron beam and the electromagnetic wave, and worked out the growth rate and start current through numerical calculations. With the help of particle-in-cell simulation, the theoretical predictions are well demonstrated.

  7. Mixed-mode oscillation suppression states in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debarati; Banerjee, Tanmoy

    2015-11-01

    We report a collective dynamical state, namely the mixed-mode oscillation suppression state where the steady states of the state variables of a system of coupled oscillators show heterogeneous behaviors. We identify two variants of it: The first one is a mixed-mode death (MMD) state, which is an interesting oscillation death state, where a set of variables show dissimilar values, while the rest arrive at a common value. In the second mixed death state, bistable and monostable nontrivial homogeneous steady states appear simultaneously to a different set of variables (we refer to it as the MNAD state). We find these states in the paradigmatic chaotic Lorenz system and Lorenz-like system under generic coupling schemes. We identify that while the reflection symmetry breaking is responsible for the MNAD state, the breaking of both the reflection and translational symmetries result in the MMD state. Using a rigorous bifurcation analysis we establish the occurrence of the MMD and MNAD states, and map their transition routes in parameter space. Moreover, we report experimental observation of the MMD and MNAD states that supports our theoretical results. We believe that this study will broaden our understanding of oscillation suppression states; subsequently, it may have applications in many real physical systems, such as laser and geomagnetic systems, whose mathematical models mimic the Lorenz system.

  8. Empirical formula of crustal torsional oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, Hajime

    2016-02-01

    Crustal torsional oscillations depend on not only crust properties but also the stellar mass and radius. Thus, one could extract stellar information by identifying the observed frequencies of stellar oscillations with the crustal torsional oscillations. Owing to the confinement of torsional oscillations inside the crust region of neutron stars, we successfully derive an empirical formula for the fundamental crustal torsional oscillations as a function of the stellar mass, radius, the so-called slope parameter of the nuclear symmetry energy, and the angular index of oscillations, with which one can estimate the frequencies with high accuracy. This empirical formula could be valuable in both the astrophysics and nuclear physics communities.

  9. Calculations of combustion response profiles and oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priem, Richard J.; Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-01-01

    The theory and procedures for determining the characteristics of pressure oscillations in rocket engines with prescribed burning rate oscillations are presented. Pressure and velocity oscillations calculated using this procedure are presented for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) to show the influence of baffles and absorbers on the burning rate oscillations required to achieve neutral stability. Results of calculations to determine local combustion responses using detailed physical models for injection, atomization, and vaporization with gas phase oscillations in baffled and unbaffled SSME combustors are presented. The contributions of the various physical phenomena occurring in a combustor to oscillations in combustion response were determined.

  10. BLOCKING OSCILLATOR DOUBLE PULSE GENERATOR CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Haase, J.A.

    1961-01-24

    A double-pulse generator, particuiarly a double-pulse generator comprising a blocking oscillator utilizing a feedback circuit to provide means for producing a second pulse within the recovery time of the blocking oscillator, is described. The invention utilized a passive network which permits adjustment of the spacing between the original pulses derived from the blocking oscillator and further utilizes the original pulses to trigger a circuit from which other pulses are initiated. These other pulses are delayed and then applied to the input of the blocking oscillator, with the result that the output from the oscillator circuit contains twice the number of pulses originally initiated by the blocking oscillator itself.

  11. Anharmonicity of internal atomic oscillation and effective antineutrino mass evaluation from gaseous molecular tritium β-decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhov, Alexey V.; Titov, Nikita A.

    2016-07-01

    Data analysis of the next-generation effective antineutrino mass measurement experiment KATRIN requires reliable knowledge of systematic corrections. In particular, the width of the daughter molecular ion excitation spectrum rovibrational band should be known with better than 1% precision. Very precise ab initio quantum calculations exist, and we compare them with the well-known tritium molecule parameters within the framework of a phenomenological model. The rovibrational band width with accuracy of a few percent is interpreted as a result of the zero-point atomic oscillation in the harmonic potential. The Morse interatomic potential is used to investigate the impact of anharmonic atomic oscillations. The calculated corrections cannot account for the difference between the ab initio quantum calculations and the phenomenological model.

  12. Ab initio non-relativistic spin dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Feizhi; Goings, Joshua J.; Li, Xiaosong; Frisch, Michael J.

    2014-12-07

    Many magnetic materials do not conform to the (anti-)ferromagnetic paradigm where all electronic spins are aligned to a global magnetization axis. Unfortunately, most electronic structure methods cannot describe such materials with noncollinear electron spin on account of formally requiring spin alignment. To overcome this limitation, it is necessary to generalize electronic structure methods and allow each electron spin to rotate freely. Here, we report the development of an ab initio time-dependent non-relativistic two-component spinor (TDN2C), which is a generalization of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equations. Propagating the TDN2C equations in the time domain allows for the first-principles description of spin dynamics. A numerical tool based on the Hirshfeld partitioning scheme is developed to analyze the time-dependent spin magnetization. In this work, we also introduce the coupling between electron spin and a homogenous magnetic field into the TDN2C framework to simulate the response of the electronic spin degrees of freedom to an external magnetic field. This is illustrated for several model systems, including the spin-frustrated Li{sub 3} molecule. Exact agreement is found between numerical and analytic results for Larmor precession of hydrogen and lithium atoms. The TDN2C method paves the way for the ab initio description of molecular spin transport and spintronics in the time domain.

  13. Ab initio non-relativistic spin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feizhi; Goings, Joshua J.; Frisch, Michael J.; Li, Xiaosong

    2014-12-01

    Many magnetic materials do not conform to the (anti-)ferromagnetic paradigm where all electronic spins are aligned to a global magnetization axis. Unfortunately, most electronic structure methods cannot describe such materials with noncollinear electron spin on account of formally requiring spin alignment. To overcome this limitation, it is necessary to generalize electronic structure methods and allow each electron spin to rotate freely. Here, we report the development of an ab initio time-dependent non-relativistic two-component spinor (TDN2C), which is a generalization of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equations. Propagating the TDN2C equations in the time domain allows for the first-principles description of spin dynamics. A numerical tool based on the Hirshfeld partitioning scheme is developed to analyze the time-dependent spin magnetization. In this work, we also introduce the coupling between electron spin and a homogenous magnetic field into the TDN2C framework to simulate the response of the electronic spin degrees of freedom to an external magnetic field. This is illustrated for several model systems, including the spin-frustrated Li3 molecule. Exact agreement is found between numerical and analytic results for Larmor precession of hydrogen and lithium atoms. The TDN2C method paves the way for the ab initio description of molecular spin transport and spintronics in the time domain.

  14. Quantum phases of AB 2 fermionic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murcia-Correa, L. S.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    2016-02-01

    A fermionic chain is a one-dimensional system with fermions that interact locally and can jump between sites in the lattice, in particular an AB n chain type, where A and B are sites that exhibit a difference in energy level of Δ and site B is repeated n-times, such that the unit cell has n +1 sites. A limit case of this model, called the ionic Hubbard model (n = 1), has been widely studied due to its interesting physics and applications. In this paper, we study the ground state of an AB 2 chain, which describes the material R 4[Pt 2(P 2O5H2)4X] · nH 2 O. Specifically, we consider a filling with two electrons per unit cell, and using the density matrix renormalization group method we found that the system exhibits the band insulator and Mott correlated insulator phases, as well as an intermediate phase between them. For couplings of Δ = 2,10 and 20, we estimate the critical points that separate these phases through the structure factor and the energy gap in the sector of charge and spin, finding that the position of the critical point rises as a function of Δ.

  15. Longitudinal wheel slip during ABS braking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartikainen, Lassi; Petry, Frank; Westermann, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    Anti-lock braking system (ABS) braking tests with two subcompact passenger cars were performed on dry and wet asphalt, as well as on snow and ice surfaces. The operating conditions of the tyres in terms of wheel slip were evaluated using histograms of the wheel slip data. The results showed different average slip levels for different road surfaces. It was also found that changes in the tyre tread stiffness affected the slip operating range through a modification of the slip value at which the maximum longitudinal force is achieved. Variation of the tyre footprint length through modifications in the inflation pressure affected the slip operating range as well. Differences in the slip distribution between vehicles with different brake controllers were also observed. The changes in slip operating range in turn modified the relative local sliding speeds between the tyre and the road. The results highlight the importance of the ABS controller's ability to adapt to changing slip-force characteristics of tyres and provide estimates of the magnitude of the effects of different tyre and road operating conditions.

  16. Ab Initio Neutron Drops with Chiral Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Hugh; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James

    2015-04-01

    Ab initio calculations for neutron drops are of interest for insights into neutron-rich nuclei and neutron star matter, and for examining the neutron-only sector of nucleon-nucleon and 3-nucleon interactions. I present ab initio results calculated using the no-core shell model with 2- and 3-body chiral Hamiltonians for neutron drops up to 20 neutrons confined in a 10 MeV harmonic trap. I discuss ground state energies, internal energies, radii, and evidence for pairing. In addition, excitation energies can be used to investigate the spin-orbit splittings in the p-shell and sd -shell. Prior Green's Function Monte Carlo calculations using the Argonne v8' potential with added 3-nucleon forces serve as a comparison. Supported by DOE Grants DESC0008485 (SciDAC/NUCLEI), DE-FG02-87ER40371, and NSF Grant 0904782; computational resources provided by the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (DOE Office of Science Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725) under an INCITE award.

  17. Compressible flow in fluidic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, Emilio; Hirsch, Damian; Gharib, Mory

    2013-11-01

    We present qualitative observations on the internal flow characteristics of fluidic oscillator geometries commonly referred to as sweeping jets in active flow control applications. We also discuss the effect of the geometry on the output jet in conditions from startup to supersonic exit velocity. Supported by the Boeing Company.

  18. Geometry of thermal plasma oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Da; Noble, A.

    2009-01-22

    We develop a method for investigating the relationship between the shape of a 1-particle distribution and non-linear electrostatic oscillations in a collisionless plasma, incorporating transverse thermal motion. A general expression is found for the maximum sustainable electric field, and is evaluated for a particular highly anisotropic distribution.

  19. Chimera States in Neural Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Sonya; Glaze, Tera

    2014-03-01

    Chimera states have recently been explored both theoretically and experimentally, in various coupled nonlinear oscillators, ranging from phase-oscillator models to coupled chemical reactions. In a chimera state, both coherent and incoherent (or synchronized and desynchronized) states occur simultaneously in populations of identical oscillators. We investigate chimera behavior in a population of neural oscillators using the Huber-Braun model, a Hodgkin-Huxley-like model originally developed to characterize the temperature-dependent bursting behavior of mammalian cold receptors. One population of neurons is allowed to synchronize, with each neuron receiving input from all the others in its group (global within-group coupling). Subsequently, a second population of identical neurons is placed under an identical global within-group coupling, and the two populations are also coupled to each other (between-group coupling). For certain values of the coupling constants, the neurons in the two populations exhibit radically different synchronization behavior. We will discuss the range of chimera activity in the model, and discuss its implications for actual neural activity, such as unihemispheric sleep.

  20. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  1. High-Frequency Gated Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    New gated oscillator generates bursts of high-frequency sine waves, square waves, and triangular waves in response to control signals. Each burst starts at zero phase, with tight tolerances on signal amplitude and frequency. Frequencies in megahertz range are made possible by using high-speed comparators and high-speed flip-flop as fast-response threshold detector.

  2. Hydrogen rotation-vibration oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1974-01-29

    A laser system is described wherein molecular species of hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes are induced to oscillate on rotational-vibrational levels by subjecting the hydrogen to a transverse beam of electrons of a narrowly defined energy between about 1 and 5 eV, thereby producing high intensity and high energy output. (Official Gazette)

  3. Oscillator Stengths and Their Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, G. M.

    2010-11-01

    The oscillator strength is a key parameter in the description of the line absorption coefficient. It can be determined through experiment, abinitio and semi-empirical calculations, and backward analysis of line profiles. Each method has its advantages, and the uncertainty attached to its determination can range from low to indeterminable. For analysis of line profiles or equivalent widths the uncertainty in the oscillator strength can rival or surpass the difference between the derived element abundance from classical LTE and non-LTE analyses. It is therefore important to understand the nature of oscillator strength uncertainties and to assess whether this uncertainty can be a factor in choosing to initiate a non-LTE analysis or in the interpretation of its results. Methods for the determination of the oscillator strength are presented, prioritizing experiments, along with commentary about the sources and impact of the uncertainties. The Sei spectrum is used to illustrate how gf-values can be constructed from published data on atomic lifetimes and line intensities.

  4. [Forced Oscillations of DNA Bases].

    PubMed

    Yakushevich, L V; Krasnobaeva, L A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the studying of forced angular oscillations of the DNA bases with the help of the mathematical model consisting of two coupled nonlinear differential equations that take into account the effects of dissipation and the influence of an external periodic field. The calculation results are illustrated for sequence of gene encoding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA 17). PMID:27192830

  5. Constant-amplitude RC oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerwin, W. J.; Westbrook, R. M.

    1970-01-01

    Sinusoidal oscillator has a frequency determined by resistance-capacitance /RC/ values of two charge control devices and a constant-amplitude voltage independent of frequency and RC values. RC elements provide either voltage-control, resistance-control, or capacitance-control of the frequency.

  6. Cubication of Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belendez, Augusto; Alvarez, Mariela L.; Fernandez, Elena; Pascual, Immaculada

    2009-01-01

    A cubication procedure of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force, and this allows us to approximate the original nonlinear differential equation by a Duffing equation in which the coefficients for the linear…

  7. Ab initio no core full configuration approach for light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngman; Shin, Ik Jae; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.; Forssén, Christian; Rotureau, Jimmy

    2014-07-01

    Comprehensive understanding of the structure and reactions of light nuclei poses theoretical and computational challenges. Still, a number of ab initio approaches have been developed to calculate the properties of atomic nuclei using fundamental interactions among nucleons. Among them, we work with the ab initio no core full configuration (NCFC) method and ab initio no core Gamow Shell Model (GSM). We first review these approaches and present some recent results.

  8. Ab initio no core full configuration approach for light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngman; Shin, Ik Jae; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.; Forssén, Christian; Rotureau, Jimmy

    2015-10-01

    Comprehensive understanding of the structure and reactions of light nuclei poses theoretical and computational challenges. Still, a number of ab initio approaches have been developed to calculate the properties of atomic nuclei using fundamental interactions among nucleons. Among them, we work with the ab initio no core full configuration (NCFC) method and ab initio no core Gamow Shell Model (GSM). We first review these approaches and present some recent results.

  9. Quantum oscillations and upper critical magnetic field of the iron-based superconductor FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouard, Alain; Duc, Fabienne; Drigo, Loïc; Toulemonde, Pierre; Karlsson, Sandra; Strobel, Pierre; Sulpice, André

    2015-01-01

    Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations and upper critical magnetic field (Hc2) of the iron-based superconductor FeSe (Tc = 8.6 \\text{K}) have been studied by tunnel diode oscillator-based measurements in magnetic fields of up to 55 T and temperatures down to 1.6 K. Several Fourier components enter the SdH oscillations spectrum with frequencies definitely smaller than predicted by band structure calculations indicating band renormalization and reconstruction of the Fermi surface at low temperature, in line with previous ARPES data. The Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg model accounts for the temperature dependence of (Hc2) for magnetic field applied both parallel (\\textbf{H} \\| ab) and perpendicular (\\textbf{H} \\| c) to the iron conducting plane, suggesting that one band mainly controls the superconducting properties in magnetic fields despite the multiband nature of the Fermi surface. Whereas Pauli pair breaking is negligible for \\textbf{H} \\| c , a Pauli paramagnetic contribution is evidenced for \\textbf{H} \\| ab with Maki parameter α = 2.1 , corresponding to Pauli field HP = 36.5 \\text{T} .

  10. The Aharanov-Bohm effect, magnetic monopoles and reversal in spin-ice lattices.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Shawn D; Zhu, Yimei

    2013-06-01

    The proof of the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect has been one of the most important experiments of the last century and used as essential evidence for the theory of gauge fields. In this article, we look at its fundamental relation to the Dirac monopole and string. Despite the Dirac string being invisible to the AB effect, it can be used to study emergent quasiparticles in condensed matter settings that behave similar to the fundamental monopoles and strings between them. We utilize phase-imaging method based on the AB effect to study the ordering in a one-model system - that of frustrated spin ice - to understand the ordering processes that occur during a magnetic field reversal cycle. The reversal is linked to the propagation of monopole defects linked by flux channels, reminiscent of Dirac strings. Monopole interactions govern the defect densities within the lattice. Furthermore, we exploit these interactions to propose a new ordering method in which high degrees of ground-state ordering can be achieved in a frustrated system. PMID:23549453

  11. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations.

    PubMed

    Duggen, Lars; Lew Yan Voon, L C; Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten

    2016-04-20

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact calculation is given to confirm this phenomenon. Our results allow for a greater freedom of design for experimentally observing Bloch oscillations. For strongly coupled oscillator systems displaying Bloch oscillations, it is further demonstrated that reordering of oscillators leads to destruction of Bloch oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics. PMID:26986189

  12. Opto-Electronic Oscillator and its Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental results of a new class of microwave oscillators called opto-electronic oscillators (OEO). We discuss techniques of achieving high stability single mode operation and demonstrate the applications of OEO in photonic communication systems.

  13. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability.

  14. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-11-24

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability. 6 figs.

  15. Synchronization of Micromechanical Oscillators Using Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mian; Wiederhecker, Gustavo S.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Barnard, Arthur; McEuen, Paul; Lipson, Michal

    2012-12-01

    Synchronization, the emergence of spontaneous order in coupled systems, is of fundamental importance in both physical and biological systems. We demonstrate the synchronization of two dissimilar silicon nitride micromechanical oscillators, that are spaced apart by a few hundred nanometers and are coupled through an optical cavity radiation field. The tunability of the optical coupling between the oscillators enables one to externally control the dynamics and switch between coupled and individual oscillation states. These results pave a path toward reconfigurable synchronized oscillator networks.

  16. Dopamine-induced oscillations of the pyloric pacemaker neuron rely on release of calcium from intracellular stores.

    PubMed

    Kadiri, Lolahon R; Kwan, Alex C; Webb, Watt W; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M

    2011-09-01

    Endogenously bursting neurons play central roles in many aspects of nervous system function, ranging from motor control to perception. The properties and bursting patterns generated by these neurons are subject to neuromodulation, which can alter cycle frequency and amplitude by modifying the properties of the neuron's ionic currents. In the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of the spiny lobster, Panulirus interruptus, the anterior burster (AB) neuron is a conditional oscillator in the presence of dopamine (DA) and other neuromodulators and serves as the pacemaker to drive rhythmic output from the pyloric network. We analyzed the mechanisms by which DA evokes bursting in the AB neuron. Previous work showed that DA-evoked bursting is critically dependent on external calcium (Harris-Warrick RM, Flamm RE. J Neurosci 7: 2113-2128, 1987). Using two-photon microscopy and calcium imaging, we show that DA evokes the release of calcium from intracellular stores well before the emergence of voltage oscillations. When this release from intracellular stores is blocked by antagonists of ryanodine or inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor channels, DA fails to evoke AB bursting. We further demonstrate that DA enhances the calcium-activated inward current, I(CAN), despite the fact that it significantly reduces voltage-activated calcium currents. This suggests that DA-induced release of calcium from intracellular stores activates I(CAN), which provides a depolarizing ramp current that underlies endogenous bursting in the AB neuron. PMID:21676929

  17. Fluidic Oscillator Array for Synchronized Oscillating Jet Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A fluidic oscillator array includes a plurality of fluidic-oscillator main flow channels. Each main flow channel has an inlet and an outlet. Each main flow channel has first and second control ports disposed at opposing sides thereof, and has a first and a second feedback ports disposed at opposing sides thereof. The feedback ports are located downstream of the control ports with respect to a direction of a fluid flow through the main flow channel. The system also includes a first fluid accumulator in fluid communication with each first control port and each first feedback port, and a second fluid accumulator in fluid communication with each second control port and each second feedback port.

  18. The SD oscillator and its attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Q.; Wiercigroch, M.; Pavlovskaia, E.; Grebogi, C.; Michael, J.; Thompson, T.

    2008-02-01

    We propose a new archetypal oscillator for smooth and discontinuous systems (SD oscillator). This oscillator behaves both smooth and discontinuous system depending on the value of the smoothness parameter. New dynamic behaviour is presented for the transitions from the smooth to discontinuous regime.

  19. Mechanical and current oscillations in corroding electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Teschke, O.; Galembeck, F.; Tenan, M.A.

    1985-06-01

    Mechanical oscillations of the solution meniscus risen around a corroding wire electrode were observed in synchronism with electrical current oscillations. Scanning electron microscopy coupled to microprobe analysis was used to investigate the topochemistry of the system under study. Solution capillarity effects on iron and on iron compounds are related to the oscillations detected in this system.

  20. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    This project focuses on a new technology that reduces NOx emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxygen-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace.

  1. Scleronomic Holonomic Constraints and Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, R.; Gonzalez-Garcia, G.; Izquierdo-De La Cruz, E.; Fernandez-Anaya, G.

    2011-01-01

    A bead sliding, under the sole influence of its own weight, on a rigid wire shaped in the fashion of a plane curve, will describe (generally anharmonic) oscillations around a local minimum. For given shapes, the bead will behave as a harmonic oscillator in the whole range, such as an unforced, undamped, Duffing oscillator, etc. We also present…

  2. Quantum phases for a generalized harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Paul

    2008-03-01

    An effective Hamiltonian for the generalized harmonic oscillator is determined by using squeezed state wavefunctions. The equations of motion over an extended phase space are determined and then solved perturbatively for a specific choice of the oscillator parameters. These results are used to calculate the dynamic and geometric phases for the generalized oscillator with this choice of parameters.

  3. Squeezed states of damped oscillator chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1993-01-01

    The Caldirola-Kanai model of one-dimensional damped oscillator is extended to the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping. The correlated and squeezed states for the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping are constructed. Based on the concept of the integrals of motion, it is demonstrated how squeezing phenomenon arises due to parametric excitation.

  4. Guiding ab initio calculations by alchemical derivatives.

    PubMed

    to Baben, M; Achenbach, J O; von Lilienfeld, O A

    2016-03-14

    We assess the concept of alchemical transformations for predicting how a further and not-tested change in composition would change materials properties. This might help to guide ab initio calculations through multidimensional property-composition spaces. Equilibrium volumes, bulk moduli, and relative lattice stability of fcc and bcc 4d transition metals Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, and Ag are calculated using density functional theory. Alchemical derivatives predict qualitative trends in lattice stability while equilibrium volumes and bulk moduli are predicted with less than 9% and 28% deviation, respectively. Predicted changes in equilibrium volume and bulk moduli for binary and ternary mixtures of Rh-Pd-Ag are in qualitative agreement even for predicted bulk modulus changes as large as +100% or -50%. Based on these results, it is suggested that alchemical transformations could be meaningful for enhanced sampling in the context of virtual high-throughput materials screening projects. PMID:26979677

  5. Ab initio determination of light hadron masses.

    PubMed

    Dürr, S; Fodor, Z; Frison, J; Hoelbling, C; Hoffmann, R; Katz, S D; Krieg, S; Kurth, T; Lellouch, L; Lippert, T; Szabo, K K; Vulvert, G

    2008-11-21

    More than 99% of the mass of the visible universe is made up of protons and neutrons. Both particles are much heavier than their quark and gluon constituents, and the Standard Model of particle physics should explain this difference. We present a full ab initio calculation of the masses of protons, neutrons, and other light hadrons, using lattice quantum chromodynamics. Pion masses down to 190 mega-electron volts are used to extrapolate to the physical point, with lattice sizes of approximately four times the inverse pion mass. Three lattice spacings are used for a continuum extrapolation. Our results completely agree with experimental observations and represent a quantitative confirmation of this aspect of the Standard Model with fully controlled uncertainties. PMID:19023076

  6. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-11-02

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis frommore » primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. Ultimately, these results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings.« less

  7. Ab initio molar volumes and Gaussian radii.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Drew F; Ninham, Barry W

    2009-02-12

    Ab initio molar volumes are calculated and used to derive radii for ions and neutral molecules using a spatially diffuse model of the electron distribution with Gaussian spread. The Gaussian radii obtained can be used for computation of nonelectrostatic ion-ion dispersion forces that underlie Hofmeister specific ion effects. Equivalent hard-sphere radii are also derived, and these are in reasonable agreement with crystalline ionic radii. The Born electrostatic self-energy is derived for a Gaussian model of the electronic charge distribution. It is shown that the ionic volumes used in electrostatic calculations of strongly hydrated cosmotropic ions ought best to include the first hydration shell. Ionic volumes for weakly hydrated chaotropic metal cations should exclude electron overlap (in electrostatic calculations). Spherical radii are calculated as well as nonisotropic ellipsoidal radii for nonspherical ions, via their nonisotropic static polarizability tensors. PMID:19140766

  8. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Todd

    Traditional approaches for modeling chemical reaction networks such as those involved in combustion have focused on identifying individual reactions and using theoretical approaches to explore the underlying mechanisms. Recent advances involving graphical processing units (GPUs), commodity products developed for the videogaming industry, have made it possible to consider a distinct approach wherein one attempts to discover chemical reactions and mechanisms. We provide a brief summary of these developments and then discuss the concept behind the ``ab initio nanoreactor'' which explores the space of possible chemical reactions and molecular species for a given stoichiometry. The nanoreactor concept is exemplified with an example to the Urey-Miller reaction network which has been previously advanced as a potential model for prebiotic chemistry. We briefly discuss some of the future directions envisioned for the development of this nanoreactor concept.

  9. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis from primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. These results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings. PMID:25411881

  10. Guiding ab initio calculations by alchemical derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    to Baben, M.; Achenbach, J. O.; von Lilienfeld, O. A.

    2016-03-01

    We assess the concept of alchemical transformations for predicting how a further and not-tested change in composition would change materials properties. This might help to guide ab initio calculations through multidimensional property-composition spaces. Equilibrium volumes, bulk moduli, and relative lattice stability of fcc and bcc 4d transition metals Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, and Ag are calculated using density functional theory. Alchemical derivatives predict qualitative trends in lattice stability while equilibrium volumes and bulk moduli are predicted with less than 9% and 28% deviation, respectively. Predicted changes in equilibrium volume and bulk moduli for binary and ternary mixtures of Rh-Pd-Ag are in qualitative agreement even for predicted bulk modulus changes as large as +100% or -50%. Based on these results, it is suggested that alchemical transformations could be meaningful for enhanced sampling in the context of virtual high-throughput materials screening projects.

  11. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S; Martínez, Todd J

    2014-12-01

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provide detailed physical insight. Although theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor--a highly accelerated first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor, we show new pathways for glycine synthesis from primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, which provide new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. These results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery, in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings. PMID:25411881

  12. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provide detailed physical insight. Although theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor—a highly accelerated first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor, we show new pathways for glycine synthesis from primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, which provide new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. These results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery, in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings.

  13. Ab Initio Modeling of Molecular Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Schwenke, David

    2014-01-01

    Radiative emission from excited states of atoms and molecules can comprise a significant fraction of the total heat flux experienced by spacecraft during atmospheric entry at hypersonic speeds. For spacecraft with ablating heat shields, some of this radiative flux can be absorbed by molecular constituents in the boundary layer that are formed by the ablation process. Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations are carried out to predict the strengths of these emission and absorption processes. This talk will describe the methods used in these calculations using, as examples, the 4th positive emission bands of CO and the 1g+ 1u+ absorption in C3. The results of these calculations are being used as input to NASA radiation modeling codes like NeqAir, HARA and HyperRad.

  14. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-11-02

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis from primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. Ultimately, these results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings.

  15. Ab Initio Calculation of the Hoyle State

    SciTech Connect

    Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lee, Dean; Meissner, Ulf-G.

    2011-05-13

    The Hoyle state plays a crucial role in the helium burning of stars heavier than our Sun and in the production of carbon and other elements necessary for life. This excited state of the carbon-12 nucleus was postulated by Hoyle as a necessary ingredient for the fusion of three alpha particles to produce carbon at stellar temperatures. Although the Hoyle state was seen experimentally more than a half century ago nuclear theorists have not yet uncovered the nature of this state from first principles. In this Letter we report the first ab initio calculation of the low-lying states of carbon-12 using supercomputer lattice simulations and a theoretical framework known as effective field theory. In addition to the ground state and excited spin-2 state, we find a resonance at -85(3) MeV with all of the properties of the Hoyle state and in agreement with the experimentally observed energy.

  16. Measuring neutrino oscillation parameters using $\

    SciTech Connect

    Backhouse, Christopher James

    2011-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It consists of two large steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector is situated at Fermilab, close to the production point of the NuMI muon-neutrino beam. The far detector is 735 km away, 716m underground in the Soudan mine, Northern Minnesota. The primary purpose of the MINOS experiment is to make precise measurements of the 'atmospheric' neutrino oscillation parameters (Δmatm2 and sin2atm). The oscillation signal consists of an energy-dependent deficit of vμ interactions in the far detector. The near detector is used to characterize the properties of the beam before oscillations develop. The two-detector design allows many potential sources of systematic error in the far detector to be mitigated by the near detector observations. This thesis describes the details of the vμ-disappearance analysis, and presents a new technique to estimate the hadronic energy of neutrino interactions. This estimator achieves a significant improvement in the energy resolution of the neutrino spectrum, and in the sensitivity of the neutrino oscillation fit. The systematic uncertainty on the hadronic energy scale was re-evaluated and found to be comparable to that of the energy estimator previously in use. The best-fit oscillation parameters of the vμ-disappearance analysis, incorporating this new estimator were: Δm2 = 2.32-0.08+0.12 x 10-3 eV2, sin 2 2θ > 0.90 (90% C.L.). A similar analysis, using data from a period of running where the NuMI beam was operated in a configuration producing a predominantly $\\bar{v}$μ beam, yielded somewhat different best-fit parameters Δ$\\bar{m}${sup 2} = (3.36-0.40+0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3eV2, sin2 2$\\bar{θ}$ = 0.86-0.12_0.11

  17. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A.; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles (4He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei—nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons—is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the ‘adiabatic projection method’ to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  18. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  19. Ablation dynamics in laser sclerotomy ab externo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Ralf; Droege, Gerit; Mohrenstecher, Dirk; Scheu, M.; Birngruber, Reginald

    1996-01-01

    Laser sclerostomy ab externo with flashlamp excited mid-IR laser systems emitting in the 2-3 micrometer spectral range is in phase II clinical trials. Although acutely high success rates were achieved, the restenosis rate after several months is about 40%. Laser pulses of several hundreds of microseconds, known to induce thermo-mechanical explosive evaporation were used for this procedure. We investigated the ablation dynamics in tissue and the cavitation bubble dynamics in water by means of an Er:YAG laser system to estimate the extent of mechanical damage zones in the sclera and in the anterior chamber, which may contribute to the clinical failure. We found substantial mechanical tissue deformation during the ablation process caused by the cavitation effects. Stress waves up to several bar generated by explosive evaporization were measured. The fast mechanical stretching and collapsing of the scleral tissue induced by cavitation resulted in tissue dissection as could be proved by flash photography and histology. The observed high restenosis might be a result of a subsequent enhanced wound healing process. Early fistula occlusions due to iris adherences, observed in about 20% of the clinical cases may be attributed to intraocular trauma induced by vapor bubble expansion through the anterior chamber after scleral perforation. An automatic feedback system minimizing adverse effects by steering and terminating the laser process during scleral fistulization is demonstrated. Moreover, a new approach in laser sclerostomy ab externo is presented using a cw-IR laser diode system emitting at the 1.94 micrometer mid-IR water absorption peak. This system was used in vitro and showed smaller damage zones compared to the pulsed laser radiation.

  20. Control of Oscillation Patterns in a Symmetric Coupled Biological Oscillator System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko; Tanaka, Reiko; Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2003-08-01

    A chain of three-oscillator system was constructed with living biological oscillators of phasmodial slime mold, Physarum polycehalum and the oscillation patterns were analyzed by the symmetric Hopf bifurcation theory using group theory. Multi-stability of oscillation patterns was observed, even when the coupling strength was fixed. This suggests that the coupling strength is not an effective parameter to obtain a desired oscillation pattern among the multiple patterns. Here we propose a method to control oscillation patterns using resonance to external stimulus and demonstrate pattern switching induced by frequency resonance given to only one of oscillators in the system.

  1. Three-cluster dynamics within an ab initio framework

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, Sofia; Romero-Redondo, Carolina; Navratil, Petr

    2013-09-26

    In this study, we introduce a fully antisymmetrized treatment of three-cluster dynamics within the ab initio framework of the no-core shell model/resonating-group method. Energy-independent nonlocal interactions among the three nuclear fragments are obtained from realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions and consistent ab initio many-body wave functions of the clusters. The three-cluster Schrödinger equation is solved with bound-state boundary conditions by means of the hyperspherical-harmonic method on a Lagrange mesh. We discuss the formalism in detail and give algebraic expressions for systems of two single nucleons plus a nucleus. Using a soft similarity-renormalization-group evolved chiral nucleon-nucleon potential, we apply the method to a 4He+n+n description of 6He and compare the results to experiment and to a six-body diagonalization of the Hamiltonian performed within the harmonic-oscillator expansions of the no-core shell model. Differences between the two calculations provide a measure of core (4He) polarization effects.

  2. Recent Developments in the Analysis of Couple Oscillator Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation considers linear arrays of coupled oscillators. Our purpose in coupling oscillators together is to achieve high radiated power through the spatial power combining which results when the oscillators are injection locked to each other. York, et. al. have shown that, left to themselves, the ensemble of injection locked oscillators oscillate at the average of the tuning frequencies of all the oscillators. Coupling these arrays achieves high radiated power through coherent spatial power combining. The coupled oscillators are usually designed to produce constant aperture phase. Oscillators are injection locked to each other or to a master oscillator to produce coherent radiation. Oscillators do not necessarily oscillate at their tuning frequency.

  3. Growth oscillation in larger foraminifera

    PubMed Central

    Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann

    2015-01-01

    This work shows the potential for applying three-dimensional biometry to studying cell growth in larger benthic foraminifera. The volume of each test chamber was measured from the three-dimensional model obtained by means of computed tomography. Analyses of cell growth based on the sequence of chamber volumes revealed constant and significant oscillations for all investigated specimens, characterized by periods of approximately 15, 30, 90, and 360 days. Possible explanations for these periods are connected to tides, lunar cycles, and seasonality. The potential to record environmental oscillations or fluctuations during the lifetime of larger foraminifera is pivotal for reconstructing short-term paleoenvironmental variations or for gaining insight into the influence of tides or tidal current on the shallow-water benthic fauna in both recent and fossil environments. PMID:26166912

  4. Analysis of Rattleback Chaotic Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Stavrinides, Stavros G.; Banerjee, Santo

    2014-01-01

    Rattleback is a canoe-shaped object, already known from ancient times, exhibiting a nontrivial rotational behaviour. Although its shape looks symmetric, its kinematic behaviour seems to be asymmetric. When spun in one direction it normally rotates, but when it is spun in the other direction it stops rotating and oscillates until it finally starts rotating in the other direction. It has already been reported that those oscillations demonstrate chaotic characteristics. In this paper, rattleback's chaotic dynamics are studied by applying Kane's model for different sets of (experimentally decided) parameters, which correspond to three different experimental prototypes made of wax, gypsum, and lead-solder. The emerging chaotic behaviour in all three cases has been studied and evaluated by the related time-series analysis and the calculation of the strange attractors' invariant parameters. PMID:24511290

  5. Electromechanical oscillations in bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Benameur, Muhammed M; Gargiulo, Fernando; Manzeli, Sajedeh; Autès, Gabriel; Tosun, Mahmut; Yazyev, Oleg V; Kis, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems constitute a class of devices lying at the interface between fundamental research and technological applications. Realizing nanoelectromechanical devices based on novel materials such as graphene allows studying their mechanical and electromechanical characteristics at the nanoscale and addressing fundamental questions such as electron-phonon interaction and bandgap engineering. In this work, we realize electromechanical devices using single and bilayer graphene and probe the interplay between their mechanical and electrical properties. We show that the deflection of monolayer graphene nanoribbons results in a linear increase in their electrical resistance. Surprisingly, we observe oscillations in the electromechanical response of bilayer graphene. The proposed theoretical model suggests that these oscillations arise from quantum mechanical interference in the transition region induced by sliding of individual graphene layers with respect to each other. Our work shows that bilayer graphene conceals unexpectedly rich and novel physics with promising potential in applications based on nanoelectromechanical systems. PMID:26481767

  6. Electromechanical oscillations in bilayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Benameur, Muhammed M.; Gargiulo, Fernando; Manzeli, Sajedeh; Autès, Gabriel; Tosun, Mahmut; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems constitute a class of devices lying at the interface between fundamental research and technological applications. Realizing nanoelectromechanical devices based on novel materials such as graphene allows studying their mechanical and electromechanical characteristics at the nanoscale and addressing fundamental questions such as electron–phonon interaction and bandgap engineering. In this work, we realize electromechanical devices using single and bilayer graphene and probe the interplay between their mechanical and electrical properties. We show that the deflection of monolayer graphene nanoribbons results in a linear increase in their electrical resistance. Surprisingly, we observe oscillations in the electromechanical response of bilayer graphene. The proposed theoretical model suggests that these oscillations arise from quantum mechanical interference in the transition region induced by sliding of individual graphene layers with respect to each other. Our work shows that bilayer graphene conceals unexpectedly rich and novel physics with promising potential in applications based on nanoelectromechanical systems. PMID:26481767

  7. Electromechanical oscillations in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benameur, Muhammed M.; Gargiulo, Fernando; Manzeli, Sajedeh; Autès, Gabriel; Tosun, Mahmut; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2015-10-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems constitute a class of devices lying at the interface between fundamental research and technological applications. Realizing nanoelectromechanical devices based on novel materials such as graphene allows studying their mechanical and electromechanical characteristics at the nanoscale and addressing fundamental questions such as electron-phonon interaction and bandgap engineering. In this work, we realize electromechanical devices using single and bilayer graphene and probe the interplay between their mechanical and electrical properties. We show that the deflection of monolayer graphene nanoribbons results in a linear increase in their electrical resistance. Surprisingly, we observe oscillations in the electromechanical response of bilayer graphene. The proposed theoretical model suggests that these oscillations arise from quantum mechanical interference in the transition region induced by sliding of individual graphene layers with respect to each other. Our work shows that bilayer graphene conceals unexpectedly rich and novel physics with promising potential in applications based on nanoelectromechanical systems.

  8. Analysis of rattleback chaotic oscillations.

    PubMed

    Hanias, Michael; Stavrinides, Stavros G; Banerjee, Santo

    2014-01-01

    Rattleback is a canoe-shaped object, already known from ancient times, exhibiting a nontrivial rotational behaviour. Although its shape looks symmetric, its kinematic behaviour seems to be asymmetric. When spun in one direction it normally rotates, but when it is spun in the other direction it stops rotating and oscillates until it finally starts rotating in the other direction. It has already been reported that those oscillations demonstrate chaotic characteristics. In this paper, rattleback's chaotic dynamics are studied by applying Kane's model for different sets of (experimentally decided) parameters, which correspond to three different experimental prototypes made of wax, gypsum, and lead-solder. The emerging chaotic behaviour in all three cases has been studied and evaluated by the related time-series analysis and the calculation of the strange attractors' invariant parameters. PMID:24511290

  9. Magnetic Torsional Oscillations in Magnetars

    SciTech Connect

    Sotani, Hajime; Kokkotas, Kostas D.; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2009-05-01

    We investigate torsional Alfven oscillations of relativistic stars with a global dipole magnetic field, via 2D numerical simulations. We find that a) there exist two families of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) with harmonics at integer multiples of the fundamental frequency, b) the QPOs are long-lived, c) for the chosen form of dipolar magnetic field, the frequency ratio of the lower to upper fundamental QPOs is about 0.6, independent of the equilibrium model or of the strength of the magnetic field, and d) within a representative sample of EOS and of various magnetar masses, the Alfven QPO frequencies are given by accurate empirical relations that depend only on the compactness of the star and on the magnetic field strength. Compared to the observational frequencies, we also obtain an upper limit on the strength of magnetic field of SGR 1806-20 (if is dominated by a dipolar component) between {approx}3 and 7x10{sup 15} Gauss.

  10. Berry phase in neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    He Xiaogang; McKellar, Bruce H.J.; Zhang Yue

    2005-09-01

    We study the Berry phase in neutrino oscillations for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. In order to have a Berry phase, the neutrino oscillations must occur in a varying medium, the neutrino-background interactions must depend on at least two independent densities, and also there must be CP violation. If the neutrino interactions with matter are mediated only by the standard model W and Z boson exchanges, these conditions imply that there must be at least three generations of neutrinos. The CP violating Majorana phases do not play a role in generating a Berry phase. We show that a natural way to satisfy the conditions for the generation of a Berry phase is to have sterile neutrinos with active-sterile neutrino mixing, in which case at least two active and one sterile neutrinos are required. If there are additional new CP violating flavor changing interactions, it is also possible to have a nonzero Berry phase with just two generations.

  11. Oscillators: Old and new perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.; Roy, Jyotirmoy

    2014-02-01

    We consider some of the well known oscillators in literature which are known to exhibit interesting effects of nonlinearity. We review the Lindstedt-Poincare technique for dealing with with the nonlinear effects and then go on to introduce the relevance of the renormalization group for the oscillator following the pioneering work of Chen et al. It is pointed out that the traditional Lindstedt-Poincare and the renormalization group techniques have operational connections. We use this to find an unexpected mode softening in the double pendulum. This mode softening prompted us to look for chaos in the double pendulum at low energies-energies that are just sufficient to allow the outer pendulum to rotate (the double pendulum is known to be chaotic at high energies-energies that are greater than that needed to make both pendulums to rotate). The emergence of the chaos is strongly dependent on initial conditions.

  12. Oscillators: Old and new perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.; Roy, Jyotirmoy

    2014-02-11

    We consider some of the well known oscillators in literature which are known to exhibit interesting effects of nonlinearity. We review the Lindstedt-Poincare technique for dealing with with the nonlinear effects and then go on to introduce the relevance of the renormalization group for the oscillator following the pioneering work of Chen et al. It is pointed out that the traditional Lindstedt-Poincare and the renormalization group techniques have operational connections. We use this to find an unexpected mode softening in the double pendulum. This mode softening prompted us to look for chaos in the double pendulum at low energies-energies that are just sufficient to allow the outer pendulum to rotate (the double pendulum is known to be chaotic at high energies-energies that are greater than that needed to make both pendulums to rotate). The emergence of the chaos is strongly dependent on initial conditions.

  13. Neutrino oscillation results from MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, Alexandre; /Oxford U.

    2007-08-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) long-baseline experiment has been actively collecting beam data since 2005, having already accumulated 3 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target (POT). MINOS uses the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) neutrino beam measured in two locations: at Fermilab, close to beam production, and 735 km downstream, in Northern Minnesota. By observing the oscillatory structure in the neutrino energy spectrum, MINOS can precisely measure the neutrino oscillation parameters in the atmospheric sector. These parameters were determined to be |{Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}| = 2.74{sub -0.26}{sup +0.44} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}/c{sup 4} and sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) > 0.87 (68% C.L.) from analysis of the first year of data, corresponding to 1.27 x 10{sup 20} POT.

  14. Combustor oscillating pressure stabilization and method

    DOEpatents

    Gemmen, Randall S.; Richards, George A.; Yip, Mui-Tong Joseph; Robey, Edward H.; Cully, Scott R.; Addis, Richard E.

    1998-01-01

    High dynamic pressure oscillations in hydrocarbon-fueled combustors typically occur when the transport time of the fuel to the flame front is at some fraction of the acoustic period. These oscillations are reduced to acceptably lower levels by restructuring or repositioning the flame front in the combustor to increase the transport time. A pilot flame front located upstream of the oscillating flame and pulsed at a selected frequency and duration effectively restructures and repositions the oscillating flame in the combustor to alter the oscillation-causing transport time.

  15. Combustor oscillating pressure stabilization and method

    DOEpatents

    Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.T.J.; Robey, E.H.; Cully, S.R.; Addis, R.E.

    1998-08-11

    High dynamic pressure oscillations in hydrocarbon-fueled combustors typically occur when the transport time of the fuel to the flame front is at some fraction of the acoustic period. These oscillations are reduced to acceptably lower levels by restructuring or repositioning the flame front in the combustor to increase the transport time. A pilot flame front located upstream of the oscillating flame and pulsed at a selected frequency and duration effectively restructures and repositions the oscillating flame in the combustor to alter the oscillation-causing transport time. 7 figs.

  16. Phased array beamforming using nonlinear oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbay, Michael; Larsen, Michael L.; Tsimring, Lev S.

    2004-10-01

    We describe a concept in which an array of coupled nonlinear oscillators is used for beamforming in phased array receivers. The signal that each sensing element receives, beam steered by time delays, is input to a nonlinear oscillator. The nonlinear oscillators for each element are in turn coupled to each other. For incident signals sufficiently close to the steering angle, the oscillator array will synchronize to the forcing signal whereas more obliquely incident signals will not induce synchronization. The beam pattern that results can show a narrower mainlobe and lower sidelobes than the equivalent conventional linear beamformer. We present a theoretical analysis to explain the beam pattern of the nonlinear oscillator array.

  17. Topological solitons in optical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaparov, V. V.; Taranenko, V. B.

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of theoretical and experimental works on self-sustaining localized structures—spatial solitons—which can be formed in optical bistable oscillators with laser and/or parametric gain. The main attention is paid to the existence and dynamical properties of spatial solitons containing phase and polarization topological defects including vortices, points of circular polarizations and lines of linear polarization, domain walls and composed domain walls with Néel point topological defects.

  18. Forced Oscillations of Supported Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Edward D.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    Oscillations of supported liquid drops are the subject of wide scientific interest, with applications in areas as diverse as liquid-liquid extraction, synthesis of ceramic powders, growing of pure crystals in low gravity, and measurement of dynamic surface tension. In this research, axisymmetric forced oscillations of arbitrary amplitude of viscous liquid drops of fixed volume which are pendant from or sessile on a rod with a fixed or moving contact line and surrounded by an inviscid ambient gas are induced by moving the rod in the vertical direction sinusiodally in time. In this paper, a preliminary report is made on the computational analysis of the oscillations of supported drops that have 'clean' interfaces and whose contact lines remain fixed throughout their motions. The relative importance of forcing to damping can be increased by either increasing the amplitude of rod motion A or Reynolds number Re. It is shown that as the ratio of forcing to damping rises, for drops starting from an initial rest state a sharp increase in deformation can occur when they are forced to oscillate in the vicinity of their resonance frequencies, indicating the incipience of hysteresis. However, it is also shown that the existence of a second stable limit cycle and the occurrence of hysteresis can be observed if the drop is subjected to a so-called frequency sweep, where the forcing frequency is first increased and then decreased over a suitable range. Because the change in drop deformation response is abrupt in the vicinity of the forcing frequencies where hysteresis occurs, it should be possible to exploit the phenomenon to accurately measure the viscosity and surface tension of the drop liquid.

  19. Minicomputer-controlled programmed oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelstein, R.

    1971-01-01

    Two programmed oscillators have been constructed, each using a low-cost minicomputer for the calculation and control functions, and each contained in a single rack of equipment. They are capable of operation in a phase-tracking mode as well as a frequency-tracking mode. When given an ephemeris suitable for the planet Venus, these units maintained phase coherence of better than 5 deg rms at 2388 MHz.

  20. B0s Oscillation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Willocq, Stephane

    2002-08-09

    The authors review new studies of the time dependence of B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mixing by the ALEPH, DELPHI and SLD Collaborations, with an emphasis on the different analysis methods used. Combining all available results yields a preliminary lower limit on the oscillation frequency of {Delta}m{sub s} > 14.4 ps{sup -1} at the 95% C.L.